WorldWideScience

Sample records for underpinning educational model

  1. Principles that underpin effective school-based drug education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midford, Richard; Munro, Geoffrey; McBride, Nyanda; Snow, Pamela; Ladzinski, Ursula

    2002-01-01

    This study identifies the conceptual underpinnings of effective school-based drug education practice in light of contemporary research evidence and the practical experience of a broad range of drug education stakeholders. The research involved a review of the literature, a national survey of 210 Australian teachers and others involved in drug education, and structured interviews with 22 key Australian drug education policy stakeholders. The findings from this research have been distilled and presented as a list of 16 principles that underpin effective drug education. In broad terms, drug education should be evidence-based, developmentally appropriate, sequential, and contextual. Programs should be initiated before drug use commences. Strategies should be linked to goals and should incorporate harm minimization. Teaching should be interactive and use peer leaders. The role of the classroom teacher is central. Certain program content is important, as is social and resistance skills training. Community values, the social context of use, and the nature of drug harm have to be addressed. Coverage needs to be adequate and supported by follow-up. It is envisaged that these principles will provide all those involved in the drug education field with a set of up-to-date, research-based guidelines against which to reference decisions on program design, selection, implementation, and evaluation.

  2. The educational theory underpinning a clinical workbook for VERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, Heather, E-mail: heather.nisbet@orh.nhs.u [Department of Clinical Oncology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Headington, Oxford, Oxon OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom); Matthews, Sara [Department of Clinical Oncology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Headington, Oxford, Oxon OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The introduction of VERT (Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training) into radiotherapy departments across England was in response to the National Radiotherapy Advisory Group's (NRAG) recommendation to the Department of Health that it may assist in enhancing the clinical learning experience of student radiotherapy radiographers. It was suggested that this may help to reduce the high attrition rate of students currently experienced, particularly in the first year of training. This paper investigates how VERT may be used in the clinical setting to develop the skills of students, in order to meet this vision. We argue that using an epistemological approach, i.e. using the theory of knowledge, to support the design of the learning resource, is key to enabling the educator to fulfil these expectations. We describe the design of a generic VERT workbook for use in the clinical departments that train students for the University of Hertfordshire. The use of educational theory to underpin the aims and inform the development of the workbook is examined. We then discuss the alignment of the workbook with the curriculum in order to enhance the students' learning experience and nurture their clinical competence. Finally, we will consider the teaching strategies used during the delivered sessions and discuss how we believe they will allow us to achieve these aims.

  3. The educational theory underpinning a clinical workbook for VERT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, Heather; Matthews, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of VERT (Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training) into radiotherapy departments across England was in response to the National Radiotherapy Advisory Group's (NRAG) recommendation to the Department of Health that it may assist in enhancing the clinical learning experience of student radiotherapy radiographers. It was suggested that this may help to reduce the high attrition rate of students currently experienced, particularly in the first year of training. This paper investigates how VERT may be used in the clinical setting to develop the skills of students, in order to meet this vision. We argue that using an epistemological approach, i.e. using the theory of knowledge, to support the design of the learning resource, is key to enabling the educator to fulfil these expectations. We describe the design of a generic VERT workbook for use in the clinical departments that train students for the University of Hertfordshire. The use of educational theory to underpin the aims and inform the development of the workbook is examined. We then discuss the alignment of the workbook with the curriculum in order to enhance the students' learning experience and nurture their clinical competence. Finally, we will consider the teaching strategies used during the delivered sessions and discuss how we believe they will allow us to achieve these aims.

  4. The philosophical and pedagogical underpinnings of Active Learning in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Michael; de Graaff, Erik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the authors draw on three sequential keynote addresses that they gave at Active Learning in Engineering Education (ALE) workshops in Copenhagen (2012), Caxias do Sol (2014) and San Sebastian (2015). Active Learning in Engineering Education is an informal international network of engineering educators dedicated to improving engineering education through active learning (http://www.ale-net.org/). The paper reiterates themes from those keynotes, namely, the philosophical and pedagogical underpinnings of Active Learning in Engineering Education, the scholarly questions that inspire engineering educators to go on improving their practice and exemplary models designed to activate the learning of engineering students. This paper aims to uncover the bedrock of established educational philosophies and theories that define and support active learning. The paper does not claim to present any new or innovative educational theory. There is already a surfeit of them. Rather, the aim is to assist Engineering Educators who wish to research how they can best activate the learning of their students by providing a readable, reasonable and solid underpinning for best practice in this field.

  5. Conditions underpinning success in joint service-education workforce planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkis, Mary Ellen; Herringer, Barbara; Stevenson, Lynn; Styles, Laureen; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne

    2009-02-25

    Vancouver Island lies just off the southwest coast of Canada. Separated from the large urban area of Greater Vancouver (estimated population 2.17 million) by the Georgia Strait, this geographical location poses unique challenges in delivering health care to a mixed urban, rural and remote population of approximately 730,000 people living on the main island and the surrounding Gulf Islands. These challenges are offset by opportunities for the Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA) to collaborate with four publicly funded post-secondary institutions in planning and implementing responses to existing and emerging health care workforce needs. In this commentary, we outline strategies we have found successful in aligning health education and training with local health needs in ways that demonstrate socially accountable outcomes. Challenges encountered through this process (i.e. regulatory reform, post-secondary policy reform, impacts of an ageing population, impact of private, for-profit educational institutions) have placed demands on us to establish and build on open and collaborative working relationships. Some of our successes can be attributed to evidence-informed decision-making. Other successes result from less tangible but no less important factors. We argue that both rational and "accidental" factors are significant--and that strategic use of "accidental" features may prove most significant in our efforts to ensure the delivery of high-quality health care to our communities.

  6. Conditions underpinning success in joint service-education workforce planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Styles Laureen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vancouver Island lies just off the southwest coast of Canada. Separated from the large urban area of Greater Vancouver (estimated population 2.17 million by the Georgia Strait, this geographical location poses unique challenges in delivering health care to a mixed urban, rural and remote population of approximately 730 000 people living on the main island and the surrounding Gulf Islands. These challenges are offset by opportunities for the Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA to collaborate with four publicly funded post-secondary institutions in planning and implementing responses to existing and emerging health care workforce needs. In this commentary, we outline strategies we have found successful in aligning health education and training with local health needs in ways that demonstrate socially accountable outcomes. Challenges encountered through this process (i.e. regulatory reform, post-secondary policy reform, impacts of an ageing population, impact of private, for-profit educational institutions have placed demands on us to establish and build on open and collaborative working relationships. Some of our successes can be attributed to evidence-informed decision-making. Other successes result from less tangible but no less important factors. We argue that both rational and "accidental" factors are significant – and that strategic use of "accidental" features may prove most significant in our efforts to ensure the delivery of high-quality health care to our communities.

  7. Cognitive components underpinning the development of model-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Tracey C S; Bryce, Nessa V; Hartley, Catherine A

    2017-06-01

    Reinforcement learning theory distinguishes "model-free" learning, which fosters reflexive repetition of previously rewarded actions, from "model-based" learning, which recruits a mental model of the environment to flexibly select goal-directed actions. Whereas model-free learning is evident across development, recruitment of model-based learning appears to increase with age. However, the cognitive processes underlying the development of model-based learning remain poorly characterized. Here, we examined whether age-related differences in cognitive processes underlying the construction and flexible recruitment of mental models predict developmental increases in model-based choice. In a cohort of participants aged 9-25, we examined whether the abilities to infer sequential regularities in the environment ("statistical learning"), maintain information in an active state ("working memory") and integrate distant concepts to solve problems ("fluid reasoning") predicted age-related improvements in model-based choice. We found that age-related improvements in statistical learning performance did not mediate the relationship between age and model-based choice. Ceiling performance on our working memory assay prevented examination of its contribution to model-based learning. However, age-related improvements in fluid reasoning statistically mediated the developmental increase in the recruitment of a model-based strategy. These findings suggest that gradual development of fluid reasoning may be a critical component process underlying the emergence of model-based learning. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. The underpinnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudge, L

    2001-03-01

    In last month's Journal, readers were introduced to the government's Improving Working Lives Strategy. This month some of the underpinning detail will be examined in order to show what is expected from employers and employees when getting the balance right between work and life away from work.

  9. Neural Underpinnings of Decision Strategy Selection: A Review and a Theoretical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichary, Szymon; Smolen, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    In multi-attribute choice, decision makers use decision strategies to arrive at the final choice. What are the neural mechanisms underlying decision strategy selection? The first goal of this paper is to provide a literature review on the neural underpinnings and cognitive models of decision strategy selection and thus set the stage for a neurocognitive model of this process. The second goal is to outline such a unifying, mechanistic model that can explain the impact of noncognitive factors (e.g., affect, stress) on strategy selection. To this end, we review the evidence for the factors influencing strategy selection, the neural basis of strategy use and the cognitive models of this process. We also present the Bottom-Up Model of Strategy Selection (BUMSS). The model assumes that the use of the rational Weighted Additive strategy and the boundedly rational heuristic Take The Best can be explained by one unifying, neurophysiologically plausible mechanism, based on the interaction of the frontoparietal network, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the brainstem nucleus locus coeruleus. According to BUMSS, there are three processes that form the bottom-up mechanism of decision strategy selection and lead to the final choice: (1) cue weight computation, (2) gain modulation, and (3) weighted additive evaluation of alternatives. We discuss how these processes might be implemented in the brain, and how this knowledge allows us to formulate novel predictions linking strategy use and neural signals.

  10. Neural Underpinnings of Decision Strategy Selection: A Review and a Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichary, Szymon; Smolen, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    In multi-attribute choice, decision makers use decision strategies to arrive at the final choice. What are the neural mechanisms underlying decision strategy selection? The first goal of this paper is to provide a literature review on the neural underpinnings and cognitive models of decision strategy selection and thus set the stage for a neurocognitive model of this process. The second goal is to outline such a unifying, mechanistic model that can explain the impact of noncognitive factors (e.g., affect, stress) on strategy selection. To this end, we review the evidence for the factors influencing strategy selection, the neural basis of strategy use and the cognitive models of this process. We also present the Bottom-Up Model of Strategy Selection (BUMSS). The model assumes that the use of the rational Weighted Additive strategy and the boundedly rational heuristic Take The Best can be explained by one unifying, neurophysiologically plausible mechanism, based on the interaction of the frontoparietal network, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the brainstem nucleus locus coeruleus. According to BUMSS, there are three processes that form the bottom-up mechanism of decision strategy selection and lead to the final choice: (1) cue weight computation, (2) gain modulation, and (3) weighted additive evaluation of alternatives. We discuss how these processes might be implemented in the brain, and how this knowledge allows us to formulate novel predictions linking strategy use and neural signals. PMID:27877103

  11. Neural underpinnings of decision strategy selection: a review and a theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Wichary

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In multi-attribute choice, decision makers use various decision strategies to arrive at the final choice. What are the neural mechanisms underlying decision strategy selection? The first goal of this paper is to provide a literature review on the neural underpinnings and cognitive models of decision strategy selection and thus set the stage for a unifying neurocognitive model of this process. The second goal is to outline such a unifying, mechanistic model that can explain the impact of noncognitive factors (e.g. affect, stress on strategy selection. To this end, we review the evidence for the factors influencing strategy selection, the neural basis of strategy use and the cognitive models explaining this process. We also present the neurocognitive Bottom-Up Model of Strategy Selection (BUMSS. The model assumes that the use of the rational, normative Weighted Additive strategy and the boundedly rational heuristic Take The Best can be explained by one unifying, neurophysiologically plausible mechanism, based on the interaction of the frontoparietal network, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the brainstem nucleus locus coeruleus. According to BUMSS, there are three processes that form the bottom-up mechanism of decision strategy selection and lead to the final choice: 1 cue weight computation, 2 gain modulation, and 3 weighted additive evaluation of alternatives. We discuss how these processes might be implemented in the brain, and how this knowledge allows us to formulate novel predictions linking strategy use and neurophysiological indices.

  12. The Philosophical and Pedagogical Underpinnings of Active Learning in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Michael; de Graaff, Erik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the authors draw on three sequential keynote addresses that they gave at Active Learning in Engineering Education (ALE) workshops in Copenhagen (2012), Caxias do Sol (2014) and San Sebastian (2015). Active Learning in Engineering Education is an informal international network of engineering educators dedicated to improving…

  13. Feel, Think, Teach--Emotional Underpinnings of Approaches to Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordts-Freudinger, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates relations between higher education teachers' approaches to teaching and their emotions during teaching, as well as their emotion regulation strategies. Based on the assumption that the approaches hinge on emotional experiences with higher education teaching and learning, three studies assessed teachers' emotions, their…

  14. Education about HIV/AIDS--Theoretical Underpinnings for a Practical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, Esther A. J.; Maxwell, Claire; Aggleton, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related education is seen by many as central to increasing young people's awareness of, as well as decreasing their vulnerability to, HIV. There is less agreement, however, on the central goals of HIV- and AIDS-related education and the form it might best take. This…

  15. Pedagogical principles underpinning undergraduate Nurse Education in the UK: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh-Franklin, Carolyn

    2016-05-01

    This review provides a contextual report of the current use of pedagogy in undergraduate nursing programmes run by Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) in the United Kingdom (UK). Pedagogy provides the framework for educators to add shape and structure to the educational process, and to support student learning and programme development. Traditionally nurse education has used a behaviourist approach focusing on learning outcomes and competency based education, although there is also increasing support for the cognitive/student learning focused pedagogic approach. The keywords andragogy, pedagogy and student centred learning were used in a systematic stepwise descriptive content analysis of the programme specifications and programme handbooks of 40 current undergraduate programme documents, leading to an undergraduate award and professional registration as a nurse. 42% (17) of documents contained reference to the words, pedagogy and student centred learning, whilst no documents used the word andragogy. Where identified, pedagogy was used in a superficial manner, with only three documents identifying a specific pedagogical philosophy: one HEI citing a value based curriculum and two HEIs referencing social constructionism. Nine HEIs made reference to student centred learning but with no additional pedagogic information. A review of teaching, learning and assessment strategies indicated no difference between the documented strategies used by HEIs when comparing those with an espoused pedagogy and those without. Although educational literature supports the use of pedagogic principles in curriculum design, this is not explicit in undergraduate nursing programme documentation, and suggests that nurse educators do not view pedagogy as important to their programmes. Instead programmes appear to be developed based on operational and functional requirements with a focus on acquisition of knowledge and skills, and the fitness to practice of graduates entering the nursing

  16. Developing Children: Developmental Discourses Underpinning Physical Education at Three Scottish Preschool Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvilly, Nollaig; Atencio, Matthew; Verheul, Martine

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on one aspect of a study that investigated the place and meaning of "physical education" to practitioners and children at three preschool settings in Scotland. We employed a poststructural type of discourse analysis to examine the developmental discourses the 14 participating practitioners drew on when talking about…

  17. "Compulsory Schooling" Despite the Law: How Education Policy Underpins the Widespread Ignorance of the Right to Home Educate in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongrand, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Everyone in France takes for granted the existence of compulsory school attendance ("école obligatoire") while home education remains very exceptional. Yet school attendance is not, and has never been, legally compulsory in France. How can one explain the fact that the right to home educate is little known and practiced? This article…

  18. Empirical evaluation of the conceptual model underpinning a regional aquatic long-term monitoring program using causal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Miller, Scott; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Archer, Erik; Roper, Brett B.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual models are an integral facet of long-term monitoring programs. Proposed linkages between drivers, stressors, and ecological indicators are identified within the conceptual model of most mandated programs. We empirically evaluate a conceptual model developed for a regional aquatic and riparian monitoring program using causal models (i.e., Bayesian path analysis). We assess whether data gathered for regional status and trend estimation can also provide insights on why a stream may deviate from reference conditions. We target the hypothesized causal pathways for how anthropogenic drivers of road density, percent grazing, and percent forest within a catchment affect instream biological condition. We found instream temperature and fine sediments in arid sites and only fine sediments in mesic sites accounted for a significant portion of the maximum possible variation explainable in biological condition among managed sites. However, the biological significance of the direct effects of anthropogenic drivers on instream temperature and fine sediments were minimal or not detected. Consequently, there was weak to no biological support for causal pathways related to anthropogenic drivers’ impact on biological condition. With weak biological and statistical effect sizes, ignoring environmental contextual variables and covariates that explain natural heterogeneity would have resulted in no evidence of human impacts on biological integrity in some instances. For programs targeting the effects of anthropogenic activities, it is imperative to identify both land use practices and mechanisms that have led to degraded conditions (i.e., moving beyond simple status and trend estimation). Our empirical evaluation of the conceptual model underpinning the long-term monitoring program provided an opportunity for learning and, consequently, we discuss survey design elements that require modification to achieve question driven monitoring, a necessary step in the practice of

  19. Metabolic robustness in young roots underpins a predictive model of maize hybrid performance in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu E Lima, Francisco; Westhues, Matthias; Cuadros-Inostroza, Álvaro; Willmitzer, Lothar; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2017-04-01

    Heterosis has been extensively exploited for yield gain in maize (Zea mays L.). Here we conducted a comparative metabolomics-based analysis of young roots from in vitro germinating seedlings and from leaves of field-grown plants in a panel of inbred lines from the Dent and Flint heterotic patterns as well as selected F 1 hybrids. We found that metabolite levels in hybrids were more robust than in inbred lines. Using state-of-the-art modeling techniques, the most robust metabolites from roots and leaves explained up to 37 and 44% of the variance in the biomass from plants grown in two distinct field trials. In addition, a correlation-based analysis highlighted the trade-off between defense-related metabolites and hybrid performance. Therefore, our findings demonstrated the potential of metabolic profiles from young maize roots grown under tightly controlled conditions to predict hybrid performance in multiple field trials, thus bridging the greenhouse-field gap. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Education models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, Sybilla; Sloep, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Educational models describes a case study on a complex learning object. Possibilities are investigated for using this learning object, which is based on a particular educational model, outside of its original context. Furthermore, this study provides advice that might lead to an increase in

  1. A Review of the Values That Underpin the Structure of an Education System and Its Approach to Disability and Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduin, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Since the Dakar Framework for Action, governments around the world, especially in Western societies, have reaffirmed their commitment to a quality education for all in an inclusive environment. The purpose of this paper is to understand the barriers that prevent an education system from guaranteeing an inclusive education for all and for children…

  2. Effective e-learning in surgical education: the core values underpinning effective e-learning environments and how these may be enhanced for future surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, R; Coulston, J

    2016-01-01

    e-learning is a valuable tool that has a number of advantages for Surgical Oncology training and education. The rapidly evolving nature of, and limited clinical exposure to oncological practice creates challenges for surgical trainees to stay up to date and engaged. Online learning can be accessed anywhere at any time and allows trainees to develop, apply and be assessed on their learning. To be effective, it must be educationally sound and embrace technology to enhance learners' experience.

  3. Inferring the Impact of Regulatory Mechanisms that Underpin CD8+ T Cell Control of B16 Tumor Growth In vivo Using Mechanistic Models and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, David J; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    A major barrier for broadening the efficacy of immunotherapies for cancer is identifying key mechanisms that limit the efficacy of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Yet, identifying these mechanisms using human samples and mouse models for cancer remains a challenge. While interactions between cancer and the immune system are dynamic and non-linear, identifying the relative roles that biological components play in regulating anti-tumor immunity commonly relies on human intuition alone, which can be limited by cognitive biases. To assist natural intuition, modeling and simulation play an emerging role in identifying therapeutic mechanisms. To illustrate the approach, we developed a multi-scale mechanistic model to describe the control of tumor growth by a primary response of CD8+ T cells against defined tumor antigens using the B16 C57Bl/6 mouse model for malignant melanoma. The mechanistic model was calibrated to data obtained following adenovirus-based immunization and validated to data obtained following adoptive transfer of transgenic CD8+ T cells. More importantly, we use simulation to test whether the postulated network topology, that is the modeled biological components and their associated interactions, is sufficient to capture the observed anti-tumor immune response. Given the available data, the simulation results also provided a statistical basis for quantifying the relative importance of different mechanisms that underpin CD8+ T cell control of B16F10 growth. By identifying conditions where the postulated network topology is incomplete, we illustrate how this approach can be used as part of an iterative design-build-test cycle to expand the predictive power of the model.

  4. Modern Media Education Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups: (1) educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc.), based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education; (2) educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions,…

  5. MODERN MEDIA EDUCATION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups:- educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc., based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education;- educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions, philosophical problems relying on the ethic, religious, ideological, ecological, protectionist theories of media education;- pragmatic models (practical media technology training, based on the uses and gratifications and ‘practical’ theories of media education;- aesthetical models (aimed above all at the development of the artistic taste and enriching the skills of analysis of the best media culture examples. Relies on the aesthetical (art and cultural studies theory; - socio-cultural models (socio-cultural development of a creative personality as to the perception, imagination, visual memory, interpretation analysis, autonomic critical thinking, relying on the cultural studies, semiotic, ethic models of media education.

  6. Inquisitive learning as a basis for instrumental teaching: : an essay on four underpinning principles of the Prince Claus Conservatoire’s instrumental teacher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, Tine; Dons, Karolien

    2016-01-01

    Up until 2005 Peter Mak was involved as pedagogy teacher in the instrumental teacher education of the Bachelor of Music of the Prince Claus Conservatoire. The programme’s pedagogy section consisted of modules developed by Peter including ‘Didactics’, ‘Learning processes’, ‘Study skills’, and

  7. Connectionist Modelling and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Colin W.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a detailed, technical introduction to the state of cognitive science research, in particular the rise of the "new cognitive science," especially artificial neural net (ANN) models. Explains one influential ANN model and describes diverse applications and their implications for education. (EV)

  8. Developmental Education Evaluation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Miller, Mitzi; And Others

    A developmental education evaluation model designed to be used at a multi-unit urban community college is described. The purpose of the design was to determine the cost effectiveness/worth of programs in order to initiate self-improvement. A needs assessment was conducted by interviewing and taping the responses of students, faculty, staff, and…

  9. Academic Education Chain Operation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ruskov, Petko; Ruskov, Andrey

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for modelling the educational processes as a value added chain. It is an attempt to use a business approach to interpret and compile existing business and educational processes towards reference models and suggest an Academic Education Chain Operation Model. The model can be used to develop an Academic Chain Operation Reference Model.

  10. Academic Education Chain Operation Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruskov, Petko; Ruskov, Andrey

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for modelling the educational processes as a value added chain. It is an attempt to use a business approach to interpret and compile existing business and educational processes towards reference models and suggest an Academic Education Chain Operation Model. The model

  11. Genetic Underpinnings of Alopecia Areata

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 15 million to support development of 3-D human tissue models Press Release | September 12, 2017 Researchers ... Bethesda, Maryland 20892 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  12. Genetic Underpinnings of Alopecia Areata

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to support development of 3-D human tissue models Press Release | September 12, 2017 Researchers aim to ... Top Main navigation Menu Close Health Topics Grants & Funding Labs @ NIAMS Clinical Trials News Room About NIAMS ...

  13. Genetic Underpinnings of Alopecia Areata

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... million to support development of 3-D human tissue models Press Release | September 12, 2017 Researchers aim ... scientific news and resources on diseases of the bones, joints, muscles, and skin from the NIAMS. Click ...

  14. Genetic Underpinnings of Alopecia Areata

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 27, 2017 NIH awards $15 million to support development of 3-D human tissue models Press Release | ... the year. NIAMS often exhibits at meetings of professional and voluntary organizations. NIAMS-Hosted Social Media Events ...

  15. Management of Listeria monocytogenes in fermented sausages using the Food Safety Objective concept underpinned by stochastic modeling and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataragas, M; Alessandria, V; Rantsiou, K; Cocolin, L

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, a demonstration is made on how the risk from the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in fermented sausages can be managed using the concept of Food Safety Objective (FSO) aided by stochastic modeling (Bayesian analysis and Monte Carlo simulation) and meta-analysis. For this purpose, the ICMSF equation was used, which combines the initial level (H0) of the hazard and its subsequent reduction (ΣR) and/or increase (ΣI) along the production chain. Each element of the equation was described by a distribution to investigate the effect not only of the level of the hazard, but also the effect of the accompanying variability. The distribution of each element was determined by Bayesian modeling (H0) and meta-analysis (ΣR and ΣI). The output was a normal distribution N(-5.36, 2.56) (log cfu/g) from which the percentage of the non-conforming products, i.e. the fraction above the FSO of 2 log cfu/g, was estimated at 0.202%. Different control measures were examined such as lowering initial L. monocytogenes level and inclusion of an additional killing step along the process resulting in reduction of the non-conforming products from 0.195% to 0.003% based on the mean and/or square-root change of the normal distribution, and 0.001%, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Convergent molecular defects underpin diverse neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofaris, George K; Buckley, Noel J

    2018-02-19

    In our ageing population, neurodegenerative disorders carry an enormous personal, societal and economic burden. Although neurodegenerative diseases are often thought of as clinicopathological entities, increasing evidence suggests a considerable overlap in the molecular underpinnings of their pathogenesis. Such overlapping biological processes include the handling of misfolded proteins, defective organelle trafficking, RNA processing, synaptic health and neuroinflammation. Collectively but in different proportions, these biological processes in neurons or non-neuronal cells lead to regionally distinct patterns of neuronal vulnerability and progression of pathology that could explain the disease symptomology. With the advent of patient-derived cellular models and novel genetic manipulation tools, we are now able to interrogate this commonality despite the cellular complexity of the brain in order to develop novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or arrest neurodegeneration. Here, we describe broadly these concepts and their relevance across neurodegenerative diseases. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Cognitive underpinnings of social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Antonia F de C

    2015-01-01

    Human social interaction is part of what defines us. Here I present an overview of recent studies of imitation, a subdomain of social interaction that can be dissected and examined in a scientific fashion. I use these studies to test two core claims: (a) that there is more than one copying mechanism in the human brain and (b) that mimicry (a form of copying) is particularly relevant for understanding social behaviour. Evidence in favour of the first claim comes from neuroimaging studies that show distinct brain systems for understanding action kinematics, action goals, and irrational actions. Further studies of participants with autism show abnormal copying of irrational actions. Evidence in favour of the second claim comes from behavioural studies of the social cues that prime mimicry and from neuroimaging studies of the pathways involved in this priming. These studies suggest that medial prefrontal cortex has a core role in controlling mimicry responses and support the STORM (social top-down response modulation) model. Future work should determine what organizing principles govern the control of social responses and how these critical mechanisms for interpersonal connection differ in autism.

  18. Can Neoclassical Economics Underpin the Reform of Centrally Planned Economies?

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Murrell

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses whether neoclassical economics can provide the intellectual underpinning for a theory of reform. I examine whether the neoclassical model satisfies an essential condition to qualify for this role: does it give us a satisfactory explanation for the vast differences in performance between capitalist and socialist economic systems? First, I focus on the theoretical arguments that have traditionally been used to examine the comparative properties of central planning and marke...

  19. Role Modeling for Clinical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ellen Richter

    1991-01-01

    To become better role models, higher educators in institutions of clinical education should be conscious of the behaviors they demonstrate and the broad range of activities and attitudes that students observe and emulate, including clinical competence, professional demeanor, doctor-patient interactions, ethical values, and social consciousness.…

  20. Educational Technology Funding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    Library and cross-disciplinary literature all stress the increasing importance of instructional technology in higher education. However, there is a dearth of articles detailing funding for library instructional technology. The bulk of library literature on funding for these projects focuses on one-time grant opportunities and on the architecture…

  1. The Practical and Theoretical Underpinning of Inclusion for College Students amidst Diverse Intersectionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaymes, Mariyah

    2017-01-01

    American higher education is facing another major transition with escalating costs, an influx of diverse students, and an over all question about the return on investment for higher education. Within these complexities, this essay will consider the practical history and theoretical underpinning which inform the experience for students with complex…

  2. Towards an educational diabetes model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a mathematical model to serve as the heart of an educational diabetes simulator. The model is based on physiological principles and consists of three compartments: the gut, the plasma and the interstitial fluid. Glucose and insulin in- and outflow is described for all three

  3. Neural and psychological underpinnings of gambling disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2016-01-01

    Gambling disorder affects 0.4 to 1.6% of adults worldwide, and is highly comorbid with other mental health disorders. This article provides a concise primer on the neural and psychological underpinnings of gambling disorder based on a selective review of the literature. Gambling disorder is assoc......Gambling disorder affects 0.4 to 1.6% of adults worldwide, and is highly comorbid with other mental health disorders. This article provides a concise primer on the neural and psychological underpinnings of gambling disorder based on a selective review of the literature. Gambling disorder...... is associated with dysfunction across multiple cognitive domains which can be considered in terms of impulsivity and compulsivity. Neuroimaging data suggest structural and functional abnormalities of networks involved in reward processing and top-down control. Gambling disorder shows 50-60% heritability...... is required to evaluate whether cognitive dysfunction and personality aspects influence the longitudinal course and treatment outcome for gambling disorder. It is hoped that improved understanding of the biological and psychological components of gambling disorder, and their interactions, may lead to improved...

  4. EXISTENTIALISM AND ITS UNDERPINNINGS FOR ANDRAGOGY

    OpenAIRE

    CARUTH, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Instructional practices are rooted in the philosophies of education. Educators, those in the practice of education, must turn to educational philosophers for guidance to questions relating to educating society. Educators must make the connection between learning practices and the philosophies of education that underlies the methods of learning. The purpose of this paper was to examine specifically the literature to determine if there is a relationship between the philosophy of existentialism ...

  5. Education of a model student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikoff, Timothy P; Kleinberg, Jon M; Strogatz, Steven H

    2012-02-07

    A dilemma faced by teachers, and increasingly by designers of educational software, is the trade-off between teaching new material and reviewing what has already been taught. Complicating matters, review is useful only if it is neither too soon nor too late. Moreover, different students need to review at different rates. We present a mathematical model that captures these issues in idealized form. The student's needs are modeled as constraints on the schedule according to which educational material and review are spaced over time. Our results include algorithms to construct schedules that adhere to various spacing constraints, and bounds on the rate at which new material can be introduced under these schedules.

  6. Chaos. Possible underpinnings for quantum mechanics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHarris, Wm.C.

    2004-01-01

    Alternative, parallel explanations for a number of counter-intuitive concepts connected with the foundations of quantum mechanics can be constructed in terms of nonlinear dynamics. These include ideas as diverse as the statistical exponential decay law and spontaneous symmetry breaking to decoherence itself and the inference from violations of Bell's inequality that local reality is ruled out in hidden variable extensions of quantum mechanics. Such alternative explanations must not be taken as demonstrations of nonlinear underpinnings for quantum mechanics, but they do raise the possibility of their existence. In this article I delve a bit into ideas connected with the exponential decay law and with Bell's inequality as demonstrations. Then an investigation of the Klein-Gordon equation shows that it should not come as a complete surprise that quantum mechanics just might contain fundamental nonlinearities. (author)

  7. New Models for American Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James W.; Wynne, Edward

    Contents of this book include: (1) "New Models: The Need for School Reform," James W. Guthrie--a survey of some of the past successes of our educational system, an attempt to assess present public opinion about it, and an analysis of some possible explanations for its apparent inability to perform satisfactory; (2) "National Assessment: A History…

  8. Awareness, Solidarity, and Action: An Educational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    How Extension fosters social change and innovation can be improved through the use of theory-based educational models. Educational models can serve as foundations for the conceptual designs of educational interventions. I describe, using examples from my own work, one such model: the awareness, solidarity, and action model. This three-part model…

  9. Postpartum depression: psychoneuroimmunological underpinnings and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson G

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available George Anderson,1 Michael Maes21CRC Clincial Research Centre/Communications, Glasgow, Scotland; 2Department of Psychiatry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: Postpartum depression (PPD is common, occurring in 10%–15% of women. Due to concerns about teratogenicity of medications in the suckling infant, the treatment of PPD has often been restricted to psychotherapy. We review here the biological underpinnings to PPD, suggesting a powerful role for the tryptophan catabolites, indoleamine 2,3-dixoygenase, serotonin, and autoimmunity in mediating the consequences of immuno-inflammation and oxidative and nitrosative stress. It is suggested that the increased inflammatory potential, the decreases in endogenous anti-inflammatory compounds together with decreased omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids, in the postnatal period cause an inflammatory environment. The latter may result in the utilization of peripheral inflammatory products, especially kynurenine, in driving the central processes producing postnatal depression. The pharmacological treatment of PPD is placed in this context, and recommendations for more refined and safer treatments are made, including the better utilization of the antidepressant, and the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of melatonin.Keywords: SSRI, kynurenine, IDO, TDO, melatonin

  10. Scientific underpinnings of biotechnology regulatory frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleim, Savannah; Smyth, Stuart J

    2018-05-25

    Part of what is presently missing at domestic regulatory levels (and that is important at the international level as well) is a detailed understanding of what the rules of, and for, regulation should be, who the actors, stakeholders and major decision makers are and finally, how to get agreement about the rules. Greater insights into the system of rules that underpin regulatory frameworks for agri-food and biotechnology products in genetically modified (GM) crop- adopting nations will provide value by clarifying the evidence used to commercialize these technologies. This article examines the public documents available from Canada, the United States, the European Union and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development regarding the development of regulatory risk assessment frameworks for products of biotechnology to determine what science grounds these frameworks. The documentation used to provide the initial structure to the existing regulatory frameworks identifies the linkages, connections and relationships that exist between science, risk assessment and regulatory policy. The relationship between risk and regulation has never been more critical to the commercialization of innovative agricultural products. Documenting the role of science-based risk assessment in regulations and how this has changed over the 20 years of experience in regulating GM crops will identify changes in the risk/regulation relationship. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ecological mechanisms underpinning climate adaptation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorel, Sandra; Colloff, Matthew J; McIntyre, Sue; Doherty, Michael D; Murphy, Helen T; Metcalfe, Daniel J; Dunlop, Michael; Williams, Richard J; Wise, Russell M; Williams, Kristen J

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem services are typically valued for their immediate material or cultural benefits to human wellbeing, supported by regulating and supporting services. Under climate change, with more frequent stresses and novel shocks, 'climate adaptation services', are defined as the benefits to people from increased social ability to respond to change, provided by the capability of ecosystems to moderate and adapt to climate change and variability. They broaden the ecosystem services framework to assist decision makers in planning for an uncertain future with new choices and options. We present a generic framework for operationalising the adaptation services concept. Four steps guide the identification of intrinsic ecological mechanisms that facilitate the maintenance and emergence of ecosystem services during periods of change, and so materialise as adaptation services. We applied this framework for four contrasted Australian ecosystems. Comparative analyses enabled by the operational framework suggest that adaptation services that emerge during trajectories of ecological change are supported by common mechanisms: vegetation structural diversity, the role of keystone species or functional groups, response diversity and landscape connectivity, which underpin the persistence of function and the reassembly of ecological communities under severe climate change and variability. Such understanding should guide ecosystem management towards adaptation planning. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Applying the Sport Education Model to Tennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvazo, Shiri

    2009-01-01

    The physical education field abounds with theoretically sound curricular approaches such as fitness education, skill theme approach, tactical approach, and sport education. In an era that emphasizes authentic sport experiences, the Sport Education Model includes unique features that sets it apart from other curricular models and can be a valuable…

  13. Exploring Higher Education Financing Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah-Young, Kofi K.; Powell, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Higher education can be financed privately, financed by governments, or shared. Given that the benefits of education accrue to the individual and the state, many governments opt for shared financing. This article examines the underpinnings of different options for financing higher education and develops a model to compare conditions to choices and…

  14. Educational game models: conceptualization and evaluation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educational game models: conceptualization and evaluation. ... The Game Object Model (GOM), that marries educational theory and game design, forms the basis for the development of the Persona Outlining ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  15. Mathematical Modeling: A Bridge to STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertil, Mahmut; Gurel, Cem

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is making a theoretical discussion on the relationship between mathematical modeling and integrated STEM education. First of all, STEM education perspective and the construct of mathematical modeling in mathematics education is introduced. A review of literature is provided on how mathematical modeling literature may…

  16. A Forecast Model for Unemployment by Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranæs, Torben; Larsen, Anders Holm; Groes, Niels

    1994-01-01

    We present a dynamic forecast model for the labour market: demand for labour by education and the distribution of labour by education among industries are determined endogenously with overall demand by industry given exogenously. The model is derived from a simple behavioural equation based on a ...... for educational groups, where the initial forecast year is a change point for unemployment....

  17. Marketing Education on a Shoestring: A Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreeve, William; And Others

    Few educators envision themselves as marketing or public relations experts, yet economic reality is forcing many academicians into these roles. Over the past four years, the Eastern Washington University Department of Education has developed a successful marketing model for educators. The model begins with a successful reform of department…

  18. Higher Education Quality Assessment Model: Towards Achieving Educational Quality Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noaman, Amin Y.; Ragab, Abdul Hamid M.; Madbouly, Ayman I.; Khedra, Ahmed M.; Fayoumi, Ayman G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a developed higher education quality assessment model (HEQAM) that can be applied for enhancement of university services. This is because there is no universal unified quality standard model that can be used to assess the quality criteria of higher education institutes. The analytical hierarchy process is used to identify the…

  19. Models for mergers in higher education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investing in creativity: Many happy returns. Education Leadership, ... A possible model for higher education mergers, based on such extrapolation, is ..... working styles should be carefully managed from the very beginning of the process.

  20. The General Education Collaboration Model: A Model for Successful Mainstreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Richard L.; Myles, Brenda Smith

    1990-01-01

    The General Education Collaboration Model is designed to support general educators teaching mainstreamed disabled students, through collaboration with special educators. The model is based on flexible departmentalization, program ownership, identification and development of supportive attitudes, student assessment as a measure of program…

  1. Eyes to See: The Foothold of Jihadi Underpinnings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Jr, John M

    2007-01-01

    .... These underpinnings are well-established and rigorously authenticated precepts that serve as a foothold for Jihadi conduct, making Islam a ready-made ideology that suits the Jihadis' insatiable goals...

  2. Towards a New Educational Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon

    2003-01-01

    A presentation of the complexity in making organizational change in educational organizations when changing the educational paradighm towards POPBL (Project Organized and Problem Based Learning organized in teams). Involves three levels of decisionmaking and organization: Institutional Level......, System Level and Individual Level. The presentation is aimed at Rectors and Directors at Univeristies concidering posibilities for educational organizational change towards POPBL....

  3. A Spinozistic Model of Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlbeck, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Spinoza's claim that self-preservation is the foundation of virtue makes for the point of departure of this philosophical investigation into what a Spinozistic model of moral education might look like. It is argued that Spinoza's metaphysics places constraints on moral education insofar as an educational account would be affected by Spinoza's…

  4. Working Memory Underpins Cognitive Development, Learning, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Working memory is the retention of a small amount of information in a readily accessible form. It facilitates planning, comprehension, reasoning, and problem solving. I examine the historical roots and conceptual development of the concept and the theoretical and practical implications of current debates about working memory mechanisms. Then, I…

  5. Conditions underpinning success in joint service-education workforce planning

    OpenAIRE

    Styles Laureen; Stevenson Lynn; Herringer Barbara; Purkis Mary; Van Neste-Kenny Jocelyne

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Vancouver Island lies just off the southwest coast of Canada. Separated from the large urban area of Greater Vancouver (estimated population 2.17 million) by the Georgia Strait, this geographical location poses unique challenges in delivering health care to a mixed urban, rural and remote population of approximately 730 000 people living on the main island and the surrounding Gulf Islands. These challenges are offset by opportunities for the Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA) t...

  6. The digital national framework - underpinning the knowledge economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K J Murray

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Providing a sustainable spatial data infrastructure creates responsibility and high demand by continually meeting and satisfying the needs of all kinds of users. It is essential to provide the right information at the right level of quality and reliability and at the right time. Geographic information (GI is today being universally recognised as a key part of the national information infrastructure, especially by government. GI is an enabler in the knowledge economy since the power of geography can be used to underpin the sharing (and trading of vital georeferenced information collected by all kinds of organisations. From this information reliable conclusions can and will be drawn and decisions made. However, achieving such an environment does not just happen. It has to be led, nurtured and developed in line with user needs. Funding requires sustained investment, and it all has to be implemented and maintained whether the economy enjoys good times or bad, and through periods of political change. These are all big challenges encountered by just about every national economy. The aim of many national governments around the world is to establish a reliable and integrated reference base for GI that can underpin the e-economy. This base needs to support government and the commercial sector who need to reference information, and potentially share it with others (eg land ownership or link it up to form an application.(eg location based services. To achieve this a consistent method of georefererencing is required and the Digital National Framework is intended to fulfil that need in Great Britain. This paper will describe what has been happening in Great Britain to build on the firm foundations of the past, and develop a modern and sustainable framework for geographic information for the future. In particular it will be shown that the business model adopted by Ordnance Survey in recent years (ie the users pay for the data has played a key role in securing

  7. A Model Technology Educator: Thomas A. Edison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzer, William S.; Rogers, George E.; Bush, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    Reflecting back over a century ago to the small village of Menlo Park, New Jersey provides insight into a remarkable visionary and an exceptional role model for today's problem-solving and design-focused technology educator: Thomas A. Edison, inventor, innovator, and model technology educator. Since Edison could not simply apply existing knowledge…

  8. Mathematical Modelling Approach in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseven, Ayla

    2015-01-01

    The topic of models and modeling has come to be important for science and mathematics education in recent years. The topic of "Modeling" topic is especially important for examinations such as PISA which is conducted at an international level and measures a student's success in mathematics. Mathematical modeling can be defined as using…

  9. Higher Education: New Models, New Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Louis; Eaton, Judith S.; Smith, Burck

    2013-01-01

    The Internet enables new models. In the commercial world, for example, we have eBay, Amazon.com, and Netflix. These new models operate with a different set of rules than do traditional models. New models are emerging in higher education as well--for example, competency-based programs. In addition, courses that are being provided from outside the…

  10. How Much? Cost Models for Online Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, George

    2001-01-01

    Reviews some of the research being done in the area of cost models for online education. Describes a cost analysis handbook; an activity-based costing model that was based on an economic model for traditional instruction at the Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis; and blending other costing models. (LRW)

  11. Understanding the biological underpinnings of ecohydrological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxman, T. E.; Scott, R. L.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.; Hamerlynck, E. P.; Jenerette, D.; Tissue, D. T.; Breshears, D. D.; Saleska, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change presents a challenge for predicting ecosystem response, as multiple factors drive both the physical and life processes happening on the land surface and their interactions result in a complex, evolving coupled system. For example, changes in surface temperature and precipitation influence near-surface hydrology through impacts on system energy balance, affecting a range of physical processes. These changes in the salient features of the environment affect biological processes and elicit responses along the hierarchy of life (biochemistry to community composition). Many of these structural or process changes can alter patterns of soil water-use and influence land surface characteristics that affect local climate. Of the many features that affect our ability to predict the future dynamics of ecosystems, it is this hierarchical response of life that creates substantial complexity. Advances in the ability to predict or understand aspects of demography help describe thresholds in coupled ecohydrological system. Disentangling the physical and biological features that underlie land surface dynamics following disturbance are allowing a better understanding of the partitioning of water in the time-course of recovery. Better predicting the timing of phenology and key seasonal events allow for a more accurate description of the full functional response of the land surface to climate. In addition, explicitly considering the hierarchical structural features of life are helping to describe complex time-dependent behavior in ecosystems. However, despite this progress, we have yet to build an ability to fully account for the generalization of the main features of living systems into models that can describe ecohydrological processes, especially acclimation, assembly and adaptation. This is unfortunate, given that many key ecosystem services are functions of these coupled co-evolutionary processes. To date, both the lack of controlled measurements and experimentation

  12. How Ordinary Meaning Underpins the Meaning of Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormell, Christopher

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the meaning of mathematics by looking at its uses in the real world. Offers mathematical modeling as a way to represent mathematical applications in real or potential situations. Presents levels of applicability, modus operandi, relationship to "pure mathematics," and consequences for education for mathematical modeling. (MDH)

  13. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  14. Economic Modeling and Analysis of Educational Vouchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epple, Dennis; Romano, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of educational vouchers has evolved from market-based analogies to models that incorporate distinctive features of the educational environment. These distinctive features include peer effects, scope for private school pricing and admissions based on student characteristics, the linkage of household residential and school choices in…

  15. Eclectic Model in the Malaysian Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Nooraini; Mohamad, Khairul Azmi; Ilmuwan, Yayasan

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims at analysing the adoption of eclectic model in the Malaysian education system. The analysis is specifically looked from the angle of Islam and the Muslims. Malaysia has a long history of education system developments, from pre to post independence of the country. From what was initially traditional, modernity later came to…

  16. Postgraduate Education for Nurses: The Middlesex Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Kay

    2001-01-01

    A British university's curriculum model for master's and postgraduate diploma nursing education is characterized by structured collaboration among students, clinical mentors, and academic supervisors. A professional development portfolio individualizes the program and facilitates autonomous learning. (Contains 21 references.) (SK)

  17. Can "Ubuntu" Provide a Model for Citizenship Education in African Democracies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enslin, Penny; Horsthemke, Kai

    2004-01-01

    Some proponents of Africanism argue that African traditional education and the principles of "ubuntu" should provide the framework for citizenship education. While conceding that understandable concerns lie behind defences of "ubuntu" as underpinning African democracy, we argue that the Africanist perspective faces various problems and makes…

  18. The Educational Situation Quality Model: Recent Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech-Betoret, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present an educational model developed in recent years entitled the "The Educational Situation Quality Model" (MOCSE, acronym in Spanish). MOCSE can be defined as an instructional model that simultaneously considers the teaching-learning process, where motivation plays a central role. It explains the functioning of an educational setting by organizing and relating the most important variables which, according to the literature, contribute to student learning. Besides being a conceptual framework, this model also provides a methodological procedure to guide research and to promote reflection in the classroom. It allows teachers to implement effective research-action programs to improve teacher-students satisfaction and learning outcomes in the classroom context. This work explains the model's characteristics and functioning, recent advances, and how teachers can use it in an educational setting with a specific subject. This proposal integrates approaches from several relevant psycho-educational theories and introduces a new perspective into the existing literature that will allow researchers to make progress in studying educational setting functioning. The initial MOCSE configuration has been refined over time in accordance with the empirical results obtained from previous research, carried out within the MOCSE framework and with the subsequent reflections that derived from these results. Finally, the contribution of the model to improve learning outcomes and satisfaction, and its applicability in the classroom, are also discussed.

  19. Towards developing understanding of the drivers, constraints from the consumption values underpinning participation in physical activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Kearns, PJ; Williams-Burnett, N; Skinner, H

    2012-01-01

    Overall participation rates in physical activity across the UK have remained relatively static since the mid 1980s, with attendant causes for concern about the inequality of participation rates amongst various target groups that may be worthy of specific investigation. Behaviour change models from the fields of leisure studies, consumer behaviour and social psychology offer conceptualisation of a notion of exchange underpinning the expectancy-value process, noting that, in order to facilitate...

  20. The Educational Situation Quality Model: Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech-Betoret, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present an educational model developed in recent years entitled the “The Educational Situation Quality Model” (MOCSE, acronym in Spanish). MOCSE can be defined as an instructional model that simultaneously considers the teaching-learning process, where motivation plays a central role. It explains the functioning of an educational setting by organizing and relating the most important variables which, according to the literature, contribute to student learning. Besides being a conceptual framework, this model also provides a methodological procedure to guide research and to promote reflection in the classroom. It allows teachers to implement effective research-action programs to improve teacher–students satisfaction and learning outcomes in the classroom context. This work explains the model’s characteristics and functioning, recent advances, and how teachers can use it in an educational setting with a specific subject. This proposal integrates approaches from several relevant psycho-educational theories and introduces a new perspective into the existing literature that will allow researchers to make progress in studying educational setting functioning. The initial MOCSE configuration has been refined over time in accordance with the empirical results obtained from previous research, carried out within the MOCSE framework and with the subsequent reflections that derived from these results. Finally, the contribution of the model to improve learning outcomes and satisfaction, and its applicability in the classroom, are also discussed. PMID:29593623

  1. The Educational Situation Quality Model: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Doménech-Betoret

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to present an educational model developed in recent years entitled the “The Educational Situation Quality Model” (MOCSE, acronym in Spanish. MOCSE can be defined as an instructional model that simultaneously considers the teaching-learning process, where motivation plays a central role. It explains the functioning of an educational setting by organizing and relating the most important variables which, according to the literature, contribute to student learning. Besides being a conceptual framework, this model also provides a methodological procedure to guide research and to promote reflection in the classroom. It allows teachers to implement effective research-action programs to improve teacher–students satisfaction and learning outcomes in the classroom context. This work explains the model’s characteristics and functioning, recent advances, and how teachers can use it in an educational setting with a specific subject. This proposal integrates approaches from several relevant psycho-educational theories and introduces a new perspective into the existing literature that will allow researchers to make progress in studying educational setting functioning. The initial MOCSE configuration has been refined over time in accordance with the empirical results obtained from previous research, carried out within the MOCSE framework and with the subsequent reflections that derived from these results. Finally, the contribution of the model to improve learning outcomes and satisfaction, and its applicability in the classroom, are also discussed.

  2. The Strategies of Modeling in Biology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Julia; Passmore, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Modeling, like inquiry more generally, is not a single method, but rather a complex suite of strategies. Philosophers of biology, citing the diverse aims, interests, and disciplinary cultures of biologists, argue that modeling is best understood in the context of its epistemic aims and cognitive payoffs. In the science education literature,…

  3. Exploring Causal Models of Educational Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkerson, Jo Ann; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This article evaluates five causal model of educational productivity applied to learning science in a sample of 882 fifth through eighth graders. Each model explores the relationship between achievement and a combination of eight constructs: home environment, peer group, media, ability, social environment, time on task, motivation, and…

  4. Enterprise Modelling for an Educational Information Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widya, I.A.; Michiels, E.F.; Volman, C.J.A.M.; Pokraev, S.; de Diana, I.P.F.; Filipe, J.; Sharp, B.; Miranda, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the modelling exercise of an educational information infrastructure that aims to support the organisation of teaching and learning activities suitable for a wide range of didactic policies. The modelling trajectory focuses on capturing invariant structures of relations between

  5. The impact of an international online accreditation system on pedagogical models and strategies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garista Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health promotion practice is characterised by a diverse workforce drawn from a broad range of disciplines, bringing together an extensive breadth of knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes and values stemming from biomedical and social science frameworks. One of the goals of the CompHP Project was to ensure that higher education training would not only reach competency-based standards necessary for best practice, but also facilitate mobility within the EU and beyond through the accreditation of professional practitioners and educational courses. As a result, higher education institutions in Italy and elsewhere are requested to shift the focus from the definition of learning objectives to the identification of teaching strategies and assessment measures to guarantee that students have acquired the competencies identified. This requires reflection on the pedagogical models underpinning course curricula and teaching–learning approaches in higher education, not only to meet the competency-based standards but also to incorporate overarching transversal competencies inherent to the profession and, more specifically, to the online accreditation procedure. Professionals applying for registration require competence in foreign languages, metacognition and be digitally literate. The article provides a brief overview of the development and structure of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education online accreditation system and proposes a pedagogical reflection on course curricula.

  6. Duty of care is underpinned by a range of obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    The courts have long established that nurses are in a duty situation and owe a duty of care to their patients (Kent v Griffiths [2001]). Traditionally, the profession set the standard of care and nurses were required to act in accordance with a practice accepted by a responsible body of their peers (Bolam v Friern HMC [1957]).The introduction of the Human Rights Act 1998 gave rise to a positive obligation on government to ensure that laws, policies and procedures are in place to protect violations of human rights. Nurses must now inform their practice with relevant statute law, common law and professional standards in order to properly discharge their duty of care. Richard Griffith considers the law that now underpins a nurse's duty of care and uses a recent report from the Health Service Ombudsman for England to illustrate the obligations that underpin the nurse-patient relationship.

  7. An Educational Model for Hands-On Hydrology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    AghaKouchak, A.; Nakhjiri, N.; Habib, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of a hands-on modeling tool developed for students in civil engineering and earth science disciplines to help them learn the fundamentals of hydrologic processes, model calibration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, and practice conceptual thinking in solving engineering problems. The toolbox includes two simplified hydrologic models, namely HBV-EDU and HBV-Ensemble, designed as a complement to theoretical hydrology lectures. The models provide an interdisciplinary application-oriented learning environment that introduces the hydrologic phenomena through the use of a simplified conceptual hydrologic model. The toolbox can be used for in-class lab practices and homework assignments, and assessment of students' understanding of hydrological processes. Using this modeling toolbox, students can gain more insights into how hydrological processes (e.g., precipitation, snowmelt and snow accumulation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff generation) are interconnected. The educational toolbox includes a MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) and an ensemble simulation scheme that can be used for teaching more advanced topics including uncertainty analysis, and ensemble simulation. Both models have been administered in a class for both in-class instruction and a final project, and students submitted their feedback about the toolbox. The results indicate that this educational software had a positive impact on students understanding and knowledge of hydrology.

  8. Neural and psychological underpinnings of gambling disorder: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Chamberlain, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Gambling disorder affects 0.4 to 1.6% of adults worldwide, and is highly comorbid with other mental health disorders. This article provides a concise primer on the neural and psychological underpinnings of gambling disorder based on a selective review of the literature. Gambling disorder is associated with dysfunction across multiple cognitive domains which can be considered in terms of impulsivity and compulsivity. Neuroimaging data suggest structural and functional abnormalities of networks...

  9. An integrated educational model for continuing nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Beverley; Gardner, Glenn; Osborne, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and evaluation of an integrated clinical learning model to inform ongoing education for surgical nurses. The research aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a Respiratory Skills Update (ReSKU) education program, in the context of organisational utility, on improving surgical nurses' practice in the area of respiratory assessment. Continuous development and integration of technological innovations and research in the healthcare environment mandate the need for continuing education for nurses. Despite an increased worldwide emphasis on this, there is scant empirical evidence of program effectiveness. A quasi experimental pre test, post test non-equivalent control group design evaluated the impact of the ReSKU program on surgical nurses' clinical practice. The 2008 study was conducted in a 400 bed regional referral public hospital and was consistent with contemporary educational approaches using multi-modal, interactive teaching strategies. The study demonstrated statistically significant differences between groups regarding reported use of respiratory skills, three months after ReSKU program attendance. Between group data analysis indicated that the intervention group's reported beliefs and attitudes pertaining to subscale descriptors showed statistically significant differences in three of the six subscales. The construct of critical thinking in the clinical context, combined with clinical reasoning and purposeful reflection, was a powerful educational strategy to enhance competency and capability in clinicians. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The mechanisms underpinning peer support: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Emma

    2017-12-20

    The employment of Peer Support Workers, who themselves have experience of significant emotional distress, can promote recovery at an individual and organisational level. While research examining the benefits of peer support within mental health services continues to grow, an understanding of how, and through what processes, these benefits are reached remains under-developed. To review the published research literature relating to the process of peer support and its underpinning mechanisms to better understand how and why it works. A scoping review of published literature identified studies relating to peer support mechanisms, processes and relationships. Studies were summarised and findings analysed. Five mechanisms were found to underpin peer support relationships (lived experience, love labour, the liminal position of the peer worker, strengths-focussed social and practical support, and the helper role). The identified mechanisms can underpin both the success and difficulties associated with peer support relationships. Further research should review a broader range of literature and clarify how these mechanisms contribute to peer support in different contexts.

  11. Approaches and models of intercultural education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Manuel Sánchez Fontalvo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Needed to be aware of the need to build an intercultural society, awareness must be assumed in all social spheres, where stands the role play education. A role of transcendental, since it must promote educational spaces to form people with virtues and powers that allow them to live together / as in multicultural contexts and social diversities (sometimes uneven in an increasingly globalized and interconnected world, and foster the development of feelings of civic belonging shared before the neighborhood, city, region and country, allowing them concern and critical judgement to marginalization, poverty, misery and inequitable distribution of wealth, causes of structural violence, but at the same time, wanting to work for the welfare and transformation of these scenarios. Since these budgets, it is important to know the approaches and models of intercultural education that have been developed so far, analysing their impact on the contexts educational where apply.   

  12. Technology and Online Education: Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine W.; Sonnenberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper contends that technology changes advance online education. A number of mobile computing and transformative technologies will be examined and incorporated into a descriptive study. The object of the study will be to design innovative mobile awareness models seeking to understand technology changes for mobile devices and how they can be…

  13. Teaching Mathematical Modeling in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Ritu; Shrivastava, Keerty; Bhardwaj, Ramakant

    2016-01-01

    Mathematics is not only a subject but it is also a language consisting of many different symbols and relations. Taught as a compulsory subject up the 10th class, students are then able to choose whether or not to study mathematics as a main subject. The present paper discusses mathematical modeling in mathematics education. The article provides…

  14. Behavioral and statistical models of educational inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Breen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how students and their families make educational decisions. We describe three types of behavioral model that might underlie decision-making and we show that they have consequences for what decisions are made. Our study thus has policy implications if we wish...

  15. Humanistic Speech Education to Create Leadership Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Beverley Jeanne

    A theoretical framework based primarily on the humanistic psychology of Abraham Maslow is used in developing a humanistic approach to speech education. The holistic view of human learning and behavior, inherent in this approach, is seen to be compatible with a model of effective leadership. Specific applications of this approach to speech…

  16. A Technological Teacher Education Program Planning Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ronald E.

    1993-01-01

    A model for technology teacher education curriculum has three facets: (1) purpose (experiential learning, personal development, technological enlightenment, economic well-being); (2) content (professional knowledge, curriculum development competence, pedagogical knowledge and skill, technological foundations); and (3) process (planned reflection,…

  17. Can a Competence or Standards Model Facilitate an Inclusive Approach to Teacher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The paper seeks to determine whether programmes of initial teacher education (ITE) can contribute to the development of beginning teachers' inclusive attitudes, values and practices. The majority of ITE programmes are based on government prescribed competence or standards frameworks, which are underpinned by Codes of Professional Values. It is…

  18. Competency Modeling in Extension Education: Integrating an Academic Extension Education Model with an Extension Human Resource Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Scott D.; Cochran, Graham R.; Harder, Amy; Place, Nick T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast an academic extension education model with an Extension human resource management model. The academic model of 19 competencies was similar across the 22 competencies of the Extension human resource management model. There were seven unique competencies for the human resource management model.…

  19. Making Validated Educational Models Central in Preschool Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinhart, Lawrence J.

    This paper presents some ideas to preschool educators and policy makers about how to make validated educational models central in standards for preschool education and care programs that are available to all 3- and 4-year-olds. Defining an educational model as a coherent body of program practices, curriculum content, program and child, and teacher…

  20. Humanistic Model in Adult Education and Science and Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Humanistic Model in Adult Education and Science and Technology: Challenges of the 21 st Century Developing Nation. ... Annals of Modern Education ... is the result of the scientific and technological advancement, this paper considers humanistic model in adult education as liberal education appropriate for adult age.

  1. False memories with age: neural and cognitive underpinnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Aleea L.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    As we age we become increasingly susceptible to memory distortions and inaccuracies. Over the past decade numerous neuroimaging studies have attempted to illuminate the neural underpinnings of aging and false memory. Here we review these studies, and link their findings with those concerning the cognitive properties of age-related changes in memory accuracy. Collectively this evidence points towards a prominent role for age-related declines in medial temporal and prefrontal brain areas, and corresponding impairments in associative binding and strategic monitoring. A resulting cascade of cognitive changes contributes to the heightened vulnerability to false memories with age, including reduced recollective ability, a reliance on gist information and familiarity-based monitoring mechanisms, as well as a reduced ability to inhibit irrelevant information and erroneous binding of features between memory traces. We consider both theoretical and applied implications of research on aging and false memories, as well as questions remaining to be addressed in future research. PMID:27592332

  2. Developmental plasticity and epigenetic mechanisms underpinning metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Felicia M; Gluckman, Peter D; Hanson, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    The importance of developmental factors in influencing the risk of later-life disease has a strong evidence base derived from multiple epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies in animals and humans. During early life, an organism is able to adjust its phenotypic development in response to environmental cues. Such developmentally plastic responses evolved as a fitness-maximizing strategy to cope with variable environments. There are now increasing data that these responses are, at least partially, underpinned by epigenetic mechanisms. A mismatch between the early and later-life environments may lead to inappropriate early life-course epigenomic changes that manifest in later life as increased vulnerability to disease. There is also growing evidence for the transgenerational transmission of epigenetic marks. This article reviews the evidence that susceptibility to metabolic and cardiovascular disease in humans is linked to changes in epigenetic marks induced by early-life environmental cues, and discusses the clinical, public health and therapeutic implications that arise.

  3. FDTD method and models in optical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Weng, Lingdong; Zhu, Hao; Du, Jihe

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been proposed as a pedagogical way in optical education. Meanwhile, FDTD solutions, a simulation software based on the FDTD algorithm, has been presented as a new tool which helps abecedarians to build optical models and to analyze optical problems. The core of FDTD algorithm is that the time-dependent Maxwell's equations are discretized to the space and time partial derivatives, and then, to simulate the response of the interaction between the electronic pulse and the ideal conductor or semiconductor. Because the solving of electromagnetic field is in time domain, the memory usage is reduced and the simulation consequence on broadband can be obtained easily. Thus, promoting FDTD algorithm in optical education is available and efficient. FDTD enables us to design, analyze and test modern passive and nonlinear photonic components (such as bio-particles, nanoparticle and so on) for wave propagation, scattering, reflection, diffraction, polarization and nonlinear phenomena. The different FDTD models can help teachers and students solve almost all of the optical problems in optical education. Additionally, the GUI of FDTD solutions is so friendly to abecedarians that learners can master it quickly.

  4. Income Distribution Over Educational Levels: A Simple Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinbergen, Jan

    An econometric model is formulated that explains income per person in various compartments of the labor market defined by three main levels of education and by education required. The model enables an estimation of the effect of increased access to education on that distribution. The model is based on a production for the economy as a whole; a…

  5. Theories and Frameworks for Online Education: Seeking an Integrated Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciano, Anthony G.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines theoretical frameworks and models that focus on the pedagogical aspects of online education. After a review of learning theory as applied to online education, a proposal for an integrated "Multimodal Model for Online Education" is provided based on pedagogical purpose. The model attempts to integrate the work of…

  6. MODELING OF INNOVATION EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF GENERAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION: THE SCIENTIFIC APPROACHES

    OpenAIRE

    Anzhelika D. Tsymbalaru

    2010-01-01

    In the paper the scientific approaches to modeling of innovation educational environment of a general educational institution – system (analysis of object, process and result of modeling as system objects), activity (organizational and psychological structure) and synergetic (aspects and principles).

  7. Heritage Education in Museums: an Inclusion- Focused Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fontal Merillas, Olaia; Marín Cepeda, Sofía

    2016-01-01

    Heritage Education in Museums: Inclusion Model (HEM-INMO) is one of the research conclusions of the Spanish Heritage Education Observatory (SHEO), funded by Spain’s Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. The Observatory evaluates educational programs generated in Spain and in the international area in the last two decades, especially in museums as heritage education non-formal contexts. Also, the HEM-INMO model is included within the aims of the National Education and Heritage Plan (NE&HP),...

  8. Agent Based Modeling as an Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J. H.; Johnson, R.; Castillo, V.

    2012-12-01

    Motivation is a key element in high school education. One way to improve motivation and provide content, while helping address critical thinking and problem solving skills, is to have students build and study agent based models in the classroom. This activity visually connects concepts with their applied mathematical representation. "Engaging students in constructing models may provide a bridge between frequently disconnected conceptual and mathematical forms of knowledge." (Levy and Wilensky, 2011) We wanted to discover the feasibility of implementing a model based curriculum in the classroom given current and anticipated core and content standards.; Simulation using California GIS data ; Simulation of high school student lunch popularity using aerial photograph on top of terrain value map.

  9. Econometric Models of Education, Some Applications. Education and Development, Technical Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinbergen, Jan; And Others

    This report contains five papers which describe mathematical models of the educational system as it relates to economic growth. Experimental applications of the models to particular educational systems are discussed. Three papers, by L. J. Emmerij, J. Blum, and G. Williams, discuss planning models for the calculation of educational requirements…

  10. Continuous Certification Within Residency: An Educational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachlin, Susan; Schonberger, Alison; Nocera, Nicole; Acharya, Jay; Shah, Nidhi; Henkel, Jacqueline

    2015-10-01

    Given that maintaining compliance with Maintenance of Certification is necessary for maintaining licensure to practice as a radiologist and provide quality patient care, it is important for radiology residents to practice fulfilling each part of the program during their training not only to prepare for success after graduation but also to adequately learn best practices from the beginning of their professional careers. This article discusses ways to implement continuous certification (called Continuous Residency Certification) as an educational model within the residency training program. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Educational model to develop trustworthy professional activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia; Varela-Ruiz, Margarita; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando; Torruco-García, Uri

    2015-01-01

    The reorganization of the national health system (SNS), enforces reflection and transformation on medical education in clinical contexts. The study presents an educational model to develop entrusted professionals activities (MEDAPROC) to train human resources in health with reliable knowledge, skills and attitudes to work in the shifting scenario of the SNS. The paper discusses international and national documents on skills in medicine. Based on the analysis of 8 domains, 50 skills and 13 entrusted professional activities (RPA) proposed by the Association of the American Medical College (AAMC) we propose a curriculum design, with the example of the undergraduate program of Gynecology and Obstetrics, with the intention to advance to internship and residency in a continuum that marks milestones and clinical practices. The pedagogical design of MEDAPROC was developed within three areas: 1) proposal of the AAMC; 2) curricular content of programs in pre and postgraduate education 3) organization of the daily agenda with academic mechanisms to develop the competencies, cover program items and develop clinical practice in deliberate learning activities, as well as milestones. The MEDAPROC offers versatility, student mobility and curricular flexibility in a system planed by academic units in diverse clinical settings.

  12. Unified underpinning of human mobility in the real world and cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Ming; Zeng, An; Yan, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Human movements in the real world and in cyberspace affect not only dynamical processes such as epidemic spreading and information diffusion but also social and economical activities such as urban planning and personalized recommendation in online shopping. Despite recent efforts in characterizing and modeling human behaviors in both the real and cyber worlds, the fundamental dynamics underlying human mobility have not been well understood. We develop a minimal, memory-based random walk model in limited space for reproducing, with a single parameter, the key statistical behaviors characterizing human movements in both cases. The model is validated using relatively big data from mobile phone and online commerce, suggesting memory-based random walk dynamics as the unified underpinning for human mobility, regardless of whether it occurs in the real world or in cyberspace.

  13. Assessment of the Quality Management Models in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basar, Gulsun; Altinay, Zehra; Dagli, Gokmen; Altinay, Fahriye

    2016-01-01

    This study involves the assessment of the quality management models in Higher Education by explaining the importance of quality in higher education and by examining the higher education quality assurance system practices in other countries. The qualitative study was carried out with the members of the Higher Education Planning, Evaluation,…

  14. Modelling of information processes management of educational complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оксана Николаевна Ромашкова

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns information model of the educational complex which includes several schools. A classification of educational complexes formed in Moscow is given. There are also a consideration of the existing organizational structure of the educational complex and a suggestion of matrix management structure. Basic management information processes of the educational complex were conceptualized.

  15. Educational productivity in higher education : An examination of part of the Walberg Educational Productivity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, M.; Jansen, E. P. W. A.

    Several factors in the H. J. Walberg Educational Productivity Model, which assumes that 9 factors affect academic achievement, were examined with a limited sample of 1st-year students in the University of Groningen. Information concerning 8 of these factors - grades, motivation, age, prior

  16. Funding medical education: should we follow a different model to general higher education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Walsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ISSUE. There has been much recent discussion on the funding of medical education. There has also been much discussion about the funding of higher education more generally. EVIDENCE. The topics of discussion have included the rising costs of education; who should pay; the various potential models of funding; and how best to ensure maximum returns from investment. IMPLICATIONS. Medical education has largely followed the emerging models of funding for higher education. However there are important reasons why the funding models for higher education may not suit medical education. These reasons include the fact that medical education is as important to the public as it is to the learner; the range of funding sources available to medical schools; the strict regulation of medical education; and the fact that the privatisation and commercialisation of higher education may not been in keeping with the social goals of medical schools and the agenda of diversification within the medical student population.

  17. Funding medical education: should we follow a different model to general higher education? Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    There has been much recent discussion on the funding of medical education. There has also been much discussion about the funding of higher education more generally. The topics of discussion have included the rising costs of education; who should pay; the various potential models of funding; and how best to ensure maximum returns from investment. Medical education has largely followed the emerging models of funding for higher education. However there are important reasons why the funding models for higher education may not suit medical education. These reasons include the fact that medical education is as important to the public as it is to the learner; the range of funding sources available to medical schools; the strict regulation of medical education; and the fact that the privatisation and commercialisation of higher education may not been in keeping with the social goals of medical schools and the agenda of diversification within the medical student population.

  18. Two Models of Engineering Education for the Professional Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir. Dick van Schenk Brill; Ir Peter Boots; Ir. Peter van Kollenburg

    2002-01-01

    Two models for engineering education that may answer the needs for "Renaissance Engineers" are described in this paper. They were the outcome of an educational renewal project, funded by the Dutch Ministry of Education and industrial companies. The first model (Corporate Curriculum) aims to bring

  19. Three Models of Education: Rights, Capabilities and Human Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeyns, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    This article analyses three normative accounts that can underlie educational policies, with special attention to gender issues. These three models of education are human capital theory, rights discourses and the capability approach. I first outline five different roles that education can play. Then I analyse these three models of educational…

  20. Exploring the Philosophical Underpinnings of Research: Relating Ontology and Epistemology to the Methodology and Methods of the Scientific, Interpretive, and Critical Research Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, James

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the philosophical underpinnings of three major educational research paradigms: scientific, interpretive, and critical. The aim was to outline and explore the interrelationships between each paradigm's ontology, epistemology, methodology and methods. This paper reveals and then discusses some of the underlying assumptions of…

  1. Flexible Programmes in Higher Professional Education: Expert Validation of a Flexible Educational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Ad; Paas, Fred; Verbraeck, Alexander; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    In a preceding case study, a process-focused demand-driven approach for organising flexible educational programmes in higher professional education (HPE) was developed. Operations management and instructional design contributed to designing a flexible educational model by means of discrete-event simulation. Educational experts validated the model…

  2. Design of the Model of Constructivist Learning Theory for Moral Education in Physical Education Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyu

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve better effect of moral education in physical education teaching, this article employed constructivist learning theory to design the model of moral education according to the characteristics of physical education teaching, in order that the majority of P.E. teachers draw lessons from it in their teaching practice, and service to…

  3. Application-Driven Educational Game to Assist Young Children in Learning English Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hong; Lee, Shu-Yu

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an educational game, named My-Pet-Shop, to enhance young children's learning of English vocabulary. The educational game is underpinned by an application-driven model, which consists of three components: application scenario, subject learning, and learning regulation. An empirical study is further conducted…

  4. False memories with age: Neural and cognitive underpinnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Aleea L; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-10-01

    As we age we become increasingly susceptible to memory distortions and inaccuracies. Over the past decade numerous neuroimaging studies have attempted to illuminate the neural underpinnings of aging and false memory. Here we review these studies, and link their findings with those concerning the cognitive properties of age-related changes in memory accuracy. Collectively this evidence points towards a prominent role for age-related declines in medial temporal and prefrontal brain areas, and corresponding impairments in associative binding and strategic monitoring. A resulting cascade of cognitive changes contributes to the heightened vulnerability to false memories with age, including reduced recollective ability, a reliance on gist information and familiarity-based monitoring mechanisms, as well as a reduced ability to inhibit irrelevant information and erroneous binding of features between memory traces. We consider both theoretical and applied implications of research on aging and false memories, as well as questions remaining to be addressed in future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pan genome of the phytoplankton Emiliania underpins its global distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Betsy A; Kegel, Jessica; Klute, Mary J; Kuo, Alan; Lefebvre, Stephane C; Maumus, Florian; Mayer, Christoph; Miller, John; Monier, Adam; Salamov, Asaf; Young, Jeremy; Aguilar, Maria; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Gonzalez, Karina; Herman, Emily K; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Napier, Johnathan; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Sarno, Analissa F; Shmutz, Jeremy; Schroeder, Declan; de Vargas, Colomban; Verret, Frederic; von Dassow, Peter; Valentin, Klaus; Van de Peer, Yves; Wheeler, Glen; Dacks, Joel B; Delwiche, Charles F; Dyhrman, Sonya T; Glöckner, Gernot; John, Uwe; Richards, Thomas; Worden, Alexandra Z; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2013-07-11

    Coccolithophores have influenced the global climate for over 200 million years. These marine phytoplankton can account for 20 per cent of total carbon fixation in some systems. They form blooms that can occupy hundreds of thousands of square kilometres and are distinguished by their elegantly sculpted calcium carbonate exoskeletons (coccoliths), rendering them visible from space. Although coccolithophores export carbon in the form of organic matter and calcite to the sea floor, they also release CO2 in the calcification process. Hence, they have a complex influence on the carbon cycle, driving either CO2 production or uptake, sequestration and export to the deep ocean. Here we report the first haptophyte reference genome, from the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP1516, and sequences from 13 additional isolates. Our analyses reveal a pan genome (core genes plus genes distributed variably between strains) probably supported by an atypical complement of repetitive sequence in the genome. Comparisons across strains demonstrate that E. huxleyi, which has long been considered a single species, harbours extensive genome variability reflected in different metabolic repertoires. Genome variability within this species complex seems to underpin its capacity both to thrive in habitats ranging from the equator to the subarctic and to form large-scale episodic blooms under a wide variety of environmental conditions.

  6. Emerging Technological Risk Underpinning the Risk of Technology Innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Classes of socio-technical hazards allow a characterization of the risk in technology innovation and clarify the mechanisms underpinning emergent technological risk. Emerging Technological Risk provides an interdisciplinary account of risk in socio-technical systems including hazards which highlight: ·         How technological risk crosses organizational boundaries, ·         How technological trajectories and evolution develop from resolving tensions emerging between social aspects of organisations and technologies and ·         How social behaviour shapes, and is shaped by, technology. Addressing an audience from a range of academic and professional backgrounds, Emerging Technological Risk is a key source for those who wish to benefit from a detail and methodical exposure to multiple perspectives on technological risk. By providing a synthesis of recent work on risk that captures the complex mechanisms that characterize the emergence of risk in technology innovation, Emerging Tec...

  7. Renewable energy technology from underpinning physics to engineering application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infield, D G

    2008-01-01

    The UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC) in it's submission to the DTI's 2006 Energy Review reminded us that the 'UK has abundant wind, wave and tidal resources available; its mild climate lends itself to bio-energy production, and solar radiation levels are sufficient to sustain a viable solar industry'. These technologies are at different stages of development but they all draw on basic and applied Science and Engineering. The paper will briefly review the renewable energy technologies and their potential for contributing to a sustainable energy supply. Three research topics will be highlighted that bridge the gap between the physics underpinning the energy conversion, and the engineering aspects of development and deployment; all three are highly relevant to the Government's programme on micro-generation. Two are these are taken from field of thin film photovoltaics (PV), one related to novel device development and the other to a measurement technique for assessing the manufacturing quality of PV modules and their performance. The third topic concerns the development of small building integrated wind turbines and examines the complex flow associated with such applications. The paper will conclude by listing key research challenges that are central to the search for efficient and cost-effective renewable energy generation

  8. The neural underpinnings of music listening under different attention conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz; Leipold, Simon; Burkhard, Anja

    2018-05-02

    Most studies examining the neural underpinnings of music listening have no specific instruction on how to process the presented musical pieces. In this study, we explicitly manipulated the participants' focus of attention while they listened to the musical pieces. We used an ecologically valid experimental setting by presenting the musical stimuli simultaneously with naturalistic film sequences. In one condition, the participants were instructed to focus their attention on the musical piece (attentive listening), whereas in the second condition, the participants directed their attention to the film sequence (passive listening). We used two instrumental musical pieces: an electronic pop song, which was a major hit at the time of testing, and a classical musical piece. During music presentation, we measured electroencephalographic oscillations and responses from the autonomic nervous system (heart rate and high-frequency heart rate variability). During passive listening to the pop song, we found strong event-related synchronizations in all analyzed frequency bands (theta, lower alpha, upper alpha, lower beta, and upper beta). The neurophysiological responses during attentive listening to the pop song were similar to those of the classical musical piece during both listening conditions. Thus, the focus of attention had a strong influence on the neurophysiological responses to the pop song, but not on the responses to the classical musical piece. The electroencephalographic responses during passive listening to the pop song are interpreted as a neurophysiological and psychological state typically observed when the participants are 'drawn into the music'.

  9. Pan Genome of the Phytoplankton Emiliania Underpins its Global Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Betsy A. [California State Univ. (CalState), San Marcos, CA (United States); Kegel, Jessica [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Klute, Mary J. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kuo, Alan [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lefebvre, Stephane C. [J. Craig Venter Inst., San Diego, CA (United States); Maumus, Florian [National Institute of Agricultural Research, Versailles (France); Mayer, Christoph [Alexander Koenig Research Museum, Bonn (Germany); Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany); Miller, John [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Monier, Adam [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Moss Landing, CA (United States); Salamov, Asaf [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Young, Jeremy [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Aguilar, Maria [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Claverie, Jean-Michel [Aix-Marseille Univ. (France); Frickenhaus, Stephan [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Univ. of Bremerhaven (Germany); Gonzalez, Karina [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Herman, Emily K. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lin, Yao-Cheng [Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Napier, Johnathan [Rothamstead Research, Harpenden (United Kingdom); Ogata, Hiroyuki [Aix-Marseille Univ. (France); Sarno, Analissa F. [California State Univ. (CalState), San Marcos, CA (United States); Schmutz, Jeremy [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center, Huntsville, AL (United States); Schroeder, Declan [Marine Biological Association of the UK, Plymouth (United Kingdom); de Vargas, Columban [CNRS. Univ. Pierre and Marie Curie (France).; Verret, Frederic [Univ. of Essex, Colchester (United Kingdom); von Dassow, Peter [Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Valentin, Klaus [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Van de Peer, Yves [Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Wheeler, Glen [Marine Biological Association of the UK, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Plymouth Marine Lab. (United Kingdom); Annotation Consortium, Emiliania huxleyi; Dacks, Joel B. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Delwiche, Charles F. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Dyhrman, Sonya T. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States); Glockner, Gernot [Univ. of Cologne (Germany); John, Uwe [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Richards, Thomas [National History Museum, London (United Kingdom); Worden, Alexandra Z. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Moss Landing, CA (United States); Zhang, Xiaoyu [California State Univ. (CalState), San Marcos, CA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor V. [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2012-06-18

    Coccolithophores have influenced the global climate for over 200 million years1. These marine phytoplankton can account for 20 per cent of total carbon fixation in some systems2. They form blooms that can occupy hundreds of thousands of square kilometres and are distinguished by their elegantly sculpted calcium carbonate exoskeletons (coccoliths), rendering themvisible fromspace3.Although coccolithophores export carbon in the form of organic matter and calcite to the sea floor, they also release CO2 in the calcification process. Hence, they have a complex influence on the carbon cycle, driving either CO2 production or uptake, sequestration and export to the deep ocean4. Here we report the first haptophyte reference genome, from the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP1516, and sequences from 13 additional isolates. Our analyses reveal a pan genome (core genes plus genes distributed variably between strains) probably supported by an atypical complement of repetitive sequence in the genome. Comparisons across strains demonstrate thatE. huxleyi, which has long been considered a single species, harbours extensive genome variability reflected in different metabolic repertoires. Genome variability within this species complex seems to underpin its capacity both to thrive in habitats ranging from the equator to the subarctic and to form large-scale episodic blooms under a wide variety of environmental conditions.

  10. Barriers in Sustainable Knowledge Management Model in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gratiela Dana BOCA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper present a comprehensive model in education using the data base collected from 101 students from Turkey. The target group was students involved in academic life system. Results are used to design a model where education transfer of knowledge it is investigated in function of possible barriers as internal, external and knowledge management factors of influence in education selection and students vision for education development. As a conclusion, the evaluation of the barriers in sustainable knowledge management in education present a cross-educational model which seems to indicate its highly effective resource for environmental education focused on sustainability, and favours the development of knowledge, attitudes and future intentions of inspiring educational environment. The model can be useful on passing of knowledge from one generation to the next generation, managing succession and distributing the competencies and responsibilities to a repetitive change.

  11. Ice Sheet System Model as Educational Entertainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, G.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the importance of polar ice sheets and their role in the evolution of Sea Level Rise (SLR), as well as Climate Change, is of paramount importance for policy makers as well as the public and schools at large. For example, polar ice sheets and glaciers currently account for 1/3 of the SLR signal, a ratio that will increase in the near to long-term future, which has tremendous societal ramifications. Consequently, it is important to increase awareness about our changing planet. In our increasingly digital society, mobile and web applications are burgeoning venues for such outreach. The Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) is a software that was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/CalTech/NASA, in collaboration with University of California Irvine (UCI), with the goal of better understanding the evolution of polar ice sheets. It is a state-of-the-art framework, which relies on higher-end cluster-computing to address some of the aforementioned challenges. In addition, it is a flexible framework that can be deployed on any hardware; in particular, on mobile platforms such as Android or iOS smart phones. Here, we look at how the ISSM development team managed to port their model to these platforms, what the implications are for improving how scientists disseminate their results, and how a broader audience may familiarize themselves with running complex climate models in simplified scenarios which are highly educational and entertaining in content. We also look at the future plans toward a web portal fully integrated with mobile technologies to deliver the best content to the public, and to provide educational plans/lessons that can be used in grades K-12 as well as collegiate under-graduate and graduate programs.

  12. Modeling student success in engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qu

    student's first year of college was about a half of a grade point for both models. The predictors of retention and cumulative GPA while being similar differ in that high school academic metrics play a more important role in predicting cumulative GPA with the affective measures playing a more important role in predicting retention. In the last investigation, multi-outcome neural network models were used to understand and to predict engineering students' retention, GPA, and graduation from entry to departure. The participants were more than 4000 engineering students (cohort years 2004 - 2006) enrolled in a large Midwestern university. Different patterns of important predictors were identified for GPA, retention, and graduation. Overall, this research explores the feasibility of using modeling to enhance a student's educational experience in engineering. Student success modeling was used to identify the most important cognitive and affective predictors for a student's first calculus course retention, GPA, and graduation. The results suggest that the statistical modeling methods have great potential to assist decision making and help ensure student success in engineering education.

  13. Dealing with selection bias in educational transition models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Jæger, Mads Meier

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes the bivariate probit selection model (BPSM) as an alternative to the traditional Mare model for analyzing educational transitions. The BPSM accounts for selection on unobserved variables by allowing for unobserved variables which affect the probability of making educational tr...... account for selection on unobserved variables and high-quality data are both required in order to estimate credible educational transition models.......This paper proposes the bivariate probit selection model (BPSM) as an alternative to the traditional Mare model for analyzing educational transitions. The BPSM accounts for selection on unobserved variables by allowing for unobserved variables which affect the probability of making educational...... transitions to be correlated across transitions. We use simulated and real data to illustrate how the BPSM improves on the traditional Mare model in terms of correcting for selection bias and providing credible estimates of the effect of family background on educational success. We conclude that models which...

  14. BUSINESS MODEL INNOVATION IN NIGERIAN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Nonso Ochinanwata; Patrick Oseloka Ezepue

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores business model innovation that aims to innovate the Nigerian higher education sector. A focus group and semi-structured interviews among higher education Nigerian academics, students and graduates are used to explore the new business model for Nigerian higher education. The study found that, to achieve efficient and effective innovation, Nigerian higher education institutions need to collaborate with industry, professionals and other stakeholders, such as company managemen...

  15. A Model Collaborative Platform for Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S.; Manduca, C. A.; Iverson, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    generated author profiles highlight the contributions an individual has made through any of the projects with an option for customization by the author. An overarching portal site provides a unified view of resources within this diverse set of geoscience education projects. The SERC CMS provides a common platform upon which individual projects can build their own identities, while allowing cross-project pollination and synergies to be realized without significant extra investment by each project. This is a sustainable model for a collaborative platform that takes advantage of the energy and resources of individual projects to advance larger community goals.

  16. Dynamics in Higher Education Politics: A Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauko, Jaakko

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model for analysing dynamics in higher education politics (DHEP). Theoretically the model draws on the conceptual history of political contingency, agenda-setting theories and previous research on higher education dynamics. According to the model, socio-historical complexity can best be analysed along two dimensions: the…

  17. Quality Assurance Model for Digital Adult Education Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Helen; Kameas, Achilles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present a model for the quality assurance of digital educational material that is appropriate for adult education. The proposed model adopts the software quality standard ISO/IEC 9126 and takes into account adult learning theories, Bloom's taxonomy of learning objectives and two instructional design models: Kolb's model…

  18. A Model of Comparative Ethics Education for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Greg L.

    2017-01-01

    Social work ethics education models have not effectively engaged social workers in practice in formal ethical reasoning processes, potentially allowing personal bias to affect ethical decisions. Using two of the primary ethical models from medicine, a new social work ethics model for education and practical application is proposed. The strengths…

  19. Postgraduate education for nurses: the Middlesex model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, K

    2001-04-01

    Nurse education has been subject to many changes and much debate and criticism over recent years. What has become increasingly evident is that with the changing nature of nursing within society, nursing curricula have to be more flexible and dynamic if they are to meet a multiplicity of needs. There is also a need to recognize that many levels of curricula will be required to prepare the nurses of the future. At Middlesex University the development of specialist practice programmes at postgraduate diploma level, and preparation of nurses for a higher level of practice at masters level has required the development of a new curriculum model which allows both the individualization of academic programmes to meet the needs of nurses, their clients and the organization in which they work, and the integration of development and learning through practice. This model is built on the results of an evaluation of an existing postgraduate programme in interprofessional health care. Key features of the curriculum development include a structured collaboration between student, practice mentor and academic supervisor, and the use of a professional development portfolio to individualize the academic programme and facilitate autonomous learning. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  20. The I3E Model for Embedding Education for Sustainability within Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, Gisela

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an evidence-based model (the I3E model) for embedding education for sustainability (EfS) within a higher education institution. This model emerged from a doctoral research that examined organisational learning and change processes at the University of Southampton to build EfS into the university curriculum. The researcher aimed…

  1. The Safe and Effective Use of Shared Data Underpinned by Stakeholder Engagement and Evaluation Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Andrew; Magrabi, Farah; Hypponen, Hannele; Wong, Zoie Shui-Yee; Nykänen, Pirkko; Scott, Philip J; Ammenwerth, Elske; Rigby, Michael

    2018-04-22

     The paper draws attention to: i) key considerations involving the confidentiality, privacy, and security of shared data; and ii) the requirements needed to build collaborative arrangements encompassing all stakeholders with the goal of ensuring safe, secure, and quality use of shared data.  A narrative review of existing research and policy approaches along with expert perspectives drawn from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) Working Group on Technology Assessment and Quality Development in Health Care and the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) Working Group for Assessment of Health Information Systems.  The technological ability to merge, link, re-use, and exchange data has outpaced the establishment of policies, procedures, and processes to monitor the ethics and legality of shared use of data. Questions remain about how to guarantee the security of shared data, and how to establish and maintain public trust across large-scale shared data enterprises. This paper identifies the importance of data governance frameworks (incorporating engagement with all stakeholders) to underpin the management of the ethics and legality of shared data use. The paper also provides some key considerations for the establishment of national approaches and measures to monitor compliance with best practice. Data sharing endeavours can help to underpin new collaborative models of health care which provide shared information, engagement, and accountability amongst all stakeholders. We believe that commitment to rigorous evaluation and stakeholder engagement will be critical to delivering health data benefits and the establishment of collaborative models of health care into the future. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.

  2. Towards a more effective model for distance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Reference: Koper, E.J.R. (2014). Towards a more effective model for distance education. e-Learning and Education. e-Learning and Education, 10. urn:nbn:de:0009-5-40105 http://eleed.campussource.de/archive/10/4010

  3. Business Models Associated with Distance Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Textbook prices are continuously rising in higher education. This paper analyzes a business model which makes commercial textbooks more expensive, and explains why this issue tends to be more severe in the field of distance learning in higher education. It reports a case of adoption of open educational resources (OER) textbook for an online course…

  4. Building Bridges between Neuroscience, Cognition and Education with Predictive Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Steve; Tommerdahl, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    As the field of Mind, Brain, and Education seeks new ways to credibly bridge the gap between neuroscience, the cognitive sciences, and education, various connections are being developed and tested. This article presents a framework and offers examples of one approach, predictive modeling within a virtual educational system that can include…

  5. Levels of Interaction Provided by Online Distance Education Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhih, Mohammed; Ossiannilsson, Ebba; Berigel, Muhammet

    2017-01-01

    Interaction plays a significant role to foster usability and quality in online education. It is one of the quality standard to reveal the evidence of practice in online distance education models. This research study aims to evaluate levels of interaction in the practices of distance education centres. It is aimed to provide online distance…

  6. The Philosophical Underpinnings of Public School Funding Jurisprudence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, James R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Uses the theories of John Rawls (democratic/egalitarian) and Robert Nozick (libertarian) as prisms through which to analyze judicial opinions underlying court decisions regarding public education financing. (302 footnotes) (MLF)

  7. Working Memory Difficulties and Eligibility for K-12 Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Corrie L.

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) has long been associated with deficiencies in reading. Approximately 35% of students in the United States who receive special education services do so under the category of specific learning disability (SLD). The study's theoretical underpinning was Baddeley's model of WM; previous research revealed a significant literature gap…

  8. Research on Educational Standards in German Science Education--Towards a Model of Student Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulgemeyer, Christoph; Schecker, Horst

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of research on modelling science competence in German science education. Since the first national German educational standards for physics, chemistry and biology education were released in 2004 research projects dealing with competences have become prominent strands. Most of this research is about the structure of…

  9. Using and Developing Measurement Instruments in Science Education: A Rasch Modeling Approach. Science & Engineering Education Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiufeng

    2010-01-01

    This book meets a demand in the science education community for a comprehensive and introductory measurement book in science education. It describes measurement instruments reported in refereed science education research journals, and introduces the Rasch modeling approach to developing measurement instruments in common science assessment domains,…

  10. THE MODEL OF LIFELONG EDUCATION IN A TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY AS A MULTILEVEL EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Sergeyeva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the current leading trend of the educational development is characterised by its continuity. Institutions of higher education as multi-level educational complexes nurture favourable conditions for realisation of the strategy of lifelong education. Today a technical university offering training of future engineers is facing a topic issue of creating a multilevel educational complex. Materials and Methods: this paper is put together on the basis of modern Russian and foreign scientific literature about lifelong education. The authors used theoretical methods of scientific research: systemstructural analysis, synthesis, modeling, analysis and generalisations of concepts. Results: the paper presents a model of lifelong education developed by authors for a technical university as a multilevel educational complex. It is realised through a set of principles: multi-level and continuity, integration, conformity and quality, mobility, anticipation, openness, social partnership and feedback. In accordance with the purpose, objectives and principles, the content part of the model is formed. The syllabi following the described model are run in accordance with the training levels undertaken by a technical university as a multilevel educational complex. All syllabi are based on the gradual nature of their implementation. In this regard, the authors highlight three phases: diagnostic, constructive and transformative, assessing. Discussion and Conclusions: the expected result of the created model of lifelong education development in a technical university as a multilevel educational complex is presented by a graduate trained for effective professional activity, competitive, prepared and sought-after at the regional labour market.

  11. Modelling Mathematical Reasoning in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhden, Olaf; Karam, Ricardo; Pietrocola, Maurício; Pospiech, Gesche

    2012-04-01

    Many findings from research as well as reports from teachers describe students' problem solving strategies as manipulation of formulas by rote. The resulting dissatisfaction with quantitative physical textbook problems seems to influence the attitude towards the role of mathematics in physics education in general. Mathematics is often seen as a tool for calculation which hinders a conceptual understanding of physical principles. However, the role of mathematics cannot be reduced to this technical aspect. Hence, instead of putting mathematics away we delve into the nature of physical science to reveal the strong conceptual relationship between mathematics and physics. Moreover, we suggest that, for both prospective teaching and further research, a focus on deeply exploring such interdependency can significantly improve the understanding of physics. To provide a suitable basis, we develop a new model which can be used for analysing different levels of mathematical reasoning within physics. It is also a guideline for shifting the attention from technical to structural mathematical skills while teaching physics. We demonstrate its applicability for analysing physical-mathematical reasoning processes with an example.

  12. Service Quality in Distance Education using the Gronroos Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid, Fazelina Sahul; Yip, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Demand for distance education programs have been increasing rapidly over the years. As a result, assessment of the quality of distance education programs has become a strategic issue that is very pertinent for program survival. This study uses Gronroos Model for assessing the service quality of the Malaysian distance education institutions. This model is chosen because it takes into account of the service delivery process and also service outcome. Our study confirms the multidimensional natur...

  13. The Sport Education Model: A Track and Field Unit Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Kason; Krause, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Track and field is a traditional instructional unit often taught in secondary physical education settings due to its history, variety of events, and potential for student interest. This article provides an approach to teaching this unit using the sport education model (SEM) of instruction, which has traditionally been presented as a model for team…

  14. A Model for the Education of Gifted Learners in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a model for developing a comprehensive system of education for gifted learners in Lebanon. The model consists of three phases and includes key elements for establishing gifted education in the country, such as raising community awareness, adopting valid identification measures, and developing effective…

  15. Sustainable Competitive Advantage for Educational Institutions: A Suggested Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarol, Tim; Soutar, Geoffrey Norman

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a model of factors critical to establishing and maintaining sustainable competitive advantage for education-services enterprises in international markets. The model, which combines industrial economics, management theory, and services marketing, seeks to explain the strategic decision-making environment in which the education exporter…

  16. Gamification in online education: proposal for a participatory learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Bigão Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Empirical studies have suggested limitations on the form of application of gamification mechanics in the context of online education. These mechanics have been applied without reference to a theoretical model dedicated to this type of education. The objective of the paper is to propose a model for a gamified platform for online education that contributes to a more participatory learning, taking into account the different student profiles. Based on literature review about approaches to gamification systems design, a set of steps was followed in order to develop a generic model for a framework dedicated to online education. The model proposed is based on the Educational Gamification Design Principles proposed by Dicheva et al. (2015. The model may contribute to the promotion of participatory learning, taking into account the different student profiles. The results of such evaluation will be published in the future.

  17. Itinerant deaf educator and general educator perceptions of the D/HH push-in model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinsky, Rebecca J

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative case study using the deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) push-in model was conducted on the perceptions of 3 itinerant deaf educators and 3 general educators working in 1 school district. Participants worked in pairs of 1 deaf educator and 1 general educator at 3 elementary schools. Open-ended research questions guided the study, which was concerned with teachers' perceptions of the model in general and with the model's advantages, disadvantages, and effectiveness. Data collected from observations, one-to-one interviews, and a focus group interview enabled the investigator to uncover 4 themes: Participants (a) had an overall positive experience, (b) viewed general education immersion as an advantage, (c) considered high noise levels a disadvantage, and (d) believed the effectiveness of the push-in model was dependent on several factors, in particular, the needs of the student and the nature of the general education classroom environment.

  18. eQETIC: a Maturity Model for Online Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Rossi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital solutions have substantially contributed to the growth and dissemination of education. The distance education modality has been presented as an opportunity for worldwide students in many types of courses. However, projects of digital educational platforms require different expertise including knowledge areas such as pedagogy, psychology, computing, and digital technologies associated with education that allow the correct development and application of these solutions. To support the evolution of such solutions with satisfactory quality indicators, this research presents a model focused on quality of online educational solutions grounded in an approach aimed to continuous process improvement. The model considers of three maturity levels and six common entities that address the specific practices for planning and developing digital educational solutions, targeting quality standards that satisfy their users, such as students, teachers, tutors, and other people involved in development and use of these kinds of educational solutions.

  19. A New State Model of Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James W.

    1983-01-01

    A new California law, Senate Bill 813, implies sweeping changes for teacher education in that state. The law permits districts to hire college graduates without teaching credentials and train them. It also requires all teachers to renew certification periodically. Implications for schools of education are discussed. (Author/PP)

  20. Mathematics Teacher Education: A Model from Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Beverly J.; Evans, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on the mathematics teacher preparation program at Simferopol State University, the largest institution of higher education in the Crimea. The article notes the value of investigating what other countries consider essential in mathematics teacher education to improve the mathematical competence of students in the United States. (SM)

  1. Modeling Strategies for Enhancing Educational Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, William K.; Bain, Olga

    2017-01-01

    With the strengthening of the global economy, contemporary societies have come to view the educational achievements of their young people as a major component of national competiveness. But there are substantial variations in the strategies employed by different nations. To maximize educational achievements, some nations believe that the provision…

  2. Education and Industry Links: A Tripartite Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Pam

    1996-01-01

    Describes a project in which a British industrial organization, the Boots Company, a family of schools, and the one-year Post-Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) teacher training course at the School of Education at the University of Nottingham cooperated in developing science-focused material in the area of Economic and Industrial…

  3. Planning for Online Education: A Systems Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciano, Anthony G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to revisit the basic principles of technology planning as applied to online education initiatives. While not meant to be an exhaustive treatment of the topic, the article is timely because many colleges and universities are considering the development and expansion of online education as part of their planning…

  4. Quality assessment in higher education using the SERVQUALQ model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Đonlagić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Economy in Bosnia and Herzegovina is striving towards growth and increased employment and it has been proven by empirical studies worldwide that higher education contributes to socio-economic development of a country. Universities are important for generation, preservation and dissemination of knowledge in order to contribute to socio-economic benefits of a country. Higher education institutions are being pressured to improve value for their activities and providing quality higher education service to students should be taken seriously. In this paper we will address the emerging demand for quality in higher education. Higher education institutions should assess quality of their services and establish methods for improving quality. Activities of quality assurance should be integrated into the management process at higher education institutions. This paper is addressing the issue of service quality measurement in higher education institutions. The most frequently used model in this context is the SERVQUAL model. This model is measuring quality from the students' point of view, since students are considered to be one of the most important stakeholders for a higher education institution. The main objective of this research is to provide empirical evidence that the adapted SERVQAL model can be used in higher education and to identify the service quality gap based on its application at one institution of higher education (Faculty of Economics in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Furthermore, results of the gap analysis using the SERVQUAL methodology provide relevant information in which areas improvement is necessary in order to enhance service quality.

  5. Smoking education and prevention: a developmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, T P; Baldwin, A R

    1992-01-01

    A developmental approach to smoking education and prevention for children and adolescents is proposed. Literature is reviewed concerning the most appropriate agent, content, and presentation, of anti-smoking education for each of three age groups: children to age ten, pre/early adolescents eleven to fifteen, and adolescents fifteen to eighteen. For children to age ten, it is suggested that parents are the best agents of education, with teachers, peers, and the mass media, also playing some role. For pre/early adolescents, peers are suggested as the best agents of education, building onto the earlier and ongoing work of the agents mentioned above. For adolescents, the role of the media hero-figure is discussed. It is emphasized that sources of influence may function additively in affecting the child or adolescent's decisions about smoking, and that education in each stage must build on the stage before.

  6. Education, Equality and the European Social Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle; Lynch, Kathleen; Brine, Jacky

    2009-01-01

    and employment. The importance of education is often mentioned in EU documents on social welfare. However, European policies in the areas of welfare and education are marked by a fundamental tension between the pursuit of capitalist growth on one hand, the pursuit of social justice and equality on the other......Social welfare and education have been themes in European collaboration since the early days of the Treaty of Rome. Especially after the establishment in 2000 of the Lisbon agenda the EU has stepped up its efforts in these two areas and has integrated both of them in a strategy for growth....... This often leads to an impoverished conceptualisation of education as just another service to be delivered on the market. A more holistic approach to education policy is necessary, an approach which takes account of the broader conditions of equality and includes not only the economic, but also the political...

  7. From bedside to classroom: the nurse educator transition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoening, Anne M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to generate a theoretical model that describes the social process that occurs during the role transition from nurse to nurse educator. Recruitment and retention of qualified nurse educators is essential in order to remedy the current staff nurse and faculty shortage in the United States, yet nursing schools face many challenges in this area. This grounded theory study utilized purposive, theoretical sampling to identify 20 nurse educators teaching in baccalaureate nursing programs in the Midwest. The Nurse Educator Transition (NET) model was created from these data.This model identifies four phases in the role transition from nurse to nurse educator: a) the Anticipatory/Expectation Phase, b) the Disorientation Phase, c) the Information-Seeking Phase, and d) the Identity Formation Phase. Recommendations include integrating formal pedagogical education into nursing graduate programs and creating evidence-based orientation and mentoring programs for novice nurse faculty.

  8. Beijing Model of Gifted Education and Talent Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Zhongxiong; Zhang, Yi; Du, Xiangyun

    In China, talent development has been one of the key points in national plans for the development of science and technology, education, and other areas over the last three decades and is especially emphasized in the national outline for medium- and long-term educational reform and development....... Beijing is the leading city in educational reform, especially in the area of gifted education in mainland China. Over the past 35 years, through constant exploration and research, a comprehensive gifted education system called the Beijing Model of Gifted Education and Talent Development (BMGETD) has...... gradually been developed. This book is a summary of the educational practices used in and research done on the BMGETD over the decades. These include several patterns for gifted education, such as acceleration in special classes, special classes without acceleration, enrichment within regular classes...

  9. Student Identification with Business Education Models: Measurement and Relationship to Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R. B.; Wheeler, Anthony R.

    2009-01-01

    Although management scholars have provided a variety of metaphors to describe the role of students in management courses, researchers have yet to explore students' identification with the models and how they are linked to educational outcomes. This article develops a measurement tool for students' identification with business education models and…

  10. PHYSICAL EDUCATION - PHYSICAL CULTURE. TWO MODELS, TWO DIDACTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Vizuete Carrizosa

    2014-11-01

    The survival of these conflicting positions and their interests and different views on education, in a lengthy space of time, as a consequence threw two teaching approaches and two different educational models, in which the objectives and content of education differ , and with them the forms and methods of teaching. The need to define the cultural and educational approach, in every time and place, is now a pressing need and challenge the processes of teacher training, as responsible for shaping an advanced physical education, adjusted to the time and place, the interests and needs of citizens and the democratic values of modern society.

  11. What Representations and Computations Underpin the Contribution of the Hippocampus to Generalization and Inference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharshan eKumaran

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research and theoretical accounts have traditionally emphasized the function of the hippocampus in episodic memory. Here we draw attention to the importance of the hippocampus to generalization, and focus on the neural representations and computations that might underpin its role in tasks such as the paired associate inference paradigm. We make a principal distinction between two different mechanisms by which the hippocampus may support generalization: an encoding-based mechanism that creates overlapping representations that capture higher-order relationships between different items (e.g. TCM – and a retrieval-based model (REMERGE that effectively computes these relationships at the point of retrieval, through a recurrent mechanism that allows the dynamic interaction of multiple pattern separated episodic codes. We also discuss what we refer to as transfer effects - a more abstract example of generalization that has also been linked to the function of the hippocampus. We consider how this phenomenon poses inherent challenges for models such as TCM and REMERGE, and outline the potential applicability of a separate class of models - hierarchical bayesian models (HBMs in this context. Our hope is that this article will provide a basic framework within which to consider the theoretical mechanisms underlying the role of the hippocampus in generalization, and at a minimum serve as a stimulus for future work addressing issues that go to the heart of the function of the hippocampus.

  12. Continuing Education of the UNAE: A model that contribute to the Educational Transformation of Ecuador. Studies on Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Antonio Martínez Molina

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Model that contributes to the educational transformation of Ecuador: Continuing Education of the National University of Education, designed with the objective of satisfying the needs of teachers based on training strategies aimed at the improvement and transformation of education from the reflection of their pedagogical practice, from a cooperative and collaborative approach. Participatory action research was carried out with the objective of improving and learning from one 's experience from reflection - action. Finally, phases for the operation of Continuing Education with society are included.

  13. Four discourse models of physics teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Johanna; Airey, John

    2017-01-01

    In Sweden, as in many other countries, the education of high-school physics teachers is typically carried out in three different environments; the education department, the physics department and school itself during teaching practice. Trainee physics teachers are in the process of building their professional identity as they move between these three environments. Although much has been written about teacher professional identity (see overview in Beijaard, Meijer, & Verloop, 2004) little ...

  14. A Model for Effective Professional Development of Formal Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Jones, A. J. P.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWE) series was developed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) education team in 2010 to provide professional development on lunar science and exploration concepts for grades 6-9 science teachers. Over 300 educators have been trained to date. The LWE model incorporates best practices from pedagogical research of science education, thoughtful integration of scientists and engineer subject matter experts for both content presentations and informal networking with educators, access to NASA-unique facilities, hands-on and data-rich activities aligned with education standards, exposure to the practice of science, tools for addressing common misconceptions, follow-up with participants, and extensive evaluation. Evaluation of the LWE model via pre- and post-assessments, daily workshop surveys, and follow-up surveys at 6-month and 1-year intervals indicate that the LWE are extremely effective in increasing educators' content knowledge, confidence in incorporating content into the classroom, understanding of the practice of science, and ability to address common student misconceptions. In order to address the efficacy of the LWE model for other science content areas, the Dynamic Response of Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars (DREAM2) education team, funded by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, developed and ran a pilot workshop called Dream2Explore at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 2015. Dream2Explore utilized the LWE model, but incorporated content related to the science and exploration of asteroids and the moons of Mars. Evaluation results indicate that the LWE model was effectively used for educator professional development on non-lunar content. We will present more detail on the LWE model, evaluation results from the Dream2Explore pilot workshop, and suggestions for the application of the model with other science content for robust educator professional development.

  15. A Model for Effective Professional Development of Formal Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L.; Jones, A. P.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWE) series was developed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) education team in 2010 to provide professional development on lunar science and exploration concepts for grades 6-9 science teachers. Over 300 educators have been trained to date. The LWE model incorporates best practices from pedagogical research of science education, thoughtful integration of scientists and engineer subject matter experts for both content presentations and informal networking with educators, access to NASA-unique facilities, hands-on and data-rich activities aligned with education standards, exposure to the practice of science, tools for addressing common misconceptions, follow-up with participants, and extensive evaluation. Evaluation of the LWE model via pre- and post-assessments, daily workshop surveys, and follow-up surveys at 6-month and 1-year intervals indicate that the LWE are extremely effective in increasing educators' content knowledge, confidence in incorporating content into the classroom, understanding of the practice of science, and ability to address common student misconceptions. In order to address the efficacy of the LWE model for other science content areas, the Dynamic Response of Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars (DREAM2) education team, funded by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, developed and ran a pilot workshop called Dream2Explore at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 2015. Dream2Explore utilized the LWE model, but incorporated content related to the science and exploration of asteroids and the moons of Mars. Evaluation results indicate that the LWE model was effectively used for educator professional development on non-lunar content. We will present more detail on the LWE model, evaluation results from the Dream2Explore pilot workshop, and suggestions for the application of the model with other science content for robust educator professional development.

  16. DEFINING AND CONSTRUCTING THE TEACHING MODEL OF ENTREPRENEUR EDUCATION BASED ON ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENTION MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Pribadi

    2005-01-01

    Concept of entrepreneurship has been widely debated whether to be an entrepreneur one need to get formal entrepreneurial education or not. Most of the formal entrepreneur education yield the same flaw, which is the lack of teaching soft skill and building the necessary entrepreneurship characteristics. Intention-based models of entrepreneurship education try to fill the gap by focusing the education on the human intention of becoming entrepreneur by defining four model of entrepreneurship edu...

  17. Spiral model of procedural cycle of educational process management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezrukov Valery I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the nature and characteristics of the spiral model Procedure educational systems management cycle. The authors identify patterns between the development of information and communication technologies and the transformation of the education management process, give the characteristics of the concept of “information literacy” and “Media Education”. Consider the design function, determine its potential in changing the traditional educational paradigm to the new - information.

  18. Correcting Dayton's Oversight: Underpinning Bosnia's Democracy with the Rule of Law

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    .... The evidence is clear that the rule of law must underpin the construction of democracy, that the path to the rule of law is comprehensive legal reform, and that the police in a formerly authoritarian...

  19. CHARACTER EDUCATION MODEL BASED ON EDUCATION IN ISLAMIC BOARDING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novrian Satria Perdana

    2015-10-01

      Abstrak, Berbagai upaya untuk menjadikan pendidikan lebih mempunyai makna bagi individu yang menyentuh tataran afektif telah dilakukan melalui mata pelajaran Pendidikan Agama, Pendidikan Kewarganegaraan, Pendidikan IPS, Pendidikan Bahasa Indonesia, dan Pendidikan Jasmani. Namun demikian upaya-upaya tersebut ternyata belum mampu mewadahi pengembangan karakter secara dinamis dan adaptif terhadap perubahan jaman yang sangat cepat. Permasalahan gagalnya pendidikan formal di sekolah dalam membentuk karakter siswa sangat perlu diantisipasi, sehingga perlu dikembangkan suatu model pembelajaran dan system pendidikan yang dapat digunakan untuk membentuk karakter siswa. Permasalahan pendidikan di sekolah yang belum dapat membentuk karakter siswa dipengaruhi oleh beberapa factor, diantaranya factor manajemen sekolah, guru, dan model pembelajaran. Untuk memperoleh model pembelajaran yang cocok, telah dilakukan penelitian tentang best practices pendidikan karakter di beberapa pesantren yang berada di propinsi Sumatera Utara, propinsi Nangroe Aceh Darussalam, propinsi Sumatera Barat, propinsi Riau, propinsi Jambi, dan propinsi Sumatera Selatan. Pengumpulan data dalam penelitian ini dilakukan dengan dua tehnik yang lazim digunakan dalam penelitian dalam penelitian kualitatif, yaitu; observasi dan wawancara mendalam. Ditemukan bahwa pesantren salafiyah lebih mengutamakan keteladanan ustadz, sedangkan pesantren modern menerapkan aturan yang ketat untuk menumbuhkan sikap disiplin dan tanggungjawab. Pesantren menumbuhkan atribut karakter saling tolong menolong, ihklas mengabdi, kesederhanaan, dan kemandirian. Kebijakan yang dapat diambil berdasarkan hasil penelitian ini adalah menerapkan pendidikan karakter secara holistic melalui program sekolah yang harus dipahami dan dipatuhi oleh semua unsur pendidik dan peserta didik.  Untuk itu, lembaga pendidikan seharusnya menetapkan misi yang eksplisit terkait pengembangan karakter siswa.   Kata Kunci: pendidikan karakter, model

  20. A Review of Research on Universal Design Educational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kavita; Ok, Min Wook; Bryant, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Universal design for learning (UDL) has gained considerable attention in the field of special education, acclaimed for its promise to promote inclusion by supporting access to the general curriculum. In addition to UDL, there are two other universal design (UD) educational models referenced in the literature, universal design of instruction (UDI)…

  1. Computer Simulation (Microcultures): An Effective Model for Multicultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jorge O.

    This paper presents a rationale for using high-fidelity computer simulation in planning for and implementing effective multicultural education strategies. Using computer simulation, educators can begin to understand and plan for the concept of cultural sensitivity in delivering instruction. The model promises to emphasize teachers' understanding…

  2. Clinical Reasoning in Athletic Training Education: Modeling Expert Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Paul R.; Lazenby, Todd W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To address the need for a more definitive approach to critical thinking during athletic training educational experiences by introducing the clinical reasoning model for critical thinking. Background: Educators are aware of the need to teach students how to think critically. The multiple domains of athletic training are comprehensive and…

  3. An Innovative School Health Education Model Designed for Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, John; Wandberg, Bob

    New threats to the health of American children, often psychosocial in nature due to societal changes, must be addressed. The Minnesota School Health Education Model is based on the integration of four primary components: (1) school health education goals aimed at health promotion, disease prevention, and long-term positive health effects on…

  4. МULTI-STAKEHOLDER MODEL OF EDUCATION PROJECT QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлия Юрьевна ГУСЕВА

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of approaches to the definition of higher education projects’ stakeholders is conducted. A model of education project quality management with the influence of stakeholders is formed. A mechanism of recognition of new groups of project’s stakeholders on the basis of set theory is offered.

  5. Modeling E-learning quality assurance benchmarking in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsaif, Fatimah; Clementking, Arockisamy

    2014-01-01

    Online education programs have been growing rapidly. While it is somehow difficult to specifically quantify quality, many recommendations have been suggested to specify and demonstrate quality of online education touching on common areas of program enhancement and administration. To design a model

  6. Inclusion Professional Development Model and Regular Middle School Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royster, Otelia; Reglin, Gary L.; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a professional development model on regular education middle school teachers' knowledge of best practices for teaching inclusive classes and attitudes toward teaching these classes. There were 19 regular education teachers who taught the core subjects. Findings for Research Question 1…

  7. Guiding and Modelling Quality Improvement in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the process of creating quality improvement in higher education institutions from the point of view of current organisational theory and social-science modelling techniques. The author considers the higher education institution as a functioning complex of rules, norms and other organisational features and reviews the social…

  8. Service learning in teacher education: an institutional model for an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interest in service learning is growing at a time of curriculum change in teacher education and institutional change in higher education in South Africa. This raises the question ";What models are available to guide institutions to develop service learning?"; This article outlines Pollack's typology of institutional responses to ...

  9. Applying the Flipped Classroom Model to English Language Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Carl A., Ed.; Moran, Clarice M., Ed.

    2017-01-01

    The flipped classroom method, particularly when used with digital video, has recently attracted many supporters within the education field. Now more than ever, language arts educators can benefit tremendously from incorporating flipped classroom techniques into their curriculum. "Applying the Flipped Classroom Model to English Language Arts…

  10. The environmental education in the Italian Renaissance: the geoethical model of Machiavelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liserre, Battista; De Pascale, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the environmental and geoethical education is also present in the thought of one of the greatest intellectuals of the Italian Renaissance: the philosopher Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527). In the "Discorsi" of Machiavelli, the natural character of the place where a city is built is a determining factor in the overall measure of the need on the character of the citizens; but the barren place, if can keep away the people from idleness, and thereby constitute an essential tool of virtuous civic life, prevents the development of the power which can be fostered only by the fertility of the site. It may give rise own laziness which hinders the development of virtue; and then, according to Machiavelli, laws must be to impose the need to produce good behavior through education. Already in the Renaissance, Machiavelli recognized the importance of establishing a harmonious relationship between man and environment and suggested that the institutions should give a virtuous model of environmental education. The physiognomy of the geographical and natural environment conditions in an essential way the exercise of civil life and the development of virtues. If the Rome's model imposes the primacy of fertile places, it happens, however, that, in his general conception of virtue and of historical dialectic, Machiavelli tended toward ultimately to increased functionality of the desolate places, which make difficult the life, and through the exercise of the need, make men more virtuous, keeping them away from the destructive threat of idleness. This aspect emerges from a different perspective, but convergent in "Asino" of Machiavelli (Chapter V). The link between the natural places and civic life that takes place isn't something absolutely default. Men's work, orders underpinning their collective life, laws that place the compulsion of necessity by the behavior of citizens, change the data of nature. Although the structure of a territory unequally, according to

  11. Oscillatory phase dynamics in neural entrainment underpin illusory percepts of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Björn; Henry, Molly J; Grigutsch, Maren; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-10-02

    Neural oscillatory dynamics are a candidate mechanism to steer perception of time and temporal rate change. While oscillator models of time perception are strongly supported by behavioral evidence, a direct link to neural oscillations and oscillatory entrainment has not yet been provided. In addition, it has thus far remained unaddressed how context-induced illusory percepts of time are coded for in oscillator models of time perception. To investigate these questions, we used magnetoencephalography and examined the neural oscillatory dynamics that underpin pitch-induced illusory percepts of temporal rate change. Human participants listened to frequency-modulated sounds that varied over time in both modulation rate and pitch, and judged the direction of rate change (decrease vs increase). Our results demonstrate distinct neural mechanisms of rate perception: Modulation rate changes directly affected listeners' rate percept as well as the exact frequency of the neural oscillation. However, pitch-induced illusory rate changes were unrelated to the exact frequency of the neural responses. The rate change illusion was instead linked to changes in neural phase patterns, which allowed for single-trial decoding of percepts. That is, illusory underestimations or overestimations of perceived rate change were tightly coupled to increased intertrial phase coherence and changes in cerebro-acoustic phase lag. The results provide insight on how illusory percepts of time are coded for by neural oscillatory dynamics.

  12. An Ontology-Underpinned Emergency Response System for Water Pollution Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Meng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the unceasing development and maturation of environment geographic information system, the response to water pollution accidents has been digitalized through the combination of monitoring sensors, management servers, and application software. However, most of these systems only achieve the basic and general geospatial data management and functional process tasks by adopting mechanistic water-quality models. To satisfy the sustainable monitoring and real-time emergency response application demand of the government and public users, it is a hotspot to study how to make the water pollution information being semantic and make the referred applications intelligent. Thus, the architecture of the ontology-underpinned emergency response system for water pollution accidents is proposed in this paper. This paper also makes a case study for usability testing of the water ontology models, and emergency response rules through an online water pollution emergency response system. The system contributes scientifically to the safety and sustainability of drinking water by providing emergency response and decision-making to the government and public in a timely manner.

  13. Mathematical Modeling in Mathematics Education: Basic Concepts and Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbas, Ayhan Kürsat; Kertil, Mahmut; Çetinkaya, Bülent; Çakiroglu, Erdinç; Alacaci, Cengiz; Bas, Sinem

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and its role in mathematics education have been receiving increasing attention in Turkey, as in many other countries. The growing body of literature on this topic reveals a variety of approaches to mathematical modeling and related concepts, along with differing perspectives on the use of mathematical modeling in teaching and…

  14. European Models of Bilingual Education: Practice, Theory and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsmore, Hugo Baetens

    1993-01-01

    European Community initiatives in language management include educational models involved in promoting mastery of at least three languages. The Luxembourg model outlines a trilingual program for the whole school population; the European School model, a complex multilingual program; and the Foyer Project, plans for immigrant minorities to move into…

  15. Adopting a Models-Based Approach to Teaching Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Ashley; MacPhail, Ann

    2018-01-01

    Background: The popularised notion of models-based practice (MBP) is one that focuses on the delivery of a model, e.g. Cooperative Learning, Sport Education, Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility, Teaching Games for Understanding. Indeed, while an abundance of research studies have examined the delivery of a single model and some have…

  16. Modeling Students' Memory for Application in Adaptive Educational Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelánek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Human memory has been thoroughly studied and modeled in psychology, but mainly in laboratory setting under simplified conditions. For application in practical adaptive educational systems we need simple and robust models which can cope with aspects like varied prior knowledge or multiple-choice questions. We discuss and evaluate several models of…

  17. Indoor Air Quality Building Education and Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Indoor Air Quality Building Education and Assessment Model (I-BEAM), released in 2002, is a guidance tool designed for use by building professionals and others interested in indoor air quality in commercial buildings.

  18. Indoor Air Quality Building Education and Assessment Model Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Indoor Air Quality Building Education and Assessment Model (I-BEAM) is a guidance tool designed for use by building professionals and others interested in indoor air quality in commercial buildings.

  19. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... generation was used to develop a holistic healthcare model for a higher education campus' health service. It became ... innovative. Health plays a .... conducted will set the tone for the interactive process of holistic healthcare.

  20. AN INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN MODEL FOR BLENDED HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Hack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Instructional design models that are used by many higher education institutions to guide course design are insufficient for the unique opportunities of blended learning. Many established models are not practical tools for college faculty to use independently in the design of courses. Models like A.D.D.I.E., use a linear approach that can translate more easily into practical stages of course design, yet are historically rooted in the rapid prototyping of educational technologies or for designing military training and are inadequate for the complex demands of higher education, where learning outcomes are geared toward higher order thinking, scientific/clinical reasoning, and a syntheses of ideas into new knowledge. Presented here is an instructional design model that strategically incorporates the nuances of higher education, yet is practically framed to assist faculty with design challenges.

  1. A model for education and promoting food science and technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model for education and promoting food science and technology among high school students and the public. ... at the tertiary stage (retail) directly with the consumer while depending on the product of FST. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  2. Modeling Academic Education Processes by Dynamic Storyboarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshitaka; Dohi, Shinichi; Tsuruta, Setsuo; Knauf, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    In high-level education such as university studies, there is a flexible but complicated system of subject offerings and registration rules such as prerequisite subjects. Those offerings, connected with registration rules, should be matched to the students' learning needs and desires, which change dynamically. Students need assistance in such a…

  3. Career Education Models. Trends and Issues Alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    The evolution of the workplace has required changes in the guidance and counseling practices of career education (CE). Basic elements of CE strategies for enhancing students' career awareness, exploration, and planning are still in place, but contemporary issues such as life-work balance, involuntary career transitions, and mentoring have led to…

  4. Contextualising Craft: Pedagogical Models for Craft Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollanen, Sinikka

    2009-01-01

    Craft education in Finland is, in many aspects, in a state of change. This concerns the independent position of craft as a school subject, the content of the compulsory craft courses containing textiles and technical work, the implementation of the new concept of a holistic craft process in the National Core Curriculum and so on. This bears…

  5. Modeling management of research and education networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Computer networks and their services have become an essential part of research and education. Nowadays every modern R&E institution must have a computer network and provide network services to its students and staff. In addition to its internal computer network, every R&E institution must have a

  6. An Amotivation Model in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo; Wingert, Robert K.; Li, Weidong; Sun, Haichun; Rukavina, Paul Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Amotivation refers to a state in which individuals cannot perceive a relationship between their behavior and that behavior's subsequent outcome. With the belief that considering amotivation as a multidimensional construct could reflect the complexity of motivational deficits in physical education, we developed this study to validate an amotivation…

  7. Advances in Bayesian Modeling in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Roy

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I provide a conceptually oriented overview of Bayesian approaches to statistical inference and contrast them with frequentist approaches that currently dominate conventional practice in educational research. The features and advantages of Bayesian approaches are illustrated with examples spanning several statistical modeling…

  8. A model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekoe, Eunice

    2014-04-24

    South Africa transformed higher education through the enactment of the Higher Education Act (No. 101 of 1997). The researcher identified the need to develop a model for the mentoring of newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.  To develop and describe the model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.  A qualitative and theory-generating design was used (following empirical findings regarding needs analysis) in order to develop the model. The conceptualisation of the framework focused on the context, content, process and the theoretical domains that influenced the model. Ideas from different theories were borrowed from and integrated with the literature and deductive and inductive strategies were applied.  The structure of the model is multidimensional and complex in nature (macro, mesoand micro) based on the philosophy of reflective practice, competency-based practice andcritical learning theories. The assumptions are in relation to stakeholders, context, mentoring, outcome, process and dynamic. The stakeholders are the mentor and mentee within an interactive participatory relationship. The mentoring takes place within the process with a sequence of activities such as relationship building, development, engagement, reflective process and assessment. Capacity building and empowerment are outcomes of mentoring driven by motivation.  The implication for nurse managers is that the model can be used to develop mentoring programmes for newly-appointed nurse educators.

  9. A model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Seekoe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa transformed higher education through the enactment of the Higher Education Act (No. 101 of 1997. The researcher identified the need to develop a model for the mentoring of newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa. Objectives: To develop and describe the model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa. Method: A qualitative and theory-generating design was used (following empirical findings regarding needs analysis in order to develop the model. The conceptualisation of the framework focused on the context, content, process and the theoretical domains that influenced the model. Ideas from different theories were borrowed from and integrated with the literature and deductive and inductive strategies were applied. Results: The structure of the model is multidimensional and complex in nature (macro, mesoand micro based on the philosophy of reflective practice, competency-based practice andcritical learning theories. The assumptions are in relation to stakeholders, context, mentoring, outcome, process and dynamic. The stakeholders are the mentor and mentee within an interactive participatory relationship. The mentoring takes place within the process with a sequence of activities such as relationship building, development, engagement, reflective process and assessment. Capacity building and empowerment are outcomes of mentoring driven by motivation. Conclusion: The implication for nurse managers is that the model can be used to develop mentoring programmes for newly-appointed nurse educators.

  10. Metaphysical and value underpinnings of traditional medicine in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omonzejele, Peter F; Maduka, Chukwugozie

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated the extent to which recourse to traditional healers depended on biometric variables; ways of knowing in good time what ailments were more likely to be better handled by traditional healers; rationale behind traditional healing methodologies. On the whole, four research questions were engaged. The sample for the study included residents in urban (Benin City) and rural (Ehime Mbano) communities in Nigeria. The instruments comprised of two questionnaires. The traditional healers were also interviewed in addition. The findings of the research included the following: in both rural and urban areas, women and more elderly persons had more recourse than other groups to traditional medicine; Christians, less educated persons, self-employed persons and women affirmed most strongly to the efficacy of traditional medicine over Western medicine with respect to certain ailments; ways for averting spiritual illnesses included obeying instructions from ancestors and offering regular sacrifices to the gods; methods used by traditional healers to determine whether an ailment was "spiritual" or as a result of home problems included diagnosis linked to divination, interpretation of dreams particularly those involving visits by ancestors, interpretation of nightmares and omens such as the appearance of owls; methods for curing patients included use of herbs particularly those believed to have magical powers, offering of sacrifices, use of incantations and wearing of protective medicine.

  11. In search of a Croatian model of nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Vladimir J; Zupanovic, Marija; Mihanovic, Frane; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bradaric, Nikola; Jankovic, Stipan

    2010-10-01

    To analyze the present status and ongoing reforms of nursing education in Europe, to compare it with the situation in Croatia, and to propose a new educational model that corresponds to the needs of the Croatian health care system. The literature on contemporary nursing education in Europe and North America was reviewed, together with European Commission directives and regulations, as well as pertinent World Health Organization documents. In addition, 20 recent annual reports from 2003-2009, submitted by national nursing associations to the Workgroup of European Nurse Researchers (WERN), were studied. After appraisal of current trends, the Working Group on Reform of Nursing Education drafted The Croatian Model for Education in Nursing and developed a three-cycle curriculum with syllabus. The proposed curriculum is radically different from traditional ones. Responding to modern demands, it focuses on outcomes (developing competencies) and is evidence-based. A new, Croatian concept of nursing education is presented that is concordant with reforms in nursing education in other European countries. It holds promise for making nursing education an integral part of a unified European system of higher education.

  12. Models in Science Education: Applications of Models in Learning and Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornek, Funda

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss different types of models in science education and applications of them in learning and teaching science, in particular physics. Based on the literature, I categorize models as conceptual and mental models according to their characteristics. In addition to these models, there is another model called "physics model" by the…

  13. The Danish apprenticeship system and the Nordic model of education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    during the latest decades. This is seen especially in three areas: VET as an instrument for social inclusion of disadvantaged youth, the state initiative to establish school-based training (training centres) and an initiative for unification of vocational and general education (the eux programme)......The paper examines the development of initial vocational education and training (VET) in Denmark in relation to the Nordic model of education. The egalitarian ideal of this model is to provide equal opportunities for education for all at all levels. This ideal has been pursued by policies in all...... the Nordic countries to establish public, free and comprehensive schooling. Key principles are the equal access for all regardless of social background and gender, and full permeability from the lowest to the highest levels with no dead ends in the education system (Blossing et al., 2014). This implies...

  14. Mixture Modeling: Applications in Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hodis, Flaviu A.

    2016-01-01

    Model-based clustering methods, commonly referred to as finite mixture modeling, have been applied to a wide variety of cross-sectional and longitudinal data to account for heterogeneity in population characteristics. In this article, we elucidate 2 such approaches: growth mixture modeling and latent profile analysis. Both techniques are…

  15. BOLOGNA MODEL OF MEDICAL EDUCATION-UTOPIA OR REALITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Lejla; Donev, Doncho

    2016-07-24

    Higher education in Europe and in the Balkan's countries is undergoing major reforms. The Bologna Process was a major reform created with the claimed goal of providing responses to issues such as the public responsibility for higher education and research, higher education governance, the social dimension of higher education and research, and the values and roles of higher education and research in modern, globalized, and increasingly complex societies with the most demanding qualification needs. Changes in the curricula, modernization of facilities and their alignment with the programs of other European universities, employment of a larger number of assistants, especially in the clinical courses at our universities are necessary. Also, it is necessary to continue to conduct further detailed analysis and evaluation of teaching content and outcomes in the future. In this review authors expressed their views and experience of using Bologna model of education in the Balkan's countries with emphasis on Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republic of Macedonia.

  16. Promoting Excellence in Nursing Education (PENE): Pross evaluation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pross, Elizabeth A

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the Promoting Excellence in Nursing Education (PENE) Pross evaluation model. A conceptual evaluation model, such as the one described here, may be useful to nurse academicians in the ongoing evaluation of educational programs, especially those with goals of excellence. Frameworks for evaluating nursing programs are necessary because they offer a way to systematically assess the educational effectiveness of complex nursing programs. This article describes the conceptual framework and its tenets of excellence. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Maturity Model of Software Product with Educational Maturity Model

    OpenAIRE

    R.Manjula; J.Vaideeswaran

    2011-01-01

    Software product line engineering is an inter-disciplinary concept. It spans the dimensions of business, architecture, process,and the organization. Similarly, Education System engineering is also an inter-disciplinary concept, which spans the dimensions of academic, infrastructure, facilities, administration etc. Some of the potential benefits of this approach includecontinuous improvements in System quality and adhering to global standards. The increasing competency in IT and Educational Se...

  18. Leadership Competence Educational Model for a Twenty-First Century Nursing Doctoral Education in Contemporary Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fusun

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes a nursing education model about leadership that can be used to improve the leadership skills of nursing doctoral students. This model is developed at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. In developing this model, the author had the opportunity to observe the University of Michigan, School of Nursing…

  19. Leader as visionary. Leadership education model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroian, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Developing nurse leaders for today and tomorrow is a priority considering the powerful relationship between leadership strength and the influence of the nursing profession in the future of health care. This article addresses leadership theories and research as they relate to visionary leadership. Education for visionary leadership is also addressed including the competencies and skill sets for effective visionary leaders. Visioning is a powerful force for change in shaping organizations and building teams for the future.

  20. The Robust Running Ape: Unraveling the Deep Underpinnings of Coordinated Human Running Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kiely

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In comparison to other mammals, humans are not especially strong, swift or supple. Nevertheless, despite these apparent physical limitations, we are among Natures most superbly well-adapted endurance runners. Paradoxically, however, notwithstanding this evolutionary-bestowed proficiency, running-related injuries, and Overuse syndromes in particular, are widely pervasive. The term ‘coordination’ is similarly ubiquitous within contemporary coaching, conditioning, and rehabilitation cultures. Various theoretical models of coordination exist within the academic literature. However, the specific neural and biological underpinnings of ‘running coordination,’ and the nature of their integration, remain poorly elaborated. Conventionally running is considered a mundane, readily mastered coordination skill. This illusion of coordinative simplicity, however, is founded upon a platform of immense neural and biological complexities. This extensive complexity presents extreme organizational difficulties yet, simultaneously, provides a multiplicity of viable pathways through which the computational and mechanical burden of running can be proficiently dispersed amongst expanded networks of conditioned neural and peripheral tissue collaborators. Learning to adequately harness this available complexity, however, is a painstakingly slowly emerging, practice-driven process, greatly facilitated by innate evolutionary organizing principles serving to constrain otherwise overwhelming complexity to manageable proportions. As we accumulate running experiences persistent plastic remodeling customizes networked neural connectivity and biological tissue properties to best fit our unique neural and architectural idiosyncrasies, and personal histories: thus neural and peripheral tissue plasticity embeds coordination habits. When, however, coordinative processes are compromised—under the integrated influence of fatigue and/or accumulative cycles of injury, overuse

  1. Academic Persistence of Online Students in Higher Education Impacted by Student Progress Factors and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lint, Anna H.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study evaluated and investigated the theoretical underpinnings of the Kember's (1995) student progress model that examines the direct or indirect effects of student persistence in online education by identifying the relationships between variables. The primary method of data collection in this study was a survey by exploring the…

  2. Science Education for Environmental Awareness: Approaches to Integrating Cognitive and Affective Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littledyke, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Science education has an important part in developing understanding of concepts that underpin environmental issues, leading potentially to pro-environmental behaviour. However, science is commonly perceived negatively, leading to inappropriate and negative models of science that do not connect to people's experiences. The article argues that the…

  3. Structural and Infrastructural Underpinnings of International R&D Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niang, Mohamed; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the process of globally distributing R&D activities with an emphasis on the effects of network maturity. It discusses emerging configurations by asking how the structure and infrastructure of international R&D networks evolve along with the move from a strong R&D center...... to dispersed development. Drawing from case studies of two international R&D networks, it presents a capability maturity model and argues that understanding the interaction between new structures and infrastructures of the dispersed networks has become a key requirement for developing organizational...

  4. Humanities’ Metaphysical Underpinnings of Late Frontier Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcibiades Malapi-Nelson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The behavior/structure methodological dichotomy as locus of scientific inquiry is closely related to the issue of modeling and theory change in scientific explanation. Given that the traditional tension between structure and behavior in scientific modeling is likely here to stay, considering the relevant precedents in the history of ideas could help us better understand this theoretical struggle. This better understanding might open up unforeseen possibilities and new instantiations, particularly in what concerns the proposed technological modification of the human condition. The sequential structure of this paper is twofold. The contribution of three philosophers better known in the humanities than in the study of science proper are laid out. The key theoretical notions interweaving the whole narrative are those of mechanization, constructability and simulation. They shall provide the conceptual bridge between these classical thinkers and the following section. Here, a panoramic view of three significant experimental approaches in contemporary scientific research is displayed, suggesting that their undisclosed ontological premises have deep roots in the Western tradition of the humanities. This ontological lock between core humanist ideals and late research in biology and nanoscience is ultimately suggested as responsible for pervasively altering what is canonically understood as “human”.

  5. Cognitive Effects of Air Pollution Exposures and Potential Mechanistic Underpinnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J L; Klocke, C; Morris-Schaffer, K; Conrad, K; Sobolewski, M; Cory-Slechta, D A

    2017-06-01

    This review sought to address the potential for air pollutants to impair cognition and mechanisms by which that might occur. Air pollution has been associated with deficits in cognitive functions across a wide range of epidemiological studies, both with developmental and adult exposures. Studies in animal models are significantly more limited in number, with somewhat inconsistent findings to date for measures of learning, but show more consistent impairments for short-term memory. Potential contributory mechanisms include oxidative stress/inflammation, altered levels of dopamine and/or glutamate, and changes in synaptic plasticity/structure. Epidemiological studies are consistent with adverse effects of air pollutants on cognition, but additional studies and better phenotypic characterization are needed for animal models, including more precise delineation of specific components of cognition that are affected, as well as definitions of critical exposure periods for such effects and the components of air pollution responsible. This would permit development of more circumscribed hypotheses as to potential behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms.

  6. Cognitive underpinnings of nationalistic ideology in the context of Brexit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmigrod, Leor; Rentfrow, Peter J; Robbins, Trevor W

    2018-05-08

    Nationalistic identities often play an influential role in citizens' voting behavior and political engagement. Nationalistic ideologies tend to have firm categories and rules for what belongs to and represents the national culture. In a sample of 332 UK citizens, we tested whether strict categorization of stimuli and rules in objective cognitive tasks would be evident in strongly nationalistic individuals. Using voting behavior and attitudes from the United Kingdom's 2016 EU referendum, we found that a flexible representation of national identity and culture was linked to cognitive flexibility in the ideologically neutral Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Remote Associates Test, and to self-reported flexibility under uncertainty. Path analysis revealed that subjective and objective cognitive inflexibility predicted heightened authoritarianism, nationalism, conservatism, and system justification, and these in turn were predictive of support for Brexit and opposition to immigration, the European Union, and free movement of labor. This model accounted for 47.6% of the variance in support for Brexit. Path analysis models were also predictive of participants' sense of personal attachment to the United Kingdom, signifying that individual differences in cognitive flexibility may contribute toward ideological thinking styles that shape both nationalistic attitudes and personal sense of nationalistic identity. These findings further suggest that emotionally neutral "cold" cognitive information processing-and not just "hot" emotional cognition-may play a key role in ideological behavior and identity.

  7. Theoretical underpinnings of state institutionalisation of inclusion and struggles in collective health in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Qamar; Muntaner, Carles

    2018-03-28

    Community participation as a strategy in health aims to increase the role of citizens in health decision-making which are contextualised within the institutions of democracy. Electoral representation as the dominant model of democracy globally is based on the elite theory of democracy that sees political decision-making a prerogative of political elites. Such political elitism is counter to the idea of democratic participation. Neoliberalism together with elitism in political sphere have worsened social inequities by undermining working class interests. Latin America has seen adverse consequences of these social inequities. In response, social movements representing collective struggles of organised citizens arose in the region. This paper explores the theoretical underpinnings of democratic participation in contemporary Latin American context at the nexus of emerging social movement activism and policy responses. The paper will use empirical examples to highlight how such democratic practices at the societal level evolved while demanding political inclusion. These societal democratic practices in Latin America are redefining democracy, which continues to be seen in the political sphere only. Health reforms promoting participatory democracy in several Latin American countries have demonstrated that establishing institutions and mechanisms of democratic participation facilitate collective participation by the organised citizenry in state affairs.

  8. The influence of role models in undergraduate nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Kirsten; Hamshire, Claire; Chambers, Alison

    2017-12-01

    To explore the concept of role modelling in undergraduate nurse education and its effect on the personal and professional development of student nurses. Effective educative strategies are important for student nurses, who have to cope with learning in both clinical and university settings. Given the contemporary issues facing nurse education and practice in the United Kingdom (UK), it is timely and important to undertake pedagogical research into the concept of role modelling as an effective educative method. A descriptive narrative approach. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 14 current/recently discontinued students from Adult and Mental Health branches of nursing degree programmes in the north-west region of England, United Kingdom (UK). Data were thematically analysed. Students valued exposure to positive role models in clinical and university settings and viewed them as beneficial to their learning. Exposure to negative role models occurred, and this provided students with opportunities to consider the type of nurse they aspired to become. In some cases, students' exposure to perceived poor practice had an adverse effect on their learning and led to negative feelings about nursing work. Clinical staff might be perceived as more relevant role models than those in the university setting although there were still opportunities for academic staff to model professional behaviours. The study found that role modelling is an effective way to support learning and led to student satisfaction across both clinical and university settings. The findings support the use of role models in nurse education, and further research about conscious positive modelling of practice is required. Exploring the use of role models is important when examining ways in which the quality of nurse education might be developed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Faculty-led faculty development: evaluation and reflections on a distributed educational leadership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzubeir, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This report describes and explores the impact of a series of faculty-led faculty development programs underpinned by principles of distributed educational leadership. We aimed to prepare faculty for their roles as facilitators and assessors in a newly implemented problem-based (PBL) graduate entry medical program. We asked participants attending a series of faculty development programs to evaluate workshops attended using an in-house designed survey. Overall descriptive statistics for all workshops and qualitative feedback for PBL workshops alone were examined. It was concluded that clinical faculty who are not specialized in medical education can offer high-quality, well-accepted training for their peers. Faculty development, underpinned by a distributed leadership approach which supports learning organization tenets, imaginative, flexible and democratic approaches to developing and nurturing expertise at all levels of the organization, is likely to lead to improvements in medical education. Despite the limitations of the survey approach to evaluation of faculty development programs, the information provided is useful both as a basis for decision making and program improvement.

  10. The genomic underpinnings of apoptosis in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is regulated in an orderly fashion by a series of genes, and has a crucial role in important physiological processes such as growth development, immunological response and so on. Recently, substantial studies have been undertaken on apoptosis in model animals including humans, fruit flies, and the nematode. However, the lack of genomic data for silkworms limits their usefulness in apoptosis studies, despite the advantages of silkworm as a representative of Lepidoptera and an effective model system. Herein we have identified apoptosis-related genes in the silkworm Bombyx mori and compared them to those from insects, mammals, and nematodes. Results From the newly assembled genome databases, a genome-wide analysis of apoptosis-related genes in Bombyx mori was performed using both nucleotide and protein Blast searches. Fifty-two apoptosis-related candidate genes were identified, including five caspase family members, two tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily members, one Bcl-2 family member, four baculovirus IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) repeat (BIR) domain family members and 1 RHG (Reaper, Hid, Grim, and Sickle; Drosophila cell death activators) family member. Moreover, we identified a new caspase family member, BmCaspase-New, two splice variants of BmDronc, and Bm3585, a mammalian TNF superfamily member homolog. Twenty-three of these apoptosis-related genes were cloned and sequenced using cDNA templates isolated from BmE-SWU1 cells. Sequence analyses revealed that these genes could have key roles in apoptosis. Conclusions Bombyx mori possesses potential apoptosis-related genes. We hypothesized that the classic intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways potentially are active in Bombyx mori. These results lay the foundation for further apoptosis-related study in Bombyx mori. PMID:21040523

  11. Exporting Finnish teacher education: Transnational pressures on national models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Chung

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses empirical data to assess the possible transfer of Finnish teacher education policy, and more specifically, the university training school, into another context. Transnational organisations increasingly pressure nation-states to carry out education policy change, especially due to dissatisfaction with international assessment outcomes. As a high performer in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA, administered by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, Finland has been at the centre of international attention. PISA revealed that the high quality of Finnish teachers contributes to the overall calibre of the country’s education system. Thus, Finnish teacher education has become a model for other education systems. This article uses empirical research to explore the export possibilities of the Finnish normaalikoulu, or university training school. It implements qualitative methodology, using semi-structured interviews with Finnish educationalists to explore the possible export of Finnish education, the implications in terms of policy transfer, and the migration of ideas, specifically the university-affiliated, teacher training school. The export and migration of Finnish education and its impact on education policy are discussed in this article, along with educational export’s position in transnational policy formation.

  12. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging underpinnings of schizoaffective disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madre, M; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Ortiz-Gil, J; Murru, A; Torrent, C; Bramon, E; Perez, V; Orth, M; Brambilla, P; Vieta, E; Amann, B L

    2016-07-01

    The neurobiological basis and nosological status of schizoaffective disorder remains elusive and controversial. This study provides a systematic review of neurocognitive and neuroimaging findings in the disorder. A comprehensive literature search was conducted via PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Web of Knowledge (from 1949 to 31st March 2015) using the keyword 'schizoaffective disorder' and any of the following terms: 'neuropsychology', 'cognition', 'structural neuroimaging', 'functional neuroimaging', 'multimodal', 'DTI' and 'VBM'. Only studies that explicitly examined a well defined sample, or subsample, of patients with schizoaffective disorder were included. Twenty-two of 43 neuropsychological and 19 of 51 neuroimaging articles fulfilled inclusion criteria. We found a general trend towards schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder being related to worse cognitive performance than bipolar disorder. Grey matter volume loss in schizoaffective disorder is also more comparable to schizophrenia than to bipolar disorder which seems consistent across further neuroimaging techniques. Neurocognitive and neuroimaging abnormalities in schizoaffective disorder resemble more schizophrenia than bipolar disorder. This is suggestive for schizoaffective disorder being a subtype of schizophrenia or being part of the continuum spectrum model of psychosis, with schizoaffective disorder being more skewed towards schizophrenia than bipolar disorder. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. On the Enterprise Modelling of an Educational Information Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widya, I.A.; Volman, C.J.A.M.; Pokraev, S.; de Diana, I.P.F.; Michiels, E.F.; Filipe, Joaquim; Sharp, Bernadette; Miranda, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the modelling exercise of an educational information infrastructure that aims to support the organisation of teaching and learning activities suitable for a wide range of didactic policies. The modelling trajectory focuses on capturing invariant structures of relations between

  14. How to Introduce Mathematic Modeling in Industrial Design Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langereis, G.R.; Hu, J.; Feijs, L.M.G.; Stillmann, G.A.; Kaiser, G.; Blum, W.B.; Brown, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    With competency based learning in a project driven environment, we are facing a different perspective of how students perceive mathematical modelling. In this chapter, a model is proposed where conventional education is seen as a process from mathematics to design, while competency driven approaches

  15. Recruiting Experienced Educators: A Model and a Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Paul A.

    1996-01-01

    A model was developed for recruiting experienced educators, extending the recruitment-as-marketing theory. To assess the model's utility, 168 experienced female teachers posed as job applicants responding to position advertisements. Participant reactions were more favorable when advertisements contained intrinsic job attributes, a personal tone,…

  16. Gender-Sensitive Social Work Practice: A Model for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Judith; Wheeler, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    Although women comprise the majority of social work clients, most psychological models of assessment and intervention are based on male psychological development. Feminist theories and therapies have turned attention to female development and its differences from male progression. A psychotherapeutic model for practice and education that allows…

  17. Modelling in Evaluating a Working Life Project in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarja, Anneli; Janhonen, Sirpa; Havukainen, Pirjo; Vesterinen, Anne

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an evaluation method based on collaboration between the higher education, a care home and university, in a R&D project. The aim of the project was to elaborate modelling as a tool of developmental evaluation for innovation and competence in project cooperation. The approach was based on activity theory. Modelling enabled a…

  18. Integrating an Interprofessional Education Model at a Private University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ramona Ann; Gottlieb, Helmut; Dominguez, Daniel G.; Sanchez-Diaz, Patricia C.; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a private University in South Texas sought to prepare eight cohorts of 25 nursing, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, and health care administration students with an interprofessional education activity as a model for collaborative learning. The two semester interprofessional activity used a blended model (Blackboard Learn®,…

  19. Genre and Literacy-Modeling Context in Educational Linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Complements review in previous volume concerning Australian literacy (in first- and second-language) initiatives that drew on systemic functional linguistics, highlights ongoing research within the same theoretical framework, and focuses on the question of modeling context in educational linguistics. The discussion includes modeling context as…

  20. A model for engineering education in the new millennium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir Reinder Bakker; Dr.Ir. Hay Geraedts; Ir. Dick van Schenk Brill

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a model for education in innovative engineering. The kernel of this model is, that students from different departments of the faculty of Applied Science and Technology are placed in industry for a period of eighteen months after two-and-a-half year of theoretical studies. During

  1. Models of the Organizational Life Cycle: Applications to Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kim S.; Whetten, David A.

    1983-01-01

    A review of models of group and organization life cycle development is provided and the applicability of those models for institutions of higher education are discussed. An understanding of the problems and characteristics present in different life cycle stages can help institutions manage transitions more effectively. (Author/MLW)

  2. Professional Education in Expert Search: A Content Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Catherine L.; Roseberry, Martha I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a descriptive model of the subject matter taught in courses on expert search in ALA-accredited programs, answering the question: What is taught in formal professional education on search expertise? The model emerged from a grounded content analysis of 44 course descriptions and 16 syllabi, and was validated via a review of…

  3. EU practices of education staff planning (Application of econometric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Sahit Surdulli

    2011-12-01

    The research results indicated that there is great interdependence between the economic growth norm in the country in one hand and the attained educational results on the economy of knowledge on the other hand. The interdependence between the number of workers and their qualification structure and the results attained in the education field in models, was expressed through equations. The Empiriev model as a concrete model for planning the necessary education cadre for certain levels of economic development is based on the basic model of Tinbergen – Bos. The coefficient values of regression reflect the form and intensity of interdependency between the number of students per million inhabitants and the national income per capita.

  4. Sensory cortex underpinnings of traumatic brain injury deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasuni S Alwis

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI can result in persistent sensorimotor and cognitive deficits including long-term altered sensory processing. The few animal models of sensory cortical processing effects of TBI have been limited to examination of effects immediately after TBI and only in some layers of cortex. We have now used the rat whisker tactile system and the cortex processing whisker-derived input to provide a highly detailed description of TBI-induced long-term changes in neuronal responses across the entire columnar network in primary sensory cortex. Brain injury (n=19 was induced using an impact acceleration method and sham controls received surgery only (n=15. Animals were tested in a range of sensorimotor behaviour tasks prior to and up to 6 weeks post-injury when there were still significant sensorimotor behaviour deficits. At 8-10 weeks post-trauma, in terminal experiments, extracellular recordings were obtained from barrel cortex neurons in response to whisker motion, including motion that mimicked whisker motion observed in awake animals undertaking different tasks. In cortex, there were lamina-specific neuronal response alterations that appeared to reflect local circuit changes. Hyper-excitation was found only in supragranular layers involved in intra-areal processing and long-range integration, and only for stimulation with complex, naturalistic whisker motion patterns and not for stimulation with simple trapezoidal whisker motion. Thus TBI induces long-term directional changes in integrative sensory cortical layers that depend on the complexity of the incoming sensory information. The nature of these changes allow predictions as to what types of sensory processes may be affected in TBI and contribute to post-trauma sensorimotor deficits.

  5. Generating original ideas: The neural underpinning of originality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayseless, Naama; Eran, Ayelet; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2015-08-01

    One of the key aspects of creativity is the ability to produce original ideas. Originality is defined in terms of the novelty and rarity of an idea and is measured by the infrequency of the idea compared to other ideas. In the current study we focused on divergent thinking (DT) - the ability to produce many alternate ideas - and assessed the neural pathways associated with originality. Considering that generation of original ideas involves both the ability to generate new associations and the ability to overcome automatic common responses, we hypothesized that originality would be associated with activations in regions related to associative thinking, including areas of the default mode network (DMN) such as medial prefrontal areas, as well as with areas involved in cognitive control and inhibition. Thirty participants were scanned while performing a DT task that required the generation of original uses for common objects. The results indicate that the ability to produce original ideas is mediated by activity in several regions that are part of the DMN including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Furthermore, individuals who are more original exhibited enhanced activation in the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC), which was also positively coupled with activity in the left occipital-temporal area. These results are in line with the dual model of creativity, according to which original ideas are a product of the interaction between a system that generates ideas and a control system that evaluates these ideas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Presenting of Indifference Management Model of Education System in Ardabil Province Using Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfazli, Elham; Saidabadi, Reza Yousefi; Fallah, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate indifference management structural model in education system of Ardabil Province. The research method was integration study using Alli modeling. Statistical society of research was 420 assistant professors of educational science, managers, and deputies of Ardabil's second period of high schools…

  7. The importance of professional skills alongside scientific and technical excellence to underpin ethical geoscience practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, Ruth; Fernandez-Fuentes, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    There is consensus that reliable ground models, based on a sound understanding of the geology and surface processes are vital as a basis for natural hazard identification and risk assessment, and there is a great deal of skill and experience in the geoscience community with mapping, modelling and predicting natural hazards and their likely impacts. This presentation will highlight the contributions of geology and geomorphology in the identification of natural hazards and mitigation of their impacts. It will then consider a range of "professional skills" that are needed by geoscientists working with other specialists and non-specialists (e.g. engineers, emergency services, land-use planners, architects responsible for building codes, politicians, regulators, the public etc) alongside technical and scientific excellence. It will argue that development and application of both scientific/technical and professional skills is essential to ensure that the maps, models and other data relevant to natural hazards and environmental change are used to provide effective public protection through communication, land-use planning and planning for resilience. The professional skills of particular importance include interdisciplinary collaboration; project management; cost-benefit analysis; effective communication with specialists and non specialists (especially the public); and facilitative skills. All the technical, scientific and professional skills need to be applied competently and with the highest standards of ethical underpinning. The contribution will consider how this can be achieved (or at least facilitated) through professional training, award of professional titles, licensure etc, drawing on international examples of best practice in professional codes of conduct and regulation directed to the protection of the public.

  8. Educational Network Environment: Models and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhivitskaya, H.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation is structured as follows: functional model of distance learning; CDS - Content Development System; CMS - Content Management System; Communications: Microsoft Lync Server 2010; LMS - Learning Management System; Contents; Contents: creation tools; Contents: Multimedia content creation

  9. Electronic learning and constructivism: a model for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Sasikarn; Isaramalai, Sang-Arun; Pohthong, Amnart

    2010-01-01

    Nurse educators are challenged to teach nursing students to become competent professionals, who have both in-depth knowledge and decision-making skills. The use of electronic learning methods has been found to facilitate the teaching-learning process in nursing education. Although learning theories are acknowledged as useful guides to design strategies and activities of learning, integration of these theories into technology-based courses appears limited. Constructivism is a theoretical paradigm that could prove to be effective in guiding the design of electronic learning experiences for the purpose of providing positive outcomes, such as the acquisition of knowledge and decision-making skills. Therefore, the purposes of this paper are to: describe electronic learning, present a brief overview of what is known about the outcomes of electronic learning, discuss constructivism theory, present a model for electronic learning using constructivism, and describe educators' roles emphasizing the utilization of the model in developing electronic learning experiences in nursing education.

  10. Intelligent Cloud Learning Model for Online Overseas Chinese Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of Chinese economy, oversea Chinese education has been paid more and more attention. However, the overseas Chinese education resource is relatively lack because of historical reasons, which hindered further development . How to better share the Chinese education resources and provide intelligent personalized information service for overseas student is a key problem to be solved. In recent years, the rise of cloud computing provides us an opportunity to realize intelligent learning mode. Cloud computing offers some advantages by allowing users to use infrastructure, platforms and software . In this paper we proposed an intelligent cloud learning model based on cloud computing. The learning model can utilize network resources sufficiently to implement resource sharing according to the personal needs of students, and provide a good practicability for online overseas Chinese education.

  11. Application of Service Quality Model in Education Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ding Hooi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ideas on service quality stem from the West. The massive developments in research in the West are undeniable of their importance. This leads to the generation and development of new ideas. These ideas were subsequently channeled to developing countries. Ideas obtained were then formulated and used by these developing countries in order to obtain better approach in channeling service quality. There are ample to be learnt from the service quality model, SERVQUAL which attain high acceptance in the West. Service quality in the education system is important to guarantee the effectiveness and quality of education. Effective and quality education will be able to offer quality graduates, which will contribute to the development of the nation. This paper will discuss the application of the SERVQUAL model into the education environment.

  12. A Model for Systemic Change Management in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylu Menchaca

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on an understanding of systems thinking as practiced by successful learning organizations and derived from large-scale projects in technology-assisted teaching and learning in Mexico and Germany, we have developed a model that offers guidance to educational institutions and organizations to support their transition from lecture-based, face-to-face teaching to interactive learner-centered eLearning. As the basis for the model, we analyzed the systemic change processes of two major educational institutions: the largest private institution of higher education in Latin America, Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM, a leading nationwide educational system of international scope with 33 branches in 27 cities throughout Mexico, and the federal flagship project in Germany, Virtuelle Fachhochschule (VFH, the Virtual University of Applied Sciences, a virtual organization with decentralized and distributed management and participants from twelve universities of applied sciences, two universities, the federal employers

  13. Theoretical Principles of Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Desmond, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers examining the didactic, academic, analytic, philosophical, and technological underpinnings of distance education: "Introduction"; "Quality and Access in Distance Education: Theoretical Considerations" (D. Randy Garrison); "Theory of Transactional Distance" (Michael G. Moore);…

  14. Perspectives on instructor modeling in mathematics teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Cassondra

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' instructional practices are greatly shaped by their own learning experiences as students in K-12 and college classrooms, which for most teachers was traditional, teacher-centered instruction. One of the challenges facing mathematics education reform is that, traditional teaching is in contrast to reform student- centered instruction. If teachers learn from their experiences as mathematics students, mathematics teacher educators are encouraged to model practices they would like teach...

  15. Daruganora: a model for inclusive inter-cultural education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Everett

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an introduction to a new model for inclusive practice in education. It sprang from a 2010 Learning and Teaching Fellowship which called for strategies to address the under representation of Indigenous and other low Socio Economic Status groups in higher education in Australia. We have since realised that it can be adapted and developed in a wide range of other contexts and could be relevant in many other countries. A monograph publication

  16. The Trans-Contextual Model of Autonomous Motivation in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger, Martin S.; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.

    2015-01-01

    The trans-contextual model outlines the processes by which autonomous motivation toward activities in a physical education context predicts autonomous motivation toward physical activity outside of school, and beliefs about, intentions toward, and actual engagement in, out-of-school physical activity. In the present article, we clarify the fundamental propositions of the model and resolve some outstanding conceptual issues, including its generalizability across multiple educational domains, criteria for its rejection or failed replication, the role of belief-based antecedents of intentions, and the causal ordering of its constructs. We also evaluate the consistency of model relationships in previous tests of the model using path-analytic meta-analysis. The analysis supported model hypotheses but identified substantial heterogeneity in the hypothesized relationships across studies unattributed to sampling and measurement error. Based on our meta-analysis, future research needs to provide further replications of the model in diverse educational settings beyond physical education and test model hypotheses using experimental methods. PMID:27274585

  17. Psychological implications of outdoor adventure model of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is a synthetic analysis of the Outdoor Adventure Education model in the context of three elementary components: the environment – in relation to the theory of space from the perspective of sociological and pedagogical theory of space; personal perspective and growth as well as social development – in relation to psychological phenomena that accompany the individual and group involved in the process of Outdoor Adventure Education. The aim is to present how these processes determine the effects of education and what personalities’ elements are involved.

  18. 75 FR 2523 - Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Arts in Education Model Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination Program; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for... Announcement I. Funding Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The Arts in Education Model Development and...

  19. Integrated Modelling in CRUCIAL Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Mukhamedzhanova, Elena; Nerobelov, Georgiy; Sedeeva, Margarita; Suhodskiy, Alexander; Mostamandy, Suleiman; Smyshlyaev, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    The NordForsk CRUCIAL project (2016-2017) "Critical steps in understanding land surface - atmosphere interactions: from improved knowledge to socioeconomic solutions" as a part of the Pan-Eurasian EXperiment (PEEX; https://www.atm.helsinki.fi/peex) programme activities, is looking for a deeper collaboration between Nordic-Russian science communities. In particular, following collaboration between Danish and Russian partners, several topics were selected for joint research and are focused on evaluation of: (1) urbanization processes impact on changes in urban weather and climate on urban-subregional-regional scales and at contribution to assessment studies for population and environment; (2) effects of various feedback mechanisms on aerosol and cloud formation and radiative forcing on urban-regional scales for better predicting extreme weather events and at contribution to early warning systems, (3) environmental contamination from continues emissions and industrial accidents for better assessment and decision making for sustainable social and economic development, and (4) climatology of atmospheric boundary layer in northern latitudes to improve understanding of processes, revising parameterizations, and better weather forecasting. These research topics are realized employing the online integrated Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment - High Resolution Limited Area Model) model within students' research projects: (1) "Online integrated high-resolution modelling of Saint-Petersburg metropolitan area influence on weather and air pollution forecasting"; (2) "Modeling of aerosol impact on regional-urban scales: case study of Saint-Petersburg metropolitan area"; (3) "Regional modeling and GIS evaluation of environmental pollution from Kola Peninsula sources"; and (4) "Climatology of the High-Latitude Planetary Boundary Layer". The students' projects achieved results and planned young scientists research training on online integrated modelling (Jun 2017) will be presented and

  20. PHYSICAL EDUCATION - PHYSICAL CULTURE. TWO MODELS, TWO DIDACTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Vizuete Carrizosa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical Education is currently facing a number of problems that are rooted in the identity crisis prompted by the spread of the professional group, the confrontation of ideas from the scientific community and the competing interests of different political and social areas, compared to which physical education has failed, or unable, to react in time. The political and ideological confrontation that characterized the twentieth century gave us two forms, each with a consistent ideological position, in which the body as a subject of education was understood from two different positions: one set from the left and communism and another, from Western democratic societies.The survival of these conflicting positions and their interests and different views on education, in a lengthy space of time, as a consequence threw two teaching approaches and two different educational models, in which the objectives and content of education differ , and with them the forms and methods of teaching. The need to define the cultural and educational approach, in every time and place, is now a pressing need and challenge the processes of teacher training, as responsible for shaping an advanced physical education, adjusted to the time and place, the interests and needs of citizens and the democratic values of modern society.

  1. Blended learning in anesthesia education: current state and future model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Jaya; Kurup, Viji

    2012-12-01

    Educators in anesthesia residency programs across the country are facing a number of challenges as they attempt to integrate blended learning techniques in their curriculum. Compared with the rest of higher education, which has made advances to varying degrees in the adoption of online learning anesthesiology education has been sporadic in the active integration of blended learning. The purpose of this review is to discuss the challenges in anesthesiology education and relevance of the Universal Design for Learning framework in addressing them. There is a wide chasm between student demand for online education and the availability of trained faculty to teach. The design of the learning interface is important and will significantly affect the learning experience for the student. This review examines recent literature pertaining to this field, both in the realm of higher education in general and medical education in particular, and proposes the application of a comprehensive learning model that is new to anesthesiology education and relevant to its goals of promoting self-directed learning.

  2. University education: From Humbolt's model to the Bologna process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodroški-Spariosu Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the European university education in the context of the Bologna process are the topic of this article. The aim is to analyze the key issues in university education in comparison to the classic or Humbolt's model. In the periods of extensive reforms of high education it is important to review the place and role of the university from the standpoint of institutional characteristics, a dominant educational orientation and attitudes towards society. The Bologna process initiated three key changes in the European system of university education: a the change of institutional framework - from the binary to the so called uniquely diversified system; b dominant orientation - instead of science the student is in the centre of education; c the social role of the university - from the development of science and impartial critique of the society towards providing educational services to the market. The pedagogic implications of these changes open the questions of the purpose of education, relations between professors and students and the identity of the modern university itself.

  3. Chemistry education based on concepts represented by mental models

    OpenAIRE

    Gibin, Gustavo Bizarria; Ferreira, Luiz Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The current legislation determines that the chemist must have a solid comprehension about chemical concepts. Literature presents the concept of mental model, which is determinant to the learning of phenomena and concepts. This paper presents some mental models that students of the Chemistry course at UFSCar have about chemical concepts. A lot of incoherence was observed in student's mental models, which is an evidence that there are problems in the learning of chemistry education.

  4. Efforts and models of education for parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal

    2010-01-01

    Artiklen omfatter en gennemgang af modeller for forældreuddannelse, der fortrinsvis anvendes i Danmark. Artiklen indlejrer modellerne i nogle bredere blikke på uddannelsessystemet og den aktuelle diskurs om ansvarliggørelse af forældre.   Udgivelsesdato: Marts 2010...

  5. EPTS Curriculum Model in the Education of Gifted Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Sak

    Full Text Available In this article, the author reviews the EPTS Model (Education Programs for Talented Students and discuss how it was developed through multiple stages, the ways it is used to develop programs for gifted students, and then presents research carried out on the effectiveness of this model in the education of gifted students. The EPTS Model has two dimensions: ability and content. The ability dimension has a hierarchical structure composed of three levels of cognitive skills. The content dimension is the extension of the regular curriculum but organized at four levels: data, concept, generalization and theory. Included in the article also is a brief critics of the current state of curricular programs in gifted education.

  6. Commentary: discovering a different model of medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Robert T

    2012-12-01

    Traditional medical schools in modern academic health centers make discoveries, create new knowledge and technology, provide innovative care to the sickest patients, and educate future academic and practicing physicians. Unfortunately, the growth of the research and clinical care missions has sometimes resulted in a loss of emphasis on the general professional education of medical students. The author concludes that it may not be practical for many established medical schools to functionally return to the reason they were created: for the education of medical students.He had the opportunity to discover a different model of medical student education at the first new MD-granting medical school created in the United States in 25 years (in 2000), the Florida State University College of Medicine. He was initially skeptical about how its distributed regional campuses model, using practicing primary care physicians to help medical students learn in mainly ambulatory settings, could be effective. But his experience as a faculty member at the school convinced him that the model works very well.He proposes a better alignment of form and function for many established medical schools and an extension of the regional community-based model to the formation of community-based primary care graduate medical education programs determined by physician workforce needs and available resources.

  7. A Global Change in Higher Education: Entrepreneurial University Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süreyya SAKINÇ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Universities are affected by the social and economic diversity stemmed from globalization and internationalization, and its functions, area of responsibility, organizational structure, funding capability respond this diversity. In today's knowledge society, different new concepts regarding the university education system such as Entrepreneur University, Corporation University, virtual university etc. have been emerged with wave of globalization effect. The rising competition in academic education and the mass demands for education prompt to universities to get seeking new funds for fixing their financial situation, and hit them transforming into entrepreneurial identity. The reflections of neoliberal approach in education have transformed the universities into the corporations which are much more focused on entrepreneurial, student-oriented and aimed to appropriate education and producing creative human resources for global development. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation will be carried on regarding the entrepreneur university model through the litterateur research to investigate its causes and factors that impact and improve it. The aim of the paper is to generate a framework that identifies dynamic processes of entrepreneur university model, dependently the litterateur syntheses. The contribution of the paper will depend on its consequent argument that entrepreneur university model is viable for Turkey. In this paper, the entrepreneur university model will be analyzed by Triple Helix phenomenon with the comparative approach.

  8. Interfaith education: A new model for today's interfaith families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sheila C.; Arenstein, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    With societal changes rapidly transforming cultures that had been largely homogenous, today's multi-cultural - and in particular interfaith - families need new educational strategies to help them understand their cultural roots and identify and clarify what aspects of their heritages they wish to nurture and transmit to their children. This paper focuses on a new model for religious education, namely non-doctrinaire "dual-faith" education, which the principal author has helped to develop in the United States (US) through the Interfaith Community (IFC), a small, independent non-profit organisation created and led by dual-faith Jewish/Christian families. The model is premised on the notion that families can have two different faiths in one household and that - with respect and education - families can be harmonious, religion can be transmitted, and tolerance broadly nurtured. While the model is particular to the US and to families with Jewish and Christian heritages, its premises and structure have significant potential to be adaptable to other religious combinations and other cultures and countries. After reviewing relevant literature and situating the IFC model in the global and US contexts, the paper sets out to clarify the importance of the concept, describe its elements, and discuss its implications for religious education in this time of changing ethos and demography.

  9. Balanced scorecard model for Paulinian educational institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sr. Evangeline Lorenzo Anastacio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The researcher aimed to come up with a mission-centered strategic management system for Paulinian schools using the Balanced Scorecard (BSC approach. To achieve this project, a consensus was derived from 39 schools in the Philippines run by the Sisters of St. Paul of Chartres (SPC using the Delphi technique. The resulting BSC model included five perspectives, namely, spirituality, internal processes, learner and external community, learning organization, and fiscal resources perspectives. Strategic objectives with the corresponding key performance indicators (KPIs were identified. Unique to the resulting BSC model is the inclusion of spirituality perspective which ensures the conscious infusion of long-lasting values in all aspects of the school.

  10. Expert System Model for Educational Personnel Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Tabares-Ospina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The staff selection is a difficult task due to the subjectivity that the evaluation means. This process can be complemented using a system to support decision. This paper presents the implementation of an expert system to systematize the selection process of professors. The management of software development is divided into 4 parts: requirements, design, implementation and commissioning. The proposed system models a specific knowledge through relationships between variables evidence and objective.

  11. Educational models in academic research on the teaching practices in science education in elementary school

    OpenAIRE

    Rebeca Chiacchio Azevedo Fernandes; Jorge Megid Neto

    2013-01-01

    We intended to identify the features and pedagogical trends of the school practices proposed and implemented in thesis and dissertations directed to science education at elementary school level from 1972 to 2005. Thirty studies were analysed regarding the teaching methodology, instructional resources, teacher-student relationships, evaluation, theoretical framework, and educational model (traditional, rediscovery, constructivist, technicist, STS, socio-cultural). We found that the constructiv...

  12. Action of multiple intra-QTL genes concerted around a co-localized transcription factor underpins a large effect QTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Shalabh; Kumar Biswal, Akshaya; Min, Aye; Henry, Amelia; Oane, Rowena H.; Raorane, Manish L.; Longkumer, Toshisangba; Pabuayon, Isaiah M.; Mutte, Sumanth K.; Vardarajan, Adithi R.; Miro, Berta; Govindan, Ganesan; Albano-Enriquez, Blesilda; Pueffeld, Mandy; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Slamet-Loedin, Inez; Sundarvelpandian, Kalaipandian; Tsai, Yuan-Ching; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Hsing, Yue-Ie C.; Kumar, Arvind; Kohli, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Sub-QTLs and multiple intra-QTL genes are hypothesized to underpin large-effect QTLs. Known QTLs over gene families, biosynthetic pathways or certain traits represent functional gene-clusters of genes of the same gene ontology (GO). Gene-clusters containing genes of different GO have not been elaborated, except in silico as coexpressed genes within QTLs. Here we demonstrate the requirement of multiple intra-QTL genes for the full impact of QTL qDTY12.1 on rice yield under drought. Multiple evidences are presented for the need of the transcription factor ‘no apical meristem’ (OsNAM12.1) and its co-localized target genes of separate GO categories for qDTY12.1 function, raising a regulon-like model of genetic architecture. The molecular underpinnings of qDTY12.1 support its effectiveness in further improving a drought tolerant genotype and for its validity in multiple genotypes/ecosystems/environments. Resolving the combinatorial value of OsNAM12.1 with individual intra-QTL genes notwithstanding, identification and analyses of qDTY12.1has fast-tracked rice improvement towards food security. PMID:26507552

  13. Excellence in Physics Education Award: Modeling Theory for Physics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestenes, David

    2014-03-01

    All humans create mental models to plan and guide their interactions with the physical world. Science has greatly refined and extended this ability by creating and validating formal scientific models of physical things and processes. Research in physics education has found that mental models created from everyday experience are largely incompatible with scientific models. This suggests that the fundamental problem in learning and understanding science is coordinating mental models with scientific models. Modeling Theory has drawn on resources of cognitive science to work out extensive implications of this suggestion and guide development of an approach to science pedagogy and curriculum design called Modeling Instruction. Modeling Instruction has been widely applied to high school physics and, more recently, to chemistry and biology, with noteworthy results.

  14. [Self-regulation and virtual reality in forensic psychiatry: An emphasis on theoretical underpinnings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbouriche, M; Renaud, P; Pelletier, J-F; De Loor, P

    2016-12-01

    Forensic psychiatry is the field whose expertise is the assessment and treatment of offending behaviours, in particular when offenses are related to mental illness. An underlying question for all etiological models concerns the manner in which an individual's behaviours are organized. Specifically, it becomes crucial to understand how certain individuals come to display maladaptive behaviours in a given environment, especially when considering issues such as offenders' responsibility and their ability to change their behaviours. Thanks to its ability to generate specific environments, associated with a high experimental control on generated simulations, virtual reality is gaining recognition in forensic psychiatry. Virtual reality has generated promising research data and may turn out to be a remarkable clinical tool in the near future. While research has increased, a conceptual work about its theoretical underpinnings is still lacking. However, no important benefit should be expected from the introduction of a new tool (as innovative as virtual reality) without an explicit and heuristic theoretical framework capable of clarifying its benefits in forensic psychiatry. Our paper introduces self-regulation perspective as the most suitable theoretical framework for virtual reality in forensic psychiatry. It will be argued that virtual reality does not solely help to increase ecological validity. However, it does allow one to grant access to an improved understanding of violent offending behaviours by probing into the underlying mechanisms involved in the self-regulation of behaviours in a dynamical environment. Illustrations are given as well as a discussion regarding perspectives in the use of virtual reality in forensic psychiatry. Copyright © 2015 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Using a logic model to evaluate the Kids Together early education inclusion program for children with disabilities and additional needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Kathleen; Manning, Claire; Williams, Kathryn; O'Brien, Ginger; Sutherland, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    Despite clear evidence that learning and social opportunities for children with disabilities and special needs are more effective in inclusive not segregated settings, there are few known effective inclusion programs available to children with disabilities, their families or teachers in the early years within Australia. The Kids Together program was developed to support children with disabilities/additional needs aged 0-8 years attending mainstream early learning environments. Using a key worker transdisciplinary team model, the program aligns with the individualised package approach of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). This paper reports on the use of a logic model to underpin the process, outcomes and impact evaluation of the Kids Together program. The research team worked across 15 Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) centres and in home and community settings. A realist evaluation using mixed methods was undertaken to understand what works, for whom and in what contexts. The development of a logic model provided a structured way to explore how the program was implemented and achieved short, medium and long term outcomes within a complex community setting. Kids Together was shown to be a highly effective and innovative model for supporting the inclusion of children with disabilities/additional needs in a range of environments central for early childhood learning and development. The use of a logic model provided a visual representation of the Kids Together model and its component parts and enabled a theory of change to be inferred, showing how a coordinated and collaborative approached can work across multiple environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Model-driven Framework for Educational Game Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Roungas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Educational games are a class of serious games whose main purpose is to teach some subject to their players. Despite the many existing design frameworks, these games are too often created in an ad-hoc manner, and typically without the use of a game design document (GDD. We argue that a reason for this phenomenon is that current ways to structure, create and update GDDs do not increase the value of the artifact in the design and development process. As a solution, we propose a model-driven, web-based knowledge management environment that supports game designers in the creation of a GDD that accounts for and relates educational and entertainment game elements. The foundation of our approach is our devised conceptual model for educational games, which also defines the structure of the design environment. We present promising results from an evaluation of our environment with eight experts in serious games.

  17. PBL and CDIO: complementary models for engineering education development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette

    2014-09-01

    This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definitions, curriculum design, relation to disciplines, engineering projects, and change strategy. The structured comparison is intended as an introduction for learning about any of these models. It also invites reflection to support the understanding and evolution of PBL and CDIO, and indicates specifically what the communities can learn from each other. It is noted that while the two approaches share many underlying values, they only partially overlap as strategies for educational reform. The conclusions are that practitioners have much to learn from each other's experiences through a dialogue between the communities, and that PBL and CDIO can play compatible and mutually reinforcing roles, and thus can be fruitfully combined to reform engineering education.

  18. Perceived Sacrifice and Few Alternatives Commitments: The Motivational Underpinnings of Continuance Commitment's Subdimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Christian; Panaccio, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Using work on self-concepts and Conservation of Resources theory, the present research examined the motivational underpinnings of continuance commitment's subcomponents of perceived sacrifice and few alternatives. Study 1 (N=208) found job scope to be positively related to perceived sacrifice commitment, and negatively related to few alternatives…

  19. Wearing the T-shirt: an exploration of the ideological underpinnings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article explores the ideological underpinnings of those narratives in four sections: 1) Paper-thin facts presents certain attitudes about Africa and the African body that have come into currency in relation to colonialism; 2) A matter of mor(t)ality examines the relationship between morality and the mortality of the African ...

  20. Cognitive Underpinnings of Moral Reasoning in Adolescence: The Contribution of Executive Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Estay, E.; Dooley, J. J.; Beauchamp, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period characterized by intense changes, which impact the interaction between individuals and their environments. Moral reasoning (MR) is an important skill during adolescence because it guides social decisions between right and wrong. Identifying the cognitive underpinnings of MR is essential to understanding the…

  1. An educational model for ensemble streamflow simulation and uncertainty analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. AghaKouchak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the hands-on modeling toolbox, HBV-Ensemble, designed as a complement to theoretical hydrology lectures, to teach hydrological processes and their uncertainties. The HBV-Ensemble can be used for in-class lab practices and homework assignments, and assessment of students' understanding of hydrological processes. Using this modeling toolbox, students can gain more insights into how hydrological processes (e.g., precipitation, snowmelt and snow accumulation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff generation are interconnected. The educational toolbox includes a MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI and an ensemble simulation scheme that can be used for teaching uncertainty analysis, parameter estimation, ensemble simulation and model sensitivity. HBV-Ensemble was administered in a class for both in-class instruction and a final project, and students submitted their feedback about the toolbox. The results indicate that this educational software had a positive impact on students understanding and knowledge of uncertainty in hydrological modeling.

  2. An econometric model on bilateral trade in education using an augmented gravity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Tay

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Trade in education has become one of the most important trades for many economies. Yet, studies of education as a trade are scant owing to the conventional view of it being non-tradable. The purpose of this paper is to econometrically investigate trade in education using a nexus of international trade theories and the gravity model, one of the most widely used models in international trade in goods that has been scantly investigated on in studies on trade in education.Design/methodology/approach: A panel data analysis is broken down for 21 exporting countries and 50 importing countries, covering 1050 observations using new UNESCO database. A number of determinants of international trade including wealth of exporter & importer, domestic capacity of exporter & importer, transport costs, common religion, common language and trade restrictiveness of the importer are empirically tested on bilateral trade flows in education. An econometric model is formulated to test determinants of trade in education using an augmented gravity model.Findings: The augmented gravity model used in this study explains with high significance the determinants of trade in education including wealth of exporter & importer, domestic capacity of exporter & importer, transport costs, common religion, common language and trade restrictiveness of the importer.Research limitations/implications: Taking a macroscopic view of education as a trade may give us a myopic view of the elements important to determine what students or parents of students as well as institutions are concerned with. Nevertheless, the nexus of international trade theories and the gravity model used in this study that are largely and traditionally used on trade in goods and services, but scantly used in trade in education have been found to be highly significant and relevant in trade in education. Future studies on macro-level of analysis involving trade in education could include other determinants of

  3. A Model for Using Reflection to Enhance Interprofessional Education

    OpenAIRE

    Zarezadeh, Yadolah; Pearson, Pauline; Dickinson, Clair

    2009-01-01

    Both Reflective Practice and Interprofessional Education (IPE) have gained a considerable attention in the past three decades. Although a plethora of literature exists on either topic, few articles address the issue of using reflective techniques to enhance IPE (King &Ross, 2003; Ross et al, 2005; Goosey & Barr, 2002; Craddock, O'Halloran, Borthwick, & McPherson, 2006) and fewer provide a model to achieve this. The aim of this article is to propose a simple model for employing reflection in t...

  4. A Conceptual Model of Spirituality in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Liesl; Habron, John

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to describe the phenomenon of spirituality in music education by means of a model derived from the academic literature on the topic. Given the centrality of lived experience within this literature, we adopted a hermeneutic phenomenological theoretical framework to describe the phenomenon. The NCT (noticing, collecting, and…

  5. Model for Educational Game Using Natural User Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrulhizam Shapi’i

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural User Interface (NUI is a new approach that has become increasingly popular in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI. The use of this technology is widely used in almost all sectors, including the field of education. In recent years, there are a lot of educational games using NUI technology in the market such as Kinect game. Kinect is a sensor that can recognize body movements, postures, and voices in three dimensions. It enables users to control and interact with game without the need of using game controller. However, the contents of most existing Kinect games do not follow the standard curriculum in classroom, thus making it do not fully achieve the learning objectives. Hence, this research proposes a design model as a guideline in designing educational game using NUI. A prototype has been developed as one of the objectives in this study. The prototype is based on proposed model to ensure and assess the effectiveness of the model. The outcomes of this study conclude that the proposed model contributed to the design method for the development of the educational game using NUI. Furthermore, evaluation results of the prototype show a good response from participant and in line with the standard curriculum.

  6. A "Semantic" View of Scientific Models for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adúriz-Bravo, Agustín

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I inspect a "semantic" view of scientific models taken from contemporary philosophy of science-I draw upon the so-called "semanticist family", which frontally challenges the received, syntactic conception of scientific theories. I argue that a semantic view may be of use both for science education in the…

  7. PBL and CDIO: Complementary Models for Engineering Education Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definitions, curriculum design, relation to disciplines,…

  8. A Developmental Model for Educational Planning: Democratic Rationalities and Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Michael; Johnson, Jerry; Reynolds, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The Developmental Democratic Planning (DDP) model frames educational planning as a process that extends beyond the immediate focus of a particular planning effort to acknowledge and cultivate the potential of all members of the organization to fulfill their roles as active participants in the democratic life of the organization. The DDP model…

  9. On the Enterprise Modelling of an Educational Information Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michiels, E.F.; Widya, I.A.; Volman, C.J.A.M.; Pokraev, S.; de Diana, I.P.F.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we present the outcomes of exercising a design trajectory in respect of the modelling of an educational information infrastructure. The infrastructure aims to support the organisation of teaching and learning activities, independently of any particular didactic policy. The design

  10. Exploring Higher Education Business Models ("If Such a Thing Exists")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, John O.

    2013-01-01

    The global economic recession has caused students, parents, and policymakers to reevaluate personal and societal investments in higher education--and has prompted the realization that traditional higher ed "business models" may be unsustainable. Predicting a shakeout, most presidents expressed confidence for their own school's ability to…

  11. Nursing education in Bangladesh: a social business model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Barbara; Nahar, Niru Shamsun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a quality nurse education programme in Bangladesh. A sustainable social business financial model was used. The project is a collaboration between Glasgow Caledonian University and the Grameen Health Care Trust. It contributes to the UN development agenda, eradication of poverty, sustainability and the development of global partnerships. There is an acute shortage of nurses in Bangladesh but many young women who wish to become nurses are unable to do so. Women are discriminated against, have few leadership opportunities and poverty affects large proportions of rural society. The collaboration between the University and the Trust provides the necessary input to ensure a quality nursing programme. A business plan was developed, competency-based teaching introduced, infrastructure and financial management processes were set-up and an evaluation framework was put in place. The systems evaluation framework monitors the financial status of the College and the effects of the programme on students. The social business model, providing access to educational loans, has enabled 118 students to graduate into employment. The College is currently on target to be financially sustainable by 2016. This project outlines a business model that tackles poverty, gender equality and contributes to the human resource deficit. Young women are equipped as change agents and leaders. The social business model provides a mechanism for releasing funds for education to those who are impoverished. It provides a viable option for increasing the number of well-educated nurse leaders in developing countries. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  12. Mentoring Triad: An Alternative Mentoring Model for Preservice Teacher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Angelina; Dekkers, John; Knight, Bruce Allen

    2017-01-01

    Within many preservice teacher education programs in Australia, mentoring is used as the overarching methodology for the professional placement. The professional placement is considered to be a key component of learning to teach, and typically a dyad mentoring model is utilized. However, it is reported that many preservice teachers experience a…

  13. Collaborative Online Teaching: A Model for Gerontological Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Amy E.; Walsh, Christine A.; Azulai, Anna; Gulbrandsen, Cari; Tong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Social work students and faculty are increasingly embracing online education and collaborative teaching. Yet models to support these activities have not been adequately developed. This paper describes how a team of instructors developed, delivered, and evaluated an undergraduate gerontological social work course using a collaborative online…

  14. Features of optical modeling in educational and scientific activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article discusses the functionality of existing software for the modeling, analysis and optimization of lighting systems and optical elements, through which the stage of their design can be automated completely. The use of these programs is shown using the example of scientific work and the educational activity of ...

  15. Student Migration to Online Education: An Economic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    The popularity of distance education has increasingly led universities to consider expanding their online offerings. Remarkably few financial models have been presented for online courses, however, and fewer still have investigated the economic consequences of the migration, or cross-over, of students from traditional classes within the…

  16. Systemic Modelling for Relating Labour Market to Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakitsos, Evangelos C.

    2016-01-01

    The present study introduces a systemic model that demonstrates a description of the relationship between the labour-market and vocational education from the perspective of systemic theory. Based on the application of the relevant methodology, the two open social systems are identified and analyzed. Their key-features are presented and the points…

  17. On Practising in Physical Education: Outline for a Pedagogical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggerholm, K.; Standal, O.; Barker, D. M.; Larsson, H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Models-based approaches to physical education have in recent years developed as a way for teachers and students to concentrate on a manageable number of learning objectives, and align pedagogical approaches with learning subject matter and context. This paper draws on Hannah Arendt's account of "vita activa" to map existing…

  18. A Pedagogical Model for Science Education through Blended Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bidarra, José; Rusman, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework to support science education through blended learning, based on a participatory and interactive approach supported by ICT-based tools, called Science Learning Activities Model (SLAM). The study constitutes a work in progress and started as a response to complex

  19. Practice-Oriented Model of Professional Education in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirin, Yury A.; Titor, Svetlana E.; Petrov, Alexander A.; Smirnov, Evgenii N.; Morozova, Ekaterina A.; Scherbakova, Olga Y.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the chosen problem is caused by the necessity of finding a model of qualitative growth of specialists training in conditions when cuts in expenditure of the state budget allocated to education occurs annually. Besides, the development of technology inevitably leads to the expansion of the list of subspecialties employers need. The…

  20. Speedminton: Using the Tactical Games Model in Secondary Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Ju; Bullard, Susan; Hovatter, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and learning of sport and sports-related games dominates the curriculum in most secondary physical education programs in America. For many secondary school students, playing games can be exciting and lead to a lifetime of participation in sport-related activities. Using the Tactical Games Model (TGM) (Mitchell et al., 2006) to teach the…

  1. Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education 2016: Mathematical Modeling and Modeling Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Christian R., Ed.; McDuffie, Amy Roth, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling plays an increasingly important role both in real-life applications--in engineering, business, the social sciences, climate study, advanced design, and more--and within mathematics education itself. This 2016 volume of "Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education" ("APME") focuses on this key topic from a…

  2. An Instructional Model for Guiding Reflection and Research in the Classroom: The Educational Situation Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech-Betoret, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present an instructional model entitled the "Modelo de Calidad de Situacion Educativa" (MCSE) and how teachers can use it to reflect and investigate in a formal educational setting. It is a theoretical framework which treat to explain the functioning of an educational setting by organizing and relating the…

  3. Values Underpinning STEM Education in the USA: An Analysis of the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeg, Darren G.; Bencze, John Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were designed to address poor science and math performance in United States schools by inculcating globally competitive science, technology, engineering, and mathematics literacies relevant to participation in future society. Considering the complex network of influences involved in the development of…

  4. There Is No Business Model for Open Educational Resources: A Business Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Langen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The economic proverb "There is no such thing such as a free lunch" applies also to open educational resources (OER). In recent years, several authors have used revenue models and business models to analyse the different sources of possible funding for OER. In this article the business models of Osterwalder and Chesbrough are combined…

  5. The Changing Nature of Adult Education in the Age of Transnational Migration: Toward a Model of Recognitive Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shibao

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the changing nature of adult education in the age of transnational migration and proposes recognitive adult education as an inclusive model that acknowledges and affirms cultural difference and diversity as positive and desirable assets.

  6. Trust and risk: a model for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Arvin; Shulruf, Boaz; Jones, Philip

    2017-09-01

    Health care delivery, and therefore medical education, is an inherently risky business. Although control mechanisms, such as external audit and accreditation, are designed to manage risk in clinical settings, another approach is 'trust'. The use of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) represents a deliberate way in which this is operationalised as a workplace-based assessment. Once engaged with the concept, clinical teachers and medical educators may have further questions about trust. This narrative overview of the trust literature explores how risk, trust and control intersect with current thinking in medical education, and makes suggestions for potential directions of enquiry. Beyond EPAs, the importance of trust in health care and medical education is reviewed, followed by a brief history of trust research in the wider literature. Interpersonal and organisational levels of trust and a model of trust from the management literature are used to provide the framework with which to decipher trust decisions in health care and medical education, in which risk and vulnerability are inherent. In workplace learning and assessment, the language of 'trust' may offer a more authentic and practical vocabulary than that of 'competency' because clinical and professional risks are explicitly considered. There are many other trust relationships in health care and medical education. At the most basic level, it is helpful to clearly delineate who is the trustor, the trustee, and for what task. Each relationship has interpersonal and organisational elements. Understanding and considered utilisation of trust and control mechanisms in health care and medical education may lead to systems that maturely manage risk while actively encouraging trust and empowerment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  7. Higher Education Program Curricula Models in Tourism and Hospitality Education: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    The relevancy of program curricula in tourism and hospitality education has been called into question by key stakeholders in light of ongoing changes in the multifaceted tourism and hospitality industry. Various program models have been identified. Program content and quality of student preparedness have been debated. Balance and areas of emphasis…

  8. On Becoming an Educated Person: Salvadoran Adult Learners' Cultural Model of Educacion/Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: In contrast to cultural constructs that equate education with cognitive development and formal schooling, the Latin American cultural model of educacion encompasses academic knowledge and social competence. Prior scholarship has mainly investigated parental notions of educacion vis-a-vis childrearing and schooling, primarily…

  9. Fractal: An Educational Model for the Convergence of Formal and Non-Formal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, Larisa

    2017-01-01

    For the last two decades, different authors have mentioned the need to have new pedagogies that respond better to current times, which are surrounded by a complex set of issues such as mobility, interculturality, curricular flexibility, accreditation and academic coverage. Fractal is an educational model proposal for online learning that is formed…

  10. Towards a pedagogical model for science education: bridging educational contexts through a blended learning approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bidarra, José; Rusman, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a design framework to support science education through blended learning, based on a participatory and interactive approach supported by ICT-based tools, called Science Learning Activities Model (SLAM). The development of this design framework started as a response to complex

  11. A Proposed Educational Model to Improve the Operations of Knowledge-Exchange between MOE and Higher Education Institutions in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husni Ana,am Ali Salem

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to build a proposed educational model for improving knowledge-exchange processes between the Ministry of Education and Higher Education institutions in Jordan. The sample of the study consisted of (301 educational leaders: (158 academic staff members from the Faculty of Educational Sciences – University of Jordan – and the Faculty of Education in Yarmouk University; and (143 members from the center of Jordanian Ministry of Education for the academic year 2016/2017. To achieve the aims of the study, the researcher built a questionnaire, consisting of (88 items as tool for collecting data. The research tool was checked for its validity and reliability semantics. To analyze the data, means and standard deviation were used. The results of the study showed that the educational leaders rated the degree of practicing knowledge-exchange processes between Jordanian Ministry of Education and Higher Education institutions in Jordan as (moderate. Also, they rated the obstacles that face knowledge-exchange processes as (moderate. The study concluded with a proposed educational model for improving knowledge-exchange processes between the Ministry of Education and Higher Education institutions in Jordan, and recommended to be approved and applied in Jordan. Keywords: A Proposed educational model, Knowledge-exchange processes, Practicing degree, Obstacles, Jordanian Universities, Jordanian Ministry of Education

  12. Implementation of a Novel Educational Modeling Approach for Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ouahabi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud model is cost-effective because customers pay for their actual usage without upfront costs, and scalable because it can be used more or less depending on the customers’ needs. Due to its advantages, Cloud has been increasingly adopted in many areas, such as banking, e-commerce, retail industry, and academy. For education, cloud is used to manage the large volume of educational resources produced across many universities in the cloud. Keep interoperability between content in an inter-university Cloud is not always easy. Diffusion of pedagogical contents on the Cloud by different E-Learning institutions leads to heterogeneous content which influence the quality of teaching offered by university to teachers and learners. From this reason, comes the idea of using IMS-LD coupled with metadata in the cloud. This paper presents the implementation of our previous educational modeling by combining an application in J2EE with Reload editor that consists of modeling heterogeneous content in the cloud. The new approach that we followed focuses on keeping interoperability between Educational Cloud content for teachers and learners and facilitates the task of identification, reuse, sharing, adapting teaching and learning resources in the Cloud.

  13. Exploring education for digital librarians meaning, modes and models

    CERN Document Server

    Myburgh, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Exploring Education for Digital Librarians provides a refreshing perspective on the discipline and profession of Library and Information Science (LIS), with a focus on preparing students for careers as librarians who can deal with present and future digital information environments. A re-examination of the knowledge base of the field, combined with a proposed theoretical structure for LIS, provide the basis for this work, which also examines competencies for practice as well as some of the international changes in the nature of higher education. The authors finally suggest a model that could b

  14. Sequence Modeling for Analysing Student Interaction with Educational Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian; Hansen, Casper; Hjuler, Niklas Oskar Daniel

    2017-01-01

    as exhibiting unproductive student behaviour. Based on our results this student representation is promising, especially for educational systems offering many different learning usages, and offers an alternative to common approaches like modelling student behaviour as a single Markov chain often done......The analysis of log data generated by online educational systems is an important task for improving the systems, and furthering our knowledge of how students learn. This paper uses previously unseen log data from Edulab, the largest provider of digital learning for mathematics in Denmark...

  15. Simulation modelling: educational development roles for learning technologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Riley

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulation modelling was in the mainstream of CAL development in the 1980s when the late David Squires introduced this author to the Dynamic Modelling System. Since those early days, it seems that simulation modelling has drifted into a learning technology backwater to become a member of Laurillard's underutilized, 'adaptive and productive' media. Referring to her Conversational Framework, Laurillard constructs a pedagogic case for modelling as a productive student activity but provides few references to current practice and available resources. This paper seeks to complement her account by highlighting the pioneering initiatives of the Computers in the Curriculum Project and more recent developments in systems modelling within geographic and business education. The latter include improvements to system dynamics modelling programs such as STELLA®, the publication of introductory textbooks, and the emergence of online resources. The paper indicates several ways in which modelling activities may be approached and identifies some educational development roles for learning technologists. The paper concludes by advocating simulation modelling as an exemplary use of learning technologies - one that realizes their creative-transformative potential.

  16. Elucidating the atomistic mechanisms underpinning plasticity in Li-Si nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Gouissem, Afif; Guduru, Pradeep R.; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-10-01

    Amorphous lithium-silicon (a-Li-Si), especially in nanostructure form, is an attractive high-capacity anode material for next-generation Li-ion batteries. During cycles of charging and discharging, a-Li-Si undergoes substantive inelastic deformation and exhibits microcracking. The mechanical response to repeated lithiation-delithiation eventually results in the loss of electrical contact and consequent decrease of capacity, thus underscoring the importance of studying the plasticity of a-Li-Si nanostructures. In recent years, a variety of phenomenological continuum theories have been introduced that purport to model plasticity and the electro-chemo-mechanical behavior of a-Li-Si. Unfortunately, the micromechanisms and atomistic considerations underlying plasticity in Li-Si material are not yet fully understood and this impedes the development of physics-based constitutive models. Conventional molecular dynamics, although extensively used to study this material, is grossly inadequate to resolve this matter. As is well known, conventional molecular dynamics simulations can only address phenomena with characteristic time scales of (at most) a microsecond. Accordingly, in such simulations, the mechanical behavior is deduced under conditions of very high strain rates (usually, 108s-1 or even higher). This limitation severely impacts a realistic assessment of rate-dependent effects. In this work, we attempt to circumvent the time-scale bottleneck of conventional molecular dynamics and provide novel insights into the mechanisms underpinning plastic deformation of Li-Si nanostructures. We utilize an approach that allows imposition of slow strain rates and involves the employment of a new and recently developed potential energy surface sampling method—the so-called autonomous basin climbing—to identify the local minima in the potential energy surface. Combined with other techniques, such as nudged elastic band, kinetic Monte Carlo and transition state theory, we assess

  17. Acting and Teacher Education: Being Model for Identity Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Sinan Özmen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study follows three pre-service teachers during three academic semesters in which they took an acting course for teachers and participated in practicum with a special focus on rehearsing and developing their teacher identities. In order to create the necessary context for them, an acting course for pre-service teacher education was designed in parallel with a model which is based on an influential acting theory. This model, namely the BEING (Believe, Experiment, Invent, Navigate, Generate, was also designed by the researcher. The incentive behind designing a model grounded on acting literature was that the relevant literature does not provide trainers with a universal model which can be referred as a manual for running and monitoring acting courses for teachers. In this case study, this model was also tested in terms of its applicability and functionality in practice. Based on analyses of audio taped interviews, session journals and reflections, the five stages of the BEING Model was found to be highly applicable and functional in terms of reflecting the natural development process of teacher identity development. Pre-service teachers displayed a significant development in communication skills and professional identities. Therefore, the BEING model provides a perspective and a philosophy of benefiting from acting literature for teacher educators with little or no knowledge on acting and theatre

  18. Acting and Teacher Education: Being Model for Identity Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Sinan Özmen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study follows three pre-service teachers during three academic semesters in which they took an acting course for teachers and participated in practicum with a special focus on rehearsing and developing their teacher identities. In order to create the necessary context for them, an acting course for pre-service teacher education was designed in parallel with a model which is based on an influential acting theory. This model, namely the BEING (Believe, Experiment, Invent, Navigate, Generate, was also designed by the researcher. The incentive behind designing a model grounded on acting literature was that the relevant literature does not provide trainers with a universal model which can be referred as a manual for running and monitoring acting courses for teachers. In this case study, this model was also tested in terms of its applicability and functionality in practice. Based on analyses of audio taped interviews, session journals and reflections, the five stages of the BEING Model was found to be highly applicable and functional in terms of reflecting the natural development process of teacher identity development. Pre-service teachers displayed a significant development in communication skills and professional identities. Therefore, the BEING model provides a perspective and a philosophy of benefiting from acting literature for teacher educators with little or no knowledge on acting and theatre.

  19. Teacher’s role model ingender education of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Dode

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gender education as an important part of education, affects by the role and attitudes of teachers. Including gender perspective in schools is a prerequisite in alienable of human development, instead insuring gender equality it is considered as respecting human rights. Elimination of the gender stereotypes has a two-fold significance since itemsurest gender equality not only in the school system but even in the society as a whole. Gender stereotype messages, regardless by hidden or displayed form, unilaterally influence the development of the personality in its appearance as well as the formation of the individual. Children learn about gender identity simply by observing what happens in different circumstances around. In education exist gender disparities, which can be assessed by means of measurable indicators. So, the content of the curricula and instructive texts, the interactive relationships teacher-students, the institutional ambiance, etc. play an important role into the preservation and transmission of the gender disparity stereotypes through the messages they convey. The purpose of thestudy is to perform a systematic research in order to show the scale and shape in which gender stereotypes are portrayed and shown in social life, even through the role model of teacher and their affecting the education for a democratic society. To achieve this goal, we use the method of studying the existing literature; a detailed analysis of the questionnaires and interviews content with school directors and teachers of pre-university education in city: Shkodër, Tiranë, Elbasan, Pogradec, Korçë. Parents and teachers attitudes, seems to be a role model and affect the education of students. Therefore it is necessary before to teach students about gender equality, teachers need to be careful in their behavior about gender equality as an integral part of thinking. Need to have successful teacher, to get successful students otherwise should be successful

  20. Exploring Higher Education Governance: Analytical Models and Heuristic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhan FINDIKLI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Governance in higher education, both at institutional and systemic levels, has experienced substantial changes within recent decades because of a range of world-historical processes such as massification, growth, globalization, marketization, public sector reforms, and the emergence of knowledge economy and society. These developments have made governance arrangements and decision-making processes in higher education more complex and multidimensional more than ever and forced scholars to build new analytical and heuristic tools and strategies to grasp the intricacy and diversity of higher education governance dynamics. This article provides a systematic discussion of how and through which tools prominent scholars of higher education have analyzed governance in this sector by examining certain heuristic frameworks and analytical models. Additionally, the article shows how social scientific analysis of governance in higher education has proceeded in a cumulative way with certain revisions and syntheses rather than radical conceptual and theoretical ruptures from Burton R. Clark’s seminal work to the present, revealing conceptual and empirical junctures between them.

  1. Evaluation of educational program in the Master of Medical Education by Eisner's educational connoisseurship and criticism model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanipoor, Fariba; Amini, Mitra; Bazrafcan, Laila

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To be more successful in medical education and identify the strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum in this field, assessment of the students’ views, graduates, professors, and experts is essential. The aim of this qualitative assessment was to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the medical education curriculum. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This research is a qualitative study using the Eisner's educational connoisseurship and criticism model that was conducted in Shiraz Medical Sciences University in 2014. In this research, graduate medical education curriculum was criticized by a team of educational experts. Fifteen professors in the first stage of the focus group meeting addressed the three stages of educational criticism. In the second stage, several interviews were conducted with the above-mentioned people. In the third phase, the implementation of video recordings from the focus group meeting was performed in written form. In the fourth stage, conventional content analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. RESULTS: This curriculum has advantages and disadvantages in the constituent elements of the program. Its weaknesses include lack of written a guide for practical courses, lack of consideration of joint practical exercise to make integrate between lessons, lack of sufficient attention to aspects of practical and functional knowledge in this field, lack of attention to performance evaluation and development, and lack of routine review of the curriculum. On the other hand, the strengths of this study include the suitability of this field for professors and its positive impact on professors and students performance in the classroom. CONCLUSION: As medical education is partly an emerging field in Iran and considering the weaknesses, reviewing the curriculum based on the main part of program, the outcomes, curriculum content, teaching strategies, student assessment, and course management are recommended. PMID:28616422

  2. Procedural Skills Education – Colonoscopy as a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitreyi Raman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, surgical and procedural apprenticeship has been an assumed activity of students, without a formal educational context. With increasing barriers to patient and operating room access such as shorter work week hours for residents, and operating room and endoscopy time at a premium, alternate strategies to maximizing procedural skill development are being considered. Recently, the traditional surgical apprenticeship model has been challenged, with greater emphasis on the need for surgical and procedural skills training to be more transparent and for alternatives to patient-based training to be considered. Colonoscopy performance is a complex psychomotor skill requiring practioners to integrate multiple sensory inputs, and involves higher cortical centres for optimal performance. Colonoscopy skills involve mastery in the cognitive, technical and process domains. In the present review, we propose a model for teaching colonoscopy to the novice trainee based on educational theory.

  3. Alternative conceptions, memory, & mental models in physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyoungho; Shin, Jongho; Park, Jiyeon; Song, Sangho; Kim, Yeounsoo; Bao, Lei

    2005-09-01

    There are two somewhat independent research traditions, which converge to suggest a form of students' knowledge: alternative conceptions and mental models. However we have little literature that explains what they are different from each other and from memory. This study tried to describe these issues with some thoughts about how cognitive psychology and science education approaches can be best synthesized in order to approach these questions.

  4. Modeling the Competence Acquiring Process in Higher Education Institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowska, Magdelena; Kusztina, Emma; Zaikin, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Changes in human capital management, new requirements regarding knowledge and skills of employees compel higher education institutions to redefine their learning programmes. This requires evaluation of the didactic process realization, which should be oriented on competences. In the article authors...... presents an approach to competence modeling. New tools and collaboration mechanisms are proposed, which allow defining the structure of competence, analyzing the level of competence development, and assessing the competence process realization in relation “expected benefit-required expense”....

  5. Unintended pregnancy and sex education in Chile: a behavioural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, J M; Thompson, N J; Valenzuela, M S; Morris, L

    1994-10-01

    This study analysed factors associated with unintended pregnancy among adolescent and young adult women in Santiago, Chile. Three variations of a behavioural model were developed. Logistic regression showed that the effect of sex education on unintended pregnancy works through the use of contraception. Other significant effects were found for variables reflecting socioeconomic status and a woman's acceptance of her sexuality. The results also suggested that labelling affects measurement of 'unintended' pregnancy.

  6. Impacts of Climate Variability and Change on (Marine) Animals: Physiological Underpinnings and Evolutionary Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pörtner, Hans O; Gutt, Julian

    2016-07-01

    Understanding thermal ranges and limits of organisms becomes important in light of climate change and observed effects on ecosystems as reported by the IPCC (2014). Evolutionary adaptation to temperature is presently unable to keep animals and other organisms in place; if they can these rather follow the moving isotherms. These effects of climate change on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems have brought into focus the mechanisms by which temperature and its oscillations shape the biogeography and survival of species. For animals, the integrative concept of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) has successfully characterized the sublethal limits to performance and the consequences of such limits for ecosystems. Recent models illustrate how routine energy demand defines the realized niche. Steady state temperature-dependent performance profiles thus trace the thermal window and indicate a key role for aerobic metabolism, and the resulting budget of available energy (power), in defining performance under routine conditions, from growth to exercise and reproduction. Differences in the performance and productivity of marine species across latitudes relate to changes in mitochondrial density, capacity, and other features of cellular design. Comparative studies indicate how and why such mechanisms underpinning OCLTT may have developed on evolutionary timescales in different climatic zones and contributed to shaping the functional characteristics and species richness of the respective fauna. A cause-and-effect understanding emerges from considering the relationships between fluctuations in body temperature, cellular design, and performance. Such principles may also have been involved in shaping the functional characteristics of survivors in mass extinction events during earth's history; furthermore, they may provide access to understanding the evolution of endothermy in mammals and birds. Accordingly, an understanding is emerging how climate changes and

  7. Examining Attitudes of Students Regarding the Sports Education Model and Direct Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Nevruz; Dalkiran, Oguzhan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the effects of sports education model and direct teaching model on the attitudes of the students, and the differences among the attitudes of students. The study group of the research included 29 students from 6th and 7th grade of a secondary school in the 2015-2016 academic years. The experimental group…

  8. An Education for Peace Model That Centres on Belief Systems: The Theory behind The Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Alison

    2017-01-01

    The education for peace model (EFPM) presented in this paper was developed within a theoretical framework of complexity science and critical theory and was derived from a review of an empirical research project conducted in a conflict affected environment. The model positions belief systems at the centre and is socioecologically systemic in design…

  9. Investigating Effective Components of Higher Education Marketing and Providing a Marketing Model for Iranian Private Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmaee, Roya Babaee; Nadi, Mohammad Ali; Shahtalebi, Badri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study and identify the effective components of higher education marketing and providing a marketing model for Iranian higher education private sector institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This study is a qualitative research. For identifying the effective components of higher education marketing and…

  10. Did Educational Expansion Trigger the Development of an Education Society? Chances and Risks of a New Model of Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunberger, Sigrid

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the question of whether educational expansion leads to a new type of society, the education society. Taking into consideration the combined elements of three models of society (the post-industrial society, the knowledge society and the information society)--the chances and risks of an educational society will be elicited…

  11. Educational models and concept of childhood in the Gaza Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Taddei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, R.E.C. (Remedial Education Centre, Gaza, Palestine was carrying out the project “Promotion of the democratic process and active participation among young population in the Gaza Strip”, approved by the Europe Initiative for democracy and Human Rights, and financed by the European Union. The project included a research activity, “Educational models and concept of childhood in the Gaza Strip”. The research is an idea coming from the long-term collaboration, started in 2002, between EducAid (Italian Ngo, Rimini, Italy and R.E.C. in the educational work with the vulnerable children in the Gaza Strip.Teachers, educators and parents play a fundamental role in the education of children and adolescents; therefore families, associations and schools should be places where children become aware of their rights as human beings, in order to become, one day, active citizens of a society that themselves can improve. It’s of fundamental importance the policy that institutions carry out (supporting families, schools and associations, because it guarantees a functional education system. We interfaced with the different faces of formal and informal education, and it was impossible not to have the sensation of being inside a big prison, not too big, if we think its size compared to one and a half million inhabitants, between a closed tall and gray wall, a sea hardly accessible due to embargo, and Erez, the check point of transit for Israel. No gas, no fuel, no electricity, yet children continue to go to school, the roads are crowded by pedestrians who are waiting for a taxi for hours under the sun, wondering if they can go to work. The potential of education and schooling represent non-violent weapons to defend peace, promote change, make children aware of their rights, begin to live their citizenship at school, at home, in the associations. Through the testimonies we realized how much these valuable potentials are in danger in the Gaza Strip, as

  12. Proposal of a pedagogical model for mathematics teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Jiménez Espinosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This research-based article reflects on mathematics teacher education, and proposes a pedagogical model for this purpose, called Gradual Research Pedagogical Model (MPGI. This model considers the central curricular elements of any academic education process: student, teacher and contents, with evaluation as transversal element for analysis and feedback. The training of future teachers is constituted by three moments, each with its specific emphasis: the first is “contextualization”, which aims at having the student understand his or her new academic role, and identify and overcome his or her academic weak points, the second is “knowledge foundation”, which offers basic education in the fields of mathematics and pedagogy, as well as sensibilization towards social issues, opening up the student’s possibilities as leader and agent of change, and lastly, “knowledge immersion”, which is centered on research and the identification and study of topics and problems of the mathematical discipline as well as the pedagogical field.

  13. Inclusive Education for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaki Balakrishnan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces briefly the evolution of Inclusive Education for students with special education needs (SEN and discusses some significant challenges in its implementation. While the aim of Inclusive Education is to include all children with SEN in mainstream schools, there are many challenges that have to be overcome for their education to be meaningful. This paper focuses primarily on the inclusion of students with intellectual disability, since they are likely to be the largest number with special education needs in ‘inclusive’ schools. It offers the outline of a curriculum that may be derived from the mainstream one in use, and suggests a model that emphasises the replacement of age / grade placement, as is the present practice, with experience and maturity underpinning learning in persons with intellectual disability. The proposed model needs, of course, to be field-tested.doi 10.5463/DCID.v23i2.111

  14. Dual degree partnership in nursing: an innovative undergraduate educational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastable, Susan B; Markowitz, Marianne

    2012-10-01

    We report the success of a unique articulation Dual Degree Partnership in Nursing (DDPN) model. The process used to establish and implement this approach is described. Unlike typical 2+2 agreements between associate degree (AD) and bachelor degree (BS) nursing education programs, the DDPN is designed with a 1+2+1 sequence. Intended to attract high school students, this model provides the opportunity to earn two degrees (AD and BS) while experiencing a 4-year campus living and learning environment. This configuration was accomplished without compromising the integrity of either of the established programs. After collecting data over the past 6 years, this model demonstrates popularity with the traditional-aged student, as well as success from an academic perspective. Statistics on retention, graduation, and NCLEX® pass rates indicate the feasibility and success of the model. Based on the findings, the potential for replication is promising for other colleges interested in a similar collaboration. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Modeling Value Chain Analysis of Distance Education using UML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Anal; Mukherjee, Soumen

    2010-10-01

    Distance education continues to grow as a methodology for the delivery of course content in higher education in India as well as abroad. To manage this growing demand and to provide certain flexibility, there must be certain strategic planning about the use of ICT tools. Value chain analysis is a framework for breaking down the sequence of business functions into a set of activities through which utility could be added to service. Thus it can help to determine the competitive advantage that is enjoyed by an institute. To implement these business functions certain visual representation is required. UML allows for this representation by using a set of structural and behavioral diagrams. In this paper, the first section defines a framework for value chain analysis and highlights its advantages. The second section gives a brief overview of related work in this field. The third section gives a brief discussion on distance education. The fourth section very briefly introduces UML. The fifth section models value chain of distance education using UML. Finally we discuss the limitations and the problems posed in this domain.

  16. Role modelling in medical education: the importance of teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Oates, Kim; Goulston, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    By observation of role models, and participation in activities, students develop their attitudes, values and professional competencies. Literature suggests that clinical skills and knowledge, personality, and teaching skills are three main areas that students consider central to the identification of positive role models. The aim of this study was to explore junior medical students' opinions of the ideal attributes of a good role model in clinical tutors. The study was conducted with one cohort (n = 301) of students who had completed year 1 of the medical programme in 2013. All students were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the ideal attributes of a good role model in a clinical tutor. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed items and one open-ended question. The response rate to the questionnaire was 265/301 (88%). Although students found all three key areas important in a good role model, students emphasised the importance of excellence in teaching skills. Specifically, students see good role models as being able to provide a constructive learning environment, a good understanding of the curriculum and an ability to cater to the learning needs of all students. Students see good role models as being able to provide a constructive learning environment While acknowledging the importance of a patient-centred approach, as well as clinical knowledge and skills, our findings reinforce the importance of the actual teaching abilities of role models within medical education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. NEW PATTERNS IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION--EMERGING CURRICULUM MODELS FOR THE AMERICAN COLLEGE. NEW DIMENSIONS IN HIGHER EDUCATION, NUMBER 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AXELROD, JOSEPH

    THIS REVIEW OF A LITERATURE SEARCH PRESENTS A DESCRIPTION OF NEW MODELS OF UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUMS THAT ARE COMING INTO EXISTENCE AND COMPARES THE PURPOSES OF THESE NEW MODELS WITH THE WEAKNESSES OF THE OLD MODELS THAT THE NEW MODELS SEEK TO CORRECT. THE NEW MODELS OF UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION ARE SEEKING TO CREATE, EVEN ON THE LARGEST CAMPUSES,…

  18. Model of Providing Assistive Technologies in Special Education Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2015-05-14

    Most students diagnosed with disabilities in Thai special education schools received assistive technologies, but this did not guarantee the greatest benefits. The purpose of this study was to survey the provision, use and needs of assistive technologies, as well as the perspectives of key informants regarding a model of providing them in special education schools. The participants were selected by the purposive sampling method, and they comprised 120 students with visual, physical, hearing or intellectual disabilities from four special education schools in Chiang Mai, Thailand; and 24 key informants such as parents or caregivers, teachers, school principals and school therapists. The instruments consisted of an assistive technology checklist and a semi-structured interview. Results showed that a category of assistive technologies was provided for students with disabilities, with the highest being "services", followed by "media" and then "facilities". Furthermore, mostly students with physical disabilities were provided with assistive technologies, but those with visual disabilities needed it more. Finally, the model of providing assistive technologies was composed of 5 components: Collaboration; Holistic perspective; Independent management of schools; Learning systems and a production manual for users; and Development of an assistive technology center, driven by 3 major sources such as Government and Private organizations, and Schools.

  19. Model for Physical Education Content Standards at Early Stages of Primary Education in the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Klincarov, Ilija; Popeska, Biljana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a model for designing national physical education content standards in early stages of primary education in the Republic of Macedonia. Proposed model is based on the findings about motor structure of children at the early stage of primary education obtained in researches realized in 5 primary schools in Skopje, the Republic of Macedonia, in relation with Macedonian PE curriculum, and overarching standards for children at this age in California, USA,chosen...

  20. Visualizations and Mental Models - The Educational Implications of GEOWALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, D.; Kendeou, P.

    2003-12-01

    Work in the earth sciences has outlined many of the faulty beliefs that students possess concerning particular geological systems and processes. Evidence from educational and cognitive psychology has demonstrated that students often have difficulty overcoming their na‹ve beliefs about science. Prior knowledge is often remarkably resistant to change, particularly when students' existing mental models for geological principles may be faulty or inaccurate. Figuring out how to help students revise their mental models to include appropriate information is a major challenge. Up until this point, research has tended to focus on whether 2-dimensional computer visualizations are useful tools for helping students develop scientifically correct models. Research suggests that when students are given the opportunity to use dynamic computer-based visualizations, they are more likely to recall the learned information, and are more likely to transfer that knowledge to novel settings. Unfortunately, 2-dimensional visualization systems are often inadequate representations of the material that educators would like students to learn. For example, a 2-dimensional image of the Earth's surface does not adequately convey particular features that are critical for visualizing the geological environment. This may limit the models that students can construct following these visualizations. GEOWALL is a stereo projection system that has attempted to address this issue. It can display multidimensional static geologic images and dynamic geologic animations in a 3-dimensional format. Our current research examines whether multidimensional visualization systems such as GEOWALL may facilitate learning by helping students to develop more complex mental models. This talk will address some of the cognitive issues that influence the construction of mental models, and the difficulty of updating existing mental models. We will also discuss our current work that seeks to examine whether GEOWALL is an

  1. The Clinical Learning Dyad Model: An Innovation in Midwifery Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susanna R; Thomas, Celeste R; Gerard, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    There is a national shortage of women's health and primary care providers in the United States, including certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives. This shortage is directly related to how many students can be trained within the existing system. The current model of midwifery clinical training is based on apprenticeship, with one-on-one interaction between a student and preceptor. Thus, the number of newly trained midwifery providers is limited by the number of available and willing preceptors. The clinical learning dyad model (CLDM), which pairs 2 beginning midwifery students with one preceptor in a busy practice, addresses this problem. In addition, this model brings in a senior midwife student as a near-peer mentor when the students are first oriented into outpatient clinical practice. The model began as a pilot project to improve the quality of training and increase available student spots in clinical education. This article discusses the origins of the model, the specifics of its design, and the results of a midterm and one-year postintervention survey. Students and preceptors involved in this model identified several advantages to the program, including increased student accountability, enhanced socialization into the profession, improved learning, and reduced teaching burden on preceptors. An additional benefit of the CLDM is that students form a learning community and collaborate with preceptors to care for women in busy clinical settings. Challenges of the model will also be discussed. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the CLDM. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  2. The limitations of mathematical modeling in high school physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forjan, Matej

    The theme of the doctoral dissertation falls within the scope of didactics of physics. Theoretical analysis of the key constraints that occur in the transmission of mathematical modeling of dynamical systems into field of physics education in secondary schools is presented. In an effort to explore the extent to which current physics education promotes understanding of models and modeling, we analyze the curriculum and the three most commonly used textbooks for high school physics. We focus primarily on the representation of the various stages of modeling in the solved tasks in textbooks and on the presentation of certain simplifications and idealizations, which are in high school physics frequently used. We show that one of the textbooks in most cases fairly and reasonably presents the simplifications, while the other two half of the analyzed simplifications do not explain. It also turns out that the vast majority of solved tasks in all the textbooks do not explicitly represent model assumptions based on what we can conclude that in high school physics the students do not develop sufficiently a sense of simplification and idealizations, which is a key part of the conceptual phase of modeling. For the introduction of modeling of dynamical systems the knowledge of students is also important, therefore we performed an empirical study on the extent to which high school students are able to understand the time evolution of some dynamical systems in the field of physics. The research results show the students have a very weak understanding of the dynamics of systems in which the feedbacks are present. This is independent of the year or final grade in physics and mathematics. When modeling dynamical systems in high school physics we also encounter the limitations which result from the lack of mathematical knowledge of students, because they don't know how analytically solve the differential equations. We show that when dealing with one-dimensional dynamical systems

  3. The Self-Regulated Learning Model and Music Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Marijan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulation and self-regulated learning (SRL are important features in music education. In this research self-regulated learning model is presented as a complex, multidimensional structure. SRL starts with the self-regulation. Self-regulation is formed through interaction with the environment, thus self-learning, self-analysis, self-judgment, self-instruction, and self-monitoring are the main functions in self-regulatory structure. Co-regulation is needed, and helps self-regulation to be activated and monitored. In music education, co-regulation refers to the instructions that teacher introduces in the lessons. These instructions have to enhance learning and develop regulation over emotions, cognitive, auditor, and motor skills in students. Learning techniques and learning strategies are core components in music education. Adapting those, students become aware of their learning processes, actions, thoughts, feelings and behaviors that are involved in learning. It is suggested that every teaching methodology has to develop learning techniques, as well as metamemory and metacognition in students, in order to gain expertise. The author has emphasized her attention to every aspect that is believed to belong to SRL. There are not many articles on the SRL in music education, written by musicians, in compare with those written by psychologists and neurologists,. Therefore, the author has suggested that this paper would encourage music teachers and performers to take an advantage in the research of SRL. These researches would help music educational systems and teachers to develop and promote learning techniques and strategies. The results would show improvement in student’s learning and self-regulation.

  4. A Technology Enhanced Learning Model for Quality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherly, Elizabeth; Uddin, Md. Meraj

    Technology Enhanced Learning and Teaching (TELT) Model provides learning through collaborations and interactions with a framework for content development and collaborative knowledge sharing system as a supplementary for learning to improve the quality of education system. TELT deals with a unique pedagogy model for Technology Enhanced Learning System which includes course management system, digital library, multimedia enriched contents and video lectures, open content management system and collaboration and knowledge sharing systems. Open sources like Moodle and Wiki for content development, video on demand solution with a low cost mid range system, an exhaustive digital library are provided in a portal system. The paper depicts a case study of e-learning initiatives with TELT model at IIITM-K and how effectively implemented.

  5. Efforts and Models of Education for Parents: the Danish Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosendal Jensen, Niels

    2009-12-01

    to underline that Danish welfare policy has been changing rather radical. The classic model was an understanding of welfare as social assurance and/or as social distribution – based on social solidarity. The modern model looks like welfare as social service and/or social investment. This means that citizens are changing role – from user and/or citizen to consumer and/or investor. The Danish state is in correspondence with decisions taken by the government investing in a national future shaped by global competition. The new models of welfare – “service” and “investment” – imply severe changes in hitherto known concepts of family life, relationship between parents and children etc. As an example the investment model points at a new implementation of the relationship between social rights and the rights of freedom. The service model has demonstrated that weakness that the access to qualified services in the field of health or education is becoming more and more dependent of the private purchasing power. The weakness of the investment model is that it represents a sort of “The Winner takes it all” – since a political majority is enabled to make agendas in societal fields former protected by the tripartite power and the rights of freedom of the citizens. The outcome of the Danish development seems to be an establishment of a political governed public service industry which on one side are capable of competing on market conditions and on the other are able being governed by contracts. This represents a new form of close linking of politics, economy and professional work. Attempts of controlling education, pedagogy and thereby the population are not a recent invention. In European history we could easily point at several such experiments. The real news is the linking between political priorities and exercise of public activities by economic incentives. By defining visible goals for the public servants, by introducing measurement of achievements and

  6. A Diverging View of Role Modeling in Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Sandhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Research in the area of role modeling has primarily focused on the qualities and attributes of exceptional role models, and less attention has been given to the act of role modeling itself (Elzubeir & Rizk, 2001; Jochemsen-van der Leeuw, van Dijk, van Etten-Jamaludin, & Wieringa-de Waard, 2013; Wright, 1996; Wright, Wong, & Newill, 1997. A standardized understanding of role modeling in medical education remains elusive (Kenny, Mann, & MacLeod, 2003. This is problematic given that role modeling is pervasively documented as an approach to teaching (Reuler & Nardone, 1994. Our study attempts to fill a void in this body of research by looking at what faculty are thinking, saying, and doing when they say they are role modeling. Individual semi-structured interviews with faculty members were conducted in the Department of General Surgery at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods for themes surrounding teaching and role modeling. Three major themes emerged from the data: (1 faculty members think they are teaching when they are acting professionally; (2 faculty members become aware of teaching opportunities and act on them; and (3 faculty members employ evidence-based teaching methods, but they are incorrectly labeling them as “role modeling.” As a whole, our findings should help distinguish between role modeling as roles and responsibilities enacted while doing one’s job well, and teaching as facilitated instruction that helps connect knowledge with action (Clayton, 2006; Fassbinder, 2007. Contributing to a better understanding of how teaching is separate from role modeling has the potential to improve the scope and quality of teaching, ultimately enhancing the learning experience for trainees.

  7. Efficiency assessment models of higher education institution staff activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Dyusekeyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates the necessity of improvement of university staff incentive system under the conditions of competition in the field of higher education, the necessity to develop a separate model for the evaluation of the effectiveness of the department heads. The authors analysed the methods for assessing production function of units. The advantage of the application of the methods to assess the effectiveness of border economic structures in the field of higher education is shown. The choice of the data envelopment analysis method to solve the problem has proved. The model for evaluating of university departments activity on the basis of the DEAmethodology has developed. On the basis of operating in Russia, Kazakhstan and other countries universities staff pay systems the structure of the criteria system for university staff activity evaluation has been designed. For clarification and specification of the departments activity efficiency criteria a strategic map has been developed that allowed us to determine the input and output parameters of the model. DEA-methodology using takes into account a large number of input and output parameters, increases the assessment objectivity by excluding experts, receives interim data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the evaluated object.

  8. Community Based Educational Model on Water Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiajeng, L.; Parwita, I. G. L.; Wiraga, I. W.; Mudhina, M.

    2018-01-01

    The previous research showed that there were indicators of water crisis in the northern and eastern part of Denpasar city and most of coastal area experienced on seawater intrusion. The recommended water conservation programs were rainwater harvesting and educate the community to develop a water saving and environmentally conscious culture. This research was conducted to built the community based educational model on water conservation program through ergonomics SHIP approach which placed the human aspect as the first consideration, besides the economic and technically aspects. The stakeholders involved in the program started from the problem analyses to the implementation and the maintenance as well. The model was built through three main steps, included determination of accepted design; building the recharge wells by involving local communities; guidance and assistance in developing a water saving and environmentally conscious culture for early childhood, elementary and junior high school students, community and industry. The program was implemented based on the “TRIHITA KARANA” concept, which means the relationship between human to God, human-to-human, and human to environment. Through the development of the model, it is expected to grow a sense of belonging and awareness from the community to maintain the sustainability of the program.

  9. Educational and Scientific Applications of Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Zhai, C.; Tang, B.; Kubar, T. L.; Zhang, J.; Bao, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA) is a web-based information system designed for the climate modeling and model analysis community to analyze climate data from models and observations. CMDA provides tools to diagnostically analyze climate data for model validation and improvement, and to systematically manage analysis provenance for sharing results with other investigators. CMDA utilizes cloud computing resources, multi-threading computing, machine-learning algorithms, web service technologies, and provenance-supporting technologies to address technical challenges that the Earth science modeling and model analysis community faces in evaluating and diagnosing climate models. As CMDA infrastructure and technology have matured, we have developed the educational and scientific applications of CMDA. Educationally, CMDA supported the summer school of the JPL Center for Climate Sciences for three years since 2014. In the summer school, the students work on group research projects where CMDA provide datasets and analysis tools. Each student is assigned to a virtual machine with CMDA installed in Amazon Web Services. A provenance management system for CMDA is developed to keep track of students' usages of CMDA, and to recommend datasets and analysis tools for their research topic. The provenance system also allows students to revisit their analysis results and share them with their group. Scientifically, we have developed several science use cases of CMDA covering various topics, datasets, and analysis types. Each use case developed is described and listed in terms of a scientific goal, datasets used, the analysis tools used, scientific results discovered from the use case, an analysis result such as output plots and data files, and a link to the exact analysis service call with all the input arguments filled. For example, one science use case is the evaluation of NCAR CAM5 model with MODIS total cloud fraction. The analysis service used is Difference Plot Service of

  10. Can an intercultural education model combat discrimination and xenophobia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisès Esteban Guitart

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present a qualitative study conducted with six indigenous and six mestizos from Intercultural University of Chiapas. The aim of the study is to exemplify the mutual perception between different ethno-linguistic groups, as well as the possible change occurred after the admission to the University. That is, opinions about the other group after and before entering the University. We conclude that a higher education intercultural model can promote mutual understanding and relationship between indigenous and mestizos and thus combat prejudices and stereotypes.     

  11. The Self-Regulated Learning Model and Music Education

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Marijan

    2017-01-01

    Self-regulation and self-regulated learning (SRL) are important features in music education. In this research self-regulated learning model is presented as a complex, multidimensional structure. SRL starts with the self-regulation. Self-regulation is formed through interaction with the environment, thus self-learning, self-analysis, self-judgment, self-instruction, and self-monitoring are the main functions in self-regulatory structure. Co-regulation is needed, and helps self-regulation to be...

  12. Female role models in physics education in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chormaic, Síle Nic; Fee, Sandra; Tobin, Laura; Hennessy, Tara

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we consider the statistics on undergraduate student representation in Irish universities and look at student numbers in secondary (high) schools in one region in Ireland. There seems to be no significant change in female participation in physics from 2002 to 2011. Additionally, we have studied the influence of an educator's gender on the prevalence of girls studying physics in secondary schools in Co. Louth, Ireland, and at the postgraduate level in Irish universities. It would appear that strong female role models have a positive influence and lead to an increase in girls' participation in physics.

  13. Separating state dependence, experience, and heterogeneity in a model of youth crime and education

    OpenAIRE

    Mancino, Maria Antonella; Navarro, Salvador; Rivers, David A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the determinants of youth crime using a dynamic discrete choice model of crime and education. We allow past education and criminal activities to affect current crime and educational decisions. We take advantage of a rich panel dataset on serious juvenile offenders, the Pathways to Desistance. Using a series of psychometric tests, we estimate a model of cognitive and social/ emotional skills that feeds into the crime and education model. This allows us to separately identify the roles...

  14. Role of educational environment for students with health disadvantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silanteva T.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the inclusive environment's support practices promoting to basic purposes of inclusive education, i.e., involvement of a bigger number of students with health disabilities into society. The article regards a number of supporting models, which prepare students for transition into an inclusive class, contribute to successful adaptation in the classroom and affect social relations of students as connected with the way they are perceived and accepted by other people. We analyzed the methodological foundation of inclusive education, drawing on theoretical underpinnings of the inclusive model, and tried to observe their coincidences with the concepts of cultural-historical approach in psychology.

  15. Effective Dementia Education and Training for the Health and Social Care Workforce: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, Claire A; Gates, Cara; Irving, Donna; Oyebode, Jan; Smith, Sarah Jane; Parveen, Sahdia; Drury, Michelle; Dennison, Alison

    2017-10-01

    Ensuring an informed and effective dementia workforce is of international concern; however, there remains limited understanding of how this can be achieved. This review aimed to identify features of effective dementia educational programs. Critical interpretive synthesis underpinned by Kirkpatrick's return on investment model was applied. One hundred and fifty-two papers of variable quality were included. Common features of more efficacious educational programs included the need for educational programs to be relevant to participants' role and experience, involve active face-to-face participation, underpin practice-based learning with theory, be delivered by an experienced facilitator, have a total duration of at least 8 hours with individual sessions of 90 minutes or more, support application of learning in practice, and provide a structured tool or guideline to guide care practice. Further robust research is required to develop the evidence base; however, the findings of this review have relevance for all working in workforce education.

  16. Precursor models construction at preschool education: an approach to improve scientific education in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SABRINA PATRICIA CANEDO- IBARRA

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore young children scientific precursor models construction and how the designed teaching strategy was successful for improving science learning at preschool in a social context. We describe how 6 years old children built a precursor model of flotation based on density. The exploratory study used a qualitative data collection and analysis following a pre-interview, instructional process and post-interview design. On analyzing children’s answers after the instructional period, we realized that several children were led to both the construction of a precursor model and a general qualitative upgrade in reasoning. We conclude that learning activities were effective and that the approach used in this study may help expand and improve teaching and learning of scientific concepts in preschool education

  17. Foreign Experience in Training Future Engineering Educators for Modeling Technological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhonko, Yevhen

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the study of foreign experience in training engineering educators for modeling technological processes. It has been stated that engineering education is a field that is being dramatically developed taking into account the occurring changes in educational paradigms, global higher education space, national higher education…

  18. Mathematical Modeling Activities as a Useful Tool for Values Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doruk, Bekir Kursat

    2012-01-01

    Values education is crucial since it is one of the factors to reach success in education in broader sense and in mathematics education in particular sense. It is also important for educating next generations of societies. However, previous research showed that expected importance for values education was not given in Mathematics courses. In a few…

  19. A New Model of Clinical Education to Increase Student Placement Availability: The Capacity Development Facilitator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Michele; Nicole, Madelyn; Blackford, Julia; Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; McAllister, Lindy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a trial of a new model of clinical education designed to increase student clinical placement availability and address workforce constraints on supervision. The University of Sydney deployed the Capacity Development Facilitators (CDF) in selected Sydney hospitals to work with staff to expand student clinical placement…

  20. Space ecoliteracy- five informal education models for community empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramaiah, Jagannatha; Jagannath, Sahana; J, Spandana; J, Sadhana; Jagannath, Shobha

    Space ecoliteracy is a historical necessity and vital aspect of space age.Space Situational Awareness has taught lessons for mankind to look inward while stretching beyond cradle in human endeavours. Quality of life for every one on the only home of mankind-TERRA shall be a feasibility only after realizing Space ecoliteracy amongst all stakeholders in space quest. Objectives of Informal Environmental Education(UNESCO/UNEP/IEEP,1977) mandates awareness, attitude, knowledge, skill and participation at Individual and Community domains. Application of Space Technology at both Telecommunications and Remote Sensing domain have started making the fact that mankind has a challenge to learn and affirm earthmanship. Community empowerment focus after Earth Summit 1992 mandate of Sustainable Development has demonstrated a deluge of best practices in Agriculture,Urban, Industries and service sectors all over the globe. Further, deployment of Space technologies have proved the immense potential only after pre-empting the participatory approach at individual and community levels.Indian Space Programme with its 44th year of space service to national development has demonstrated self reliance in space technology for human development. Space technology for the most underdeveloped is a success story both in communication and information tools for quality of life. In this presentation Five Space Ecoliteracy models designed and validated since 1985 till date on informal environmental education namely 1) Ecological Environmental Studies by Students-EESS (1988): cited as one of the 20 best eco -education models by Earth Day Network,2)Community Eco Literacy Campaign-CEL,(2000): cited as a partner under Clean Up the World Campaign,UN, 3) Space Eco Literacy(2011)-an informa 8 week space eco literacy training reported at 39th COSPAR 12 assembly and 4) Space Eco Literacy by Practice(2014)- interface with formal education at institutions and 5) Space Ecoliteracy Mission as a space out reach in

  1. Ethical underpinnings for the development of health literacy in schools: ethical premises ('why'), orientations ('what') and tone ('how').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paakkari, Leena; George, Shanti

    2018-03-06

    Schools are seen as crucial environments to influence and develop the health literacy of new generations, but without sufficient reflection on the ethical underpinnings of intentions and interventions around health literacy. In contrast, we argue here that ethics are fundamental to all education. The article adopts a 'One world' approach that generalizes broadly across the so-called Global North and Global South. It also generalizes across various age groups among school pupils, advocating age appropriate application of the arguments advanced. Our analysis examines why health literacy should be promoted in schools and argues that the purpose should embrace the values of social justice and should not stop at individual and national cost benefit analysis. Discussion about the orientation of health literacy highlights meta-cognitive skills around critical thinking, self-awareness and citizenship rather than lists of practical skills. Finally, approaches to health literacy in classrooms are presented with an ethical tone that draws attention to the power relations responsible for health inequities and that does not assume that such power relations are the given framework for health literacy interventions and activities. These arguments are reinforced by urging that related debates address dynamic social realities such as international migration. We reiterate the need for ethical questions to be consciously and systematically addressed from early on, beginning with intentions to promote health literacy even before these intentions are translated into action, within the political space where education meets public health and health promotion. We underline again the context of fluidity and dynamism, as new challenges emerge within pedagogies and curricula, especially in response to changing populations in the society around.

  2. A Reduced Wind Power Grid Model for Research and Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmatov, V. [Energinet.dk, Fjordvejen 1-11, DK-7000 Fredericia (Denmark); Lund, T.; Hansen, A.D.; Sorensen, P.E. [Risoe National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Nielsen, A.H. [Centre for Electric Technology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2006-07-01

    A reduced grid model of a transmission system with a number of central power plants, consumption centers, local wind turbines and a large offshore wind farm is developed and implemented in the simulation tool PowerFactory (DIgSILENT). The reduced grid model is given by Energinet.dk, Transmission System Operator of Denmark (TSO) for Natural Gas and Electricity, to the Danish Universities and the Risoe National Laboratory. Its intended usage is education and studying of interaction between electricity-producing wind turbines and a realistic transmission system. Focus in these studies is on voltage stability issues and on the ride-through capability of different wind turbine concepts, equipped with advanced controllers, developed by the Risoe National Laboratory.

  3. MODEL CAR TRANSPORT SYSTEM - MODERN ITS EDUCATION TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Bouchner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The model car transport system is a laboratory intended for a practical development in the area of the motor traffic. It is also an important education tool for students’ hands-on training, enabling students to test the results of their own studies. The main part of the model car transportation network is a model in a ratio 1:87 (HO, based on component units of FALLER Car system, e.g. cars, traffic lights, carriage way, parking spaces, stop sections, branch-off junctions, sensors and control sections. The model enables to simulate real traffic situations. It includes a motor traffic in a city, in a small village, on a carriageway between a city and a village including a railway crossing. The traffic infrastructure includes different kinds of intersections, such as T-junctions, a classic four-way crossroad and four-way traffic circle, with and without traffic lights control. Another important part of the model is a segment of a highway which includes an elevated crossing with highway approaches and exits.

  4. Understanding the cognitive and motivational underpinnings of sexual passion from a dualistic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Frederick L; Vallerand, Robert J; Bernard-Desrosiers, Léa; Guilbault, Valérie; Rajotte, Guillaume

    2017-11-01

    Sexual passion has always been conceptualized as a one-dimensional phenomenon that emerges from interactions with partners. Drawing from the literature on passionate activities, sexual passion was defined in terms of its intrapersonal motivational and cognitive components and examined from a dualistic perspective. More specifically, in 5 studies, we investigated how 2 types of sexual passion, harmonious and obsessive, can lead to clearly distinct subjective, relational, and cognitive outcomes. Study 1 validated a scale measuring harmonious and obsessive sexual passion, and showed that each type of sexual passion leads to common, but also distinct, subjective consequences during sexual activity engagement for both singles and romantically engaged individuals. Studies 2 and 3 differentiated the constructs of harmonious and obsessive sexual passion from competing constructs existing in the literature and provided evidence for its predictive validity regarding various relational outcomes, including relationship sustainability over time. Finally, Studies 4 and 5 investigated the cognitive consequences of each type of sexual passion by showing how they reflect distinct levels of integration of sexual and relational representations, and how they can lead to biased processing of sexual information (Study 4) and conflict with ongoing sex-unrelated goals (Studies 5a and 5b). Overall, the present series of studies provides a new look at sexual passion from a motivational and cognitive intrapersonal perspective that is not restricted to interpersonal ramifications with partners. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. A Risk-Amelioration Model of Sibling Relationships: Conceptual Underpinnings and Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H.; Stoneman, Zolinda

    1996-01-01

    This study represents further work into the area of what specific processes determine whether a sibling relationship will be positive or negative. Specifically addressed was the influence of each child's personality or temperament in shaping the quality and type of sibling relationship. Significant attention was paid to analyzing sibling…

  6. An efficient and effective teaching model for ambulatory education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan-Smith, Martha; Young, William W; Keller, Adam M

    2002-07-01

    Teaching and learning in the ambulatory setting have been described as inefficient, variable, and unpredictable. A model of ambulatory teaching that was piloted in three settings (1973-1981 in a university-affiliated outpatient clinic in Portland, Oregon, 1996-2000 in a community outpatient clinic, and 2000-2001 in an outpatient clinic serving Dartmouth Medical School's teaching hospital) that combines a system of education and a system of patient care is presented. Fully integrating learners into the office practice using creative scheduling, pre-rotation learning, and learner competence certification enabled the learners to provide care in roles traditionally fulfilled by physicians and nurses. Practice redesign made learners active members of the patient care team by involving them in such tasks as patient intake, histories and physicals, patient education, and monitoring of patient progress between visits. So that learners can be active members of the patient care team on the first day of clinic, pre-training is provided by the clerkship or residency so that they are able to competently provide care in the time available. To assure effective education, teaching and learning times are explicitly scheduled by parallel booking of patients for the learner and the preceptor at the same time. In the pilot settings this teaching model maintained or improved preceptor productivity and on-time efficiency compared with these outcomes of traditional scheduling. The time spent alone with patients, in direct observation by preceptors, and for scheduled case discussion was appreciated by learners. Increased satisfaction was enjoyed by learners, teachers, clinic staff, and patients. Barriers to implementation include too few examining rooms, inability to manipulate patient appointment schedules, and learners' not being present in a teaching clinic all the time.

  7. Research on "STI +" Model in College Entrepreneurship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maike; Xu, Shuo; Gu, Jibao

    2017-01-01

    The current state attaches great importance to college entrepreneurship education, but entrepreneurship education should combine with college students' professional learning. Different professional learning backgrounds have commonalities in entrepreneurship education; there may be differences, too. Various professional knowledge background and…

  8. A crowdsourcing model for creating preclinical medical education study tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Hansen C; Dattilo, Jonathan R; Jonas, Andrea M; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2013-06-01

    During their preclinical course work, medical students must memorize and recall substantial amounts of information. Recent trends in medical education emphasize collaboration through team-based learning. In the technology world, the trend toward collaboration has been characterized by the crowdsourcing movement. In 2011, the authors developed an innovative approach to team-based learning that combined students' use of flashcards to master large volumes of content with a crowdsourcing model, using a simple informatics system to enable those students to share in the effort of generating concise, high-yield study materials. The authors used Google Drive and developed a simple Java software program that enabled students to simultaneously access and edit sets of questions and answers in the form of flashcards. Through this crowdsourcing model, medical students in the class of 2014 at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine created a database of over 16,000 questions that corresponded to the Genes to Society basic science curriculum. An analysis of exam scores revealed that students in the class of 2014 outperformed those in the class of 2013, who did not have access to the flashcard system, and a survey of students demonstrated that users were generally satisfied with the system and found it a valuable study tool. In this article, the authors describe the development and implementation of their crowdsourcing model for creating study materials, emphasize its simplicity and user-friendliness, describe its impact on students' exam performance, and discuss how students in any educational discipline could implement a similar model of collaborative learning.

  9. Interprofessional collaboration: three best practice models of interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane R. Bridges

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education is a collaborative approach to develop healthcare students as future interprofessional team members and a recommendation suggested by the Institute of Medicine. Complex medical issues can be best addressed by interprofessional teams. Training future healthcare providers to work in such teams will help facilitate this model resulting in improved healthcare outcomes for patients. In this paper, three universities, the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, the University of Florida and the University of Washington describe their training curricula models of collaborative and interprofessional education.The models represent a didactic program, a community-based experience and an interprofessional-simulation experience. The didactic program emphasizes interprofessional team building skills, knowledge of professions, patient centered care, service learning, the impact of culture on healthcare delivery and an interprofessional clinical component. The community-based experience demonstrates how interprofessional collaborations provide service to patients and how the environment and availability of resources impact one's health status. The interprofessional-simulation experience describes clinical team skills training in both formative and summative simulations used to develop skills in communication and leadership.One common theme leading to a successful experience among these three interprofessional models included helping students to understand their own professional identity while gaining an understanding of other professional's roles on the health care team. Commitment from departments and colleges, diverse calendar agreements, curricular mapping, mentor and faculty training, a sense of community, adequate physical space, technology, and community relationships were all identified as critical resources for a successful program. Summary recommendations for best practices included the need for administrative

  10. Interprofessional collaboration: three best practice models of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Diane R; Davidson, Richard A; Odegard, Peggy Soule; Maki, Ian V; Tomkowiak, John

    2011-04-08

    Interprofessional education is a collaborative approach to develop healthcare students as future interprofessional team members and a recommendation suggested by the Institute of Medicine. Complex medical issues can be best addressed by interprofessional teams. Training future healthcare providers to work in such teams will help facilitate this model resulting in improved healthcare outcomes for patients. In this paper, three universities, the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, the University of Florida and the University of Washington describe their training curricula models of collaborative and interprofessional education.The models represent a didactic program, a community-based experience and an interprofessional-simulation experience. The didactic program emphasizes interprofessional team building skills, knowledge of professions, patient centered care, service learning, the impact of culture on healthcare delivery and an interprofessional clinical component. The community-based experience demonstrates how interprofessional collaborations provide service to patients and how the environment and availability of resources impact one's health status. The interprofessional-simulation experience describes clinical team skills training in both formative and summative simulations used to develop skills in communication and leadership.One common theme leading to a successful experience among these three interprofessional models included helping students to understand their own professional identity while gaining an understanding of other professional's roles on the health care team. Commitment from departments and colleges, diverse calendar agreements, curricular mapping, mentor and faculty training, a sense of community, adequate physical space, technology, and community relationships were all identified as critical resources for a successful program. Summary recommendations for best practices included the need for administrative support

  11. Interprofessional collaboration: three best practice models of interprofessional education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Diane R.; Davidson, Richard A.; Odegard, Peggy Soule; Maki, Ian V.; Tomkowiak, John

    2011-01-01

    Interprofessional education is a collaborative approach to develop healthcare students as future interprofessional team members and a recommendation suggested by the Institute of Medicine. Complex medical issues can be best addressed by interprofessional teams. Training future healthcare providers to work in such teams will help facilitate this model resulting in improved healthcare outcomes for patients. In this paper, three universities, the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, the University of Florida and the University of Washington describe their training curricula models of collaborative and interprofessional education. The models represent a didactic program, a community-based experience and an interprofessional-simulation experience. The didactic program emphasizes interprofessional team building skills, knowledge of professions, patient centered care, service learning, the impact of culture on healthcare delivery and an interprofessional clinical component. The community-based experience demonstrates how interprofessional collaborations provide service to patients and how the environment and availability of resources impact one's health status. The interprofessional-simulation experience describes clinical team skills training in both formative and summative simulations used to develop skills in communication and leadership. One common theme leading to a successful experience among these three interprofessional models included helping students to understand their own professional identity while gaining an understanding of other professional's roles on the health care team. Commitment from departments and colleges, diverse calendar agreements, curricular mapping, mentor and faculty training, a sense of community, adequate physical space, technology, and community relationships were all identified as critical resources for a successful program. Summary recommendations for best practices included the need for administrative support

  12. Evaluation of Medical Education virtual Program: P3 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Rita; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Boroumand, Maryam

    2016-10-01

    In e-learning, people get involved in a process and create the content (product) and make it available for virtual learners. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the first virtual master program in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences according to P3 Model. This is an evaluation research study with post single group design used to determine how effective this program was. All students 60 who participated more than one year in this virtual program and 21 experts including teachers and directors participated in this evaluation project. Based on the P3 e-learning model, an evaluation tool with 5-point Likert rating scale was designed and applied to collect the descriptive data. Students reported storyboard and course design as the most desirable element of learning environment (2.30±0.76), but they declared technical support as the less desirable part (1.17±1.23). Presence of such framework in this regard and using it within the format of appropriate tools for evaluation of e-learning in universities and higher education institutes, which present e-learning curricula in the country, may contribute to implementation of the present and future e-learning curricula efficiently and guarantee its implementation in an appropriate way.

  13. Evaluation of medical education virtual program: P3 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA REZAEE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In e-learning, people get involved in a process and create the content (product and make it available for virtual learners. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the first virtual master program in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences according to P3 Model. Methods: This is an evaluation research study with post single group design used to determine how effective this program was. All students 60 who participated more than one year in this virtual program and 21 experts including teachers and directors participated in this evaluation project. Based on the P3 e-learning model, an evaluation tool with 5-point Likert rating scale was designed and applied to collect the descriptive data. Results: Students reported storyboard and course design as the most desirable element of learning environment (2.30±0.76, but they declared technical support as the less desirable part (1.17±1.23. Conclusion: Presence of such framework in this regard and using it within the format of appropriate tools for evaluation of e-learning in universities and higher education institutes, which present e-learning curricula in the country, may contribute to implementation of the present and future e-learning curricula efficiently and guarantee its implementation in an appropriate way.

  14. Derivation and Implementation of a Model Teaching the Nature of Science Using Informal Science Education Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Barbara S.; Burkett, Ruth; Leard, Cyndy

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a model for using informal science education venues as contexts within which to teach the nature of science. The model was initially developed to enable university education students to teach science in elementary schools so as to be consistent with "National Science Education Standards" (NSES) (1996) and "A Framework for…

  15. MBA in Education Leadership: A Model for Developing an Interdisciplinary Principal Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel A.; Somers, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a model for developing an interdisciplinary principal preparation program, an MBA in Education Leadership, which integrates best practices in both education and business within an educational context. The paper addresses gaps that exist in many traditional principal preparation programs and provides an alternative model, which…

  16. How do you assign persistent identifiers to extracts from large, complex, dynamic data sets that underpin scholarly publications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, Lesley; Car, Nicholas; Evans, Benjamin; Klump, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Persistent identifiers in the form of a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) are becoming more mainstream, assigned at both the collection and dataset level. For static datasets, this is a relatively straight-forward matter. However, many new data collections are dynamic, with new data being appended, models and derivative products being revised with new data, or the data itself revised as processing methods are improved. Further, because data collections are becoming accessible as services, researchers can log in and dynamically create user-defined subsets for specific research projects: they also can easily mix and match data from multiple collections, each of which can have a complex history. Inevitably extracts from such dynamic data sets underpin scholarly publications, and this presents new challenges. The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has been experiencing and making progress towards addressing these issues. The NCI is large node of the Research Data Services initiative (RDS) of the Australian Government's research infrastructure, which currently makes available over 10 PBytes of priority research collections, ranging from geosciences, geophysics, environment, and climate, through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and social sciences. Data are replicated to, or are produced at, NCI and then processed there to higher-level data products or directly analysed. Individual datasets range from multi-petabyte computational models and large volume raster arrays, down to gigabyte size, ultra-high resolution datasets. To facilitate access, maximise reuse and enable integration across the disciplines, datasets have been organized on a platform called the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). Combined, the NERDIP data collections form a rich and diverse asset for researchers: their co-location and standardization optimises the value of existing data, and forms a new resource to underpin data-intensive Science. New publication

  17. Study on development of education model and its evaluation system for radiation safety

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, K W; Nam, Y M

    2002-01-01

    As one of the detailed action strategy of multi object preparedness for strengthening of radiation safety management by MOST, this project was performed, in order to promote the safety culture for user and radiation worker through effective education program. For the prevention of radiological accident and effective implementation of radiation safety education and training, this project has been carried out the development of education model and its evaluation system on radiation safety. In the development of new education model, education course was classified; new and old radiation worker, temporary worker, lecturer and manager. The education model includes the contents of expanding the education opportunity and workplace training. In the development of evaluation system, the recognition criteria for commission-education institute and inside-education institute which should establish by law were suggested for evaluation program. The recognition criteria contains classification, student, method, facilities, ...

  18. MODELING OF SYSTEM COMPONENTS OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Samerkhanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the principles of System Studies, describes the components of the educational programs of the control system. Educational Program Management is a set of substantive, procedural, resource, subject-activity, efficiently and evaluation components, which ensures the integrity of integration processes at all levels of education. Ensuring stability and development in the management of educational programs is achieved by identifying and securing social norms, the status of the educational institution program managers to ensure the achievement of modern quality of education.Content Management provides the relevant educational content in accordance with the requirements of the educational and professional standards; process control ensures the efficient organization of rational distribution process flows; Resource Management provides optimal distribution of personnel, information and methodological, material and technical equipment of the educational program; contingent management provides subject-activity interaction of participants of the educational process; quality control ensures the quality of educational services.

  19. Shared Curriculum Model: A Promising Practice for Education Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Liz; Gorski, Mary Sue; Sroczynski, Maureen; Farmer, Pat; Wortock, Jean

    2015-12-01

    The shared curriculum model is one of four successful models of academic progression identified through a consensus-building process facilitated by The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, AARP, and the AARP Foundation. Seamless academic progression from the associate degree in nursing (ADN) to the baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN) is achieved either by simultaneously revising both ADN and BSN curricula or by making targeted adjustments in ADN or BSN curricula to create a unified academic progression. Systematic vetting and definitive agreement on nursing prerequisites and corequisites, general education courses, nursing major content, and general degree requirements are necessary to ensure coordinated degree progression. A standardized set of expectations for beginning professional practice and for unique baccalaureate nursing knowledge ensures vital nursing content across the ADN-to-BSN continuum. Examples of state and regional ADN-to-BSN progression programs using the shared curriculum model are highlighted. The shared curriculum model is a promising practical and sustainable approach to seamless ADN-to-BSN academic progression. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. TO THE QUESTION OF MODELS OF ANALYSIS ASSESSING FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Galushkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, author discusses model of analysis assessing the financial condition of the educational organization of higher education. Author analyzes the sequence (algorithm analysis of fi nancial and economic activity of the educational organization of higher education in the process of separating the analysis of questions of the analysis of the state educational institutions of higher education and non-state educational institutions of higher education. Author also deals with the determination of the average annual values of indicators of educational institution of higher education. In conclusion, the author makes a scientifi cally-based own conclusions and gives a number of suggestions.Goal / task. Aim of the article is to identify further ways of optimizing the financial condition of the educational organization of higher education.Methodology. Author started his research with the setting and the formulation of research objectives. The author defined the subject of the study, prepared by the empirical basis of the study.Results. According to the results of the study produced five research-based fi ndings presented in the article.Conclusions / signifi cance. 1. Analysis of the financial condition of the educational institutions of higher education can be defi ned as a complex and complex economic studies to identify patterns of the system factors in the financial well-being, the subject of analysis of educational, teaching, research and related activities.2. Integral assessment of the conditions of the financial analysis of the educational institution of higher education leads to the conclusion that it should include a number of stages.3. Analysis of the financial condition of the educational institution of higher education should be characterized as a specific type of analytical work. However, it is obvious that it can not be a simple kind of financial analysis of its object, and is a special form of research. The most significant

  1. Teachers’ individual action theories about competence-based education: the value of the cognitive apprenticeship model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seezink, Audrey; Poell, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Seezink, A., Poell, R. F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2009). Teachers' individual action theories about competence-based education: The value of the cognitive apprenticeship model. Journal of Vocational Education & Training, 61, 203-215.

  2. A model of collaboration between nursing education institutions in the North West Province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen K. Direko

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: A model of collaboration was acceptable to the majority of nurse education stakeholders. Other implications are that there was a need for the improvement of scholarship among nurse educators and clinical mentors, sharing rare skills, and addressing perceived challenges.

  3. Life course epidemiology: Modeling educational attainment with administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Leslie L; Wall-Wieler, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the processes across childhood and adolescence that affect later life inequalities depends on many variables for a large number of individuals measured over substantial time periods. Linkable administrative data were used to generate birth cohorts and to study pathways of inequity in childhood and early adolescence leading to differences in educational attainment. Advantages and disadvantages of using large administrative data bases for such research were highlighted. Children born in Manitoba, Canada between 1982 and 1995 were followed until age 19 (N = 89,763), with many time-invariant measures serving as controls. Five time-varying predictors of high school graduation-three social and two health-were modelled using logistic regression and a framework for examining predictors across the life course. For each time-varying predictor, six temporal patterns were tested: full, accumulation of risk, sensitive period, and three critical period models. Predictors measured in early adolescence generated the highest odds ratios, suggesting the importance of adolescence. Full models provided the best fit for the three time-varying social measures. Residence in a low-income neighborhood was a particularly influential predictor of not graduating from high school. The transmission of risk across developmental periods was also highlighted; exposure in one period had significant implications for subsequent life stages. This study advances life course epidemiology, using administrative data to clarify the relationships among several measures of social behavior, cognitive development, and health. Analyses of temporal patterns can be useful in studying such other outcomes as educational achievement, teen pregnancy, and workforce participation.

  4. Life course epidemiology: Modeling educational attainment with administrative data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie L Roos

    Full Text Available Understanding the processes across childhood and adolescence that affect later life inequalities depends on many variables for a large number of individuals measured over substantial time periods. Linkable administrative data were used to generate birth cohorts and to study pathways of inequity in childhood and early adolescence leading to differences in educational attainment. Advantages and disadvantages of using large administrative data bases for such research were highlighted.Children born in Manitoba, Canada between 1982 and 1995 were followed until age 19 (N = 89,763, with many time-invariant measures serving as controls. Five time-varying predictors of high school graduation-three social and two health-were modelled using logistic regression and a framework for examining predictors across the life course. For each time-varying predictor, six temporal patterns were tested: full, accumulation of risk, sensitive period, and three critical period models.Predictors measured in early adolescence generated the highest odds ratios, suggesting the importance of adolescence. Full models provided the best fit for the three time-varying social measures. Residence in a low-income neighborhood was a particularly influential predictor of not graduating from high school. The transmission of risk across developmental periods was also highlighted; exposure in one period had significant implications for subsequent life stages.This study advances life course epidemiology, using administrative data to clarify the relationships among several measures of social behavior, cognitive development, and health. Analyses of temporal patterns can be useful in studying such other outcomes as educational achievement, teen pregnancy, and workforce participation.

  5. Educational models in academic research on the teaching practices in science education in elementary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Chiacchio Azevedo Fernandes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We intended to identify the features and pedagogical trends of the school practices proposed and implemented in thesis and dissertations directed to science education at elementary school level from 1972 to 2005. Thirty studies were analysed regarding the teaching methodology, instructional resources, teacher-student relationships, evaluation, theoretical framework, and educational model (traditional, rediscovery, constructivist, technicist, STS, socio-cultural. We found that the constructivist model was dominant (63%, followed by the socio-cultural (20% and the rediscovery one (10%, and that the pedagogical practices were elaborated by researchers, applied by teachers and performed by students, showing a vertical hierarchy between university and school. However, the implemented practices (actual level usually were quite distant from the researchers discourse (proposed level. We also observed that the researchers didn’t find many difficulties in designing and applying a pedagogical proposal with innovative features, but to make changes in the school and social relations, as well as in the evaluation practices, is a barrier difficult to overcome.

  6. Post-Secondary Education Development in South East Asia: A Model for Curriculum Development in Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Allan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a model for continuing education that emanated from the author's involvement in the Participatory Action Research (PAR) component of Simon Fraser University's Adult Education for Economic Development (AEED) Project, funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). The project's goal was to develop new centers…

  7. Pre-Service Education and Attitudes towards Inclusion: The Role of the Teacher Educator within a Permeated Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Jackie

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the role of teacher educators working within a permeated teaching model in Northern Ireland, and student teachers' attitudes towards special educational needs (SEN) and inclusion. A cohort of 125 student teachers representing eight subject areas responded to a survey exploring attitudes towards issues relating to inclusive…

  8. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.O. [Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lapham, E.V. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Child Development Center

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  9. Educational Models in the Historical Development of Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Gregorio

    1978-01-01

    Examines recent experiments and historical processes in Latin American education since the beginning of the 19th century. Topics discussed include Spanish colonial educational policies, political influences on education after independence, moves for popular education, ascent of the middle classes, and the relationship between the educational…

  10. The Physical Education and Sport Interface: Models, Maxims and Maelstrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Clive C.

    2011-01-01

    Within many school contexts physical education and sport have historically been positioned as polemic, and while there has been plenty of rhetoric about physical education as well as sport within education, there has seldom been engaged debate or discussion about the relationship between physical education and sport in school settings. This…

  11. Modelling Inclusive Special Needs Education: Insights from Dutch Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bij, T.; Geijsel, F. P.; Garst, G. J. A.; Ten Dam, G. T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive special needs education is prominent on the international education agenda. Research on the characteristics of inclusive education for students with special needs and schools providing this is scarce, however. Our aim in the present study was therefore to further theory-building with regard to inclusive special needs education. On the…

  12. An Integrated Model of Decision-Making in Health Contexts: The Role of Science Education in Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Julia C.

    2018-01-01

    Health education is to foster health literacy, informed decision-making and to promote health behaviour. To date, there are several models that seek to explain health behaviour (e.g. the Theory of Planned Behaviour or the Health Belief Model). These models include motivational factors (expectancies and values) that play a role in decision-making…

  13. THE INTEGRATION INTERACTION OF PEDAGOGICAL HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION AND SCHOOL IN DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE MODELS OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Pavel Pavlovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to an actual problem of integration interaction of educational institutions of various levels. The concepts of integration and pedagogical interaction are analyzed; the features and the intrinsic characteristics which are showing in modern conditions of a development of education are marked out in this article. The question of mechanisms of realization of integration interaction is designated there. The distance interactive courses devoted to development of innovative models of education are offered as one of the possible mechanisms of realization of integration interaction of pedagogical higher education institution and establishments of the general education. The development of innovative models of education is considered in two directions: on the one hand, the role of pedagogical higher education institution in the spread of innovations and rendering the methodical help to teachers in their development is allocated; on the other hand, the way of integration interaction, in particular, the use of Moodle environment and Adobe Connect system, can be considered as innovative. Possibilities of Moodle ("Modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment" as environments of distance learning which is intended for development and placement of training and methodical materials in the Internet/the Intranet network and the organization of educational process on their basis, and also Adobe Connect as flexible system of the distributed training and communication with use of technologies of the web communications, allowing to provide a possibility of teaching, training and collaboration at any distance on the Internet are characterized in the article. The feature of the research is design and realization of distance learning on the basis of a Moodle environment and Adobe Connect system combination in online modes and offline, use of interactive models of occupations. The results of research received during training of teachers at

  14. Rural model dedicated education unit: partnership between college and hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Lisa M

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the pilot project development of a rural model Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) by a rural college nursing program and a rural hospital to increase student nurses' confidence and proficiency and improve recruitment of prepared rural staff nurses. Traditionally, for economies of scale, most student clinical rotations occurred in urban settings with the number of students per clinical instructor allowed by the state board of nursing. College budget constraints negated the placement of fewer than this mandated maximum number of students in a rural hospital with a clinical instructor; moreover, rural hospitals could not accommodate 10 students at one time. Rural nursing students were anxious in the urban settings, and this anxiety precluded learning in many instances. Rural hospitals face higher registered nurse vacancies than urban centers. Of the nurses applying for open positions, many were not prepared for the demands of rural nursing, resulting in increased turnover and high orientation costs. The rural model DEU addressed issues of both the nursing program and the hospital. The design and development of the rural model DEU and the advantages of the partnership for the college nursing program and the hospital are discussed. Initial outcomes and serendipitous findings from the pilot project are also discussed. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Complex Coronary Hemodynamics - Simple Analog Modelling as an Educational Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Gaurav R; Peter, Elvis; Kakouros, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Invasive coronary angiography remains the cornerstone for evaluation of coronary stenoses despite there being a poor correlation between luminal loss assessment by coronary luminography and myocardial ischemia. This is especially true for coronary lesions deemed moderate by visual assessment. Coronary pressure-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) has emerged as the gold standard for the evaluation of hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenosis, which is cost effective and leads to improved patient outcomes. There are, however, several limitations to the use of FFR including the evaluation of serial stenoses. In this article, we discuss the electronic-hydraulic analogy and the utility of simple electrical modelling to mimic the coronary circulation and coronary stenoses. We exemplify the effect of tandem coronary lesions on the FFR by modelling of a patient with sequential disease segments and complex anatomy. We believe that such computational modelling can serve as a powerful educational tool to help clinicians better understand the complexity of coronary hemodynamics and improve patient care.

  16. Toward a model of institutional scholarship in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Leila; Mucciolo, Thomas W

    2011-12-01

    Using an expanded definition of scholarship that goes beyond the scholarship of discovery (research) to include the scholarship of integration, the scholarship of application, and the scholarship of teaching, this article explains interrelationships among these scholarship types in health professions and specifically dental education. Such interrelationships can lead to meaningful expansion of scholarship especially in the form of translational research, which relies on the development of all four of these types of scholarship. In recent years, health care-related organizations have been seeking ways to expand translational research. At the same time, an increasing number of academic institutions have been considering how to redefine what qualifies as advancing one's discipline in ways that go beyond mere number of publications and grants to better reflect the faculty member's overall scholarly effort. These redefinitions and a new attention to scholarly collaboration have led to the concept of a "complete scholar": one who makes contributions in all four areas of scholarship by collaborating with other scholars, practitioners, and members of the community. Expanding the concept of a complete scholar to that of a "complete institution" is the basis for what we propose as a Model of Institutional Scholarship. This model is exemplified by the Cochrane Collaboration, a gold standard for a complete vision of research on evidence-based health care. In the Model of Institutional Scholarship, an institution can visualize, plan, develop, and orchestrate all scholarship being conducted within its realm, creating collaborations among individual efforts that will enhance effectiveness and the creation of new knowledge.

  17. Competency-based education: a new model for teaching orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alman, Benjamin A; Ferguson, Peter; Kraemer, William; Nousiainen, Markku T; Reznick, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    The current methods used to train residents to become orthopaedic surgeons are based on tradition, not evidence-based models. Educators have only a limited ability to assess trainees for competency using validated tests in various domains. The reduction in resident work hours limits the time available for clinical training, which has resulted in some calls for lengthening the training process. Another approach to address limited training hours is to focus training in a program that allows residents to graduate from a rotation based on demonstrated competency rather than on time on a service. A pilot orthopaedic residency curriculum, which uses a competency-based framework of resident training and maximizes the use of available training hours, has been designed and is being implemented.

  18. The Pedagogical Reflection Model - an educational perspective on clinical decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voergaard Poulsen, Bettina; Vibholm Persson, Stine; Skriver, Mette

    Clinical decision-making is important in patient-centred nursing, which is known in nursing education and research (1) The Pedagogical Reflection Model (PRM) can provide a framework that supports students’ decision-making in patient-specific situations. PRM is based on the assumption that clinical......) The aims of this study were to explore how nurse students and clinical supervisors use PRM as method to reflect before, during and after PRM guidance in relation to clinical decisions in the first year of clinical practice...... decision-making needs to take into account; 1) clinical experiences, 2) the perspective of the patient, 3) clinical observations and investigations, 4) knowledge about patients experiences of being a patient and ill, 5) medical knowledge about diseases, and 6) the organizational framework (2,3,4)(Figure 1...

  19. The relational underpinnings of quality internal auditing in medical clinics in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Abraham; Zisu, Malka

    2009-03-01

    Internal auditing is a key mechanism in enhancing organizational reliability. However, research on the ways quality internal auditing is enabled through learning, deterrence, motivation and process improvement is scant. In particular, the relational underpinnings of internal auditing have been understudied. This study attempts to address this need by examining how organizational trust, perceived organizational support and psychological safety enable internal auditing. Data collected from employees in medical clinics of one of the largest healthcare organizations in Israel at two points in time six months apart. Our results show that organizational trust and perceived organizational support are positively related to psychological safety (measured at time 1), which, in turn, is associated with internal auditing (measured at time 2).

  20. Comparing instrumental and deliberative paradigms underpinning the assessment of social values for cultural ecosystem services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raymond, Christopher M.; Kenter, Jasper O.; Plieninger, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapid advancements in the development of non-monetary techniques for the assessment of social values for ecosystem services, little research attention has been devoted to the evaluation of their underpinning paradigms. This study evaluates two contrasting paradigms for the assessment...... of social values in non-monetary terms: an instrumental paradigm involving an objective assessment of the distribution, type and/or intensity of values that individuals assign to the current state of ecosystems and a deliberative paradigm involving the exploration of desired end states through group...... discussion. We present and then justify through case examples two approaches for assessing social values for ecosystem services using the instrumental paradigm and two approaches using the deliberative paradigm. Each approach makes different assumptions about: the underlying rationale for values assessment...

  1. [Evaluation of flipped classroom teaching model in undergraduates education of oral and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ming; Cao, Xia; Fang, Xiao; Wang, Xu-dong; Zhang, Li-li; Zheng, Jia-wei; Shen, Guo-fang

    2015-12-01

    Flipped classroom is a new teaching model which is different from the traditional teaching method. The history and characteristics of flipped classroom teaching model were introduced in this paper. A discussion on how to establish flipped classroom teaching protocol in oral and maxillofacial surgery education was carried out. Curriculum transformation, construction of education model and possible challenges were analyzed and discussed.

  2. Developing the Practising Model in Physical Education: An Expository Outline Focusing on Movement Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, D. M.; Aggerholm, K.; Standal, O.; Larsson, H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Physical educators currently have a number of pedagogical (or curricular) models at their disposal. While existing models have been well-received in educational contexts, these models seek to extend students' capacities within a limited number of "human activities" (Arendt, 1958). The activity of "human practising,"…

  3. Systems Models in Educational Research: A Review and Realignment in the Context of Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nicolette

    2015-01-01

    System models are commonly used in tertiary education as a mechanism for describing the interacting components of educational phenomena, but have hitherto been uncritically accepted. This paper provides a critical review of existing systems models, including the 3P model defined Biggs, and outlines their conceptual challenges. A revised model…

  4. The Integration of Environmental Education in Science Materials by Using "MOTORIC" Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukarjita, I. Wayan; Ardi, Muhammad; Rachman, Abdul; Supu, Amiruddin; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2015-01-01

    The research of the integration of Environmental Education in science subject matter by application of "MOTORIC" Learning models has carried out on Junior High School Kupang Nusa Tenggara Timur Indonesia. "MOTORIC" learning model is an Environmental Education (EE) learning model that collaborate three learning approach i.e.…

  5. Comorbid substance use disorder in schizophrenia: a selective overview of neurobiological and cognitive underpinnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Patrizia; Daum, Irene

    2013-09-01

    Although individuals with schizophrenia show a lifetime prevalence of 50% for suffering from a comorbid substance use disorder, substance abuse usually represents an exclusion criterion for studies on schizophrenia. This implies that surprisingly little is known about a large group of patients who are particularly difficult to treat. The aim of the present work is to provide a brief and non-exhaustive overview of the current knowledgebase about neurobiological and cognitive underpinnings for dual diagnosis schizophrenia patients. Studies published within the last 20 years were considered using computerized search engines. The focus was on nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, cannabis and cocaine being among the most common substances of abuse. All drugs of abuse target dopaminergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission which are also involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Current literature suggests that neurocognitive function might beless disrupted in substance-abusing compared to non-abusing schizophrenia patients, but in particular the neuroimaging database on this topic is sparse. Detrimental effects on brain structure and function were shown for patients for whom alcohol is the main substance of abuse. It is as yet unclear whether this finding might be an artifact of age differences of patient subgroups with different substance abuse patterns. More research is warranted on the specific neurocognitive underpinnings of schizophrenia patients abusing distinct psychoactive substances. Treatment programs might either benefit from preserved cognitive function as a resource or specifically target cognitive impairment in different subgroups of addicted schizophrenia patients. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  6. SYSTEMIC RESEARCH MODEL OF DEVELOPMENT OF MARKETING THOUGHT AND EDUCATION IN CROATIA

    OpenAIRE

    Renko, Nataša

    2001-01-01

    The author conceived the model for systemic research of development of marketing thought and education in Croatia. The model consists of six elements which are completely interactive and have essential influence on development of marketing educational system. The model also helped to evaluate historical occurences which had preceded and influenced the present situation in Croatia, and which might have possible consequences to future development of marketing educational system in Croatia.

  7. Impact of Diabetes Education Based on Type 1 Diabetes management model

    OpenAIRE

    Ocakçı, Ayşe Ferda

    2015-01-01

    The diabetes management is considered to be adversely affected when adolescent-specific education methods are not used. In this study, Type 1 Diabetes Management Model which ensures standardisation of the diabetes education and is based on the health promotion model and formed by applying health promotion model (HPM) according to the mastery-learning theory was used. The study was performed to determine effectiveness of diabetes education based on “Type 1 Diabetes Management Model” on adolesc...

  8. Integrating centralized and decentralized organization structures: an education and development model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, R; Banks, A

    2001-01-01

    Organization change efforts have led to critically examining the structure of education and development departments within hospitals. This qualitative study evaluated an education and development model in an academic health sciences center. The model combines centralization and decentralization. The study results can be used by staff development educators and administrators when organization structure is questioned. This particular model maximizes the benefits and minimizes the limitations of centralized and decentralized structures.

  9. A DISTANCE EDUCATION MODEL FOR JORDANIAN STUDENTS BASED ON AN EMPIRICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad SHAHER MASHHOUR

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance education is expanding worldwide. Numbers of students enrolled in distance education are increasing at very high rates. Distance education is said to be the future of education because it addresses educational needs of the new millennium. This paper represents the findings of an empirical study on a sample of Jordanian distance education students into a requirement model that addresses the need of such education at the national level. The responses of the sample show that distance education is offering a viable and satisfactory alternative to those who cannot enroll in regular residential education. The study also shows that the shortcomings of the regular and the current form of distance education in Jordan can be overcome by the use of modern information technology.

  10. The processes underpinning reductions in disability among people with chronic neck pain. A preliminary comparison between two distinct types of physiotherapy intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dave P; Woby, Steve R

    2018-04-01

    To establish whether different processes underpin changes in disability in people with neck pain who underwent two types of active physiotherapy intervention. This study was a sub-analysis of a randomized controlled trial assessing whether the addition of Interactive Behavioral Modification Therapy (a cognitively informed physiotherapy treatment) to a Progressive Neck Exercise Program improved outcome in patients with chronic neck pain. Regression analyses were performed to determine the extent to which demographics, changes in pain, and changes in certain cognitive factors were related to changes in disability. In the progressive neck exercise group, changes in levels of pain intensity were the only factor significantly related to change in disability, explaining 33% of the variance. In the interactive behavioral modification therapy group, changes in pain intensity, and catastrophizing together explained 54% of the variance in change in disability. Only changes in catastrophizing displayed a significant β value in the final model. Different processes appear to underpin changes in disability in patients undergoing cognitively informed physiotherapy to those undergoing a primarily exercise-based approach. Implications for rehabilitation Certain cognitive factors are known to be related to levels of disability in patients with chronic neck pain Specifically targeting these factors results in more patients making a clinically meaningful reduction in disability Different processes appear to underpin reductions in disability when people with neck pain are treated with cognitively informed physiotherapy to when treated with exercise alone, which may account for why more patients improve when treated in this manner. Reductions in catastrophizing appear to be particularly important and efforts should be made to assess and treat catastrophic thoughts in people with chronic neck pain.

  11. Mechanisms underpinning effective peer support: a qualitative analysis of interactions between expert peers and patients newly-diagnosed with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proudfoot Judith G

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing burden on mental health services has led to the growing use of peer support in psychological interventions. Four theoretical mechanisms have been proposed to underpin effective peer support: advice grounded in experiential knowledge, social support, social comparison and the helper therapy principle. However, there has been a lack of studies examining whether these mechanisms are also evident in clinical populations in which interpersonal dysfunction is common, such as bipolar disorder. Method This qualitative study, conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial, examined whether the four mechanisms proposed to underpin effective peer support were expressed in the email exchange between 44 individuals newly-diagnosed with bipolar disorder and their Informed Supporters (n = 4, over the course of a supported online psychoeducation program for bipolar disorder. A total of 104 text segments were extracted and coded. The data were complemented by face-to-face interviews with three of the four Informed Supporters who participated in the study. Results Qualitative analyses of the email interchange and interview transcripts revealed rich examples of all four mechanisms. The data illustrated how the involvement of Informed Supporters resulted in numerous benefits for the newly-diagnosed individuals, including the provision of practical strategies for illness management as well as emotional support throughout the intervention. The Informed Supporters encouraged the development of positive relationships with mental health services, and acted as role models for treatment adherence. The Informed Supporters themselves reported gaining a number of benefits from helping, including a greater sense of connectedness with the mental health system, as well as a broader knowledge of illness management strategies. Conclusions Examples of the mechanisms underpinning effective peer support were found in the sample of emails from

  12. A Staff Education Consortium: One Model for Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Cheryl Beth; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the development, organization, activities, problems, and future of a staff education consortium of five medical center hospitals in Boston. The purposes of the consortium are mutual sharing, reduction in duplication, and cost containment of educational programing. (JOW)

  13. Social influence and student choice of higher education institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Krezel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This conceptual paper discusses changes in higher education sector, growing competition as a result of new private education providers and the adoption of student-as-customer perspective in recruitment and marketing of higher education institutions. The paper reviews numerous models of student choice and identifies inconsistencies in the role of social factors in the student choice. These inconsistencies are of special importance in current higher education landscape and growing prominence of peer-to-peer communication via social media. Consequently, a thorough understanding of influences that effect student choice of higher education institution is imperative. This conceptual paper puts forward a conceptual framework that integrates Kelman’s processes of social influence and Cialdini-Goldstein’s goals that underpin the acceptance of that influence to examine the effects social context has on student choice of higher education institution.

  14. Science in bullet points: How to compile scientific results to underpin guidelines for CO2 storage for the German transposition of the European CCS Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    In 2012 the German Parliament passed the transposition of the EC Directive 2009/31/EC the "Carbon Dioxide Storage Law" (KSpG). The law focuses on the demonstration of the CO2 storage technology and mainly regulates the storage part of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) chain. As the law has a conceptual character, appendix 1 provides a description of criteria for the characterisation and assessment of a potential CO2 storage site starting with field data ending with requirements for dynamic modelling of the storage complex. Appendix 2 describes the expected monitoring system during all relevant phases of a life cycle of a CO2 storage site. The criteria given in the appendices are of general nature, which reflects on one hand that the CO2 storage technology is still being developed and on the other hand that site specific aspects needs to be considered. In 2004 the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany launched the programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN with one key aspect being the development of technologies for a sustainable storage of carbon dioxide in geological formations. Within this research field more than 30 projects in three phases have been funded until the end of 2014. In order to benefit from the gathered knowledge and use the experiences for the policy/law making process the umbrella project AUGE has been launched in October 2012 with a life time of three years. The aim of the project is to review and compile all results of projects funded during the three phases to underpin the appendices of the KSpG. In the first part of the paper the most important findings of the project with regard to the overall risk of a geological CO2 storage and the procedure of compiling the guidance document will be discussed. Milestones of this project were • the compilation of the results of national, European and international projects; • interviews with stakeholders; • a workshops to define state of the art for certain involved technologies and existing gaps

  15. The challenge of reframing engineering education

    CERN Document Server

    Sale, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Challenge of Reframing Engineering Education is the first book to document the experience of implementing the CDIO Engineering Educational Framework in a large educational institution in the Asian context. It focuses on how to successfully implement and manage the key stages, activities and inevitable challenges that have to be negotiated in any large scale curriculum innovation. Its main purpose is to provide a practical resource for curriculum innovators and practitioners on what needs to be done, how and on what basis. It is written in a more narrative style than is typical of the genre, engaging the reader more intimately with the actual decision making processes and rationale that underpins curriculum innovation in the real context of institutional life. The book also encompasses many innovative practices for supporting student learning which are relevant in all mainstream educational contexts. These include an evidence-based learning approach for creative teaching, an explicit model for developing g...

  16. Modelling inclusive special needs education : Insights from Dutch secondary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Bij, T.; Geijsel, F.P.; Garst, G.J.A.; Ten Dam, G.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive special needs education is prominent on the international education agenda. Research on the characteristics of inclusive education for students with special needs and schools providing this is scarce, however. Our aim in the present study was therefore to further theory-building with

  17. eQETIC: A Maturity Model for Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Rogério; Mustaro, Pollyana Notargiacomo

    2015-01-01

    Digital solutions have substantially contributed to the growth and dissemination of education. The distance education modality has been presented as an opportunity for worldwide students in many types of courses. However, projects of digital educational platforms require different expertise including knowledge areas such as pedagogy, psychology,…

  18. Social Emotional Learning and Educational Stress: A Predictive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Serhat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between social emotional learning and educational stress. Participants were 321 elementary students. Social emotional learning and educational stress scale were used as measures. The relationships between social emotional learning and educational stress were examined using correlation…

  19. A three-dimensional model for educational game analysis & design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, Nick; Bril, Ivo; Braad, Eelco

    2015-01-01

    For over thirty years, there has been a discussion about the effectiveness of educational games in comparison to traditional learning materials. To help further this discussion, we aim to understand ‘how educational games work’ by formalising (and visualising) the educational and motivational

  20. Pandora's Box: A new model for education in Asia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... Many who have only experienced face-to-face education in an ... In fact, in Asia, distance education using information and communication technologies (ICTs) is ... Part of the problem is that students in the countryside must move to the city to get an education. ... Mobile phones connect producers to markets.

  1. Community Environmental Education as a Model for Effective Environmental Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Morag

    2008-01-01

    The benefits of community environmental education outlined in environmental education literature are supported by the findings and implications of a research study undertaken in New Zealand. Evidence from a two-case case study suggests that environmental programmes guided by the key principles and practices of community environmental education,…

  2. Community of inquiry model: advancing distance learning in nurse anesthesia education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecka, Shannon L; Kotcherlakota, Suhasini; Berger, Ann M

    2014-06-01

    The number of distance education courses offered by nurse anesthesia programs has increased substantially. Emerging distance learning trends must be researched to ensure high-quality education for student registered nurse anesthetists. However, research to examine distance learning has been hampered by a lack of theoretical models. This article introduces the Community of Inquiry model for use in nurse anesthesia education. This model has been used for more than a decade to guide and research distance learning in higher education. A major strength of this model learning. However, it lacks applicability to the development of higher order thinking for student registered nurse anesthetists. Thus, a new derived Community of Inquiry model was designed to improve these students' higher order thinking in distance learning. The derived model integrates Bloom's revised taxonomy into the original Community of Inquiry model and provides a means to design, evaluate, and research higher order thinking in nurse anesthesia distance education courses.

  3. An integrated model of decision-making in health contexts: the role of science education in health education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Julia C.

    2018-03-01

    Health education is to foster health literacy, informed decision-making and to promote health behaviour. To date, there are several models that seek to explain health behaviour (e.g. the Theory of Planned Behaviour or the Health Belief Model). These models include motivational factors (expectancies and values) that play a role in decision-making in health contexts. In this theoretical paper, it is argued that none of these models makes consequent use of expectancy-value pairs. It is further argued that in order to make these models fruitful for science education and for informed decision-making, models should systematically incorporate knowledge as part of the decision-making process. To fill this gap, this theoretical paper introduces The Integrated Model of Decision-Making in Health Contexts. This model includes three types of knowledge (system health knowledge, action-related health knowledge and effectiveness health knowledge) as influencing factors for motivational factors (perceived health threat, attitude towards health action, attitude towards health outcome and subjective norm) that are formed of expectancy-value pairs and lead to decisions. The model's potential for health education in science education as well as research implications is discussed.

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Point-of-View Modeling for Industrial and Technology Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.; Fantz, Todd D.; Jones, Millie

    2013-01-01

    Enrollment in technology education at the college level has been declining, so it is becoming essential for technology teacher educators to investigate ways to increase the enrollment in their programs. Technology teacher educators are exploring the extent to which distance-learning technologies such as video modeling can be used by industrial and…

  5. From the Schoolhouse to the Statehouse: Building a Statewide Model for Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhine, Luke

    2013-01-01

    This article details the journey Luke Rhine, a Program Specialist in Career and Technology Education at the Maryland State Department of Education, as he went about the difficult task of building consistency and establishing rigorous expectations for Technology education in Maryland. As a result, Maryland has developed a model for Technology…

  6. The Wheel Model of STEAM Education Based on Traditional Korean Scientific Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyoung Won

    2016-01-01

    The Korean STEAM education pursues a convergent human resources education, but there are shortcomings associated with it due to the fact that it excludes the Humanities in its curriculum. This study embodies the accomplishments from the design and field application of the STEAM education model that has added Humanities fields (history, geography,…

  7. Does the phenomenon of Open Educational Resources lead to new didactic model? “It depends”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didderen, Wim; Verjans, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Didderen, W., & Verjans, S. (2012). Does the phenomenon of Open Educational Resources lead to new didactic model? “It depends”. In R. Jacobi, & N. van der Woert (Eds.), Trend Report Open Educational Resources 2012 (pp. 9-15). Utrecht: SURF Foundation - Special Interest Group Open Educational

  8. Analyzing Process Quality of Early Childhood Education with Many Facet Rash Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Ramazan; Isikoglu, Nesrin

    2008-01-01

    Quality of early childhood education institutions specifically, dimensions of process quality should be evaluated. Purpose of this study is to analyze process quality of early childhood education by using many-facet Rasch measurement model (MFRM). In this study, data were collected from twelve early childhood education institutions by four…

  9. Educational Diversity and Learning Leadership: A Proposition, Some Principles and a Model of Inclusive Leadership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the case for developing a particular form of leadership to meet the challenge of educational diversity. A model for inclusive leadership is articulated drawing upon the fields of educational management and leadership, knowledge management, individual differences and educational inclusion. The article begins with a proposition…

  10. The CAREL Center for Education Diagnosis and Learning: A Self-Correcting Innovative Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Albert

    1968-01-01

    The Central Atlantic Regional Educational Laboratory (CAREL) Center for Educational Diagnosis and Learning is a model based on a cybernetic approach for the development of educational programs designed to personalize the student's instructional experiences and humanize his daily living. The CAREL Project has set three major objectives and 12…

  11. Reflections from the GPE Financing Conference in Dakar: A Model of Education Diplomacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, April Michelle

    2018-01-01

    Providing inclusive and equitable quality education for all children will require sustained cooperation and investment from donor and partner nations worldwide. As a multi-stakeholder funding mechanism, the Global Partnership for Education (GPE) is an important Education Diplomacy model. The 2018 Dakar Financing Conference is a vibrant…

  12. THE COMPETENCE-CONTEXT MODEL OF TRAINING AND EDUCATION IN COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Rybakina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The article is devoted to the problem of finding models of implementation of continuing education.Aim. The article deals with the competence and context-based model of learning and education in a comprehensive school as a part of lifelong education. The structural components of the competence-context model are described. The author also presents results of the model testing.Methodology and research methods. The competence-based approach is a methodological base of the presented research. The article carries out theoretical analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature concerning with the research problem. The author also applies such methods as: modeling of teaching objects, pedagogical experiment, quantitative and qualitative analysis.Results. The author suggests an educational model of competence formation and development in the framework of the theory of context-based education, which supports continuing personal development in the system of lifelong education. The paper describes the essence of the components of the competence-context model of training and upbringing.Scientific novelty. The research justifies the need to distinguish an invariant result of the continuing education. It is shown that competence as a combination of cognitive, social and reflective experience can act as an invariant.Practical significance. The proposed results of testing of the competencecontext model of training and education in comprehensive schools of the Samara region can be in-demand among school teachers for their educational work.

  13. The Innovations on teachers’ initial training in relation to values education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Peiró i Gregòri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Educating in values is a means to achieve the students’ maturity (self-control. This is an unfinished process and it requires to progress in Educational Theory, namely: innovation. To explain and define this premise, the following aspects are addressed. First, situating ourselves in the sociocultural innovational context of educational system. Then, to inquire, from a comparative view, about the relevant model for innovation in teacher education, respect to enable them to address the educational values in their professional tasks. As here we are offering an experience, it displays the criteria underpinning our model with an innovative style. After, We turn to explain the mode of how the innovation fits in the course "Theory and history of education" for the initial training of teachers. Inserts in the 'Bologna model' development, this article explains how to establish the teaching relationship with University students. Finally we proposed pedagogical requirements.

  14. Reforming Iraqi Journalism and Mass Communication Higher Education: Adapting the UNESCO Model Curricula for Journalism Education to Iraqi Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlik, John V.; Laufer, Peter D.; Burns, David P.; Ataya, Ramzi T.

    2012-01-01

    Journalism and mass communication higher education in Iraq is well established but largely isolated from global developments since the 1970s. In the post-Iraq war period, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) implemented a multiyear project to work with the leadership of Iraqi higher education to help update…

  15. A Review of Research on the Educational Benefits of the Inclusive Model of Education for Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks-Monroe, Sherry L.

    2011-01-01

    The practice of inclusion is not a new idea to the educational setting; it is a newer term. Before No Child Left Behind, during the 1970s students with disabilities were mainstreamed into the general education population under Public Law 94-142. Public law 94-142, which was renamed to Individuals with Disabilities Educational Act (IDEA), required…

  16. A Novel Conceptual Model of Environmental Communal Education: Content Analysis Based on Distance Education Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezi, Soheila; Shobeiri, Seyed Mohammad; Sarmadi, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Environmental education as a learning process increases people's knowledge and awareness about the environment. Although in some countries, the Environmental Communal Education (ECE) is the core of the environmental education by formal and informal organizations and groups, but, it has not clarified the meaning of the ECE's concept. Therefore the…

  17. Education Empowerment Model for the Disabled Learners: A Case Study at Cicendo School for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil, Mustofa; Shantini, Yanti; Sardin

    2015-01-01

    This paper originates from a study conducted to examine the challenges faced by the Schools for Special Education (SLB) in their effort to empower people living with disabilities. The study aimed: 1) to describe the stages involved in the education for empowerment of the disabled groups through schools for special education, 2) to present an…

  18. Leadership Educator Journeys: Expanding a Model of Leadership Educator Professional Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemiller, Corey; Priest, Kerry L.

    2017-01-01

    There is a great deal of literature on leadership education best-practices (e.g., curricular considerations, teaching strategies, assessment of learning). Yet, to be a leadership educator is more than having knowledge or expertise of content and pedagogy. Perceptions, experiences, and values of leadership educators comprise a professional identity…

  19. A Path Analysis of Educator Perceptions of Open Educational Resources Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Hope

    2014-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) are making their way into a variety of educational contexts from formal lesson planning to just in time learning. Educators and training professionals have been recognized as an important audience for these materials. The concepts of "self-efficacy" and "outcome judgment" from social cognitive…

  20. Domain Modeling for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model-Research Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Definitions are provided for this section to distinguish between adaptive training and education elements and also to highlight their relationships ...illustrate this point Franke (2011) asserts that through the use of case study examples, instruction can provide the pedagogical foundation for decision...a prime example of an adaptive training and education system: a learner or trainee model, an instructional or pedagogical model, a domain model

  1. Modeling & Simulation Education for the Acquisition and T&E Workforce: FY07 Deliverable Package

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olwell, David H; Johnson, Jean; Few, Stephanie; Didoszak, Jarema M

    2007-01-01

    This technical report presents the deliverables for calendar year 2007 for the "Educating the Modeling and Simulation Workforce" project performed for the DoD Modeling and Simulation Steering Committee...

  2. Systematic review of evidence underpinning non-pharmacological therapies in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olley, Richard; Morales, Andrea

    2017-05-15

    underpin the use of these therapies. This report on a PRISMA systematic review of the available literature demonstrates that only two therapies have some evidence to underpin the use of these non-pharmaceutical therapies and that a significant research gap is exists. What are the implications for practitioners? The implications for practitioners is that significant research effort is required to determine the efficacy of many of the therapies that are currently deployed, and thus many of the therapies used lack an evidence base at this time.

  3. ONLINE MODEL OF EDUCATION QUALITY ASSURANCE EQUASP IMPLEMENTATION: EXPERIENCE OF VYATKA STATE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Pugach

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of assessing the quality of higher education. In the Russian Federation recently quality assessment of educational services provided by state-accredited universities is carried out by the state represented by the Ministry of education and science. State universities have simulated internal systemseducation quality assessment in accordance with the methodology proposed by the Ministry of education and science. Currently more attention is paid to the independent assessment of education quality which is the basis of professional public accreditation. The project "EQUASP" financed within the framework of the TEMPUS programme is directed to the problem of implementing the methodology of the online model of independent higher education quality assessment in the practice of Russian universities. The proposed model for assessing the quality of education is based on usage of 5 standards. The authors have done a comparative analysis of the model of higher education quality assessment existing in Vyatka State University and the model of education quality assessing offered by European universities-participants of the project EQUASP. The authors have presented the main results of investigation of this problem and some suggestions for improving the model of education quality assessment used by Vyatka State University.

  4. The Eczema Education Programme: intervention development and model feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, K; Ersser, S J; Dennis, H; Farasat, H; More, A

    2014-07-01

    The systematic support of parents of children with eczema is essential to their effective management; however, we have few models of support. This study examines the rationale, evidence base and development of a large-scale, structured, theory-based, nurse-led intervention, the 'Eczema Education Programme' (EEP), for parents of children with eczema. To outline development of the EEP, model of delivery, determine its feasibility and evaluate this based on service access and parental satisfaction data. Parent-child dyads meeting EEP referral criteria were recruited and demographic information recorded. A questionnaire survey of parental satisfaction was conducted 4 weeks post EEP; parental focus groups at 6 weeks provided comparative qualitative data. Descriptive statistics were derived from the questionnaire data using Predictive Analytics Software (PASW); content analysis was applied to focus group data. A total of 356 parents attended the EEP during the evaluation period. Service access was achieved for those in a challenging population. Both survey data (n = 146 parents, 57%) and focus group data (n = 21) revealed a significant level of parental satisfaction with the programme. It was feasible to provide the EEP as an adjunct to normal clinical care on a large scale, achieving a high level of patient/parent satisfaction and access within an urban area of multiple deprivation and high mobility. The intervention is transferable and the results are generalizable to other ethnically diverse child eczema populations within metropolitan areas in Britain. A multicentre RCT is required to test the effectiveness of this intervention on a larger scale. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. Scientific Visualization & Modeling for Earth Systems Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, S. Raj; Rodriguez, Waldo J.

    2003-01-01

    Providing research experiences for undergraduate students in Earth Systems Science (ESS) poses several challenges at smaller academic institutions that might lack dedicated resources for this area of study. This paper describes the development of an innovative model that involves students with majors in diverse scientific disciplines in authentic ESS research. In studying global climate change, experts typically use scientific visualization techniques applied to remote sensing data collected by satellites. In particular, many problems related to environmental phenomena can be quantitatively addressed by investigations based on datasets related to the scientific endeavours such as the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Working with data products stored at NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers, visualization software specifically designed for students and an advanced, immersive Virtual Reality (VR) environment, students engage in guided research projects during a structured 6-week summer program. Over the 5-year span, this program has afforded the opportunity for students majoring in biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, physics, engineering and science education to work collaboratively in teams on research projects that emphasize the use of scientific visualization in studying the environment. Recently, a hands-on component has been added through science student partnerships with school-teachers in data collection and reporting for the GLOBE Program (GLobal Observations to Benefit the Environment).

  6. Quality assessment in higher education using the SERVQUALQ model

    OpenAIRE

    Đonlagić, Sabina; Fazlić, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Economy in Bosnia and Herzegovina is striving towards growth and increased employment and it has been proven by empirical studies worldwide that higher education contributes to socio-economic development of a country. Universities are important for generation, preservation and dissemination of knowledge in order to contribute to socio-economic benefits of a country. Higher education institutions are being pressured to improve value for their activities and providing quality higher education s...

  7. Building New Education Model to Enhance the Comprehensive Competence of the Medical Students The exploration of PRICE Education Model in School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Huang; Bingjie Lu; Jifeng Fu; Yanping Zhang; Wenhan Mei; Yan Li; Yifei Wang

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the competence of medical students, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine innovates the new PRICE education model, through Problem-based Learning(P) and Research-based learning(R), guides the students to give full play to the active learning; break the traditional discipline-centered teaching model by an integrated curriculum(I),combines with clinical practice-based learning(C) to solve the disjointed question between the basic theory and clinical practice in medical education, uses the comprehensive evaluation system(E) to assess the learning effect of the students and the quality of the teaching. The PRICE education model is verified by our educational practice.

  8. Consumer Control Points: Creating a Visual Food Safety Education Model for Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Carole B.

    Consumer education has always been a primary consideration in the prevention of food-borne illness. Using nutrition education and the new food guide as a model, this paper develops suggestions for a framework of microbiological food safety principles and a compatible visual model for communicating key concepts. Historically, visual food guides in…

  9. A Web-Based Model for Diabetes Education and Decision Support for the Home Care Nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Michelle; Kirby, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Diabetes education for the home care population requires expert knowledge to be available at the point-of-care, the patient's home. This poster displays a model for Web-based diabetes education and decision support for the home care nurse. The system utilizes the line of reasoning (LOR) model to organize and represent expert decision-making thought processes.

  10. An Application of the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation in Elementary School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntovolis, Yannis; Barkoukis, Vassilis; Michelinakis, Evaggelos; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2015-01-01

    Elementary school physical education can play a prominent role in promoting children's leisure-time physical activity. The trans-contextual model of motivation has been proven effective in describing the process through which school physical education can affect students' leisure-time physical activity. This model has been tested in secondary…

  11. [Modern model of organization of pedagogical process in physical education of students in universities

    OpenAIRE

    Bashavets, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Current studies are characterized by active development of models of physical education students (sectional, professionally oriented, individual, improving traditional etc.). The author, based on analysis of international experience, tryed to determine the most appropriate model of physical education in Ukrainian universities

  12. Effect of the Sport Education Tactical Model on Coeducational and Single Gender Game Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Tony; McCollum, Starla; Sundal, Jacqueline; Colquit, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Physical education teachers are faced with a decision when teaching physical activities in schools. What type of instructional model should be used, and should classes be coeducational or single gender? The current study had two purposes. The first purpose investigated the effectiveness of the sport education tactical model (SETM) during game play…

  13. Habituation Model of Implementing Environmental Education in Elementary School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaenuri, Z.; Sudarmin, S.; Utomo, Y.

    2017-01-01

    is designed using a qualitative approach. This study is focused on the implementation of environmental education in primary schools. Data collection uses observation sheet instrument (observation), focused interview, and Focus Group Discussion (FGD). The research data were analyzed descriptively. The results......The purpose of this study is to analyze the implementation of environmental education in Elementary School. The study was conducted at SDN 1 Kota Banda Aceh. The research subjects are school residents (students, teachers, education personnel, principals, and school committees). This research...... show that the implementation of environmental education can be realized in habituation to maintain personal hygiene, class cleanliness, and worship together according to his beliefs and sports....

  14. Organizational models of educational technology in U.S. and Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Kevin H; Kamin, Carol; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Moses, Anna; Heestand, Diane

    2008-07-01

    To examine the organizational structure of educational technology units within U.S. and Canadian medical schools in order to (1) identify organization models that support educational technology, (2) describe key attributes of these models, and (3) discuss the strengths and challenges associated with these models. The authors distributed a survey to 88 schools that had previously provided information on their educational technology services and infrastructure. The authors developed the survey through a series of pilots and, then, from the data for each respondent school, created concept maps, which were used to identify organizational models. The authors conducted analyses to determine differences among models. The authors coded the comments about organizational models and identified themes. The authors received adequate data for analysis from 61 schools (69%). Four models for educational technology organizations emerged: (1) centralized units located in the school of medicine, (2) centralized units located at the health science center, (3) centralized units at the comprehensive university, and (4) no centralized unit (Dispersed Model). The majority (75%) of schools relied on some type of centralized organization. Whereas few organization attributes proved to be statistically significant, the centralized models have more resources devoted to educational technology and a closer alignment with the academic mission than the Dispersed Model. Medical schools primarily use central models. The authors recommend that schools structuring their educational technology resources consider exploration of a central model because of its focused use of resources to improve teaching and learning.

  15. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Carl H; Reber, Kris M; Trittmann, Jennifer K B; Huang, Hong; Tomblin, Jordanna; Moorehead, Pamela A; Bauer, John A; Smith, Charles V; Mahan, John D

    2011-01-01

    Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience. This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey. The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, pteaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education. While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both resident and fellow learning and satisfaction. Further investigation into the value of utilizing fellows as a positive force in

  16. Frontopolar cortical inefficiency may underpin reward and working memory dysfunction in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogia, Jigar; Dima, Danai; Kumari, Veena; Frangou, Sophia

    2012-12-01

    Emotional dysregulation in bipolar disorder is thought to arise from dysfunction within prefrontal cortical regions involved in cognitive control coupled with increased or aberrant activation within regions engaged in emotional processing. The aim of this study was to determine the common and distinct patterns of functional brain abnormalities during reward and working memory processing in patients with bipolar disorder. Participants were 36 euthymic bipolar disorder patients and 37 healthy comparison subjects matched for age, sex and IQ. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was conducted during the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the n-back working memory task. During both tasks, patients with bipolar disorder demonstrated a pattern of inefficient engagement within the ventral frontopolar prefrontal cortex with evidence of segregation along the medial-lateral dimension for reward and working memory processing, respectively. Moreover, patients also showed greater activation in the anterior cingulate cortex during the Iowa Gambling Task and in the insula during the n-back task. Our data implicate ventral frontopolar dysfunction as a core abnormality underpinning bipolar disorder and confirm that overactivation in regions involved in emotional arousal is present even in tasks that do not typically engage emotional systems.

  17. Contact networks structured by sex underpin sex-specific epidemiology of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Matthew J; Weber, Nicola L; Steward, Lucy C; Hodgson, David J; Boots, Mike; Croft, Darren P; Delahay, Richard J; McDonald, Robbie A

    2018-02-01

    Contact networks are fundamental to the transmission of infection and host sex often affects the acquisition and progression of infection. However, the epidemiological impacts of sex-related variation in animal contact networks have rarely been investigated. We test the hypothesis that sex-biases in infection are related to variation in multilayer contact networks structured by sex in a population of European badgers Meles meles naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis. Our key results are that male-male and between-sex networks are structured at broader spatial scales than female-female networks and that in male-male and between-sex contact networks, but not female-female networks, there is a significant relationship between infection and contacts with individuals in other groups. These sex differences in social behaviour may underpin male-biased acquisition of infection and may result in males being responsible for more between-group transmission. This highlights the importance of sex-related variation in host behaviour when managing animal diseases. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Neural underpinnings of divergent production of rules in numerical analogical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofei; Jung, Rex E; Zhang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Creativity plays an important role in numerical problem solving. Although the neural underpinnings of creativity have been studied over decades, very little is known about neural mechanisms of the creative process that relates to numerical problem solving. In the present study, we employed a numerical analogical reasoning task with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of divergent production of rules in numerical analogical reasoning. Participants performed two tasks: a multiple solution analogical reasoning task and a single solution analogical reasoning task. Results revealed that divergent production of rules involves significant activations at Brodmann area (BA) 10 in the right middle frontal cortex, BA 40 in the left inferior parietal lobule, and BA 8 in the superior frontal cortex. The results suggest that right BA 10 and left BA 40 are involved in the generation of novel rules, and BA 8 is associated with the inhibition of initial rules in numerical analogical reasoning. The findings shed light on the neural mechanisms of creativity in numerical processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An Exploratory Qualitative Exploration of the Personal Values Underpinning Taiwanese and Malaysians’ Wine Consumption Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Mirosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented buying power of East Asian consumers has resulted in increased interest in these markets. Wine is a particularly promising sector to target as the number of East Asians choosing to drink wine rises. In order to serve these markets, companies must understand factors influencing consumers’ choices. The objective of this research was to understand how Taiwanese and Malaysian consumers’ personal values influenced their consumption decisions about wine. The means–end chain framework and associated semi-structured interview technique, value laddering, was used to elicit consumers’ preferred product attributes, the consequences of these attributes and the values that underpin these consequences. Data collection involved intercepting foreign travelers from Malaysia and Taiwan in New Zealand (20 Taiwanese and 20 Malaysian to partake in a wine choice interview. The resulting findings are exploratory in nature. Analysis revealed the most preferred wine attributes for Taiwanese were “Price” and “Sensory Aspects”—that these attributes were linked to consequences “Financial Considerations” and “Satisfy Senses”—which in turn were linked to personal values “Self Direction” and “Achievement”. For the Malaysian participants, the attribute “Sensory Aspects” of wine was most important, as was the value “Hedonism”. This study adds to literature related to beverage consumption decision making by exploring cultural aspects. It also offers suggestions for practitioners interested in targeting these consumers.

  20. Two Complementary Mechanisms Underpin Cell Wall Patterning during Xylem Vessel Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Rene; Tang, Lu; Lampugnani, Edwin R; Barkwill, Sarah; Lathe, Rahul; Zhang, Yi; McFarlane, Heather E; Pesquet, Edouard; Niittyla, Totte; Mansfield, Shawn D; Zhou, Yihua; Persson, Staffan

    2017-10-01

    The evolution of the plant vasculature was essential for the emergence of terrestrial life. Xylem vessels are solute-transporting elements in the vasculature that possess secondary wall thickenings deposited in intricate patterns. Evenly dispersed microtubule (MT) bands support the formation of these wall thickenings, but how the MTs direct cell wall synthesis during this process remains largely unknown. Cellulose is the major secondary wall constituent and is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthases (CesAs) whose catalytic activity propels them through the membrane. We show that the protein CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1 (CSI1)/POM2 is necessary to align the secondary wall CesAs and MTs during the initial phase of xylem vessel development in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice ( Oryza sativa ). Surprisingly, these MT-driven patterns successively become imprinted and sufficient to sustain the continued progression of wall thickening in the absence of MTs and CSI1/POM2 function. Hence, two complementary principles underpin wall patterning during xylem vessel development. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  1. Neural computations underpinning the strategic management of influence in advice giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Uri; Palminteri, Stefano; Brunetti, Silvia; Olesen, Cecilie; Frith, Chris D; Bahrami, Bahador

    2017-12-19

    Research on social influence has focused mainly on the target of influence (e.g., consumer and voter); thus, the cognitive and neurobiological underpinnings of the source of the influence (e.g., politicians and salesmen) remain unknown. Here, in a three-sided advice-giving game, two advisers competed to influence a client by modulating their own confidence in their advice about which lottery the client should choose. We report that advisers' strategy depends on their level of influence on the client and their merit relative to one another. Moreover, blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the temporo-parietal junction is modulated by adviser's current level of influence on the client, and relative merit prediction error affects activity in medial-prefrontal cortex. Both types of social information modulate ventral striatum response. By demonstrating what happens in our mind and brain when we try to influence others, these results begin to explain the biological mechanisms that shape inter-individual differences in social conduct.

  2. Cognitive control in adolescence: neural underpinnings and relation to self-report behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna

    Full Text Available Adolescence is commonly characterized by impulsivity, poor decision-making, and lack of foresight. However, the developmental neural underpinnings of these characteristics are not well established.To test the hypothesis that these adolescent behaviors are linked to under-developed proactive control mechanisms, the present study employed a hybrid block/event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI Stroop paradigm combined with self-report questionnaires in a large sample of adolescents and adults, ranging in age from 14 to 25. Compared to adults, adolescents under-activated a set of brain regions implicated in proactive top-down control across task blocks comprised of difficult and easy trials. Moreover, the magnitude of lateral prefrontal activity in adolescents predicted self-report measures of impulse control, foresight, and resistance to peer pressure. Consistent with reactive compensatory mechanisms to reduced proactive control, older adolescents exhibited elevated transient activity in regions implicated in response-related interference resolution.Collectively, these results suggest that maturation of cognitive control may be partly mediated by earlier development of neural systems supporting reactive control and delayed development of systems supporting proactive control. Importantly, the development of these mechanisms is associated with cognitive control in real-life behaviors.

  3. A critical assessment of the ecological assumptions underpinning compensatory mitigation of salmon-derived nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Scott F.; Marcarelli, Amy M.; Baxter, Colden V.; Wipfli, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    We critically evaluate some of the key ecological assumptions underpinning the use of nutrient replacement as a means of recovering salmon populations and a range of other organisms thought to be linked to productive salmon runs. These assumptions include: (1) nutrient mitigation mimics the ecological roles of salmon, (2) mitigation is needed to replace salmon-derived nutrients and stimulate primary and invertebrate production in streams, and (3) food resources in rearing habitats limit populations of salmon and resident fishes. First, we call into question assumption one because an array of evidence points to the multi-faceted role played by spawning salmon, including disturbance via redd-building, nutrient recycling by live fish, and consumption by terrestrial consumers. Second, we show that assumption two may require qualification based upon a more complete understanding of nutrient cycling and productivity in streams. Third, we evaluate the empirical evidence supporting food limitation of fish populations and conclude it has been only weakly tested. On the basis of this assessment, we urge caution in the application of nutrient mitigation as a management tool. Although applications of nutrients and other materials intended to mitigate for lost or diminished runs of Pacific salmon may trigger ecological responses within treated ecosystems, contributions of these activities toward actual mitigation may be limited.

  4. China's new oil import status underpins world's most dynamic petroleum scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    China is poised to become a net importer of oil in 1994--95. That sets the stage for China importing more than 1 million b/d of crude oil and refined products on a net basis by the turn of the century. That development underpins a bigger story -- arguably the biggest story on the petroleum scene today. The turnabout that is seeing the world's fifth biggest oil producer go from significant oil exporter in recent years to major oil importer by the turn of the century points to several other truisms in the petroleum industry: That an oil demand surge in the Asia-Pacific region led by China will fuel overall world oil demand growth for years to come; that a refining and petrochemical boom in a country that accounts for about one fifth of the world's population has dramatic implications for those two industries; that privatization has gathered so much momentum in the global petroleum industry that even Communist China has embraced some form of it; that China's domestic crude supply shortfall is creating unprecedented opportunities for foreign upstream investors in one of the world's most prospective yet underexplored and underexploited regions; and that the same new openness that is distinguishing China's petroleum industry today is turning some of its state owned companies into major competitors to be reckoned with on the international scene, upstream and downstream. The paper discusses China's oil export/import balance, supply/demand outlook, policy changes, and new regulations governing export of crude oil and products

  5. Associative learning mechanisms underpinning the transition from recreational drug use to addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Lee; Balleine, Bernard W; Corbit, Laura H; Killcross, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Learning theory proposes that drug seeking is a synthesis of multiple controllers. Whereas goal-directed drug seeking is determined by the anticipated incentive value of the drug, habitual drug seeking is elicited by stimuli that have formed a direct association with the response. Moreover, drug-paired stimuli can transfer control over separately trained drug seeking responses by retrieving an expectation of the drug's identity (specific transfer) or incentive value (general transfer). This review covers outcome devaluation and transfer of stimulus-control procedures in humans and animals, which isolate the differential governance of drug seeking by these four controllers following various degrees of contingent and noncontingent drug exposure. The neural mechanisms underpinning these four controllers are also reviewed. These studies suggest that although initial drug seeking is goal-directed, chronic drug exposure confers a progressive loss of control over action selection by specific outcome representations (impaired outcome devaluation and specific transfer), and a concomitant increase in control over action selection by antecedent stimuli (enhanced habit and general transfer). The prefrontal cortex and mediodorsal thalamus may play a role in this drug-induced transition to behavioral autonomy. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. A concept for a magnetic field detector underpinned by the nonlinear dynamics of coupled multiferroic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beninato, A.; Emery, T.; Baglio, S.; Andò, B.; Bulsara, A. R.; Jenkins, C.; Palkar, V.

    2013-12-01

    Multiferroic (MF) composites, in which magnetic and ferroelectric orders coexist, represent a very attractive class of materials with promising applications in areas, such as spintronics, memories, and sensors. One of the most important multiferroics is the perovskite phase of bismuth ferrite, which exhibits weak magnetoelectric properties at room temperature; its properties can be enhanced by doping with other elements such as dysprosium. A recent paper has demonstrated that a thin film of Bi0.7Dy0.3FeO3 shows good magnetoelectric coupling. In separate work it has been shown that a carefully crafted ring connection of N (N odd and N ≥ 3) ferroelectric capacitors yields, past a critical point, nonlinear oscillations that can be exploited for electric (E) field sensing. These two results represent the starting point of our work. In this paper the (electrical) hysteresis, experimentally measured in the MF material Bi0.7Dy0.3FeO3, is characterized with the applied magnetic field (B) taken as a control parameter. This yields a "blueprint" for a magnetic (B) field sensor: a ring-oscillator coupling of N = 3 Sawyer-Tower circuits each underpinned by a mutliferroic element. In this configuration, the changes induced in the ferroelectric behavior by the external or "target" B-field are quantified, thus providing a pathway for very low power and high sensitivity B-field sensing.

  7. Education and Social Cohesion: Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseyenko, Olena

    2005-01-01

    Social cohesion is understood as the social networks and the norms of reciprocity and trustworthiness that arise from connections among individuals. When students attend higher education institutions, they go through a process of socialization, and it is vital to ensure that they acquire the core values that underpin the social cohesion. This…

  8. Emerging Business Models in Education Provisioning: A Case Study on Providing Learning Support as Education-as-a-Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loina Prifti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to give a deeper understanding on emerging business models in the context of education. Industry 4.0/the Industrial Internet in general and especially recent advances in cloud computing enable a new kind of service offering in the education sector and lead to new business models for education: Education-as-a-Service (EaaS. Within EaaS, learning, and teaching contents are delivered as services. By combining a literature review with a qualitative case study, this paper makes a three-fold contribution to the field of business models in education: First, we provide a theoretical definition for a common understanding of EaaS. Second, we present the state-of-the-art research on this new paradigm. Third, in the case study we describe a “best practices” business model of an existing EaaS provider. These insights build a theoretical foundation for further research in this area. The paper concludes with a research agenda for further research in this emerging field.

  9. Balancing the seen and unseen: Nurse educator as role model for critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Christy; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; Myrick, Florence; Strean, William B

    2018-05-04

    Critical thinking is an important indicator of student learning and is an essential outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. The role of nurse educators in the development of students' critical thinking has been overlooked despite the importance of their actions to facilitate critical thinking in nursing education. We used a constructivist grounded theory approach within a larger mixed methods triangulation study to explore how nurse educators revealed their critical thinking in practice. From the grounded theory approach, a model emerged from our research, outlining the important aspects of nurse educators' critical thinking and how it is revealed in the clinical setting. The important categories of this model include: a) fostering the student-educator relationship; b) role modeling critical thinking; c) mobilizing and operationalizing resources; as well as d) balancing factors that impact nurse educators' critical thinking. Our findings inform what is known about nurse educators' critical thinking and how it can be implemented in nurse educators' teaching practice. Given our findings, we offer recommendations for future nursing education practice and research, including the need to apply our findings in additional settings and further develop nurse educators' awareness of their own critical thinking. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Models of Change: The Future of Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Ken; Baynes, Brochocka

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses design and design education in the context of four major social and environmental concerns identified by Bruce Archer in 1973: overpopulation; pollution; depletion of natural resources; control. It argues for the social and economic importance of design education in primary and secondary schools. It identifies "designerly…

  11. Educators Eye Ning Transition to a Pay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michelle R.

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on a move by the online social-networking site Ning to start charging for its services which has raised worries that new fees could stifle educators' technological collaboration and creativity and touch off similar moves by other companies that provide comparable services heavily used by educators. Ning, which provides a…

  12. A Distributed Leadership Change Process Model for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra; Harvey, Marina

    2017-01-01

    The higher education sector operates in an increasingly complex global environment that is placing it under considerable stress and resulting in widespread change to the operating context and leadership of higher education institutions. The outcome has been the increased likelihood of conflict between academics and senior leaders, presaging the…

  13. Urban Education: A Model for Leadership and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Karen Symms, Ed.; Goodyear, Rodney, Ed.; Brewer, Dominic, Ed.; Rueda, Robert, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Many factors complicate the education of urban students. Among them have been issues related to population density; racial, ethnic, cultural, and linguistic diversity; poverty; racism (individual and institutional); and funding levels. Although urban educators have been addressing these issues for decades, placing them under the umbrella of "urban…

  14. Rethinking the Educator Portfolio: An Innovative Criteria-Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Kanade; Chen, Chen Amy; Schwartz, Brian S; Loeser, Helen; Ashe, Cynthia; Irby, David M

    2017-11-07

    Academic medical centers struggle to achieve parity in advancement and promotions between educators and discovery-oriented researchers in part because of narrow definitions of scholarship, lack of clear criteria for measuring excellence, and barriers to making educational contributions available for peer review. Despite recent progress in expanding scholarship definitions and identifying excellence criteria, these advances are not integrated into educator portfolio (EP) templates or curriculum vitae platforms. From 2013 to 2015, a working group from the Academy of Medical Educators (AME) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) designed a streamlined, criteria-based EP (EP 2.0) template highlighting faculty members' recent activities in education and setting rigorous evaluation methods to enable educational scholarship to be objectively evaluated for academic advancement, AME membership, and professional development. The EP 2.0 template was integrated into the AME application, resulting in high overall satisfaction among candidates and the selection committee and positive feedback on the template's transparency, ease of use, and streamlined format. In 2016, the EP 2.0 template was integrated into the campus-wide curriculum vitae platform and academic advancement system. The authors plan to increase awareness of the EP 2.0 template by educating promotions committees and faculty at UCSF and partnering with other institutions to disseminate it for use. They also plan to study the impact of the template on supporting educators by making their important scholarly contributions available for peer review, providing guidance for professional development, and decreasing disparities in promotions.

  15. Exploring Business Models for MOOCS in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Elizabeth L.; Smith, Shamus P.; Reisman, Sorel

    2015-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) potentially challenge the traditional dominance of brick and mortar institutions as providers of quality higher education. The benefits for students include reduced education costs and global access to exclusive institution courses and instructors. However, the benefits for institutions are less clear as there…

  16. Soviet Cineclubs: Baranov's Film/Media Education Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a historical form of media literacy education that is still insufficiently discussed in English language literature: Russian cineclubs. We focus on one particular cineclub that was created by a Soviet educator Oleg Baranov in the 1950s. We describe this cineclub's context and structure, and discuss its popularity among…

  17. Irish International Cultural and Educational Exchange: Two Models for Inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøss, Michael

    2006-01-01

    An account of the cultural and educational foreign policies of Denmark and Canada and a discussion of their relevance for the future of Irish foreign policy.......An account of the cultural and educational foreign policies of Denmark and Canada and a discussion of their relevance for the future of Irish foreign policy....

  18. Malaysian Private Education Quality: Application of SERVQUAL Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Anthony; Mansori, Shaheen

    2013-01-01

    Intense competition among existing private education providers and the Malaysian government's relaxation of regulations for allowing international universities to open off shore campuses in Malaysia, have forced companies in the education industry to develop strategies which can help them to make their existing students satisfied and keep them…

  19. Assessing the Needs of Adults for Continuing Education: A Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Donald E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the needs assessment studies described in this journal issue. Concludes that (1) lessons from completed needs assessments can help continuing education practitioners plan and conduct future studies, and (2) a rational, need-reduction, decision-making approach can improve continuing education programs. (CT)

  20. Effects of Using Model Robots in the Education of Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, Attila; Pap-Szigeti, Róbert; Lakatos Török, Erika

    2010-01-01

    In this article we try to show how new devices and methods can help in the education of programming. At Kecskemét College programmable mobile robots and instead of behavioral, the constructivist pedagogical methods were used. Our experiments have proved our hypothesis as the improved new methodical education using devices can give more practical…

  1. Tarot Images and Spiritual Education: The Three I's Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semetsky, Inna

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents education as a process of human development toward becoming our authentic Selves and posits the Tarot hermeneutic as one of the means of holistic, spiritual education. As a system of images and symbols, Tarot encompasses the three I's represented by intuition, insight and imagination in contrast to the three R's of traditional…

  2. Training model to institutionalize population education in the in-service education programme for elementary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugenia, M E

    1982-12-01

    The goal of the Philippine Population Education Program (PEP) since its inception in 1972 is to institutionalize population education in the formal educational system. The PEP Training Section views institutionalization of population education in the inservice education program for elementary school teachers as part of the process of making it an integral part of that program. In practice elementary school teachers periodically attend training programs organized by division or district supervisors and school principals. This is the usual modality through which teachers are updated on or informed about new thrusts and recent developments in teaching content, strategies, and methodologies. In this context, the PEP Training Section convened a seminar workshop in December 1981 for 10 subject area supervisors from the 3 large geographic island groups of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. They represented 10 school divisions and subject areas where population education is integrated. The specific objectives of the 5 day activity were to: discuss existing inservice training programs in the school divisions; prepare a training model incorporating population education in the overall division inservice training program; and develop a content chart or a listing of topical areas on population education for the training model. 1 of the outputs of the seminar workshop was a training model incorporating population education in the regular inservice training programs using 3 delivery schemes, i.e., seminar workship on the teaching of specific subject areas; district staff meeting and/or echo seminars organized by district supervisors following division seminars; and regular teachers' meeting at the school level organized by school principals. Another output was a content chart listing suggested topics in population education classified according to subject areas into which they will be incorporated. The semninar workshop concluded with a plan to try out the model using the identified

  3. Designing and Developing a New Model of Education Surau and Madrasah Minangkabau Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haviz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to design and develop a new model of education surau and madrasah minangkabau (SMM Indonesia. The method used is educational design research with phase: preliminary research, prototyping phase and assessment phase. The participants of this research are 120 social religious activists as practitioner and 3 experts. The instrument used is validation and observation sheets. Means and standard deviation are calcualted for finding the level of validity and observation of implementation of prototype. The result show that the characteristics of prototype are organization, minangkabau knowledge, pedagogical competencies and social awareness. At process of design, a new model education SMM develop based on the as reality and good practical education. At construction of model, a new model education SMM is constructed by spesific program. At modernization of the education system, a new model education SMM must concist Islamic and indigenes Minangkabau value. At flexible pedagogies and intervention, a new model education SMM require new pedagogical ideas or themes and a special intervention from Islamic universities and stakeholders. In conclusion, design and develop a new model SMM Indonesia have the relevancy and internal consistency to stop the "stationary phase or run slowly" of surau and madrasah.

  4. Binge Drinking and the Young Brain: A Mini Review of the Neurobiological Underpinnings of Alcohol-Induced Blackout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Hermens

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Binge drinking has significant effects on memory, particularly with regards to the transfer of information to long-term storage. Partial or complete blocking of memory formation is known as blackout. Youth represents a critical period in brain development that is particularly vulnerable to alcohol misuse. Animal models show that the adolescent brain is more vulnerable to the acute and chronic effects of alcohol compared with the adult brain. This mini-review addresses the neurobiological underpinnings of binge drinking and associated memory loss (blackout in the adolescent and young adult period. Although the extent to which there are pre-existing versus alcohol-induced neurobiological changes remains unclear, it is likely that repetitive binge drinking in youth has detrimental effects on cognitive and social functioning. Given its role in learning and memory, the hippocampus is a critical region with neuroimaging research showing notable changes in this structure associated with alcohol misuse in young people. There is a great need for earlier identification of biological markers associated with alcohol-related brain damage. As a means to assess in vivo neurochemistry, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has emerged as a particularly promising technique since changes in neurometabolites often precede gross structural changes. Thus, the current paper addresses how MRS biomarkers of neurotransmission (glutamate, GABA and oxidative stress (indexed by depleted glutathione in the hippocampal region of young binge drinkers may underlie propensity for blackouts and other memory impairments. MRS biomarkers may have particular utility in determining the acute versus longer-term effects of binge drinking in young people.

  5. Transformational leadership model for nursing education leaders in nursing education institutions / Sipho Wellington Mkhize

    OpenAIRE

    Mkhize, Sipho Wellington

    2009-01-01

    The nursing education leader provides visionary leadership to his/her organisation, as well as to the profession of nursing, and must have t he authority and resources necessary to ensure nursing education and training standards are met. This link between professional practice and operational activity of the organisation leads to greater involvement in decision making and fosters collaboration within nursing education and training and interdisciplinary teams. A collabora...

  6. Effects of a school-based sexuality education program on peer educators: the Teen PEP model

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, J. M.; Howard, S.; Perotte, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of the Teen Prevention Education Program (Teen PEP), a peer-led sexuality education program designed to prevent unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV among high school students. The study design was a quasi-experimental, nonrandomized design conducted from May 2007 to May 2008. The sample consisted of 96 intervention (i.e. Teen PEP peer educators) and 61 comparison students from five high schools in New Jersey. Baseline a...

  7. Free and Open Source Software underpinning the European Forest Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Aseretto, Dario; Di Leo, Margherita; de Rigo, Daniele; Corti, Paolo; McInerney, Daniel; Camia, Andrea; San-Miguel-Ayanz, Jesús

    2013-04-01

    Worldwide, governments are growingly focusing [1] on free and open source software (FOSS) as a move toward transparency and the freedom to run, copy, study, change and improve the software [2]. The European Commission (EC) is also supporting the development of FOSS (see e.g., [3]). In addition to the financial savings, FOSS contributes to scientific knowledge freedom in computational science (CS) [4] and is increasingly rewarded in the science-policy interface within the emerging paradigm of open science [5-8]. Since complex computational science applications may be affected by software uncertainty [4,9-11], FOSS may help to mitigate part of the impact of software errors by CS community-driven open review, correction and evolution of scientific code [10,12-15]. The continental scale of EC science-based policy support implies wide networks of scientific collaboration. Thematic information systems also may benefit from this approach within reproducible [16] integrated modelling [4]. This is supported by the EC strategy on FOSS: "for the development of new information systems, where deployment is foreseen by parties outside of the EC infrastructure, [F]OSS will be the preferred choice and in any case used whenever possible" [17]. The aim of this contribution is to highlight how a continental scale information system may exploit and integrate FOSS technologies within the transdisciplinary research underpinning such a complex system. A European example is discussed where FOSS innervates both the structure of the information system itself and the inherent transdisciplinary research for modelling the data and information which constitute the system content. The information system. The European Forest Data Centre (EFDAC, http://forest.jrc.ec.europa.eu/efdac/) has been established at the EC Joint Research Centre (JRC) as the focal point for forest data and information in Europe to supply European decision-makers with processed, quality checked and timely policy relevant

  8. Chains of (dis)trust : Exploring the underpinnings of knowledge-sharing and quality care across mental health services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, P.R.; Calnan, M.W.

    Quality and safety in healthcare settings are underpinned by organisational cultures, which facilitate or impede the refinement, sharing and application of knowledge. Avoiding the use of the term culture as a residual category, we focus specifically on describing chains of (dis)trust, analysing

  9. On the inference of agency in operant action : an examination of the cognitive and neural underpinnings in health and schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation elucidates cognitive and neural underpinnings of the sense of agency, which is the feeling that we are in control of our actions and the subsequent consequences. This consciously accessible sensation of control is pervasive, sometimes subtle, and can even be illusory in nature.

  10. Examination of ethical practice in nursing continuing education using the Husted model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, J

    1998-01-01

    Beliefs about human nature, adult education, adult learners, and moral commitment are at the heart of the educator-learner agreement. In continuing nursing education, it is the point where professional values, morals, and ethical principles meet. Using Husteds' bioethical decision-making model, the values, beliefs, and actions within the educator-learning agreement are identified and organized by the bioethical standards. By relating the bioethical standards to practice, continuing nurse educators can find their own basis for practice and work toward attaining a consistent professional ethical orientation.

  11. Associations among the Five Components within COSO Internal Control-Integrated Framework as the Underpinning of Quality Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Rae

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the associations among COSO components and how they affect the monitoring function of organisations. Five components of an effective internal control system are described using the framework designed by COSO (1992 and have been selected because they have been identified as underpinning quality corporate governance. Structural equation modelling (SEM was used first to run confirmatory factor analysis to determine the measurement models for the five COSO components. The COSO report (1992 described the internal control framework as a multidirectional iterative and situational (contingent process. The primary structural model was designed to reflect the one-way directional associations in the model described and shown in Exhibit 1 within the COSO report (1992. SEM analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses. Additional secondary SEM analyses were undertaken to investigate the reciprocal associations suggested in the COSO report (1992. Findings from the primary SEM analysis provide partial support for associations among the COSO components and enhanced monitoring quality that leads to good corporate governance. The results show that control environment is associated with three dimensions of information and communication (information accuracy, information openness, communication and learning. Additionally, two dimensions of information and communication (communication and learning and information feedback flow were found to be associated with risk assessment. An indirect association is supported by the results between control environment and risk assessment through the associations among three dimensions of information and communication (information accuracy, information openness and information feedback flow. Risk assessment is associated with control activities, which is subsequently associated with monitoring. The results of the additional secondary SEM analyses supported the reciprocal associations among risk assessment

  12. In search of a health education model: teachers' conceptions in four Mediterranean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caussidier, Claude; El Hage, Fadi; Munoz, François; Remki, Latifa; Larribi, Rym; Khzami, Salah-Eddine; Berger, Dominique; de Carvalho, Graça S; Favre, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    School programs are defined to promote the health of the pupils and to develop their competencies so that they can adopt behaviors favorable to their health. With the European project FP6 Biohead-Citizen (2004-2007), we analyzed the conceptions of teachers as regards health education, in France, Lebanon, Morocco and Tunisia, in reference to the biomedical model and the social health model. These four countries were selected because their school curricula represented different models of health education. Lebanon and Tunisia addressed health education with the biomedical model. In Morocco, the curriculum was also primarily based on the biomedical model and enclosed a few instructions issued from the social health model. In France, the health education curriculum declared an approach based on the health promotion model. Our study was based on multivariate statistical analyses of questionnaires filled out by 2537 in-service and pre-service teachers. Our analysis showed that the conceptions of the teachers concerning health education were not structured and related to a specific model. We also found that the dominating factors of influence on the choices expressed with regards to health education were, among different sociocultural variables, the religion, the home country, and, to a lesser extent, the level of training. Thus, the conceptions of the teachers were not integrated into comprehensive approaches but related to individual characteristics. Consequently health education implementation would require thorough training for pre-service and in-service teachers and should also explicitly take into account their conceptions and values.

  13. THE PRINCIPLES OF THE HUMANITARIAN THINKING IN MODELING EDUCATION SYSTEMS AND PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vladimirovna Sazina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to consider the current conditions for modeling education systems and processes based methodologically on the principles of “the humanitarian thinking” in a special for Russia moment in history, when educational and cultural types are changing radically; to determine the subject of inquiry and the language of modeling.Methodology: approaches developed by the author as a part of «the aesthetic paradigm of education»Results: the subject of modeling is an integral network of moral and aesthetical values in education systems and processes based on the so-called «humanitarian thinking»; the possibly most successful models of education systems and processes are: «aesthetic education paradigm» as a complete and integral network modeling main values and purposes for strategic planning (“culture creation” and a school everyday life; “moral (value communication” organized through the “network interactions” (interaction between the students and the lecturer of the Pedagogical Academy as a practical model of culture-creating activity.Field of application: educational process in the graduate school (teaching the Humanities, and in the secondary school as an integral network of moral and aesthetical values and purposes in the education system.

  14. F229. THE BIOLOGICAL UNDERPINNINGS OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN DELUSIONAL DISORDER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF QUALITATIVE EVIDENCE-TO-DATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Estrada, Francesc; Montalvo, Itziar; Monreal, José Antonio; Palao, Diego; Labad, Javier

    2018-01-01

    identified, of which 12 met our inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were addressed: (1) Dopaminergic dysfunction (n=4): ziprasidone-induced supersensitivity psychosis by chronic blockade of D2 Dopamine Receptor (DRD2) (n=1); pretreatment levels of plasma homovallinic acid (pHVA) (n=1); dopamine transporter (DAT) dysfunction (n=1) and effectiveness of aripiprazole (DRD2 agonist) (n=1). (2) Serotonergic dysfunction (n=6): drug occupancy in 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors (n=3) and efficacy of 5-HT2 antagonists (n=3). Brain dysfunction (n=7): hypoperfusion in cerebral blood flow in temporal and parietal lobes, left side (n=5), right side (n=1) and lack of basal ganglia and subcortical gray matter lesions (n=1). Genetic evidence (n=1): implications of DRD2 Ser311Cys, DRD3 Ser9Gly and TH VNTR polymorphisms. Discussion The strongests biological contributors for treatment response in delusional disorder seem to be those implicating monoaminergic systems, particularly dopamine and serotonergic neurotransmitters. Although the low level of evidence, the serotonergic dysfunction may be associated with response rates, especially in delusional disorder somatic type. The link between genetic variants of dopamine receptors and neuroimaging findings in delusional disorder may open new avenues for the search of the biological underpinnings of treatment response. The evidence for an integrated model involving dopamine and serotonin systems bears further investigations.

  15. Applying Catastrophe Theory to an Information-Processing Model of Problem Solving in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we test an information-processing model (IPM) of problem solving in science education, namely the working memory overload model, by applying catastrophe theory. Changes in students' achievement were modeled as discontinuities within a cusp catastrophe model, where working memory capacity was implemented as asymmetry and the degree…

  16. A Race to the Bottom: MOOCs and Higher Education Business Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Yoram M.

    2014-01-01

    This is a critical examination of the claims that innovations such as massive open online courses (MOOCs) will disrupt the business models of the higher education sector. It describes what business models are, analyses the business model of free MOOCs offered by traditional universities and compares that model to that of paid online courses…

  17. A Systematic Review of Agent-Based Modelling and Simulation Applications in the Higher Education Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X.; Blackmore, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a systematic review of agent-based modelling and simulation (ABMS) applications in the higher education (HE) domain. Agent-based modelling is a "bottom-up" modelling paradigm in which system-level behaviour (macro) is modelled through the behaviour of individual local-level agent interactions (micro).…

  18. Learning within a Connectivist Educational Collective Blog Model: A Case Study of UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Elaine; Brown, Mel; Elbeltagi, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The use Web 2.0 technologies and specifically blogs has become increasingly prevalent within the Higher Education (HE) sector within recent years as educators begin to maximise the opportunities such tools can provide for teaching and learning and to experiment with their usage in a wide range of context. The use of such technologies has been…

  19. Taking Educational Games Seriously: Using the RETAIN Model to Design Endogenous Fantasy into Standalone Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Glenda A.; Kenny, Robert F.; Vick, Erik H.

    2008-01-01

    We are witnessing a mad rush to pour educational content into games in an ad hoc manner in hopes that player/learners are motivated simply because the content is housed inside a game. A failure to base educational game design on well-established learning and instructional theories increases the risk of the game failing to meet its intended…

  20. The Conceptual Model of Future Teachers Training to Dual Education in VET (Vocational Education & Training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholdasbekova, Saule; Nurzhanbayeva, Zhanat; Karatayev, Galymzhan; Akhmet, Laura Smatullaevna; Anarmetov, Bahitzhan

    2016-01-01

    In the article the author presents the theoretical understanding of research problems of training of the future teachers-organizers of the dual training system in vocational education & training (VET) in the conditions of the credit technology of education. The author's vision of way to solve the problem is discussed in the description of the…