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Sample records for underlying neuropathological disorder

  1. Huntington's disease (HD): the neuropathology of a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, U; Seidel, K; Heinsen, H; Vonsattel, J P; den Dunnen, W F; Korf, H W

    2016-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited, and currently untreatable, neuropsychiatric disorder. This progressive and ultimately fatal disease is named after the American physician George Huntington and according to the underlying molecular biological mechanisms is assigned to the human polyglutamine or CAG-repeat diseases. In the present article we give an overview of the currently known neurodegenerative hallmarks of the brains of HD patients. Subsequent to recent pathoanatomical studies the prevailing reductionistic concept of HD as a human neurodegenerative disease, which is primarily and more or less exclusively confined to the striatum (ie, caudate nucleus and putamen) has been abandoned. Many recent studies have improved our neuropathological knowledge of HD; many of the early groundbreaking findings of neuropathological HD research have been rediscovered and confirmed. The results of this investigation have led to the stepwise revision of the simplified pathoanatomical and pathophysiological HD concept and culminated in the implementation of the current concept of HD as a multisystem degenerative disease of the human brain. The multisystem character of the neuropathology of HD is emphasized by a brain distribution pattern of neurodegeneration (i) which apart from the striatum includes the cerebral neo-and allocortex, thalamus, pallidum, brainstem and cerebellum, and which (ii) therefore, shares more similarities with polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias than previously thought. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  2. DTI AND MYELIN PLASTICITY IN BIPOLAR DISORDER: INTEGRATING NEUROIMAGING AND NEUROPATHOLOGICAL FINDINGS.

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    MARCELLA eBELLANI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a major psychiatric illness with a chronic recurrent course, ranked among the worldwide leading disabling diseases. Its pathophysiology is still not completely understood, and findings are still inconclusive, though a great interest on the topic has been constantly raised by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, genetic and neuropathological studies. In recent years, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI investigations have prompted interest in the key role of White Matter (WM abnormalities in BD.In this report we summarized and commented recent findings from DTI studies in BD, reporting fractional anisotropy (FA as putative measure of WM integrity, as well as recent data from neuropathological studies focusing on oligodendrocyte involvement in WM alterations in BD.DTI research indicates that BD is most commonly associated with a WM disruption within the fronto-limbic network, which may be accompanied by other WM changes spread throughout temporal and parietal regions.Neuropathological studies, mainly focused on the fronto-limbic network, have repeatedly shown a loss of oligodendrocyte cell count underlying WM alterations, although an increased oligodendrocyte density has been also documented suggesting a putative role in remyelination processes for oligodendrocytes in BD.According to our review, a greater integration between DTI and morphological findings is needed in order to elucidate processes affecting WM, either glial loss or myelin plasticity, on the basis of a more targeted research in BD.

  3. Neuropathological mechanisms of seizures in autism spectrum disorder

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    Richard Eugene Frye

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reviews biological abnormalities shared by autism spectrum disorder (ASD and epilepsy. Two neuropathological findings are shared by ASD and epilepsy: abnormalities in minicolumn architecture and -aminobutyric acid (GABA. The peripheral neuropil, which is the region that contains the inhibition circuits of the minicolumns, has been found to be decreased in the post-mortem ASD brain. ASD and epilepsy are associated with inhibitory GABA neurotransmission abnormalities including reduced GABAA and GABAB subunit expression. These abnormalities can elevate the excitation-to-inhibition balance, resulting in hyperexcitablity of the cortex and, in turn, increases the risk of seizures. Medical abnormalities associated with both epilepsy and ASD are discussed. These include specific genetic syndromes, specific metabolic disorders including disorders of energy metabolism and GABA and glutamate neurotransmission, mineral and vitamin deficiencies, heavy metal exposures and immune dysfunction. Many of these medical abnormalities can result in an elevation of the excitatory-inhibitory balance. Fragile X is linked to dysfunction of the mGluR5 receptor and Fragile X, Angelman and Rett syndromes are linked to a reduction in GABAA receptor expression. Defects in energy metabolism can reduce GABA interneuron function. Both pyridoxine dependent seizures and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency cause GABA deficiencies while urea cycle defects and phenylketonuria cause abnormalities in glutamate neurotransmission. Mineral deficiencies can cause glutamate and GABA neurotransmission abnormalities and heavy metals can cause mitochondrial dysfunction which disrupts GABA metabolism. Thus, both ASD and epilepsy are associated with similar abnormalities that may alter the excitatory-to-inhibitory balance of the cortex. These parallels may explain the high prevalence of epilepsy in ASD and the elevated prevalence of ASD features in individuals with

  4. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neuropathology of the Cerebellum

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    David R Hampson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes that are perturbed in autism including language and communication, social interactions, stereotyped behavior, motor activity and motor coordination, and higher cognitive functions. The link between autism and cerebellar dysfunction should not be surprising to those who study its cellular, physiological, and functional properties. Postmortem studies have revealed neuropathological abnormalities in cerebellar cellular architecture while studies on mouse lines with cell loss or mutations in single genes restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells have also strongly implicated this brain structure in contributing to the autistic phenotype. This connection has been further substantiated by studies investigating brain damage in humans restricted to the cerebellum. In this review, we summarize advances in research on idiopathic autism and three genetic forms of autism that highlight the key roles that the cerebellum plays in this spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  5. Autism spectrum disorders and neuropathology of the cerebellum.

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    Hampson, David R; Blatt, Gene J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes that are perturbed in autism including language and communication, social interactions, stereotyped behavior, motor activity and motor coordination, and higher cognitive functions. The link between autism and cerebellar dysfunction should not be surprising to those who study its cellular, physiological, and functional properties. Postmortem studies have revealed neuropathological abnormalities in cerebellar cellular architecture while studies on mouse lines with cell loss or mutations in single genes restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells have also strongly implicated this brain structure in contributing to the autistic phenotype. This connection has been further substantiated by studies investigating brain damage in humans restricted to the cerebellum. In this review, we summarize advances in research on idiopathic autism and three genetic forms of autism that highlight the key roles that the cerebellum plays in this spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  6. Shared molecular neuropathology across major psychiatric disorders parallels polygenic overlap

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    Gandal, Michael J; Haney, Jillian R; Parikshak, Neelroop N

    2018-01-01

    -based phenotypes across five major psychiatric disorders-autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and alcoholism-compared with matched controls. We identified patterns of shared and distinct gene-expression perturbations across these conditions. The degree of sharing of transcriptional dysregulation...

  7. The spectrum of neuropathologic findings in deaths associated with seizure disorders.

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    Blisard, K S; McFeeley, P J

    1988-07-01

    The pathologic and neuropathologic findings in 90 autopsied cases of death associated with a seizure disorder or complication thereof were reviewed. Most (69%) of the deceased individuals were between 21 and 40 years of age; two thirds were male. In 58% of patients, no cause of death other than seizure disorder was found. The ultimate cause of death in those patients was assumed to be a cardiac arrhythmia or respiratory arrest. Drowning accounted for 19% of deaths, and 17% of patients died of other contributory causes such as suicide, exposure, or atherosclerotic coronary vascular disease. Aspiration was found in the remaining 6%. Tongue lacerations or bite marks were observed in only one third of cases. The brain was normal in approximately two thirds of cases, with no focus for the origination of seizure found on neuropathologic examination. In the remainder of cases, a variety of lesions was found, with cavitary lesions, contusions, and dural lesions being the most common ones.

  8. Molecular Neuropathology of Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes in Alcohol Use Disorders

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    José J. Miguel-Hidalgo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Postmortem studies reveal structural and molecular alterations of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in both the gray and white matter (GM and WM of the prefrontal cortex (PFC in human subjects with chronic alcohol abuse or dependence. These glial cellular changes appear to parallel and may largely explain structural and functional alterations detected using neuroimaging techniques in subjects with alcohol use disorders (AUDs. Moreover, due to the crucial roles of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in neurotransmission and signal conduction, these cells are very likely major players in the molecular mechanisms underpinning alcoholism-related connectivity disturbances between the PFC and relevant interconnecting brain regions. The glia-mediated etiology of alcohol-related brain damage is likely multifactorial since metabolic, hormonal, hepatic and hemodynamic factors as well as direct actions of ethanol or its metabolites have the potential to disrupt distinct aspects of glial neurobiology. Studies in animal models of alcoholism and postmortem human brains have identified astrocyte markers altered in response to significant exposures to ethanol or during alcohol withdrawal, such as gap-junction proteins, glutamate transporters or enzymes related to glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA metabolism. Changes in these proteins and their regulatory pathways would not only cause GM neuronal dysfunction, but also disturbances in the ability of WM axons to convey impulses. In addition, alcoholism alters the expression of astrocyte and myelin proteins and of oligodendrocyte transcription factors important for the maintenance and plasticity of myelin sheaths in WM and GM. These changes are concomitant with epigenetic DNA and histone modifications as well as alterations in regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs that likely cause profound disturbances of gene expression and protein translation. Knowledge is also available about interactions between astrocytes and

  9. Age-related disorders of sleep and motor control in the rat models of functionally distinct cholinergic neuropathology.

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    Ciric, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Petrovic, Jelena; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2016-03-15

    We studied the impact of aging during sleep in the rat models of Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) disease cholinergic neuropathology to determine the possible different and earlier onset of age-related sleep disorder during the neurodegenerative diseases vs. healthy aging. We used the bilateral nucleus basalis (NB) and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) lesioned rats as the in vivo models of functionally distinct cholinergic neuropathology, and we followed the impact of aging on sleep architecture, the electroencephalographic (EEG) microstructure and motor control across sleep/wake states. Our results have shown for the first time that the earliest signs of aging during distinct cholinergic neuropathology were expressed through a different and topographically specific EEG microstructure during rapid eye movement sleep (REM). EEG delta amplitude attenuation within the sensorimotor cortex (SMCx) during REM was the earliest sign of aging in the NB lesion. EEG sigma amplitude augmentation within the motor cortex (MCx) during REM was the earliest sign of aging in the PPT lesion. In addition, aging was differently expressed through the SMCx drive alterations, but it was commonly expressed through the MCx drive alterations during all sleep/wake states. Our study provided evidence of distinct REM sleep disorders and sleep state related cortical drives as the signs of aging onset during functionally distinct cholinergic neuropathologies (NB lesion vs. PPT lesion). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of neuropathological markers in the interpretation of neuropsychiatric disorders: Focus on fetal and perinatal programming.

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    Fanni, Daniela; Gerosa, Clara; Rais, Monica; Ravarino, Alberto; Van Eyken, Peter; Fanos, Vassilios; Faa, Gavino

    2018-03-16

    The study of neuropathological markers in patients affected by mental/psychiatric disorders is relevant for the comprehension of the pathogenesis and the correlation with the clinical symptomatology. The neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) recognizes intraneuronal and extracellular neurofibrillary formation responsible for neuronal degeneration. Immunohistochemical studies discovered many interesting results for a better interpretation of the AD pathogenesis, while the "metal hypothesis" supports that metal ions might differentially influence the formation of amyloid aggregates. The most relevant pathological findings reported in schizophrenia originate from computer assisted tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), suggesting the brain abnormalities involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The theory of fetal programming illustrates the epigenetic factors that may act during the intrauterine life on brain development, with relevant consequences on the susceptibility to develop AD or schizophrenia later in life. The neuropathological interpretation of AD and schizophrenia shows that the presence of severe neuropathological changes is not always associated with severe cognitive impairment. A better dialogue between psychiatrics and pathologists might help to halt insurgence and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Huntington's disease (HD) : the neuropathology of a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of the human brain

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    Rueb, U.; Seidel, K.; Heinsen, H.; Vonsattel, J. P.; den Dunnen, W. F.; Korf, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited, and currently untreatable, neuropsychiatric disorder. This progressive and ultimately fatal disease is named after the American physician George Huntington and according to the underlying molecular biological mechanisms is assigned to

  12. Gene-wise association of variants in four lysosomal storage disorder genes in neuropathologically confirmed Lewy body disease.

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    Clark, Lorraine N; Chan, Robin; Cheng, Rong; Liu, Xinmin; Park, Naeun; Parmalee, Nancy; Kisselev, Sergey; Cortes, Etty; Torres, Paola A; Pastores, Gregory M; Vonsattel, Jean P; Alcalay, Roy; Marder, Karen; Honig, Lawrence L; Fahn, Stanley; Mayeux, Richard; Shelanski, Michael; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Lee, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Variants in GBA are associated with Lewy Body (LB) pathology. We investigated whether variants in other lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) genes also contribute to disease pathogenesis. We performed a genetic analysis of four LSD genes including GBA, HEXA, SMPD1, and MCOLN1 in 231 brain autopsies. Brain autopsies included neuropathologically defined LBD without Alzheimer Disease (AD) changes (n = 59), AD without significant LB pathology (n = 71), Alzheimer disease and lewy body variant (ADLBV) (n = 68), and control brains without LB or AD neuropathology (n = 33). Sequencing of HEXA, SMPD1, MCOLN1 and GBA followed by 'gene wise' genetic association analysis was performed. To determine the functional effect, a biochemical analysis of GBA in a subset of brains was also performed. GCase activity was measured in a subset of brain samples (n = 64) that included LBD brains, with or without GBA mutations, and control brains. A lipidomic analysis was also performed in brain autopsies (n = 67) which included LBD (n = 34), ADLBV (n = 3), AD (n = 4), PD (n = 9) and control brains (n = 17), comparing GBA mutation carriers to non-carriers. In a 'gene-wise' analysis, variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 were significantly associated with LB pathology (p range: 0.03-4.14 x10(-5)). Overall, the mean levels of GCase activity were significantly lower in GBA mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (plipid classes, ceramides and sphingolipids, was observed in LBD brains carrying GBA mutations compared to controls (p range: p<0.05-p<0.01). Our study indicates that variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 are associated with LB pathology. Biochemical data comparing GBA mutation carrier to non-carriers support these findings, which have important implications for biomarker development and therapeutic strategies.

  13. Gene-wise association of variants in four lysosomal storage disorder genes in neuropathologically confirmed Lewy body disease.

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    Lorraine N Clark

    Full Text Available Variants in GBA are associated with Lewy Body (LB pathology. We investigated whether variants in other lysosomal storage disorder (LSD genes also contribute to disease pathogenesis.We performed a genetic analysis of four LSD genes including GBA, HEXA, SMPD1, and MCOLN1 in 231 brain autopsies. Brain autopsies included neuropathologically defined LBD without Alzheimer Disease (AD changes (n = 59, AD without significant LB pathology (n = 71, Alzheimer disease and lewy body variant (ADLBV (n = 68, and control brains without LB or AD neuropathology (n = 33. Sequencing of HEXA, SMPD1, MCOLN1 and GBA followed by 'gene wise' genetic association analysis was performed. To determine the functional effect, a biochemical analysis of GBA in a subset of brains was also performed. GCase activity was measured in a subset of brain samples (n = 64 that included LBD brains, with or without GBA mutations, and control brains. A lipidomic analysis was also performed in brain autopsies (n = 67 which included LBD (n = 34, ADLBV (n = 3, AD (n = 4, PD (n = 9 and control brains (n = 17, comparing GBA mutation carriers to non-carriers.In a 'gene-wise' analysis, variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 were significantly associated with LB pathology (p range: 0.03-4.14 x10(-5. Overall, the mean levels of GCase activity were significantly lower in GBA mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (p<0.001. A significant increase and accumulation of several species for the lipid classes, ceramides and sphingolipids, was observed in LBD brains carrying GBA mutations compared to controls (p range: p<0.05-p<0.01.Our study indicates that variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 are associated with LB pathology. Biochemical data comparing GBA mutation carrier to non-carriers support these findings, which have important implications for biomarker development and therapeutic strategies.

  14. Neurobehavioural, neuropathological and biochemical profiles in a novel mouse model of co-morbid posttraumatic stress disorder and mild traumatic brain injury.

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    Joseph Olubunmi Ojo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Co-morbid mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD has become the signature disorder for returning combat veterans. The clinical heterogeneity and overlapping symptomatology of mTBI and PTSD underscore the need to develop a preclinical model that will enable the characterization of unique and overlapping features and allow discrimination between both disorders. This study details the development and implementation of a novel experimental paradigm for PTSD and combined PTSD-mTBI. The PTSD paradigm involved exposure to a danger-related predator odor under repeated restraint over a 21day period and a physical trauma (inescapable footshock. We administered this paradigm alone, or in combination with a previously established mTBI model. We report outcomes of behavioral, pathological and biochemical profiles at an acute timepoint. PTSD animals demonstrated recall of traumatic memories, anxiety and an impaired social behavior. In both mTBI and combination groups there was a pattern of disinhibitory like behavior. mTBI abrogated both contextual fear and impairments in social behavior seen in PTSD animals. No major impairment in spatial memory was observed in any group. Examination of neuroendocrine and neuroimmune responses in plasma revealed a trend towards increase in corticosterone in PTSD and combination groups, and an apparent increase in Th1 and Th17 proinflamatory cytokine(s in the PTSD only and mTBI only groups respectively. In the brain there were no gross neuropathological changes in any groups. We observed that mTBI on a background of repeated trauma exposure resulted in an augmentation of axonal injury and inflammatory markers neurofilament L and ICAM-1. Our observations thus far suggest that this novel stress-trauma-related paradigm may be a useful model for investigating further the overlapping and distinct spatio-temporal and behavioral/biochemical relationship between mTBI and PTSD experienced by combat

  15. Neurobehavioral, neuropathological and biochemical profiles in a novel mouse model of co-morbid post-traumatic stress disorder and mild traumatic brain injury

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    Ojo, Joseph O.; Greenberg, M. Banks; Leary, Paige; Mouzon, Benoit; Bachmeier, Corbin; Mullan, Michael; Diamond, David M.; Crawford, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Co-morbid mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has become the signature disorder for returning combat veterans. The clinical heterogeneity and overlapping symptomatology of mTBI and PTSD underscore the need to develop a preclinical model that will enable the characterization of unique and overlapping features and allow discrimination between both disorders. This study details the development and implementation of a novel experimental paradigm for PTSD and combined PTSD-mTBI. The PTSD paradigm involved exposure to a danger-related predator odor under repeated restraint over a 21 day period and a physical trauma (inescapable footshock). We administered this paradigm alone, or in combination with a previously established mTBI model. We report outcomes of behavioral, pathological and biochemical profiles at an acute timepoint. PTSD animals demonstrated recall of traumatic memories, anxiety and an impaired social behavior. In both mTBI and combination groups there was a pattern of disinhibitory like behavior. mTBI abrogated both contextual fear and impairments in social behavior seen in PTSD animals. No major impairment in spatial memory was observed in any group. Examination of neuroendocrine and neuroimmune responses in plasma revealed a trend toward increase in corticosterone in PTSD and combination groups, and an apparent increase in Th1 and Th17 proinflammatory cytokine(s) in the PTSD only and mTBI only groups respectively. In the brain there were no gross neuropathological changes in any groups. We observed that mTBI on a background of repeated trauma exposure resulted in an augmentation of axonal injury and inflammatory markers, neurofilament L and ICAM-1 respectively. Our observations thus far suggest that this novel stress-trauma-related paradigm may be a useful model for investigating further the overlapping and distinct spatio-temporal and behavioral/biochemical relationship between mTBI and PTSD experienced by combat

  16. Rationalization of the Irrational Neuropathologic Basis of Hypothyroidism-Olfaction Disorders Paradox: Experimental Study.

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    Aydin, Nazan; Ramazanoglu, Leyla; Onen, Mehmet Resid; Yilmaz, Ilhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Altinkaynak, Konca; Calik, Muhammet; Kanat, Ayhan

    2017-11-01

    Hypothyroidism is defined as an underactive thyroid gland and one of the reasons for inadequate stimulation of thyroid is dysfunction of the hormone regulating brain centers. Olfaction disorders have been considered as a problem in hypothyroidism. It has been hypothesized that olfaction disorders reduce olfactory stimulation and diminished olfactory stimulus may trigger hypothyroidism. In this study, an examination was made of the thyroid hormone levels, histologic features of thyroid glands, and vagal nerve network degradation in an experimental animal model of olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). A total of 25 rats were divided into control (n = 5), SHAM (n = 5), and OBX (n = 15) groups and were followed up for 8 weeks. Thyroid hormone levels were measured before (1 time), during the experiment (1 time/month) and the animals were decapitated. The olfactory bulbs, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerves, and thyroid gland sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and tunnel dye to determine OBX-related damage. Specimens were analyzed stereologically to evaluate neuron density of the vagal nucleus and hormone-filled total follicle volume (TFV) per cubic centimeter, and these were statistically compared with thyroid hormone levels. The mean degenerated neuron density of the vagal nucleus was 21 ± 8/mm 3 . TFV and triiodothyronine (T 3 )-thyroxine (T 4 ) levels were measured as TFV, (312 ± 91) × 10 6 μm 3 /cm 3 ; T 3 , 105 μg/dl; T 4 , 1.89 μg/dl in control (group I). Mean degenerated neuron density, 56 ± 12/mm 3 ; TFV, (284 ± 69) × 10 6 μm 3 /cm 3 ; T 3 , 103 μg/dl; T 4 , 1.85 μg/dl in SHAM (group II). Mean degenerated neuron density, 235 ± 64/mm 3 ; TFV, (193 ± 34) × 10 6 μm 3 /cm 3 ; T 3 , 86 μg/dl; T 4 , 1.37 μg/dl in the OBX group (group III). The TFV were significantly diminished because of apoptotic degradation in olfactory bulbs and thyroid gland with decreased T 3 - T 4 levels with increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in OBX

  17. Anormalidades neuropatológicas e neuroquímicas no transtorno afetivo bipolar Neuropathological and neurochemical abnormalities in bipolar disorder

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    Benício Noronha Frey

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Estudos pós-mortem, farmacológicos, de neuroimagem e em modelos animais têm demonstrado uma possível associação de mecanismos de sinalização intracelular na fisiopatologia do transtorno afetivo bipolar (TAB. Esse trabalho tem como objetivo revisar os achados em neuropatologia e bioquímica celular. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma pesquisa ao MEDLINE, entre 1980 e 2003, tendo sido utilizados os unitermos: bipolar disorder, signaling, second messengers e postmortem, além de referências cruzadas dos artigos selecionados. RESULTADOS: uropatológicos demonstraram uma diminuição do número de células neuronais e gliais, principalmente no córtex pré-frontal de pacientes bipolares. Estudos neuroquímicos demonstraram alterações nas vias do AMPc, fosfatidilinositol, Wnt/GSK-3beta e Ca++ intracelular nesses pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: Os achados de alterações neuropatológicas e neuroquímicas no TAB podem estar relacionados com a fisiopatologia deste transtorno e com os efeitos dos estabilizadores de humor. No entanto, mais estudos são necessários para esclarecer o papel das cascatas de sinalização intracelular na patogênese deste transtorno.OBJECTIVES: Postmortem, pharmacological, neuroimaging, and animal model studies have demonstrated a possible association of intracellular signaling mechanisms in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. The objective of this paper is to review the findings in neuropathology and cellular biochemistry. METHODS: We performed a MEDLINE research, between 1980-2003, using bipolar disorder, signaling, second messengers, and postmortem as keywords, and cross-references. RESULTS: Neuropathological studies reported a decrease in neuronal and glial cells, mainly in the prefrontal cortex of bipolar patients. Neurochemical studies reported dysfunction in cAMP, phosphoinositide, Wnt/GSK-3b, and intracellular Ca++ pathways in these patients. CONCLUSION: The neuropathological and neurochemical abnormalities

  18. Neuropathology of alcoholism.

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    Sutherland, Greg T; Sheedy, Donna; Kril, Jillian J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in structural changes to the brain. In alcoholics without coexisting thiamine deficiency or liver disease this is largely restricted to a loss of white-matter volume. When it occurs, neuronal loss is limited in anatomic distribution and only detected with quantitative techniques. This relative paucity of neurodegeneration is reflected in studies of gene and protein expression in postmortem brain where findings are subtle and discordant between studies. In alcoholics with coexisting pathologies, neuronal loss is more marked and affects a wider range of anatomic regions, especially subcortical nuclei. Although this more widespread damage may reflect a more severe drinking history, there is evidence linking thiamine deficiency and the consequences of liver disease to the pathogenesis of alcohol-related brain damage. Furthermore, a range of other factors, such as cigarette smoking and mood disorders, that are common in alcoholics, have the potential to influence studies of brain pathology and should be considered in further studies of the neuropathology of alcoholism. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The neuropathology of sport

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    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Stein, Thor D.

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  20. The neuropathology of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  1. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

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    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  2. from Neuropathology and Experimental Demyelination

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    Graham R. Campbell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the most efficient producers of energy in the form of ATP. Energy demands of axons, placed at relatively great distances from the neuronal cell body, are met by mitochondria, which when functionally compromised, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS in excess. Axons are made metabolically efficient by myelination, which enables saltatory conduction. The importance of mitochondria for maintaining the structural integrity of myelinated axons is illustrated by neuroaxonal degeneration in primary mitochondrial disorders. When demyelinated, the compartmentalisation of ion channels along axons is disrupted. The redistribution of electrogenic machinery is thought to increase the energy demand of demyelinated axons. We review related studies that focus on mitochondria within unmyelinated, demyelinated and dysmyelinated axons in the central nervous system. Based on neuropathological observations we propose the increase in mitochondrial presence within demyelinated axons as an adaptive process to the increased energy need. An increased presence of mitochondria would also increase the capacity to produce deleterious agents such as ROS when functionally compromised. Given the lack of direct evidence of a beneficial or harmful effect of mitochondrial changes, the precise role of increased mitochondrial presence within axons due to demyelination needs to be further explored in experimental demyelination in-vivo and in-vitro.

  3. Molecular Neuropathology of TDP-43 Proteinopathies

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    Manuela Neumann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of TDP-43 as the major component of the pathologic inclusions in most forms of sporadic and familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS resolved a long-standing enigma concerning the nature of the ubiquitinated disease protein under these conditions. Anti-TDP-43 immunohistochemistry and the recent development of novel tools, such as phosphorylation-specific TDP-43 antibodies, have increased our knowledge about the spectrum of pathological changes associated with FTLD-U and ALS and moreover, facilitated the neuropathological routine diagnosis of these conditions. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding on the molecular neuropathology and pathobiology of TDP-43 in FTLD and ALS.

  4. Coffin-Siris syndrome. Neuropathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBassio, W A; Kemper, T L; Knoefel, J E

    1985-04-01

    We studied the neuropathologic features of a patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome. Two previously reported cases showed Dandy-Walker (D-W) malformations. In the present case there was no evidence of D-W malformation; instead there were hindbrain abnormalities of inferior and medial accessory olives, large arcuate nuclei, heterotopic olivary nuclei, and heterotopic nuclei in the white matter of the cerebellum. Although the hindbrain abnormalities in this case are different from those previously reported, they all have in common an intimate developmental relationship with the same embryological areas. This study suggests that the Coffin-Siris syndrome is a neurocutaneous disorder with hindbrain abnormalities in cerebellum and brain stem.

  5. Changing patterns of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathology

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    Gray Francoise

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the evolution of the pathogenic concepts associated with the infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, with emphasis to the pathology of the nervous system. Although the first description of damage to the nervous system in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS only appeared in 1982, the dramatic diffusion of the epidemic worldwide, as well as the invariably rapidly fatal outcome of the disease before the introduction of efficient treatment, generated from the beginning an enormous amount of research and re-thinking on a number of pathogenetic concepts. Less than 25 years after the first autopsy series on AIDS patients were published and the virus responsible for AIDS was identified, satisfactory definition and classification of a number of neuropathological complications of HIV infection have been established. This has led to the establishment of accurate clinical and biological diagnosis of the main neurological complications of the disease, which remain a major cause of disability and death in patients. Clinical and experimental studies have provided essential insight into the pathogenesis of CNS lesions and the natural history of the disorder. The relatively recent introduction of effective antiretroviral therapy in 1995-6 dramatically improved the course of prognosis of HIV disease. However, there remain a number of unsolved pathogenetic issues, the most puzzling of which remains the precise mechanism of neuronal damage underlying the specific HIV-related cognitive disorder (HIV-dementia. In addition, although antiretroviral therapy has changed the course of neurological complications, new issues have emerged, such as the lack of improvement or even paradoxical deterioration of the neurological status in treated patients. Interpretation of these complications remains largely speculative, partly because of the small number of neuropathological studies related to the beneficial consequence of this

  6. Neuropathological Alterations in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Matthew P.; Masliah, Eliezer; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) include “positive” lesions such as amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neurofibrillary tangles, and glial responses, and “negative” lesions such as neuronal and synaptic loss. Despite their inherently cross-sectional nature, postmortem studies have enabled the staging of the progression of both amyloid and tangle pathologies, and, consequently, the development of diagnostic criteria that are now used worldwide. In addition, clinicopathological correlation studies have been crucial to generate hypotheses about the pathophysiology of the disease, by establishing that there is a continuum between “normal” aging and AD dementia, and that the amyloid plaque build-up occurs primarily before the onset of cognitive deficits, while neurofibrillary tangles, neuron loss, and particularly synaptic loss, parallel the progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, these cross-sectional neuropathological data have been largely validated by longitudinal in vivo studies using modern imaging biomarkers such as amyloid PET and volumetric MRI. PMID:22229116

  7. Neuropathological Changes and Clinical Features of Autism Spectrum Disorder Participants Are Similar to that Reported in Congenital and Chronic Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandota, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Anatomic, histopathologic, and MRI/SPET studies of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) patients' brains confirm existence of very early developmental deficits. In congenital and chronic murine toxoplasmosis several cerebral anomalies also have been reported, and worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with T. "gondii"…

  8. [Neuropathology of frontotemporal dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical phenotype of dementia, characterized by complex of clinical symptoms, including disinhibition, character change, increased appetite, sexual misconduct and language problems. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a pathological classification of neurodegenerative disorder and its core consists of Pick's disease (PiD). Historically, PiD was morphologically subclassified into three types, but recent immunocytochemical investigations defined type I as PiD with Pick bodies (three repeat tauopathy), type II as corticobasal degeneration (CBD, four repeat tauopathy) and type III as FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U). The recent progress provided an evidence that the majority of FTLD-U represented primary TDP 43 proteionopathy. Three major clinical phenotypes of FTLD consist of FTD, semantic dementia (SD) and progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA). Clinical and pathological correlative studies demonstrated that majority of the background pathology of FTD is PiD with Pick bodies, that of SD is FTLD-U and that of PNFA is CBD, although there are too many exceptions. Although FTD is one of the major clinical manifestations of FTLD, the most frequent pathological background of FTD is Alzheimer disease (AD). The degenerative processes causing FTD symptoms include dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and argyrophilic grain disease. Moreover, vascular process such as Binswanger disease and inflammatory process such as neurosyphilis could also present with FTD symptoms. Since FTD requires special clinical care distinct from AD, clinical diagnosis of FTD is quite important. But for the fundamental treatment based on background pathological processes, surrogate biomarkers, including structural and functional neuroimages and findings of cerebrospinal fluid, blood and urine, should be pursued for future progress in FTD research.

  9. Neuropathology and Animal Models of Autism: Genetic and Environmental Factors

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    Bharathi S. Gadad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a heterogeneous behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder. It is defined by the presence of marked social deficits, specific language abnormalities, and stereotyped repetitive patterns of behavior. Because of the variability in the behavioral phenotype of the disorder among patients, the term autism spectrum disorder has been established. In the first part of this review, we provide an overview of neuropathological findings from studies of autism postmortem brains and identify the cerebellum as one of the key brain regions that can play a role in the autism phenotype. We review research findings that indicate possible links between the environment and autism including the role of mercury and immune-related factors. Because both genes and environment can alter the structure of the developing brain in different ways, it is not surprising that there is heterogeneity in the behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes of autism spectrum disorders. Finally, we describe animal models of autism that occur following insertion of different autism-related genes and exposure to environmental factors, highlighting those models which exhibit both autism-like behavior and neuropathology.

  10. Neuropathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, M.A.; Roizin, L.; Gold, G.

    1971-01-01

    The etiology of neuropathies in man and animals is reviewed. X-irradiation of rabbits on the 18th day of fetal life with 150 r disturbed the normal developmental changes of tissue respiration and anaerobic glycolysis of brain during ontogenesis. X-irradiation of the brain of 7-day-old rats (600 r) resulted in a large selective deficit of cerebellar weight at 7 1 / 2 months with a substantial increase of cellularity. A reduction in the cellular response to superficial freezing injury was dependent on the dosage of previous local brain x-irradiation, but independent of the time interval between irradiation and injury. It was suggested that radiation damage was stored up in local cells until they were stimulated to divide, when they died. Similar modifications were also induced in the response to subsequent intracerebral infection with Bacillus pertussis and were believed to support the view that brain macrophages are of local origin. The similarity of mast cell changes induced by compound 48/80 in both acute and chronic stages to those in irradiated monkey brains suggested that some of the lesions may reflect a process of delayed hypersensitivity with antigen provided by some component of the mast cells. (U.S.)

  11. The etiology of spontaneous intracerebralhemorrhage: Insights from a neuropathological series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Luis; Branco, Mariana; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo Pires, Manuel

    The etiology of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is frequently undetermined. We aimed to assess the impact of the neuropathological study on the etiologic diagnosis of ICH. Patients with ICH admitted to a tertiary hospital in the last 14 years were identified, and histological samples of surgically-drained ICH were retrieved. Blinded from neuropathological results, a clinical etiology was hypothesized. Pathological samples were reviewed, and immunohistochemistry study for β-amyloid was performed in all the cases where structural abnormalities were not identified. From 2002 - 2016, 113 patients with ICH underwent surgical drainage and had specimens taken for histology. The mean age was 51.6 years (SD = 19.2). Clinical and imaging data defined a presumable etiology in 47 patients (44.2%), including 30 patients with suspected structural pathology, 11 patients under anticoagulation, and 8 patients with probable hypertensive hemorrhage, while most had an undetermined etiology. Using neuropathological analysis, a definitive diagnosis was possible in 88.5% of the patients. Arteriovenous malformations (38.1%) and cavernous hemangiomas (16.8%) represented the most common findings. In 9.7%, the blood vessels showed cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The neuropathological study established a definite etiology in an additional 44.3% of patients other than only using the clinical and imaging data.
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  12. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease.

  13. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

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    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  14. Monoaminergic Neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimić, Goran; Leko, Mirjana Babić; Wray, Selina; Harrington, Charles; Delalle, Ivana; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Bažadona, Danira; Buée, Luc; de Silva, Rohan; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Wischik, Claude; Hof, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    None of the proposed mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) fully explains the distribution patterns of the neuropathological changes at the cellular and regional levels, and their clinical correlates. One aspect of this problem lies in the complex genetic, epigenetic, and environmental landscape of AD: early-onset AD is often familial with autosomal dominant inheritance, while the vast majority of AD cases are late-onset, with the ε4 variant of the gene encoding apolipoprotein E (APOE) known to confer a 5–20 fold increased risk with partial penetrance. Mechanisms by which genetic variants and environmental factors influence the development of AD pathological changes, especially neurofibrillary degeneration, are not yet known. Here we review current knowledge of the involvement of the monoaminergic systems in AD. The changes in the serotonergic, noradrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminergic, and melatonergic systems in AD are briefly described. We also summarize the possibilities for monoamine-based treatment in AD. Besides neuropathologic AD criteria that include the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), special emphasis is given to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Both of these brainstem nuclei are among the first to be affected by tau protein abnormalities in the course of sporadic AD, causing behavioral and cognitive symptoms of variable severity. The possibility that most of the tangle-bearing neurons of the LC and DRN may release amyloid β as well as soluble monomeric or oligomeric tau protein trans-synaptically by their diffuse projections to the cerebral cortex emphasizes their selective vulnerability and warrants further investigations of the monoaminergic systems in AD. PMID:27084356

  15. Brief Report: Life History and Neuropathology of a Gifted Man with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenheim, Karen, M.; Escobar, Alfonso; Rapin, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent interest in the pathogenesis of the autism spectrum disorders (pervasive developmental disorders), neuropathological descriptions of brains of individuals with well documented clinical information and without potentially confounding symptomatology are exceptionally rare. Asperger syndrome differs from classic autism by lack of…

  16. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, A Neuropathological Study

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    Geysu Karlıkaya

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Scientific Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodejenerative disorder of unknown cause characterized by degeneration and death of motor neurons. The diagnosis requires clinical evidence of both upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction and diagnostic tests to exclude other disorders with similar symptomatology. Pathologically ALS is characterized by loss of motor nerve cells in the spinal cord, brainstem and primary motor cortex accompanied by degeneration of the corticospinal tracts. A variety of inclusions have been described as major pathological features in ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders, these inclusions clarify the diagnosis and can provide insight into biochemical pathways leading to cell death. Objectives: This study is a review of the clinical and neuropathological features of sporadic ALS with special attention on two of the most common inclusions; Bunina bodies and ubiquitin immuonreactive (ub-ir inclusions. Material and Methods: We retrospectively analysed the clinical features of 11 autopsy confirmed ALS patients and classified the patients according to the revised El Escorial criteria. We also evaluated the motor cortex, hypoglossal nucleus and spinal cord sections from autopsies of these ALS patients and 7 controls, focusing on the specificity of Bunina bodies and ub-ir inclusions. Results: 4 patients qualified for clinically probable ALS, 1 patient for clinically probable-laboratory supported ALS, 5 patients for progressive spinal muscular atrophy and 1 patient for progressive bulbar palsy. Both Bunina bodies and ub-ir inclusions were found in most of these cases, %81.8 and %90.9 respectively. No Bunina bodies were seen in the control cases while ub-ir inclusions were seen in 3 control cases. Conclusions: This study confirms the specificity of Bunina bodies in sporadic ALS. Since ub-ir inclusions were also seen in a few of the controls, although they are characteristic of sporadic ALS they are not

  17. Brief report: life history and neuropathology of a gifted man with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenheim, Karen M; Escobar, Alfonso; Rapin, Isabelle

    2012-03-01

    Despite recent interest in the pathogenesis of the autism spectrum disorders (pervasive developmental disorders), neuropathological descriptions of brains of individuals with well documented clinical information and without potentially confounding symptomatology are exceptionally rare. Asperger syndrome differs from classic autism by lack of cognitive impairment or delay in expressive language acquisition. We examined the 1,570 g brain of a 63 year old otherwise healthy mathematician with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder of Asperger subtype. Except for an atypical gyral pattern and megalencephaly, we detected no specific neuropathologic abnormality. Taken together, the behavioral data and pathological findings in this case are compatible with an early neurodevelopmental process affecting multiple neuroanatomic networks, but without a convincing morphologic signature detectable with routine neuropathologic technology.

  18. Neuropathological diagnosis of brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Bianca

    2011-11-01

    With recent progress in radiological, pathological, immunohistochemical, molecular and genetic diagnoses, the characterisation of brain tumours has improved. The last World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System was done in 2007, based on morphological features, growth pattern and molecular profile of neoplastic cells, defined malignancy grade. The neuropathological diagnosis and the grading of each histotype are based on identification of histopathological criteria and immunohistochemical data. Molecular and genetic profiles may identify different tumour subtypes varying in biological and clinical behaviour, indicating prognostic and predictive factors. In order to investigate new therapeutic approaches, it is important to study the molecular pathways responsible for proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and anaplastic transformation. Different prognostic and predictive factors for glioma patients were identified by genetic studies, such as the loss of heterozygosis on chromosome 1p and 19q for oligodendrogliomas, proangiogenic factors such as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for glioblastomas and the methylation status of gene promoter of MethylGuanine-MethylTransferase. In conclusion, the prognostic evaluation and the therapeutic strategies for patients depend on the synthesis of histological diagnosis, malignancy grade, gene-molecular profile, radiological images, surgical resection and clinical findings (age, tumour location, and "performance status").

  19. The history of neuropathology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, D

    2010-01-01

    The history of Italian Neuropathology begins in the XIX century with Lombroso with his studies of criminal and prostitutes, inspired by the positivism of the era, and on the brain of epileptic patients. It reached its peak at the beginning of XX century with Camillo Golgi, Nobel laureate for his impregnation of neurons and the theory of the diffuse neuronal net. Neuropathology was then cultivated in Asylums and Universities where the main subject of interest were dementias and degenerative diseases, followed by vascular and inflammatory diseases. Some Laboratories arose in the country, especially in neurological institutes and some people later began to emigrate, especially to France and Germany and then to USA in order to improve their Neuropathology. Starting in the late fifties of the 20th century there was a progressive enrichment of Neuropathology with histochemistry, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and then molecular biology and the number of Laboratories increased consistently. As in other developed countries, Neuropathology with the enlargement of its scientific fields, began to split in sub-disciplines. It remained as a wide spectrum of knowledge, but neuropathologists were obliged to specialize in specific areas of the discipline. The continuous change of the set up of the university studies in the country in the last 20 years did not favor Neuropathology from which, moreover, some new independent disciplines originated.

  20. The underlying neurobiology of bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    MANJI, HUSSEINI K; QUIROZ, JORGE A; PAYNE, JENNIFER L; SINGH, JASKARAN; LOPES, BARBARA P; VIEGAS, JENILEE S; ZARATE, CARLOS A

    2003-01-01

    Clinical studies over the past decades have attempted to uncover the biological factors mediating the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) utilizing a variety of biochemical and neuroendocrine strategies. Indeed, assessments of cerebrospinal fluid chemistry, neuroendocrine responses to pharmacological challenge, and neuroreceptor and transporter binding have demonstrated a number of abnormalities in the amine neurotransmitter systems in this disorder. However, recent studies have also implicated critical signal transduction pathways as being integral to the pathophysiology and treatment of BD, in addition to a growing body of data suggesting that impairments of neuroplasticity and cellular resilience may also underlie the pathophysiology of the disorder. It is thus noteworthy that mood stabilizers and antidepressants indirectly regulate a number of factors involved in cell survival pathways - including MAP kinases, CREB, BDNF and bcl-2 protein - and may thus bring about some of their delayed long-term beneficial effects via underappreciated neurotrophic effects. PMID:16946919

  1. Behavior of disordered boron carbide under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-21

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6 GPa approximately = P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2-3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  2. Severe neonatal epileptic encephalopathy and KCNQ2 mutation: neuropathological substrate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eDalen Meurs-Van Der Schoor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Neonatal convulsions are clinical manifestations in a heterogeneous group of disorders with different etiology and outcome. They are attributed to several genetic causes. Methods:We describe a patient with intractable neonatal seizures who died from respiratory compromise during a status epilepticus. Results:This case report provides EEG, MRI, genetic analysis and neuropathological data. Genetic analysis revealed a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in the KCNQ2 gene, which encodes a subunit of a voltage-gated potassium channel. KCNQ2 gene mutation is associated with intractable neonatal seizures. EEG, MRI data as well as mutation analysis have been described in other KCNQ2 cases. Postmortem neuropathologic investigation revealed mild malformation of cortical development with increased heterotopic neurons in the deep white matter compared to an age-matched control subject. The new finding of this study is the combination of a KCNQ2 mutation and the cortical abnormalities. Conclusions:KCNQ2 mutations should be considered in neonates with refractory epilepsy of unknown cause. The mild cortical malformation is an important new finding, though it remains unknown whether these cortical abnormalities are due to the KCNQ2 mutation or are secondary to the refractory seizures.

  3. Pneumomediastinum on Multidetector CT: The Radiologic Signs and Underlying Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Soo Jin; Kim, Young Tong

    2011-01-01

    We can see the typical signs of pneumomediastinum on chest radiography and we can also see them on the multiplanar reformatted (MPR) image of multidetector CT (MDCT). MDCT can help to understand the anatomical feature of these signs and differentiate pneumomediastinum from pneumothorax, pneumopericardium and the Mach band effect. MDCT shows the peribronchovascular air, which reveals the Macklin effect, and it can also evaluate the underlying disorders that cause pneumomediastinum. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to inform physicians about the mechanism and anatomical features of pneumomediastinum, and to help them understand the imaging findings and underlying disorders of pneumomediastinum as seen on MDCT

  4. Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Environmental Toxicants: Epigenetics as an Underlying Mechanism

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    Nguyen Quoc Vuong Tran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism spectrum disorders (ASD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, calls for more research into the identification of etiologic and risk factors. The Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD hypothesizes that the environment during fetal and childhood development affects the risk for many chronic diseases in later stages of life, including neurodevelopmental disorders. Epigenetics, a term describing mechanisms that cause changes in the chromosome state without affecting DNA sequences, is suggested to be the underlying mechanism, according to the DOHaD hypothesis. Moreover, many neurodevelopmental disorders are also related to epigenetic abnormalities. Experimental and epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to prenatal environmental toxicants is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. In addition, there is also evidence that environmental toxicants can result in epigenetic alterations, notably DNA methylation. In this review, we first focus on the relationship between neurodevelopmental disorders and environmental toxicants, in particular maternal smoking, plastic-derived chemicals (bisphenol A and phthalates, persistent organic pollutants, and heavy metals. We then review studies showing the epigenetic effects of those environmental factors in humans that may affect normal neurodevelopment.

  5. An under-diagnosed geriatric syndrome: sleep disorders among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Sleep disorders are commonly under-diagnosed in the geriatric population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep problems among older adults admitted to the geriatrics out-patient clinic. Methods: Two hundred and three patients (136 female) older than 75 years of age were included in the study.

  6. An under-diagnosed geriatric syndrome: sleep disorders among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Introduction: Sleep disorders are commonly under-diagnosed in the geriatric population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep problems among older adults admitted to the geriatrics out-patient clinic. Methods: Two hundred and three patients (136 female) older than 75 years of age were included in the ...

  7. Identifying the genetic components underlying the pathophysiology of movement disorders

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    Ezquerra M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mario Ezquerra, Yaroslau Compta, Maria J MartiParkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Service of Neurology, Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERNED, SpainAbstract: Movement disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions, few of which have been classically described as bona fide hereditary illnesses (Huntington’s chorea, for instance. Most are considered to be either sporadic or to feature varying degrees of familial aggregation (parkinsonism and dystonia. In the late twentieth century, Mendelian monogenic mutations were found for movement disorders with a clear and consistent family history. Although important, these findings apply only to very rare forms of movement disorders. Already in the twenty-first century, and taking advantage of the modern developments in genetics and molecular biology, growing attention is being paid to the complex genetics of movement disorders. The search for risk genetic variants (polymorphisms in large cohorts and the identification of different risk variants across different populations and ethnic groups are under way, with the most relevant findings to date corresponding to recent genome wide association studies in Parkinson’s disease. These new approaches focusing on risk variants may enable the design of screening tests for early or even preclinical disease, and the identification of likely therapeutic targets.Keywords: genetics, movement disorders, Parkinson’s disease, parkinsonism, dystonia

  8. Etiologies underlying sex differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Sara M; Pfaff, Donald W

    2014-08-01

    The male predominance of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is one of the best-known, and at the same time, one of the least understood characteristics of these disorders. In this paper we review genetic, epigenetic, hormonal, and environmental mechanisms underlying this male preponderance. Sex-specific effects of Y-linked genes (including SRY expression leading to testicular development), balanced and skewed X-inactivation, genes that escape X-inactivation, parent-of-origin allelic imprinting, and the hypothetical heterochromatin sink are reviewed. These mechanisms likely contribute to etiology, instead of being simply causative to ASD. Environments, both internal and external, also play important roles in ASD's etiology. Early exposure to androgenic hormones and early maternal immune activation comprise environmental factors affecting sex-specific susceptibility to ASD. The gene-environment interactions underlying ASD, suggested here, implicate early prenatal stress as being especially detrimental to boys with a vulnerable genotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. How golden is the gold standard of neuropathology in dementia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Rockwood, K.

    2011-01-01

    Current Alzheimer's disease (AD) criteria state that a definite diagnosis can only be made by postmortem examination. The neuropathological confirmation is often referred to as the "gold standard." In this article, we review what constitutes a gold standard and how the neuropathological examination

  10. The neuropathology of hereditary congenital facial palsy vs Mobius syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Zwaag, B. van der; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the neuropathology of hereditary congenital facial palsy. METHODS: The authors compared brainstem pathology of three members of one family with autosomal dominant congenital facial palsy to that in three age-matched controls. The neuropathologic findings of the familial

  11. Invited review: Frontotemporal dementia caused by microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) mutations: a chameleon for neuropathology and neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetti, B; Oblak, A L; Boeve, B F; Johnson, K A; Dickerson, B C; Goedert, M

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary frontotemporal dementia associated with mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is a protean disorder. Three neuropathologic subtypes can be recognized, based on the presence of inclusions made of tau isoforms with three and four repeats, predominantly three repeats and mostly four repeats. This is relevant for establishing a correlation between structural magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography using tracers specific for aggregated tau. Longitudinal studies will be essential to determine the evolution of anatomical alterations from the asymptomatic stage to the various phases of disease following the onset of symptoms. © 2014 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Neuropathological Society.

  12. MicroRNA Implications across Neurodevelopment and Neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabata Martino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have rapidly emerged as biologically important mediators of posttranscriptional and epigenetic regulation in both plants and animals. miRNAs function through a variety of mechanisms including mRNA degradation and translational repression; additionally, miRNAs may guide gene expression by serving as transcription factors. miRNAs are highly expressed in human brain. Tissue and cell type-specific enrichments of certain miRNAs within the nervous system argue for a biological significance during neurodevelopmental stages. On the other hand, a large number of studies have reported links between alterations of miRNA homeostasis and pathologic conditions such as cancer, heart diseases, and neurodegeneration. Thus, profiles of distinct or aberrant miRNA signatures have most recently surged as one of the most fascinating interests in current biology. Here, the most recent insights into the involvement of miRNAs in the biology of the nervous system and the occurrence of neuropathological disorders are reviewed and discussed.

  13. Impact of Cytokines and Chemokines on Alzheimer's Disease Neuropathological Hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Catarina; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; Henriques, Ana Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, neuropathologically characterized by aggregates of β-amyloid peptides, which deposit as senile plaques, and of TAU protein, which forms neurofibrillary tangles. It is now widely accepted that neuroinflammation is implicated in AD pathogenesis. Indeed, inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) can impact on the Alzheimer´s amyloid precursor protein by affecting its expression levels and amyloidogenic processing and/or β -amyloid aggregation. Additionally, cytokines and chemokines can influence kinases' activities, leading to abnormal TAU phosphorylation. To date there is no cure for AD, but several therapeutic strategies have been directed to prevent neuroinflammation. Anti-inflammatory, but also anti-amyloidogenic compounds, such as flavonoids were shown to favourably modulate some pathological events associated with neurodegeneration. This review focuses on the role of cytokines and chemokines in AD-associated pathologies, and summarizes the potential anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing or slowing down disease progression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Neuropathology in mice expressing mouse alpha-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Rieker

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein (αSN in human is tightly linked both neuropathologically and genetically to Parkinson's disease (PD and related disorders. Disease-causing properties in vivo of the wildtype mouse ortholog (mαSN, which carries a threonine at position 53 like the A53T human mutant version that is genetically linked to PD, were never reported. To this end we generated mouse lines that express mαSN in central neurons at levels reaching up to six-fold compared to endogenous mαSN. Unlike transgenic mice expressing human wildtype or mutant forms of αSN, these mαSN transgenic mice showed pronounced ubiquitin immunopathology in spinal cord and brainstem. Isoelectric separation of mαSN species revealed multiple isoforms including two Ser129-phosphorylated species in the most severely affected brain regions. Neuronal Ser129-phosphorylated αSN occurred in granular and small fibrillar aggregates and pathological staining patterns in neurites occasionally revealed a striking ladder of small alternating segments staining either for Ser129-phosphorylated αSN or ubiquitin but not both. Axonal degeneration in long white matter tracts of the spinal cord, with breakdown of myelin sheaths and degeneration of neuromuscular junctions with loss of integrity of the presynaptic neurofilament network in mαSN transgenic mice, was similar to what we have reported for mice expressing human αSN wildtype or mutant forms. In hippocampal neurons, the mαSN protein accumulated and was phosphorylated but these neurons showed no ubiquitin immunopathology. In contrast to the early-onset motor abnormalities and muscle weakness observed in mice expressing human αSN, mαSN transgenic mice displayed only end-stage phenotypic alterations that manifested alongside with neuropathology. Altogether these findings show that increased levels of wildtype mαSN does not induce early-onset behavior changes, but drives end-stage pathophysiological changes in murine neurons that are

  15. Temporomandibular disorders and painful comorbidities: clinical association and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; de Faria, Flavio Augusto Cardoso; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-03-01

    The association between temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and headaches, cervical spine dysfunction, and fibromyalgia is not artefactual. The aim of this review is to describe the comorbid relationship between TMD and these three major painful conditions and to discuss the clinical implications and the underlying pain mechanisms involved in these relationships. Common neuronal pathways and central sensitization processes are acknowledged as the main factors for the association between TMD and primary headaches, although the establishment of cause-effect mechanisms requires further clarification and characterization. The biomechanical aspects are not the main factors involved in the comorbid relationship between TMD and cervical spine dysfunction, which can be better explained by the neuronal convergence of the trigeminal and cervical spine sensory pathways as well as by central sensitization processes. The association between TMD and fibromyalgia also has supporting evidence in the literature, and the proposed main mechanism underlying this relationship is the impairment of the descending pain inhibitory system. In this particular scenario, a cause-effect relationship is more likely to occur in one direction, that is, fibromyalgia as a risk factor for TMD. Therefore, clinical awareness of the association between TMD and painful comorbidities and the support of multidisciplinary approaches are required to recognize these related conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuropathologic features in the hippocampus and cerebellum of three older men with fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability, and is the most common single-gene disorder known to be associated with autism. Despite recent advances in functional neuroimaging and our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, only limited neuropathologic information on FXS is available. Methods Neuropathologic examinations were performed on post-mortem brain tissue from three older men (aged 57, 64 and 78 years) who had received a clinical or genetic diagnosis of FXS. In each case, physical and cognitive features were typical of FXS, and one man was also diagnosed with autism. Guided by reports of clinical and neuroimaging abnormalities of the limbic system and cerebellum of individuals with FXS, the current analysis focused on neuropathologic features present in the hippocampus and the cerebellar vermis. Results Histologic and immunologic staining revealed abnormalities in both the hippocampus and cerebellar vermis. Focal thickening of hippocampal CA1 and irregularities in the appearance of the dentate gyrus were identified. All lobules of the cerebellar vermis and the lateral cortex of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum had decreased numbers of Purkinje cells, which were occasionally misplaced, and often lacked proper orientation. There were mild, albeit excessive, undulations of the internal granular cell layer, with patchy foliar white matter axonal and astrocytic abnormalities. Quantitative analysis documented panfoliar atrophy of both the anterior and posterior lobes of the vermis, with preferential atrophy of the posterior lobule (VI to VII) compared with age-matched normal controls. Conclusions Significant morphologic changes in the hippocampus and cerebellum in three adult men with FXS were identified. This pattern of pathologic features supports the idea that primary defects in neuronal migration, neurogenesis and aging may underlie the neuropathology reported in FXS. PMID:21303513

  17. [Neuropathology of superficial hemosiderosis and neuroferritinopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathology of superficial hemosiderosis. Gross finding shows diffuse brownish discoloration at the surface of the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. Severe atrophy and necrosis is present in the cerebellum. Extensive deposits of hemosiderin that are well recognized with Berlin blue and ferritin immunohistochemistry are present at the surface and in the superficial parenchyma of the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum and spinal cord. Although the pathomechanism of this disease remains unresolved, continuous or recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage may be important for developing diffuse hemosiderin deposition. Neuroferritinopathy. Intranuclear and intracytoplasmic bodies are seen in glia and subsets of neurons in the central nervous system as well as in extraneural tissue. They are stained by Perls' method for ferric iron. The bodies are immunopositive against antibodies raised against mutated and wild type of ferritin light polypeptide as well as ferritin heavy polypeptide. It is suggested that loss of normal function and gain of toxic function may be crucial for neurodegeneration of neuroferritinopathy. Both diseases could be helpful to understand and clarify the pathomechanism of neurodegeneration associated with iron metabolism.

  18. Challenging the exclusion of gambling disorder as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Kathleen V

    2015-02-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act explicitly excludes "compulsive gambling" from its definition of disability, thus denying gambling addicts protection from employer discrimination based on their disorder. Since the enactment of the ADA, however, scientific understandings of gambling disorder have evolved to view the condition as an addiction, rather than as a compulsion or impulse-control disorder. This move is mirrored in the DSM-5's reclassification of gambling disorder under the category of "substance-related and other addictive disorders." This Note contends that gambling disorder would qualify as a "disability" under the ADA, were it not for the disorder's current statutory exclusion. This Note therefore recommends that the ADA be amended to bring gambling disorder within its coverage. Such a change would not only reflect recent developments in the field of addiction psychology, but would also further the ADA's underlying purpose--to protect individuals with disabilities from workplace discrimination.

  19. 4D flow mri post-processing strategies for neuropathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauben, Eric Mathew

    4D flow MRI allows for the measurement of a dynamic 3D velocity vector field. Blood flow velocities in large vascular territories can be qualitatively visualized with the added benefit of quantitative probing. Within cranial pathologies theorized to have vascular-based contributions or effects, 4D flow MRI provides a unique platform for comprehensive assessment of hemodynamic parameters. Targeted blood flow derived measurements, such as flow rate, pulsatility, retrograde flow, or wall shear stress may provide insight into the onset or characterization of more complex neuropathologies. Therefore, the thorough assessment of each parameter within the context of a given disease has important medical implications. Not surprisingly, the last decade has seen rapid growth in the use of 4D flow MRI. Data acquisition sequences are available to researchers on all major scanner platforms. However, the use has been limited mostly to small research trials. One major reason that has hindered the more widespread use and application in larger clinical trials is the complexity of the post-processing tasks and the lack of adequate tools for these tasks. Post-processing of 4D flow MRI must be semi-automated, fast, user-independent, robust, and reliably consistent for use in a clinical setting, within large patient studies, or across a multicenter trial. Development of proper post-processing methods coupled with systematic investigation in normal and patient populations pushes 4D flow MRI closer to clinical realization while elucidating potential underlying neuropathological origins. Within this framework, the work in this thesis assesses venous flow reproducibility and internal consistency in a healthy population. A preliminary analysis of venous flow parameters in healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients is performed in a large study employing 4D flow MRI. These studies are performed in the context of the chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency hypothesis. Additionally, a

  20. The Neuropathology of Huntington´s disease: classical findings, recent developments and correlation to functional neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, Udo; Vonsattel, Jean Paul V; Heinsen, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a severe, autosomal dominantly inherited, gradually worsening neurological disorder, the clinical features of which were first described in 1863 by Irving W. Lyon and with additional details, in 1872, by George Huntington. Progress in molecular biological research has shown that HD is caused by meiotically unstable CAG-repeats in the mutated HD gene (the so-called IT 15 gene) on chromosome 4p16.3, which encodes the mutated protein huntingtin (Htt). This monograph provides a survey of the stepwise progress in neuropathological HD research made during a time period of more than hundred years, the currently known neuropathological hallmarks of HD, as well as their pathogenic and clinical relevance. Starting with the initial descriptions of the progressive degeneration of the neostriatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) as one of the key events in HD, the worldwide practiced Vonsattel HD grading system of striatal neurodegeneration will be outlined. Correlating qualitative and quantitative neuropathological data with characteristics pertaining to the functional neuroanatomy of the human brain, subsequent chapters will highlight the latest neuropathological HD findings: the area- and layer-specifi c neuronal loss in the cerebral neo- and allocortex, the neurodegeneration of select thalamic nuclei, the affection of the cerebellar cortex and the deep cerebellar nuclei, the involvement of distinct brainstem nuclei, and the pathophysiological relevance of these pathologies for the clinical phenotype of HD. Finally, the potential pathophysiological role of axonal transport deficit

  1. Complex anxiety disorders : Risk factors, underlying mechanisms, and treatment enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hofmeijer-Sevink, M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to address lacunas in the current knowledge of complex anxiety disorders. This is an important topic since complex anxiety disorders tend to develop a chronic course and because current guidelines are incomplete. In this thesis, several studies are presented regarding the various

  2. Phenotypic differences based on staging of Alzheimer's neuropathology in autopsy-confirmed dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peavy, Guerry M; Edland, Steven D; Toole, Belinda M; Hansen, Lawrence A; Galasko, Douglas R; Mayo, Ann M

    2016-10-01

    The goal was to compare subgroups of dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) using neuropathological measures to differentiate 'pure' Lewy body (LB) dementia from 'mixed' DLB [co-occurring LB and Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology] to facilitate diagnostic decision-making and future development of interventions based on predicted type(s) of neuropathology. Studies comparing these groups are rare relative to those differentiating 'pure' AD and all-cause DLB, and are limited by insufficient sample size, brief cognitive batteries, and/or absence of autopsy confirmation. To address these limitations, we assessed cognition and other features in a large, autopsy-confirmed DLB sample using an extensive neuropsychological battery. Subjects from an AD research center autopsy series satisfying DLB pathology criteria were divided by an AD neuropathology index into DLB-LB (Braak stage 0-3) (n = 38) and DLB-AD (Braak stage 4-6) (n = 41) and compared on baseline variables from chart reviews and standardized measures. DLB-LB subjects were more impaired on visuospatial constructions, visual conceptual reasoning, and speed of processing, but less impaired on verbal memory and confrontation naming. All-type hallucinations occurred more frequently in DLB-LB, while delusions were common in both groups. Groups were similar in education and age at onset, and in baseline age, dementia severity, and functional capacity. Salient findings included greater impairment on visual tasks and speed of processing and more frequent reports of all-type hallucinations in DLB-LB compared to DLB-AD. Relatively intact confrontation naming in DLB-LB and no differences in reported delusions were of note. Identifying differences in phenotypic features can improve prediction of underlying neuropathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Autism spectrum disorders and neuropathology of the cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Hampson, David R.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes ...

  4. The importance of brain banks for molecular neuropathological research: The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedova, Irina; Harding, Antony; Sheedy, Donna; Garrick, Therese; Sundqvist, Nina; Hunt, Clare; Gillies, Juliette; Harper, Clive G

    2009-01-01

    New developments in molecular neuropathology have evoked increased demands for postmortem human brain tissue. The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre (TRC) at The University of Sydney has grown from a small tissue collection into one of the leading international brain banking facilities, which operates with best practice and quality control protocols. The focus of this tissue collection is on schizophrenia and allied disorders, alcohol use disorders and controls. This review highlights changes in TRC operational procedures dictated by modern neuroscience, and provides examples of applications of modern molecular techniques to study the neuropathogenesis of many different brain disorders.

  5. The Importance of Brain Banks for Molecular Neuropathological Research: The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Harding

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available New developments in molecular neuropathology have evoked increased demands for postmortem human brain tissue. The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre (TRC at The University of Sydney has grown from a small tissue collection into one of the leading international brain banking facilities, which operates with best practice and quality control protocols. The focus of this tissue collection is on schizophrenia and allied disorders, alcohol use disorders and controls. This review highlights changes in TRC operational procedures dictated by modern neuroscience, and provides examples of applications of modern molecular techniques to study the neuropathogenesis of many different brain disorders.

  6. Quantum thermostatted disordered systems and sensitivity under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzan, Tommaso; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2018-03-01

    A one-dimensional quantum system with off diagonal disorder, consisting of a sample of conducting regions randomly interspersed within potential barriers is considered. Results mainly concerning the large N limit are presented. In particular, the effect of compression on the transmission coefficient is investigated. A numerical method to simulate such a system, for a physically relevant number of barriers, is proposed. It is shown that the disordered model converges to the periodic case as N increases, with a rate of convergence which depends on the disorder degree. Compression always leads to a decrease of the transmission coefficient which may be exploited to design nano-technological sensors. Effective choices for the physical parameters to improve the sensitivity are provided. Eventually large fluctuations and rate functions are analysed.

  7. [The characteristics of iron metabolism under iron-deficiency anemia and chronic disorders anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorkalova, E V; Aznabaeva, L F; Nikulicheva, V I; Safuanova, G Sh; Chepurnaia, A N

    2011-07-01

    The study investigated the issues of iron metabolism under iron-deficiency anemia and chronic disorders anemia and dependencies of production of IL-1? and sICAM-1 immunoinflammatory markers from degree of severity and duration of anemia. The study data indicates that under iron-deficiency anemia lactoferrin and sICAM-1 are the negative regulators of hemopoiesis. The inhibition of transferrin expression by the proinflammatory cytokines is one of the causes of inefficient hemopoiesis under chronic disorders anemia.

  8. Neuropeptide Y mitigates neuropathology and motor deficits in mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Neves, Joana; Gonçalves, Nélio; Cunha-Santos, Janete; Simões, Ana Teresa; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Hirai, Hirokazu; Kügler, Sebastian; Cavadas, Cláudia; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-10-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a fatal, dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder associated with an expanded polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein, and characterized by progressive impairment of motor coordination, associated with neurodegeneration of specific brain regions, including cerebellum and striatum. The currently available therapies do not allow modification of disease progression. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been shown to exert potent neuroprotective effects by multiple pathways associated with the MJD mechanisms of disease. Thus, we evaluated NPY levels in MJD and investigated whether raising NPY by gene transfer would alleviate neuropathological and behavioural deficits in cerebellar and striatal mouse models of the disease. For that, a cerebellar transgenic and a striatal lentiviral-based models of MJD were used. NPY overexpression in the affected brain regions in these two mouse models was obtained by stereotaxic injection of adeno-associated viral vectors encoding NPY. Up to 8 weeks after viral injection, balance and motor coordination behaviour and neuropathology were analysed. We observed that NPY levels were decreased in two MJD patients' cerebella and in striata and cerebella of disease mouse models. Furthermore, overexpression of NPY alleviated the motor coordination impairments and attenuated the related neuropathological parameters, preserving cerebellar volume and granular layer thickness, reducing striatal lesion and decreasing mutant ataxin-3 aggregation. Additionally, NPY mediated increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and decreased neuroinflammation markers. Our data suggest that NPY is a potential therapeutic strategy for MJD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Stroke and sleep-disordered breathing: A relationship under construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Olga; Arboix, Adrià

    2016-02-16

    The association between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and cardiovascular risk has been the focus of attention in recent years. Sleep disorders are emerging risk factors for cardiovascular disease and have been related to the whole spectrum of stroke, including transient ischemic attack, ischemic cerebral infarction and intracerebral haemorrhage. It has been shown that lacunar stroke or lacunar infarctions affecting the internal capsule or the protuberance are associated with a higher frequency of SDB. Acute stroke patients with associated SDB have a worse prognosis and a higher mortality as compared to patients with first-ever stroke without SDB. Preliminary studies provide evidence of the usefulness of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure when SDB is present in stroke patients.

  10. Mixed neuropathologies and associations with domain-specific cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenowitz, Willa D; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Keene, C Dirk; Hawes, Stephen E; Longstreth, W T; Woltjer, Randy L; Kukull, Walter A

    2017-10-24

    To test whether decline in specific cognitive domains associated with Alzheimer disease neuropathologic change (ADNC) is modified by co-occurrence of other neuropathologies such as Lewy body disease (LBD) or vascular brain injury (VBI). Data came from 1,603 autopsied participants evaluated at US Alzheimer's Disease Centers. Standardized z scores in memory, attention, language, and executive function were derived from neuropsychological test scores assessed at each annual visit. Multivariable linear mixed-effects models assessed associations between neuropathologies and longitudinal trajectories of domain scores. Compared to other participants, those with ADNC + LBD generally had worse cognitive trajectories, particularly lower initial executive function and faster attention decline. Participants with ADNC + VBI typically had less impairment and slower decline. Interactions were significant between LBD and ADNC for memory ( p = 0.046) and between VBI and ADNC for language ( p = 0.03); decline was slower than expected if these neuropathologies acted additively on the rate of decline. In secondary models, these interactions were limited to those with high ADNC (but not intermediate ADNC). In a subset of 260 participants with data on microinfarct location, cortical and subcortical microinfarcts were associated with decline in memory, language, and executive function in those without ADNC, but this effect was reduced among those with ADNC. ADNC + LBD (but not ADNC + VBI) was associated with poorer executive function and attention compared to other pathology groupings. However, the effect of co-occurring pathologies on cognitive trajectories may depend on the severity of ADNC. Future studies using antemortem biomarkers should seek to replicate these neuropathologic observations. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. A Mutual Self- and Informant-Report of Cognitive Complaint Correlates with Neuropathological Outcomes in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Gifford

    Full Text Available This study examines whether different sources of cognitive complaint (i.e., self and informant predict Alzheimer's disease (AD neuropathology in elders with mild cognitive impairment (MCI.Data were drawn from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform and Neuropathology Datasets (observational studies for participants with a clinical diagnosis of MCI and postmortem examination (n = 1843, 74±8 years, 52% female. Cognitive complaint (0.9±0.5 years prior to autopsy was classified into four mutually exclusive groups: no complaint, self-only, informant-only, or mutual (both self and informant complaint. Postmortem neuropathological outcomes included amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Proportional odds regression related complaint to neuropathology, adjusting for age, sex, race, education, depressed mood, cognition, APOE4 status, and last clinical visit to death interval.Mutual complaint related to increased likelihood of meeting NIA/Reagan Institute (OR = 6.58, p = 0.004 and Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease criteria (OR = 5.82, p = 0.03, and increased neurofibrillary tangles (OR = 3.70, p = 0.03, neuritic plaques (OR = 3.52, p = 0.03, and diffuse plaques (OR = 4.35, p = 0.02. Informant-only and self-only complaint was not associated with any neuropathological outcome (all p-values>0.12.In MCI, mutual cognitive complaint relates to AD pathology whereas self-only or informant-only complaint shows no relation to pathology. Findings support cognitive complaint as a marker of unhealthy brain aging and highlight the importance of obtaining informant corroboration to increase confidence of underlying pathological processes.

  12. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  13. Shared and unique mechanisms underlying binge eating disorder and addictive disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Erica M.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Gearhardt, Ashley N.

    2018-01-01

    Scientific interest in “food addiction” is growing, but the topic remains controversial. One critique of “food addiction” is its high degree of phenotypic overlap with binge eating disorder (BED). In order to examine associations between problematic eating behaviors, such as binge eating and “food addiction,” we propose the need to move past examining similarities and differences in symptomology. Instead, focusing on relevant mechanisms may more effectively determine whether “food addiction” contributes to disordered eating behavior for some individuals. This paper reviews the evidence for mechanisms that are shared (i.e., reward dysfunction, impulsivity) and unique for addiction (i.e., withdrawal, tolerance) and eating disorder (i.e., dietary restraint, shape/weight concern) frameworks. This review will provide a guiding framework to outline future areas of research needed to evaluate the validity of the “food addiction” model and to understand its potential contribution to disordered eating. PMID:26879210

  14. Clinical, biochemical, neuropathological and molecular findings of the first Polish case of adenylosuccinase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzewska, Hanna; Schmidt-Sidor, Bogna; Lewandowska, Eliza; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Stepień, Tomasz; Rafałowska, Janina

    2008-01-01

    Adenylosuccinase (ADSL) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting mainly the nervous system. The disease causes psychomotor retardation, frequently with autistic features and epilepsy. ADSL deficiency may be diagnosed by detection of two abnormal metabolites in body fluids--succinyladenosine (S-Ado) and succinylaminoimidazole carboxamide riboside (SAICAr). It is assumed that the former metabolite is neurotoxic. We present clinical, biochemical and neuropathological findings of a child affected by a severe form of ADSL deficiency. She had progressive neurological symptoms that started immediately after birth and died at 2.5 months of age. Macroscopically the brain showed signs of moderate atrophy. Histological examination of all grey matter structures showed widespread damage of neurons accompanied by microspongiosis of neuropile. Cerebral white matter showed lack of myelination in the centrum semiovale and diffuse spongiosis of neuropile. Myelination appropriate for the age was visible in posterior limb of internal capsule, in striatum, thalamus and in brain stem structures but diffuse destruction of myelin sheets was seen with severe marked astroglial reaction with signs of destruction of the cells and their processes. Ultrastructural examination showed enormous destruction of all cellular elements, but astonishingly mitochondria were relatively spared. The neuropathological changes can be considered as the neurotoxic result of metabolic disturbances connected with adenylosuccinase deficiency.

  15. Clarifying the prospective relationships between social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms and underlying vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety and eating disorders are highly comorbid. Several explanations for these high levels of comorbidity have been theorized. First, social anxiety might be a vulnerability factor for eating disorders. Second, eating disorders might be a vulnerability factor for social anxiety. Third, the two kinds of disorders may have common, shared psychological vulnerabilities. The current study (N = 300 undergraduate women) investigates a model of social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms that examines each of these possibilities across two time points (Time 1 and six months later). We do not find support for either social anxiety or eating disorder symptoms per se predicting each other across time. Instead, we find that some underlying vulnerabilities prospectively predict symptoms of both disorders, whereas other vulnerabilities are specific to symptoms of one disorder. Specifically we find that maladaptive perfectionism is a shared prospective vulnerability for social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms. Alternatively, we find that social appearance anxiety is specific for eating disorder symptoms, whereas high standards is specific for social anxiety symptoms. These data help clarify our understanding of how and why social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms frequently co-occur. PMID:27444957

  16. A common genetic factor underlies hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spector Tim D

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain conditions characterised by blood vessel occlusion or vascular spasm have been found to cluster together in epidemiological studies. However the biological causes for these associations remain controversial. This study used a classical twin design to examine whether these conditions are linked through shared environmental exposures or by a common underlying genetic propensity to vasospasm. Methods We investigated the association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease in twins from a national register. Phenotype status was determined using a questionnaire and the genetic and environmental association between phenotypes was estimated through variance components analysis. Results Responses were obtained from 2,204 individuals comprising 525 monozygotic and 577 dizygotic pairs. There was a significant genetic contribution to all four traits with heritabilities ranging from 0.34 to 0.64. Multivariate model-fitting demonstrated that a single common genetic factor underlies the four conditions. Conclusions We have confirmed an association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease, and shown that a single genetic factor underlies them. The demonstration of a shared genetic factor explains the association between them and adds weight to the theory of an inherited predisposition to vasospasm.

  17. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Degeneration of rapid eye movement sleep circuitry underlies rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dillon; Peever, John

    2017-05-01

    During healthy rapid eye movement sleep, skeletal muscles are actively forced into a state of motor paralysis. However, in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder-a relatively common neurological disorder-this natural process is lost. A lack of motor paralysis (atonia) in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder allows individuals to actively move, which at times can be excessive and violent. At first glance this may sound harmless, but it is not because rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder patients frequently injure themselves or the person they sleep with. It is hypothesized that the degeneration or dysfunction of the brain stem circuits that control rapid eye movement sleep paralysis is an underlying cause of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. The link between brain stem degeneration and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder stems from the fact that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder precedes, in the majority (∼80%) of cases, the development of synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy, which are known to initially cause degeneration in the caudal brain stem structures where rapid eye movement sleep circuits are located. Furthermore, basic science and clinical evidence demonstrate that lesions within the rapid eye movement sleep circuits can induce rapid eye movement sleep-specific motor deficits that are virtually identical to those observed in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This review examines the evidence that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is caused by synucleinopathic neurodegeneration of the core brain stem circuits that control healthy rapid eye movement sleep and concludes that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is not a separate clinical entity from synucleinopathies but, rather, it is the earliest symptom of these disorders. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and

  19. Systemic immune challenges trigger and drive Alzheimer-like neuropathology in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstic Dimitrije

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most prevalent form of age-related dementia, and its effect on society increases exponentially as the population ages. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuroinflammation, mediated by the brain’s innate immune system, contributes to AD neuropathology and exacerbates the course of the disease. However, there is no experimental evidence for a causal link between systemic inflammation or neuroinflammation and the onset of the disease. Methods The viral mimic, polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (PolyI:C was used to stimulate the immune system of experimental animals. Wild-type (WT and transgenic mice were exposed to this cytokine inducer prenatally (gestation day (GD17 and/or in adulthood. Behavioral, immunological, immunohistochemical, and biochemical analyses of AD-associated neuropathologic changes were performed during aging. Results We found that a systemic immune challenge during late gestation predisposes WT mice to develop AD-like neuropathology during the course of aging. They display chronic elevation of inflammatory cytokines, an increase in the levels of hippocampal amyloid precursor protein (APP and its proteolytic fragments, altered Tau phosphorylation, and mis-sorting to somatodendritic compartments, and significant impairments in working memory in old age. If this prenatal infection is followed by a second immune challenge in adulthood, the phenotype is strongly exacerbated, and mimics AD-like neuropathologic changes. These include deposition of APP and its proteolytic fragments, along with Tau aggregation, microglia activation and reactive gliosis. Whereas Aβ peptides were not significantly enriched in extracellular deposits of double immune-challenged WT mice at 15 months, they dramatically increased in age-matched immune-challenged transgenic AD mice, precisely around the inflammation-induced accumulations of APP and its proteolytic fragments, in striking similarity to

  20. Neuropathology and brain weight in traumatic-crush asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarraj, Safa; Laxton, Ross; Swift, Ben; Kolar, Alexander J; Chapman, Rob C; Fegan-Earl, Ashley W; Cary, Nat R B

    2017-11-01

    Traumatic (crush) asphyxia is a rare condition caused by severe compression of the chest and trunk leading to often extreme so-called asphyxial signs, including cyanosis in head and neck regions, multiple petechiae, and subconjunctival haemorrhage as well as neurological manifestations. To investigate the neuropathology and brain weight in traumatic asphyxia caused by different accidents such as industrial accidents and road traffic collision. Post mortem records of 20 cases of traumatic asphyxia (TA) resulting from different causes of which four brains are available for comprehensive neuropathological examination. The expected brain weights for given body height and associated 95% confidence range were calculated according to the following formula: baseline brain weight (BBW) + body height x rate (g/cm). The 95% confidence range was calculated by adding and subtracting the standard error (SE) x 1.96 (7-8). There was a trend for higher brain weight in the TA cohort but it was not significant (1494 g vs 1404 g, p = 0.1). The upper limits of the brain weight of 95% confidence was 1680 g vs 1660 g, p = 0.9. The neuropathological examination of four available brains from the TA cohort showed severe congestion of blood vessels, perivascular haemorrhages and occasional βAPP deposits consistent with early axonal disruption. Brain examination is informative as part of investigation of TA. Developing ischaemic changes and an increase in brain weight are the most likely indicators of a prolonged period of patient's survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. African ancestry protects against Alzheimer's disease-related neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, D; Grinberg, L T; Alba, J G; Naslavsky, M S; Licinio, L; Farfel, J M; Suemoto, C K; de Lucena Ferretti, R E; Leite, R E P; de Andrade, M P; dos Santos, A C F; Brentani, H; Pasqualucci, C A; Nitrini, R; Jacob-Filho, W; Zatz, M

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in dementia epidemiology have reported higher Alzheimer's disease rates in African-Americans when compared with White Americans. To determine whether genetically determined African ancestry is associated with neuropathological changes commonly associated with dementia, we analyzed a population-based brain bank in the highly admixed city of São Paulo, Brazil. African ancestry was estimated through the use of previously described ancestry-informative markers. Risk of presence of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, small vessel disease, brain infarcts and Lewy bodies in subjects with significant African ancestry versus those without was determined. Results were adjusted for multiple environmental risk factors, demographic variables and apolipoprotein E genotype. African ancestry was inversely correlated with neuritic plaques (P=0.03). Subjects with significant African ancestry (n=112, 55.4%) showed lower prevalence of neuritic plaques in the univariate analysis (odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55-0.95, P=0.01) and when adjusted for age, sex, APOE genotype and environmental risk factors (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.89, P=0.02). There were no significant differences for the presence of other neuropathological alterations. We show for the first time, using genetically determined ancestry, that African ancestry may be highly protective of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, functioning through either genetic variants or unknown environmental factors. Epidemiological studies correlating African-American race/ethnicity with increased Alzheimer's disease rates should not be interpreted as surrogates of genetic ancestry or considered to represent African-derived populations from the developing nations such as Brazil.

  2. Leigh-type neuropathology in Pearson syndrome associated with impaired ATP production and a novel mtDNA deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santorelli, F M; Barmada, M A; Pons, R; Zhang, L L; DiMauro, S

    1996-11-01

    Pearson syndrome is a systemic disorder of oxidative phosphorylation in infants, predominantly affecting the bone marrow and exocrine pancreas and associated with single deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). CNS involvement may occur in patients who survive the infantile hematopoietic disorder. We describe a Pearson syndrome patient who developed neurologic manifestations associated with the pathologic features of Leigh syndrome. Biochemical studies in muscle and skin fibroblasts showed partial deficiencies of complexes I and IV of the respiratory chain. Adenosine triphosphate production in mitochondria isolated from skin fibroblasts was reduced to 25% of controls. We detected a novel 3.6 Kb mtDNA deletion in skin fibroblasts from the proband but not in his mother's white blood cells. Leigh syndrome seems to be the common neuropathologic expression of any disorder causing severe impairment of oxidative energy production in the CNS.

  3. Neuropathological assessment and validation of mouse models for Alzheimer's disease: applying NIA-AA guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dirk Keene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dozens of transgenic mouse models, generally based on mutations associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD, have been developed, in part, for preclinical testing of candidate AD therapies. However, none of these models has successfully predicted the clinical efficacy of drugs for treating AD patients. Therefore, development of more translationally relevant AD mouse models remains a critical unmet need in the field. A concept not previously implemented in AD preclinical drug testing is the use of mouse lines that have been validated for neuropathological features of human AD. Current thinking suggests that amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle deposition is an essential component for accurate modeling of AD. Therefore, the AD translational paradigm would require pathologic Aβ and tau deposition, a disease-relevant distribution of plaques and tangles, and a pattern of disease progression of Aβ and tau isoforms similar to the neuropathological features found in the brains of AD patients. Additional parameters useful to evaluate parallels between AD and animal models would include 1 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF AD biomarker changes with reduced Aβ and increased phospho-tau/tau; 2 structural and functional neuroimaging patterns including MRI hippocampal atrophy, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG, and amyloid/tau PET alterations in activity and/or patterns of pathologic peptide deposition and distribution; and 3 cognitive impairment with emphasis on spatial learning and memory to distinguish presymptomatic and symptomatic mice at specific ages. A validated AD mouse model for drug testing would likely show tau-related neurofibrillary degeneration following Aβ deposition and demonstrate changes in pathology, CSF analysis, and neuroimaging that mirror human AD. Development of the ideal model would revolutionize the ability to establish the translational value of AD mouse models and serve as a platform for discussions about national phenotyping guidelines

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  5. Digital pathology: a tool for 21st century neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Miguel; Judkins, Alexander R

    2009-04-01

    Digital pathology represents an electronic environment for performing pathologic analysis and managing the information associated with this activity. The technology to create and support digital pathology has largely developed over the last decade. The use of digital pathology tools is essential to adapt and lead in the rapidly changing environment of 21st century neuropathology. The utility of digital pathology has already been demonstrated by pathologists in several areas including consensus reviews, quality assurance (Q/A), tissue microarrays (TMAs), education and proficiency testing. These utilities notwithstanding, interface issues, storage and image formatting all present challenges to the integration of digital pathology into the neuropathology work environment. With continued technologic improvements, as well as the introduction of fluorescent side scanning and multispectral detection, future developments in digital pathology offer the promise of adding powerful analytic tools to the pathology work environment. The integration of digital pathology with biorepositories offers particular promise for neuropathologists engaged in tissue banking. The utilization of these tools will be essential for neuropathologists to continue as leaders in diagnostics, translational research and basic science in the 21st century.

  6. Dissociation of decision making under ambiguity and decision making under risk: a neurocognitive endophenotype candidate for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Dong, Yi; Ji, Yifu; Zhu, Chunyan; Yu, Fengqiong; Ma, Huijuan; Chen, Xingui; Wang, Kai

    2015-03-03

    Evidence in the literature suggests that executive dysfunction is regarded as an endophenotype candidate for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Decision making is an important domain of executive function. However, few studies that have investigated whether decision making is a potential endophenotype for OCD have produced inconsistent results. Differences in the findings across these studies may be attributed to several factors: different study materials, comorbidity, medication, etc. There are at least two types of decision making that differ mainly in the degree of uncertainty and how much useful information about consequences and their probabilities are provided to the decision maker: decision making under ambiguity and decision making under risk. The aim of the present study was to simultaneously examine decision making under ambiguity as assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and decision making under risk as measured by the Game of Dice Task (GDT) in OCD patients and their unaffected first-degree relative (UFDR) for the first time. The study analyzed 55 medication-naïve, non-depressed OCD patient probands, 55 UFDRs of the OCD patients and 55 healthy matched comparison subjects (CS) without a family history of OCD with the IGT, the GDT and a neuropsychological test battery. While the OCD patients and the UFDRs performed worse than the CS on the IGT, they were unimpaired on the GDT. Our study supports the claim that decision making under ambiguity differs from decision making under risk and suggests that dissociation of decision making under ambiguity and decision making under risk may qualify to be a neurocognitive endophenotypes for OCD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical, genetic and neuropathological findings in a series of 138 fetuses with a corpus callosum malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alby, Caroline; Malan, Valérie; Boutaud, Lucile; Marangoni, Maria Angela; Bessières, Bettina; Bonniere, Maryse; Ichkou, Amale; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Sonigo, Pascale; Millischer, Anne-Elodie; Thomas, Sophie; Ville, Yves; Vekemans, Michel; Encha-Razavi, Férechté; Attié-Bitach, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Corpus callosum malformation (CCM) is the most frequent brain malformation observed at birth. Because CCM is a highly heterogeneous condition, the prognosis of fetuses diagnosed prenatally remains uncertain, making prenatal counseling difficult. We evaluated retrospectively a total of 138 fetuses, 117 with CCM observed on prenatal imaging examination, and 21 after postmortem autopsy. On ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging, CCM was either isolated (N = 40) or associated with other neurological (N = 57) or extra cerebral findings (N = 21/20, respectively). Most fetuses (N = 132) remained without a diagnosis at the time of pregnancy termination. This emphasizes the need to establish a neuropathological classification and to perform a genomic screening using comparative genomic hybridization. A neuropathological examination performed on 138 cases revealed a spectrum of CCMs, classified as follows: agenesis of corpus callosum (55), CC hypoplasia (30), CC dysmorphism (24), and CCM associated with a malformation of cortical development (29). Of interest, after fetopathological examination, only 16/40 malformations were classified as isolated, highlighting the importance of the autopsy following termination of pregnancy. Among the 138 cases, the underlying etiology was found in 46 cases: diabetes (one case), cytomegalovirus infection (one case), 23 chromosome abnormalities, and 21 mendelian conditions. In our series of 138 cases of CCM, prenatal and postmortem examinations identified a variety of genetic causes. However, no diagnosis could be established in 67% of cases. The classification based on the underlying neurodevelopmental defects paves the way for further genetic studies and genotype-phenotype correlations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Long-term treadmill exercise inhibits the progression of Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-li; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, He; Shi, Li-de

    2013-11-01

    Previously our study has demonstrated that long-term treadmill exercise improved cognitive deficit in APP/PS1 transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease (AD) paralleled by enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP). The present study was undertaken to further investigate whether the treadmill running could inhibit the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neuropathology in hippocampus of the APP/PS1 mouse models of AD, and to define a potential molecular mechanism underlying the exercise-induced reduction in AD-like neuropathology. Five months of treadmill exercise resulted in a robust reduction in β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and tau phosphorylation in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in APP phosphorylation and PS1 expression. We also observed GSK3, rather than CDK5, was inhibited by treadmill exercise. These results indicate that treadmill exercise is sufficient to inhibit the progression of AD-like neuropathology in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model, and may mediate APP processing in favor of reduced Aβ deposition. In addition, we demonstrate that treadmill exercise attenuates AD-like neuropathology in AD transgenic mice via a GSK3 dependent signaling pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Changing times - changing diseases. Review of the neuropathological autopsy documentations at the Markusovszky University Teaching Hospital (1964-2014)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzuly, Ferenc; Schneider, Ferenc; Iványi, János László; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Mariann; Sütő, Krisztián; Tolvaj, Balázs; Kálmán, Bernadette

    2014-10-26

    Nearly 6000 autoptic studies were carried out during the last 50 years at the Laboratory of Neuropathology, Markusovszky University Teaching Hospital, Hungary. The aim of the authors was to present those previously frequent and often fatal conditions that can be prevented or treated today. Retrospective analyses of the neuropathological documentations. Measles-related subacute sclerosing panencephalitis caused death in 13 cases, the last occurred in 1991. The mandatory vaccination against the causative virus has eliminated this severe neurological complication. Fourteen lives were lost due to herpes simplex encephalitis, including the last case seen in 1999. Feasibility of early diagnosis and the availability of acyclovir therapy resulted in better outcome without fatality. Tuberculous meningitis still occurred in most recent years, although only sporadically. Recognition of this condition is not straightforward due to its rarity, and considerations for this disease are often omitted from the routine differential diagnosis. The generally low mortality rates in tick borne encephalitis further dropped after the introduction of vaccination. Altogether only 8 such cases were documented. The last fatal cases of neurolues were seen in the 1990s. However, syphilis itself has not disappeared, and the number of cases with newly acquired infection continues to rise. The introduction of intrathecal methotrexate and radiotherapy made possible the prevention or effective treatment of meningeal leukosis. A careful coordination of these treatment modalities, however, is important as nervous system complications may develop in the form of disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy that is also reflected in the records. The 50-year neuropathology documentation reflects changes in the occurrence of diseases, and it calls attention to those disorders which can be prevented or treated today, but may represent diagnostic challenges.

  10. A model of disordered zone formation in Cu3Au under cascade-producing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapinos, V.G.; Bacon, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    A model to describe the disordering of ordered Cu 3 Au under irradiation is proposed. For the thermal spike phase of a displacement cascade, the processes of heat evolution and conduction in the cascade region are modelled by solving the thermal conduction equation by a discretization method for a medium that can melt and solidify under appropriate conditions. The model considers disordering to result from cascade core melting, with the final disordered zone corresponding to the largest molten zone achieved. The initial conditions for this treatment are obtained by simulation of cascades by the MARLOWE code. The contrast of disordered zones imaged in a superlattice dark-field reflection and projected on the plane parallel to the surface of a thin foil was calculated. The average size of images from hundreds of cascades created by incident Cu + ions were calculated for different ion energies and compared with experimental transmission electron microscopy data. The model is in reasonable quantitative agreement with the experimentally observed trends. (author)

  11. Neuropathological characteristics of the brain in two patients with SLC19A3 mutations related to the biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Pronicki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease is a severe form of a rare neurogenetic disorder caused by pathogenic molecular variants in the thiamine transporter gene. Nowadays, a potentially effective treatment is known, therefore the early diagnosis is mandatory. The aim of the paper was to assess the contribution of neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies to a proper diagnosis. We present the brain study of two Polish patients with SLC19A3 mutations, including (1 an infant with an intriguing “walnut” appearance of the brain autopsied many years before the discovery of the SLC19A3 defect, and (2 a one-year-old patient with clinical features of Leigh syndrome. In patient 2, biotin/thiamine responsiveness was not tested at the time of diagnosis and causal treatment started with one-year delay. The central nervous system lesions found in the patients displayed almost clearly a specific pattern for SLC19A3 defect, as previously proposed in diagnostic criteria. Our study presents a detailed description of neuropathological and MRI findings of both patients. We confirm that the autopsy and/or MRI of the brain is sufficient to qualify a patient with an unknown neuropathological disorder directly for SLC19A3 mutations testing and a prompt trial of specific treatment.

  12. Involvement of NMDA receptors in soman-induced neuropathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Groot, D.M.; Bierman, E.P.; Van Huygevoort, A.H.; Bruijnzeel, P.L.

    1993-05-13

    Our current working hypothesis with regard to soman-induced neuropathology is that accumulated ACh, resulting from soman-inhibited ACHE potentiates glutamate-induced neuronal degeneration, most likely by lowering the threshold for glutamate excitation at the NMDA-receptor sites. The activation of the NMDA-ionic channels may lead to massive Ca2+ fluxes into the postsynaptic cell, causing cell degeneration. In this concept the NMDA receptor plays a crucial role. In the present study, the involvement of NMDA receptors in soman-induced convulsions is tested by injecting NMDA receptor antagonists MK801, AP5 and TCP, whether or not in combination with atropine and/or diazepam, either directly into the hippocampal CA1 area or in the lateral ventricle very near to CA1. This area is predominantly affected by soman and contains high concentrations of NMDA receptors. Also the effect of injection with a non-NMDA receptor antagonist is tested.

  13. [Clinical and neuropathological aspects of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubaran, C; Fernandes, J; Martins, F; Souza, J; Machado, R; Cadore, M

    1996-12-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of most serious problems in public health and the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome one of the gravest consequences of alcoholism. The pathology is often undiagnosed in its less evident presentations, therefore an accurate diagnostic approach is a critical step in planning treatment. Besides new pharmacological proposals, treatment is based on the restoration of thiamine, although this is insufficient to prevent the psychological decline of a great number of patients. The cognitive impact of the pathology is derived from the interaction of alcoholic neurotoxicity, thiamine deficiency and personal susceptibility. In this article the history, epidemiology, clinical and neuropathological features of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, as well as some aspects of its treatment and prognosis, are described.

  14. [Clinical and neuropathological characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, János; Simon, Viktória; Bereczki, Erika; Majer, Réka; Varkoly, Gréta; Murnyák, Balázs; Kálmán, János; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2017-04-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia. The accurate diagnosis is often possible only by neuropathological examination. The morphologic hallmarks are the presence of α-synuclein-rich Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, identical to those seen in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Neurotransmitter deficits, synaptic and ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) dysfunction play major role in the pathomechanism. Characteristic symptoms are cognitive fluctuation, parkinsonism and visual hallucinations. Due to the often atypical clinical presentation novel imaging techniques and biomarkers could help the early diagnosis. Although curative treatment is not available, therapies can improve quality of life. Clinicopathological studies are important in exploring pathomechanisms, ensuring accurate diagnosis and identifying therapeutic targets. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(17): 643-652.

  15. Computed tomography in Krabbe's disease: comparison with neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieshima, A; Eda, I; Matsui, A; Yoshino, K; Takashima, S; Takeshita, K

    1983-01-01

    We report computed tomography (CT) appearance of two patients with Krabbe's disease. The most common findings included severe brain atrophy: an enlarged frontal extracerebral space, dilatation of ventricles, enlarged cisterns and enlarged cortical sulci. There was low attenuation in the corpus medullaris of the cerebellum, and symmetrical focal hypodensity in the central periventricular white matter. CT at the terminal stage (16 months) showed marked cerebral atrophy including flattening of the heads of caudate nuclei and widening of the third ventricles confirmed by a neuropathological study. There was relatively less low density on the white matter of Krabbe's disease compared with that of other leukodystrophies. These CT findings may be useful in the diagnosis. The relative lack of low density in the white matter of Krabbe's disease might be related to severe gliosis and reduced total lipid contents.

  16. Scientific conception on mechanisms of calcium homeostasis disorders under low dose effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abylaev, Zh.A.; Dospolova, Zh.G.

    1997-01-01

    Scientific conception of probable consequences of calcium homeostasis disorders in personals, exposed to low dose effect of ionizing radiation has been developed. Principle positions of the conception is that pathologic processes development have different ways of conducting. During predominance of low doses of external gamma-radiation there is leading pathologic mechanism (mechanism 1) of disorder neuroendocrine regulation of both the calcium and the phosphor. In this case sicks have disorders of both the vegetative tonus and the endocrine status. Under internal irradiation (mechanism 2) there is disfunction of organs and systems (bore changes and disorders of hormone status). These changes are considered as consequence of negative action on organism of incorporated long-living radionuclides. Radio-toxic factors action (mechanism 3) provokes the excess of hormones, which acting on bone tissue and could be cause of steroid osteoporosis. Influence of chronic stress factor (mechanism 4) enlarges and burden action on organism of low radiation doses. It is emphasized, that decisive role in development of pathologic processes has mechanism of disturbance of neuroendocrine regulation of calcium exchange

  17. Voluntary Running Attenuates Memory Loss, Decreases Neuropathological Changes and Induces Neurogenesis in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Aranguiz, Florencia; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of memory and cognitive abilities, and the appearance of amyloid plaques composed of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles formed of tau protein. It has been suggested that exercise might ameliorate the disease; here, we evaluated the effect of voluntary running on several aspects of AD including amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, inflammatory reaction, neurogenesis and spatial memory in the double transgenic APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD. We report that voluntary wheel running for 10 weeks decreased Aβ burden, Thioflavin-S-positive plaques and Aβ oligomers in the hippocampus. In addition, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed fewer phosphorylated tau protein and decreased astrogliosis evidenced by lower staining of GFAP. Further, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed increased number of neurons in the hippocampus and exhibited increased cell proliferation and generation of cells positive for the immature neuronal protein doublecortin, indicating that running increased neurogenesis. Finally, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed improved spatial memory performance in the Morris water maze. Altogether, our findings indicate that in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice, voluntary running reduced all the neuropathological hallmarks of AD studied, reduced neuronal loss, increased hippocampal neurogenesis and reduced spatial memory loss. These findings support that voluntary exercise might have therapeutic value on AD. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  18. Heightened reward learning under stress in generalized anxiety disorder: a predictor of depression resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bethany H; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    Stress-induced anhedonia is associated with depression vulnerability (Bogdan & Pizzagalli, 2006). We investigated stress-induced deficits in reward learning in a depression-vulnerable group with analogue generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, n = 34), and never-depressed healthy controls (n = 41). Utilizing a computerized signal detection task, reward learning was assessed under stressor and neutral conditions. Controls displayed intact reward learning in the neutral condition, and the expected stress-induced blunting. The GAD group as a whole also showed intact reward learning in the neutral condition. When GAD subjects were analyzed as a function of prior depression history, never-depressed GAD subjects showed heightened reward learning in the stressor condition. Better reward learning under stress among GAD subjects predicted lower depression symptoms 1 month later. Robust reward learning under stress may indicate depression resistance among anxious individuals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Beclin 1 mitigates motor and neuropathological deficits in genetic mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Nóbrega, Clévio; Vasconcelos-Ferreira, Ana; Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Aveleira, Célia; Hirai, Hirokazu; Déglon, Nicole; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2013-07-01

    Machado-Joseph disease or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, the most common dominantly-inherited spinocerebellar ataxia, results from translation of the polyglutamine-expanded and aggregation prone ataxin 3 protein. Clinical manifestations include cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs and there is no therapy to delay disease progression. Beclin 1, an autophagy-related protein and essential gene for cell survival, is decreased in several neurodegenerative disorders. This study aimed at evaluating if lentiviral-mediated beclin 1 overexpression would rescue motor and neuropathological impairments when administered to pre- and post-symptomatic lentiviral-based and transgenic mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease. Beclin 1-mediated significant improvements in motor coordination, balance and gait with beclin 1-treated mice equilibrating longer periods in the Rotarod and presenting longer and narrower footprints. Furthermore, in agreement with the improvements observed in motor function beclin 1 overexpression prevented neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration, decreasing formation of polyglutamine-expanded aggregates, preserving Purkinje cell arborization and immunoreactivity for neuronal markers. These data show that overexpression of beclin 1 in the mouse cerebellum is able to rescue and hinder the progression of motor deficits when administered to pre- and post-symptomatic stages of the disease.

  20. Structural Integrity of the Limbic-Prefrontal Connection: Neuropathological Correlates of Anxiety in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Brown, Timothy T.; Järvinen, Anna M.; Erhart, Matthew; Korenberg, Julie R.; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by a hypersocial personality and desire to form close relationships, juxtaposed with significant anxieties of non-social events. The neural underpinnings of anxiety in individuals with WS are currently unknown. Aberrations in the anatomical and microstructural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus (UF) have been recently implicated in social and generalized anxiety disorders. Based on these findings, we tested the hypothesis that the reported anxieties in individuals with WS share similar neuropathological correlates. Towards this end, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) methods were employed to examine the microstructural integrity (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, longitudinal diffusivity) of the UF in 18 WS and 15 typically developing adults (TD). Anxiety and sociability questionnaires were administered to determine associations with DTI indices of UF across groups. Results revealed comparable white matter integrity of the UF across groups, yet elevated subjective experience of anxiety in those with WS. Additionally, sociability and UF microstructural properties were dissociated across both groups. Whereas no relationships were found between DTI indices and anxiety in TD participants, strong negative associations were observed between these constructs in individuals with WS. Findings indicated that increased anxiety manifested by individuals with WS was associated with DTI measures of the UF and may signal structural or possibly physiological aberration involving this tract within the prefrontal-temporal network. PMID:26214361

  1. Sensorimotor and Neurocognitive Dysfunctions Parallel Early Telencephalic Neuropathology in Fucosidosis Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn Stroobants

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fucosidosis is a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD caused by lysosomal α-L-fucosidase deficiency. Insufficient α-L-fucosidase activity triggers accumulation of undegraded, fucosylated glycoproteins and glycolipids in various tissues. The human phenotype is heterogeneous, but progressive motor and cognitive impairments represent the most characteristic symptoms. Recently, Fuca1-deficient mice were generated by gene targeting techniques, constituting a novel animal model for human fucosidosis. These mice display widespread LSD pathology, accumulation of secondary storage material and neuroinflammation throughout the brain, as well as progressive loss of Purkinje cells. Fuca1-deficient mice and control littermates were subjected to a battery of tests detailing different aspects of motor, emotional and cognitive function. At an early stage of disease, we observed reduced exploratory activity, sensorimotor disintegration as well as impaired spatial learning and fear memory. These early markers of neurological deterioration were related to the respective stage of neuropathology using molecular genetic and immunochemical procedures. Increased expression of the lysosomal marker Lamp1 and neuroinflammation markers was observed throughout the brain, but appeared more prominent in cerebral areas in comparison to cerebellum of Fuca1-deficient mice. This is consistent with impaired behaviors putatively related to early disruptions of motor and cognitive circuits particularly involving cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and hippocampus. Thus, Fuca1-deficient mice represent a practical and promising fucosidosis model, which can be utilized for pathogenetic and therapeutic studies.

  2. Intraoperative neuropathology of glioma recurrence: cell detection and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Fazly S.; Gokozan, Hamza N.; Goksel, Behiye; Otero, Jose J.; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative neuropathology of glioma recurrence represents significant visual challenges to pathologists as they carry significant clinical implications. For example, rendering a diagnosis of recurrent glioma can help the surgeon decide to perform more aggressive resection if surgically appropriate. In addition, the success of recent clinical trials for intraoperative administration of therapies, such as inoculation with oncolytic viruses, may suggest that refinement of the intraoperative diagnosis during neurosurgery is an emerging need for pathologists. Typically, these diagnoses require rapid/STAT processing lasting only 20-30 minutes after receipt from neurosurgery. In this relatively short time frame, only dyes, such as hematoxylin and eosin (H and E), can be implemented. The visual challenge lies in the fact that these patients have undergone chemotherapy and radiation, both of which induce cytological atypia in astrocytes, and pathologists are unable to implement helpful biomarkers in their diagnoses. Therefore, there is a need to help pathologists differentiate between astrocytes that are cytologically atypical due to treatment versus infiltrating, recurrent, neoplastic astrocytes. This study focuses on classification of neoplastic versus non-neoplastic astrocytes with the long term goal of providing a better neuropathological computer-aided consultation via classification of cells into reactive gliosis versus recurrent glioma. We present a method to detect cells in H and E stained digitized slides of intraoperative cytologic preparations. The method uses a combination of the `value' component of the HSV color space and `b*' component of the CIE L*a*b* color space to create an enhanced image that suppresses the background while revealing cells on an image. A composite image is formed based on the morphological closing of the hue-luminance combined image. Geometrical and textural features extracted from Discrete Wavelet Frames and combined to classify

  3. Childhood disintegrative disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik

    2003-01-01

    In 1908 a Viennese remedial educator Theodor Heller described six children under the name of dementia infantilis who had insidiously developed a severe mental regression between the 3rd and 4th years of life after normal mental development. Neuropathological and other medical conditions are somet......In 1908 a Viennese remedial educator Theodor Heller described six children under the name of dementia infantilis who had insidiously developed a severe mental regression between the 3rd and 4th years of life after normal mental development. Neuropathological and other medical conditions....... Information is provided related to nosology, epidemiological data, differential diagnosis, aetiology, treatment and outcome....

  4. Diffusion of a passive scalar by convective flows under parametric disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldobin, Denis S.; Shklyaeva, Elizaveta V.

    2009-01-01

    We study transport of a weakly diffusive pollutant (a passive scalar) through thermoconvective flow in a fluid-saturated horizontal porous layer heated from below under frozen parametric disorder. In the presence of disorder (random frozen inhomogeneities of the heating or of macroscopic properties of the porous matrix), spatially localized flow patterns appear below the convective instability threshold of the system without disorder. Thermoconvective flows crucially affect the transport of a pollutant along the layer, especially when its molecular diffusion is weak. The effective (or eddy) diffusivity also allows us to observe the transition from a set of localized currents to an almost everywhere intense 'global' flow. We present results of numerical calculation of the effective diffusivity and discuss them in the context of localization of fluid currents and the transition to a 'global' flow. Our numerical findings are in good agreement with the analytical theory that we develop for the limit of a small molecular diffusivity and sparse domains of localized currents. Though the results are obtained for a specific physical system, they are relevant for a broad variety of fluid dynamical systems.

  5. Lissencephaly (agyria) syndrome. Computed tomographic and neuropathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Minako; Takashima, Sachio; Yoshida, Haruhiko (Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-01-01

    Lissencephaly (agyria) is a rare congenital brain anomaly characterized by a lack of apparent gyri formation. We reported previously a case of the lissencephaly syndrome. This paper presented a comparison between CT findings at the age of 5 months and neuropathological findings at 19 months. The macroscopical examination showed smooth surface without cerebral convolution, incomplete sylvian fissure formation without operculum insulae, cavum septi pellucidi, enlargement of the lateral ventricle especially in the posterior portion, thicker white matter of frontal lobe than that of occipital lobe, thick cortex with poor demarcation between gray and white matter. These changes corresponded well to the findings in CT previously done; Therefore CT scan is useful for the diagnosis of this disease. Golgi study revealed that there was a disorganization of neuronal disposition and developmental retardation or arrest of neutrons, in addition to a maldevelopment of cortical cellular layers. In the patient there was a history of acute exanthematous disease of her mother at 2 months of pregnancy. The patient showed hepatosplenomegaly with elevation of IgM and cytomegalovirus CF titer at 5 months, and chronic nonspecific infectious lesions with necrosis in lymphnodes, liver and submandibular glands at autopsy. These clinical and pathological findings may be considered to suggest that the intrauterine infection had caused the syndrome in this patient.

  6. Line-scan diffusion tensor imaging of the posttraumatic brain stem: changes with neuropathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, K; Weis, J; Kreis, R; Aghayev, E; Jackowski, C; Thali, M; Boesch, C; Maier, S E; Dirnhofer, R; Lövblad, K O

    2006-01-01

    Following trauma, imaging of brain stem lesions is often inconclusive. In a man who suffered a lethal accident, postmortem MR diffusion tensor (DT) imaging of the brain and neuropathologic examination were performed. DT imaging showed a disorganization of fibers in the brain stem that was not found in 2 controls and corresponded to changes on neuropathologic correlation. Diffusion tensor imaging provides an insight into the organization of myelinated structures of the CNS, potentially allowing diagnosis of traumatic fiber tract rupture.

  7. Hippocampal phospho-tau/MAPT neuropathology in the fornix in Alzheimer disease: an immunohistochemical autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowey, Edward D; Ziskin, Jennifer L

    2016-10-28

    Whereas early Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology and mild cognitive impairment are relatively common in aging, accurate prediction of patients that will progress to dementia requires new biomarkers. Recently, substantial work has focused on phospho-tau/MAPT (p-MAPT) neuropathology since its regional propagation correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Recent diffusion tensor imaging studies in AD suggest that increased diffusion in the fornix secondary to p-MAPT-related axonal injury could serve as a predictive biomarker of the risk of disease progression. However, our knowledge of p-MAPT neuropathology in the fornix is limited. To address this gap in knowledge, we examined p-MAPT neuropathology in the fornix and basal forebrain nuclei via AT8 immunohistochemistry in 39 brain autopsies spanning the spectrum of AD neuropathologic changes. We found that the fornix and its precommissural efferent target nuclei (septum and nucleus accumbens) demonstrated neuronal and thread-like p-MAPT neuropathology only in National Institute on Aging/Alzheimer Association (NIA/AA) stages B2 and B3 of neurofibrillary degeneration, consistent with involvement after (and propagation from) the hippocampal formation. Interestingly, although tau astrogliopathy was frequently observed in the mammillary bodies in stage B2, neuronal tauopathy was not observed in the postcommissural targets (mammillary bodies and anterior thalamic nucleus) until stage B3. Tauopathy in the nucleus basalis of Meynert was strongly correlated with p-MAPT-positive axons in the fornix, suggesting that projections to the hippocampus also likely contribute to fornix tauopathy. Our cross-sectional autopsy findings indicate that the fornix is involved by p-MAPT neuropathology secondary to hippocampal involvement by AD neuropathology. Furthermore, our findings are compatible with the goal of in vivo detection of p-MAPT-related axonal pathology in the fornix in AD as a possible biomarker of p

  8. Disorder effects on helical edge transport in graphene under a strong tilted magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunli; Cazalilla, Miguel A.

    2015-10-01

    In a recent experiment, Young et al. [Nature (London) 505, 528 (2014), 10.1038/nature12800] observed a metal to insulator transition as well as transport through helical edge states in monolayer graphene under a strong, tilted magnetic field. Under such conditions, the bulk is a magnetic insulator which can exhibit metallic conduction through helical edges. It was found that the two-terminal conductance of the helical channels deviates from the expected quantized value (=e2/h per edge, at zero temperature). Motivated by this observation, we study the effect of disorder on the conduction through the edge channels. We show that, unlike for helical edges of topological insulators in semiconducting quantum wells, a disorder Rashba spin-orbit coupling does not lead to backscattering, at least to leading order. Instead, we find that the lack of perfect antialignment of the electron spins in the helical channels to be the most likely cause for backscattering arising from scalar (i.e., spin-independent) impurities. The intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and other time-reversal symmetry-breaking and/or sublattice parity-breaking potentials also lead to (subleading) corrections to the channel conductance.

  9. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes in oculopalatal myoclonus: implication for neural pathways, underlying the disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Moon, So Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is characterized by rhythmic involuntary jerky movements of the soft palate of the throat. When associated with eye movements, it is called oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM). Ordinary PM is characterized by hypertrophic olivary degeneration, a trans-synaptic degeneration following loss of neuronal input to the inferior olivary nucleus due to an interruption of the Guillain-Mollaret triangle usually by a hemorrhage. However, the neural pathways underlying the disorder are uncertain. In an attempt to understand the pathologic neural pathways, we examined the metabolic correlates of this tremulous condition. Brain FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 patients with OPM (age, 49.9{+-}4.6 y: all males: 7 with pontine hemorrhage, 1 with diffuse brainstem infarction) and age-matched 50 healthy males (age, 50.7{+-} 9.0) and the regional glucose metabolism compared using SPM99. For group analysis, the hemispheres containing lesions were assigned to the right side of the brain. Patients with OPM had significant hypometabolism in the ipsilateral (to the lesion) brainstem and superior temporal and parahippocampal gyri (P < 0.05 corrected, k = 100). By contrast, there was significant hypermetabolism in the contralateral middle and inferior temporal gyri, thalamus, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus (P < 0.05 corrected, k=l00). Our data demonstrate the distinct metabolic changes between several ipsilateral and contralateral brain regions (hypometabolism vs. hypermetabolism) in patients with OPM. This may provide clues for understanding the neural pathways underlying the disorder.

  10. Brain activation for response inhibition under gaming cue distraction in internet gaming disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Chung Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated neural substrates related to the loss of control in college students with internet gaming disorder (IGD. We hypothesized that deficit in response inhibition under gaming cue distraction was the possible mechanism for the loss of control internet use. Eleven cases of IGD and 11 controls performed Go/NoGo tasks with/without gaming distraction in the functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. When the gaming picture was shown as background while individuals were performing Go/NoGo tasks, the IGD group committed more commission errors. The control group increased their brain activations more over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and superior parietal lobe under gaming cue distraction in comparison with the IGD group. Furthermore, brain activation of the right DLPFC and superior parietal lobe were negatively associated with performance of response inhibition among the IGD group. The results suggest that the function of response inhibition was impaired under gaming distraction among the IGD group, and individuals with IGD could not activate right DLPFC and superior parietal lobe to keep cognitive control and attention allocation for response inhibition under gaming cue distraction. This mechanism should be addressed in any intervention for IGD.

  11. Neuroprotection by NMDA receptor antagonists in a variety of neuropathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, G C

    2001-09-01

    Because of adverse reactions, early efforts to introduce high affinity competitive or use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists into patients suffering from stroke, head trauma or epilepsy met with failure. Later it was discovered that both low affinity use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists and compounds with selective affinity for the NR2B receptor subunit met the criteria for safe administration into patients. Furthermore, these low affinity antagonists exhibit significant mechanistic differences from their higher affinity counterparts. Success of the latter is attested to the ability of the following low affinity compounds to be marketed: 1) Cough suppressant-dextromethorphan (available for decades); 2) Parkinson's disease--amantadine, memantine and budipine; 3) Dementia--memantine; and 4) Epilepsy--felbamate. Moreover, Phase III clinical trials are ongoing with remacemide for epilepsy and Huntington's disease and head trauma for HU-211. A host of compounds are or were under evaluation for the possible treatment of stroke, head trauma, hyperalgesia and various neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the fact that other drugs with associated NMDA receptor mechanisms have reached clinical status, this review focuses only on those competitive and use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists that reached clinical trails. The ensuing discussions link the in vivo pharmacological investigations that led to the success/mistakes/ failures for eventual testing of promising compounds in the clinic.

  12. Oxidative metabolism is associated with physiological disorders in fruits stored under multiple environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Geoffrey B; Shelp, Barry J; DeEll, Jennifer R; Bozzo, Gale G

    2016-04-01

    In combination with low temperature, controlled atmosphere storage and 1-methylcyclopropene (ethylene antagonist) application are used to delay senescence of many fruits and vegetables. Controlled atmosphere consists of low O2 and elevated CO2. When sub-optimal partial pressures are used, these practices represent multiple abiotic stresses that can promote the development of physiological disorders in pome fruit, including flesh browning and cavities, although there is some evidence for genetic differences in susceptibility. In the absence of surface disorders, fruit with flesh injuries are not easily distinguished from asymptomatic fruit until these are consumed. Oxidative stress metabolites tend to accumulate (e.g., γ-aminobutyrate) or rapidly decline (e.g., ascorbate and glutathione) in vegetative tissues exposed to hypoxic and/or elevated CO2 environments. Moreover, these phenomena can be associated with altered energy and redox status. Biochemical investigations of Arabidopsis and tomato plants with genetically-altered levels of enzymes associated with the γ-aminobutyrate shunt and the ascorbate-glutathione pathway indicate that these metabolic processes are functionally related and critical for dampening the oxidative burst in vegetative and fruit tissues, respectively. Here, we hypothesize that γ-aminobutyrate accumulation, as well energy and antioxidant depletion are associated with the development of physiological injury in pome fruit under multiple environmental stresses. An improved understanding of this relationship could assist in maintaining the quality of stored fruit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Age-dependent postoperative cognitive impairment and Alzheimer-related neuropathology in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with increased cost of care, morbidity, and mortality. However, its pathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Specifically, it is unknown why elderly patients are more likely to develop POCD and whether POCD is dependent on general anesthesia. We therefore set out to investigate the effects of peripheral surgery on the cognition and Alzheimer-related neuropathology in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in the mice. The surgery induced post-operative elevation in brain β-amyloid (Aβ) levels and cognitive impairment in the 18 month-old wild-type and 9 month-old Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice, but not the 9 month-old wild-type mice. The Aβ accumulation likely resulted from elevation of beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme and phosphorylated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. γ-Secretase inhibitor compound E ameliorated the surgery-induced brain Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in the 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgery was able to induce cognitive impairment independent of general anesthesia, and that the combination of peripheral surgery with aging- or Alzheimer gene mutation-associated Aβ accumulation was needed for the POCD to occur. These findings would likely promote more research to investigate the pathogenesis of POCD.

  14. Potential neural mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Katherine; Stone, Wendy L.; Dawson, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence supports the efficacy of early intervention for improving outcomes for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the mechanisms underlying their effectiveness remain poorly understood. This paper reviews the research literature on the neural bases of the early core deficits in ASD and proposes three key features of early intervention related to the neural mechanisms that may contribute to its effectiveness in improving deficit areas. These features include (1) the early onset of intensive intervention which capitalizes on the experience-expectant plasticity of the immature brain, (2) the use of treatment strategies that address core deficits in social motivation through an emphasis on positive social engagement and arousal modulation, and (3) promotion of complex neural networks and connectivity through thematic, multi-sensory and multi-domain teaching approaches. Understanding the mechanisms of effective early intervention will enable us to identify common or foundational active ingredients for promoting optimal outcomes in children with ASD. PMID:25108609

  15. Use of androgenic anabolic steroids by patients under treatment for substance use disorder: case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Mario Xerfan do Amaral

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study reports several case studies about the use of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS by patients under treatment for substance use disorder (SUD. Ten subjects were interviewed, two women and eight men, ranging from 25 to 43 years old. Regarding treatment regime, eight subjects were inpatients and two, outpatients. ASSIST-WHO and MINI-SUD scales and a semi-structured interview were used as research instruments. Seven subjects reported the use of AAS within fewer than twelve months from the interview date. Mental health professionals did not previously question none of the subjects were about the use of AAS. We discuss the efficacy of the chosen instruments to assess AAS use.

  16. Disorders of communication: dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderby, Pam

    2013-01-01

    Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder which can be classified according to the underlying neuropathology and is associated with disturbances of respiration, laryngeal function, airflow direction, and articulation resulting in difficulties of speech quality and intelligibility. There are six major types of dysarthria: flaccid dysarthria associated with lower motor neuron impairment, spastic dysarthria associated with damaged upper motor neurons linked to the motor areas of the cerebral cortex, ataxic dysarthria primarily caused by cerebellar dysfunction, and hyperkinetic dysarthria and hypokinetic dysarthria, which are related to a disorder of the extrapyramidal system. The sixth is generally termed a mixed dysarthria and is associated with damage in more than one area, resulting in speech characteristics of at least two groups. The features of the speech disturbance of these six major types of dysarthria are distinctive and can assist with diagnosis. Dysarthria is a frequent symptom of many neurological conditions and is commonly associated with progressive neurological disease. It has a profound effect upon the patient and their families as communication is integrally related with expressing personality and social relationships. Speech and language therapy can be used to encourage the person to use the speech that is already available to them more effectively, can increase the range and consistency of sound production, can teach strategies for improving intelligibility and communicative effectiveness, can guide the individual to use methods that are less tiring and more successful, and can introduce the appropriate Augmentative and Alternative Communication approaches as and when required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurotoxicity by Synthetic Androgen Steroids: Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, and Neuropathology: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Neri, Margherita; Bello, Stefania; Fiore, Carmela; Riezzo, Irene; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic substances derived from testosterone that are largely employed due to their trophic effect on muscle tissue of athletes at all levels. Since a great number of organs and systems are a target of AAS, their adverse effects are primarily on the following systems: reproductive, hepatic, musculoskeletal, endocrine, renal, immunological, infectious, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and hematological. Neuropsychiatric and behavioral effects as a result of AAS abuse are well known and described in the literature. Mounting evidence exists suggesting that in addition to psychiatric and behavioral effects, non-medical use of AAS carries neurodegenerative potential. Although, the nature of this association remains largely unexplored, recent animal studies have shown the recurrence of this AAS effect, ranging from neurotrophin unbalance to increased neuronal susceptibility to apoptotic stimuli. Experimental and animal studies strongly suggest that apoptotic mechanisms are at least in part involved in AAS-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, a great body of evidence is emerging suggesting that increased susceptibility to cellular oxidative stress could play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative disorders and cognitive impairment. As in other drug-evoked encephalopathies, the key mechanisms involved in AAS – induced neuropathology could represent a target for future neuroprotective strategies. Progress in the understanding of these mechanisms will provide important insights into the complex pathophysiology of AAS-induced neurodegeneration, and will pave the way for forthcoming studies. Supplementary to abandoning the drug abuse that represents the first step in reducing the possibility of irreversible brain damage in AAS abusers, neuroprotective strategies have to be developed and implemented in future. PMID:26074748

  18. TARDBP mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with TDP-43 neuropathology: a genetic and histopathological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Leverenz, James B; Bekris, Lynn M; Bird, Thomas D; Yuan, Wuxing; Elman, Lauren B; Clay, Dana; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Steinbart, Ellen; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Neumann, Manuela; Wu, I-Lin; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Kalb, Robert; Galasko, Douglas R; Montine, Thomas J; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Yu, Chang-En

    2008-05-01

    TDP-43 is a major component of the ubiquitinated inclusions that characterise amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitin inclusions (FTLD-U). TDP-43 is an RNA-binding and DNA-binding protein that has many functions and is encoded by the TAR DNA-binding protein gene (TARDBP) on chromosome 1. Our aim was to investigate whether TARDBP is a candidate disease gene for familial ALS that is not associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). TARDBP was sequenced in 259 patients with ALS, FTLD, or both. We used TaqMan-based SNP genotyping to screen for the identified variants in control groups matched to two kindreds of patients for age and ethnic origin. Additional clinical, genetic, and pathological assessments were made in these two families. We identified two variants in TARDBP, which would encode Gly290Ala and Gly298Ser forms of TDP-43, in two kindreds with familial ALS. The variants seem to be pathogenic because they co-segregated with disease in both families, were absent in controls, and were associated with TDP-43 neuropathology in both members of one of these families for whom CNS tissue was available. The Gly290Ala and Gly298Ser mutations are located in the glycine-rich domain of TDP-43, which regulates gene expression and mediates protein-protein interactions such as those with heterogeneous ribonucleoproteins. Owing to the varied and important cellular functions of TDP-43, these mutations might cause neurodegeneration through both gains and losses of function. The finding of pathogenic mutations in TARDBP implicates TDP-43 as an active mediator of neurodegeneration in TDP-43 proteinopathies, a class of disorder that includes ALS and FTLD-U. National Institutes of Health (AG10124, AG17586, AG005136-22, PO1 AG14382), Department of Veterans Affairs, Friedrich-Baur Stiftung (0017/2007), US Public Health Service, ALS Association, and Fundació 'la Caixa'.

  19. Dementia in SPG4 hereditary spastic paraplegia: clinical, genetic, and neuropathologic evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment and dementia has been reported in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) linked to the SPG4 locus. There has only been one postmortem examination described; not all accept that progressive cognitive decline is a feature of this disorder. OBJECTIVE: A family with SPG4-HSP known to have a deletion of exon 17 in the spastin gene (SPG4delEx17) was cognitively assessed over a 7-year period. The index family member died and a postmortem examination was performed. METHODS: Thirteen family members older than 40 years were clinically and cognitively assessed using the Cambridge Cognitive Assessment over a 7-year period. The presence of SPG4delEx17 was assessed; a neuropathologic examination of the brain of the index family member was performed. RESULTS: Cognitive decline occurred in 6 of the 13 family members and in all 4 older than 60 years. Two genetic deletions were identified: SPG4delEx17 in 12 of the 13 family members and a deletion of SPG6 (SPG6del) in 5. Eight individuals had the SPG4delEx17 deletion only; 4 had evidence of progressive cognitive impairment. Four family members had both SPG4delEx17 and SPG6del; 2 of these had cognitive impairment. One family member with the SPG6del alone had neither HSP nor cognitive impairment. The index case with both deletions died with dementia; the brain showed widespread ubiquitin positivity within the neocortex and white matter. CONCLUSION: Cognitive decline and dementia is a feature of SPG4-HSP due to a deletion of exon 17 of the spastin gene.

  20. Pedigree with frontotemporal lobar degeneration – motor neuron disease and Tar DNA binding protein-43 positive neuropathology: genetic linkage to chromosome 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loy Clement T

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD represents a clinically, pathologically and genetically heterogenous neurodegenerative disorder, often complicated by neurological signs such as motor neuron-related limb weakness, spasticity and paralysis, parkinsonism and gait disturbances. Linkage to chromosome 9p had been reported for pedigrees with the neurodegenerative disorder, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD and motor neuron disease (MND. The objective in this study is to identify the genetic locus in a multi-generational Australian family with FTLD-MND. Methods Clinical review and standard neuropathological analysis of brain sections from affected pedigree members. Genome-wide scan using microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphism fine mapping. Examination of candidate genes by direct DNA sequencing. Results Neuropathological examination revealed cytoplasmic deposition of the TDP-43 protein in three affected individuals. Moreover, we identify a family member with clinical Alzheimer's disease, and FTLD-Ubiquitin neuropathology. Genetic linkage and haplotype analyses, defined a critical region between markers D9S169 and D9S1845 on chromosome 9p21. Screening of all candidate genes within this region did not reveal any novel genetic alterations that co-segregate with disease haplotype, suggesting that one individual carrying a meiotic recombination may represent a phenocopy. Re-analysis of linkage data using the new affection status revealed a maximal two-point LOD score of 3.24 and a multipoint LOD score of 3.41 at marker D9S1817. This provides the highest reported LOD scores from a single FTLD-MND pedigree. Conclusion Our reported increase in the minimal disease region should inform other researchers that the chromosome 9 locus may be more telomeric than predicted by published recombination boundaries. Moreover, the existence of a family member with clinical Alzheimer's disease, and who shares the disease

  1. Reduced Number of Pigmented Neurons in the Substantia Nigra of Dystonia Patients? Findings from Extensive Neuropathologic, Immunohistochemistry, and Quantitative Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Iacono

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dystonias (Dys represent the third most common movement disorder after essential tremor (ET and Parkinson's disease (PD. While some pathogenetic mechanisms and genetic causes of Dys have been identified, little is known about their neuropathologic features. Previous neuropathologic studies have reported generically defined neuronal loss in various cerebral regions of Dys brains, mostly in the basal ganglia (BG, and specifically in the substantia nigra (SN. Enlarged pigmented neurons in the SN of Dys patients with and without specific genetic mutations (e.g., GAG deletions in DYT1 dystonia have also been described. Whether or not Dys brains are associated with decreased numbers or other morphometric changes of specific neuronal types is unknown and has never been addressed with quantitative methodologies. Methods: Quantitative immunohistochemistry protocols were used to estimate neuronal counts and volumes of nigral pigmented neurons in 13 SN of Dys patients and 13 SN of age‐matched control subjects (C. Results: We observed a significant reduction (∼20% of pigmented neurons in the SN of Dys compared to C (p<0.01. Neither significant volumetric changes nor evident neurodegenerative signs were observed in the remaining pool of nigral pigmented neurons in Dys brains. These novel quantitative findings were confirmed after exclusion of possible co‐occurring SN pathologies including Lewy pathology, tau‐neurofibrillary tangles, β‐amyloid deposits, ubiquitin (ubiq, and phosphorylated‐TAR DNA‐binding protein 43 (pTDP43‐positive inclusions. Discussion: A reduced number of nigral pigmented neurons in the absence of evident neurodegenerative signs in Dys brains could indicate previously unconsidered pathogenetic mechanisms of Dys such as neurodevelopmental defects in the SN.

  2. Fractionation of Social Brain Circuits in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Simmons, W. Kyle; Milbury, Lydia A.; Wallace, Gregory L.; Cox, Robert W.; Martin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are developmental disorders characterized by impairments in social and communication abilities and repetitive behaviours. Converging neuroscientific evidence has suggested that the neuropathology of autism spectrum disorders is widely distributed, involving impaired connectivity throughout the brain. Here, we evaluate the…

  3. Severe Neonatal Epileptic Encephalopathy and KCNQ2 Mutation: Neuropathological Substrate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen Meurs-van der Schoor, Charlotte; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam; van Kempen, Marjan; Bugiani, Marianna; Aronica, Eleonora; Ronner, Hanneke; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neonatal convulsions are clinical manifestations in a heterogeneous group of disorders with different etiology and outcome. They are attributed to several genetic causes. Methods: We describe a patient with intractable neonatal seizures who died from respiratory compromise during a

  4. Influence of taste disorders on dietary behaviors in cancer patients under chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laviano Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine the relationship between energy and nutrient consumption with chemosensory changes in cancer patients under chemotherapy. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study, enrolling 60 subjects. Cases were defined as patients with cancer diagnosis after their second chemotherapy cycle (n = 30, and controls were subjects without cancer (n = 30. Subjective changes of taste during treatment were assessed. Food consumption habits were obtained with a food frequency questionnaire validated for Mexican population. Five different concentrations of three basic flavors --sweet (sucrose, bitter (urea, and a novel basic taste, umami (sodium glutamate-- were used to measure detection thresholds and recognition thresholds (RT. We determine differences between energy and nutrient consumption in cases and controls and their association with taste DT and RT. Results No demographic differences were found between groups. Cases showed higher sweet DT (6.4 vs. 4.4 μmol/ml; p = 0.03 and a higher bitter RT (100 vs. 95 μmol/ml; p = 0.04 than controls. Cases with sweet DT above the median showed significant lower daily energy (2,043 vs.1,586 kcal; p = 0.02, proteins (81.4 vs. 54 g/day; p = 0.01, carbohydrates (246 vs.192 g/day; p = 0.05, and zinc consumption (19 vs.11 mg/day; p = 0.01 compared to cases without sweet DT alteration. Cases with sweet DT and RT above median were associated with lower completion of energy requirements and consequent weight loss. There was no association between flavors DT or RT and nutrient ingestion in the control group. Conclusion Changes of sweet DT and bitter RT in cancer patients under chemotherapy treatment were associated with lower energy and nutrient ingestion. Taste detection and recognition thresholds disorders could be important factors in malnutrition development on patients with cancer under chemotherapy treatment.

  5. Frontotemporal dementia with severe thalamic involvement : a clinical and neuropathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radanovic Márcia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is the third-leading cause of cortical dementia after Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia, and is characterized by a dementia where behavioral disturbances are prominent and appear early in the course of the disease. We report the case of a 58 year-old man affected by dementia with behavioral disturbances, in addition to rigid-hypokinetic and a lower motor neuron syndrome that were present at later stages of the illness. Neuroimaging studies showed frontotemporal atrophy. Neuropathological studies revealed intense thalamic neuronal loss and astrocytic gliosis, as well as moderate frontotemporal neuronal loss, astrocytosis and spongiform degeneration. Thalamic degeneration has previously been described among the wide group of neuropathological features of FTD. The aim of the present study is to show the clinical and neuropathological aspects of thalamic degeneration in FTD, along with its role in behavioral disturbances, a common finding in this condition.

  6. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke lesions in a dog brain: neuropathological characterisation and comparison to human ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Barbara Blicher; Gredal, Hanne; Wirenfeldt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Dogs develop spontaneous ischaemic stroke with a clinical picture closely resembling human ischaemic stroke patients. Animal stroke models have been developed, but it has proved difficult to translate results obtained from such models into successful therapeutic strategies in human....../macrophages and astrocytes. Conclusions The neuropathological changes reported in the present study were similar to findings in human patients with ischaemic stroke. The dog with spontaneous ischaemic stroke is of interest as a complementary spontaneous animal model for further neuropathological studies....... stroke patients. In order to face this apparent translational gap within stroke research, dogs with ischaemic stroke constitute an opportunity to study the neuropathology of ischaemic stroke in an animal species. Case presentation A 7 years and 8 months old female neutered Rottweiler dog suffered...

  7. Chronic idiopathic urticaria and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): an under-recognized comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K

    2012-01-01

    A large body of literature supports the role of psychologic stress in urticaria; however, the comorbidity between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a classic stress-mediated syndrome, has received little attention. The underlying etiology of urticaria is not identifiable in about 70% of patients, possibly because of difficulties with identification of a direct cause-and-effect relationship between a potential causative factor and the onset of urticaria. The core features of PTSD (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision [DSMIV-TR]) that are important in urticaria include (1) autonomic nervous system reactivity and state of sympathetic hyperarousal that can manifest as CIU, and (2) the persistent re-experiencing of the traumatic events in PTSD, which can manifest as urticaria or angioedema, or both, affecting a previously traumatized body region (eg, urticarial wheals affecting the body region where the patient had been stabbed years earlier). The following features of PTSD make it difficult to use the cause-and-effect model for the determination of causation: (1) PTSD may first emerge years after the initial trauma and is classified as PTSD with Delayed Onset (DSMIV-TR); and (2) the traumatic triggers that precipitate the PTSD symptoms may be unique and idiosyncratic to the patient and not even qualify as stressful or traumatic by standard criteria (eg, precipitating events for the PTSD may include smell of a certain cologne that was used by the perpetrator or witnessing a scene in a movie that was reminiscent of the location where the abuse occurred). Finally, in PTSD with Delayed Onset, patients may not make a conscious association between their recurrent urticaria and their earlier traumas because they can develop classically conditioned associations between stimuli that are reminiscent of the original abuse situation and their somatic reactions such as urticaria. The clinician

  8. New systems of care for substance use disorders: treatment, finance, and technology under health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pating, David R; Miller, Michael M; Goplerud, Eric; Martin, Judith; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    This article outlined ways in which persons with addiction are currently underserved by our current health care system. However, with the coming broad scale reforms to our health care system, the access to and availability of high-quality care for substance use disorders will increase. Addiction treatments will continue to be offered through traditional substance abuse care systems, but these will be more integrated with primary care, and less separated as treatment facilities leverage opportunities to blend services, financing mechanisms, and health information systems under federally driven incentive programs. To further these reforms, vigilance will be needed by consumers, clinicians, and policy makers to assure that the unmet treatment needs of individuals with addiction are addressed. Embedded in this article are essential recommendations to facilitate the improvement of care for substance use disorders under health care reform. Ultimately, as addiction care acquires more of the “look and feel” of mainstream medicine, it is important to be mindful of preexisting trends in health care delivery overall that are reflected in recent health reform legislation. Within the world of addiction care, clinicians must move beyond their self-imposed “stigmatization” and sequestration of specialty addiction treatment. The problem for addiction care, as it becomes more “mainstream,” is to not comfortably feel that general slogans like “Treatment Works,” as promoted by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment during its annual Recovery Month celebrations, will meet the expectations of stakeholders outside the specialty addiction treatment community. Rather, the problem is to show exactly how addiction treatment works, and to what extent it works-there have to be metrics showing changes in symptom level or functional outcome, changes in health care utilization, improvements in workplace attendance and

  9. Modeling of the Structure of Disordered Metallic Alloys and Its Transformation Under Thermal Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Ryan Paul

    taken of the beds. The bursts of images provide a Gaussian distribution of particle speeds in x and y directions thus giving rise to the notion of "temperature." This temperature scales with the motor speed settings. The measured average degree of crystallinity is found to decrease as the effective temperature was raised suggesting that nano-crystallites dissociate under thermal forcing. The evolution of a specimen's structure is calculated rigorously by means of the law of mass action formalism. A system of thermal dissociation reaction equations is written out for the set of nano-crystallites according to the 3-D crystallite size distribution. The equilibrium treatment is justified because the energy differences between metastable RCP structures fall within kT. Thermal dissociation of one surface atom at a time is assumed because the energy cost in dissociation of a surface atom on a nano-crystallite is significantly less than that of a multi atom cluster. The full set of reaction equations cover all possible dissociation steps, which may amount to several thousand for a disordered alloy specimen. The primary determining factor in each of these dissociation equations is the dissociation potential or the amount of attractive energy needed to remove a surface atom on a nano-crystallite of a given size. The attractive potential between atoms is calculated using a Lennard-Jones potential between a pair of atoms for which quantum chemistry calculations exist in the literature. All interactions impinged on the surface atom by all other atoms in a crystallite are summed. As the nano-crystallites dissociate due to heating, the structure of the alloy changes, and this leads to modifications of alloy's transport properties. The model is found to predict the melting temperature of various disordered binary alloys as well as refractory metals in good agreement with known data. The structure model for disordered binary alloys gives an excellent characterization of the alloy

  10. Clinical neuropathology practice news 3-2012: the "ABC" in AD-revised and updated guideline for the neuropathologic assessment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Gelpi, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The two major approaches for the neuropathological assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology have been based on the assessment of neuritic plaques (CERAD) and neurofibrillary pathology (Braak and Braak). In 1997 these two approaches were integrated in the criteria and recommendations of the National Institute on Aging and the Reagan Institute Working group. Recently a new guideline has been published by the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association. This new guideline recognizes the existence of a pre-clinical stage of AD as part of continuous neuropathological changes in the background of the disease process, and it fosters the assessment of amyloid-beta phases in addition to neurofibrillary degeneration and neuritic plaques following an "ABC" score. Further, it suggests protocols for the neuropathological assessment of additional/concomitant neurodegenerative and vascular pathologies. Altogether, the new guideline responds to the need for an update of the existing "1997 criteria" for AD. Continued studies will have to assess the added value of the new approach and the influence of interlaboratory and/or methodological differences on the implementation of these new recommendations.

  11. Inhibitory control and decision making under risk in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mudan; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Skunde, Mandy; Schag, Kathrin; Rudofsky, Gottfried; de Zwaan, Martina; Zipfel, Stephan; Herzog, Wolfgang; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

    2013-11-01

    To investigate neuropsychological mechanisms of impulsivity in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED). Nineteen BN patients and 31 age- and body-mass-index (BMI)-matched healthy controls (c-BN) as well as 54 overweight and obese BED patients and 43 age- and BMI-matched healthy controls (c-BED) were investigated using an inhibitory control task (stop signal task, SST) and a decision-making under risk task (game of dice task, GDT). Compared to c-BN, BN patients demonstrated significant greater stop signal reaction times in the SST, but no differences for the frequency of risky decisions in the GDT. BED patients did not differ from c-BED in the SST or the GDT. BN but not BED patients differed from their respective control groups concerning the "stopping" component of impulsivity. These differences in motor inhibition may contribute to the behavioral distinctions in binge-eating behavior between BN and BED. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Neurobiology and Genetics of Impulse Control Disorders: Relationships to Drug Addictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Judson A.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2008-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs), including pathological gambling, trichotillomania, kleptomania and others, have been conceptualized to lie along an impulsive-compulsive spectrum. Recent data have suggested that these disorders may be considered addictions. Here we review the genetic and neuropathological bases of the impulse control disorders and consider the disorders within these non-mutually exclusive frameworks. PMID:17719013

  13. The prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in patients with heavy menstrual bleeding with and without gynecologic abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, H. Marieke; Mulder, Andre; Bogchelman, Dick H.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Meijer, Karina

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) with and without gynecologic abnormalities. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a single-center prospective cohort study of 112 consecutive patients who were

  14. TREM2 Overexpression has No Improvement on Neuropathology and Cognitive Impairment in Aging APPswe/PS1dE9 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Teng; Wan, Yu; Zhang, Ying-Dong; Zhou, Jun-Shan; Gao, Qing; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Shi, Jian-Quan; Lu, Huan; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2017-03-01

    Previously, we showed that overexpression of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2), a microglia-specific immune receptor, in the brain of a middle-aged (7 months old) APPswe/PS1dE9 mice could ameliorate Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related neuropathology by enhancement of microglial amyloid-β (Aβ) phagocytosis. Since AD is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, it is critical to assess the efficacy of TREM2 overexpression in aging animals with an advanced disease stage. In vivo, we employed a lentiviral strategy to overexpress TREM2 in the brain of aging (18 months old) APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, and observed its efficacy on AD-related neuropathology and cognitive functions. Afterwards, we directly isolated microglia from middle-aged and aging APPswe/PS1dE9 mice and determined effects of TREM2 overexpression on microglial Aβ phagocytosis and Aβ-binding receptors expression in vitro. In aging APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, TREM2 overexpression has no beneficial effect on AD-related neuropathology and spatial cognitive functions. Of note, in vitro experiments showed a significant reduction of Aβ phagocytosis in microglia from aging APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, possibly attributing to the declined expression of Aβ-binding receptors. Meanwhile, this phagocytic deficit in microglia from aging APPswe/PS1dE9 mice cannot be rescued by TREM2 overexpression. Taken together, our study shows that TREM2 overexpression fails to provide neuroprotection in aging APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, possibly attributing to deficits in microglial Aβ phagocytosis at the late-stage of disease progression. These findings indicate that TREM2-mediated protection in AD is at least partially dependent on the reservation of microglial phagocytic functions, emphasizing the importance of early therapeutic interventions for this devastating disease.

  15. The anxiety disorders and suicidal ideation: accounting for co-morbidity via underlying personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naragon-Gainey, K; Watson, D

    2011-07-01

    The anxiety disorders are robust correlates/predictors of suicidal ideation, but it is unclear whether (a) the anxiety disorders are specifically associated with suicidal ideation or (b) the association is due to co-morbidity with depression and other disorders. One means of modeling co-morbidity is through the personality traits neuroticism/negative emotionality (N/NE) and extraversion/positive emotionality (E/PE), which account for substantial shared variance among the internalizing disorders. The current study examines the association between the internalizing disorders and suicidal ideation, after controlling for co-morbidity via N/NE and E/PE. The sample consisted of 327 psychiatric out-patients. Multiple self-report and interview measures were collected for internalizing disorders [depression, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social anxiety, panic and specific phobia] and suicidal ideation, as well as self-report measures for N/NE and E/PE. A model was hypothesized in which each disorder and suicidal ideation was regressed on N/NE, and depression and social anxiety were regressed on E/PE. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine the unique association of suicidality with each disorder, beyond shared variance with N/NE and E/PE. The hypothesized model was an acceptable fit to the data. Although zero-order analyses indicated that suicidal ideation was moderately to strongly correlated with all of the disorders, only depression and PTSD remained significantly associated with suicidal ideation in the SEM analyses. In a latent variable model that accounts for measurement error and a broad source of co-morbidity, only depression and PTSD were uniquely associated with suicidal ideation; panic, GAD, social anxiety and specific phobia were not.

  16. Common and distinct brain networks underlying panic and social anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ku; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung

    2018-01-03

    Although panic disorder (PD) and phobic disorders are independent anxiety disorders with distinct sets of diagnostic criteria, there is a high level of overlap between them in terms of pathogenesis and neural underpinnings. Functional connectivity research using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) shows great potential in identifying the similarities and differences between PD and phobias. Understanding common and distinct networks between PD and phobic disorders is critical for identifying both specific and general neural characteristics of these disorders. We review recent rsfMRI studies and explore the clinical relevance of resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in PD and phobias. Although findings differ between studies, there are some meaningful, consistent findings. Social anxiety disorder (SAD) and PD share common default mode network alterations. Alterations within the sensorimotor network are observed primarily in PD. Increased connectivity in the salience network is consistently reported in SAD. This review supports hypotheses that PD and phobic disorders share common rsFC abnormalities and that the different clinical phenotypes between the disorders come from distinct brain functional network alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Binge or control? : assessment of the validity, treatment and underlying mechanisms of Binge Eating Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on patients with Binge Eating Disorder. The thesis consists of three parts. In the first part the validity of the diagnosis of BED will be discussed. The results of two literature reviews and an empirical cross-sectional study suggested that BED is a distinct eating disorder and

  18. Cross-Species Studies on the Mechanisms Underlying Abnormal Behavior in Bipolar Disorder: A Dopaminergic Focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enkhuizen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder, affecting approximately 2% of the worldwide population. It is characterized by euphoric states of mania and opposite mood states of depression, which are devastating to the patients’ quality of life. Current treatment options are poor and

  19. Epidemiological patterns and correlates of mental disorders among orphans and vulnerable children under institutional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Mutiso, Victoria; W Musyimi, Christine; Tele, Albert; Ndetei, David M

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence, comorbidity and socio-demographic correlates of common mental disorders among orphan and vulnerable children (OVCs) in residential care. The Youth Self Report (YSR) instrument was adapted for use and administered to 630 OVCs aged 10-18 years in four institutions operating within the Eastern province of Kenya. We estimated the prevalence of YSR syndromes and used logistic regression analyses to examine socio-demographic factors associated with each disorder. The prevalence of any mental disorder according to YSR syndrome scale was 30.8% (95% CI 27.1-34.6). Female gender and older children were less likely to be associated with risk of scoring in the clinical range of the mental disorders. The presence of multiple mental problems was seen among 16.7% of the children. Of the 16.7%, 5.6% had one comorbid mental disorder and 11.1% had three to eight mental disorders. We found a high prevalence of mental disorders and co-occurring disorders among the OVCs in residential institutions in Kenya. There is need for an alternative approach that can reach out to critical numbers of children for screening and public health, rather than purely clinical approach. The capacity for these institutions should also be regulated and more efforts focusing on improving the quality of care in the facilities taken into account at all times.

  20. A Memory-Based Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Evaluating Basic Assumptions Underlying the PTSD Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David C.; Berntsen, Dorthe; Bohni, Malene Klindt

    2008-01-01

    In the mnemonic model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the current memory of a negative event, not the event itself, determines symptoms. The model is an alternative to the current event-based etiology of PTSD represented in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association,…

  1. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of neuropathologic features of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W Beecham

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD and related dementias are a major public health challenge and present a therapeutic imperative for which we need additional insight into molecular pathogenesis. We performed a genome-wide association study and analysis of known genetic risk loci for AD dementia using neuropathologic data from 4,914 brain autopsies. Neuropathologic data were used to define clinico-pathologic AD dementia or controls, assess core neuropathologic features of AD (neuritic plaques, NPs; neurofibrillary tangles, NFTs, and evaluate commonly co-morbid neuropathologic changes: cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA, Lewy body disease (LBD, hippocampal sclerosis of the elderly (HS, and vascular brain injury (VBI. Genome-wide significance was observed for clinico-pathologic AD dementia, NPs, NFTs, CAA, and LBD with a number of variants in and around the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE. GalNAc transferase 7 (GALNT7, ATP-Binding Cassette, Sub-Family G (WHITE, Member 1 (ABCG1, and an intergenic region on chromosome 9 were associated with NP score; and Potassium Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Channel, Subfamily M, Beta Member 2 (KCNMB2 was strongly associated with HS. Twelve of the 21 non-APOE genetic risk loci for clinically-defined AD dementia were confirmed in our clinico-pathologic sample: CR1, BIN1, CLU, MS4A6A, PICALM, ABCA7, CD33, PTK2B, SORL1, MEF2C, ZCWPW1, and CASS4 with 9 of these 12 loci showing larger odds ratio in the clinico-pathologic sample. Correlation of effect sizes for risk of AD dementia with effect size for NFTs or NPs showed positive correlation, while those for risk of VBI showed a moderate negative correlation. The other co-morbid neuropathologic features showed only nominal association with the known AD loci. Our results discovered new genetic associations with specific neuropathologic features and aligned known genetic risk for AD dementia with specific neuropathologic changes in the largest brain autopsy study of AD and related

  2. Neural networks underlying language and social cognition during self-other processing in Autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Rajesh K; Sartin, Emma B; Stevens, Carl; Deshpande, Hrishikesh D; Klein, Christopher; Klinger, Mark R; Klinger, Laura Grofer

    2017-07-28

    The social communication impairments defining autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may be built upon core deficits in perspective-taking, language processing, and self-other representation. Self-referential processing entails the ability to incorporate self-awareness, self-judgment, and self-memory in information processing. Very few studies have examined the neural bases of integrating self-other representation and semantic processing in individuals with ASD. The main objective of this functional MRI study is to examine the role of language and social brain networks in self-other processing in young adults with ASD. Nineteen high-functioning male adults with ASD and 19 age-sex-and-IQ-matched typically developing (TD) control participants made "yes" or "no" judgments of whether an adjective, presented visually, described them (self) or their favorite teacher (other). Both ASD and TD participants showed significantly increased activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) during self and other processing relative to letter search. Analyses of group differences revealed significantly reduced activity in left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG), and left inferior parietal lobule (LIPL) in ASD participants, relative to TD controls. ASD participants also showed significantly weaker functional connectivity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) with several brain areas while processing self-related words. The LIFG and IPL are important regions functionally at the intersection of language and social roles; reduced recruitment of these regions in ASD participants may suggest poor level of semantic and social processing. In addition, poor connectivity of the ACC may suggest the difficulty in meeting the linguistic and social demands of this task in ASD. Overall, this study provides new evidence of the altered recruitment of the neural networks underlying language and social cognition in ASD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Dissociative disorder manifesting for underlying adolescent hemi-parkinsonism: New chronology for old mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shailesh; Garg, Amit; Khanna, Amit

    2015-08-01

    Dissociative symptoms can be induced by a variety of conditions that can either coexist or mimic each other in clinical presentation. In coexisting dissociative disorder with medical illness, the causality remains uncertain, but sometime its role as nidus for dissociative symptoms just cannot be ruled out. The origin of "organic dissociative disorder" is undoubtedly found by various authors who demonstrated that a high percentage of patients with dissociative symptoms present with some form of neurological insult before developing the symptom. Herein we report on a case of adolescent onset hemi-parkinsonism with coexisting dissociative disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nothing new under the sun: post-traumatic stress disorders in the ancient world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hamid, Walid Khalid; Hughes, Jamie Hacker

    2014-01-01

    Herodotus' account of the Athenian spear carrier Epizelus' psychogenic mutism following the Marathon Wars is usually cited as the first documented account of post-traumatic stress disorders in historical literature. This paper describes much earlier accounts of post combat disorders that were recorded as occurring in Mesopotamia (present day Iraq) during the Assyrian dynasty (1300-609 BC). The descriptions in this paper include many symptoms of what we would now identify in current diagnostic classification systems as post-traumatic stress disorders; including flashbacks, sleep disturbance and low mood. The Mesopotamians explain the disorder in terms of spirit affliction; the spirit of those enemies whom the patient had killed during battle causing the symptoms.

  5. The putative role of environmental aluminium in the development of chronic neuropathology in adults and children. How strong is the evidence and what could be the mechanisms involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gerwyn; Puri, Basant K; Frye, Richard E

    2017-10-01

    The conceptualisation of autistic spectrum disorder and Alzheimer's disease has undergone something of a paradigm shift in recent years and rather than being viewed as single illnesses with a unitary pathogenesis and pathophysiology they are increasingly considered to be heterogeneous syndromes with a complex multifactorial aetiopathogenesis, involving a highly complex and diverse combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. One such environmental factor implicated as a potential cause in both syndromes is aluminium, as an element or as part of a salt, received, for example, in oral form or as an adjuvant. Such administration has the potential to induce pathology via several routes such as provoking dysfunction and/or activation of glial cells which play an indispensable role in the regulation of central nervous system homeostasis and neurodevelopment. Other routes include the generation of oxidative stress, depletion of reduced glutathione, direct and indirect reductions in mitochondrial performance and integrity, and increasing the production of proinflammatory cytokines in both the brain and peripherally. The mechanisms whereby environmental aluminium could contribute to the development of the highly specific pattern of neuropathology seen in Alzheimer's disease are described. Also detailed are several mechanisms whereby significant quantities of aluminium introduced via immunisation could produce chronic neuropathology in genetically susceptible children. Accordingly, it is recommended that the use of aluminium salts in immunisations should be discontinued and that adults should take steps to minimise their exposure to environmental aluminium.

  6. Interactive social neuroscience to study autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, Max J; Naples, Adam J; McPartland, James C

    2015-03-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate difficulty with social interactions and relationships, but the neural mechanisms underlying these difficulties remain largely unknown. While social difficulties in ASD are most apparent in the context of interactions with other people, most neuroscience research investigating ASD have provided limited insight into the complex dynamics of these interactions. The development of novel, innovative "interactive social neuroscience" methods to study the brain in contexts with two interacting humans is a necessary advance for ASD research. Studies applying an interactive neuroscience approach to study two brains engaging with one another have revealed significant differences in neural processes during interaction compared to observation in brain regions that are implicated in the neuropathology of ASD. Interactive social neuroscience methods are crucial in clarifying the mechanisms underlying the social and communication deficits that characterize ASD.

  7. Emotional Reactivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Behavioural and Neurobiological Correlates of Underlying Mechanisms and the Role of Emotional Memory Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Thome, Janine

    2017-01-01

    The symptom pattern of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) comprises four clusters: “involuntary distressing memories”, “persistent avoidance of stimuli related to the traumatic event”, “negative alterations in cognition and mood”, and “in arousal and reactivity” (DSM 5, American Psychological Association). Increasing evidence points towards enhanced emotional reactivity as an underlying mechanism of the latter mentioned symptom pattern in individuals with PTSD. From a process oriented persp...

  8. Metallothionein Expression and Roles During Neuropathology in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2006-01-01

    and apoptotic cell death after brain injury, while astroglia is stimulated. This indicates that MT-I+II function independently of species of origin. Previously, we showed that MT-I+II also ameliorate autoimmune, excitotoxic and inflammatory CNS disorders, and independent groups have confirmed this and have...... and apoptotic cell death, whereby the delayed (secondary) tissue damage was inhibited after brain injury and 6-AN-toxicity. MT-I+II also diminish the primary CNS toxicity caused directly by 6-AN and the clinical outcome (mortality). Additionally, MT-I+II stimulate astrogliosis; expression of growth factors......, their receptors and neurotrophins (TGFb, TGFb-Receptor, bFGF, bFGF-Receptor, VEGF, NT-3, NT-4/5, NGF); angiogenesis; and growth cone formation. Hence, MT-I+II enhance CNS tissue repair as seen clearly after the cryogenic injury, after which MT-I+II promote substitution of the necrotic lesion cavity with a glial...

  9. GENETICS AND NEUROPATHOLOGY OF HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Anton; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Dietrich, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder that prominently affects the basal ganglia, leading to affective, cognitive, behavioral and motor decline. The basis of HD is a CAG repeat expansion to >35 CAG in a gene that codes for a ubiquitous protein known as huntingtin, resulting in an expanded N-terminal polyglutamine tract. The size of the expansion is correlated with disease severity, with increasing CAG accelerating the age of onset. A variety of possibilities have been proposed as to the mechanism by which the mutation causes preferential injury to the basal ganglia. The present chapter provides a basic overview of the genetics and pathology of HD. PMID:21907094

  10. RNA interference mitigates motor and neuropathological deficits in a cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Clévio; Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Déglon, Nicole; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease or Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Recent studies demonstrate that RNA interference is a promising approach for the treatment of Machado-Joseph disease. However, whether gene silencing at an early time-point is able to prevent the appearance of motor behavior deficits typical of the disease when initiated before onset of the disease had not been explored. Here, using a lentiviral-mediated allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 in an early pre-symptomatic cerebellar mouse model of Machado-Joseph disease we show that this strategy hampers the development of the motor and neuropathological phenotypic characteristics of the disease. At the histological level, the RNA-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-3 decreased formation of mutant ataxin-3 aggregates, preserved Purkinje cell morphology and expression of neuronal markers while reducing cell death. Importantly, gene silencing prevented the development of impairments in balance, motor coordination, gait and hyperactivity observed in control mice. These data support the therapeutic potential of RNA interference for Machado-Joseph disease and constitute a proof of principle of the beneficial effects of early allele-specific silencing for therapy of this disease.

  11. Developmental Pathway Genes and Neural Plasticity Underlying Emotional Learning and Stress-Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheau, Marissa E.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2017-01-01

    The manipulation of neural plasticity as a means of intervening in the onset and progression of stress-related disorders retains its appeal for many researchers, despite our limited success in translating such interventions from the laboratory to the clinic. Given the challenges of identifying individual genetic variants that confer increased risk…

  12. Alcohol abuse, personality disorders, and aggression : The quest for a common underlying mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garofalo, C.; Wright, Aidan G.C.

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and personality disorders are often comorbid, and their co-occurrence is associated with worse rognostic expectations, poor therapeutic outcomes, as well as deleterious behavioral and interpersonal consequences. The current review aims at untangling the association among alcohol abuse,

  13. Atypical Neurophysiology Underlying Episodic and Semantic Memory in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massand, Esha; Bowler, Dermot M.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show atypicalities in episodic memory (Boucher et al. in Psychological Bulletin, 138 (3), 458-496, 2012). We asked participants to recall the colours of a set of studied line drawings (episodic judgement), or to recognize line drawings alone (semantic judgement). Cycowicz et al. ("Journal of…

  14. Oculomotor Performance Identifies Underlying Cognitive Deficits in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loe, Irene M.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Yasui, Enami; Luna, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of the cognitive control in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder through the use of oculomotor tests reveal that this group showed susceptibility to peripheral distractors and deficits in response inhibition. All subjects were found to have intact sensorimotor function and working memory.

  15. Underlying Manifestations of Developmental Phonological Disorders in French-Speaking Pre-Schoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau-Lapré, Françoise; Rvachew, Susan

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the psycholinguistic profiles of Quebec French-speaking children with developmental phonological disorders (DPD). The purpose was to determine whether the endophenotypes that have been identified in English-speaking children with DPD are similarly associated with speech impairment in French-speaking children. Seventy-two…

  16. Neuropathology and Neurochemistry of Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Ferrer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is no longer considered a complex motor disorder characterized by Parkinsonism but rather a systemic disease with variegated non-motor deficits and neurological symptoms, including impaired olfaction, autonomic failure, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric symptoms. Many of these alterations appear before or in parallel with motor deficits and then worsen with disease progression. Although there is a close relation between motor symptoms and the presence of Lewy bodies (LBs and neurites filled with abnormal -synuclein, other neurological alterations are independent of the amount of -synuclein inclusions in neurons and neurites, thereby indicating that different mechanisms probably converge in the degenerative process. Involvement of the cerebral cortex that may lead to altered behaviour and cognition are related to several convergent factors such as (a abnormal -synuclein and other proteins at the synapses, rather than LBs and neurites, (b impaired dopaminergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic and serotoninergic cortical innervation, and (c altered neuronal function resulting from reduced energy production and increased energy demands. These alterations appear at early stages of the disease and may precede by years the appearance of cell loss and cortical atrophy.

  17. Hemodynamic and Neuropathological Analysis in Rats with Aluminum Trichloride-Induced Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Szu-Ming; Fan, Chi-Chen; Chiue, Ming-Shiuan; Chou, Chi; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hemodynamic normality is crucial to maintaining the integrity of cerebral vessels and, therefore, preserving the cognitive functions of Alzheimer's disease patients. This study investigates the implications of the hemodynamic changes and the neuropathological diversifications of AlCl3-induced AD. METHODS: The experimental animals were 8- to 12-wk-old male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a (+)control group. Food intake, water ...

  18. Long-term neuropathological and behavioral impairments after exposure to nerve agents

    OpenAIRE

    Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Apland, James P.; Prager, Eric M.; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I.; Miller, Steven L.; Braga, Maria F.M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the deleterious effects of acute nerve agent exposure is the induction of status epilepticus (SE). If SE is not controlled effectively, it causes extensive brain damage. Here, we review the neuropathology observed after nerve agent���induced SE, as well as the ensuing pathophysiological, neurological, and behavioral alterations, with an emphasis on their time course and longevity. Limbic structures are particularly vulnerable to damage by nerve agent exposure. The basolateral amygdala ...

  19. Hippocampal neuropathology of domoic acid-induced epilepsy in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Paul S; Wen, Xiling; Toyoda, Izumi; Gulland, Frances M D; Van Bonn, William

    2014-05-01

    California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are abundant human-sized carnivores with large gyrencephalic brains. They develop epilepsy after experiencing status epilepticus when naturally exposed to domoic acid. We tested whether sea lions previously exposed to DA (chronic DA sea lions) display hippocampal neuropathology similar to that of human patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Hippocampi were obtained from control and chronic DA sea lions. Stereology was used to estimate numbers of Nissl-stained neurons per hippocampus in the granule cell layer, hilus, and pyramidal cell layer of CA3, CA2, and CA1 subfields. Adjacent sections were processed for somatostatin immunoreactivity or Timm-stained, and the extent of mossy fiber sprouting was measured stereologically. Chronic DA sea lions displayed hippocampal neuron loss in patterns and extents similar but not identical to those reported previously for human patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similar to human patients, hippocampal sclerosis in sea lions was unilateral in 79% of cases, mossy fiber sprouting was a common neuropathological abnormality, and somatostatin-immunoreactive axons were exuberant in the dentate gyrus despite loss of immunopositive hilar neurons. Thus, hippocampal neuropathology of chronic DA sea lions is similar to that of human patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. CNS involvement in V30M transthyretin amyloidosis: clinical, neuropathological and biochemical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Luís F; Magalhães, Rui; Freitas, Joel; Taipa, Ricardo; Pires, Manuel Melo; Osório, Hugo; Dias, Daniel; Pessegueiro, Helena; Correia, Manuel; Coelho, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Since liver transplant (LT) was introduced to treat patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy carrying the V30M mutation (ATTR-V30M), ocular and cardiac complications have developed. Long-term central nervous system (CNS) involvement was not investigated. Our goals were to: (1) identify and characterise focal neurological episodes (FNEs) due to CNS dysfunction in ATTR-V30M patients; (2) characterise neuropathological features and temporal profile of CNS transthyretin amyloidosis. We monitored the presence and type of FNEs in 87 consecutive ATTR-V30M and 35 non-ATTR LT patients. FNEs were investigated with CT scan, EEG and extensive neurovascular workup. MRI studies were not performed because all patients had cardiac pacemakers as part of the LT protocol. We characterised transthyretin amyloid deposition in the brains of seven ATTR-V30M patients, dead 3-13 years after polyneuropathy onset. FNEs occurred in 31% (27/87) of ATTR-V30M and in 5.7% (2/35) of the non-ATTR transplanted patients (OR=7.0, 95% CI 1.5 to 33.5). FNEs occurred on average 14.6 years after disease onset (95% CI 13.3 to 16.0) in ATTR-V30M patients, which is beyond the life expectancy of non-transplanted ATTR-V30M patients (10.9, 95% CI 10.5 to 11.3). ATTR-V30M patients with FNEs had longer disease duration (OR=1.24; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.43), renal dysfunction (OR=4.65; 95% CI 1.20 to 18.05) and were men (OR=3.57; 95% CI 1.02 to 12.30). CNS transthyretin amyloidosis was already present 3 years after polyneuropathy onset and progressed from the meninges and its vessels towards meningocortical vessels and the superficial brain parenchyma, as disease duration increased. Our findings indicate that CNS clinical involvement occurs in ATTR-V30M patients regardless of LT. Longer disease duration after LT can provide the necessary time for transthyretin amyloidosis to progress until it becomes clinically relevant. Highly sensitive imaging methods are needed to identify and monitor brain ATTR. Disease

  1. Vascular cognitive impairment neuropathology guidelines (VCING): the contribution of cerebrovascular pathology to cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobot, Olivia A; Attems, Johannes; Esiri, Margaret; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Ironside, James W; Kalaria, Rajesh N; King, Andrew; Lammie, George A; Mann, David; Neal, James; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth

    2016-11-01

    There are no generally accepted protocols for post-mortem assessment in cases of suspected vascular cognitive impairment. Neuropathologists from seven UK centres have collaborated in the development of a set of vascular cognitive impairment neuropathology guidelines (VCING), representing a validated consensus approach to the post-mortem assessment and scoring of cerebrovascular disease in relation to vascular cognitive impairment. The development had three stages: (i) agreement on a sampling protocol and scoring criteria, through a series of Delphi method surveys; (ii) determination of inter-rater reliability for each type of pathology in each region sampled (Gwet's AC2 coefficient); and (iii) empirical testing and validation of the criteria, by blinded post-mortem assessment of brain tissue from 113 individuals (55 to 100 years) without significant neurodegenerative disease who had had formal cognitive assessments within 12 months of death. Fourteen different vessel and parenchymal pathologies were assessed in 13 brain regions. Almost perfect agreement (AC2 > 0.8) was found when the agreed criteria were used for assessment of leptomeningeal, cortical and capillary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, large infarcts, lacunar infarcts, microhaemorrhage, larger haemorrhage, fibrinoid necrosis, microaneurysms, perivascular space dilation, perivascular haemosiderin leakage, and myelin loss. There was more variability (but still reasonably good agreement) in assessment of the severity of arteriolosclerosis (0.45-0.91) and microinfarcts (0.52-0.84). Regression analyses were undertaken to identify the best predictors of cognitive impairment. Seven pathologies-leptomeningeal cerebral amyloid angiopathy, large infarcts, lacunar infarcts, microinfarcts, arteriolosclerosis, perivascular space dilation and myelin loss-predicted cognitive impairment. Multivariable logistic regression determined the best predictive models of cognitive impairment. The preferred model included moderate

  2. Underlying Factors Behind the Low Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Oman: Sociocultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouhtit, Allal; Al-Farsi, Yahya; Al-Sharbati, Marwan; Waly, Mostafa; Gupta, Ishita; Al-Farsi, Omar; Al-Khaduri, Maha; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological surveys from various countries indicate an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), leading researchers to debate whether there are now 'more affected' or 'more detected'. The epidemiology of ASD in developing countries, such as Oman, has generally indicated a lower prevalence compared to developed countries in the West. In Oman, the prevalence is low; however, this article highlights some of the factors that could contribute to the appearance of a low ASD rate: cross-cultural variations in the presentation of distress; a lack of reliable biological markers for diagnosing ASD, and a lack of health services for children with ASD, thus limiting the number of participants in epidemiological surveys. While the defining features of ASD have yet to be established, pilot studies in Oman indicate a substantial number of children with these disorders. Therefore, it is important that these discrepancies be addressed and the need for appropriate services for this patient population in Oman be highlighted.

  3. Severe encephalopathy with brain atrophy and hypomyelination due to adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency--MRI, clinical, biochemical and neuropathological findings of Polish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzewska, Hanna; Schmidt-Sidor, Bogna; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Bogdańska, Anna; Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Stepień, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the ADSL gene. The disease was identified in 1984 by Jaeken and van der Berghe as the first inborn defect of purine biosynthesis. Affected children revealed encephalopathy with epilepsy and marked psychomotor retardation. A neurological examination showed hypotonia, followed sometimes after years by spasticity. The diagnosis is based on detection in the urine and CSF succinyladenosine (S-Ado) and succinylaminoimidazole carboxamide ribotide (SAICAr). We present brain MR examinations of seven patients with ADSL deficiency in the correlation with their clinical findings. In all cases lack of myelination or of delayed myelination of cerebral white matter was seen. Additionally cerebral and cerebellar atrophy was observed. Neuropathological findings revealed damage of all cellular elements of brain tissue and are cause of observed MR changes. Hypo/dysmyelination seemed to be secondary to damage of oligodendroglia and axons of damaged neuronal cells.

  4. Social safeness and disordered eating: Exploring underlying mechanisms of body appreciation and inflexible eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Catarina; Ferreira, Cláudia; Mendes, Ana Laura; Trindade, Inês A

    2017-06-01

    Feelings of social safeness and connectedness have been associated with adaptive emotion regulation processes and well-being indicators. Further, literature has demonstrated that interpersonal experiences play an important role in the etiology and maintenance of body and eating psychopathology. However, the study of the role of social variables and emotion regulation processes in the engagement in inflexible eating rules and eating psychopathology is still in its early stages. The current study aims to fill some gaps within the literature and explore the mediator role of body appreciation and inflexible eating rules in the link between social safeness and disordered eating. Participants were 253 women, aged between 18 and 50 years old, who completed a series of online self-report measures. Results from the tested path analysis model showed that social safeness holds a significant effect on eating psychopathology, through the mechanisms of body appreciation and inflexible eating rules. Also, results suggested that women who present higher levels of social safeness tend to present a more positive and respectful attitude towards their body and decreased adoption of inflexible eating rules, which seem to explain lower levels of disordered eating behaviours. These findings seem to present empirical support for the development of intervention programs that promote a positive, affectionate and healthy relationship with one's body image, in order to prevent the inflexible adherence to eating rules and disordered eating behaviours.

  5. [Hyperhidrosis and social anxiety disorder--the same old thing under a different cloak?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahaloni, Elad; Iancu, Iulian

    2014-10-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a reason for treatment by many specialists in medicine, such as dermatologists, family medicine doctors, surgeons and also psychiatrists. Hyperhidrosis causes considerable distress and disability. Despite the fact that the condition has been known for thousands of years, it is yet unclear whether excessive sweating derives from emotional" activation of the central nervous system, whether the emotional symptoms evolve due to local dysfunction of the sweat glands, or a combination of the two problems. In this article, we will present two conditions: hyperhidrosis and Social Anxiety Disorder, a mental condition with anxiety and avoidanrce in social settings that is frequently accompanied by sweating. We will discuss the similarities and differences between these disorders and the various treatments available for these conditions. Research shows that social anxiety does not explain hyperhidrosis, but that excessive sweating reduces the threshold for social anxiety. Among people with hyperhidrosis, the functional disability and the emotional problems are mediated by the social anxiety. We propose treating the symptoms of hyperhidrosis and social anxiety disorder in combination in order to achieve maximal improvement in these patients.

  6. The Energy Metabolism Dysfunction in Psychiatric Disorders Postmortem Brains: Focus on Proteomic Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana S. Zuccoli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders represent a great medical and social challenge and people suffering from these conditions face many impairments regarding personal and professional life. In addition, a mental disorder will manifest itself in approximately one quarter of the world's population at some period of their life. Dysfunction in energy metabolism is one of the most consistent scientific findings associated with these disorders. With this is mind, this review compiled data on disturbances in energy metabolism found by proteomic analyses of postmortem brains collected from patients affected by the most prevalent psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia (SCZ, bipolar disorder (BPD, and major depressive disorder (MDD. We searched in the PubMed database to gather the studies and compiled all the differentially expressed proteins reported in each work. SCZ studies revealed 92 differentially expressed proteins related to energy metabolism, while 95 proteins were discovered in BPD, and 41 proteins in MDD. With the compiled data, it was possible to determine which proteins related to energy metabolism were found to be altered in all the disorders as well as which ones were altered exclusively in one of them. In conclusion, the information gathered in this work could contribute to a better understanding of the impaired metabolic mechanisms and hopefully bring insights into the underlying neuropathology of psychiatric disorders.

  7. The comparition of Personality Patterns, irrational beliefs and impulsivity in males with with drug abuse disorder under Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    samere asadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this research was to determine the difference between personality Patterns, irrational beliefs and impulsivity in men with drug abuse disorder under Treatment. Method: in this casual- comparative research, 80 men ( 40 males with drug abuse under Treatment and 40 of normal males that were selected with available sampling .Groups were matched in terms of demoghraphy characteristics ( age, sexuality, education level and marital status and were valued with means of Eysenk Perceived Stress Inventory, Jonze Irrational Beliefs Scale and Baret Impulsivity Inventory. Results: The result of variance analysis showed that addicts compared to normal people, get more scores on extraversion, neuroticism and psychosis. Addicts group had Higher men scores in irrational beliefs compare of other group. There was significant difference between groups in impulsivity and impulsivity in addicts persons is the most. Conclussion: The traits of Personality, irrational beliefs and Unrealistic and high level impulsivity are factors that propel individuals toward more drug abuse and finally addict and aiming this factors in individuals with abuse disorder under Treatment can lead to prevent of Substance Abuse Relapse.

  8. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, Underlying Affective Vulnerabilities, and Smoking for Affect Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Amanda R.; Cook, Jessica W.; Japuntich, Sandra J.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is overrepresented among cigarette smokers. It has been hypothesized that those with PTSD smoke to alleviate negative affect and counteract deficient positive affect commonly associated with the disorder; however, limited research has examined associations between PTSD symptoms, smoking motives, and affective vulnerability factors. In the current study, we examined (1) whether PTSD symptoms were associated with positive reinforcement and negative reinforcement smoking motives; and (2) whether two affective vulnerability factors implicated in PTSD—anxiety sensitivity and anhedonia—mediated relationships between PTSD symptoms and smoking motives. Methods Data were drawn from a community sample of non-treatment-seeking smokers recruited without regard for trauma history (N = 342; 10+cig/day). We used the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) to assess overall PTSD symptom severity as well as individual PTSD subfactors. Results Overall, PTSD symptom severity was significantly associated with negative reinforcement, but not positive reinforcement, smoking motives. Variation in anxiety sensitivity significantly mediated the relation between PTSD symptom severity and negative reinforcement smoking motives, whereas anhedonia did not. Regarding PTSD subfactors, emotional numbing was the only PTSD subfactor associated with smoking rate, while re-experiencing symptoms were uniquely associated with both positive reinforcement and negative reinforcement smoking motives. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Findings suggest that anxiety sensitivity may be an important feature associated with PTSD that enhances motivation to smoke for negative reinforcement purposes. Smoking cessation interventions that alleviate anxiety sensitivity and enhance coping with negative affect may be useful for smokers with elevated PTSD symptoms. PMID:25823634

  9. Rates of Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis Under the DSM-5 Criteria Compared to DSM-IV-TR Criteria in a Hospital-Based Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley-McAndrew, Michelle; Mertz, Jana; Hoffman, Martin; Crawford, Donald

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to determine whether there was a decrease in the number of children diagnosed on the autism spectrum after the implementation of the new diagnostic criteria as outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders Fifth Edition published in May 2013. We reviewed 1552 charts of children evaluated at the Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, Autism Spectrum Disorders Clinic. A comparison was made of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (autism, Asperger disorder, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified) from 2010 to May 2013 using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria with children diagnosed from June 2013 through June 2015 under the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders Fifth Edition. Using χ(2) analysis, the 2013-2015 rate of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis (39%) was significantly lower (P disorder diagnosis was significantly lower under the recently implemented Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders Fifth Edition criteria. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Spatial-memory deficit in schizophrenia spectrum disorders under viewpoint-independent demands in the virtual courtyard task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Leanne K; Girard, Todd A; King, Jelena; King, Matthew J; Herdman, Katherine A; Christensen, Bruce K; King, John

    2013-01-01

    This study builds upon our previous work indicating that impaired hippocampal-dependent forms of memory are core to schizophrenia. Using a virtual-reality courtyard task, we presented participants with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD; n = 20) and a healthy community comparison group (n = 20) with objects to remember within a town square, followed by a recognition test of the location of objects from either the same viewpoint or a shifted viewpoint relative to initial presentation. The SSD group demonstrated a relative deficit under shifted- compared to same-view conditions. These findings provide further support for deficient hippocampal-dependent cognition in SSD.

  11. Multimodal imaging in cerebral gliomas and its neuropathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gempt, Jens, E-mail: jens.gempt@lrz.tum.de [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Soehngen, Eric [Abteilung für Neuroradiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Abteilung für Neuropathologie des Instituts für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Förster, Stefan [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Ryang, Yu-Mi [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); Schlegel, Jürgen [Abteilung für Neuropathologie des Instituts für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany); and others

    2014-05-15

    Introduction: Concerning the preoperative clinical diagnostic work-up of glioma patients, tumor heterogeneity challenges the oncological therapy. The current study assesses the performance of a multimodal imaging approach to differentiate between areas in malignant gliomas and to investigate the extent to which such a combinatorial imaging approach might predict the underlying histology. Methods: Prior to surgical resection, patients harboring intracranial gliomas underwent MRIs (MR-S, PWI) and {sup 18}F-FET-PETs. Intratumoral and peritumoral biopsy targets were defined, by MRI only, by FET-PET only, and by MRI and FET-PET combined, and biopsied prior to surgical resection and which then received separate histopathological examinations. Results: In total, 38 tissue samples were acquired (seven glioblastomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma, one anaplastic oligoastrocytoma, one diffuse astrocytoma, and one oligoastrocytoma) and underwent histopathological analysis. The highest mean values of Mib1 and CD31 were found in the target point “T’ defined by MRI and FET-PET combined. A significant correlation between NAA/Cr and PET tracer uptake (−0.845, p < 0.05) as well as Cho/Cr ratio and cell density (0.742, p < 0.05) and NAA/Cr ratio and MIB-1 (−0761, p < 0.05) was disclosed for this target point, though not for target points defined by MRI and FET-PET alone. Conclusion: Multimodal-imaging-guided stereotactic biopsy correlated more with histological malignancy indices, such as cell density and MIB-1 labeling, than targets that were based solely on the highest amino acid uptake or contrast enhancement on MRI. The results of our study indicate that a combined PET-MR multimodal imaging approach bears potential benefits in detecting glioma heterogeneity.

  12. Myxobacterial natural products: An under-valued source of products for drug discovery for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehhaghi, Mona; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2018-03-02

    Age-related disorders impose noticeable financial and emotional burdens on society. This impact is becoming more prevalent with the increasing incidence of neurodegenerative diseases and is causing critical concerns for treatment of patients worldwide. Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and motor neuron disease are the most prevalent and the most expensive to treat neurodegenerative diseases globally. Therefore, exploring effective therapies to overcome these disorders is a necessity. Natural products and their derivatives have increasingly attracted attention in drug discovery programs that have identified microorganisms which produce a large range of metabolites with bioactive properties. Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative bacteria with large genome size, produce a wide range of secondary metabolites with significant chemical structures and a variety of biological effects. They are potent natural product producers. In this review paper, we attempt to overview some secondary metabolites synthesized by myxobacteria with neuroprotective activity through known mechanisms including production of polyunsaturated fatty acids, reduction of apoptosis, immunomodulation, stress reduction of endoplasmic reticulum, stabilization of microtubules, enzyme inhibition and serotonin receptor modulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Underlying Factors Behind the Low Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Oman; Sociocultural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allal Ouhtit

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological surveys from various countries indicate an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD, leading researchers to debate whether there are now ‘more affected’ or ‘more detected’. The epidemiology of ASD in developing countries, such as Oman, has generally indicated a lower prevalence compared to developed countries in the West. In Oman, the prevalence is low; however, this article highlights some of the factors that could contribute to the appearance of a low ASD rate: cross-cultural variations in the presentation of distress; a lack of reliable biological markers for diagnosing ASD, and a lack of health services for children with ASD, thus limiting the number of participants in epidemiological surveys. While the defining features of ASD have yet to be established, pilot studies in Oman indicate a substantial number of children with these disorders. Therefore, it is important that these discrepancies be addressed and the need for appropriate services for this patient population in Oman be highlighted.

  14. Border Terriers under primary veterinary care in England: demography and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Dan G; Darwent, Elisabeth C; Church, David B; Brodbelt, Dave C

    2017-01-01

    The Border Terrier is a working terrier type that is generally considered to be a relatively healthy and hardy breed. This study aimed to characterise the demography and common disorders of Border Terriers receiving veterinary care in England using de-identified electronic patient record data within the VetCompass™ Programme. Annual birth proportion for Border Terriers showed a decreasing trend from 1.46% in 2005 to 0.78% in 2014. The median adult bodyweight for males (10.9 kg, IQR: 9.6-12.3, range: 6.3-25.0) was higher than for females (9.1 kg, IQR: 8.2-10.3, range: 5.2-21.6) ( P  skin disorder (10.17%, 95% CI: 8.60-11.93).Syndromic analysis showed that the most prevalent body locations affected were the head-and-neck (37.75%, 95% CI: 35.14-40.43), abdomen (18.61%, 95% CI: 16.55-20.81) and limb (11.53%, 95% CI: 9.86-13.37). At least one organ system was affected in 834 (62.85%) Border Terriers. The most prevalent organ systems affected were the digestive (32.03%, 95% CI: 29.52-34.61), integument (26.68%, 95% CI: 24.31-29.14), connective/soft tissue (11.15%, 95% CI: 9.51-12.97) and auditory (9.87%, 95% CI: 8.32-11.60). At least one affected pathophysiological process was described in 881 (66.39%) Border Terriers. The most prevalent pathophysiologic processes recorded were inflammation (31.65%, 95% CI: 29.15-34.23), nutritional (9.04%, 95% CI: 7.55-10.72), mass/swelling (8.89%, 95% CI: 7.42-10.55), traumatic (7.99%, 95% CI: 6.59-9.58) and infectious (7.76%, 95% CI: 6.38-9.33). This study documented a trend towards reducing ownership and relatively long-livedness in the Border Terrier. The most common disorders were periodontal disease, overweight/obesity and otitis externa. Predisposition to dental and neurological disease was suggested. These results can provide a comprehensive evidence resource to support breed-based health plans that can contribute positively to reforms to improve health and welfare within the breed.

  15. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Affective Theory of Mind in Violent Antisocial Personality Disorder and/or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Boris; Pawliczek, Christina; Müller, Bernhard W; Wiltfang, Jens; Brüne, Martin; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R; Leygraf, Norbert; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2017-10-21

    Among violent offenders with schizophrenia, there are 2 sub-groups, one with and one without, conduct disorder (CD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), who differ as to treatment response and alterations of brain structure. The present study aimed to determine whether the 2 groups also differ in Theory of Mind and neural activations subsuming this task. Five groups of men were compared: 3 groups of violent offenders-schizophrenia plus CD/ASPD, schizophrenia with no history of antisocial behavior prior to illness onset, and CD/ASPD with no severe mental illness-and 2 groups of non-offenders, one with schizophrenia and one without (H). Participants completed diagnostic interviews, the Psychopathy Checklist Screening Version Interview, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, authorized access to clinical and criminal files, and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing an adapted version of the Reading-the-Mind-in-the-Eyes Task (RMET). Relative to H, nonviolent and violent men with schizophrenia and not CD/ASPD performed more poorly on the RMET, while violent offenders with CD/ASPD, both those with and without schizophrenia, performed similarly. The 2 groups of violent offenders with CD/ASPD, both those with and without schizophrenia, relative to the other groups, displayed higher levels of activation in a network of prefrontal and temporal-parietal regions and reduced activation in the amygdala. Relative to men without CD/ASPD, both groups of violent offenders with CD/ASPD displayed a distinct pattern of neural responses during emotional/mental state attribution pointing to distinct and comparatively successful processing of social information. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Psycholinguistic Profiling Reveals Underlying Impairments for Greek Children with Speech Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geronikou, Eleftheria; Rees, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility that similar speech error patterns in children may arise from different patterns of underlying speech processing difficulties. Four Greek children (aged 4;7-5;6 years) with similar speech output difficulties were assessed with a range of experimental tasks with phonologically matched items in order to…

  17. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7: Clinical Course, Phenotype-Genotype Correlations, and Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Laura C.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Vangel, Mark G.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. METHODS We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in 5, and autopsy in 4 cases. RESULTS We identified 4 stages of the illness. Stage 0; gene positive but phenotypically silent. Stage 1; no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms. Stage 2; symptoms and signs progress modestly. Stage 3; rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r=-0.74, p=0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p=0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. DISCUSSION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through 4 clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

  18. Creutzfeldt-Jacob-disease: The computerized tomogram in relation to clinical, electroencephalographic and neuropathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieger, A.; Vonofakos, D.; Vitzthum, H.

    1981-12-01

    The computerized tomogram (CT) of a senile case of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease with rapid progress, showed after an initially minor parietal dilatation of the gyri, a volume increase, predominantly on the right side, in the area of the cerebral convexity and a right-preponderant dilatation of the anterior horns. By neuropathologic examination indications for a passed cerebral oedema was found, covering the cortex atrophy, which previously had been detected by CT. Progression and local intensity of the atrophic signs in CT - in combination with clinical and electroencephalographic findings - suggest the existence of a Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and permit its delineation against other atrophying processes.

  19. Creutzfeldt-Jacob-disease: The computerized tomogram in relation to clinical, electroencephalographic and neuropathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zieger, A.

    1981-01-01

    The computerized tomogram (CT) of a senile case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with rapid progress, showed after an initially minor parietal dilatation of the gyri, a volume increase, predominantly on the right side, in the area of the cerebral convexity and a right-preponderant dilatation of the anterior horns. By neuropathologic examination indications for a passed cerebral oedema was found, covering the cortex atrophy, which previously had been detected by CT. Progression and local intensity of the atrophic signs in CT - in combination with clinical and electroencephalographic findings - let appear probable the existence of a Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and permit its delineation against other atrophying processes. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Depression and Alzheimer's disease: is stress the initiating factor in a common neuropathological cascade?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a high co-morbidity between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression has been known for a long time. More interesting though are recent studies indicating that depression and number of depressive episodes earlier in life is associated with increased risk of AD development....... This suggests the existence of common neuropathological mechanisms behind depression and AD. Here we propose that the brain changes associated with depressive episodes that compromise the brain's ability to cope with stress may constitute risk factors for development of AD. Furthermore, in individuals...... serotonergic and cholinergic system, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and brain derived neurotrophic factor, and discussed in relation to AD....

  1. Functional and dysfunctional brain circuits underlying emotional processing of music in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caria, Andrea; Venuti, Paola; de Falco, Simona

    2011-12-01

    Despite intersubject variability, dramatic impairments of socio-communicative skills are core features of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). A deficit in the ability to express and understand emotions has often been hypothesized to be an important correlate of such impairments. Little is known about individuals with ASD's ability to sense emotions conveyed by nonsocial stimuli such as music. Music has been found to be capable of evoking and conveying strong and consistent positive and negative emotions in healthy subjects. The ability to process perceptual and emotional aspects of music seems to be maintained in ASD. Individuals with ASD and neurotypical (NT) controls underwent a single functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session while processing happy and sad music excerpts. Overall, fMRI results indicated that while listening to both happy and sad music, individuals with ASD activated cortical and subcortical brain regions known to be involved in emotion processing and reward. A comparison of ASD participants with NT individuals demonstrated decreased brain activity in the premotor area and in the left anterior insula, especially in response to happy music excerpts. Our findings shed new light on the neurobiological correlates of preserved and altered emotional processing in ASD.

  2. Apathy in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is common and under-recognized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, T R; Muhammed, K; Drew, D; Lawton, M; Crabbe, M; Rolinski, M; Quinnell, T; Zaiwalla, Z; Ben-Shlomo, Y; Husain, M; Hu, M T M

    2018-03-01

    Apathy is an important neuropsychiatric feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), which often emerges before the onset of motor symptoms. Patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) have a high probability of developing PD in future. Neuropsychiatric problems are common in RBD, but apathy has not previously been detailed in this key prodromal population. Eighty-eight patients with polysomnographically proven RBD, 65 patients with PD and 33 controls were assessed for apathy using the Lille Apathy Rating Scale. Cognition and depression were also quantified. The sensitivity of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale screening questions for apathy and depression was calculated. A total of 46% of patients with RBD were apathetic, compared with 31% of patients with PD in our sample. Most patients with RBD with depression were apathetic but more than half of apathetic patients were not depressed. The sensitivity of the single Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale screening question was only 33% for mild apathy and 50% for severe apathy. Apathy is common in RBD and is underestimated by a single self-report question. Recognition of apathy as a distinct neuropsychiatric feature in RBD could aid targeted treatment interventions and might contribute to the understanding of prodromal PD. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Academy of Neurology.

  3. An Underlying Common Factor, Influenced by Genetics and Unique Environment, Explains the Covariation Between Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Burnout: A Swedish Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Lisa; Blom, Victoria; Bergström, Gunnar; Svedberg, Pia

    2016-12-01

    Depression and anxiety are highly comorbid due to shared genetic risk factors, but less is known about whether burnout shares these risk factors. We aimed to examine whether the covariation between major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and burnout is explained by common genetic and/or environmental factors. This cross-sectional study included 25,378 Swedish twins responding to a survey in 2005-2006. Structural equation models were used to analyze whether the trait variances and covariances were due to additive genetics, non-additive genetics, shared environment, and unique environment. Univariate analyses tested sex limitation models and multivariate analysis tested Cholesky, independent pathway, and common pathway models. The phenotypic correlations were 0.71 (0.69-0.74) between MDD and GAD, 0.58 (0.56-0.60) between MDD and burnout, and 0.53 (0.50-0.56) between GAD and burnout. Heritabilities were 45% for MDD, 49% for GAD, and 38% for burnout; no statistically significant sex differences were found. A common pathway model was chosen as the final model. The common factor was influenced by genetics (58%) and unique environment (42%), and explained 77% of the variation in MDD, 69% in GAD, and 44% in burnout. GAD and burnout had additive genetic factors unique to the phenotypes (11% each), while MDD did not. Unique environment explained 23% of the variability in MDD, 20% in GAD, and 45% in burnout. In conclusion, the covariation was explained by an underlying common factor, largely influenced by genetics. Burnout was to a large degree influenced by unique environmental factors not shared with MDD and GAD.

  4. The clinical, neuroanatomical, and neuropathologic phenotype ofTBK1-associated frontotemporal dementia: A longitudinal case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriath, Carolin A M; Bocchetta, Martina; Brotherhood, Emilie; Woollacott, Ione O C; Norsworthy, Penny; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Dick, Katrina M; Gordon, Elizabeth; Harding, Sophie R; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian; Warren, Jason D; Revesz, Tamas; Lashley, Tammaryn; Mead, Simon; Rohrer, Jonathan D

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the TANK-binding kinase 1 ( TBK1 ) gene have recently been shown to cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, the phenotype of TBK1 -associated FTD is currently unclear. We performed a single case longitudinal study of a patient who was subsequently found to have a novel A705fs mutation in the TBK1 gene. He was assessed annually over a 7-year period with a series of clinical, cognitive, and magnetic resonance imaging assessments. His brain underwent pathological examination at postmortem. The patient presented at the age of 64 years with an 18-month history of personality change including increased rigidity and obsessiveness, apathy, loss of empathy, and development of a sweet tooth. His mother had developed progressive behavioral and cognitive impairment from the age of 57 years. Neuropsychometry revealed intact cognition at first assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging showed focal right temporal lobe atrophy. Over the next few years his behavioral problems progressed and he developed cognitive impairment, initially with anomia and prosopagnosia. Neurological examination remained normal throughout without any features of motor neurone disease. He died at the age of 72 years and postmortem showed TDP-43 type A pathology but with an unusual novel feature of numerous TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive neuritic structures at the cerebral cortex/subcortical white matter junction. There was also associated argyrophilic grain disease not previously reported in other TBK1 mutation cases. TBK1 -associated FTD can be associated with right temporal variant FTD with progressive behavioral change and relatively intact cognition initially. The case further highlights the benefits of next-generation sequencing technologies in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders and the importance of detailed neuropathologic analysis.

  5. Neuropathological correlates of falling in the CC75C population-based sample of the older old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kathryn; Hunter, Sally; Dening, Tom; Xuereb, John H; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol; Fleming, Jane

    2012-07-01

    Previous imaging studies have suggested links between brain pathologies and factors that are associated with falls such as gait, balance and daily function. Possible neuropathological correlates of older people's falls have been suggested based on brain imaging studies, but to date none have been examined in brain tissue. Falls data collected from repeated surveys of a population-based cohort of individuals aged at least 75 years old at baseline were related to neuropathological data collected from post-mortem examination of the study's associated brain donor collection (n=212). Amongst people without dementia, most cerebrovascular neuropathological features examined, particularly white matter pallor, microinfarcts and microscopic atherosclerosis, were increasingly common across the subgroups categorised by no reports of falling, only one or at least two reports of falling. The overall burden of pathology was greater in those with dementia, but only microinfarcts showed a similar increase with respect to reported falling status. Subclinical pathologies sharing a common vascular origin are associated with increased falling amongst people with no dementia, as are microinfarcts in those with dementia. Although further research is needed to address the mechanisms of falls and their neuropathological correlates, the findings from the current study would suggest that if cerebrovascular disease prevention reduces vascular neuropathology changes this may have direct benefits in reducing falls amongst older people with or without dementia.

  6. Brain Mechanisms Underlying Reactive Aggression in Borderline Personality Disorder-Sex Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpertz, Sabine C; Nagy, Krisztina; Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Schmitt, Ruth; Mancke, Falk; Schmahl, Christian; Bertsch, Katja

    2017-08-15

    Aggression in borderline personality disorder (BPD) is thought to be mediated through emotion dysregulation via high trait anger. Until now, data comparing anger and aggression in female and male patients with BPD have been widely missing on the behavioral and particularly the brain levels. Thirty-three female and 23 male patients with BPD and 30 healthy women and 26 healthy men participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging study. We used a script-driven imagery task consisting of narratives of both interpersonal rejection and directing physical aggression toward others. While imagining both interpersonal rejection and acting out aggressively, a sex × group interaction was found in which male BPD patients revealed higher activity in the left amygdala than female patients. In the aggression phase, men with BPD exhibited higher activity in the lateral orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices compared with healthy men and female patients. Positive connectivity between amygdala and posterior middle cingulate cortex was found in female patients but negative connectivity was found in male patients with BPD. Negative modulatory effects of trait anger on amygdala-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and amygdala-lateral orbitofrontal cortex coupling were shown in male BPD patients, while in female patients trait anger positively modulated dorsolateral prefrontal cortex-amygdala coupling. Trait aggression was found to positively modulate connectivity of the left amygdala to the posterior thalamus in male but not female patients. Data suggest poor top-down adjustment of behavior in male patients with BPD despite their efforts at control. Female patients appear to be less aroused through rejection and to successfully dampen aggressive tension during the imagination of aggressive behavior. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An update on CRF mechanisms underlying alcohol use disorders and dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Marian Hartmann Quadros

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused substance worldwide. The emergence of alcohol use disorders, and alcohol dependence in particular, is accompanied by functional changes in brain reward and stress systems, which contribute to escalated alcohol drinking and seeking. Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF systems have been critically implied in the transition towards problematic alcohol drinking and alcohol dependence. This review will discuss how dysregulation of CRF function contributes to the vulnerability for escalated alcohol drinking and other consequences of alcohol consumption, based on preclinical evidence. CRF signaling, mostly via CRF1 receptors, seems to be particularly important in conditions of excessive alcohol taking and seeking, including during early and protracted withdrawal, relapse, as well as during withdrawal-induced anxiety and escalated aggression promoted by alcohol. Modulation of CRF1 function seems to exert a less prominent role over low to moderate alcohol intake, or to species-typical behaviors. While CRF mechanisms in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis have some contribution to the neurobiology of alcohol abuse and dependence, a pivotal role for extra-hypothalamic CRF pathways, particularly in the extended amygdala, is well characterized. More recent studies further suggest a direct modulation of brain reward function by CRF signaling in the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex, among other structures. This review will further discuss a putative role for other components of the CRF system that contribute for the overall balance of CRF function in reward and stress pathways, including CRF2 receptors, CRF binding protein and Urocortins, a family of CRF-related peptides.

  8. Massively parallel sequencing and targeted exomes in familial kidney disease can diagnose underlying genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Andrew J; McCarthy, Hugh J; Ho, Gladys; Holman, Katherine; Farnsworth, Elizabeth; Patel, Chirag; Fletcher, Jeffery T; Mallawaarachchi, Amali; Quinlan, Catherine; Bennetts, Bruce; Alexander, Stephen I

    2017-12-01

    Inherited kidney disease encompasses a broad range of disorders, with both multiple genes contributing to specific phenotypes and single gene defects having multiple clinical presentations. Advances in sequencing capacity may allow a genetic diagnosis for familial renal disease, by testing the increasing number of known causative genes. However, there has been limited translation of research findings of causative genes into clinical settings. Here, we report the results of a national accredited diagnostic genetic service for familial renal disease. An expert multidisciplinary team developed a targeted exomic sequencing approach with ten curated multigene panels (207 genes) and variant assessment individualized to the patient's phenotype. A genetic diagnosis (pathogenic genetic variant[s]) was identified in 58 of 135 families referred in two years. The genetic diagnosis rate was similar between families with a pediatric versus adult proband (46% vs 40%), although significant differences were found in certain panels such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (88% vs 17%). High diagnostic rates were found for Alport syndrome (22 of 27) and tubular disorders (8 of 10), whereas the monogenic diagnostic rate for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract was one of 13. Quality reporting was aided by a strong clinical renal and genetic multidisciplinary committee review. Importantly, for a diagnostic service, few variants of uncertain significance were found with this targeted, phenotype-based approach. Thus, use of targeted massively parallel sequencing approaches in inherited kidney disease has a significant capacity to diagnose the underlying genetic disorder across most renal phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural and chemical disorder in semiconductors under pressure: Evidence in II-VI’s, role of photoactive defects, material predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Bernard A.; Lindberg, George P.; Gross, Nelson

    2017-05-01

    Hydrostatic pressure can sometimes generate structural and chemical disorder within crystals. We review pressure-Raman experiments on ZnSe, ZnTe, and CdSe showing evidence for these phenomena. In ZnSe and ZnTe Raman spectra recorded with low laser flux show only pre-transition structural disorder on approaching the lowest pressure transition, as is typical for first-order phase changes. Spectra recorded with higher laser flux (sub-band-gap) observe precipitation of anion nanocrystals. This behavior is absent in CdSe. A model is developed that considers the role of crystal defects. The defects promote plastic deformation assisted by photoexcitation of Jahn-Teller distortions. Nanocrystals can precipitate on dislocations in deformed regions under energetically favorable conditions. Model calculations based on theories for precipitation in metals account for the influence of pressure on the nanocrystal formation in ZnSe and ZnTe, and explain its absence in CdSe. Material maps are constructed to predict the tendencies for similar precipitation in III-V, II-VI, I-VII, and chalcopyrite crystals.

  10. Hypersexuality as a Neuropsychiatric Disorder: The neurobiology and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidi, Hatta; Asiff, Muna; Kumar, Jaya; Das, Srijit; Hatta, Nurul Hazwani; Alfonso, Cesar

    2017-03-21

    Hypersexuality refers to abnormally increased or extreme involvement in any sexual activity. It is clinically challenging, presents trans-diagnostically and there is extensive medical literature addressing nosology, pathogenesis and neuropsychiatric aspects. Classification includes deviant behaviours, diagnosable entities related to impulsivity, and obsessional phenomena. Some clinicians view an increase in sexual desire as 'normal' while psychodynamic theorists consider it ego-defensive at times alleviating unconscious anxiety rooted in intrapsychic conflicts. We highlight the hypersexuality as multi-dimensional involving an increase in sexual activity that is associated with distress and functional impairment. The aetiology of hypersexuality is multi-factorial with differential diagnoses that include major psychiatric disorders (e.g. bipolar disorder), adverse effects of treatments (e.g. levodopa-treatment), substance-induced disorders (e.g. amphetamine substance use), neuropathological disorders (e.g. frontal lobe syndrome), among others. Numerous neurotransmitters are implicated in its pathogenesis, with dopamine and noradrenaline playing a crucial role in the neural reward pathways and emotionally-regulated limbic system neural circuits. The management of hypersexuality is determined by the principle of de causa effectu evanescent, if the causes are treated, the effect may disappear. We aim to review the role of pharmacological agents causing hypersexuality and centrally acting agents treating the associated underlying medical conditions. Bio-psycho-social determinants are pivotal in embracing the understanding and guiding management of this complex and multi-determined clinical syndrome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is an amplifier of virus-induced neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Sarma, Jayasri

    2014-04-01

    Microglia, the major resident immune cells in the central nervous system (CNS) are considered as the key cellular mediators of neuroinflammatory processes. In the past few years, microglial research has become a main focus in cellular neuroimmunology and neuroinflammation. Chronic/remitting neurological disease such as multiple sclerosis (MS) has long been considered an inflammatory autoimmune disease with the infiltration of peripheral myelin-specific T cells into the CNS. With the rapid advancement in the field of microglia and astrocytic neurobiology, the term neuroinflammation progressively started to denote chronic CNS cell-specific inflammation in MS. The direct glial responses in MS are different from conventional peripheral immune responses. This review attempts to summarize current findings of neuroinflammatory responses within the CNS by direct infection of neural cells by mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) and the mechanisms by which glial cell responses ultimately contribute to the neuropathology on demyelination. Microglia can be persistently infected by MHV. Microglial activation and phagocytosis are recognized to be critically important in the pathogenesis of demyelination. Emerging evidence for the pathogenic role of microglia and the activation of inflammatory pathways in these cells in MHV infection supports the concept that microglia induced neuroinflammation is an amplifier of virus-induced neuropathology.

  12. Cognitive Impairment, Neuroimaging, and Alzheimer Neuropathology in Mouse Models of Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Eric D.; Boger, Heather A.; Ledreux, Aurélie; Kelley, Christy M.; Mufson, Elliott J.; Falangola, Maria F.; Guilfoyle, David N.; Nixon, Ralph A.; Patterson, David; Duval, Nathan; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte E.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common non-lethal genetic condition that affects approximately 1 in 700 births in the United States of America. DS is characterized by complete or segmental chromosome 21 trisomy, which leads to variable intellectual disabilities, progressive memory loss, and accelerated neurodegeneration with age. During the last three decades, people with DS have experienced a doubling of life expectancy due to progress in treatment of medical comorbidities, which has allowed this population to reach the age when they develop early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Individuals with DS develop cognitive and pathological hallmarks of AD in their fourth or fifth decade, and are currently lacking successful prevention or treatment options for dementia. The profound memory deficits associated with DS-related AD (DS-AD) have been associated with degeneration of several neuronal populations, but mechanisms of neurodegeneration are largely unexplored. The most successful animal model for DS is the Ts65Dn mouse, but several new models have also been developed. In the current review, we discuss recent findings and potential treatment options for the management of memory loss and AD neuropathology in DS mouse models. We also review age-related neuropathology, and recent findings from neuroimaging studies. The validation of appropriate DS mouse models that mimic neurodegeneration and memory loss in humans with DS can be valuable in the study of novel preventative and treatment interventions, and may be helpful in pinpointing gene-gene interactions as well as specific gene segments involved in neurodegeneration. PMID:26391050

  13. Glucose levels during life and neuropathologic findings at autopsy among people never treated for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Paul K; Walker, Rod L; Sonnen, Joshua; Gibbons, Laura E; Melrose, Rebecca; Hassenstab, Jason; Keene, C Dirk; Postupna, Nadia; Montine, Thomas J; Larson, Eric B

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated associations between glucose and dementia-related neuropathologic findings among people without diabetes treatment history to elucidate mechanisms of glucose's potential effect on dementia. We used glucose and hemoglobin A1c values to characterize glucose exposures over 5 years before death (primary) and age bands from 55-59 through 80-84 (secondary). Autopsy evaluations included Braak stage for neurofibrillary tangles, Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease grade for neuritic plaques, macroscopic infarcts including lacunar infarcts, Lewy bodies, cerebral microinfarcts, and hippocampal sclerosis. Of 529 who came to autopsy, we included 430 with no history of diabetes treatment. We found no associations between glucose levels and Braak stage or Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease grade. There was a suggestion of a relationship between glucose and hippocampal sclerosis, although this was inconsistent across analyses. There was higher risk of Lewy bodies in substantia nigra and locus ceruleus with higher glucose levels in age band analyses. We did not find interactions between glucose levels, neuropathologic findings, and dementia. The mechanism by which glucose may impact dementia risk is still unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reducing GBA2 Activity Ameliorates Neuropathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André R A Marques

    Full Text Available The enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA hydrolyses glucosylceramide (GlcCer in lysosomes. Markedly reduced GBA activity is associated with severe manifestations of Gaucher disease including neurological involvement. Mutations in the GBA gene have recently also been identified as major genetic risk factor for Parkinsonism. Disturbed metabolism of GlcCer may therefore play a role in neuropathology. Besides lysosomal GBA, cells also contain a non-lysosomal glucosylceramidase (GBA2. Given that the two β-glucosidases share substrates, we speculated that over-activity of GBA2 during severe GBA impairment might influence neuropathology. This hypothesis was studied in Niemann-Pick type C (Npc1-/- mice showing secondary deficiency in GBA in various tissues. Here we report that GBA2 activity is indeed increased in the brain of Npc1-/- mice. We found that GBA2 is particularly abundant in Purkinje cells (PCs, one of the most affected neuronal populations in NPC disease. Inhibiting GBA2 in Npc1-/- mice with a brain-permeable low nanomolar inhibitor significantly improved motor coordination and extended lifespan in the absence of correction in cholesterol and ganglioside abnormalities. This trend was recapitulated, although not to full extent, by introducing a genetic loss of GBA2 in Npc1-/- mice. Our findings point to GBA2 activity as therapeutic target in NPC.

  15. Convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain: therapeutic potential and neuropathological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Neil U; Gill, Steven S; Love, Seth

    2014-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) describes a direct method of drug delivery to the brain through intraparenchymal microcatheters. By establishing a pressure gradient at the tip of the infusion catheter in order to exploit bulk flow through the interstitial spaces of the brain, CED offers a number of advantages over conventional drug delivery methods-bypass of the blood-brain barrier, targeted distribution through large brain volumes and minimization of systemic side effects. Despite showing early promise, CED is yet to fulfill its potential as a mainstream strategy for the treatment of neurological disease. Substantial research effort has been dedicated to optimize the technology for CED and identify the parameters, which govern successful drug distribution. It seems likely that successful clinical translation of CED will depend on suitable catheter technology being used in combination with drugs with optimal physicochemical characteristics, and on neuropathological analysis in appropriate preclinical models. In this review, we consider the factors most likely to influence the success or failure of CED, and review its application to the treatment of high-grade glioma, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). © 2013 International Society of Neuropathology.

  16. Correlation of Alzheimer Disease Neuropathologic Changes With Cognitive Status: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bouras, Constantin; Braak, Heiko; Cairns, Nigel J.; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Crain, Barbara J.; Davies, Peter; Del Tredici, Kelly; Duyckaerts, Charles; Frosch, Matthew P.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hof, Patrick R.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jellinger, Kurt A.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Kövari, Enikö; Kukull, Walter A.; Leverenz, James B.; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Mann, David M.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Schneider, Julie A.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Thal, Dietmar R.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woltjer, Randall L.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Clinicopathologic correlation studies are critically important for the field of Alzheimer disease (AD) research. Studies on human subjects with autopsy confirmation entail numerous potential biases that affect both their general applicability and the validity of the correlations. Many sources of data variability can weaken the apparent correlation between cognitive status and AD neuropathologic changes. Indeed, most persons in advanced old age have significant non-AD brain lesions that may alter cognition independently of AD. Worldwide research efforts have evaluated thousands of human subjects to assess the causes of cognitive impairment in the elderly, and these studies have been interpreted in different ways. We review the literature focusing on the correlation of AD neuropathologic changes (i.e. β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles) with cognitive impairment. We discuss the various patterns of brain changes that have been observed in elderly individuals to provide a perspective for understanding AD clinicopathologic correlation and conclude that evidence from many independent research centers strongly supports the existence of a specific disease, as defined by the presence of Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Although Aβ plaques may play a key role in AD pathogenesis, the severity of cognitive impairment correlates best with the burden of neocortical neurofibrillary tangles. PMID:22487856

  17. Neuropathology of the recessive A673V APP mutation: Alzheimer disease with distinctive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, Giorgio; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Botta, Mario; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Uggetti, Andrea; Catania, Marcella; Moro, Maria Luisa; Redaelli, Veronica; Spagnoli, Alberto; Rossi, Roberta Simona; Salmona, Mario; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2010-12-01

    Mutations of three different genes, encoding β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, the APP mutation A673V has been identified that stands out from all the genetic defects previously reported in these three genes, since it causes the disease only in the homozygous state (Di Fede et al. in Science 323:1473-1477, 2009). We here provide the detailed neuropathological picture of the proband of this family, who was homozygous for the APP A673V mutation and recently came to death. The brain has been studied by histological and immunohistochemical techniques, at the optical and ultrastructural levels. Cerebral Aβ accumulation and tau pathology were severe and extensive. Peculiar features were the configuration of the Aβ deposits that were of large size, mostly perivascular and exhibited a close correspondence between the pattern elicited by amyloid stainings and the labeling obtained with immunoreagents specific for Aβ40 or Aβ42. Moreover, Aβ deposition spared the neostriatum while deeply affecting the cerebellum, and therefore was not in compliance with the hierarchical topographical sequence of involvement documented in sporadic AD. Therefore, the neuropathological picture of familial AD caused by the APP recessive mutation A673V presents distinctive characteristics compared to sporadic AD or familial AD inherited as a dominant trait. Main peculiar features are the morphology, structural properties and composition of the Aβ deposits as well as their topographic distribution in the brain.

  18. Dual-task performance under acute stress in female adolescents with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, Michael; Parzer, Peter; Koenig, Julian; Resch, Franz; Brunner, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Research to elucidate early alterations of higher cognitive processes in adolescents with BPD is rare. This study investigated differences in dual-task performance in adolescents with BPD during stress and non-stress conditions. The study sample comprised 30 female adolescents with BPD and 34 healthy controls. The impact of stress on dual-task performance was measured using a standardized stressor. Self-reports of distress and measures of heart rate (HR) were obtained to measure stress reactivity. There were no group differences in task performance. Under stress conditions, the performance on the auditory task decreased in both groups but without significant group differences. Healthy controls showed an increase of mean HR after stress induction compared to no change in the BPD group. The finding of attenuated HR response to acute stress in adolescent patients with BPD may contradict current theories that the affective hyperresponsivity in BPD is based on a biologically determined mechanism.

  19. Maladaptive daydreaming: Evidence for an under-researched mental health disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelsen, Jayne; Lehrfeld, Jonathan M; Jopp, Daniela S; Somer, Eli

    2016-05-01

    This study explores the recently described phenomenon of Maladaptive Daydreaming (MD) and attempts to enhance the understanding of its features. It documents the experiences of 340 self-identified maladaptive daydreamers who spend excessive amounts of time engaged in mental fantasy worlds, in comparison to 107 controls. Our sample included a total of 447 individuals, aged 13-78, from 45 countries who responded to online announcements. Participants answered quantitative and qualitative questions about their daydreaming habits and completed seven questionnaires assessing mental health symptoms. Findings demonstrated that MD differs significantly from normative daydreaming in terms of quantity, content, experience, controllability, distress, and interference with life functioning. Results also demonstrated that Maladaptive Daydreamers endorsed significantly higher rates of attention deficit, obsessive compulsive and dissociation symptoms than controls. In sum, findings suggested that MD represents an under-acknowledged clinical phenomenon that causes distress, hinders life functioning and requires more scientific and clinical attention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanisms underlying REBT in mood disordered patients: predicting depression from the hybrid model of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Chris J; Izadikah, Zahra; Oei, Tian P S

    2012-06-01

    Jackson's (2005, 2008a) hybrid model of learning identifies a number of learning mechanisms that lead to the emergence and maintenance of the balance between rationality and irrationality. We test a general hypothesis that Jackson's model will predict depressive symptoms, such that poor learning is related to depression. We draw comparisons between Jackson's model and Ellis' (2004) Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and Theory (REBT) and thereby provide a set of testable learning mechanisms potentially underlying REBT. Results from 80 patients diagnosed with depression completed the learning styles profiler (LSP; Jackson, 2005) and two measures of depression. Results provide support for the proposed model of learning and further evidence that low rationality is a key predictor of depression. We conclude that the hybrid model of learning has the potential to explain some of the learning and cognitive processes related to the development and maintenance of irrational beliefs and depression. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Engmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet.

  2. National Institute on Aging–Alzheimer’s Association guidelines for the neuropathologic assessment of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Bradley T.; Phelps, Creighton H.; Beach, Thomas G.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duyckaerts, Charles; Frosch, Matthew P.; Masliah, Eliezer; Mirra, Suzanne S.; Nelson, Peter T.; Schneider, Julie A.; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Thies, Bill; Trojanowski, John Q.; Vinters, Harry V.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The current consensus criteria for the neuropathologic diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), known as the National Institute on Aging/Reagan Institute of the Alzheimer Association Consensus Recommendations for the Postmortem Diagnosis of AD or NIA-Reagan Criteria [1], were published in 1997 (hereafter referred to as “1997 Criteria”). Knowledge of AD and the tools used for clinical investigation of cognitive impairment and dementia have advanced substantially since then and have prompted this update on the neuropathologic assessment of AD. PMID:22265587

  3. Office stent placement under local anesthesia is a safe and efficient procedure for the management of multiple ureteral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, A; D'Anna, M; Costa-Grau, M; Luque, P; García-Cruz, E; Franco, A; Alcaraz, A

    2018-03-01

    To assess the outcomes of ureteral stent placement under local anesthesia for the management of multiple ureteral disorders. Retrospective study of 45 consecutive ureteral stents placed under local anesthesia from January 2015 to July 2016. Inclusion criteria were hemodynamically stable patients with urinary obstruction, urinary fistula or for prophylactic ureteral localization during surgery. Five minutes before the procedure, 10ml of lidocaine gel and 50ml of lidocaine solution were instilled in the bladder. A 4.8Fr ureteral stent was placed using a 15.5Fr flexible cystoscope under fluoroscopic control. Characteristics of procedures and outcomes were analysed. A total of 45 procedures (33 placement, 12 replacements) were attempted in 37 patients, of which 40 (89%) were successful. There were 10 male (27%) and 27 female patients (73%) with a mean age of 58.6 years (±17.5). Main indications for stent placement were stones (37.8%), extrinsic ureteral compression (28.9%) and surgery ureteral localization (22.2%). The reasons for failing to complete a procedure were the inability to pass the guidewire/stent in 4 cases (8.8%) or to identify the ureteral orifice in 1 (2.2%). Postoperative complications occurred in 8 patients (17.8%) (7 Clavien I, 1 Clavien IIIa). No procedure was prematurely terminated due to pain. Statistical analysis did not find significant successful predictors. The outpatient setting provided a fourfold cost decrease. Ureteral stent placement can be safely and effectively performed under local anesthesia in the office cystoscopy room. This procedure could free operating room time, reduce costs and minimize side effects of general anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient with rapidly evolving neurological disease with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Lewy body dementia, chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Maria Gabriella; Tiple, Dorina; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Ladogana, Anna; Colaizzo, Elisa; Capellari, Sabina; Rossi, Marcello; Parchi, Piero; Masullo, Carlo; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of rapidly evolving neurological disease in a patient with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma. The coexistence of severe multiple pathologies in a single patient strengthens the need to perform accurate clinical differential diagnoses in rapidly progressive dementias. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Quantitative MR Imaging and Spectroscopy in Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection and Periventricular Leukomalacia Suggests a Comparable Neuropathological Substrate of the Cerebral White Matter Lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voorn, J.P.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Vermeulen, R.J.; Barkhof, F.; van der Knaap, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) both lead to static cerebral white matter lesions. In contrast to PVL, the neuropathologicAL substrate of these lesions in congenital CMV is not clear. By comparing changes in quantitative magnetic resonance (MR)

  6. Under-reactive but easily distracted: An fMRI investigation of attentional capture in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Keehn

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, salient behaviorally-relevant information often fails to capture attention, while subtle behaviorally-irrelevant details commonly induce a state of distraction. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate the neurocognitive networks underlying attentional capture in sixteen high-functioning children and adolescents with ASD and twenty-one typically developing (TD individuals. Participants completed a rapid serial visual presentation paradigm designed to investigate activation of attentional networks to behaviorally-relevant targets and contingent attention capture by task-irrelevant distractors. In individuals with ASD, target stimuli failed to trigger bottom-up activation of the ventral attentional network and the cerebellum. Additionally, the ASD group showed no differences in behavior or occipital activation associated with contingent attentional capture. Rather, results suggest that to-be-ignored distractors that shared either task-relevant or irrelevant features captured attention in ASD. Results indicate that individuals with ASD may be under-reactive to behaviorally-relevant stimuli, unable to filter irrelevant information, and that both top-down and bottom-up attention networks function atypically in ASD. Lastly, deficits in target-related processing were associated with autism symptomatology, providing further support for the hypothesis that non-social attentional processes and their neurofunctional underpinnings may play a significant role in the development of sociocommunicative impairments in ASD.

  7. Evaluation and management of acute menorrhagia in women with and without underlying bleeding disorders: consensus from an international expert panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Andra H.; Kouides, Peter A.; Abdul-Kadir, Rezan; Dietrich, Jennifer E.; Edlund, Mans; Federici, Augusto B.; Halimeh, Susan; Kamphuisen, Pieter Willem; Lee, Christine A.; Martínez-Perez, Oscar; McLintock, Claire; Peyvandi, Flora; Philipp, Claire; Wilkinson, Jeffrey; Winikoff, Rochelle

    2011-01-01

    Acute menorrhagia is a common gynecological disorder. Prevalence is high among women with inherited bleeding disorders and recent guidance for optimal management is lacking. Following a comprehensive review of the literature, an international expert panel in obstetrics, gynecology and hematology

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 Activity as a Correlate to Exercise-Mediated Amelioration of Cognitive Decline and Neuropathological Alterations in an Aging Rat Model of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kurucz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder with cognitive impairment. Physical exercise has long been proven to be beneficial in the disorder. The present study was designed to examine the effect of voluntary exercise on spatial memory, imaging, and pathological abnormalities. Particular focus has been given to the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1—an important cellular cytoprotectant in preserving mental acuity—using an aging rat model of dementia. Male and female Wistar rats were segregated into six groups—namely, (i aged sedentary (control females (ASF, n=8; (ii aged sedentary (control males (ASM, n=8; (iii aged running females (ARF, n=8; (iv aged running males (ARM, n=8; (v young control females (YCF, n=8; and (vi young control males (YCM, n=8. Rats in the ARF and ARM groups had free access to a standardized inbuilt running wheel during the 3-month evaluation period. Spatial memory was investigated using the Morris Water Test, imaging and pathological alterations were assessed using positron emission tomography (PET imaging and histopathological examinations (H&E, Congo red staining, respectively, and HO-1 enzyme activity assays were also conducted. The outcomes suggest that voluntary physical exercise mitigates impaired spatial memory and neuropathological changes exhibited by the aging sedentary group, via elevated HO-1 activity, contributing to the antioxidant capacity in the aging brain.

  9. Clinical and neuropathological features of ALS/FTD with TIA1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch-Reinshagen, Veronica; Pottier, Cyril; Nicholson, Alexandra M; Baker, Matt; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Krieger, Charles; Sengdy, Pheth; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis W; Mesulam, Marsel; Weintraub, Sandra; Bigio, Eileen; Zinman, Lorne; Keith, Julia; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zivkovic, Sasha A; Lacomis, David; Taylor, J Paul; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2017-12-07

    Mutations in the stress granule protein T-cell restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) were recently shown to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with or without frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we provide detailed clinical and neuropathological descriptions of nine cases with TIA1 mutations, together with comparisons to sporadic ALS (sALS) and ALS due to repeat expansions in C9orf72 (C9orf72+). All nine patients with confirmed mutations in TIA1 were female. The clinical phenotype was heterogeneous with a range in the age at onset from late twenties to the eighth decade (mean = 60 years) and disease duration from one to 6 years (mean = 3 years). Initial presentation was either focal weakness or language impairment. All affected individuals received a final diagnosis of ALS with or without FTD. No psychosis or parkinsonism was described. Neuropathological examination on five patients found typical features of ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP, type B) with anatomically widespread TDP-43 proteinopathy. In contrast to C9orf72+ cases, caudate atrophy and hippocampal sclerosis were not prominent. Detailed evaluation of the pyramidal motor system found a similar degree of neurodegeneration and TDP-43 pathology as in sALS and C9orf72+ cases; however, cases with TIA1 mutations had increased numbers of lower motor neurons containing round eosinophilic and Lewy body-like inclusions on HE stain and round compact cytoplasmic inclusions with TDP-43 immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence failed to demonstrate any labeling of inclusions with antibodies against TIA1. In summary, our TIA1 mutation carriers developed ALS with or without FTD, with a wide range in age at onset, but without other neurological or psychiatric features. The neuropathology was characterized by widespread TDP-43 pathology, but a more restricted pattern of neurodegeneration than C9orf72+ cases. Increased numbers of round eosinophilic and Lewy

  10. Resistance to Alzheimer Disease Neuropathologic Changes and Apparent Cognitive Resilience in the Nun and Honolulu-Asia Aging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Caitlin S; Keene, C Dirk; Flanagan, Margaret E; Hemmy, Laura S; Lim, Kelvin O; White, Lon R; Montine, Kathleen S; Montine, Thomas J

    2017-06-01

    Two population-based studies key to advancing knowledge of brain aging are the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study (HAAS) and the Nun Study. Harmonization of their neuropathologic data allows cross comparison, with findings common to both studies likely generalizable, while distinct observations may point to aging brain changes that are dependent on sex, ethnicity, environment, or lifestyle factors. Here, we expanded the neuropathologic evaluation of these 2 studies using revised NIA-Alzheimer's Association guidelines and compared directly the neuropathologic features of resistance and apparent cognitive resilience. There were significant differences in prevalence of Alzheimer disease neuropathologic change, small vessel vascular brain injury, and Lewy body disease between these 2 studies, suggesting that sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle factors may significantly influence resistance to developing brain injury with age. In contrast, hippocampal sclerosis prevalence was very similar, but skewed to poorer cognitive performance, suggesting that hippocampal sclerosis could act sequentially with other diseases to impair cognitive function. Strikingly, despite these observed differences, the proportion of individuals resistant to all 4 diseases of brain or displaying apparent cognitive resilience was virtually identical between HAAS and Nun Study participants. Future in vivo validation of these results awaits comprehensive biomarkers of these 4 brain diseases. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MRI in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Correlation with clinical and neuropathological data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Klisch, J.; Brechtelsbauer, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Wolf, H.K. [Department of Neuropathology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Gass, S. [Department of Neurology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    1998-02-01

    To ascertain whether increased grey matter signal intensity on T2-weighted images in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) corresponds to the stage and severity of this disease, we correlated MRI findings in four of our own and previously reported patients with sporadic CJD with the clinical variants, neuropathological changes at autopsy, duration of the disease and survival time after MRI examination. Of 15 patients with the extrapyramidal type of CJD, 10 showed increased signal in the basal ganglia on T2-weighted images. One of seven patients with the Heidenhain variant had increased signal in the occipital cortex. Patients without increased grey matter signal intensity had a longer overall duration of CJD (P = 0.035). Although the interval between onset of neurological symptoms and MRI was not different, patients without increased grey matter signal also survived longer after MRI examination (P = 0.022). (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 23 refs.

  12. MRI in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Correlation with clinical and neuropathological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L.; Klisch, J.; Brechtelsbauer, D.; Wolf, H.K.; Gass, S.

    1998-01-01

    To ascertain whether increased grey matter signal intensity on T2-weighted images in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) corresponds to the stage and severity of this disease, we correlated MRI findings in four of our own and previously reported patients with sporadic CJD with the clinical variants, neuropathological changes at autopsy, duration of the disease and survival time after MRI examination. Of 15 patients with the extrapyramidal type of CJD, 10 showed increased signal in the basal ganglia on T2-weighted images. One of seven patients with the Heidenhain variant had increased signal in the occipital cortex. Patients without increased grey matter signal intensity had a longer overall duration of CJD (P = 0.035). Although the interval between onset of neurological symptoms and MRI was not different, patients without increased grey matter signal also survived longer after MRI examination (P = 0.022). (orig.)

  13. Farnesyltransferase haplodeficiency reduces neuropathology and rescues cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaowu; Cao, Dongfeng; Hottman, David A; Yuan, LiLian; Bergo, Martin O; Li, Ling

    2013-12-13

    Isoprenoids and prenylated proteins have been implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD), including amyloid-β precursor protein metabolism, Tau phosphorylation, synaptic plasticity, and neuroinflammation. However, little is known about the relative importance of the two protein prenyltransferases, farnesyltransferase (FT) and geranylgeranyltransferase-1 (GGT), in the pathogenesis of AD. In this study, we defined the impact of deleting one copy of FT or GGT on the development of amyloid-β (Aβ)-associated neuropathology and learning/memory impairments in APPPS1 double transgenic mice, a well established model of AD. Heterozygous deletion of FT reduced Aβ deposition and neuroinflammation and rescued spatial learning and memory function in APPPS1 mice. Heterozygous deletion of GGT reduced the levels of Aβ and neuroinflammation but had no impact on learning and memory. These results document that farnesylation and geranylgeranylation play differential roles in AD pathogenesis and suggest that specific inhibition of protein farnesylation could be a potential strategy for effectively treating AD.

  14. Computed tomography in Krabbe's disease: Comparison with neuropathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieshima, A.; Eda, I.; Yoshino, K.; Takashima, S.; Takeshita, K.; Matsui, A.

    1983-10-01

    We report computed tomography (CT) appearance of two patients with Krabbe's disease. The most common findings included severe brain atrophy: en enlarged frontal extracerebral space, dilatation of ventricles, enlarged cisterns and enlarged cortical sulci. There was low attenuation in the corpus medullaris of the cerebellum, and symmetrical focal hypodensity in the central periventricular white matter. CT at the terminal stage (16 months) showed marked cerebral atrophy including flattening of the heads of caudate nuclei and widening of the third ventricles confirmed by a neuropathological study. There was relatively less low density on the white matter of Krabbe's disease compared with that of other leukodystrophies. These CT findings may be useful in the diagnosis. The relative lack of low density in the white matter of Krabbe's disease might be related to severe gliosis and reduced total lipid contents.

  15. Neuropathological survey reveals underestimation of the prevalence of neuroinfectious diseases in cattle in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchet, Laura; Walland, Julia; Wüthrich, Daniel; Boujon, Céline L; Posthaus, Horst; Bruggmann, Rémy; Schüpbach-Regula, Gertraud; Oevermann, Anna; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2017-09-01

    Neuroinfectious diseases in livestock represent a severe threat to animal health, but their prevalence is not well documented and the etiology of disease often remains unidentified. The aims of this study were to generate baseline data on the prevalence of neuroinfectious diseases in cattle in Switzerland by neuropathological survey, and to identify disease-associated pathogens. The survey was performed over a 1-year period using a representative number of brainstem samples (n=1816) from fallen cattle. In total, 4% (n=73) of the animals had significant lesions, the most frequent types of which were indicative of viral (n=27) and bacterial (n=31) etiologies. Follow-up diagnostics by immunohistochemistry, PCR protocols and next-generation sequencing identified infection with Listeria monocytogenes (n=6), ovine herpesvirus 2 (n=7), bovine astrovirus CH13 (n=2), bovine herpesvirus 6 (n=6), bovine retrovirus CH15 (n=2), posavirus 1 (n=2), and porcine astroviruses (n=2). A retrospective questionnaire-based investigation indicated that animals' owners observed clinical signs of neurological disease in about one-third of cases with lesions, which was estimated to correspond to approximately 85 cases per year in the adult fallen cattle population in Switzerland. This estimate stands in sharp contrast to the number of cases reported to the authorities and reveals a gap in disease surveillance. Systematic neuropathological examination and follow-up molecular testing of neurologically diseased cattle could significantly enhance the efficiency of disease detection for the purposes of estimating the prevalence of endemic diseases, identifying new or re-emerging pathogens, and providing "early warnings" of disease outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  17. Effect of Common Neuropathologies on Progression of Late Life Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A.; Leurgans, Sue; Schneider, Julie A.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Wilson, Robert S.; Bennett, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Brain pathologies of Alzheimer’s, cerebrovascular and Lewy body diseases are common in old age, but the relationship of these pathologies with progression from normal cognitive function to the various stages of cognitive impairment is unknown. In this study, we fit latent Markov models from longitudinal cognitive data to empirically derive three latent stages corresponding to no impairment, mild impairment, and moderate impairment; then, we examined the associations of common neuropathologies with the rates of transition among these stages. Cognitive and neuropathological data were available from 653 autopsied participants in two ongoing cohort studies of aging who were cognitively healthy at baseline (mean baseline age 79.1 years) and had longitudinal cognitive data. On average, participants in these analyses developed mild impairment 5 years after enrollment, progressed to moderate impairment after an additional 3.4 years, and stayed impaired for 2.8 years until death. AD and chronic macroscopic infarcts were associated with a higher risk of progression to mild impairment and subsequently to moderate impairment. By contrast, Lewy bodies were associated only with progression from mild to moderate impairment. The 5-year probability of progression to mild or moderate impairment was 20% for persons without any of these three pathologies, 38% for AD only, 51% for AD and macroscopic infarcts, and 56% for AD, infarcts and Lewy bodies. Thus, the presence of AD pathology alone nearly doubles the risk of developing cognitive impairment in late life, and the presence of multiple pathologies further increases this risk over multiple years prior to death. PMID:25976345

  18. Hemodynamic and neuropathological analysis in rats with aluminum trichloride-induced Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Ming; Fan, Chi-Chen; Chiue, Ming-Shiuan; Chou, Chi; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic normality is crucial to maintaining the integrity of cerebral vessels and, therefore, preserving the cognitive functions of Alzheimer's disease patients. This study investigates the implications of the hemodynamic changes and the neuropathological diversifications of AlCl3-induced AD. The experimental animals were 8- to 12-wk-old male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a (+)control group. Food intake, water intake, and weight changes were recorded daily for 22 wk. Synchronously, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the rats with AlCl3-induced AD were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hemorheological parameters were analyzed using a computerized auto-rotational rheometer. The brain tissue of the subjects was analyzed using immunohistological chemical (IHC) staining to determine the beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels. The results of hemodynamic analysis revealed that the whole blood viscosity (WBV), fibrinogen, plasma viscosity and RBC aggregation index (RAI) in (+)control were significantly higher than that of control group, while erythrocyte electrophoresis (EI) of whole blood in (+)control were significantly lower than that of control group. The results of acetylcholinesterase-RBC (AChE-RBC)in the (+)control group was significantly higher than that of the control group. The results also show that the reduction of rCBF in rats with AlCl3-induced AD was approximately 50% to 60% that of normal rats. IHC stain results show that significantly more Aβ plaques accumulated in the hippocampus and cortex of the (+)control than in the control group. The results accentuate the importance of hemorheology and reinforce the specific association between hemodynamic and neuropathological changes in rats with AlCl3-induced AD. Hemorheological parameters, such as WBV and fibrinogen, and AChE-RBC were ultimately proven to be useful biomarkers of the severity and progression of AD patients. In addition, the

  19. Dravet syndrome as epileptic encephalopathy: evidence from long-term course and neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, Claudia B.; Liu, Joan Y.W.; Liagkouras, Ioannis; Gibbons, Vaneesha S.; Labrum, Robyn W.; Ellis, Rachael; Woodward, Cathy; Davis, Mary B.; Smith, Shelagh J.; Cross, J. Helen; Appleton, Richard E.; Yendle, Simone C.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Bellows, Susannah T.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Martinian, Lillian; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Thom, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epilepsy syndrome of infantile onset, frequently caused by SCN1A mutations or deletions. Its prevalence, long-term evolution in adults and neuropathology are not well known. We identified a series of 22 adult patients, including three adult post-mortem cases with Dravet syndrome. For all patients, we reviewed the clinical history, seizure types and frequency, antiepileptic drugs, cognitive, social and functional outcome and results of investigations. A systematic neuropathology study was performed, with post-mortem material from three adult cases with Dravet syndrome, in comparison with controls and a range of relevant paediatric tissue. Twenty-two adults with Dravet syndrome, 10 female, were included, median age 39 years (range 20–66). SCN1A structural variation was found in 60% of the adult Dravet patients tested, including one post-mortem case with DNA extracted from brain tissue. Novel mutations were described for 11 adult patients; one patient had three SCN1A mutations. Features of Dravet syndrome in adulthood include multiple seizure types despite polytherapy, and age-dependent evolution in seizure semiology and electroencephalographic pattern. Fever sensitivity persisted through adulthood in 11 cases. Neurological decline occurred in adulthood with cognitive and motor deterioration. Dysphagia may develop in or after the fourth decade of life, leading to significant morbidity, or death. The correct diagnosis at an older age made an impact at several levels. Treatment changes improved seizure control even after years of drug resistance in all three cases with sufficient follow-up after drug changes were instituted; better control led to significant improvement in cognitive performance and quality of life in adulthood in two cases. There was no histopathological hallmark feature of Dravet syndrome in this series. Strikingly, there was remarkable preservation of neurons and interneurons in the neocortex and hippocampi of Dravet adult post

  20. MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER WITHOUT PSYCHOTIC SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN UNDER THE AGE OF 14 YEAR-OLD RAPE VICTIM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andika Metrisiawan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a very large impact on the global disease that affects people worldwide.Lately, an estimated 350 million people suffering from depression. The World MentalHealth Survey in 17 countries stated that 1 in 20 people who reported experiencing adepressive episode in the last 1 year. Depressive disorders often appear early in life andcauses a decrease in a person's interest and often recurrent. For this reason it is said thatdepression is the leading cause of disability in relation to total annual loss due to disability.Therapy should be given a basic psychosocial support combined with antidepressantmedication or psychotherapy such as cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy or problem-solving treatment. This case report discusses the severe depression without psychotic symptoms in children under the age of 14 year-old rapevictim. In addition to the victim made an approach to the development of psychological 1 therapy is also given in the form of Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy ie 1 x 20 mgfluoxetine oral and Benzodiazepine 1 x 10 mg orally. 

  1. The underlying dimensionality of PTSD in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie

    2015-01-01

    There has been a substantial body of literature devoted to answering one question: Which latent model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) best represents PTSD's underlying dimensionality? This research summary will, therefore, focus on the literature pertaining to PTSD's latent structure as represented in the fourth (DSM-IV, 1994) to the fifth (DSM-5, 2013) edition of the DSM. This article will begin by providing a clear rationale as to why this is a pertinent research area, then the body of literature pertaining to the DSM-IV and DSM-IV-TR will be summarised, and this will be followed by a summary of the literature pertaining to the recently published DSM-5. To conclude, there will be a discussion with recommendations for future research directions, namely that researchers must investigate the applicability of the new DSM-5 criteria and the newly created DSM-5 symptom sets to trauma survivors. In addition, researchers must continue to endeavour to identify the "correct" constellations of symptoms within symptom sets to ensure that diagnostic algorithms are appropriate and aid in the development of targeted treatment approaches and interventions. In particular, the newly proposed DSM-5 anhedonia model, externalising behaviours model, and hybrid models must be further investigated. It is also important that researchers follow up on the idea that a more parsimonious latent structure of PTSD may exist.

  2. The underlying dimensionality of PTSD in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie

    2015-01-01

    There has been a substantial body of literature devoted to answering one question: Which latent model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) best represents PTSD's underlying dimensionality? This research summary will, therefore, focus on the literature pertaining to PTSD's latent structure as represented in the fourth (DSM-IV, 1994) to the fifth (DSM-5, 2013) edition of the DSM. This article will begin by providing a clear rationale as to why this is a pertinent research area, then the body of literature pertaining to the DSM-IV and DSM-IV-TR will be summarised, and this will be followed by a summary of the literature pertaining to the recently published DSM-5. To conclude, there will be a discussion with recommendations for future research directions, namely that researchers must investigate the applicability of the new DSM-5 criteria and the newly created DSM-5 symptom sets to trauma survivors. In addition, researchers must continue to endeavour to identify the “correct” constellations of symptoms within symptom sets to ensure that diagnostic algorithms are appropriate and aid in the development of targeted treatment approaches and interventions. In particular, the newly proposed DSM-5 anhedonia model, externalising behaviours model, and hybrid models must be further investigated. It is also important that researchers follow up on the idea that a more parsimonious latent structure of PTSD may exist. PMID:25994027

  3. Concentrated Solutions of Single-Chain Nanoparticles: A Simple Model for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins under Crowding Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Angel J; Lo Verso, Federica; Arbe, Arantxa; Pomposo, José A; Colmenero, Juan

    2016-03-03

    By means of large-scale computer simulations and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we investigate solutions of single-chain nanoparticles (SCNPs), covering the whole concentration range from infinite dilution to melt density. The analysis of the conformational properties of the SCNPs reveals that these synthetic nano-objects share basic ingredients with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), as topological polydispersity, generally sparse conformations, and locally compact domains. We investigate the role of the architecture of the SCNPs in their collapse behavior under macromolecular crowding. Unlike in the case of linear macromolecules, which experience the usual transition from self-avoiding to Gaussian random-walk conformations, crowding leads to collapsed conformations of SCNPs resembling those of crumpled globules. This behavior is already found at volume fractions (about 30%) that are characteristic of crowding in cellular environments. The simulation results are confirmed by the SANS experiments. Our results for SCNPs--a model system free of specific interactions--propose a general scenario for the effect of steric crowding on IDPs: collapse from sparse conformations at high dilution to crumpled globular conformations in cell environments.

  4. Social cognition and underlying cognitive mechanisms in children with an extra X chromosome: a comparison with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, S; Stockmann, L; van Buggenhout, G; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C; Swaab, H

    2014-06-01

    Individuals with an extra X chromosome are at increased risk for autism symptoms. This study is the first to assess theory of mind and facial affect labeling in children with an extra X chromosome. Forty-six children with an extra X chromosome (29 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 17 girls with Trisomy X), 56 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 88 non-clinical controls, aged 9-18 years, were included. Similar to children with ASD, children with an extra X chromosome showed significant impairments in social cognition. Regression analyses showed that different cognitive functions predicted social cognitive skills in the extra X and ASD groups. The social cognitive deficits were similar for boys and girls with an extra X chromosome, and not specific for a subgroup with high Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised autism scores. Thus, children with an extra X chromosome show social cognitive deficits, which may contribute to social dysfunction, not only in children showing a developmental pattern that is 'typical' for autism but also in those showing mild or late presenting autism symptoms. Our findings may also help explain variance in type of social deficit: children may show similar social difficulties, but these may arise as a consequence of different underlying information processing deficits. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  5. Differential co-expression and regulation analyses reveal different mechanisms underlying major depressive disorder and subsyndromal symptomatic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Yang, Jing; Chen, Jin; Wu, Qingyuan; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Jianguo; Shao, Weihua; Mu, Jun; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yongtao; Li, Zhiwei; Xie, Peng

    2015-04-03

    Recent depression research has revealed a growing awareness of how to best classify depression into depressive subtypes. Appropriately subtyping depression can lead to identification of subtypes that are more responsive to current pharmacological treatment and aid in separating out depressed patients in which current antidepressants are not particularly effective. Differential co-expression analysis (DCEA) and differential regulation analysis (DRA) were applied to compare the transcriptomic profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with two depressive subtypes: major depressive disorder (MDD) and subsyndromal symptomatic depression (SSD). Six differentially regulated genes (DRGs) (FOSL1, SRF, JUN, TFAP4, SOX9, and HLF) and 16 transcription factor-to-target differentially co-expressed gene links or pairs (TF2target DCLs) appear to be the key differential factors in MDD; in contrast, one DRG (PATZ1) and eight TF2target DCLs appear to be the key differential factors in SSD. There was no overlap between the MDD target genes and SSD target genes. Venlafaxine (Efexor™, Effexor™) appears to have a significant effect on the gene expression profile of MDD patients but no significant effect on the gene expression profile of SSD patients. DCEA and DRA revealed no apparent similarities between the differential regulatory processes underlying MDD and SSD. This bioinformatic analysis may provide novel insights that can support future antidepressant R&D efforts.

  6. Neuroimaging Endophenotypes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Rajneesh; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that has a strong genetic basis, and is heterogeneous in its etiopathogenesis and clinical presentation. Neuroimaging studies, in concert with neuropathological and clinical research, have been instrumental in delineating trajectories of development in children with ASD. Structural neuroimaging has revealed ASD to be a disorder with general and regional brain enlargement, especially in the frontotemporal cortices, while functional neuroimaging studies have highlighted diminished connectivity, especially between frontal-posterior regions. The diverse and specific neuroimaging findings may represent potential neuroendophenotypes, and may offer opportunities to further understand the etiopathogenesis of ASD, predict treatment response and lead to the development of new therapies. PMID:26234701

  7. Protein secondary structure appears to be robust under in silico evolution while protein disorder appears not to be.

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Christian

    2010-01-16

    MOTIVATION: The mutation of amino acids often impacts protein function and structure. Mutations without negative effect sustain evolutionary pressure. We study a particular aspect of structural robustness with respect to mutations: regular protein secondary structure and natively unstructured (intrinsically disordered) regions. Is the formation of regular secondary structure an intrinsic feature of amino acid sequences, or is it a feature that is lost upon mutation and is maintained by evolution against the odds? Similarly, is disorder an intrinsic sequence feature or is it difficult to maintain? To tackle these questions, we in silico mutated native protein sequences into random sequence-like ensembles and monitored the change in predicted secondary structure and disorder. RESULTS: We established that by our coarse-grained measures for change, predictions and observations were similar, suggesting that our results were not biased by prediction mistakes. Changes in secondary structure and disorder predictions were linearly proportional to the change in sequence. Surprisingly, neither the content nor the length distribution for the predicted secondary structure changed substantially. Regions with long disorder behaved differently in that significantly fewer such regions were predicted after a few mutation steps. Our findings suggest that the formation of regular secondary structure is an intrinsic feature of random amino acid sequences, while the formation of long-disordered regions is not an intrinsic feature of proteins with disordered regions. Put differently, helices and strands appear to be maintained easily by evolution, whereas maintaining disordered regions appears difficult. Neutral mutations with respect to disorder are therefore very unlikely.

  8. Recurrence risk and prediction of a delivery under 34 weeks of gestation after a history of a severe hypertensive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenveld, J.; Buttinger, A.; van der Post, J.; Wolf, H.; Mol, B. W.; Ganzevoort, W.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Langenveld J, Buttinger A, van der Post J, Wolf H, Mol B, Ganzevoort W. Recurrence risk and prediction of a delivery under 34 weeks of gestation after a history of a severe hypertensive disorder. BJOG 2011;118:589-595. Objective  The aim of this study was to report

  9. Gene networks underlying convergent and pleiotropic phenotypes in a large and systematically-phenotyped cohort with heterogeneous developmental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tallulah Andrews

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Readily-accessible and standardised capture of genotypic variation has revolutionised our understanding of the genetic contribution to disease. Unfortunately, the corresponding systematic capture of patient phenotypic variation needed to fully interpret the impact of genetic variation has lagged far behind. Exploiting deep and systematic phenotyping of a cohort of 197 patients presenting with heterogeneous developmental disorders and whose genomes harbour de novo CNVs, we systematically applied a range of commonly-used functional genomics approaches to identify the underlying molecular perturbations and their phenotypic impact. Grouping patients into 408 non-exclusive patient-phenotype groups, we identified a functional association amongst the genes disrupted in 209 (51% groups. We find evidence for a significant number of molecular interactions amongst the association-contributing genes, including a single highly-interconnected network disrupted in 20% of patients with intellectual disability, and show using microcephaly how these molecular networks can be used as baits to identify additional members whose genes are variant in other patients with the same phenotype. Exploiting the systematic phenotyping of this cohort, we observe phenotypic concordance amongst patients whose variant genes contribute to the same functional association but note that (i this relationship shows significant variation across the different approaches used to infer a commonly perturbed molecular pathway, and (ii that the phenotypic similarities detected amongst patients who share the same inferred pathway perturbation result from these patients sharing many distinct phenotypes, rather than sharing a more specific phenotype, inferring that these pathways are best characterized by their pleiotropic effects.

  10. Food specific inhibitory control under negative mood in binge-eating disorder: Evidence from a multimethod approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leehr, Elisabeth J; Schag, Kathrin; Dresler, Thomas; Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz; Hautzinger, Martin; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Zipfel, Stephan; Giel, Katrin E; Ehlis, Ann-Christine

    2018-02-01

    Inhibitory control has been discussed as a developmental and maintenance factor in binge-eating disorder (BED). The current study is the first aimed at investigating inhibitory control in a negative mood condition on a psychophysiological and behavioral level in BED with a combination of electroencephalography (EEG) and eye tracking (ET). We conducted a combined EEG and ET study with overweight individuals with BED (BED+, n = 24, mean age = 31, mean BMI = 35 kg/m 2 ) and without BED (BED-, n = 23, mean age = 28, mean BMI = 35 kg/m 2 ) and a normal-weight (NWC, n = 26, mean age 28, mean BMI = 22 kg/m 2 ) control group. We assessed self-report data regarding impulsivity and emotion regulation as well as the processing of food stimuli under negative mood in an antisaccade task. Main outcome variables comprise event-related potentials (ERP) regarding conflict processing (N2) and performance monitoring (error-related negativity [ERN/Ne]) assessed by EEG and inhibitory control (errors in the first and second saccade) assessed by ET. BED+ patients reported increased impulsivity and higher emotion regulation difficulties compared with the other groups. The eye tracking data revealed impaired inhibitory control in BED+ compared with both control groups. Further, we found preliminary evidence from EEG recordings that conflict processing might be less thorough in the BED+ sample as well as in the NWC sample. In the BED+ sample this might be connected to the inhibitory control deficits on behavioral level. While the BED- sample showed increased conflict processing latencies (N2 latencies), which might indicate a compensation mechanism, the BED+ sample did not show such a mechanism. Performance monitoring (ERN/Ne latencies and amplitudes) was not impaired in the BED+ sample compared with both control samples. Participants with BED reported higher impulsivity and lower emotion regulation capacities. The combined investigation of electrocortical processes and

  11. Hemodynamic and neuropathological analysis in rats with aluminum trichloride-induced Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ming Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hemodynamic normality is crucial to maintaining the integrity of cerebral vessels and, therefore, preserving the cognitive functions of Alzheimer's disease patients. This study investigates the implications of the hemodynamic changes and the neuropathological diversifications of AlCl3-induced AD. METHODS: The experimental animals were 8- to 12-wk-old male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a (+control group. Food intake, water intake, and weight changes were recorded daily for 22 wk. Synchronously, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF of the rats with AlCl3-induced AD were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The hemorheological parameters were analyzed using a computerized auto-rotational rheometer. The brain tissue of the subjects was analyzed using immunohistological chemical (IHC staining to determine the beta-amyloid (Aβ levels. RESULTS: The results of hemodynamic analysis revealed that the whole blood viscosity (WBV, fibrinogen, plasma viscosity and RBC aggregation index (RAI in (+control were significantly higher than that of control group, while erythrocyte electrophoresis (EI of whole blood in (+control were significantly lower than that of control group. The results of acetylcholinesterase-RBC (AChE-RBCin the (+control group was significantly higher than that of the control group. The results also show that the reduction of rCBF in rats with AlCl3-induced AD was approximately 50% to 60% that of normal rats. IHC stain results show that significantly more Aβ plaques accumulated in the hippocampus and cortex of the (+control than in the control group. CONCLUSION: The results accentuate the importance of hemorheology and reinforce the specific association between hemodynamic and neuropathological changes in rats with AlCl3-induced AD. Hemorheological parameters, such as WBV and fibrinogen, and AChE-RBC were ultimately proven to be useful biomarkers of the

  12. Systemic and transdermal melatonin administration prevents neuropathology in response to perinatal asphyxia in newborn lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridas, James D S; Yawno, Tamara; Sutherland, Amy E; Nitsos, Ilias; Ditchfield, Michael; Wong, Flora Y; Hunt, Rod W; Fahey, Michael C; Malhotra, Atul; Wallace, Euan M; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L

    2018-02-21

    Perinatal asphyxia remains a principal cause of infant mortality and long-term neurological morbidity, particularly in low-resource countries. No neuroprotective interventions are currently available. Melatonin (MLT), a potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic agent, offers promise as an intravenous (IV) or transdermal therapy to protect the brain. We aimed to determine the effect of melatonin (IV or transdermal patch) on neuropathology in a lamb model of perinatal asphyxia. Asphyxia was induced in newborn lambs via umbilical cord occlusion at birth. Animals were randomly allocated to melatonin commencing 30 minutes after birth (60 mg in 24 hours; IV or transdermal patch). Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was undertaken at 12 and 72 hours. Animals (control n = 9; control+MLT n = 6; asphyxia n = 16; asphyxia+MLT [IV n = 14; patch n = 4]) were euthanised at 72 hours, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brains were collected for analysis. Asphyxia resulted in severe acidosis (pH 6.9 ± 0.0; lactate 9 ± 2 mmol/L) and altered determinants of encephalopathy. MRS lactate:N-acetyl aspartate ratio was 2.5-fold higher in asphyxia lambs compared with controls at 12 hours and 3-fold higher at 72 hours (P asphyxia; P = .02). Asphyxia significantly increased brain white and grey matter apoptotic cell death (activated caspase-3), lipid peroxidation (4HNE) and neuroinflammation (IBA-1). These changes were significantly mitigated by both IV and patch melatonin. Systemic or transdermal neonatal melatonin administration significantly reduces the neuropathology and encephalopathy signs associated with perinatal asphyxia. A simple melatonin patch, administered soon after birth, may improve outcome in infants affected by asphyxia, especially in low-resource settings. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Pineal Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Clinical Neuropathology Practice News 3-2012: the “ABC” in AD – revised and updated guideline for the neuropathologic assessment of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Gelpi, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The two major approaches for the neuropathological assessment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) related pathology have been based on the assessment of neuritic plaques (CERAD) and neurofibrillary pathology (Braak and Braak). In 1997 these two approaches were integrated in the criteria and recommendations of the National Institute on Aging and the Reagan Institute Working group. Recently a new guideline has been published by the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer’s Association. This new guideline recognizes the existence of a pre-clinical stage of AD as part of continuous neuropathological changes in the background of the disease process, and it fosters the assessment of amyloid-b phases in addition to neurofibrillary degeneration and neuritic plaques following an “ABC” score. Further, it suggests protocols for the neuropathological assessment of additional/concomitant neurodegenerative and vascular pathologies. Altogether, the new guideline responds to the need for an update of the existing “1997 criteria” for AD. Continued studies will have to assess the added value of the new approach and the influence of interlaboratory and/or methodological differences on the implementation of these new recommendations. PMID:22551914

  14. Parent-reported and clinician-observed autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): implications for practice under DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzadzinski, Rebecca; Dick, Catherine; Lord, Catherine; Bishop, Somer

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often present with social difficulties, though the extent to which these clearly overlap with symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not well understood. We explored parent-reported and directly-observed ASD symptoms on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) in children referred to ASD-specialty clinics who received diagnoses of either ADHD (n = 48) or ASD (n = 164). Of the ADHD sample, 21 % met ASD cut-offs on the ADOS and 30 % met ASD cut-offs on all domains of the ADI-R. Four social communication ADOS items (Quality of Social Overtures, Unusual Eye Contact, Facial Expressions Directed to Examiner, and Amount of Reciprocal Social Communication) adequately differentiated the groups while none of the items on the ADI-R met the criteria for adequate discrimination. Results of this work highlight the challenges that clinicians and researchers face when distinguishing ASD from other disorders in verbally fluent, school-age children.

  15. Dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias: under-recognized movement disorders in domestic animals? A comparison with human dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eRichter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e. dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans, and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals.

  16. Vascular Contributions in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Neuropathological Changes: First Autopsy Evidence from a South Asian Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Printha; Shankar, S K; Yasha, T C; Gorrie, Catherine; Amaratunga, Dhammika; Hulathduwa, Sanjayah; Kumara, K Sunil; Samarasinghe, Kamani; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Steinbusch, Harry W M; De Silva, K Ranil D

    2016-10-18

    Evidence from various consortia on vascular contributions has been inconsistent in determining the etiology of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate vascular risk factors and cerebrovascular pathologies associated in manifestation of AD-related neuropathological changes of an elderly population. Postmortem brain samples from 76 elderly subjects (≥50 years) were used to study genetic polymorphisms, intracranial atherosclerosis of the circle of Willis (IASCW), and microscopic infarcts in deep white matters. From this cohort, 50 brains (≥60 years) were subjected to neuropathological diagnosis using immunohistopathological techniques. Besides the association with age, the apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele was significantly and strongly associated with Thal amyloid-β phases ≥1 [odds ratio (OR) = 6.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-33.45] and inversely with Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) stages ≥III (0.02, 0.0-0.47). Illiterates showed a significant positive association for Braak NFT stages ≥IV (14.62, 1.21-176.73) and a significant negative association for microscopic infarcts (0.15, 0.03-0.71) in deep white matters. With respect to cerebrovascular pathologies, cerebral small vessel lesions (white matter hyperintensities and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) showed a higher degree of associations among them and with AD-related neuropathological changes (p pathology (IASCW), which showed a significant association only with Braak NFT stages ≥I (p = 0.050). These findings suggest that besides age, education, and genetic factors, other vascular risk factors were not associated with AD-related neuropathological changes and urge prompt actions be taken against cerebral small vessel diseases since evidence for effective prevention is still lacking.

  17. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Petrovic, Jelena; Milosevic, Vuk; Zivkovic, Miroslava; Stojanov, Dragan; Milojkovic, Olga; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHS...

  18. A Single Neonatal Exposure to BMAA in a Rat Model Produces Neuropathology Consistent with Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Louise Scott

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although cyanobacterial β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, Parkinson’s Disease (PD and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, no BMAA animal model has reproduced all the neuropathology typically associated with these neurodegenerative diseases. We present here a neonatal BMAA model that causes β-amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary tangles of hyper-phosphorylated tau, TDP-43 inclusions, Lewy bodies, microbleeds and microgliosis as well as severe neuronal loss in the hippocampus, striatum, substantia nigra pars compacta, and ventral horn of the spinal cord in rats following a single BMAA exposure. We also report here that BMAA exposure on particularly PND3, but also PND4 and 5, the critical period of neurogenesis in the rodent brain, is substantially more toxic than exposure to BMAA on G14, PND6, 7 and 10 which suggests that BMAA could potentially interfere with neonatal neurogenesis in rats. The observed selective toxicity of BMAA during neurogenesis and, in particular, the observed pattern of neuronal loss observed in BMAA-exposed rats suggest that BMAA elicits its effect by altering dopamine and/or serotonin signaling in rats.

  19. Neuropathological effect of carbamate molluscicides on the land snail, Eobania vermiculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essawy, Amina E; Abdelmeguied, Nabila E; Radwan, Mohamed A; Hamed, Sherifa S; Hegazy, Amira E

    2009-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the neuropathological effect of the two carbamate pesticides: methomyl and methiocarb on the neurons of the buccal ganglia in the land snail Eobania vermiculata using topical application and baiting technique. Their in vivo effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) activity were also investigated. Sublethal dose and concentration (1/4 LD(50) and 1/4 LC(50)) of both pesticides were used, and the experiment lasted for 14 days. Histopathological and ultrastuctural alterations in the buccal ganglia were more obvious after the baiting technique treatment than after the topical application method, and methomyl was found to be more toxic than methiocarb. These alterations included shrinkage of the perikarya of neurons, increased cytoplasmic basophilia, and extreme indentation of the plasma membrane. In addition, the nuclei appeared karyolitic, eccentric, and highly shrunken with an irregular nuclear envelope. The most outstanding symptom observed after topical application of methiocarb was a highly vacuolated cytoplasm with a peripheral increase in electron density associated with dense accumulations of free ribosomes. On the other hand, an increased number of lysosomes and autophagosomes were observed after topical application of methomyl. Mitochondrial damage, increased number of lipid droplets, and myelin figures were frequently observed in ganglia treated with either methomyl or methiocarb. Moreover, it was noticed that both compounds induced reductions in AChE activity. However, methomyl exhibited more potency in reducing AChE activity than methiocarb.

  20. Heterogeneity in Red Wine Polyphenolic Contents Differentially Influences Alzheimer's Disease-type Neuropathology and Cognitive Deterioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lap; Chen, Ling Hong; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Wei; Talcott, Stephen T.; Ono, Kenjiro; Teplow, David; Humala, Nelson; Cheng, Alice; Percival, Susan S.; Ferruzzi, Mario; Janle, Elsa; Dickstein, Dara L.; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2009-01-01

    We recently found that moderate consumption of two unrelated red wines generate from different grape species, a Cabernet Sauvignon and a muscadine wine that are characterized by distinct component composition of polyphenolic compounds, significantly attenuated the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type brain pathology and memory deterioration in a transgenic AD mouse model. Interestingly, our evidence suggests that the two red wines attenuated AD phenotypes through independent mechanisms. In particular, we previously found that treatment with Cabernet Sauvignon reduced the generation of AD-type amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. In contrast, evidence from our present study suggests that muscadine treatment attenuates Aβ neuropathology and Aβ-related cognitive deterioration in Tg2576 mice by interfering with the oligomerization of Aβ molecules to soluble high-molecular-weight Aβ oligomer species that are responsible for initiating a cascade of cellular events resulting in cognitive decline. Collectively, our observations suggest that distinct polyphenolic compounds from red wines may be bioavailable at the organism level and beneficially modulate AD phenotypes through multiple Aβ-related mechanisms. Results from these studies suggest the possibility of developing a “combination” of dietary polyphenolic compounds for AD prevention and/or therapy by modulating multiple Aβ-related mechanisms. PMID:19158422

  1. Long-term neuropathological and behavioral impairments after exposure to nerve agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Apland, James P; Prager, Eric M; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I; Miller, Steven L; Braga, Maria F M

    2016-06-01

    One of the deleterious effects of acute nerve agent exposure is the induction of status epilepticus (SE). If SE is not controlled effectively, it causes extensive brain damage. Here, we review the neuropathology observed after nerve agent-induced SE, as well as the ensuing pathophysiological, neurological, and behavioral alterations, with an emphasis on their time course and longevity. Limbic structures are particularly vulnerable to damage by nerve agent exposure. The basolateral amygdala (BLA), which appears to be a key site for seizure initiation upon exposure, suffers severe neuronal loss; however, GABAergic BLA interneurons display a delayed death, perhaps providing a window of opportunity for rescuing intervention. The end result is a long-term reduction of GABAergic activity in the BLA, with a concomitant increase in spontaneous excitatory activity; such pathophysiological alterations are not observed in the CA1 hippocampal area, despite the extensive neuronal loss. Hyperexcitability in the BLA may be at least in part responsible for the development of recurrent seizures and increased anxiety, while hippocampal damage may underlie the long-term memory impairments. Effective control of SE after nerve agent exposure, such that brain damage is also minimized, is paramount for preventing lasting neurological and behavioral deficits. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Neuropathological sequelae of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and apathy: A review of neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Roger C; Rosselli, Monica; Uddin, Lucina Q; Antoni, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Apathy remains a common neuropsychiatric disturbance in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) despite advances in anti-retroviral treatment (ART). The goal of the current review is to recapitulate findings relating apathy to the deleterious biobehavioral effects of HIV-1 in the post-ART era. Available literatures demonstrate that the emergence of apathy with other neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms may be attributed to neurotoxic effects of viral proliferation, e.g., aggregative effect of Tat and gp120 on apoptosis, transport and other enzymatic reactions amongst dopaminergic neurons and neuroglia. An assortment of neuroimaging modalities converge on the severity of apathy symptoms associated with the propensity of the virus to replicate within frontal-striatal brain circuits that facilitate emotional processing. Burgeoning research into functional brain connectivity also supports the effects of microvascular and neuro-inflammatory injury linked to aging with HIV-1 on the presentation of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Summarizing these findings, we review domains of HIV-associated neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric impairment linked to apathy in HIV. Taken together, these lines of research suggest that loss of affective, cognitive and behavioral inertia is commensurate with the neuropathology of HIV-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of NMDA Receptor-Mediated Glutamatergic Signaling in Chronic and Acute Neuropathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Carvajal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs have two opposing roles in the brain. On the one hand, NMDARs control critical events in the formation and development of synaptic organization and synaptic plasticity. On the other hand, the overactivation of NMDARs can promote neuronal death in neuropathological conditions. Ca2+ influx acts as a primary modulator after NMDAR channel activation. An imbalance in Ca2+ homeostasis is associated with several neurological diseases including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These chronic conditions have a lengthy progression depending on internal and external factors. External factors such as acute episodes of brain damage are associated with an earlier onset of several of these chronic mental conditions. Here, we will review some of the current evidence of how traumatic brain injury can hasten the onset of several neurological conditions, focusing on the role of NMDAR distribution and the functional consequences in calcium homeostasis associated with synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death present in this group of chronic diseases.

  4. Acute hydrogen sulfide-induced neuropathology and neurological sequelae: challenges for translational neuroprotective research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbeiha, Wilson; Whitley, Elizabeth; Anantharam, Poojya; Kim, Dong-Suk; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), the gas with the odor of rotten eggs, was formally discovered in 1777, over 239 years ago. For many years, it was considered an environmental pollutant and a health concern only in occupational settings. Recently, however, it was discovered that H 2 S is produced endogenously and plays critical physiological roles as a gasotransmitter. Although at low physiological concentrations it is physiologically beneficial, exposure to high concentrations of H 2 S is known to cause brain damage, leading to neurodegeneration and long-term neurological sequelae or death. Neurological sequelae include motor, behavioral, and cognitive deficits, which are incapacitating. Currently, there are concerns about accidental or malicious acute mass civilian exposure to H 2 S. There is a major unmet need for an ideal neuroprotective treatment, for use in the field, in the event of mass civilian exposure to high H 2 S concentrations. This review focuses on the neuropathology of high acute H 2 S exposure, knowledge gaps, and the challenges associated with development of effective neuroprotective therapy to counteract H 2 S-induced neurodegeneration. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Neuropathological and Reelin deficiencies in the hippocampal formation of rats exposed to MAM; differences and similarities with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricon, Julien; Bellon, Alfredo; Frieling, Helge; Kebir, Oussama; Le Pen, Gwenaëlle; Beuvon, Frédéric; Daumas-Duport, Catherine; Jay, Thérèse M; Krebs, Marie-Odile

    2010-04-22

    Adult rats exposed to methylazoxymethanol (MAM) at embryonic day 17 (E17) consistently display behavioral characteristics similar to that observed in patients with schizophrenia and replicate neuropathological findings from the prefrontal cortex of psychotic individuals. However, a systematic neuropathological analysis of the hippocampal formation and the thalamus in these rats is lacking. It is also unclear if reelin, a protein consistently associated with schizophrenia and potentially involved in the mechanism of action of MAM, participates in the neuropathological effects of this compound. Therefore, a thorough assessment including cytoarchitectural and neuromorphometric measurements of eleven brain regions was conducted. Numbers of reelin positive cells and reelin expression and methylation levels were also studied. Compared to untreated rats, MAM-exposed animals showed a reduction in the volume of entorhinal cortex, hippocampus and mediodorsal thalamus associated with decreased neuronal soma. The entorhinal cortex also showed laminar disorganization and neuronal clusters. Reelin methylation in the hippocampus was decreased whereas reelin positive neurons and reelin expression were unchanged. Our results indicate that E17-MAM exposure reproduces findings from the hippocampal formation and the mediodorsal thalamus of patients with schizophrenia while providing little support for reelin's involvement. Moreover, these results strongly suggest MAM-treated animals have a diminished neuropil, which likely arises from abnormal neurite formation; this supports a recently proposed pathophysiological hypothesis for schizophrenia.

  6. Transplantation of cerebellar neural stem cells improves motor coordination and neuropathology in Machado-Joseph disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Liliana S; Nóbrega, Clévio; Hirai, Hirokazu; Kaspar, Brian K; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-02-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is a neurodegenerative disease without effective treatment. Patients with Machado-Joseph disease exhibit significant motor impairments such as gait ataxia, associated with multiple neuropathological changes including mutant ATXN3 inclusions, marked neuronal loss and atrophy of the cerebellum. Thus, an effective treatment of symptomatic patients with Machado-Joseph disease may require cell replacement, which we investigated in this study. For this purpose, we injected cerebellar neural stem cells into the cerebellum of adult Machado-Joseph disease transgenic mice and assessed the effect on the neuropathology, neuroinflammation mediators and neurotrophic factor levels and motor coordination. We found that upon transplantation into the cerebellum of adult Machado-Joseph disease mice, cerebellar neural stem cells differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Importantly, cerebellar neural stem cell transplantation mediated a significant and robust alleviation of the motor behaviour impairments, which correlated with preservation from Machado-Joseph disease-associated neuropathology, namely reduction of Purkinje cell loss, reduction of cellular layer shrinkage and mutant ATXN3 aggregates. Additionally, a significant reduction of neuroinflammation and an increase of neurotrophic factors levels was observed, indicating that transplantation of cerebellar neural stem cells also triggers important neuroprotective effects. Thus, cerebellar neural stem cells have the potential to be used as a cell replacement and neuroprotective approach for Machado-Joseph disease therapy. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Functional evaluations of genes disrupted in patients with Tourette’s Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawei eSun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tourette Disorder (TD is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder with complex genetic architecture and unclear neuropathology. Disruptions of particular genes have been identified in subsets of TD patients. However, none of the findings has been replicated, probably due to the complex and heterogeneous genetic architecture of TD that involves both common and rare variants. To understand the etiology of TD, functional analyses are required to characterize the molecular and cellular consequences caused by mutations in candidate genes. Such molecular and cellular alterations may converge into common biological pathways underlying the heterogeneous genetic etiology of TD patients. Herein, we review specific genes implicated in TD etiology, discuss the functions of these genes in the mammalian central nervous system and the corresponding behavioral anomalies exhibited in animal models and, importantly, review functional analyses that can be performed to evaluate the role(s that the genetic disruptions might play in TD. Specifically, the functional assays include novel cell culture systems, genome editing techniques, bioinformatics approaches, transcriptomic analyses and genetically modified animal models applied or developed to study genes associated with TD or with other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. By describing methods used to study diseases with genetic architecture similar to TD, we hope to develop a systematic framework for investigating the etiology of TD and related disorders.

  8. Möbius syndrome. A clinical, radiological, neurophysiological, genetic and neuropathological study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    The overall conclusion of this study is that the Möbius condition contains two distinct disorders: Firstly, an autosomal disorder which can be best described as hereditary congenital facial palsy. Secondly, a disorder for which we reserve the name Möbius syndrome and is characterized by congenital

  9. Sleep disorders in children with traumatic brain injury: a case of serious neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stores, Gregory; Stores, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review the basic aspects of sleep disturbance in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A search was performed on reports of sleep disturbances in children who had suffered TBI. Adults with TBI were also considered to anticipate the nature and significance of such disturbances in younger patients. Types of reported sleep disturbance were noted and their possible aetiology and management considered. Sleep disturbance has consistently been associated with TBI but the literature suggests that this aspect of patient care is often inadequately considered and there has been little research on the subject, especially in relation to children. Excessive daytime sleepiness is often mentioned, less so insomnia and parasomnias, but there is little information about the specific sleep disorders underlying these problems. Sleep disorders with potentially important developmental consequences have been neglected in the care of children with TBI. Screening for sleep problems should be routine and followed, if indicated, by a detailed diagnosis of the child's underlying specific sleep disorder, the possible aetiology of which includes neuropathology and potential medical, psychological, or psychiatric comorbidities. Appropriate assessments and modern treatment options are now well defined although generally underutilized. Further well-designed research is needed for which guidelines are available. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Cortisol levels at baseline and under stress in adolescent males with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, with or without comorbid conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northover, Clare; Thapar, Anita; Langley, Kate; Fairchild, Graeme; van Goozen, Stephanie H M

    2016-08-30

    Reported findings on cortisol reactivity to stress in young people with ADHD are very variable. This inconsistency may be explained by high rates of comorbidity with Conduct Disorder (CD). The present study examined cortisol responses to a psychosocial stressor in a large sample of adolescent males with ADHD (n=202), with or without a comorbid diagnosis of Conduct Disorder (CD). Associations between stress reactivity and callous-unemotional traits and internalizing symptoms were also assessed. The ADHD only (n=95) and ADHD+CD (n=107) groups did not differ in baseline cortisol, but the ADHD+CD group showed significantly reduced cortisol stress reactivity relative to the ADHD only group. Regression analyses indicated that ADHD symptom severity predicted reduced baseline cortisol, whereas CD symptom severity predicted increased baseline cortisol (ADHD β=-0.24, CD β=0.16, R=0.26) and reduced cortisol stress reactivity (β=-0.17, R=0.17). Callous-unemotional traits and internalizing symptoms were not significantly related to baseline or stress-induced cortisol. Impaired cortisol reactivity is hypothesised to reflect fearlessness and is associated with deficient emotion regulation and inhibition of aggressive and antisocial behaviour. Consequently, it may partly explain the greater severity of problems seen in those with comorbid ADHD and CD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Personality disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... personality disorder Borderline personality disorder Dependent personality disorder Histrionic personality disorder Narcissistic personality disorder Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder Paranoid ...

  12. The functional highly sensitive brain: a review of the brain circuits underlying sensory processing sensitivity and seemingly related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Bianca; Aron, Elaine; Pospos, Sarah; Jessen, Dana

    2018-04-19

    During the past decade, research on the biological basis of sensory processing sensitivity (SPS)-a genetically based trait associated with greater sensitivity and responsivity to environmental and social stimuli-has burgeoned. As researchers try to characterize this trait, it is still unclear how SPS is distinct from seemingly related clinical disorders that have overlapping symptoms, such as sensitivity to the environment and hyper-responsiveness to incoming stimuli. Thus, in this review, we compare the neural regions implicated in SPS with those found in fMRI studies of-Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Schizophrenia (SZ) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) to elucidate the neural markers and cardinal features of SPS versus these seemingly related clinical disorders. We propose that SPS is a stable trait that is characterized by greater empathy, awareness, responsivity and depth of processing to salient stimuli. We conclude that SPS is distinct from ASD, SZ and PTSD in that in response to social and emotional stimuli, SPS differentially engages brain regions involved in reward processing, memory, physiological homeostasis, self-other processing, empathy and awareness. We suggest that this serves species survival via deep integration and memory for environmental and social information that may subserve well-being and cooperation.This article is part of the theme issue 'Diverse perspectives on diversity: multi-disciplinary approaches to taxonomies of individual differences'. © 2018 The Authors.

  13. Disorders of oxidation homeostasis in the blood and organs of rats under the influence of external x-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzlenkova, N.Je.

    2009-01-01

    The study was performed in the blood and organs (lungs and skin) of male rats weighing 160-180 g. Single external x-ray exposure to minimal and medial lethal doses causes stable disorders in oxidation homeostasis resulting in peroxidation state and development of chronic oxidative stress in the organism of the exposed rats.

  14. Neuron-specific chromatin remodeling: a missing link in epigenetic mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, memory, and intellectual disability disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Wood, Marcelo A

    2014-05-01

    Long-term memory formation requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression. Until recently nucleosome remodeling, one of the major epigenetic mechanisms for controlling gene expression, had been largely unexplored in the field of neuroscience. Nucleosome remodeling is carried out by chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) that interact with DNA and histones to physically alter chromatin structure and ultimately regulate gene expression. Human exome sequencing and gene wide association studies have linked mutations in CRC subunits to intellectual disability disorders, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, how mutations in CRC subunits were related to human cognitive disorders was unknown. There appears to be both developmental and adult specific roles for the neuron specific CRC nBAF (neuronal Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor). nBAF regulates gene expression required for dendritic arborization during development, and in the adult, contributes to long-term potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We propose that the nBAF complex is a novel epigenetic mechanism for regulating transcription required for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory processes and that impaired nBAF function may result in human cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An aid to the diagnosis of genetic disorders underlying adult-onset renal failure : a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.; Strunk, A. L. M.; Meijer, S.; Boers, J. E.; Aries, M.J.H.; Abbes, A. P.; Engel, H.; Beukhof, J. R.

    Several genetic disorders can present in adult patients with renal insufficiency. Genetic renal disease other than ADPKD accounts for ESRD in 3% of the adult Dutch population. Because of this low prevalence and their clinical heterogeneity most adult nephrologists are less familiar with these

  16. Timing of mTOR activation affects tuberous sclerosis complex neuropathology in mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Magri

    2013-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a dominantly inherited disease with high penetrance and morbidity, and is caused by mutations in either of two genes, TSC1 or TSC2. Most affected individuals display severe neurological manifestations – such as intractable epilepsy, mental retardation and autism – that are intimately associated with peculiar CNS lesions known as cortical tubers (CTs. The existence of a significant genotype-phenotype correlation in individuals bearing mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 is highly controversial. Similar to observations in humans, mouse modeling has suggested that a more severe phenotype is associated with mutation in Tsc2 rather than in Tsc1. However, in these mutant mice, deletion of either gene was achieved in differentiated astrocytes. Here, we report that loss of Tsc1 expression in undifferentiated radial glia cells (RGCs early during development yields the same phenotype detected upon deletion of Tsc2 in the same cells. Indeed, the same aberrations in cortical cytoarchitecture, hippocampal disturbances and spontaneous epilepsy that have been detected in RGC-targeted Tsc2 mutants were observed in RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutant mice. Remarkably, thorough characterization of RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutants also highlighted subventricular zone (SVZ disturbances as well as STAT3-dependent and -independent developmental-stage-specific defects in the differentiation potential of ex-vivo-derived embryonic and postnatal neural stem cells (NSCs. As such, deletion of either Tsc1 or Tsc2 induces mostly overlapping phenotypic neuropathological features when performed early during neurogenesis, thus suggesting that the timing of mTOR activation is a key event in proper neural development.

  17. Neuropathologic correlates of hippocampal atrophy in the elderly: a clinical, pathologic, postmortem MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Dawe

    Full Text Available The volume of the hippocampus measured with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is increasingly used as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the neuropathologic basis of structural MRI changes in the hippocampus in the elderly has not been directly assessed. Postmortem MRI of the aging human brain, combined with histopathology, could be an important tool to address this issue. Therefore, this study combined postmortem MRI and histopathology in 100 elderly subjects from the Rush Memory and Aging Project and the Religious Orders Study. First, to validate the information contained in postmortem MRI data, we tested the hypothesis that postmortem hippocampal volume is smaller in subjects with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease compared to subjects with mild or no cognitive impairment, as observed in antemortem imaging studies. Subsequently, the relations of postmortem hippocampal volume to AD pathology, Lewy bodies, amyloid angiopathy, gross infarcts, microscopic infarcts, and hippocampal sclerosis were examined. It was demonstrated that hippocampal volume was smaller in persons with a clinical diagnosis of AD compared to those with no cognitive impairment (P = 2.6 × 10(-7 or mild cognitive impairment (P = 9.6 × 10(-7. Additionally, hippocampal volume was related to multiple cognitive abilities assessed proximate to death, with its strongest association with episodic memory. Among all pathologies investigated, the most significant factors related to lower hippocampal volume were shown to be AD pathology (P = 0.0018 and hippocampal sclerosis (P = 4.2 × 10(-7. Shape analysis allowed for visualization of the hippocampal regions most associated with volume loss for each of these two pathologies. Overall, this investigation confirmed the relation of hippocampal volume measured postmortem to clinical diagnosis of AD and measures of cognition, and concluded that both AD pathology and hippocampal sclerosis affect hippocampal

  18. Alzheimer’s disease is not “brain aging”: neuropathological, genetic, and epidemiological human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Davis, Paulina R.; Neltner, Janna H.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Abner, Erin L.; Smith, Charles D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    Human studies are reviewed concerning whether “aging”-related mechanisms contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. AD is defined by specific neuropathology: neuritic amyloid plaques and neocortical neurofibrillary tangles. AD pathology is driven by genetic factors related not to aging per se, but instead to the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In contrast to genes involved in APP-related mechanisms, there is no firm connection between genes implicated in human “accelerated aging” diseases (progerias) and AD. The epidemiology of AD in advanced age is highly relevant but deceptively challenging to address given the low autopsy rates in most countries. In extreme old age, brain diseases other than AD approximate AD prevalence while the impact of AD pathology appears to peak by age 95 and decline thereafter. Many distinct brain diseases other than AD afflict older human brains and contribute to cognitive impairment. Additional prevalent pathologies include cerebrovascular disease and hippocampal sclerosis, both high-morbidity brain diseases that appear to peak in incidence later than AD chronologically. Because of these common brain diseases of extreme old age, the epidemiology differs between clinical “dementia” and the subset of dementia cases with AD pathology. Additional aging-associated mechanisms for cognitive decline such as diabetes and synapse loss have been linked to AD and these hypotheses are discussed. Criteria are proposed to define an “aging-linked” disease, and AD fails all of these criteria. In conclusion, it may be most fruitful to focus attention on specific pathways involved in AD rather than attributing it to an inevitable consequence of aging. PMID:21516511

  19. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. With a comparison of neuropathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)); Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori

    1984-06-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patients; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia.

  20. The use of psychotropic medication in patients with emotionally unstable personality disorder under the care of UK mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Carol; Crawford, Michael J; Bhatti, Sumera F; Patel, Maxine X; Barnes, Thomas R E

    2015-04-01

    Guideline recommendations for the pharmacologic treatment of personality disorder lack consensus, particularly for emotionally unstable personality disorder (EUPD), and there is limited information on current prescribing practice in the United Kingdom. To characterize the nature and quality of current prescribing practice for personality disorder across the United Kingdom, as part of a quality improvement program. A cross-sectional survey of self-selected psychiatric services providing care for adults with personality disorder (ICD-10 criteria) was conducted. Data were collected during May 2012. Of 2,600 patients with a diagnosis of personality disorder, more than two-thirds (68%) had a diagnosis of EUPD. Almost all (92%) patients in the EUPD subgroup were prescribed psychotropic medication, most commonly an antidepressant or antipsychotic, principally for symptoms and behaviors that characterize EUPD, particularly affective dysregulation. Prescribing patterns were similar between those who had a diagnosed comorbid mental illness and those who had EUPD alone, but the latter group was less likely to have had their medication reviewed over the previous year, particularly with respect to tolerability (53% vs 43%). The use of psychotropic medication in EUPD in the United Kingdom is largely outside the licensed indications. Whether the treatment target is identified as intrinsic symptoms of EUPD or comorbid mental illness may depend on the diagnostic threshold of individual clinicians. Compared with prescribing for EUPD where there is judged to be a comorbid mental illness, the use of off-label medication for EUPD alone is less systematically reviewed and monitored, so opportunities for learning may be lost. Treatment may be continued long term by default. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Common and disease-specific dysfunctions of brain systems underlying attentional and executive control in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Tobias; Wolter, Sarah; Falck, Stefanie; Wild, Eva; Wild, Florian; Gruber, Eva; Falkai, Peter; Gruber, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder broadly overlap in multiple areas involving clinical phenomenology, genetics, and neurobiology. Still, the investigation into specific elementary (sub-)processes of executive functioning may help to define clear points of distinction between these categorical diagnoses to validate the nosological dichotomy and, indirectly, to further elucidate their pathophysiological underpinnings. In the present behavioral study, we sought to separate common from diagnosis-specific deficits in a series of specific elementary sub-functions of executive processing in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. For our purpose, we administered a modern and multi-purpose neuropsychological task paradigm to equal-sized and matched groups of schizophrenia patients, patients with bipolar disorder, and healthy control subjects. First, schizophrenia patients compared to the bipolar group exhibited a more pronounced deficit in general measures of task performance comprising both response speed and accuracy. Additionally, bipolar patients showed increased advance task preparation, i.e., were better able to compensate for response speed deficits when longer preparation intervals were provided. Set-shifting, on the other hand, was impaired to a similar degree in both patient groups. Finally, schizophrenia patients exhibited a specific deficit in conflict processing (inhibitory control) and the shielding of task-relevant processing from distraction (i.e., attentional maintenance). The present investigation suggests that specific neuropsychological measures of elementary executive functions may represent important points of dissociation between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, which may help to differentiate the pathophysiological underpinnings of these major psychiatric disorders. In this context, the present findings highlight the measures of inhibitory control and attentional maintenance as promising candidates.

  2. Amygdala activation during emotional face processing in adolescents with affective disorders: the role of underlying depression and anxiety symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bulk, Bianca G.; Meens, Paul H. F.; van Lang, Natasja D. J.; de Voogd, E. L.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Crone, Eveline A.; Vermeiren, Robert R. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Depressive and anxiety disorders are often first diagnosed during adolescence and it is known that they persist into adulthood. Previous studies often tried to dissociate depressive and anxiety disorders, but high comorbidity makes this difficult and maybe even impossible. The goal of this study was to use neuroimaging to test what the unique contribution is of depression and anxiety symptomatology on emotional processing and amygdala activation, and to compare the results with a healthy control group. We included 25 adolescents with depressive and/or anxiety disorders and 26 healthy adolescents. Participants performed an emotional face processing task while in the MRI scanner. We were particularly interested in the relation between depression/anxiety symptomatology and patterns of amygdala activation. There were no significant differences in activation patterns between the control group and the clinical group on whole brain level and ROI level. However, we found that dimensional scores on an anxiety but not a depression subscale significantly predicted brain activation in the right amygdala when processing fearful, happy and neutral faces. These results suggest that anxiety symptoms are a better predictor for differentiating activation patterns in the amygdala than depression symptoms. Although the current study includes a relatively large sample of treatment naïve adolescents with depression/anxiety disorders, results might be influenced by differences between studies in recruitment strategies or methodology. Future research should include larger samples with a more equal distribution of adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of depression and/or anxiety. To conclude, this study shows that abnormal amygdala responses to emotional faces in depression and anxiety seems to be more dependent on anxiety symptoms than on depression symptoms, and thereby highlights the need for more research to better characterize clinical groups in future studies. PMID:24926249

  3. Amygdala activation during emotional face processing in adolescents with affective disorders: the role of underlying depression and anxiety symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca G Van Den Bulk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDepressive and anxiety disorders are often first diagnosed during adolescence and it is known that they persist into adulthood. Previous studies often tried to dissociate depressive and anxiety disorders, but high comorbidity makes this difficult and maybe even impossible. The goal of this study was to use neuroimaging to test what the unique contribution is of depression and anxiety symptomatology on emotional processing and amygdala activation, and to compare the results with a healthy control group. We included 25 adolescents with depressive and/or anxiety disorders and 26 healthy adolescents. Participants performed an emotional face processing task while in the MRI scanner. We were particularly interested in the relation between depression/anxiety symptomatology and patterns of amygdala activation. There were no significant differences in activation patterns between the control group and the clinical group on whole brain level and ROI level. However, we found that dimensional scores on an anxiety but not a depression subscale significantly predicted brain activation in the right amygdala when processing fearful, happy and neutral faces. These results suggest that anxiety symptoms are a better predictor for differentiating activation patterns in the amygdala than depression symptoms. Although the current study includes a relatively large sample of treatment naïve adolescents with depression/anxiety disorders, results might be influenced by differences between studies in recruitment strategies or methodology. Future research should include larger samples with a more equal distribution of adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of depression and/or anxiety. To conclude, this study shows that abnormal amygdala responses to emotional faces in depression and anxiety seems to be more dependent on anxiety symptoms than on depression symptoms, and thereby highlights the need for more research to better characterize clinical groups in future

  4. Low dose of caffeine enhances the efficacy of antidepressants in major depressive disorder and the underlying neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Shan; Deng, Ran; Fan, Yuyan; Li, Keqin; Meng, Fangang; Li, Xueli; Liu, Rui

    2017-08-01

    Caffeine is one of the most frequently used psychoactive substances ingested mainly via beverage or food products. Major depressive disorder is a serious and devastating psychiatric disorder. Emerging evidence indicates that caffeine enhances the antidepressant-like activity of common antidepressant drugs in rodents. However, whether joint administration of low dose of caffeine enhances the antidepressant actions in depressed patients remains unclear. A total of 95 male inpatients were assigned to three groups and were asked to take either caffeine (60, 120 mg) or placebo (soymilk powder) daily for 4 wk on the basis of their current antidepressant medications. Results showed that chronic supplementation with low dose of caffeine (60 mg) produced rapid antidepressant action by reduction of depressive scores. Furthermore, low dose of caffeine improved cognitive performance in depressed patients. However, caffeine did not affect sleep as measured by overnight polysomnography. Moreover, chronic caffeine consumption elicited inhibition of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation by normalization of salivary cortisol induced by Trier social stress test. These findings indicated the potential benefits of further implications of supplementary administration of caffeine to reverse the development of depression and enhance the outcome of antidepressants treatment in major depressive disorder. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Molecular hypotheses to explain the shared pathways and underlying pathobiological causes in catatonia and in catatonic presentations in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter-Ross, E M

    2018-04-01

    The pathobiological causes, the shared cellular and molecular pathways in catatonia and in catatonic presentation in neuropsychiatric disorders are yet to be determined. The hypotheses in this paper have been deduced from the latest scientific research findings and clinical observations of patients with genetic disorders, behavioral phenotypes and other family members suffering mental disorders. The first hypothesis postulates that catatonia and the heterogeneity of catatonic signs and symptoms involve nucleolar dysfunction arising from abnormalities of the brain-specific, non-coding micro-RNA, SNORD115 genes (either duplications or deletions) which result in pathobiological dysfunction of various combinations in the downstream pathways (possibly along with other genes in these shared pathways). SNORD115 controls five genes CRHR1, PBRM1, TAF1, DPM2, and RALGPS1 as well as the alternative splicing of serotonin 2C receptor. SNORD115 abnormalities with varying downstream multigene involvement would account for catatonia across the life span within some subtypes of autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar and major depressive disorder, psychosis, genetic disorders, and in immune disorders such as anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody encephalitis as well as the susceptibility to the neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) if environmentally triggered. Furthermore, SNORD115 genes may underlie a genetic vulnerability when environmental triggers result in excess serotonin producing the serotonin syndrome, a condition similar to NMS in which catatonia may occur. Dysfunction of SNORD115-PBRM1 connecting with SMARCA2 as well as other proven schizophrenia-associated genes might explain why traditionally catatonia has been classified with schizophrenia. SNORD115-TAF1 and SNORD-DPM2 dysfunction introduce possible clues to the parkinsonism and increased creatinine phosphokinase in NMS, while abnormalities of SNORD115-RALGPS1 suggest links to both anti

  6. Trajectories of physical function prior to death and brain neuropathology in a community-based cohort: the act study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Z. LaCroix

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms linking cognitive and physical functioning in older adults are unclear. We sought to determine whether brain pathological changes relate to the level or rate of physical performance decline. Methods This study analyzed data from 305 participants in the autopsy subcohort of the prospective Adult Changes in Thought (ACT study. Participants were aged 65+ and free of dementia at enrollment. Physical performance was measured at baseline and every two years using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB. Data from 3174 ACT participants with ≥2 SPPB measurements were used to estimate two physical function measures: 1 rate of SPPB decline defined by intercept and slope; and 2 estimated SPPB 5 years prior to death. Neuropathology findings at autopsy included neurofibrillary tangles (Braak stage, neuritic plaques (CERAD level, presence of amyloid angiopathy, microinfarcts, cystic infarcts, and Lewy bodies. Associations (adjusted for sex, age, body mass index and education between dichotomized neuropathologic outcomes and SPPB measures were estimated using modified Poisson regression with inverse probability weights (IPW estimated via Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE. Relative risks for the 20th, 40th, and 60th percentiles (lowest levels and highest rates of decline relative to the 80th percentile (highest level and lowest rate of decline were calculated. Results Decedents with the least vs. most SPPB decline (slope > 75th vs. < 25th percentiles had higher SPPB scores, and were more likely to be male, older, have higher education, and exercise regularly at baseline. No significant associations were observed between neuropathology findings and rate of SPPB decline. Lower predicted SPPB scores 5 years prior to death were associated with higher risk of microinfarcts (RR = 3.08, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.93–1.07 for the 20th vs. 80th percentiles of SPPB and significantly higher risk of cystic infarcts

  7. α-Linolenic Acid, A Nutraceutical with Pleiotropic Properties That Targets Endogenous Neuroprotective Pathways to Protect against Organophosphate Nerve Agent-Induced Neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsade Piermartiri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available α-Linolenic acid (ALA is a nutraceutical found in vegetable products such as flax and walnuts. The pleiotropic properties of ALA target endogenous neuroprotective and neurorestorative pathways in brain and involve the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a major neuroprotective protein in brain, and downstream signaling pathways likely mediated via activation of TrkB, the cognate receptor of BDNF. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms of ALA efficacy against the highly toxic OP nerve agent soman. Organophosphate (OP nerve agents are highly toxic chemical warfare agents and a threat to military and civilian populations. Once considered only for battlefield use, these agents are now used by terrorists to inflict mass casualties. OP nerve agents inhibit the critical enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE that rapidly leads to a cholinergic crisis involving multiple organs. Status epilepticus results from the excessive accumulation of synaptic acetylcholine which in turn leads to the overactivation of muscarinic receptors; prolonged seizures cause the neuropathology and long-term consequences in survivors. Current countermeasures mitigate symptoms and signs as well as reduce brain damage, but must be given within minutes after exposure to OP nerve agents supporting interest in newer and more effective therapies. The pleiotropic properties of ALA result in a coordinated molecular and cellular program to restore neuronal networks and improve cognitive function in soman-exposed animals. Collectively, ALA should be brought to the clinic to treat the long-term consequences of nerve agents in survivors. ALA may be an effective therapy for other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Regional thalamic neuropathology in patients with hippocampal sclerosis and epilepsy: A postmortem study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinjab, Barah; Martinian, Lillian; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Thom, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Clinical, experimental, and neuroimaging data all indicate that the thalamus is involved in the network of changes associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), particularly in association with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), with potential roles in seizure initiation and propagation. Pathologic changes in the thalamus may be a result of an initial insult, ongoing seizures, or retrograde degeneration through reciprocal connections between thalamic and limbic regions. Our aim was to carry out a neuropathologic analysis of the thalamus in a postmortem (PM) epilepsy series, to assess the distribution, severity, and nature of pathologic changes and its association with HS. Methods Twenty-four epilepsy PM cases (age range 25–87 years) and eight controls (age range 38–85 years) were studied. HS was classified as unilateral (UHS, 11 cases), bilateral (BHS, 4 cases) or absent (No-HS, 9 cases). Samples from the left and right sides of the thalamus were stained with cresyl violet (CV), and for glial firbillary acidic protein (GFAP) and synaptophysin. Using image analysis, neuronal densities (NDs) or field fraction staining values (GFAP, synaptophysin) were measured in four thalamic nuclei: anteroventral nucleus (AV), lateral dorsal nucleus (LD), mediodorsal nucleus (MD), and ventrolateral nucleus (VL). The results were compared within and between cases. Key Findings The severity, nature, and distribution of thalamic pathology varied between cases. A pattern that emerged was a preferential involvement of the MD in UHS cases with a reduction in mean ND ipsilateral to the side of HS (p = 0.05). In UHS cases, greater field fraction values for GFAP and lower values for synaptophysin and ND were seen in the majority of cases in the MD ipsilateral to the side of sclerosis compared to other thalamic nuclei. In addition, differences in the mean ND between classical HS, atypical HS, and No-HS cases were noted in the ipsilateral MD (p < 0.05), with lower values observed in

  9. Molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent GABAergic synapse development and plasticity and its implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha

    2011-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons are critical for the normal function and development of neural circuits, and their dysfunction is implicated in a large number of neurodevelopmental disorders. Experience and activity-dependent mechanisms play an important role in GABAergic circuit development, also recent studies involve a number of molecular players involved in the process. Emphasizing the molecular mechanisms of GABAergic synapse formation, in particular basket cell perisomatic synapses, this paper draws attention to the links between critical period plasticity, GABAergic synapse maturation, and the consequences of its dysfunction on the development of the nervous system.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Activity-Dependent GABAergic Synapse Development and Plasticity and Its Implications for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidisha Chattopadhyaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic interneurons are critical for the normal function and development of neural circuits, and their dysfunction is implicated in a large number of neurodevelopmental disorders. Experience and activity-dependent mechanisms play an important role in GABAergic circuit development, also recent studies involve a number of molecular players involved in the process. Emphasizing the molecular mechanisms of GABAergic synapse formation, in particular basket cell perisomatic synapses, this paper draws attention to the links between critical period plasticity, GABAergic synapse maturation, and the consequences of its dysfunction on the development of the nervous system.

  11. Effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing in German Armed Forces Soldiers With Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Under Routine Inpatient Care Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Kai; Eggert, Patrick; Lorenz, Sebastian; Herr, Kerstin; Willmund, Gerd; Zimmermann, Peter; Alliger-Horn, Christina

    2017-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the more commonly occurring mental disorders following potentially traumatizing events soldiers may encounter when deployed abroad. One of the first-line recommended treatment options is eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). The number of studies assessing the effectiveness of EMDR in German soldiers under routine conditions is currently almost nil. A retrospective, quasi-experimental effectiveness study on EMDR in an inpatient setting is presented using a prepost design. The study compares symptom reduction in soldiers (N = 78) with a wait-list (N = 18). Effect sizes of EMDR were measured for PTSD, symptoms of depression, and general mental health. Effect size for EMDR treatment of PTSD was d = 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51 to 1.36, for symptoms of depression d = 0.99; 95% CI: 0.31 to 1.36, and for general psychiatric symptoms d = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.17 to 1.21. The effects resulting from EMDR treatment were somewhat weaker than those reported in comparable studies in civilians. EMDR therapy is an effective treatment to reduce symptoms of PTSD and depression. However, in the military context it needs to be complemented by treatment options that specifically address further conditions perpetuating the disorders. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change, Lewy body disease, and vascular brain injury in clinic- and community-based samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenowitz, Willa D; Keene, C Dirk; Hawes, Stephen E; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Longstreth, W T; Woltjer, Randy L; Crane, Paul K; Larson, Eric B; Kukull, Walter A

    2017-05-01

    We examined the relationships between Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change (ADNC), Lewy body disease (LBD), and vascular brain injury (VBI) in 2 large autopsy samples. Because findings may differ between study populations, data came from U.S. Alzheimer's Disease Centers contributing to the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (n = 2742) and from the population-based Adult Changes in Thought study (n = 499). Regardless of study population, over 50% of participants with ADNC had co-occurring LBD or VBI; the majority of whom had a clinical AD dementia diagnosis prior to death. Overlap of pathologies was similar between studies, especially after standardizing to the distribution of age and dementia status in the Adult Changes in Thought population. LBD, but not VBI, was positively associated with ADNC in both studies. Interestingly, cortical LBD was more common in those with intermediate ADNC compared to low or high ADNC, especially in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (p < 0.001). High prevalence of co-occurring neuropathologies among older adults with dementia has implications for accurate diagnosis of dementia etiologies and development of disease-modifying strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MM2-thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: neuropathological, biochemical and transmission studies identify a distinctive prion strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio; Suardi, Silvia; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Indaco, Antonio; Limido, Lucia; Vimercati, Chiara; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Langeveld, Jan; Terruzzi, Alessandro; Brambilla, Antonio; Zerbi, Pietro; Fociani, Paolo; Bishop, Matthew T; Will, Robert G; Manson, Jean C; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-09-01

    In Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), molecular typing based on the size of the protease resistant core of the disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc) ) and the M/V polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene correlates with the clinico-pathologic subtypes. Approximately 95% of the sporadic 129MM CJD patients are characterized by cerebral deposition of type 1 PrP(Sc) and correspond to the classic clinical CJD phenotype. The rare 129MM CJD patients with type 2 PrP(Sc) are further subdivided in a cortical and a thalamic form also indicated as sporadic fatal insomnia. We observed two young patients with MM2-thalamic CJD. Main neuropathological features were diffuse, synaptic PrP immunoreactivity in the cerebral cortex and severe neuronal loss and gliosis in the thalamus and olivary nucleus. Western blot analysis showed the presence of type 2A PrP(Sc) . Challenge of transgenic mice expressing 129MM human PrP showed that MM2-thalamic sporadic CJD (sCJD) was able to transmit the disease, at variance with MM2-cortical sCJD. The affected mice showed deposition of type 2A PrP(Sc) , a scenario that is unprecedented in this mouse line. These data indicate that MM2-thalamic sCJD is caused by a prion strain distinct from the other sCJD subtypes including the MM2-cortical form. © 2012 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2012 International Society of Neuropathology.

  14. Clinical and Neurobiological Relevance of Current Animal Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck; Lázaro, María T.; Choi, Chang Soon; Bahn, Geon Ho; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social and communication impairments, as well as repetitive and restrictive behaviors. The phenotypic heterogeneity of ASD has made it overwhelmingly difficult to determine the exact etiology and pathophysiology underlying the core symptoms, which are often accompanied by comorbidities such as hyperactivity, seizures, and sensorimotor abnormalities. To our benefit, the advent of animal models has allowed us to assess and test diverse risk factors of ASD, both genetic and environmental, and measure their contribution to the manifestation of autistic symptoms. At a broader scale, rodent models have helped consolidate molecular pathways and unify the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying each one of the various etiologies. This approach will potentially enable the stratification of ASD into clinical, molecular, and neurophenotypic subgroups, further proving their translational utility. It is henceforth paramount to establish a common ground of mechanistic theories from complementing results in preclinical research. In this review, we cluster the ASD animal models into lesion and genetic models and further classify them based on the corresponding environmental, epigenetic and genetic factors. Finally, we summarize the symptoms and neuropathological highlights for each model and make critical comparisons that elucidate their clinical and neurobiological relevance. PMID:27133257

  15. Identification of genes associated with dissociation of cognitive performance and neuropathological burden: Multistep analysis of genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptional data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C White

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The molecular underpinnings of the dissociation of cognitive performance and neuropathological burden are poorly understood, and there are currently no known genetic or epigenetic determinants of the dissociation."Residual cognition" was quantified by regressing out the effects of cerebral pathologies and demographic characteristics on global cognitive performance proximate to death. To identify genes influencing residual cognition, we leveraged neuropathological, genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptional data available for deceased participants of the Religious Orders Study (n = 492 and the Rush Memory and Aging Project (n = 487. Given that our sample size was underpowered to detect genome-wide significance, we applied a multistep approach to identify genes influencing residual cognition, based on our prior observation that independent genetic and epigenetic risk factors can converge on the same locus. In the first step (n = 979, we performed a genome-wide association study with a predefined suggestive p < 10-5, and nine independent loci met this threshold in eight distinct chromosomal regions. Three of the six genes within 100 kb of the lead SNP are expressed in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC: UNC5C, ENC1, and TMEM106B. In the second step, in the subset of participants with DLPFC DNA methylation data (n = 648, we found that residual cognition was related to differential DNA methylation of UNC5C and ENC1 (false discovery rate < 0.05. In the third step, in the subset of participants with DLPFC RNA sequencing data (n = 469, brain transcription levels of UNC5C and ENC1 were evaluated for their association with residual cognition: RNA levels of both UNC5C (estimated effect = -0.40, 95% CI -0.69 to -0.10, p = 0.0089 and ENC1 (estimated effect = 0.0064, 95% CI 0.0033 to 0.0096, p = 5.7 × 10-5 were associated with residual cognition. In secondary analyses, we explored the mechanism of these associations and found that ENC1 may be related to

  16. X-ray diffraction study of the Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrochlore disordering sequence under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulié, Aurélien, E-mail: aurelien.soulie@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Appliqué, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Menut, Denis [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Appliqué, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Crocombette, Jean-Paul [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Chartier, Alain [CEA, DEN, Service de la Corrosion et du Comportement des Matériaux dans leur Environnement, Laboratoire de Modélisation, de Thermodynamique et de Thermochimie, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Sellami, Neila [Univ. Paris Sud, ICMMO-SP2M, Bât. 410, F-91405 Orsay (France); Sattonnay, Gaël [Univ. Paris-Sud, CSNSM, CNRS, IN2P3, Bât. 108, F-91405 Orsay (France); Monnet, Isabelle [CIMAP, CEA, CNRS, Université de Caen, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); and others

    2016-11-15

    The disordering sequence of Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrochlore, a nano-oxide phase that strengthens ODS steels under irradiation is studied in the experimental and modeling framework. XRD analysis has been performed considering both swift heavy ion and low energy/low mass ion irradiations. The simulation within molecular dynamics of Frenkel pair accumulation proves able to reproduce the variation of the amorphization fluence with temperature. XRD patterns calculated from the simulations reproduce well the patterns observed experimentally in the literature. Both experiments and calculations point to a first transition from pyrochlore to fluorite before an eventual amorphization. For swift heavy ion irradiations with 93 MeV Xe ions, tracks of direct impact amorphization are visible by HRTEM. Advanced refinement shows that one third of the pyrochlore impacted by an ion transforms into fluorite, while two third are directly amorphized. - Highlights: • A comparison between swift heavy ion and low energy/low mass ion irradiation of Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrochlore is performed. • Simulations of the irradiation with Molecular dynamics reproduce the amorphization dose at low energy/mass ion irradiation. • Advanced refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns gives the evolution of phase fractions in pyrochlore under irradiation. • The disordering sequence a transition from pyrochlore to defect fluorite before an eventual amorphization.

  17. Neuropathology of two Brazilian autopsied cases of tropical spastic paraparesis / HTLV-I associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM of long evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro-Costa Carlos Maurício de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a neuropathological analysis of two cases of TSP/HAM originating from Brazil. These two cases had, respectively, an evolution of 13 and 40 years. The main neuropathological findings consisted of spinal cord atrophy, mainly the lower thoracic cord, diffuse degeneration of the white and grey matter, rare foci of mononuclear and perivascular cuffs, and hyaline hardening of arteriolae. The supraspinal structures were normal, excepting for a slight gliosis in the cerebellum. An analysis on the long evolutive cases as described in the literature is outlined in this study.

  18. Modeling of Disordered Binary Alloys Under Thermal Forcing: Effect of Nanocrystallite Dissociation on Thermal Expansion of AuCu3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. W.; Cress, R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Disordered binary alloys are modeled as a randomly close-packed assembly of nanocrystallites intermixed with randomly positioned atoms, i.e., glassy-state matter. The nanocrystallite size distribution is measured in a simulated macroscopic medium in two dimensions. We have also defined, and measured, the degree of crystallinity as the probability of a particle being a member of nanocrystallites. Both the distribution function and the degree of crystallinity are found to be determined by alloy composition. When heated, the nanocrystallites become smaller in size due to increasing thermal fluctuation. We have modeled this phenomenon as a case of thermal dissociation by means of the law of mass action. The crystallite size distribution function is computed for AuCu3 as a function of temperature by solving some 12 000 coupled algebraic equations for the alloy. The results show that linear thermal expansion of the specimen has contributions from the temperature dependence of the degree of crystallinity, in addition to respective thermal expansions of the nanocrystallites and glassy-state matter.

  19. Impaired decision-making under risk is associated with gaming-specific inhibition deficits among college students with Internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan-Wei; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Yip, Sarah W; Chen, Pin-Ru; Li, Song; Xu, Jiansong; Zhang, Jin-Tao; Deng, Lin-Yuan; Liu, Qin-Xue; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2015-09-30

    A growing body of evidence indicates that both inhibition and decision-making deficits play essential roles in the development and maintenance of Internet gaming disorder (IGD). Clarifying whether impaired decision-making among individuals with IGD is related to poor inhibition will advance our understanding of IGD and contribute to intervention development. However, the relationship between these two functions remains unclear. In this study, we sought to systemically examine inhibitory processes, decision-making and the relationship between the two among individuals with IGD. Thirty-four individuals with IGD and 32 matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. In comparison to HCs, IGD subjects demonstrated inhibition deficits during performance of the gaming-related Go/No-Go task and impaired decision-making under risk. In addition, errors on No-Go trials during the gaming-related Go/No-Go task were positively associated with decision-making impairments under risk but not under ambiguity among IGD subjects. These results suggest individuals with IGD are impaired in some aspects of inhibition and decision-making functions, and that decision-making deficits under risk are linked to poor inhibition specifically related to gaming cues, which has implications for the development of novel intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MRI and neuropathological validations of the involvement of air pollutants in cortical selective neuronal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Sohail; Anwar, Khaleeq; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2014-03-01

    Vehicles are a major source of air pollution, especially particulate matter (PM) pollution, throughout the world and auto-rickshaws are considered main contributors to this air pollution. PM, in addition to causing respiratory and cardiovascular disorders, has potential to gain access to the brain and could induce neuroinflammation leading to different neurological disorders. Therefore, in the current project, MRI and immunohistochemistry techniques were adopted to ascertain the neurotoxic potential of the chronic exposure to different PM generated by two-stroke auto-rickshaws (TSA), four-stroke auto-rickshaws (FSA), and aluminum sulfate (AS) solution in rats. The results highlighted that all treated groups followed a pattern of dose-dependent increase in pure cortical neuronal loss, selective neuronal loss (SNL), nuclear pyknosis, karyolysis, and karyorrhexis. Mild to moderate areas of penumbra were also observed with increase in the population of activated microglia and astrocytes, while no alteration in the intensities of T2W MRI signals was perceived in any group. When comparing the findings, TSA possess more neurotoxic potential than FSA and AS, which could be associated with increased concentration of certain elements in TSA emissions. The study concludes that chronic exposure to PM from TSA, FSA, and AS solutions produces diverse neuropathies in the brain, which may lead to different life-threatening neurological disorders like stroke, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's disorders. Government and environmental agencies should take serious notice of this alarming situation, and immediate steps should be implemented to improve the standards of PM emissions from auto-rickshaws.

  1. Clinical imaging and neuropathological correlations in an unusual case of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallon, D.; Guyant-Marechal, L.; Laquerriere, A.; Wevers, R.A.; Martinaud, O.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Yntema, H.G.; Saugier-Veber, P.; Hannequin, D.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare autosomal recessive lipid storage disorder due to a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP 27) with reduced or no chenodeoxycholic synthesis. This deficiency leads to an accumulation of cholestanol in different sites such as

  2. mTOR-related neuropathology in mutant tsc2 zebrafish: Phenotypic, transcriptomic and pharmacological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheldeman, Chloë; Mills, James D.; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Serra, Ines; Copmans, Daniëlle; Iyer, Anand M.; Whalley, Benjamin J.; Maes, Jan; Jansen, Anna C.; Lagae, Lieven; Aronica, Eleonora; de Witte, Peter A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare, genetic disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. Patients with TSC are neurologically characterized by the presence of abnormal brain structure, intractable epilepsy and TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders. Given the lack

  3. Reversibility of neuropathology and motor deficits in an inducible mouse model for FXTAS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.K. Hukema (Renate); R.A.M. Buijsen (Ronald); M. Schonewille (Martijn); C. Raske (Christopher); E.A.W.F.M. Severijnen (Lies-Anne); I.M. Nieuwenhuizen-Bakker; R.F.M. Verhagen (Rob F.M.); L. van Dessel (Lisanne); A. Maas (Alex); N. Charlet-Berguerand (Nicolas); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); P.J. Hagerman (Paul); R.F. Berman (Robert); R. Willemsen (Rob)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractFragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting carriers of the fragile X-premutation, who have an expanded CGG repeat in the 5'-UTR of the FMR1 gene. FXTAS is characterized by progressive development of intention tremor, ataxia,

  4. Reversibility of neuropathology and motor deficits in an inducible mouse model for FXTAS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hukema, Renate K; Buijsen, Ronald A M; Schonewille, Martijn; Raske, Chris; Severijnen, Lies-Anne W F M; Nieuwenhuizen-Bakker, Ingeborg; Verhagen, Rob F M; van Dessel, Lisanne; Maas, Alex; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hagerman, Paul J; Berman, Robert F; Willemsen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting carriers of the fragile X-premutation, who have an expanded CGG repeat in the 5'-UTR of the FMR1 gene. FXTAS is characterized by progressive development of intention tremor, ataxia, parkinsonism

  5. Personality Disorder Cognitions in the Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel, C.; Waller, G.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with eating disorder have relatively high rates of comorbid personality disorder diagnoses, including both anxiety-based personality disorders (obsessive-compulsive and avoidant) and borderline personality disorder. However, there is preliminary evidence that the core cognitions underlying personality pathology in the eating disorders are those related specifically to anxiety. This article builds on that evidence, replicating and extending the findings with a large sample of patients...

  6. DSM-5 under-Identifies PDDNOS: Diagnostic Agreement between the DSM-5, DSM-IV, and Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Black, Amanda; Tierney, Cheryl D.

    2013-01-01

    Agreement between the DSM-5, DSM-IV, and Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder was assessed in 125 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which included high and low functioning autism (HFA and LFA) and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDDNOS), and children with other clinical disorders (e.g., ADHD, mental…

  7. Characterization of Behavioral, Neuropathological, Brain Metabolic and Key Molecular Changes in zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Peng

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is caused by an expansion of the trinucleotide poly (CAG tract located in exon 1 of the huntingtin (Htt gene leading to progressive neurodegeneration in selected brain regions, and associated functional impairments in motor, cognitive, and psychiatric domains. Since the discovery of the gene mutation that causes the disease, mouse models have been developed by different strategies. Recently, a new model, the zQ175 knock-in (KI line, was developed in an attempt to have the Htt gene in a context and causing a phenotype that more closely mimics HD in humans. The behavioral phenotype was characterized across the independent laboratories and important features reminiscent of human HD are observed in zQ175 mice. In the current study, we characterized the zQ175 model housed in an academic laboratory under reversed dark-light cycle, including motor function, in vivo longitudinal structural MRI imaging for brain volume, MRS for striatal metabolites, neuropathology, as well as a panel of key disease marker proteins in the striatum at different ages. Our results suggest that homozygous zQ175 mice exhibited significant brain atrophy before the motor deficits and brain metabolite changes. Altered striatal medium spiny neuronal marker, postsynaptic marker protein and complement component C1qC also characterized zQ175 mice. Our results confirmed that the zQ175 KI model is valuable in understanding of HD-like pathophysiology and evaluation of potential therapeutics. Our data also provide suggestions to select appropriate outcome measurements in preclinical studies using the zQ175 mice.

  8. Administration of a selective β2 adrenergic receptor antagonist exacerbates neuropathology and cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, Caterina; Wisely, Elena V; Hartman, Lauren K; Caccamo, Antonella; Oddo, Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    Currently, there are no available approaches to cure or slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits and intraneuronal tangles that comprised hyperphosphorylated tau. The β2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) are expressed throughout the cortex and hippocampus and play a key role in cognitive functions. Alterations in the function of these receptors have been linked to AD; however, these data remain controversial as apparent contradicting reports have been published. Given the current demographics of growing elderly population and the high likelihood of concurrent β-blocker use for other chronic conditions, more studies into the role of this receptor in AD animal models are needed. Here, we show that administration of ICI 118,551 (ICI), a selective β2AR antagonist, exacerbates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of AD, the 3xTg-AD mice. Neuropathologically, ICI increased Aβ levels and Aβ plaque burden. Concomitantly, ICI-treated 3xTg-AD mice showed an increase in tau phosphorylation and accumulation. Mechanistically, these changes were linked to an increase in amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing. These results suggest that under the conditions used here, selective pharmacologic inhibition of β2ARs has detrimental effects on AD-like pathology in mice. Overall, these studies strengthen the notion that the link between β2ARs and AD is likely highly complex and suggest caution in generalizing the beneficial effects of β blockers on AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Role of Protein Radicals in Chronic Neuroimmune Dysfunction and Neuropathology in Response to a Multiple-Hit Model of Gulf War Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    War Illness Mouse Model, Chlorpyrifos, LPS, NF-KB p50, microglia , chronic neuroinflammation , serum markers, neuropathology 16. SECURITY...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chronic peripheral inflammation and neuroinflammation have been linked to Gulf...sample analysis is ongoing, preliminary results suggest that the hippocampus in NF-κB p50-/- mice is more vulnerable to chronic neuroinflammation at

  10. Shared Neuropathological Characteristics of Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease: Impacts on Cognitive Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennifer M.; Harrison, Fiona E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past few decades, the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), as well as older individuals at risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), has increased. While the consumption of diets high in fat (total and saturated) have been linked to increased risk of AD, diets rich in antioxidants, polyunsaturated fats, and omega-3 fatty acids are associated with decreased risk. Additionally, AD patients are at increased risk for developing T2DM. Recent research suggests that there are stronger similarities between AD and T2DM than have previously been considered. Here we review the neurocognitive and inflammatory effects of high-fat diet consumption, its relationship to AD, and the treatment potential of dietary interventions that may decrease risk of cognitive decline and other associated neuropathological changes, such as insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:26340637

  11. A neural cell adhesion molecule-derived peptide reduces neuropathological signs and cognitive impairment induced by Abeta25-35

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, B; Novikova, T; Novitskaya, V

    2007-01-01

    death and brain atrophy in response to Abeta25-35. Finally, the Abeta25-35-administration led to a reduced short-term memory as determined by the social recognition test. A synthetic peptide termed FGL derived from the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was able to prevent or, if already manifest......, strongly reduce all investigated signs of Abeta25-35-induced neuropathology and cognitive impairment. The FGL peptide was recently demonstrated to be able to cross the blood-brain-barrier. Accordingly, we found that the beneficial effects of FGL were achieved not only by intracisternal, but also...... and cognitive impairment involves the modulation of intracellular signal-transduction mediated through GSK3beta....

  12. Comparison of neuropathology in Parkinson's disease subjects with and without deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gian D; Ouyang, Bichun; Serrano, Geidy; Shill, Holly A; Goetz, Christopher; Stebbins, Glenn; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Mehta, Shyamal H; Caviness, John N; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Adler, Charles H; Beach, Thomas G

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this postmortem study was to compare, in Parkinson's disease subjects with and without bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), the loss of pigmented neurons within the substantia nigra and pathological alpha-synuclein density within the SN and other brain regions. PD subjects were identified from the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders database (STN-DBS = 11, non-DBS = 156). Pigmented neuron loss scores within the substantia nigra as well as alpha-synuclein density scores within the substantia nigra and 9 other brain regions were compared, the latter individually and in summary as the Lewy body brain load score. DBS subjects had higher alpha-synuclein density scores within the substantia nigra, olfactory bulb, and locus ceruleus, as well as higher total Lewy body brain load scores when compared with non-DBS subjects. No differences in substantia nigra pigmented neuron loss scores were found. STN-DBS subjects tend to have higher alpha-synuclein density scores, but do not have a differential loss of substantia nigra pigmented neurons. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Luminescent properties under X-ray excitation of Ba(1-x)PbxWO4 disordered solid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakiz, B.; Hallaoui, A.; Taoufyq, A.; Benlhachemi, A.; Guinneton, F.; Villain, S.; Ezahri, M.; Valmalette, J.-C.; Arab, M.; Gavarri, J.-R.

    2018-02-01

    A series of polycrystalline barium-lead tungstate Ba1-xPbxWO4 with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 was synthesized using a classical solid-state method with thermal treatment at 1000 °C. These materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction profile analyses were performed using Rietveld method. These materials crystallized in the scheelite tetragonal structure and behaved as quasi ideal solid solution. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the solid solution. Structural distortions were evidenced in X-ray diffraction profiles and in vibration Raman spectra. The scanning electron microscopy experiments showed large and rounded irregular grains. Luminescence experiments were performed under X-ray excitation. The luminescence emission profiles have been interpreted in terms of four Gaussian components, with a major contribution of blue emission. The integrated intensity of luminescence reached a maximum value in the composition range x = 0.3-0.6, in relation with distortions of crystal lattice.

  14. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Nigel J; Perrin, Richard J; Franklin, Erin E; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C

    2015-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (eight), Australia (three), UK (one) and Germany (two). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving nine participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final "gold standard" neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  15. Pitfalls in the use of whole slide imaging for the diagnosis of central nervous system tumors: A pilot study in surgical neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Pekmezci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI finds increasingly higher value in everyday surgical pathology in addition to its well-established use for educational and research purposes. However, its diagnostic utility, especially in subspecialty settings such as neuropathology, is not fully validated. Neuropathology practice is unique with smaller overall tissue size and frequent need for high-power evaluation. In addition, tumor grade is an integral part of the initial diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of primary pathology diagnosis of surgical neuropathology specimens using WSI. Materials and Methods: We reviewed consecutive surgical neuropathology cases diagnosed in our institution during a 2-month period and identified a single diagnostic slide, which was scanned at 40× magnification. Two neuropathologists who were blinded to the original diagnoses reviewed the whole slide image and rendered a diagnosis including tumor grade when applicable. They reviewed the single diagnostic slide after a wash-out period. Intra- and inter-observer discrepancies, as well as reasons for discrepancies, were evaluated. Results: The concordance rates were 94.9% and 88% for two neuropathologists. Two critical issues leading to discrepancies were identified: (1 identification of mitoses and (2 recognition of nuclear details. Conclusions: Given the current study is exclusively for surgical neuropathology cases, an all-encompassing conclusion about the utility of WSI for diagnostic purposes may not be available. Nevertheless, pathologists should be aware of the potential pitfalls due to identification of mitotic figures and nuclear details. We recommend independent validation for each subspecialty of pathology to identify subspecialty-specific concerns, so they can be properly addressed.

  16. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder Under Treatment Outcomes Research (AUTOR): a European observational study in pediatric subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Virginia; Lopez-Romero, Pedro; Anand, Ernie

    2015-12-01

    The ADHD Under Treatment Observational Research (AUTOR) study was a European prospective, observational study that assessed factors associated with changes in ADHD severity, estimated change from baseline in quality of life (QoL), and characterized changes in ADHD symptoms over a 2-year period as a function of baseline treatment. The primary objective was to identify factors associated with worsening in ADHD severity during a 2-year follow-up period for subjects aged 6-17 years, who were receiving the same pharmacotherapy for 3-8 months before enrollment and had a Clinical Global Impression (CGI)-ADHD-Severity score of mild/lower and a CGI-ADHD-Improvement score of improved/very much improved. Multivariate logistic regression examined the association of factors with worsening in ADHD. Mixed-model repeated measures regression analyzed QoL in terms of change from baseline in CHIP-CE PRF scores. There were 704 subjects analyzed. Variables associated with worsening ADHD severity were parental occupation, poorer school outcomes, and use of psychoeducation; baseline treatment was not significant. Among the secondary objectives, initial use of atomoxetine (vs. stimulants) was associated with a significant improvement on the CHIP-CE PRF total score, with an adjusted treatment difference of -6.0 (95 % CI -7.9, -4.1) at 24 months. Additionally, the odds of stability (CGI-ADHD-S ≤ 3 over the 2-year period) were significantly lower for subjects initially responding to stimulants compared with atomoxetine (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3, 0.8). ADHD symptom worsening was associated with initial use of psychoeducation, parental occupation, and poorer school outcomes. Response to initial treatment with atomoxetine was associated with improved QoL over 2 years.

  17. FISH-based detection of 1p 19q codeletion in oligodendroglial tumors: Procedures and protocols for neuropathological practice - A publication under the auspices of the Research Committee of the European Confederation of Neuropathological Societies (Euro-CNS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Woehrer (Adelheid); P. Sander (P.); C.C. Haberler (Christine); S. Kern; H. Maier (Hannes); M. Preusser (Matthias); C. Hartmann (Christian); J.M. Kros (Johan); J.A. Hainfellner (Johannes)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe codeletion of chromosomal arms 1p 19q is a characteristic and early genetic event in oligodendroglial tumors, that is associated with a better prognosis and enhanced response to therapy. Over the last years, the increasing clinical demand to determine the 1p 19q status has led to the

  18. Brief Report: An Exploratory Study Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes for Autism Spectrum Disorders under DSM-IV-TR with the Proposed DSM-5 Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Vicki; Aldridge, Fiona; Chandler, Felicity; Witzlsperger, Ellen; Smith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The proposed revision for Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) represents a shift from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). As the proposed DSM-5 criteria require a higher minimum number of symptoms to be…

  19. Correlation between spermatogenesis disorders and rat testes CYP2E1 mRNA contents under experimental alcoholism or type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayakhmetova, Ganna M; Bondarenko, Larysa B; Matvienko, Anatoliy V; Kovalenko, Valentina M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between spermatogenesis disorders and CYP2E1 mRNA contents in testes of rats with experimental alcoholism or type I diabetes. Two pathological states characterized by CYP2E1 induction were simulated on Wistar male rats: experimental alcoholism and type I diabetes. As controls for each state, equal number of animals (of the same age and weight) were used. Morphological evaluation of rat testes was carried out. The spermatogenic epithelium state was estimated by four points system. CYP2E1 mRNA expression was rated by method of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Pearson correlation coefficients were used for describing relationships between variables. The presence of alcoholism and diabetes-mediated quantitative and qualitative changes in male rat spermatogenic epithelium in comparison with norm has been demonstrated. The increased levels of testes CYP2E1 have been fixed simultaneously. CYP2E1 mRNA content negatively strongly correlated with spermatogenic index value (r=-0.99; Palcoholism. The strong correlation between CYP2E1 mRNA content and number of spermatogonia (r=0.99; P<0.001) and "windows" occurrence (r=0.96; P<0.001) has been fixed in diabetic rats testes. Present investigation has demonstrated that the testicular failure following chronic ethanol consumption and diabetes type I in male rats accompanied CYP2E1 mRNA over-expression in testes. The correlation between the levels of CYP2E1 mRNA in testes and spermatogenesis disorders allow supposing the involvement of CYP2E1 into the non-specific pathogenetic mechanisms of male infertility under above-mentioned pathologies. Copyright © 2014 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  1. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka; Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth; Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore; Nout, Remi A.; Sturdza, Alina; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  2. Typical and atypical stem cells in the brain, vitamin C effect and neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Nualart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are considered a valuable cellular resource for tissue replacement therapies in most brain disorders. Stem cells have the ability to self-replicate and differentiate into numerous cell types, including neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. As a result, stem cells have been considered the "holy grail" of modern medical neuroscience. Despite their tremendous therapeutic potential, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate their differentiation. In this review, we analyze stem cells in embryonic and adult brains, and illustrate the differentiation pathways that give origin to most brain cells. We also evaluate the emergent role of the well known anti-oxidant, vitamin C, in stem cell differentiation. We believe that a complete understanding of all molecular players, including vitamin C, in stem cell differentiation will positively impact on the use of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Functional polarization of neuroglia: Implications in neuroinflammation and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-03-01

    Recent neuroscience research has established the adult brain as a dynamic organ having a unique ability to undergo changes with time. Neuroglia, especially microglia and astrocytes, provide dynamicity to the brain. Activation of these glial cells is a major component of the neuroinflammatory responses underlying brain injury and neurodegeneration. Glial cells execute functional reaction programs in response to diverse microenvironmental signals manifested by neuropathological conditions. Activated microglia exist along a continuum of two functional states of polarization namely M1-type (classical/proinflammatory activation) and M2-type (alternative/anti-inflammatory activation) as in macrophages. The balance between classically and alternatively activated microglial phenotypes influences disease progression in the CNS. The classically activated state of microglia drives the neuroinflammatory response and mediates the detrimental effects on neurons, whereas in their alternative activation state, which is apparently a beneficial activation state, the microglia play a crucial role in tissue maintenance and repair. Likewise, in response to immune or inflammatory microenvironments astrocytes also adopt neurotoxic or neuroprotective phenotypes. Reactive astrocytes exhibit two distinctive functional phenotypes defined by pro- or anti-inflammatory gene expression profile. In this review, we have thoroughly covered recent advances in the understanding of the functional polarization of brain and peripheral glia and its implications in neuroinflammation and neurological disorders. The identifiable phenotypes adopted by neuroglia in response to specific insult or injury can be exploited as promising diagnostic markers of neuroinflammatory diseases. Furthermore, harnessing the beneficial effects of the polarized glia could undoubtedly pave the way for the formulation of novel glia-based therapeutic strategies for diverse neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc

  4. Kainic Acid-Induced Post-Status Epilepticus Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Diverging Seizure Phenotype and Neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bertoglio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of epilepsy models is to investigate disease ontogenesis and therapeutic interventions in a consistent and prospective manner. The kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (KASE rat model is a widely used, well-validated model for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. As we noted significant variability within the model between labs potentially related to the rat strain used, we aimed to describe two variants of this model with diverging seizure phenotype and neuropathology. In addition, we evaluated two different protocols to induce status epilepticus (SE. Wistar Han (Charles River, France and Sprague-Dawley (Harlan, The Netherlands rats were subjected to KASE using the Hellier kainic acid (KA and a modified injection scheme. Duration of SE and latent phase were characterized by video-electroencephalography (vEEG in a subgroup of animals, while animals were sacrificed 1 week (subacute phase and 12 weeks (chronic phase post-SE. In the 12 weeks post-SE groups, seizures were monitored with vEEG. Neuronal loss (neuronal nuclei, microglial activation (OX-42 and translocator protein, and neurodegeneration (Fluorojade C were assessed. First, the Hellier protocol caused very high mortality in WH/CR rats compared to SD/H animals. The modified protocol resulted in a similar SE severity for WH/CR and SD/H rats, but effectively improved survival rates. The latent phase was significantly shorter (p < 0.0001 in SD/H (median 8.3 days animals compared to WH/CR (median 15.4 days. During the chronic phase, SD/H rats had more seizures/day compared to WH/CR animals (p < 0.01. However, neuronal degeneration and cell loss were overall more extensive in WH/CR than in SD/H rats; microglia activation was similar between the two strains 1 week post-SE, but higher in WH/CR rats 12 weeks post-SE. These neuropathological differences may be more related to the distinct neurotoxic effects of KA in the two rat strains than being the outcome of seizure

  5. Association between fatty acid metabolism in the brain and Alzheimer disease neuropathology and cognitive performance: A nontargeted metabolomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G Snowden

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD pathology and expression of AD symptoms is poorly understood. Omega-3 and -6 fatty acids have previously been linked to both protective and pathogenic effects in AD. However, to date little is known about how the abundance of these species is affected by differing levels of disease pathology in the brain.We performed metabolic profiling on brain tissue samples from 43 individuals ranging in age from 57 to 95 y old who were stratified into three groups: AD (N = 14, controls (N = 14 and "asymptomatic Alzheimer's disease" (ASYMAD, i.e., individuals with significant AD neuropathology at death but without evidence for cognitive impairment during life (N = 15 from the autopsy sample of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA. We measured 4,897 metabolite features in regions both vulnerable in the middle frontal and inferior temporal gyri (MFG and ITG and resistant (cerebellum to classical AD pathology. The levels of six unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs in whole brain were compared in controls versus AD, and the differences were as follows: linoleic acid (p = 8.8 x 10-8, FC = 0.52, q = 1.03 x 10-6, linolenic acid (p = 2.5 x 10-4, FC = 0.84, q = 4.03 x 10-4, docosahexaenoic acid (p = 1.7 x 10-7, FC = 1.45, q = 1.24 x 10-6, eicosapentaenoic acid (p = 4.4 x 10-4, FC = 0.16, q = 6.48 x 10-4, oleic acid (p = 3.3 x 10-7, FC = 0.34, q = 1.46 x 10-6, and arachidonic acid (p = 2.98 x 10-5, FC = 0.75, q = 7.95 x 10-5. These fatty acids were strongly associated with AD when comparing the groups in the MFG and ITG, respectively: linoleic acid (p ASYMAD>AD and increases in docosahexanoic acid (AD>ASYMAD>control may represent regionally specific threshold levels of these metabolites beyond which the accumulation of AD pathology triggers the expression of clinical symptoms. The main limitation of this study is the relatively small sample size. There are few cohorts with extensive longitudinal cognitive assessments

  6. Under-diagnosis of mental disorder in people with intellectual disabilities: study of prevalence in population with different degrees of intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos PEÑA SALAZAR

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are a few studies in the literature analyzing the prevalence of mental illness in people with intellectual disabilities (ID. This study explores the prevalence of mental disorders in adults without previous mental disorder and different degrees of ID. We assessed 142 individuals with varying degrees of ID and with unknown previous psychiatric disorder. We applied the diagnostic battery PAS-ADD based on criteria ICD-10 and DSM-IV TR to analyzed the prevalence of mental disorders in people with mild / moderate ID. We applied the Spanish version of the scale DASH-II to analyze the prevalence of mental disorders in people with severe and profound ID. We found a psychiatric disorder previously undiagnosed in 29.57% of our sample. In people with mild/ moderate ID the most common psychiatric disorder was depressive disorder (33.3%, but in people with severe and profound ID was the anxiety disorder. The most prevalent medical comorbidity was epilepsy (22.5% of the total sample and 39.2% in the population with severe / profound intellectual disabilities. Psychiatric disorders seem to be more common in the population with ID than in the general population, increasing their prevalence and medical comorbidity in severe and profound ID.

  7. Autism as early neurodevelopmental disorder: evidence for an sAPPα-mediated anabolic pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Sokol, Deborah K.; Erickson, Craig; Ray, Balmiki; Ho, Chang Y.; Maloney, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by social skills and communication deficits and interfering repetitive behavior. Intellectual disability often accompanies autism. In addition to behavioral deficits, autism is characterized by neuropathology and brain overgrowth. Increased intracranial volume often accompanies this brain growth. We have found that the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) associated amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), especially its neuroprotective processing product, secrete...

  8. Prion diseases and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAN Shu-qin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases (PrD are a group of encephalopathies with neurodegenerative changes caused by prion protein (PrP whose characteristic datum is transmissibility. In most cases they occur in a sporadic form although a group of them are familial associated with mutations in PrP gene. Phenotypicvariability of fatal familial insomnia (FFI versus familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease178 (fCJD178 seems to determine the different methionine-valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PrP gene. Sleep disorders is one of the important clinical features for the diagnosis and definition of PrD. FFI, a hereditary disorder characterized by loss of physiological sleep with oneiric stupor, autonomic and motor hyperactivity. The polysomnography (PSG shows disappearance of the physiological pattern of non-rapid eye movement (NREM and rapid eye movement (REM sleep, as well as sleep spindles and K-complexes were absent. The hypothesis of the origin of these disorders is thalamic neuronal loss, especially in the anterior and dorsomedial nuclei, described in the neuropathology of these patients; besides, PET reveals hypofunction of thalamic nuclei, centres responsible for controlling wake-sleep. In CJD the wake-sleep disorders is not considered characteristic; nonetheless, frequent alterations have been found in the electroencephalographic registers of sleep. Besides thalamic neurodegeneration, there could be common etiopathogenic mechanisms in PrD in relation to the biological function of PrP.

  9. Chronic Hormonal Imbalance and Adipose Redistribution Is Associated with Hypothalamic Neuropathology following Blast Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandeVord, Pamela J; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Ereifej, Evon; Hermundstad, Amy; Mao, Shijie; Hadden, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disorders have been shown to be a consequence of blast traumatic brain injury in soldiers returning from military conflicts. Hormone deficiency and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) dysfunction can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, and decreased quality of life. Given these changes following blast exposure, the current study focused on investigating chronic pathology within the hypothalamus following blast, in addition to systemic effects. An established rodent model of blast neurotrauma was used to induce mild blast-induced neurotrauma. Adipose tissue, blood, and brain samples were collected at one and three months following a single blast exposure. Adipose tissue and blood were evaluated for changes in ACTH, adiponectin, C-reactive protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, interleukin (IL)-1β, and leptin. The hypothalamus was evaluated for injury using immunohistochemical techniques. The results demonstrated that the weight of the blast animals was significantly less, compared with the sham group. The slower rate of increase in their weight was associated with changes in ACTH, IL-1β, and leptin levels. Further, histological analysis indicated elevated levels of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells within the hypothalamus. The data suggest that long-term outcomes of brain injury occurring from blast exposure include dysfunction of the hypothalamus, which leads to compromised hormonal function, elevated biological stress-related hormones, and subsequent adipose tissue remodeling.

  10. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: Clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Stefanie H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Sims, Katherine B.; Hedley-Whyte, E. T.; Vossough, Arastoo; Frosch, Matthew P.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    Pigmented orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids HDLS are two adult onset leukodystrophies with neuroaxonal spheroids presenting with prominent neurobehavioral, cognitive, and motor symptoms. These are familial or sporadic disorders characterized by cerebral white matter degeneration including myelin and axonal loss, gliosis, macrophages, and axonal spheroids. We report clinical, neuroimaging and pathological correlations of four women ages 34–50 years with adult onset leukodystrophy. Their disease course ranged from 1.5–8 years. Three patients had progressive cognitive and behavioral changes whereas one had acute onset. Neuroimaging revealed white matter abnormalities characterized by symmetric, bilateral, T2 hyperintense and T1 hypointense MRI signal involving frontal lobe white matter in all patients. Extensive laboratory investigations were negative apart from abnormalities in some mitochondrial enzymes and immunologic parameters. Autopsies demonstrated severe leukodystrophy with myelin and axonal loss, axonal spheroids, and macrophages with early and severe frontal white matter involvement. The extent and degree of changes outside the frontal lobe appeared to correlate with disease duration. The prominent neurobehavioral deficits and frontal white matter disease provides clinical-pathologic support for association pathways linking distributed neural circuits subserving cognition. These observations lend further support to the notion that white matter disease alone can account for dementia. PMID:18422757

  11. Linalool reverses neuropathological and behavioral impairments in old triple transgenic Alzheimer's mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabogal-Guáqueta, Angélica Maria; Osorio, Edison; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Several types of treatments have been tested to block or delay the onset of the disease, but none have been completely successful. Diet, lifestyle and natural products are currently the main scientific focuses. Here, we evaluate the effects of oral administration of the monoterpene linalool (25 mg/kg), every 48 h for 3 months, on aged (21-24 months old) mice with a triple transgenic model of AD (3xTg-AD) mice. Linalool-treated 3xTg-AD mice showed improved learning and spatial memory and greater risk assessment behavior during the elevated plus maze. Hippocampi and amygdalae from linalool-treated 3xTg-AD mice exhibited a significant reduction in extracellular β-amyloidosis, tauopathy, astrogliosis and microgliosis as well as a significant reduction in the levels of the pro-inflammatory markers p38 MAPK, NOS2, COX2 and IL-1β. Together, our findings suggest that linalool reverses the histopathological hallmarks of AD and restores cognitive and emotional functions via an anti-inflammatory effect. Thus, linalool may be an AD prevention candidate for preclinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Linalool reverses neuropathological and behavioral impairments in old triple transgenic Alzheimer’s mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Sabogal-Guáqueta Angélica; Edison, Osorio; Patricia, Cardona-Gómez Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Several types of treatments have been tested to block or delay the onset of the disease, but none have been completely successful. Diet, lifestyle and natural products are currently the main scientific focuses. Here, we evaluate the effects of oral administration of the monoterpene linalool (25 mg / kg), every 48 hours for 3 months, on aged (21–24 months old) mice with a triple transgenic model of AD (3xTg-AD) mice. Linalool-treated 3xTg-AD mice showed improved learning and spatial memory and greater risk assessment behavior during the elevated plus maze. Hippocampi and amygdalae from linalool-treated 3xTg-AD mice exhibited a significant reduction in extracellular β-amyloidosis, tauopathy, astrogliosis and microgliosis as well as a significant reduction in the levels of the pro-inflammatory markers p38 MAPK, NOS2, COX2 and IL-1β. Together, our findings suggest that linalool reverses the histopathological hallmarks of AD and restores cognitive and emotional functions via an anti-inflammatory effect. Thus, linalool may be an AD prevention candidate for preclinical studies. PMID:26549854

  13. 2000 Volvo Award winner in basic science studies: Exogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha mimics nucleus pulposus-induced neuropathology. Molecular, histologic, and behavioral comparisons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, T; Kikuchi, S; Shubayev, V; Myers, R R

    2000-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the 17-kDa form of tumor necrosis factor-alpha is the pathophysiologic agent expressed by herniated nucleus pulposus in vivo that is primarily responsible for the histologic and behavioral manifestations of experimental sciatica associated with herniated lumbar discs. The authors determined the molecular weight and concentration of active tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rat herniated disc and used exogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha at the same molecular weight to study its neuropathologic effect on rat nerve root and dorsal root ganglion preparations in vivo. Expressed by herniated nucleus pulposus in culture, tumor necrosis factor-alpha causes neuropathologic injury in nerve roots and neuropathic pain states in which mechanical allodynia is seen in response to peripheral stimuli. Western blotting was used to identify the molecular weight of the operative tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein form, and measures of optical density were used for semiquantitative determination of concentration. Plastic-embedded nerve roots and dorsal root ganglion were used for neuropathologic evaluation, and von Frey stimulation was used to quantify mechanical allodynia. The 17-kDa form of tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by herniated nucleus pulposus at a concentration of approximately 0.48 ng per herniated rat lumbar disc. Exogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha applied in vivo to rat nerve roots produced neuropathologic changes and behavior deficits that mimicked experimental studies with herniated nucleus pulposus applied to nerve roots. The data reinforce other evidence that tumor necrosis factor-alpha is involved in mechanisms of neuropathic pain.

  14. The Role of Protein Radicals in Chronic Neuroimmune Dysfunction and Neuropathology in Response to a Multiple-Hit Model of Gulf War Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Model, Chlorpyrifos, LPS, NF-KB p50, microglia , chronic neuroinflammation , serum markers, neuropathology 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chronic peripheral inflammation and neuroinflammation have been linked to Gulf War Illness (GWI...ongoing, preliminary results suggest that the hippocampus in NF-κB p50-/- mice is more vulnerable to chronic neuroinflammation at one week after pro

  15. Evaluation of acetylcholine, seizure activity and neuropathology following high-dose nerve agent exposure and delayed neuroprotective treatment drugs in freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acon-Chen, Cindy; Koenig, Jeffrey A; Smith, Garrett R; Truitt, Amber R; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents such as soman (GD) inhibit acetylcholinesterase, producing an excess of acetylcholine (ACh), which results in respiratory distress, convulsions and status epilepticus that leads to neuropathology. Several drugs (topiramate, clobazam, pregnanolone, allopregnanolone, UBP 302, cyclopentyladenosine [CPA], ketamine, midazolam and scopolamine) have been identified as potential neuroprotectants that may terminate seizures and reduce brain damage. To systematically evaluate their efficacy, this study employed in vivo striatal microdialysis and liquid chromatography to respectively collect and analyze extracellular ACh in freely moving rats treated with these drugs 20 min after seizure onset induced by a high dose of GD. Along with microdialysis, EEG activity was recorded and neuropathology assessed at 24 h. GD induced a marked increase of ACh, which peaked at 30 min post-exposure to 800% of control levels and then steadily decreased toward baseline levels. Approximately 40 min after treatment, only midazolam (10 mg/kg) and CPA (60 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction of ACh levels, with CPA reducing ACh levels more rapidly than midazolam. Both drugs facilitated a return to baseline levels at least 55 min after treatment. At 24 h, only animals treated with CPA (67%), midazolam (18%) and scopolamine (27%) exhibited seizure termination. While all treatments except for topiramate reduced neuropathology, CPA, midazolam and scopolamine showed the greatest reduction in pathology. Our results suggest that delayed treatment with CPA, midazolam, or scopolamine is effective at reducing GD-induced seizure activity and neuropathology, with CPA and midazolam capable of facilitating a reduction in GD-induced ACh elevation.

  16. Selenomethionine Ameliorates Neuropathology in the Olfactory Bulb of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Zhong-Hao Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory dysfunction is an early and common symptom in Alzheimer′s disease (AD and is reported to be related to several pathologic changes, including the deposition of Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau protein as well as synaptic impairment. Selenomethionine (Se-Met, the major form of selenium in animals and humans, may be a promising therapeutic option for AD as it decreases the deposition of Aβ and tau hyperphosphorylation in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3× Tg-AD. In this study, 4-month-old AD mice were treated with 6 µg/mL Se-Met in drinking water for 12 weeks and the effect of Se-Met on neuropathological deficits in olfactory bulb (OB of 3× Tg-AD mice was investigated. The administration of Se-Met effectively decreased the production and deposition of Aβ by inhibiting β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1-regulated amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and reduced the level of total tau and phosphorylated tau, which depended on depressing the activity and expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5. Meanwhile, Se-Met reduced glial activation, relieved neuroinflammation and attenuated neuronal cell death in the OB of AD mice. So Se-Met could improve pathologic changes of AD in the OB, which further demonstrated the potential therapeutic effect of Se-Met in AD.

  17. Calpain inhibition reduces ataxin-3 cleavage alleviating neuropathology and motor impairments in mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Ana Teresa; Gonçalves, Nélio; Nobre, Rui Jorge; Duarte, Carlos Bandeira; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2014-09-15

    Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD) is the most prevalent autosomal dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxia. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the ATXN3 gene, which translates into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein. Present treatments are symptomatic and do not prevent disease progression. As calpain overactivation has been shown to contribute to mutant ataxin-3 proteolysis, translocation to the nucleus, inclusions formation and neurodegeneration, we investigated the potential role of calpain inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to alleviate MJD pathology. For this purpose, we administered orally the calpain inhibitor BDA-410 to a lentiviral mouse model of MJD. Western-blot and immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of N- and C-terminal mutant ataxin-3 fragments and the colocalization of large inclusions with cleaved caspase-3 in the mice brain. Oral administration of the calpain inhibitor BDA-410 decreased both fragments formation and full-length ataxin-3 levels, reduced aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 and prevented cell injury and striatal and cerebellar degeneration. Importantly, in correlation with the preserved cerebellar morphology, BDA-410 prevented motor behavioural deficits. In conclusion, BDA-410 alleviates Machado-Joseph neuropathology and may therefore be an effective therapeutic option for MJD. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and its co-occurrence with Alzheimer’s disease and other cerebrovascular neuropathologic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenowitz, Willa D.; Nelson, Peter T.; Besser, Lilah M.; Heller, Katherine B.; Kukull, Walter A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the relationship between cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), Alzheimer’s disease neuropathologic changes (ADNC), other vascular brain pathologies, and cognition in a large multi-center autopsy sample. Data was obtained from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center on autopsied subjects (N=3,976) who died between 2005 and 2012. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models estimated the associations between CAA and other pathologies, and between CAA severity and cognitive test scores proximal to death. CAA tended to co-occur with ADNC but a substantial minority of cases were discrepant. CAA was absent in 22% (n= 520) of subjects with frequent neuritic plaques but present in 20.9% (n=91) of subjects with no neuritic plaques. In subjects with no/sparse neuritic plaques, non-hemorrhagic brain infarcts were more common in those with CAA pathology than without (P= 0.007). In subjects without the APOE ε4 allele, CAA severity was associated with lower cognition proximal to death, factoring in other pathologies. The presence of CAA in non-AD patients may indicate a distinct cerebrovascular condition. PMID:26239176

  19. Functional impairments in patients with borderline personality disorders demonstrated by neurospect HMPAO Tc99 in basal conditions and under frontal activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Cristian; Mena G, Ismael; Correa, Maria del Pilar

    2000-01-01

    We study a sample of 18 patients in basal conditions and 31 patients with diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder (DSM-IV Criteria) during cortical activation by means of the Wisconsin card sorting test and assessing function/cerebral blood flow by means of HMPAO Tc 99m NeuroSPECT. The results of changes of cerebral blood flow are shown statistically in a parametric image expressing standard deviations above or below the means of a normative data base for the corresponding age of the patient. We consider only as having significance levels below 2 standard deviations of the normal means . Over this parametric map we project a matrix of Brodmann areas developed by our group in order to precisely localize the areas of abnormality observed. We express our results as percentages of the areas of Brodmann that demonstrates hypoperfusion and we compare the results in a population studied in basal conditions (n=18) and (n=31) during activation by means of the Wisconsin card sorting test. In our results we highlight, in order of importance areas of paradoxical hypoperfusion in conditions of activation versus basal measurements in anterior cyngulate gyrus (Area 24) in both hemispheres. This is followed in importance by Subgenual area (Area 25), area 40 and area 32 in the left hemisphere, and area 28 in the right hemisphere, then followed by area 28 and area 36 in the left hemisphere, area M* and area 44 in both hemispheres, and areas 32, 9 and 46 of Brodmann in the right hemisphere. We concluded that there is a dysfunctional correlation of frontal function in borderline personality disorder. Particularly noticeable is the lack of motivation when there are changes in plans and conduct, lack of pleasure and loss of the meaning of a task during the cortical stimulation. In particular, the Brodmann areas 24, 25 and 32, linked to motivation show a wider involvement when they are exposed to changes in planning and in coping strategies, as it happens during the Wisconsin Test

  20. Preclinical study of dimebon on β-amyloid-mediated neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease

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    Xie Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimebon is a retired non-selective antihistamine drug currently being investigated as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Results from several completed clinical trials are mixed and contradictory. Proper interpretations of these clinical observations, as well as future development of dimebon in AD treatment are complicated by the lack of concrete information on the mechanisms by which dimebon might benefit AD. Results The present studies are designed specifically to assess whether dimebon might modulate β-amyloid (Aβ-mediated responses which are central to the development and progression of AD dementia. We found that dimebon is bioavailable in the brains of mice following oral administration. AD mice chronically treated with dimebon exhibited a trend of improvement in spatial memory function without affecting the levels of total Aβ as well as soluble oligomeric Aβ in the brain. The same trend of behavior improvement is also seen in wild type animals chronically treated with dimebon. Conclusion Collectively, our preclinical studies using the TgCRND8 AD mouse model demonstrated that dimebon might have some beneficial effect in improving cognitive function independent of Alzheimer's disease-type Aβ-related mechanisms or global energy metabolism in the brain. Observations from our study and others suggesting dimebon might improve cognition in wild type mice and rats raises the possibility that dimebon might be able to benefit cognitive function in patients with other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington's disease, or in the aging population. Additional studies will be necessary to clarify the mechanisms by which dimebon might directly or indirectly benefit cognitive function.

  1. Experimental intoxication of guinea pigs with Ipomoea carnea: behavioural and neuropathological alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholich, Luciana A; Márquez, Mercedes; Pumarola i Batlle, Martí; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Teibler, Gladys P; Rios, Elvio E; Acosta, Ofelia C

    2013-12-15

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant that affects goats, with symptoms being characterised by nervous disorders and death. Swainsonine and calystegines are the principal toxic components isolated from I. carnea, which also yields lysergic acid derivatives. The aim of this study was to improve the clinical characterisation of experimental intoxication by I. carnea in guinea pigs through the evaluation of behavioural changes and to perform a thorough histopathological analysis of the affected CNS. Leaves of I. carnea were administered to guinea pigs. Open-field gait analysis and monoamine levels were measured. The poisoned animals exhibited increased vocalisation, lethargy, and a reduction in the locomotion frequency after the fourth week of intoxication, as demonstrated in the open-field test. Significant differences were observed in hind-limb gait width by the last week of intoxication. After 65 days, the guinea pigs were euthanised, necropsied, and examined using light and electron microscopy. At the end of the experiment, plasma serotonin decreased. In contrast, dopamine decreased, and noradrenaline increased in urine. Brain sections were evaluated with conventional histological methods and immunohistochemistry (IHC), as well as by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Vacuoles were observed throughout the brain, but they were particularly prominent in the brainstem. In addition, there were PAS-negative regions, and the Nissl substance was dispersed or absent, which was confirmed with the Kluver-Barreda stain. Moderate microgliosis was observed by immunohistochemistry. In the medulla oblongata, numerous ubiquitin-positive spheroids together with neuronal degeneration were observed in the nucleus gracilis/cuneatus. Furthermore, vacuoles were observed in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and endothelial cells by TEM. Our results showed that the behavioural effects may have been caused by alterations in the brain in conjunction with changes in monoamine levels. This

  2. Neuropathological findings in entorhinal cortex of subjects aged 50 years or older and their correlation with dementia in a sample from Southern Brazil

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    Edson Rodrigues Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The aims of this study were to survey neurodegenerative changes detected by abnormal protein deposits in the Entorhinal Cortex (EC of subjects aged 50 years or older and to correlate these findings with suspected dementia, as detected by the IQCODE (Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly . Methods: Fourteen brains were submitted to the immunohistochemistry technique for different proteins (beta-amyloid, tau, -synuclein and phospho-TDP-43 and data obtained compared with IQCODE scores. Results: Fifty-seven percent of the individuals exhibited IQCODE results compatible with dementia, being classified into the demented group (DG: 87.5% of patients had neuropathological findings corresponding to Alzheimer's-like brain pathology (ALBP. Of the patients in the non-demented group (NDG, 16.7% met neuropathological criteria for ALBP. All individuals in the DG showed deposits of more than one kind of protein in the EC. The most common association was hyperphosphorylated tau and beta-amyloid protein (87.5%. Discussion: Most individuals with dementia had neuropathological findings of ALBP, as did one individual with no signs of dementia, characterizing a preclinical stage. The results of this study suggest that deposits of a single type of anomalous protein are normal findings in an aging brain, while more than one kind of protein or the combined presence of anomalous protein deposits indicate the presence of dementia.

  3. Regional correlations between [11C]PIB PET and post-mortem burden of amyloid-beta pathology in a diverse neuropathological cohort

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    Sang Won Seo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging-pathological correlation studies show that in vivo amyloid-β (Aβ positron emission tomography (PET strongly predicts the presence of significant Aβ pathology at autopsy. We sought to determine whether regional PiB-PET uptake would improve sensitivity for amyloid detection in comparison with global measures (experiment 1, and to estimate the relative contributions of different Aβ aggregates to in vivo PET signal (experiment 2. In experiment 1, 54 subjects with [11C] PiB-PET during life and postmortem neuropathologic examination (85.2% with dementia, interval from PET to autopsy 3.1 ± 1.9 years were included. We assessed Thal amyloid phase (N = 36 and CERAD score (N = 54 versus both global and regional PiB SUVRs. In experiment 2 (N = 42, PiB SUVR and post-mortem amyloid β burden was analyzed in five customized regions of interest matching regions sampled at autopsy. We assessed the relative contribution of neuritic plaques (NPs, diffuse plaques (DPs and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA to regional PIB SUVR using multi-linear regression. In experiment 1, there were no differences in Area Under the Curve for amyloid phase ≥ A2 and CERAD score ≥ C2 between global and highest regional PiB SUVR (p = 0.186 and 0.230. In experiment 2, when NPs, DPs, and/or CAA were included in the same model, moderate to severe NPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in all regions except for the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.414–0.804, p < 0.05, whereas DPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in the angular gyrus ROI (β = 0.446, p = 0.010. CAA was also associated with PiB SUVR in the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.222–0.355, p < 0.05. In conclusion, global PiB-PET SUVR performed as well as regional values for amyloid detection in our cohort. The substrate-specific binding of PiB might differ among the brain specific regions.

  4. Regional correlations between [11C]PIB PET and post-mortem burden of amyloid-beta pathology in a diverse neuropathological cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang Won; Ayakta, Nagehan; Grinberg, Lea T; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Lehmann, Manja; Reed, Bruce; DeCarli, Charles; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J; Boxer, Adam L; O'Neil, James P; Jin, Lee-Way; Seeley, William W; Jagust, William J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2017-01-01

    Imaging-pathological correlation studies show that in vivo amyloid-β (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) strongly predicts the presence of significant Aβ pathology at autopsy. We sought to determine whether regional PiB-PET uptake would improve sensitivity for amyloid detection in comparison with global measures (experiment 1), and to estimate the relative contributions of different Aβ aggregates to in vivo PET signal (experiment 2). In experiment 1, 54 subjects with [ 11 C] PiB-PET during life and postmortem neuropathologic examination (85.2% with dementia, interval from PET to autopsy 3.1 ± 1.9 years) were included. We assessed Thal amyloid phase (N = 36) and CERAD score (N = 54) versus both global and regional PiB SUVRs. In experiment 2 (N = 42), PiB SUVR and post-mortem amyloid β burden was analyzed in five customized regions of interest matching regions sampled at autopsy. We assessed the relative contribution of neuritic plaques (NPs), diffuse plaques (DPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to regional PIB SUVR using multi-linear regression. In experiment 1, there were no differences in Area Under the Curve for amyloid phase ≥ A2 and CERAD score ≥ C2 between global and highest regional PiB SUVR ( p  = 0.186 and 0.230). In experiment 2, when NPs, DPs, and/or CAA were included in the same model, moderate to severe NPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in all regions except for the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.414-0.804, p  PiB SUVR in the angular gyrus ROI (β = 0.446, p  = 0.010). CAA was also associated with PiB SUVR in the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.222-0.355, p  PiB-PET SUVR performed as well as regional values for amyloid detection in our cohort. The substrate-specific binding of PiB might differ among the brain specific regions.

  5. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Bulimia What Causes Eating Disorders? Sports and Eating Disorders Effects of Eating Disorders Treatment for Eating Disorders Print ... when they are biologically destined to gain it. Effects of Eating Disorders Eating disorders are serious medical illnesses. They often ...

  6. Mental Disorders

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    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  7. A critical appraisal of neuroimaging studies of bipolar disorder: toward a new conceptualization of underlying neural circuitry and roadmap for future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mary L; Swartz, Holly A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This critical review appraises neuroimaging findings in bipolar disorder in emotion processing, emotion regulation, and reward processing neural circuitry, to synthesize current knowledge of the neural underpinnings of bipolar disorder, and provide a neuroimaging research “roadmap” for future studies. Method We examined findings from all major studies in bipolar disorder that used fMRI, volumetric analyses, diffusion imaging, and resting state techniques, to inform current conceptual models of larger-scale neural circuitry abnormalities in bipolar disorder Results Bipolar disorder can be conceptualized in neural circuitry terms as parallel dysfunction in bilateral prefrontal cortical (especially ventrolateral prefrontal cortical)-hippocampal-amygdala emotion processing and emotion regulation neural circuitries, together with an “overactive” left-sided ventral striatal-ventrolateral and orbitofrontal cortical reward processing circuitry, that result in characteristic behavioral abnormalities associated with bipolar disorder: emotional lability, emotional dysregulation and heightened reward sensitivity. A potential structural basis for these functional abnormalities are gray matter decreases in prefrontal and temporal cortices, amygdala and hippocampus, and fractional anisotropy decreases in white matter tracts connecting prefrontal and subcortical regions. Conclusion Neuroimaging studies of bipolar disorder clearly demonstrate abnormalities in neural circuitries supporting emotion processing, emotion regulation and reward processing, although there are several limitations to these studies. Future neuroimaging research in bipolar disorder should include studies adopting dimensional approaches; larger studies examining neurodevelopmental trajectories in bipolar disorder and at-risk youth; multimodal neuroimaging studies using integrated systems approaches; and studies using pattern recognition approaches to provide clinically useful, individual

  8. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

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    Jelena Petrovic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS. The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8, and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6 electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG, the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure, the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs. Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann–Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman’s correlation. Results We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency (αAVG in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered “alpha flow”, indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions

  9. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and "flow"-possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Jelena; Milosevic, Vuk; Zivkovic, Miroslava; Stojanov, Dragan; Milojkovic, Olga; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS). The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8), and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6) electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG), the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure), the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs). Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann-Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman's correlation. We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency ( α AVG) in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered "alpha flow", indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions. Although the stroke induced slower alpha was a

  10. Influence of neuropathology on convection-enhanced delivery in the rat hippocampus.

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    Svetlana Kantorovich

    Full Text Available Local drug delivery techniques, such as convention-enhanced delivery (CED, are promising novel strategies for delivering therapeutic agents otherwise limited by systemic toxicity and blood-brain-barrier restrictions. CED uses positive pressure to deliver infusate homogeneously into interstitial space, but its distribution is dependent upon appropriate tissue targeting and underlying neuroarchitecture. To investigate effects of local tissue pathology and associated edema on infusate distribution, CED was applied to the hippocampi of rats that underwent electrically-induced, self-sustaining status epilepticus (SE, a prolonged seizure. Infusion occurred 24 hours post-SE, using a macromolecular tracer, the magnetic resonance (MR contrast agent gadolinium chelated with diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid and covalently attached to albumin (Gd-albumin. High-resolution T1- and T2-relaxation-weighted MR images were acquired at 11.1 Tesla in vivo prior to infusion to generate baseline contrast enhancement images and visualize morphological changes, respectively. T1-weighted imaging was repeated post-infusion to visualize final contrast-agent distribution profiles. Histological analysis was performed following imaging to characterize injury. Infusions of Gd-albumin into injured hippocampi resulted in larger distribution volumes that correlated with increased injury severity, as measured by hyperintense regions seen in T2-weighted images and corresponding histological assessments of neuronal degeneration, myelin degradation, astrocytosis, and microglial activation. Edematous regions included the CA3 hippocampal subfield, ventral subiculum, piriform and entorhinal cortex, amygdalar nuclei, middle and laterodorsal/lateroposterior thalamic nuclei. This study demonstrates MR-visualized injury processes are reflective of cellular alterations that influence local distribution volume, and provides a quantitative basis for the planning of local therapeutic

  11. Evaluation of Avulsion-Induced Neuropathology in Rat Spinal Cords with 18F-FDG Micro-PET/CT.

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    Ze-Min Ling

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus root avulsion (BPRA leads to dramatic motoneuron death and glial reactions in the corresponding spinal segments at the late stage of injury. To protect spinal motoneurons, assessment of the affected spinal segments should be done at an earlier stage of the injury. In this study, we employed 18F-FDG small-animal PET/CT to assess the severity of BPRA-induced cervical spinal cord injuries. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly treated and divided into three groups: Av+NS (brachial plexus root avulsion (Av treated with normal saline, Av+GM1 (treated with monosialoganglioside, and control. At time points of 3 day (d, 1 week (w, 2 w, 4 w and 8 w post-injury, 18F-FDG micro-PET/CT scans and neuropathology assessments of the injured spinal roots, as well as the spinal cord, were performed. The outcomes of the different treatments were compared. The results showed that BPRA induced local bleeding and typical Wallerian degeneration of the avulsed roots accompanied by 18F-FDG accumulations at the ipsilateral cervical intervertebral foramen. BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and overexpression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the motoneurons correlated with higher 18F-FDG uptake in the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord during the first 2 w post-injury. The GM1 treatment reduced BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and inhibited the de novo nNOS expressions in spinal motoneurons. The GM1 treatment also protected spinal motoneurons from avulsion within the first 4 w post-injury. The data from this study suggest that 18F-FDG PET/CT could be used to assess the severity of BPRA-induced primary and secondary injuries in the spinal cord. Furthermore, GM1 is an effective drug for reducing primary and secondary spinal cord injuries following BPRA.

  12. Chronic temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with enhanced Alzheimer-like neuropathology in 3×Tg-AD mice.

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    Xiao-Xin Yan

    Full Text Available The comorbidity between epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (AD is a topic of growing interest. Senile plaques and tauopathy are found in epileptic human temporal lobe structures, and individuals with AD have an increased incidence of spontaneous seizures. However, why and how epilepsy is associated with enhanced AD-like pathology remains unknown. We have recently shown β-secretase-1 (BACE1 elevation associated with aberrant limbic axonal sprouting in epileptic CD1 mice. Here we sought to explore whether BACE1 upregulation affected the development of Alzheimer-type neuropathology in mice expressing mutant human APP, presenilin and tau proteins, the triple transgenic model of AD (3×Tg-AD. 3×Tg-AD mice were treated with pilocarpine or saline (i.p. at 6-8 months of age. Immunoreactivity (IR for BACE1, β-amyloid (Aβ and phosphorylated tau (p-tau was subsequently examined at 9, 11 or 14 months of age. Recurrent convulsive seizures, as well as mossy fiber sprouting and neuronal death in the hippocampus and limbic cortex, were observed in all epileptic mice. Neuritic plaques composed of BACE1-labeled swollen/sprouting axons and extracellular AβIR were seen in the hippocampal formation, amygdala and piriform cortices of 9 month-old epileptic, but not control, 3×Tg-AD mice. Densities of plaque-associated BACE1 and AβIR were elevated in epileptic versus control mice at 11 and 14 months of age. p-Tau IR was increased in dentate granule cells and mossy fibers in epileptic mice relative to controls at all time points examined. Thus, pilocarpine-induced chronic epilepsy was associated with accelerated and enhanced neuritic plaque formation and altered intraneuronal p-tau expression in temporal lobe structures in 3×Tg-AD mice, with these pathologies occurring in regions showing neuronal death and axonal dystrophy.

  13. Differential associations between sensory loss and neuropsychiatric symptoms in adults with and without a neurocognitive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Kim M; Mortby, Moyra E; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the differential associations between sensory loss and neuropsychiatric symptoms among older adults with and without diagnosed neurocognitive disorder. The sample comprised 1,393 adults (52.3% men) aged between 72 and 79 years from a community-based cohort study. There were 213 cases of mild and 64 cases of major neurocognitive disorders. The main outcome was number of informant reported symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Sensory loss was defined by visual acuity worse the 0.3 logMAR (6/12 or 20/40) and self-reported hearing problems. Clinically relevant NPI symptoms were reported in 182 (13.1%) participants, but no individual symptom occurred in more than 5% of the total sample. Among participants diagnosed with a major neurocognitive disorder, those with any sensory loss had over three times (95%CI: 1.72-11.78) greater rates of NPI symptoms than those with unimpaired levels of sensory functioning. There were no differences in the number of neuropsychiatric symptoms by type of sensory loss, and no additional risk associated with a dual sensory loss compared to a single sensory loss. There was no evidence of an association between sensory loss and number of neuropsychiatric symptoms among cognitively healthy adults. The extent to which this association is the result of underlying neuropathology, unmet need, or interpersonal factors is unclear. These findings have significant implications for dementia care settings, including hospitals and respite care, as patients with sensory loss are at increased risk of neuropsychiatric symptoms and may require additional psychosocial support. Interventions to manage sensory loss and reduce the impact of sensory limitations on neuropsychiatric symptoms are needed.

  14. Autism as early neurodevelopmental disorder: evidence for an sAPPα-mediated anabolic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debomoy K Lahiri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by social skills and communication deficits and interfering repetitive behavior. Intellectual disability often accompanies autism. In addition to behavioral deficits, autism is characterized by neuropathology and brain overgrowth. Increased intracranial volume often accompanies this brain growth. We have found that the Alzheimer’s disease (AD associated amyloid-β precursor protein (APP, especially its neuroprotective processing product, secreted APP α (sAPPα, is elevated in persons with autism. This has led to the anabolic hypothesis of autism etiology, in which neuronal overgrowth in the brain results in interneuronal misconnections that may underlie multiple autism symptoms. We review the contribution of research in brain volume and of APP to the anabolic hypothesis, and relate APP to other proteins and pathways that have already been directly associated with autism, such as fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, Ras small GTPase/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (Ras/ERK, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR. We also present additional evidence of MRI intracranial measurements in favor of the anabolic hypothesis. Finally, since it appears that APP’s involvement in autism is part of a multi-partner network, we extend this concept into the inherently interactive realm of epigenetics. We speculate that the underlying molecular abnormalities that influence APP’s contribution to autism are epigenetic markers overlaid onto potentially vulnerable gene sequences due to environmental influence.

  15. Autism as early neurodevelopmental disorder: evidence for an sAPPα-mediated anabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Debomoy K; Sokol, Deborah K; Erickson, Craig; Ray, Balmiki; Ho, Chang Y; Maloney, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by social skills and communication deficits and interfering repetitive behavior. Intellectual disability often accompanies autism. In addition to behavioral deficits, autism is characterized by neuropathology and brain overgrowth. Increased intracranial volume often accompanies this brain growth. We have found that the Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), especially its neuroprotective processing product, secreted APP α, is elevated in persons with autism. This has led to the "anabolic hypothesis" of autism etiology, in which neuronal overgrowth in the brain results in interneuronal misconnections that may underlie multiple autism symptoms. We review the contribution of research in brain volume and of APP to the anabolic hypothesis, and relate APP to other proteins and pathways that have already been directly associated with autism, such as fragile X mental retardation protein, Ras small GTPase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin. We also present additional evidence of magnetic resonance imaging intracranial measurements in favor of the anabolic hypothesis. Finally, since it appears that APP's involvement in autism is part of a multi-partner network, we extend this concept into the inherently interactive realm of epigenetics. We speculate that the underlying molecular abnormalities that influence APP's contribution to autism are epigenetic markers overlaid onto potentially vulnerable gene sequences due to environmental influence.

  16. A systems approach identifies networks and genes linking sleep and stress: implications for neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Scarpa, Joseph R; Fitzpatrick, Karrie; Losic, Bojan; Gao, Vance D; Hao, Ke; Summa, Keith C; Yang, He S; Zhang, Bin; Allada, Ravi; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Kasarskis, Andrew

    2015-05-05

    Sleep dysfunction and stress susceptibility are comorbid complex traits that often precede and predispose patients to a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we demonstrate multilevel organizations of genetic landscape, candidate genes, and molecular networks associated with 328 stress and sleep traits in a chronically stressed population of 338 (C57BL/6J × A/J) F2 mice. We constructed striatal gene co-expression networks, revealing functionally and cell-type-specific gene co-regulations important for stress and sleep. Using a composite ranking system, we identified network modules most relevant for 15 independent phenotypic categories, highlighting a mitochondria/synaptic module that links sleep and stress. The key network regulators of this module are overrepresented with genes implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases. Our work suggests that the interplay among sleep, stress, and neuropathology emerges from genetic influences on gene expression and their collective organization through complex molecular networks, providing a framework for interrogating the mechanisms underlying sleep, stress susceptibility, and related neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sexual desire disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Keith A

    2008-06-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and sexual aversion disorder (SAD) are an under-diagnosed group of disorders that affect men and women. Despite their prevalence, these two disorders are often not addressed by healthcare providers and patients due their private and awkward nature. As physicians, we need to move beyond our own unease in order to adequately address our patients' sexual problems and implement appropriate treatment. Using the Sexual Response Cycle as the model of the physiological changes of humans during sexual stimulation and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition this article will review the current literature on the desire disorders focusing on prevalence, etiology, and treatment.

  18. Glycosylation defects underlying fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: a novel pathogenetic model. "When the wine goes in, strange things come out" - S.T. Coleridge, The Piccolomini.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binkhorst, M.; Wortmann, S.B.; Funke, S.; Kozicz, L.T.; Wevers, R.A.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term used to describe the craniofacial dysmorphic features, malformations, and disturbances in growth, neurodevelopment and behavior occurring in individuals prenatally exposed to alcohol. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) represents the severe end of

  19. Sexual Desire Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and sexual aversion disorder (SAD) are an under-diagnosed group of disorders that affect men and women. Despite their prevalence, these two disorders are often not addressed by healthcare providers and patients due their private and awkward nature. As physicians, we need to move beyond our own unease in order to adequately address our patients’ sexual problems and implement appropriate treatment. Using the Sexual Response Cycle as the model of the phys...

  20. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian sleep has evolved under the influence of the day-night cycle and in response to reproductive needs, food seeking, and predator avoidance, resulting in circadian (predictive) and homeostatic (reactive) regulation. A molecular clock characterized by transcription/translation feedback loops...... mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...... in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive sleep apneas...

  1. Gray Matter Abnormalities in Non-comorbid Medication-naive Patients with Major Depressive Disorder or Social Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjin Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Interpretation: Our results indicate that MDD and SAD share common patterns of gray matter abnormalities in the orbitofrontal-striatal-thalamic circuit, salience network and dorsal attention network. These consistent structural differences in the two patient groups may contribute to the broad spectrum of emotional, cognitive and behavioral disturbances observed in MDD patients and SAD patients. In addition, we found disorder-specific involvement of the visual processing regions in MDD and the precentral cortex in SAD. These findings provide new evidence regarding the shared and specific neuropathological mechanisms that underlie MDD and SAD.

  2. Host genetic factors predisposing to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallianpur, Asha R; Levine, Andrew J

    2014-09-01

    The success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in transforming the lives of HIV-infected individuals with access to these drugs is tempered by the increasing threat of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) to their overall health and quality of life. Intensive investigations over the past two decades have underscored the role of host immune responses, inflammation, and monocyte-derived macrophages in HAND, but the precise pathogenic mechanisms underlying HAND remain only partially delineated. Complicating research efforts and therapeutic drug development are the sheer complexity of HAND phenotypes, diagnostic imprecision, and the growing intersection of chronic immune activation with aging-related comorbidities. Yet, genetic studies still offer a powerful means of advancing individualized care for HIV-infected individuals at risk. There is an urgent need for 1) longitudinal studies using consistent phenotypic definitions of HAND in HIV-infected subpopulations at very high risk of being adversely impacted, such as children, 2) tissue studies that correlate neuropathological changes in multiple brain regions with genomic markers in affected individuals and with changes at the RNA, epigenomic, and/or protein levels, and 3) genetic association studies using more sensitive subphenotypes of HAND. The NIH Brain Initiative and Human Connectome Project, coupled with rapidly evolving systems biology and machine learning approaches for analyzing high-throughput genetic, transcriptomic and epigenetic data, hold promise for identifying actionable biological processes and gene networks that underlie HAND. This review summarizes the current state of understanding of host genetic factors predisposing to HAND in light of past challenges and suggests some priorities for future research to advance the understanding and clinical management of HAND in the cART era.

  3. Genetic dissection of a cell-autonomous neurodegenerative disorder: lessons learned from mouse models of Niemann-Pick disease type C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Lopez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding neurodegenerative disease progression and its treatment requires the systematic characterization and manipulation of relevant cell types and molecular pathways. The neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC is highly amenable to genetic approaches that allow exploration of the disease biology at the organismal, cellular and molecular level. Although NPC is a rare disease, genetic analysis of the associated neuropathology promises to provide insight into the logic of disease neural circuitry, selective neuron vulnerability and neural-glial interactions. The ability to control the disorder cell-autonomously and in naturally occurring spontaneous animal models that recapitulate many aspects of the human disease allows for an unparalleled dissection of the disease neurobiology in vivo. Here, we review progress in mouse-model-based studies of NPC disease, specifically focusing on the subtype that is caused by a deficiency in NPC1, a sterol-binding late endosomal membrane protein involved in lipid trafficking. We also discuss recent findings and future directions in NPC disease research that are pertinent to understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in general.

  4. Olfactory identification deficits and associated response inhibition in obsessive-compulsive disorder: on the scent of the orbitofronto-striatal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Giuseppe; Quartini, Adele; Ratti, Flavia; Pagliuca, Giulio; Gallo, Andrea

    2013-11-30

    Olfactory identification ability implicates the integrity of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). The fronto-striatal circuits including the OFC have been involved in the neuropathology of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). However, only a few studies have examined olfactory function in patients with OCD. The Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) and tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Battery (CANTAB) were administered to 25 patients with OCD and to 21 healthy matched controls. OCD patients showed a significant impairment in olfactory identification ability as well as widely distributed cognitive deficits in visual memory, executive functions, attention, and response inhibition. The degree of behavioural impairment on motor impulsivity (prolonged response inhibition Stop-Signal Reaction Time) strongly correlated with the B-SIT score. Our study is the first to indicate a shared OFC pathological neural substrate underlying olfactory identification impairment, impulsivity, and OCD. Deficits in visual memory, executive functions and attention further indicate that regions outside of the orbitofronto-striatal loop may be involved in this disorder. Such results may help delineate the clinical complexity of OCD and support more targeted investigations and interventions. In this regard, research on the potential diagnostic utility of olfactory identification deficits in the assessment of OCD would certainly be useful. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor resection cavity administered iodine-131-labeled antitenascin 81C6 radioimmunotherapy in patients with malignant glioma: neuropathology aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, Roger E. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)]. E-mail: mclen001@mc.duke.edu; Akabani, Gamal [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Friedman, Henry S. [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Reardon, David A. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Cleveland, Linda [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Cokgor, Ilkcan [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Herndon, James E. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Wikstrand, Carol [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Boulton, Susan T. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Friedman, Allan H. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Bigner, Darell D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    receiving less than 86 Gy. Conclusions: Histopathologic analysis correlated with prognosis. Among all patients (Group A) there was a significant correlation between biopsy outcome, survival, and total radiation absorbed dose. Among the Group B proximal therapy patients, the neuropathologic changes were qualitatively similar to those described for external beam therapy and interstitial brachytherapy.

  6. The neuropathology of sport

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, Ann C.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Stein, Thor D.

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing deme...

  7. Molecular Neuropathology of Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Reifenberger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  8. Neuropathology of stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Pruessner, J.; Sousa, N.; Almeida, O.F.X.; van Dam, A.M.; Rajkowska, G.; Swaab, D.F.; Czéh, B.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental challenges are part of daily life for any individual. In fact, stress appears to be increasingly present in our modern, and demanding, industrialized society. Virtually every aspect of our body and brain can be influenced by stress and although its effects are partly mediated by

  9. Neuropathology of stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Paul J; Pruessner, Jens; Sousa, Nuno; Almeida, Osborne F X; Van Dam, Anne Marie; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Swaab, Dick F; Czéh, Boldizsár

    Environmental challenges are part of daily life for any individual. In fact, stress appears to be increasingly present in our modern, and demanding, industrialized society. Virtually every aspect of our body and brain can be influenced by stress and although its effects are partly mediated by

  10. Neuropathology of phenylketonuria (PKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Specola

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Untreated phenylketonuria (PKU causes cognitive, neuropsychological and motor skills impairment as well as microcephaly and demyelization. Persistent hyperphenylalaninemia produces toxicity on neurons and glial cells, alters cortical development, growth and dendritic density High levels of phenylalanine and low levels of neutral aminoacids in the brain disrupt neurotransmitter synthesis, increase oxidative damage, reduce the number of dopaminergic neurons and decrease the length of dendrites. White matter lesions are not present in all patients and there is no relation between these lesions and clinical severity. It has been shown that selenium and carnitine supplementation can decrease lipid and protein peroxidation. There are several mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration of patients with phenylketonuria; early treatment and strict nutritional control significantly improve the prognosis of these patients.

  11. Treating autism spectrum disorder with gluten-free and casein-free diet: the underlying microbiota-gut-brain axis mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciéslińska, Anna; Kostyra, Elzbieta; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2017-01-01

    There is a rising interest in the use of dietary interventions to
    ameliorate prevalent brain diseases, including Autism Spectrum
    Disorder (ASD). Nowadays, the existence of communication between
    gut and brain is well accepted and thus diet can influence
    brain functioning. A well-known

  12. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia.

  13. Translational potential of astrocytes in brain disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Steardo, Luca; Montana, Vedrana

    2015-01-01

    Fundamentally, all brain disorders can be broadly defined as the homeostatic failure of this organ. As the brain is composed of many different cells types, including but not limited to neurons and glia, it is only logical that all the cell types/constituents could play a role in health and disease. Yet, for a long time the sole conceptualization of brain pathology was focused on the well-being of neurons. Here, we challenge this neuron-centric view and present neuroglia as a key element in neuropathology, a process that has a toll on astrocytes, which undergo complex morpho-functional changes that can in turn affect the course of the disorder. Such changes can be grossly identified as reactivity, atrophy with loss of function and pathological remodeling. We outline the pathogenic potential of astrocytes in variety of disorders, ranging from neurotrauma, infection, toxic damage, stroke, epilepsy, neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, Alexander disease to neoplastic changes seen in gliomas. We hope that in near future we would witness glial-based translational medicine with generation of deliverables for the containment and cure of disorders. We point out that such as a task will require a holistic and multi-disciplinary approach that will take in consideration the concerted operation of all the cell types in the brain. PMID:26386136

  14. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make treatment less successful. Examples include: Anxiety disorders Eating disorders Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Alcohol or drug problems Physical health problems, such as heart disease, thyroid ...

  15. Schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder Images Schizoaffective disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  16. Panic disorder, phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Waters, Allison M

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of recent empirical developments, current controversies, and areas in need of further research in relation to factors that are common as well as specific to the etiology and maintenance of panic disorder, phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder. The relative contribution of broad risk factors to these disorders is discussed, including temperament, genetics, biological influences, cognition, and familial variables. In addition, the role that specific learning experiences play in relation to each disorder is reviewed. In an overarching hierarchical model, it is proposed that generalized anxiety disorder, and to some extent panic disorder, loads most heavily on broad underlying factors, whereas specific life history contributes most strongly to circumscribed phobias.

  17. Formulation of a medical food cocktail for Alzheimer's disease: beneficial effects on cognition and neuropathology in a mouse model of the disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Parachikova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplements have been extensively studied for their beneficial effects on cognition and AD neuropathology. The current study examines the effect of a medical food cocktail consisting of the dietary supplements curcumin, piperine, epigallocatechin gallate, α-lipoic acid, N-acetylcysteine, B vitamins, vitamin C, and folate on cognitive functioning and the AD hallmark features and amyloid-beta (Aβ in the Tg2576 mouse model of the disease.The study found that administering the medical food cocktail for 6 months improved cortical- and hippocampal- dependent learning in the transgenic mice, rendering their performance indistinguishable from non-transgenic controls. Coinciding with this improvement in learning and memory, we found that treatment resulted in decreased soluble Aβ, including Aβ oligomers, previously found to be linked to cognitive functioning.In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that combination diet consisting of natural dietary supplements improves cognitive functioning while decreasing AD neuropathology and may thus represent a safe, natural treatment for AD.

  18. International recommendation for a comprehensive neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery brain tissue: A consensus Task Force report from the ILAE Commission on Diagnostic Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora; Miyata, Hajime; Sarnat, Harvey B; Thom, Maria; Roessler, Karl; Rydenhag, Bertil; Jehi, Lara; Krsek, Pavel; Wiebe, Samuel; Spreafico, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an effective treatment in many patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies. An early decision for surgical therapy is facilitated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible brain lesion congruent with the electrophysiologically abnormal brain region. Recent advances in the pathologic diagnosis and classification of epileptogenic brain lesions are helpful for clinical correlation, outcome stratification, and patient management. However, application of international consensus classification systems to common epileptic pathologies (e.g., focal cortical dysplasia [FCD] and hippocampal sclerosis [HS]) necessitates standardized protocols for neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery specimens. To this end, the Task Force of Neuropathology from the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Commission on Diagnostic Methods developed a consensus standard operational procedure for tissue inspection, distribution, and processing. The aims are to provide a systematic framework for histopathologic workup, meeting minimal standards and maximizing current and future opportunities for morphofunctional correlations and molecular studies for both clinical care and research. Whenever feasible, anatomically intact surgical specimens are desirable to enable systematic analysis in selective hippocampectomies, temporal lobe resections, and lesional or nonlesional neocortical samples. Correct orientation of sample and the sample's relation to neurophysiologically aberrant sites requires good communication between pathology and neurosurgical teams. Systematic tissue sampling of 5-mm slabs along a defined anatomic axis and application of a limited immunohistochemical panel will ensure a reliable differential diagnosis of main pathologies encountered in epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Preoperative Quantitative MR Tractography Compared with Visual Tract Evaluation in Patients with Neuropathologically Confirmed Gliomas Grades II and III: A Prospective Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Anna F.; Nilsson, Markus; Latini, Francesco; Mårtensson, Johanna; Zetterling, Maria; Berntsson, Shala G.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Lätt, Jimmy; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Low-grade gliomas show infiltrative growth in white matter tracts. Diffusion tensor tractography can noninvasively assess white matter tracts. The aim was to preoperatively assess tumor growth in white matter tracts using quantitative MR tractography (3T). The hypothesis was that suspected infiltrated tracts would have altered diffusional properties in infiltrated tract segments compared to noninfiltrated tracts. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight patients with suspected low-grade glioma were included after written informed consent and underwent preoperative diffusion tensor imaging in this prospective review-board approved study. Major white matter tracts in both hemispheres were tracked, segmented, and visually assessed for tumor involvement in thirty-four patients with gliomas grade II or III (astrocytomas or oligodendrogliomas) on postoperative neuropathological evaluation. Relative fractional anisotropy (rFA) and mean diffusivity (rMD) in tract segments were calculated and compared with visual evaluation and neuropathological diagnosis. Results. Tract segment infiltration on visual evaluation was associated with a lower rFA and high rMD in a majority of evaluated tract segments (89% and 78%, resp.). Grade II and grade III gliomas had similar infiltrating behavior. Conclusion. Quantitative MR tractography corresponds to visual evaluation of suspected tract infiltration. It may be useful for an objective preoperative evaluation of tract segment involvement

  20. Gulf War agent exposure causes impairment of long-term memory formation and neuropathological changes in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuchra Zakirova

    Full Text Available Gulf War Illness (GWI is a chronic multisymptom illness with a central nervous system component such as memory deficits, neurological, and musculoskeletal problems. There are ample data that demonstrate that exposure to Gulf War (GW agents, such as pyridostigmine bromide (PB and pesticides such as permethrin (PER, were key contributors to the etiology of GWI post deployment to the Persian GW. In the current study, we examined the consequences of acute (10 days exposure to PB and PER in C57BL6 mice. Learning and memory tests were performed at 18 days and at 5 months post-exposure. We investigated the relationship between the cognitive phenotype and neuropathological changes at short and long-term time points post-exposure. No cognitive deficits were observed at the short-term time point, and only minor neuropathological changes were detected. However, cognitive deficits emerged at the later time point and were associated with increased astrogliosis and reduction of synaptophysin staining in the hippocampi and cerebral cortices of exposed mice, 5 months post exposure. In summary, our findings in this mouse model of GW agent exposure are consistent with some GWI symptom manifestations, including delayed onset of symptoms and CNS disturbances observed in GWI veterans.

  1. Gastrointestinal issues in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Elaine Y

    2014-01-01

    While autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by communication impairments, social abnormalities, and stereotypic behaviors, several medical comorbidities are observed in autistic individuals. Of these, gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities are of particular interest given their reported prevalence and correlation with the severity of core autism-related behavioral abnormalities. This review discusses the GI pathologies seen in ASD individuals and the association of particular GI conditions with known genetic and environmental risk factors for autism. It further addresses how GI abnormalities can affect the neuropathological and behavioral features of ASD, as well as the development of autism-related endophenotypes such as immune dysregulation, hyperserotonemia, and metabolic dysfunction. Finally, it presents emerging evidence for a gut-brain connection in autism, wherein GI dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis or severity of ASD symptoms.

  2. Altered Processing and Integration of Multisensory Bodily Representations and Signals in Eating Disorders: A Possible Path Toward the Understanding of Their Underlying Causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Dakanalis, Antonios

    2018-01-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM V) eating problems are the clinical core of eating disorders (EDs). However, the importance of shape and weight overvaluation symptoms in these disorders underlines the critical role of the experience of the body in the etiology of EDs. This article suggests that the transdiagnostic centrality of these symptoms in individuals with EDs may reflect a deficit in the processing and integration of multisensory bodily representations and signals. Multisensory body integration is a critical cognitive and perceptual process, allowing the individual to protect and extend her/his boundaries at both the homeostatic and psychological levels. To achieve this goal the brain integrates sensory data arriving from real-time multiple sensory modalities and internal bodily information with predictions made using the stored information about the body from conceptual, perceptual, and episodic memory. In this view the emotional, visual, tactile, proprioceptive and interoceptive deficits reported by many authors in individuals with EDs may reflect a broader impairment in multisensory body integration that affects the individual's abilities: (a) to identify the relevant interoceptive signals that predict potential pleasant (or aversive) consequences; and (b) to modify/correct the autobiographical allocentric (observer view) memories of body related events (self-objectified memories). Based on this view, the article also proposes a strategy, based on new technologies (i.e., virtual reality and brain/body stimulation), for using crossmodal associations to reactivate and correct the multisensory body integration processes.

  3. Altered Processing and Integration of Multisensory Bodily Representations and Signals in Eating Disorders: A Possible Path Toward the Understanding of Their Underlying Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Riva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM V eating problems are the clinical core of eating disorders (EDs. However, the importance of shape and weight overvaluation symptoms in these disorders underlines the critical role of the experience of the body in the etiology of EDs. This article suggests that the transdiagnostic centrality of these symptoms in individuals with EDs may reflect a deficit in the processing and integration of multisensory bodily representations and signals. Multisensory body integration is a critical cognitive and perceptual process, allowing the individual to protect and extend her/his boundaries at both the homeostatic and psychological levels. To achieve this goal the brain integrates sensory data arriving from real-time multiple sensory modalities and internal bodily information with predictions made using the stored information about the body from conceptual, perceptual, and episodic memory. In this view the emotional, visual, tactile, proprioceptive and interoceptive deficits reported by many authors in individuals with EDs may reflect a broader impairment in multisensory body integration that affects the individual’s abilities: (a to identify the relevant interoceptive signals that predict potential pleasant (or aversive consequences; and (b to modify/correct the autobiographical allocentric (observer view memories of body related events (self-objectified memories. Based on this view, the article also proposes a strategy, based on new technologies (i.e., virtual reality and brain/body stimulation, for using crossmodal associations to reactivate and correct the multisensory body integration processes.

  4. Influence of post-traumatic stress disorder on neuroinflammation and cell proliferation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Acosta

    Full Text Available Long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI are closely associated with the development of severe psychiatric disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, yet preclinical studies on pathological changes after combined TBI with PTSD are lacking. In the present in vivo study, we assessed chronic neuroinflammation, neuronal cell loss, cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in specific brain regions of adult Sprague-Dawley male rats following controlled cortical impact model of moderate TBI with or without exposure to PTSD. Eight weeks post-TBI, stereology-based histological analyses revealed no significant differences between sham and PTSD alone treatment across all brain regions examined, whereas significant exacerbation of OX6-positive activated microglial cells in the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle, but not cerebellum, in animals that received TBI alone and combined TBI-PTSD compared with PTSD alone and sham treatment. Additional immunohistochemical results revealed a significant loss of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of TBI alone and TBI-PTSD compared to PTSD alone and sham treatment. Further examination of neurogenic niches revealed a significant downregulation of Ki67-positive proliferating cells, but not DCX-positive neuronally migrating cells in the neurogenic subgranular zone and subventricular zone for both TBI alone and TBI-PTSD compared to PTSD alone and sham treatment. Comparisons of levels of neuroinflammation and neurogenesis between TBI alone and TBI+PTSD revealed that PTSD did not exacerbate the neuropathological hallmarks of TBI. These results indicate a progressive deterioration of the TBI brain, which, under the conditions of the present approach, was not intensified by PTSD, at least within our time window and within the examined areas of the brain. Although the PTSD manipulation employed here did not exacerbate the pathological effects of TBI, the observed long

  5. Influence of post-traumatic stress disorder on neuroinflammation and cell proliferation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Sandra A; Diamond, David M; Wolfe, Steven; Tajiri, Naoki; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Hernandez, Diana G; Sanberg, Paul R; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    Long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are closely associated with the development of severe psychiatric disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet preclinical studies on pathological changes after combined TBI with PTSD are lacking. In the present in vivo study, we assessed chronic neuroinflammation, neuronal cell loss, cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in specific brain regions of adult Sprague-Dawley male rats following controlled cortical impact model of moderate TBI with or without exposure to PTSD. Eight weeks post-TBI, stereology-based histological analyses revealed no significant differences between sham and PTSD alone treatment across all brain regions examined, whereas significant exacerbation of OX6-positive activated microglial cells in the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle, but not cerebellum, in animals that received TBI alone and combined TBI-PTSD compared with PTSD alone and sham treatment. Additional immunohistochemical results revealed a significant loss of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of TBI alone and TBI-PTSD compared to PTSD alone and sham treatment. Further examination of neurogenic niches revealed a significant downregulation of Ki67-positive proliferating cells, but not DCX-positive neuronally migrating cells in the neurogenic subgranular zone and subventricular zone for both TBI alone and TBI-PTSD compared to PTSD alone and sham treatment. Comparisons of levels of neuroinflammation and neurogenesis between TBI alone and TBI+PTSD revealed that PTSD did not exacerbate the neuropathological hallmarks of TBI. These results indicate a progressive deterioration of the TBI brain, which, under the conditions of the present approach, was not intensified by PTSD, at least within our time window and within the examined areas of the brain. Although the PTSD manipulation employed here did not exacerbate the pathological effects of TBI, the observed long-term inflammation and suppressed

  6. Functional convergence of histone methyltransferases EHMT1 and KMT2C involved in intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom S Koemans

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Kleefstra syndrome, caused by haploinsufficiency of euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1, is characterized by intellectual disability (ID, autism spectrum disorder (ASD, characteristic facial dysmorphisms, and other variable clinical features. In addition to EHMT1 mutations, de novo variants were reported in four additional genes (MBD5, SMARCB1, NR1I3, and KMT2C, in single individuals with clinical characteristics overlapping Kleefstra syndrome. Here, we present a novel cohort of five patients with de novo loss of function mutations affecting the histone methyltransferase KMT2C. Our clinical data delineates the KMT2C phenotypic spectrum and reinforces the phenotypic overlap with Kleefstra syndrome and other related ID disorders. To elucidate the common molecular basis of the neuropathology associated with mutations in KMT2C and EHMT1, we characterized the role of the Drosophila KMT2C ortholog, trithorax related (trr, in the nervous system. Similar to the Drosophila EHMT1 ortholog, G9a, trr is required in the mushroom body for short term memory. Trr ChIP-seq identified 3371 binding sites, mainly in the promoter of genes involved in neuronal processes. Transcriptional profiling of pan-neuronal trr knockdown and G9a null mutant fly heads identified 613 and 1123 misregulated genes, respectively. These gene sets show a significant overlap and are associated with nearly identical gene ontology enrichments. The majority of the observed biological convergence is derived from predicted indirect target genes. However, trr and G9a also have common direct targets, including the Drosophila ortholog of Arc (Arc1, a key regulator of synaptic plasticity. Our data highlight the clinical and molecular convergence between the KMT2 and EHMT protein families, which may contribute to a molecular network underlying a larger group of ID/ASD-related disorders.

  7. In vivo modeling of neuronal function, axonal impairment and connectivity in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecka, J A; Levy, S; Isacson, O

    2016-06-01

    Modeling neurological diseases using human embryonic or patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) improves the understanding of molecular and cellular changes underlying these diseases and can lead to new, potentially personalized therapies. Changes in expression of axon guidance cues and altered cytoskeletal maintenance have been implicated in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, most of the iPSC patient-derived cellular dysfunction and phenotypic studies have been performed in vitro. To study the intrinsic axonal impairments and neuronal connectivity deficits in human disease iPSC-derived neurons we propose to graft these cells into the physiological three-dimensional multi-structural environment of the central nervous system of rodent models to obtain relevant in vivo data. Such human iPSC in vivo chimeric models can allow for neuronal maturation, capture neuropathological phenotypes of axonal and connectivity impairments, and serve as target engagement and drug validation studies using human cells, thus highly relevant for advancement of the drug development process in the late pre-clinical stages. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cyclothymic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Cyclothymic disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, 2013:139-141. Fava M, Ostergaard SD, Cassano P. Mood disorders: depressive disorders (major ...

  9. In the psychiatrist's chair: how neurologists understand conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Richard; Armstrong, David; Barnes, Philip; Wessely, Simon

    2009-10-01

    Conversion disorder ('hysteria') was largely considered to be a neurological problem in the 19th century, but without a neuropathological explanation it was commonly assimilated with malingering. The theories of Janet and Freud transformed hysteria into a psychiatric condition, but as such models decline in popularity and a neurobiology of conversion has yet to be found, today's neurologists once again face a disorder without an accepted model. This article explores how today's neurologists understand conversion through in-depth interviews with 22 neurology consultants. The neurologists endorsed psychological models but did not understand their patients in such terms. Rather, they distinguished conversion from other unexplained conditions clinically by its severity and inconsistency. While many did not see this as clearly distinct from feigning, they did not feel that this was their problem to resolve. They saw themselves as 'agnostic' regarding non-neuropathological explanations. However, since neurologists are in some ways more expert in conversion than psychiatrists, their continuing support for the deception model is important, and begs an explanation. One reason for the model's persistence may be that it is employed as a diagnostic device, used to differentiate between those unexplained symptoms that could, in principle, have a medical explanation and those that could not.

  10. Under Under Under / Merit Kask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kask, Merit

    2006-01-01

    20. nov. esietendub Kumu auditooriumis MTÜ Ühenduse R.A.A.A.M teatriprojekt "Under" poetess Marie Underist. Lavastajad Merle Karusoo ja Raimo Pass, kunstnik Jaagup Roomet, helilooja Urmas Lattikas, peaosas Katrin Saukas

  11. Diffuse and Focal Brain Injury in a Large Animal Model of PTE: Mechanisms Underlying Epileptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: A) Contusion injury validation and neuropathology B) Grid electrode development and testing C) Wireless Large Animal Custom Enclosure...In addition, we will test the NF-L and GFAP immunoassay to begin quantification of this biomarkers, as well as collecting serum from the animals pre...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0675 TITLE: Diffuse and Focal Brain Injury in a Large Animal Model of PTE: Mechanisms Underlying Epileptogenesis

  12. A review on eye movement studies in childhood and adolescent psychiatry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambregts-Rommelse, N.N.J.; Stigchel, S. van der; Sergeant, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The neural substrates of eye movement measures are largely known. Therefore, measurement of eye movements in psychiatric disorders may provide insight into the underlying neuropathology of these disorders. Visually guided saccades, antisaccades, memory guided saccades, and smooth pursuit eye

  13. A review on eye movement studies in childhood and adolescent psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommelse, N.N.J.; van der Stigchel, S.; Sergeant, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The neural substrates of eye movement measures are largely known. Therefore, measurement of eye movements in psychiatric disorders may provide insight into the underlying neuropathology of these disorders. Visually guided saccades, antisaccades, memory guided saccades, and smooth pursuit eye

  14. Forensic Psychiatric Aspects of Impulse Control Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Soysal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Impulse control disorders is an important psychiatric disorder group which draws attention in recent years. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other classical disorders like pyromania, kleptomania, intermittent explosive disorder and compulsive buying could be evasuated under this topic. The aim of this article is to review forensic psychiatric aspects of impulse control disorders and evaluate the disorders in terms of their legal status. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 16-29

  15. The Female Sexual Response: Current Models, Neurobiological Underpinnings and Agents Currently Approved or Under Investigation for the Treatment of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Clayton, Anita H; Pfaus, James G

    2015-11-01

    How a woman responds to sexual cues is highly dependent on a number of distinct, yet related, factors. Researchers have attempted to explain the female sexual response for decades, but no single model reigns supreme. Proper female sexual function relies on the interplay of somatic, psychosocial and neurobiological factors; misregulation of any of these components could result in sexual dysfunction. The most common sexual dysfunction disorder is hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). HSDD is a disorder affecting women across the world; a recent in-person diagnostic interview study conducted in the USA found that an estimated 7.4% of US women suffer from HSDD. Despite the disorder's prevalence, it is often overlooked as a formal diagnosis. In a survey of primary care physicians and obstetrics/gynaecology specialists, the number one reason for not assigning an HSDD diagnosis was the lack of a safe and effective therapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This changed with the recent FDA approval of flibanserin (Addyi™) for the treatment of premenopausal women with acquired, generalized HSDD; there are still, however, no treatments approved outside the USA. HSDD is characterized by a marked decrease in sexual desire, an absence of motivation (also known as avolition) to engage in sexual activity, and the condition's hallmark symptom, marked patient distress. Research suggests that HSDD may arise from an imbalance of the excitatory and inhibitory neurobiological pathways that regulate the mammalian sexual response; top-down inhibition from the prefrontal cortex may be hyperactive, and/or bottom-up excitation to the limbic system may be hypoactive. Key neuromodulators for the excitatory pathways include norepinephrine, oxytocin, dopamine and melanocortins. Serotonin, opioids and endocannabinoids serve as key neuromodulators for the inhibitory pathways. Evolving treatment strategies have relied heavily on these crucial research findings, as many of

  16. The endogenous and reactive depression subtypes revisited: integrative animal and human studies implicate multiple distinct molecular mechanisms underlying major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Karim; Keers, Robert; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Carboni, Lucia; Domenici, Enrico; Uher, Rudolf; McGuffin, Peter; Schalkwyk, Leonard C

    2014-05-07

    Traditional diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD) suggested that the presence or absence of stress prior to onset results in either 'reactive' or 'endogenous' subtypes of the disorder, respectively. Several lines of research suggest that the biological underpinnings of 'reactive' or 'endogenous' subtypes may also differ, resulting in differential response to treatment. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing the gene-expression profiles of three animal models of 'reactive' and 'endogenous' depression. We then translated these findings to clinical samples using a human post-mortem mRNA study. Affymetrix mouse whole-genome oligonucleotide arrays were used to measure gene expression from hippocampal tissues of 144 mice from the Genome-based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project. The study used four inbred mouse strains and two depressogenic 'stress' protocols (maternal separation and Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress) to model 'reactive' depression. Stress-related mRNA differences in mouse were compared with a parallel mRNA study using Flinders Sensitive and Resistant rat lines as a model of 'endogenous' depression. Convergent genes differentially expressed across the animal studies were used to inform candidate gene selection in a human mRNA post-mortem case control study from the Stanley Brain Consortium. In the mouse 'reactive' model, the expression of 350 genes changed in response to early stresses and 370 in response to late stresses. A minimal genetic overlap (less than 8.8%) was detected in response to both stress protocols, but 30% of these genes (21) were also differentially regulated in the 'endogenous' rat study. This overlap is significantly greater than expected by chance. The VAMP-2 gene, differentially expressed across the rodent studies, was also significantly altered in the human study after correcting for multiple testing. Our results suggest that 'endogenous' and 'reactive' subtypes of depression are associated with largely

  17. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes.

  18. Defining Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Richard; Maughan, Barbara; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Background: ICD-10 and DSM-IV include similar criterial symptom lists for conduct disorder (CD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), but while DSM-IV treats each list separately, ICD-10 considers them jointly. One consequence is that ICD-10 identifies a group of children with ODD subtype who do not receive a diagnosis under DSM-IV. Methods: We…

  19. Pathomechanisms Underlying X-Adrenoleukodystrophy: A Three-Hit Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjit; Pujol, Aurora

    2011-01-01

    X-adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex disease where inactivation of ABCD1 gene results in clinically diverse phenotypes, the fatal disorder of cerebral ALD (cALD) or a milder disorder of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN). Loss of ABCD1 function results in defective beta oxidation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) resulting in excessive accumulation of VLCFA, the biochemical “hall mark” of X-ALD. At present, the ABCD1-mediated mechanisms that determine the different phenotype of X-ALD are not well understood. The studies reviewed here suggest for a “three-hit hypothesis” for neuropathology of cALD. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with these three phases of cALD disease should facilitate the development of effective pharmacological therapeutics for X-ALD. PMID:20626745

  20. CO(2) hypersensitivity in recently abstinent alcohol dependent individuals:; A possible mechanism underlying the high risk for anxiety disorder among alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassovsky, Yuri; Hurliman, Elisabeth; Abrams, Kenneth; Kushner, Matt G

    2004-01-01

    Alcohol, administered acutely, is known to cause CO(2) hyposensitivity. CO(2) hypersensitivity associated with anxiogenic hyperventilation (HV) could reasonably be expected to emerge as an opponent process upon withdrawal from chronic alcohol use. To test this hypothesis, we applied two well-known methods to quantify CO(2) sensitivity in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent individuals and never alcohol-disordered individuals who are social drinkers. We found that the alcoholic group exhibited significantly greater CO(2) sensitivity than did controls in response to both challenges. Indirect evidence of chronic HV was also obtained. These findings implicate the effect of chronic alcohol use on CNS-based CO(2) sensitivity in heightening the vulnerability to disturbing anxiety symptoms and syndromes exhibited by alcoholic individuals. Future work must verify that pathological drinking actually causes the dysregulated respiratory responding observed in this study as is inferred in our conclusions.

  1. Efficacy of the GluK1/AMPA Receptor Antagonist LY293558 against Seizures and Neuropathology in a Soman-Exposure Model without Pretreatment and its Pharmacokinetics after Intramuscular Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Scientific, Torrington, CT ). Five stainless steel, cortical screw electrodes were stereotaxically implanted using the following coor- dinates (after...neuropathology: deficits in DRL acquisition. Neurobehav Toxicol Teratol 8: 179–187. Mercey G, Verdelet T, Renou J, Kliachyna M, Baati R, Nachon F, Jean L

  2. Clinical, neuropathological, and genetic characteristics of the novel IVS9+1delG GRN mutation in a patient with frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipa, Ricardo; Tuna, Assunção; Damásio, Joana; Pinto, Pedro S; Cavaco, Sara; Pereira, Sonia; Milterberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Galimberti, Daniela; Melo-Pires, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) refers to a clinically, pathologically, and genetically heterogeneous group of dementias that arises from the degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes. Mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN) are a major cause of FTLD with TDP-43 inclusions. Herein, we describe the clinical, neuropathological, and genetic findings in a case of autosomal dominant behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) with asymmetrical parkinsonism and prominent visuospatial deficits that carries a novel GRN mutation. This case highlights important clinical characteristics that seem to be common in FTLD GRN-associated patients, such as asymmetrical parkinsonism and parietal symptoms, and that are correlated to the pathological involvement of striatum (rather than substantia nigra in our case) and parietal lobe. We also emphasize that plasma progranulin level can be useful to infer about the pathogenicity of new GRN mutations.

  3. Cognitive-Enhancing Effects of a Polyphenols-Rich Extract from Fruits without Changes in Neuropathology in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Pan, Alexandre; Dudonné, Stéphanie; Bourassa, Philippe; Bourdoulous, Morgane; Tremblay, Cyntia; Desjardins, Yves; Calon, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    No effective preventive treatment is available for age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies indicate that a diet rich in fruit is associated with cognitive improvement. It was thus proposed that high polyphenol concentrations found in berries can prevent cognitive impairment associated with aging and AD. Therefore, the Neurophenols project aimed at investigating the effects of a polyphenolic extract from blueberries and grapes (PEBG) in the triple-transgenic (3xTg-AD) mouse model of AD, which develops AD neuropathological markers, including amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, leading to memory deficits. In this study, 12-month-old 3xTg-AD and NonTg mice were fed a diet supplemented with standardized PEBG (500 or 2500 mg/kg) for 4 months (n = 15-20/group). A cognitive evaluation with the novel object recognition test was performed at 15 months of age and mice were sacrificed at 16 months of age. We observed that PEBG supplementation with doses of 500 or 2500 mg/kg prevented the decrease in novel object recognition observed in both 15-month-old 3xTg-AD mice and NonTg mice fed a control diet. Although PEBG treatment did not reduce Aβ and tau pathologies, it prevented the decrease in mature BDNF observed in 16-month-old 3xTg-AD mice. Finally, plasma concentrations of phenolic metabolites, such as dihydroxyphenyl valerolactone, a microbial metabolite of epicatechin, positively correlated with memory performances in supplemented mice. The improvement in object recognition observed in 3xTg-AD mice after PEBG administration supports the consumption of polyphenols-rich extracts to prevent memory impairment associated with age-related disease, without significant effects on classical AD neuropathology.

  4. Cortical gyrification in autistic and Asperger disorders: a preliminary magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Roger J; Minshew, Nancy J; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Hardan, Antonio Y

    2010-12-01

    The validity of Asperger disorder as a distinct syndrome from autism is unclear partly because of the paucity of differentiating neurobiological evidence. Frontal lobe cortical folding between these disorders was compared using the gyrification index. Twenty-three boys underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging: 6 with high-functioning autism, 9 with Asperger disorder, and 8 controls. Using the first coronal slice anterior to the corpus callosum, total and outer cortical contours were traced to calculate the gyrification index. This index was also calculated for superior and inferior regions to examine dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices, respectively. Analysis of variance revealed differences in the left inferior gyrification index, which was higher in the autism group compared with Asperger and control groups. There were no differences in age, intelligence quotient, and brain volume. These preliminary findings suggest that cortical folding may be abnormally high in the frontal lobe in autism but not Asperger disorder, suggesting distinct frontal lobe neuropathology.

  5. Cortical Gyrification in Autistic and Asperger Disorders: A Preliminary Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Roger J.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2011-01-01

    The validity of Asperger disorder as a distinct syndrome from autism is unclear partly due to the paucity of differentiating neurobiological evidence. Frontal lobe cortical folding between these disorders was compared using the gyrification index. Twenty-three boys underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging: six with high-functioning autism, nine with Asperger disorder, and eight controls. Using the first coronal slice anterior to the corpus callosum, total and outer cortical contours were traced to calculate the gyrification index. This index was also calculated for superior and inferior regions to examine dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices, respectively. Analysis of variance revealed differences in the left inferior gyrification index, which was higher in the autism group compared to Asperger and control groups. There were no differences in age, intelligence quotient, and brain volume. These preliminary findings suggest that cortical folding may be abnormally high in the frontal lobe in autism but not Asperger disorder, suggesting distinct frontal lobe neuropathology. PMID:20413799

  6. Prevalence of and factors influencing posttraumatic stress disorder among mothers of children under five in Kabul, Afghanistan, after decades of armed conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Kaoruko; Takano, Takehito; Mashal, Taufiq; Hemat, Shafiqullah; Nakamura, Keiko

    2008-04-23

    In the period following wars and other forms of armed conflict, health and quality of life of mothers is a major concern as they have the closest contact with children. The present study was performed to examine the impact of exposure to events related to armed conflicts on post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among women raising children, and to identify factors that alleviate the negative consequences of exposure to traumatic events. A structured interview survey was conducted in Kabul Province, Afghanistan, in 2006. The subjects were the mothers of children less than 5 years old randomly selected from 1400 households in Kabul Province, Afghanistan. Symptoms of PTSD were assessed according to the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). Exposure to traumatic events related to armed conflict, experience of hardship with regard to basic needs, resources that the subjects seek for mental health support, and socioeconomic variables were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between PTSD symptoms and predictor variables. The prevalence rate of PTSD among 1172 women participated in this study was 29.8%. The most prevalent symptom was arousal (74.8%), followed by re-experiencing (54.9%) and avoidance (33.7%). The prevalence rate of PTSD symptoms among subjects who reported having experienced at least one event related to armed conflict (52.7%) was significantly higher than that among those who reported no such experiences (9.6%). Experience of food shortage was independently associated with PTSD. Seeking support for mental health was related to lower prevalence of PTSD symptoms among those who reported no direct experience of events related to armed conflict. However, no such relationship was observed with PTSD symptoms among those who reported having direct experience of events related to armed conflict. Direct exposure to traumatic events was significantly associated with

  7. Prevalence of and factors influencing posttraumatic stress disorder among mothers of children under five in Kabul, Afghanistan, after decades of armed conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemat Shafiqullah

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the period following wars and other forms of armed conflict, health and quality of life of mothers is a major concern as they have the closest contact with children. The present study was performed to examine the impact of exposure to events related to armed conflicts on post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD among women raising children, and to identify factors that alleviate the negative consequences of exposure to traumatic events. Methods A structured interview survey was conducted in Kabul Province, Afghanistan, in 2006. The subjects were the mothers of children less than 5 years old randomly selected from 1400 households in Kabul Province, Afghanistan. Symptoms of PTSD were assessed according to the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV. Exposure to traumatic events related to armed conflict, experience of hardship with regard to basic needs, resources that the subjects seek for mental health support, and socioeconomic variables were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between PTSD symptoms and predictor variables. Results The prevalence rate of PTSD among 1172 women participated in this study was 29.8%. The most prevalent symptom was arousal (74.8%, followed by re-experiencing (54.9% and avoidance (33.7%. The prevalence rate of PTSD symptoms among subjects who reported having experienced at least one event related to armed conflict (52.7% was significantly higher than that among those who reported no such experiences (9.6%. Experience of food shortage was independently associated with PTSD. Seeking support for mental health was related to lower prevalence of PTSD symptoms among those who reported no direct experience of events related to armed conflict. However, no such relationship was observed with PTSD symptoms among those who reported having direct experience of events related to armed conflict. Conclusion Direct

  8. A-site order–disorder in the NdBaMn2O5+δ SOFC electrode material monitored in situ by neutron diffraction under hydrogen flow

    KAUST Repository

    Tonus, Florent

    2017-05-11

    The A-site disordered perovskite manganite, Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO3, has been obtained by heating the A-site-ordered and vacancy ordered layered double perovskite, NdBaMn2O5, in air at 1300 °C for 5 h. Combined transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and neutron powder diffraction (NPD) analysis at 25 °C revealed that Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO3 has a pseudotetragonal unit cell with orthorhombic symmetry (space group Imma, √2ap × 2ap × √2ap) at 20 °C with the cell dimensions a = 5.503(1) Å, b = 7.7962(4) Å, c = 5.502(1) Å, in contrast to Pm[3 with combining macron]m or Cmcm that have been previously stated from X-ray diffraction studies. The in situ neutron diffraction study carried out on Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO3 in hydrogen flow up to T ∼ 900 °C, allows monitoring the A-site cation disorder–order structural phase transition of this representative member of potential SOFC anode materials between air sintering conditions and hydrogen working conditions. Oxygen loss from Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO3 proceeds with retention of A-site disorder until the oxygen content reaches the Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO2.5 composition at 600 °C. The phase transition to layered NdBaMn2O5 and localization of the oxygen vacancies in the Nd layer proceeds at 800 °C with retention of the oxygen content. Impedance spectroscopy measurements for the oxidized A-site ordered electrode material, NdBaMn2O6, screen printed on a Ce0.9Gd0.1O2−δ (CGO) electrolyte showed promising electrochemical performance in air at 700 °C with a polarization resistance of 1.09 Ω cm2 without any optimization.

  9. Dissociative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... actions and identity. People with dissociative disorders escape reality in ways that are involuntary and unhealthy and ... conditions. Complications People with dissociative disorders are at increased risk of complications and associated disorders, such as: ...

  10. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  11. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Therapist Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Helping Kids Cope With Stress Helping Kids Handle Worry Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress Anxiety Disorders Special Needs Factsheet Social Phobia Special Needs Factsheet Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) ...

  12. Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of terror ... their lives and they cannot leave their homes. Panic disorder is more common in women than men. It ...

  13. Genetics of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerner B

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Berit Kerner Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Bipolar disorder is a common, complex genetic disorder, but the mode of transmission remains to be discovered. Many researchers assume that common genomic variants carry some risk for manifesting the disease. The research community has celebrated the first genome-wide significant associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and bipolar disorder. Currently, attempts are under way to translate these findings into clinical practice, genetic counseling, and predictive testing. However, some experts remain cautious. After all, common variants explain only a very small percentage of the genetic risk, and functional consequences of the discovered SNPs are inconclusive. Furthermore, the associated SNPs are not disease specific, and the majority of individuals with a “risk” allele are healthy. On the other hand, population-based genome-wide studies in psychiatric disorders have rediscovered rare structural variants and mutations in genes, which were previously known to cause genetic syndromes and monogenic Mendelian disorders. In many Mendelian syndromes, psychiatric symptoms are prevalent. Although these conditions do not fit the classic description of any specific psychiatric disorder, they often show nonspecific psychiatric symptoms that cross diagnostic boundaries, including intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit, impulse control deficit, and psychosis. Although testing for chromosomal disorders and monogenic Mendelian disorders is well established, testing for common variants is still controversial. The standard concept of genetic testing includes at least three broad criteria that need to be fulfilled before new genetic tests should be introduced: analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. These criteria are

  14. Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E. Rosenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a national online registry to examine variation in cumulative prevalence of community diagnosis of psychiatric comorbidity in 4343 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Adjusted multivariate logistic regression models compared influence of individual, family, and geographic factors on cumulative prevalence of parent-reported anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention deficit disorder. Adjusted odds of community-assigned lifetime psychiatric comorbidity were significantly higher with each additional year of life, with increasing autism severity, and with Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder—not otherwise specified compared with autistic disorder. Overall, in this largest study of parent-reported community diagnoses of psychiatric comorbidity, gender, autistic regression, autism severity, and type of ASD all emerged as significant factors correlating with cumulative prevalence. These findings could suggest both underlying trends in actual comorbidity as well as variation in community interpretation and application of comorbid diagnoses in ASD.

  15. Psychiatric disorders and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "SH. Akhondzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are common in women during their childbearing years. Special considerations are needed when psychotic disorders present during pregnancy. Early identification and treatment of psychiatric disorders in pregnancy can prevent morbidity in pregnancy and in postpartum with the concomitant risks to mother and baby. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psychiatric illnesses during pregnancy is made more difficult by the overlap between symptoms of the disorders and symptoms of pregnancy. In majority of cases both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy should be considered. However, psychiatric disorders in pregnancy are often under treated because of concerns about potential harmful effects of medication. This paper reviews findings about the presentation and course of major psychiatric disorders during pregnancy.

  16. The role of natural products in the discovery of new drug candidates for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders I: Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Helineide Cristina; da Rocha, Miguel Divino; Viegas, Flávia Pereira Dias; Nicastro, Patrícia Carolina; Fossaluzza, Poliana Calve; Fraga, Carlos Alberto Manssour; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Viegas, Claudio

    2011-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are currently incurable pathologies with huge social and economic impacts closely related to the increasing of life expectancy in modern times. Although the clinical and neuropathological aspects of these debilitating disorders are distinct, they share a pattern of neurodegeneration in anatomically or functionally related regions. For each disease, presently available treatments only address symptoms and do not alter the course or progression of the underlying diseases. In this context, the search for new effective chemical entities, capable of acting on diverse biochemical targets, with new mechanisms of action and low toxicity are genuine challenges to research groups and the pharmaceutical industry. This medical need has led to the reemerging of modern natural products chemistry that has yielded sophisticated and complex new lead molecules for drug discovery and development. In this review we discuss some of the main contributions of the natural products chemistry that covers multiple and varied plant species. Advances in the discovery of active constituents of plants, herbs, and extracts prescribed by traditional medicine practices for the treatment of senile neurodegenerative disorders, especially for PD, in the period after the 2000s is reviewed. The most important contributions from the 1990s are also discussed. The review also focuses on the pharmacological mechanisms of action that might underlie the purported beneficial improvements in memory and cognition, neurovascular function, and in neuroprotection. It is concluded that natural product chemistry brings tremendous diversity and historical precedent to a huge area of unmet medical need.

  17. Self-disorders in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, Julie; Nilsson, Lars Siersbæk; Sæbye, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    Self-disorders have been hypothesized to be an underlying and trait-like core feature of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and a certain degree of temporal stability of self-disorders would therefore be expected. The aim of the study was to examine the persistence of self-disorders measured...... by the Examination of Anomalous Self Experiences over a time span of 5 years. 48 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders were thoroughly assessed for psychopathology at baseline and 5 years later. Self-disorders were assessed by the Examination of Anomalous Self Experiences. The level of self-disorders...... was same at the two occasions for the full Examination of Anomalous Self Disorders and for four out of the five domains. For one domain, the level of self-disorders increased slightly from baseline to follow-up. The correlations between baseline and follow-up were moderate. 9 out of the 13 most...

  18. Dynamic behaviour of the soft palate during nasal positive pressure ventilation under anaesthesia and paralysis: comparison between patients with and without obstructive sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, M; Kato, S; Sato, S; Okazaki, J; Kitamura, Y; Ishikawa, T; Sato, Y; Isono, S

    2018-01-01

    Difficult mask ventilation is common and is known to be associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). It is our hypothesis that the incidence of expiratory retropalatal (RP) airway closure (primary outcome) during nasal positive pressure ventilation (PPV) is more frequent in patients with SDB (apnea hypopnea index ≥5 h -1 ) than non-SDB subjects. The severity of SDB was assessed before surgery using a portable sleep monitor. In anaesthetized and paralysed patients with (n=11) and without SDB (n=9), we observed the behaviour of the RP airway endoscopically during nasal PPV with the mouth closed and determined the dynamic RP closing pressure, which was defined as the highest airway pressure above which the RP airway closure was reversed. The static RP closing pressure was obtained during cessation of mechanical ventilation in patients with dynamic RP closure during nasal PPV. The expiratory RP airway closure accompanied by expiratory flow limitation occurred more frequently in SDB patients (9/11, 82%) than in non-SDB subjects (2/9, 22%; exact logistic regression analysis: P=0.022, odds ratio 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.1-15.4). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses indicated AHI >10h -1 and presence of habitual snoring as clinically useful predictors for the occurrence of RP closure during PPV. Dynamic RP closing pressure was greater than the static RP closing pressure by approximately 4-5 cm H 2 O. Valve-like dynamic RP closure that limits expiratory flow during nasal PPV occurs more frequently in SDB patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. [Genetic and neuroendocrine aspects in autism spectrum disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, Norma; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; de la Chesnaye, Elsa; Guerra-Araiza, Christian

    The autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was described in 1943 and is defined as a developmental disorder that affects social interaction and communication. It is usually identified in early stages of development from 18 months of age. Currently, autism is considered a neurological disorder with a spectrum covering cases of different degrees, which is associated with genetic factors, not genetic and environmental. Among the genetic factors, various syndromes have been described that are associated with this disorder. Also, the neurobiology of autism has been studied at the genetic, neurophysiological, neurochemical and neuropathological levels. Neuroimaging techniques have shown multiple structural abnormalities in these patients. There have also been changes in the serotonergic, GABAergic, catecholaminergic and cholinergic systems related to this disorder. This paper presents an update of the information presented in the genetic and neuroendocrine aspects of autism spectrum disorder. Copyright © 2014 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Disturbance in the neural circuitry underlying positive emotional processing in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatzko, Alexander; Schmitt, Andrea; Demirakca, Traute; Weimer, Erik; Braus, Dieter F

    2006-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the circuitry underlying movie-induced positive emotional processing in subjects with chronic PTSD. Ten male subjects with chronic PTSD and ten matched controls were studied. In an fMRI-paradigm a sequence of a wellknown Walt Disney cartoon with positive emotional valence was shown. PTSD subjects showed an increased activation in the right posterior temporal, precentral and superior frontal cortex. Controls recruited more emotion-related regions bilateral in the temporal pole and areas of the left fusiform and parahippocampal gyrus. This pilot study is the first to reveal alterations in the processing of positive emotions in PTSD possibly reflecting a neuronal correlate of the symptom of emotional numbness in PTSD.

  1. Imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Maher, Eamonn R

    2015-01-01

    sequence shown to disturb imprinted gene expression, and the correspondingly broad range of resultant clinical syndromes. At the same time, however, it has become clear that this diversity of IDs has common underlying principles, not only in shared molecular mechanisms, but also in interrelated clinical...... impacts upon growth, development and metabolism. Thus, detailed and systematic analysis of IDs can not only identify unifying principles of molecular epigenetics in health and disease, but also support personalisation of diagnosis and management for individual patients and families.......Congenital imprinting disorders (IDs) are characterised by molecular changes affecting imprinted chromosomal regions and genes, i.e. genes that are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Recent years have seen a great expansion in the range of alterations in regulation, dosage or DNA...

  2. Rare disorders can be an underlying cause of cyclic vomiting: Familial Mediterranean fever, Helicobacter pylori gastritis, and cavernous transformation of the portal vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egritaş Gürkan, Ödül; Ünlüsoy Aksu, Aysel; Demirtaş, Zeliha; Dalgıç, Buket

    2015-11-01

    Considering the etiology of cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) in childhood, a variety of underlying organic causes has been clearly identified in the literature. The aim of this study was to emphasize that endoscopic evaluation in the first step may help diagnosis and treatment in patients with CVS, unlike the CVS-related "North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition" (NASPGHAN) consensus statement in 2008. The medical files of patients with vomiting complaints admitted to our tertiary center between the years 2007 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were identified according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes at their initial presentation, including vomiting. A total of 815 patients with vomiting complaints were evaluated. Of the 379 patients who presented with vomiting only, 336 patients were already being followed for chronic vomiting. Cyclic vomiting was detected in 31 out of 336 patients. In our series, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cavernous transformation of the portal vein, and Helicobacter pylori (HP) gastritis presented with CVS for the first time in the pediatric age group. We emphasize that endoscopic evaluation in patients with CVS should be performed as the first step for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Genetics of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, complex genetic disorder, but the mode of transmission remains to be discovered. Many researchers assume that common genomic variants carry some risk for manifesting the disease. The research community has celebrated the first genome-wide significant associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and bipolar disorder. Currently, attempts are under way to translate these findings into clinical practice, genetic counseling, and predictive testing. However, some experts remain cautious. After all, common variants explain only a very small percentage of the genetic risk, and functional consequences of the discovered SNPs are inconclusive. Furthermore, the associated SNPs are not disease specific, and the majority of individuals with a "risk" allele are healthy. On the other hand, population-based genome-wide studies in psychiatric disorders have rediscovered rare structural variants and mutations in genes, which were previously known to cause genetic syndromes and monogenic Mendelian disorders. In many Mendelian syndromes, psychiatric symptoms are prevalent. Although these conditions do not fit the classic description of any specific psychiatric disorder, they often show nonspecific psychiatric symptoms that cross diagnostic boundaries, including intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit, impulse control deficit, and psychosis. Although testing for chromosomal disorders and monogenic Mendelian disorders is well established, testing for common variants is still controversial. The standard concept of genetic testing includes at least three broad criteria that need to be fulfilled before new genetic tests should be introduced: analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. These criteria are currently not fulfilled for common genomic variants in psychiatric disorders. Further work is clearly needed before genetic testing for common variants in

  4. Psychobiology of anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J

    2008-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is currently classified as an anxiety disorder. However, there is growing interest in the concept of an obsessive-compulsive spectrum of disorders (OCSDs). The relationship between anxiety disorders and OCSDs has been questioned. The psychobiology of anxiety disorders and OCSDs is briefly reviewed in this article. While there appear to be several distinct contrasts in the underlying psychobiology of these conditions, there is also evidence of overlapping mechanisms. In addition, there are crucial gaps in our current database, confounding nosological decision-making. Conceptualizing various anxiety disorders and putative OCSDs as lying within a broader spectrum of emotional disorders may be useful. However, clinicians must also recognize that individual anxiety and obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions, including disorders characterized by body-focused repetitive behaviors, have distinct psychobiological underpinnings and require different treatment approaches.

  5. Modeling the Interaction between Quinolinate and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE): Relevance for Early Neuropathological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serratos, Iris N.; Castellanos, Pilar; Pastor, Nina; Millán-Pacheco, César; Rembao, Daniel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; Reyes-Espinosa, Francisco; Díaz-Garrido, Paulina; López-Macay, Ambar; Martínez-Flores, Karina; López-Reyes, Alberto; Sánchez-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Elvis; Santamaria, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor involved in neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. RAGE induces cellular signaling upon binding to a variety of ligands. Evidence suggests that RAGE up-regulation is involved in quinolinate (QUIN)-induced toxicity. We investigated the QUIN-induced toxic events associated with early noxious responses, which might be linked to signaling cascades leading to cell death. The extent of early cellular damage caused by this receptor in the rat striatum was characterized by image processing methods. To document the direct interaction between QUIN and RAGE, we determined the binding constant (Kb) of RAGE (VC1 domain) with QUIN through a fluorescence assay. We modeled possible binding sites of QUIN to the VC1 domain for both rat and human RAGE. QUIN was found to bind at multiple sites to the VC1 dimer, each leading to particular mechanistic scenarios for the signaling evoked by QUIN binding, some of which directly alter RAGE oligomerization. This work contributes to the understanding of the phenomenon of RAGE-QUIN recognition, leading to the modulation of RAGE function. PMID:25757085

  6. Phenotypic patterns of MELAS/LS overlap syndrome associated with m.13513G>A mutation, and neuropathological findings in one autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoxia; Qi, Xiao Kun; Yao, Sheng; Chen, Bin; Luan, Xinghua; Zhang, Wei; Han, Manfu; Yuan, Yun

    2010-12-01

    The 13513G>A mutation in the ND5 gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is usually associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactate acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), or Leigh syndrome (LS). In this study, we describe three young Chinese patients with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome who carried the m.13513G>A mutation. Clinical and MRI features were characteristic of both MELAS and LS. Interestingly, the clinical presentation of this overlap syndrome could be variable depending on the degree of relative contribution of MELAS and LS, that is, MELAS as the initial presenting syndrome, LS as the predominant syndrome, or both MELAS and LS appearing at the same time. The final brain MRI showed findings characteristic of both MELAS and LS, with asymmetrical lesions in the cortex and subcortical white matter of the occipital, temporal, and frontal lobes (MELAS), and bilateral and symmetrical lesions in the basal ganglia and brainstem (LS). Brain autopsy in one case revealed infarct-like lesions in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and brainstem, providing further insight into the distribution of the pathological lesions in MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. This is the first report of the brain pathological changes in a patient with m.13513G>A mutation. The spatial distribution of infarct-like lesions in the brain could explain the symptoms in MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. © 2010 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  7. Early stages of Alzheimer's disease are alarming signs in injury deaths caused by traffic accidents in elderly people (≥60 years of age): A neuropathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Printha; Gorrie, Catherine; Shankar, S K; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T; Amaratunga, Dhammika; Hulathduwa, Sanjayah; Kumara, K Sunil; Samarasinghe, Kamani; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Steinbusch, H W M; De Silva, K Ranil D

    2017-01-01

    There is little information available in the literature concerning the contribution of dementia in injury deaths in elderly people (≥60 years). This study was intended to investigate the extent of dementia-related pathologies in the brains of elderly people who died in traffic accidents or by suicide and to compare our findings with age- and sex-matched natural deaths in an elderly population. Autopsy-derived human brain samples from nine injury death victims (5 suicide and 4 traffic accidents) and nine age- and sex-matched natural death victims were screened for neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular pathologies using histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques. For the analysis, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0 was used. There was a greater likelihood for Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related changes in the elders who succumbed to traffic accidents (1 out of 4) compared to age- and sex-matched suicides (0 out of 5) or natural deaths (0 out of 9) as assessed by the National Institute on Aging - Alzheimer's Association guidelines. Actual burden of both neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and (SPs) was comparatively higher in the brains of traffic accidents, and the mean NFT counts were significantly higher in the region of entorhinal cortex ( P stages may be a contributing factor to injury deaths caused by traffic accidents in elderly people whereas suicidal brain neuropathologies resembled natural deaths.

  8. Gene-based association study of genes linked to hippocampal sclerosis of aging neuropathology: GRN, TMEM106B, ABCC9, and KCNMB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumata, Yuriko; Nelson, Peter T; Ellingson, Sally R; Fardo, David W

    2017-05-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) is a common neurodegenerative condition associated with dementia. To learn more about genetic risk of HS-Aging pathology, we tested gene-based associations of the GRN, TMEM106B, ABCC9, and KCNMB2 genes, which were reported to be associated with HS-Aging pathology in previous studies. Genetic data were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium, linked to autopsy-derived neuropathological outcomes from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center. Of the 3251 subjects included in the study, 271 (8.3%) were identified as an HS-Aging case. The significant gene-based association between the ABCC9 gene and HS-Aging appeared to be driven by a region in which a significant haplotype-based association was found. We tested this haplotype as an expression quantitative trait locus using 2 different public-access brain gene expression databases. The HS-Aging pathology protective ABCC9 haplotype was associated with decreased ABCC9 expression, indicating a possible toxic gain of function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alzheimer's-type neuropathology in the precuneus is not increased relative to other areas of neocortex across a range of cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Abner, Erin L; Scheff, Stephen W; Schmitt, Frederick A; Kryscio, Richard J; Jicha, Gregory A; Smith, Charles D; Patel, Ela; Markesbery, William R

    2009-02-06

    We studied Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the precuneus and surrounding brain areas. Anatomically, the precuneus corresponds to the medial portion of human cerebral cortical Brodmann Area 7. This study utilized patients from the University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center autopsy cohort. Data from 47 brains were used comprising patients of differing antemortem cognitive impairment severities, each with longitudinal clinical data and extensive neuropathological data. We assessed whether the precuneus and surrounding areas are differentially vulnerable to AD-type pathological lesions (diffuse amyloid plaques, neuritic amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles). Eleven areas of brain were evaluated for each case: amygdala, hippocampal CA1, subiculum, entorhinal cortex, frontal cortex, superior and middle temporal gyri, inferior parietal lobule, occipital cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, Brodmann Area 31, and the precuneus proper. Like other areas of neocortex, the precuneus demonstrated increased diffuse and neuritic amyloid plaques early in the evolution in AD, and increased neurofibrillary tangles late in AD. Correcting for the antemortem cognitive status of the patients, there was no evidence of an increase in the density of AD-type pathology in the precuneus or neighboring areas relative to other areas of cerebral neocortex. Our results are not consistent with the idea that the precuneus is involved in a special way with plaques or tangles relative to other areas of neocortex.

  10. The crystallography of correlated disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, David A; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2015-05-21

    Classical crystallography can determine structures as complicated as multi-component ribosomal assemblies with atomic resolution, but is inadequate for disordered systems--even those as simple as water ice--that occupy the complex middle ground between liquid-like randomness and crystalline periodic order. Correlated disorder nevertheless has clear crystallographic signatures that map to the type of disorder, irrespective of the underlying physical or chemical interactions and material involved. This mapping hints at a common language for disordered states that will help us to understand, control and exploit the disorder responsible for many interesting physical properties.

  11. Julius Hallervorden's wartime activities: implications for science under dictatorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevell, M I; Peiffer, J

    2001-08-01

    The eponym Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome recalls Julius Hallervorden's and Hugo Spatz's original description of this pediatric neurodegenerative disorder. Julius Hallervorden's important contribution to the practice of neuropathology over a long career cannot be underestimated. However, his work as a pathologist during the Third Reich put him in close proximity with the implementation of biologic solutions (i.e., euthanasia) targeting those individuals with significant intellectual or physical disabilities in chronic-care facilities. The Nazi program of active euthanasia provided a scientific opportunity to gain quick access to pathologic materials. This opportunity was recognized and used by Hallervorden to achieve personal scientific objectives and research efforts. These efforts resulted in a number of postwar scientific publications using materials obtained through the euthanasia program. The participation of distinguished academic physicians in such a program provides a cautionary tale of the potential results of ethical compromise and the effects of the abrogation of personal autonomy in the setting of a totalitarian dictatorship.

  12. Effect of Concurrent Src Kinase Inhibition with Short-Duration Hypothermia on Ca2+/Calmodulin Kinase IV Activity and Neuropathology after Hypoxia-Ischemia in the Newborn Swine Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratimenos, Panagiotis; Koutroulis, Ioannis; Jain, Amit; Malaeb, Shadi; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) results in increased activation of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase IV (CaM kinase IV) mediated by Src kinase. Therapeutic hypothermia ameliorates neuronal injury in the newborn. Inhibition of Src kinase concurrently with hypothermia further attenuates the hypoxia-induced increased activation of CaM kinase IV compared with hypothermia alone. Ventilated piglets were exposed to HI, received saline or a selective Src kinase inhibitor (PP2), and were cooled to 33°C. Neuropathology, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) concentrations, and CaM kinase IV activity were determined. The neuropathology mean score (mean ± SD) was 0.4 ± 0.43 in normoxia-normothermia (p Src kinase inhibitor were comparable in the levels of ATP and PCr, indicating that they were similar in their degree of energy failure prior to treatments. Hypothermia or Src kinase inhibitor (PP2) did not restore the ATP and PCr levels. Hypothermia and Src kinase inhibition attenuated apoptotic cell death and improved neuropathology after hypoxia. The combination of short-duration hypothermia with Src kinase inhibition following hypoxia further attenuates the increased activation of CaM kinase IV compared to hypothermia alone in the newborn swine brain. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Colin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD presents in different phases over time and is oftencomplicated by comorbid conditions such as substance-use disordersand anxiety disorders. Treatment usually involves pharmacotherapywith combinations of different classes of medications and frequentmedication revisions.

  14. Conduct disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000919.htm Conduct disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Conduct disorder is a set of ongoing emotional and behavioral ...

  15. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personality disorders are a group of mental illnesses. They involve long-term patterns of thoughts and behaviors that ... serious problems with relationships and work. People with personality disorders have trouble dealing with everyday stresses and problems. ...

  16. Menstrual Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Menstrual Disorders in Teens Page Content Article Body Within ... test Measurement of gonadotropins, prolactin and androgens How Menstrual Disorders are treated with Drug Therapy: After exclusion ...

  17. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mental disorder(s) (84.5%). 1 Table 1 Download PNG image Download PDF file Past Year Co-morbidity ... in the past 12 months. Table 2 Download PNG image Download PDF file Past Year Treatment of ...

  18. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  19. TMJ disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and dislocations. Alternative Names TMD; Temporomandibular joint disorders; Temporomandibular muscle disorders References Garza I, Schwedt TJ, Robertson CE, Smith JH. Headache and other craniofacial pain. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  20. Conversion disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000954.htm Conversion disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Conversion disorder is a mental condition in which a person ...

  1. Neuromuscular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can ... function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Multiple sclerosis Myasthenia ...

  2. Mathematics disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001534.htm Mathematics disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's ...

  3. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to stay ... concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too ...

  4. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  5. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Publications About Eating Disorders Research Results PubMed: Journal Articles about Eating Disorders Contact Us The National Institute of Mental Health Information Resource Center Hours: 8:30 a.m. ...

  6. Panic Disorder and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health illnesses Alcoholism, substance abuse, and addictive behavior Anxiety disorders Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness) Borderline personality disorder Depression Eating disorders Post-traumatic ...

  7. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gucciardi, Enza; Celasun, Nalan; Ahmad, Farah; Stewart, Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Eating disorders are an increasing public health problem among young women. Anorexia and bulimia may give rise to serious physical conditions such as hypothermia, hypotension, electrolyte imbalance, endocrine disorders, and kidney failure. Key Issues Eating disorders are primarily a problem among women. In Ontario in 1995, over 90% of reported hospitalized cases of anorexia and bulimia were women. In addition to eating disorders, preoccupation with weight, body image and...

  8. Apathy associated with neurocognitive disorders: Recent progress and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanctôt, Krista L; Agüera-Ortiz, Luis; Brodaty, Henry; Francis, Paul T; Geda, Yonas E; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marshall, Gad A; Mortby, Moyra E; Onyike, Chiadi U; Padala, Prasad R; Politis, Antonios M; Rosenberg, Paul B; Siegel, Emma; Sultzer, David L; Abraham, Eleenor H

    2017-01-01

    Apathy is common in neurocognitive disorders (NCDs) such as Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. Although the definition of apathy is inconsistent in the literature, apathy is primarily defined as a loss of motivation and decreased interest in daily activities. The Alzheimer's Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer's Research and Treatment (ISTAART) Neuropsychiatric Syndromes Professional Interest Area (NPS-PIA) Apathy workgroup reviewed the latest research regarding apathy in NCDs. Progress has recently been made in three areas relevant to apathy: (1) phenomenology, including the use of diagnostic criteria and novel instruments for measurement, (2) neurobiology, including neuroimaging, neuropathological and biomarker correlates, and (3) interventions, including pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and noninvasive neuromodulatory approaches. Recent progress confirms that apathy has a significant impact on those with major NCD and those with mild NCDs. As such, it is an important target for research and intervention. Copyright © 2016 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... They may say they're in a bad mood. A mood disorder is different. It affects a person's everyday emotional state. Nearly one in ten people aged 18 and older have mood disorders. These include depression and bipolar disorder (also ...

  10. Anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women of other races and ethnicities. 7 What causes anxiety disorders? Researchers think anxiety disorders are caused by a ... Asnaani, A… .Hofmann, S.G. (2011). Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness . Journal of Psychiatric ...

  11. Panic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Samarasinghe, D S

    1983-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a prevalent anxiety disorder with lifetimeprevalence rates ranging from 1.1% to 3.7% in the general populationand 3.0% to 8.3% in clinic settings.[1]The presence of agoraphobia inpatients with PD is associated with substantial severity, comorbidity(e.g. major depression, other anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse) andfunctional impairment.[1

  12. Which clinical signs are valid indicators for speech language disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Margreet R. Luinge; Margot I. Visser-Bochane; Dr. C.P. van der Schans; Sijmen A. Reijneveld; W.P. Krijnen

    2016-01-01

    Speech language disorders, which include speech sound disorders and language disorders, are common in early childhood. These problems, and in particular language problems, frequently go under diagnosed, because current screening instruments have no satisfying psychometric properties. Recent research

  13. Enteric bacterial metabolites propionic and butyric acid modulate gene expression, including CREB-dependent catecholaminergic neurotransmission, in PC12 cells--possible relevance to autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra B Nankova

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA like propionic (PPA, and butyric acid (BA, which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals

  14. Social communication deficits and conduct disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Donno, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that a proportion of children with Conduct Disorder may have unidentified Autistic Spectrum Disorder (Gilchrist et al., 2001 Gilmour, Hill, Place & Skuse, 2004). This paper considers the argument that a subgroup of children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder are undetected and subsumed under Conduct Disorder or similar descriptors. Diagnostic criteria are described and issues relevant to Conduct Disorder discussed. This is followed by an examination of the similariti...

  15. [Conversion disorder : functional neuroimaging and neurobiological mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, J; Piette, C; Salmon, E; Scantamburlo, G

    2017-04-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder often encountered in neurology services. This condition without organic lesions was and still is sometimes referred as an imaginary illness or feigning. However, the absence of organic lesions does not exclude the possibility of cerebral dysfunction. The etiologic mechanisms underlying this disorder remain uncertain even today.The advent of cognitive and functional imaging opens up a field of exploration for psychiatry in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying mental disorders and especially the conversion disorder. This article reports several neuroimaging studies of conversion disorder and attempts to generate hypotheses about neurobiological mechanisms.

  16. Dyslipidemia in Dermatological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Chetana; Shenoy, Manjunath Mala; Rao, Gururaja K.

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are one of the common metabolic disorders. A link between dermatological disorders like psoriasis and dyslipidemia has been established in the recent past. Many dermatological disorders could have a systemic inflammatory component which explains such association. Chronic inflammatory dermatological disorders could also have other metabolic imbalances that may contribute to dyslipidemia. Presence of such abnormal metabolism may justify routine screening of these disorders for associated dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities and early treatment of such comorbidities to improve quality of life. Some of the drugs used by dermatologists such as retinoids are also likely to be a cause of dyslipidemia. Hence, it is imperative that the dermatologists obtain scientific knowledge on the underlying mechanisms involved in dyslipidemia and understand when to intervene with therapies. A systematic review of the English language literature was done by using Google Scholar and PubMed. In this review, attempts are made to list the dermatological disorders associated with dyslipidemia; to simplify the understanding of underlying mechanisms; and to give a brief idea about the interventions. PMID:26713286

  17. Clinical features, neurogenetics and neuropathology of the polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias type 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, Udo; Schöls, Ludger; Paulson, Henry; Auburger, Georg; Kermer, Pawel; Jen, Joanna C; Seidel, Kay; Korf, Horst-Werner; Deller, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias type 1 (SCA1), 2 (SCA2), 3 (SCA3), 6 (SCA6) and 7 (SCA7) are genetically defined autosomal dominantly inherited progressive cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs). They belong to the group of CAG-repeat or polyglutamine diseases and share pathologically expanded and meiotically unstable glutamine-encoding CAG-repeats at distinct gene loci encoding elongated polyglutamine stretches in the disease proteins. In recent years, progress has been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these currently incurable diseases: Identification of underlying genetic mechanisms made it possible to classify the different ADCAs and to define their clinical and pathological features. Furthermore, advances in molecular biology yielded new insights into the physiological and pathophysiological role of the gene products of SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7 (i.e. ataxin-1, ataxin-2, ataxin-3, α-1A subunit of the P/Q type voltage-dependent calcium channel, ataxin-7). In the present review we summarize our current knowledge about the polyglutamine ataxias SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7 and compare their clinical and electrophysiological features, genetic and molecular biological background, as well as their brain pathologies. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the structure, interactions and functions of the different disease proteins. On the basis of these comprehensive data, similarities, differences and possible disease mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of psychotherapy as a method of mental disorders treatment at the Jagiellonian University and in Kraków before World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembińska, Edyta; Rutkowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the origins of Polish psychotherapy with a special focus on psychotherapy development in Krakow and at the Jagiellonian University. The history of Krakow psychotherapy starts with the foundation of the Psychiatry and Neuropathology Clinic of the Jagiellonian University in 1905. Doctors working in the Department of psychotherapy developed their skills through contacts with the Zurich University Psychiatric Clinic Burgholzli. At the same time psychotherapy, and psychoanalysis in particular, were raising more and more interest in Poland. The most dynamic development of psychoanalysis reflected in the number of scientific publications, occurs in the years leading to the outbreak of War World I. This article presents brief portraits of the first Polish psychoanalysts ( Ludwik Jekels, Herman Nunberg, Ludwika Karpińska, Stefan Borowiecki, Jan Nelken, Kraol de Beaurain). Many of them worked in Psychiatry and Neuropathology Clinic of the Jagiellonian University. Their scientific achievements and contribution to the development of the international psychoanalytic movement are described, as well as relationships with leading psychoanalysts of this period (Freud, Jung). With the outbreak of World War I the research on and treatment of war neurosis was initiated in the Psychiatry and Neuropathology Clinic. Professor Piltz, the director of the clinic, together with his assistants (Borowiecki, de Beuarain, Artwiński) devised a unique in European psychiatry and highly efficient method of post-traumatic disorders treatment, in which psychotherapy was of key importance.

  19. Functional neuroimaging of sleep disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Chun; Zhao Jun; Guan Yihui

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disorders may affect the health and normal life of human badly. However, the pathophysiology underlying adult sleep disorders is still unclear. Functional neuroimaging can be used to investigate whether sleep disorders are associated with specific changes in brain structure or regional activity. This paper reviews functional brain imaging findings in major intrinsic sleep disorders (i.e., idiopathic insomnia, narcolepsy, and obstructive sleep apnea) and in abnormal motor behavior during sleep (i.e., periodic limb movement disorder and REM sleep behavior disorder). Metabolic/functional investigations (positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging) are mainly reviewed, as well as neuroanatomical assessments (voxel-based morphometry, magnetic resonance spectroscopy). Meanwhile, here are some brief introduction of different kinds of sleep disorders. (authors)

  20. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Marguerite; Nigg, Joel T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there have been numerous technical and methodological advances available to clinicians and researchers to better understand attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its etiology. Despite the growing body of literature investigating the disorder’s pathophysiology, ADHD remains a complex psychiatric disorder to characterize. This chapter will briefly review the literature on ADHD, with a focus on its history, the current genetic insights, neurophysiologic theories, and the use of neuroimaging to further understand the etiology. We address some of the major concerns that remain unclear about ADHD, including subtype instability, heterogeneity, and the underlying neural correlates that define the disorder. We highlight that the field of ADHD is rapidly evolving; the descriptions provided here will hopefully provide a sturdy foundation for which to build and improve our understanding of the disorder. PMID:24214656

  1. Corpus callosum changes in euthymic bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Adrian J; Ali, Heba E; Nesbitt, David; Moore, P Brian; Young, Allan H; Ferrier, I Nicol

    2014-02-01

    Changes in corpus callosum area and thickness have been reported in bipolar disorder. Imaging and limited neuropathological data suggest possible abnormalities in myelination and/or glial function. To compare corpus callosum area, thickness and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 signal intensity in patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls. A total of 48 patients with euthymic bipolar disorder and 46 healthy controls underwent MRI analysis of callosal midsagittal area, callosal thickness and T1 signal intensity. The bipolar group had smaller overall and subregional callosal areas and correspondingly reduced callosal width than the control group. Age correlated negatively with callosal area in the control group but not in the bipolar group. Signal intensity was higher in women than in men in both groups. Signal intensity was reduced in women, but not in men, in the bipolar group. Observed differences probably relate to diagnosis rather than mood state and bipolar disorder appears to result in morphometric change that overrides changes seen in normal ageing. Intensity changes are consistent with possible altered myelination or glial function. A gender-dependent factor appears to operate and to interact with diagnosis.

  2. Adult separation anxiety disorder in the DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bögels, S.M.; Knappe, S.; Clark, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike other DSM-IV anxiety disorders, separation anxiety disorder (SAD) has been considered a disorder that typically begins in childhood, and could be diagnosed only in adults "if onset is before 18." Moreover, SAD is the only DSM-IV anxiety disorder placed under "Disorders Usually First Diagnosed

  3. Nonorganic insomnia in generalized anxiety disorder. 2. Comparative studies on sleep, awakening, daytime vigilance and anxiety under lorazepam plus diphenhydramine (Somnium) versus lorazepam alone, utilizing clinical, polysomnographic and EEG mapping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu, B; Saletu-Zyhlarz, G; Anderer, P; Brandstätter, N; Frey, R; Gruber, G; Klösch, G; Mandl, M; Grünberger, J; Linzmayer, L

    1997-01-01

    Previous human pharmacological and toxicological studies demonstrated advantages of the combination drug Somnium [SOM, lorazepam (LOR) 1 mg plus diphenhydramine 25 mg] over 1 mg LOR alone, as it showed synergistic effects in hypnotic properties and antagonistic effects in regard to toxicity. In the present double-blind, parallel-group study, hypnotic and anxiolytic effects of SOM were studied in 44 patients with non-organic insomnia related to mild generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), as compared with LOR alone. After a placebo run-in phase of 1 week, they received active treatment (1 tablet SOM or LOR 1 mg) for 4 weeks and thereafter placebo again for 1 week. Clinical evaluations included the physician's general assessment of efficacy, tolerance and adverse effects, the Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HAMA), the Zung self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and depression scale, the withdrawal symptom scale (WSS), hematology and blood chemistry. Sleep laboratory evaluations included objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality, measured by polysomnography, self-rating of sleep and awakening quality (SSA) and a psychometric test battery in the morning, as well as measurement of daytime brain function, objectivated by EEG mapping. Physicians' global evaluation of insomnia demonstrated no changes in the pre-drug placebo period, moderate improvement under both drugs, with a marginal advantage of SOM over LOR in the first 2 weeks, and a return to pre-drug values in the post-drug placebo period. Anxiety improved in observer ratings (HAMA) under both drugs, in self-rating (SAS) under the combination drug only, with the scores returning to pre-drug placebo values after post-drug placebo substitution. There were no significant findings in the self-rating depression scale and the WSS, with the exception of an improvement in the WSS score 4 weeks after SOM, as compared with pre-drug placebo. There were no rebound phenomena. Both drugs were well tolerated-in regard to both

  4. Impact of anesthetic regimen on the respiratory pattern, EEG microstructure and sleep in the rat model of cholinergic Parkinson's disease neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, K; Petrovic, J; Ciric, J; Kalauzi, A; Saponjic, J

    2015-09-24

    We hypothesized that the impact of distinct anesthetic regimens could be differently expressed during anesthesia and on post-anesthesia sleep in the neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, we followed the impact of ketamine/diazepam and pentobarbital anesthesia in a rat model of the severe Parkinson's disease cholinergic neuropathology on the electroencephalographic (EEG) microstructure and respiratory pattern during anesthesia, and on the post-anesthesia sleep. We performed the experiments on adult, male, spontaneously breathing Wistar rats chronically instrumented for sleep recording. The bilateral pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) lesion was done by ibotenic acid microinfusion. Following postoperative recovery, we recorded sleep for 6h, induced anesthesia 24h later using ketamine/diazepam or pentobarbital, and repeated sleep recordings sessions 48h and 6days later. During 20min of each anesthesia we recorded both the EEG and respiratory movements. For sleep and EEG analysis, Fourier analysis was applied on 6-h recordings, and each 10-s epoch was differentiated as a state of wakefulness (Wake), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) or rapid eye movement (REM). Additionally, the group probability density distributions of all EEG frequency band relative amplitudes were calculated for each state, with particular attention during anesthesia. For respiratory pattern analysis we used Monotone Signal Segments Analysis. The PPT lesion was identified through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry. Our data show that the ketamine/diazepam anesthetic regimen in the PPT-lesioned rats induces more alterations in the EEG microstructure and respiratory pattern than does the pentobarbital anesthesia. In addition, the equal time required to establish an anesthetized state, and the long-term effect on post-anesthesia sleep in the PPT-lesioned vs. control rats suggest this anesthetic regimen as potentially more beneficial both for anesthesia

  5. Anti-semaphorin 4D immunotherapy ameliorates neuropathology and some cognitive impairment in the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Amber L; Franciosi, Sonia; Villanueva, Erika B; Xie, Yuanyun; Winter, Laurie A; Veeraraghavan, Janaki; Jonason, Alan; Felczak, Boguslaw; Zhang, Weining; Kovalik, Vlad; Waltl, Sabine; Hall, George; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Smith, Ernest S; Bowers, William J; Zauderer, Maurice; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disease with no disease-modifying therapy currently available. In addition to characteristic motor deficits and atrophy of the caudate nucleus, signature hallmarks of HD include behavioral abnormalities, immune activation, and cortical and white matter loss. The identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets that contribute to these degenerative cellular processes may lead to new interventions that slow or even halt the course of this insidious disease. Semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) is a transmembrane signaling molecule that modulates a variety of processes central to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration including glial cell activation, neuronal growth cone collapse and apoptosis of neural precursors, as well as inhibition of oligodendrocyte migration, differentiation and process formation. Therefore, inhibition of SEMA4D signaling could reduce CNS inflammation, increase neuronal outgrowth and enhance oligodendrocyte maturation, which may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases, including HD. To that end, we evaluated the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of an anti-SEMA4D monoclonal antibody, which prevents the interaction between SEMA4D and its receptors, in the YAC128 transgenic HD mouse model. Anti-SEMA4D treatment ameliorated neuropathological signatures, including striatal atrophy, cortical atrophy, and corpus callosum atrophy and prevented testicular degeneration in YAC128 mice. In parallel, a subset of behavioral symptoms was improved in anti-SEMA4D treated YAC128 mice, including reduced anxiety-like behavior and rescue of cognitive deficits. There was, however, no discernible effect on motor deficits. The preservation of brain gray and white matter and improvement in behavioral measures in YAC128 mice treated with anti-SEMA4D suggest that this approach could represent a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HD. Importantly, this work

  6. The significance of cortical cerebellar microbleeds and microinfarcts in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases. A post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Devos, David; Defebvre, Luc; Moreau, Caroline; Capparos-Lefebvre, Dominique; Pasquier, Florence; Leys, Didier; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Bordet, Regis

    2015-01-01

    As cortical microbleeds and microinfarcts in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases have been studied predominantly at the level of the cerebral hemispheres and linked to the presence of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), we aimed at determining with 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) whether the causes and the frequency of cortical cerebellar microbleeds (CCeMBs) and microinfarcts (CCeMIs) are the same. Hundred and four postmortem brains, composed of 29 with pure Alzheimer's disease (AD), 9 with AD associated to CAA, 10 with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, 9 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 10 with Lewy body disease, 12 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 9 with vascular dementia (VaD), and 16 controls, were examined. On a horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere examined with 7.0-tesla MRI, the number CCeMBs and CCeMIs were compared between the different disease groups and the control group. The MRI findings were also compared with the corresponding mean values observed on histological examination of a separate standard horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere, used for diagnostic purpose. CCeMBs and CCeMIs were only significantly increased in the VaD group. When comparing the diseased patients with and without CAA mutually and with those with arterial hypertension and severe atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease, only in the latter an increase of CCeMBs and CCeMIs was observed. There was an excellent correlation between the MRI and the neuropathological findings. CCeMBs and CCeMIs are mainly due to atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease and not due to CAA. Their increased presence cannot be included to the Boston diagnostic criteria for CAA. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Learning and Memory Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease-Like Neuropathology in the PS19 and APPSwe Mouse Models of Tauopathy and Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Denise Isabelle; Defensor, Erwin; Memar Ardestani, Pooneh; Yi, Bitna; Halpain, Michelle; Seabrook, Guy; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, pharmacological modulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2 (eIF2α) pathway was achieved using an integrated stress response inhibitor (ISRIB). While members of this signaling cascade have been suggested as potential therapeutic targets for neurodegeneration, the biological significance of this pathway has not been comprehensively assessed in animal models of AD. The present study investigated the ER stress pathway and its long-term modulation utilizing in vitro and in vivo experimental models of tauopathy (MAPT P301S)PS19 and amyloidosis (APP Swe ). We report that thapsigargin induces activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) in primary cortical neurons (PCNs) derived from rat and APP Swe nontransgenic (nTg) and transgenic (Tg) mice. ISRIB mitigated the induction of ATF4 in PCNs generated from wild-type (WT) but not APP Swe mice despite partially restoring thapsigargin-induced translational repression in nTg PCNs. In vivo , C57BL/6J and PS19 mice received prolonged, once-daily administration of ISRIB. While the compound was well tolerated by PS19 and C57BL/6J mice, APP Swe mice treated per this schedule displayed significant mortality. Thus, the dose was reduced and administered only on behavioral test days. ISRIB did not improve learning and memory function in APP Swe Tg mice. While ISRIB did not reduce tau-related neuropathology in PS19 Tg mice, no evidence of ER stress-related dysfunction was observed in either of these Tg models. Taken together, the significance of ER stress and the relevance of these models to the etiology of AD require further investigation.

  8. Increased expressions of ADAMTS-13, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and neurofilament correlate with severity of neuropathology in Border disease virus-infected small ruminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gungor Cagdas Dincel

    Full Text Available Border Disease (BD, caused by Pestivirus from the family Flaviviridae, leads to serious reproductive losses and brain anomalies such as hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in aborted fetuses and neonatal lambs. In this report it is aimed to investigate the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin type I repeats-13 (ADAMTS-13, and neurofilament (NF in the brain tissue in small ruminants infected with Border Disease Virus (BDV and to identify any correlation between hypomyelinogenesis and BD neuropathology. Results of the study revealed that the levels of ADAMTS-13 (p<0.05, nNOS (p<0.05, and NF (p<0.05 were remarkably higher in BDV-infected brain tissue than in the uninfected control. It was suggested that L-arginine-NO synthase pathway is activated after infection by BDV and that the expression of NF and nNOS is associated with the severity of BD. A few studies have focused on ADAMTS-13 expression in the central nervous system, and its function continues to remain unclear. The most prominent finding from our study was that ADAMTS-13, which contain two CUB domains, has two CUB domains and its high expression levels are probably associated with the development of the central nervous system (CNS. The results also clearly indicate that the interaction of ADAMTS-13 and NO may play an important role in the regulation and protection of the CNS microenvironment in neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, NF expression might indicate the progress of the disease. To the best of the authors'knowledge, this is the first report on ADAMTS-13 expression in the CNS of BDV-infected small ruminants.

  9. Mental disorders, brain disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Amongst DSM's most vocal 'insider' critics has been Thomas Insel, Director of the US National Institute of Mental Health. Insel has publicly criticised DSM's adherence to a symptom-based classification of mental disorder, and used the weight ...

  10. Investigation of underlying mechanisms contributing to the maintenance, development, and exacerbation of features associated with Borderline Personality Disorder: the role of metacognition, emotion regulation suppression, and the lack of emotion regulation reappraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Salayandia, Luis Lira

    2015-01-01

    Background Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is considered to be one of the most debilitating and difficult to treat mental disorders. Traditionally, studies investigating the aetiology and mechanisms associated with the development and exacerbation of BPD have relied on the use of clinical populations. As a consequence, the opportunities to understand vulnerabilities and fundamental processes that may contribute to the development and maintenance of the disorder have be...

  11. Body image in social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderka, Idan M; Gutner, Cassidy A; Lazarov, Amit; Hermesh, Haggai; Hofmann, Stefan G; Marom, Sofi

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder falls under the category of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, yet research has suggested it may also be highly associated with social anxiety disorder. The current study examined body image variables among 68 outpatients with primary obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; n=22), social anxiety disorder (SAD; n=25), and panic disorder (PD; n=21). Participants filled out self-report measures of body image disturbance, attitudes toward one's appearance, and anxiety. Body image disturbance and attitudes toward appearance did not significantly differ between the groups. However, SAD symptoms predicted body image disturbance, Appearance Evaluation and Body Areas Satisfaction, and OCD symptoms predicted Appearance Orientation. These findings suggest that SAD and OCD may be associated with different facets of body image. Implications for the treatment of anxiety disorders and for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Eating Disorders as Coping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Amy M.; Much, Kari

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the complex nature of eating disorders, specifically highlighting their use as coping mechanisms for underlying emotional and psychological concerns. Case examples of college counseling center clients are discussed in order to illustrate common ways in which eating disorders are utilized by clients with varying…

  13. Compulsive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, John M; Black, Donald W

    2004-02-01

    Compulsive disorders include a diverse group of conditions characterized by excessive thoughts or preoccupations combined with poorly controlled behaviors. They include trichotillomania, kleptomania, pathologic gambling, compulsive buying disorder, compulsive sexual behavior, and compulsive computer use. Some investigators have suggested that these conditions constitute a spectrum of disorders linked to obsessive-compulsive disorder. Others have questioned the validity of this conceptualization, and have debated the relationship between these disorders. Nevertheless, much has been learned about compulsive disorders, and there have been some successes with psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatments. Recent therapy-based interventions have moved from psychodynamic treatments toward cognitive-behavioral modalities. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors remain the best-studied pharmacologic treatment, but researchers have also explored other antidepressants, opioid agonists, mood stabilizers, and atypical antipsychotics.

  14. [Eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshie; Okamoto, Yuri; Jinnin, Ran; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Yasumasa

    2015-02-01

    Eating disorders are characterized by aberrant patterns of eating behavior, including such symptoms as extreme restriction of food intake or binge eating, and severe disturbances in the perception of body shape and weight, as well as a drive for thinness and obsessive fears of becoming fat. Eating disorder is an important cause for physical and psychosocial morbidity in young women. Patients with eating disorders have a deficit in the cognitive process and functional abnormalities in the brain system. Recently, brain-imaging techniques have been used to identify specific brain areas that function abnormally in patients with eating disorders. We have discussed the clinical and cognitive aspects of eating disorders and summarized neuroimaging studies of eating disorders.

  15. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    TUČKOVÁ, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to create an eating disorder prevention program. The thesis particularly focuses on the eating disorder problems during adolescence and early adulthood along with the explanation and specification of basic terms, history and cause of the disorder. A strong emphasis is placed on the possibilities of the prevention. A qualitative research was carried out within the scope of this thesis and it brought useful data about the students and their knowledge of the ea...

  16. Digested disorder

    OpenAIRE

    DeForte, Shelly; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins is overwhelming. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a ?Digested Disorder? project and represent a series of reader?s digest type articles objectively representing the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be ded...

  17. Digested disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Krishna D; DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins grows fast. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a ?Digested Disorder? project and represent a new issue of reader?s digest of the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrin...

  18. Whiplash-Associated Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrara, S. D.; Ananian, V.; Baccino, E.

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript presents the International Guidelines developed by the Working Group on Personal Injury and Damage under the patronage of the International Academy of Legal Medicine (IALM) regarding the Methods of Ascertainment of any suspected Whiplash-Associated Disorders (WAD). The document...

  19. Personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, L.M.C.; Verheul, R.; Verster, J.C.; Brady, K.; Galanter, M.; Conrod, P.

    2012-01-01

    Subject of this chapter is the often found combination of personality disorders and ­substance abuse disorders. The serious nature of this comorbidity is shown through the discussion of prevalence and epidemiological data. Literature shows that the comorbidity, hampering the diagnostic process, is

  20. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  1. Dysthymic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health: Keeping Your Emotional HealthManaging Daily StressDepressionGrieving: Facing Illness, Death, and Other LossesTherapy and CounselingUnderstanding Your Teen’s Emotional HealthGeneralized Anxiety Disorder Home Diseases and Conditions Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD) ...

  2. Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not receive early and comprehensive treatment . Without treatment, many youngsters with conduct disorder are unable to adapt to the demands of ... break laws or behave in an antisocial manner. Treatment of children with conduct disorder can be complex and challenging. Treatment can be ...

  3. Conduct disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, J.K.; Smeets, K.C.; Herpers, P.; Scheepers, F.; Glennon, J.; Rommelse, N.N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic

  4. Gambling disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, David C; Stea, Jonathan N; Grant, Jon E

    2011-11-26

    Gambling disorders, including pathological gambling and problem gambling, have received increased attention from clinicians and researchers over the past three decades since gambling opportunities have expanded around the world. This Seminar reviews prevalence, causes and associated features, screening and diagnosis, and treatment approaches. Gambling disorders affect 0·2-5·3% of adults worldwide, although measurement and prevalence varies according to the screening instruments and methods used, and availability and accessibility of gambling opportunities. Several distinct treatment approaches have been favourably evaluated, such as cognitive behavioural and brief treatment models and pharmacological interventions. Although promising, family therapy and support from Gamblers Anonymous are less well empirically supported. Gambling disorders are highly comorbid with other mental health and substance use disorders, and a further understanding is needed of both the causes and treatment implications of this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrer, Peter; Mulder, Roger; Crawford, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Personality disorder is now being accepted as an important condition in mainstream psychiatry across the world. Although it often remains unrecognized in ordinary practice, research studies have shown it is common, creates considerable morbidity, is associated with high costs to services...... and to society, and interferes, usually negatively, with progress in the treatment of other mental disorders. We now have evidence that personality disorder, as currently classified, affects around 6% of the world population, and the differences between countries show no consistent variation. We are also getting...... increasing evidence that some treatments, mainly psychological, are of value in this group of disorders. What is now needed is a new classification that is of greater value to clinicians, and the WPA Section on Personality Disorders is currently undertaking this task....

  6. Autism spectrum disorder - childhood disintegrative disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the larger developmental disorder category of autism spectrum disorder . ... American Psychiatric Association. Autism spectrum disorder. ... VA: American Psychiatric Publishing: 2013;50-59. Raviola GJ, ...

  7. Topographic distribution of brain iron deposition and small cerebrovascular lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques; Devos, David; Moreau, Caroline; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Deramecourt, Vincent; Pasquier, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Leys, Didier; Bordet, Regis

    2017-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in 15% of the cases. A neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD-TDP is suspected. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study compares the topographic distribution of iron (Fe) deposition and the incidence of small cerebrovascular lesions in ALS and in FTLD brains. Seventy-eight post-mortem brains underwent 7.0-tesla MRI. The patients consisted of 12 with ALS, 38 with FTLD, and 28 controls. Three ALS brains had minor FTLD features. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere were submitted to T2 and T2* MRI sequences. The amount of Fe deposition in the deep brain structures and the number of small cerebrovascular lesions was determined in ALS and the subtypes of FTLD compared to control brains, with neuropathological correlates. A significant increase of Fe deposition was observed in the claustrum, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, thalamus, and subthalamic nucleus of the FTLD-FUS and FTLD-TDP groups, while in the ALS one, the Fe increase was only observed in the caudate and the subthalamic nuclei. White matter changes were only significantly more severe in the FTLD compared to those in ALS and in controls brains. Cortical micro-bleeds were increased in the frontal and temporal lobes of FTLD as well as of ALS brains compared to controls. Cortical micro-infarcts were, on the other hand, more frequent in the control compared to the ALS and FTLD groups. The present study supports the assumption of a neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD and illustrates the favourable vascular risk profile in these diseases.

  8. DNA damage response and senescence in endothelial cells of human cerebral cortex and relation to Alzheimer's neuropathology progression: a population-based study in the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC-CFAS) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Claire J; Simpson, Julie E; Al Mashhadi, Sufana; Axe, Claire; Wilson, Suzanna; Heath, Pamela R; Shaw, Pamela J; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B

    2014-12-01

    Abnormalities of the brain microvasculature in Alzheimer's disease have led to the vascular hypothesis of the disease, which predicts that vascular changes precede neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. To determine the spectrum of endothelial injury in the elderly and its relation to Alzheimer-type neuropathology we investigated DNA damage in a population-based sample derived from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. We examined endothelial damage in frontal and temporal cortex (n = 97) using immunohistochemistry for γH2AX and DNA-protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). To determine the effects of endothelial DNA damage at the earliest stages of Alzheimer's pathology we further focused our analysis on cases classified as Braak 0-II and examined endothelial senescence using histochemistry for β-galactosidase and the expression of genes related to DNA damage and senescence using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We demonstrated large variation in endothelial DNA damage which was not associated with Alzheimer's neuropathology. Endothelial DNA-PKcs correlated with neuronal and glial DNA-PKcs counts. Focusing our further analysis on Braak 0-II cases, qPCR analysis demonstrated a trend to increased TP53 (P = 0.064) in cases with high compared with low endothelial DNA damage which was supported by immunohistochemical analysis of p53. Endothelial β-galactosidase expression was associated with increased neuronal (P = 0.033) and glial (P = 0.038), but not endothelial DNA-PKcs expression. Damage to brain endothelial cells occurs early in relation to, or independently of, Alzheimer pathology, and parallels that in neurones and glia. Endothelial DNA damage and senescence are a brain ageing process that may contribute to dysfunction of the neurovascular unit in some elderly individuals. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  9. Using the mood disorder questionnaire and bipolar spectrum diagnostic scale to detect bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder among eating disorder patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Screening scales for bipolar disorder including the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and Bipolar Spectrum Diagnostic Scale (BSDS) have been plagued by high false positive rates confounded by presence of borderline personality disorder. This study examined the accuracy of these scales for detecting bipolar disorder among patients referred for eating disorders and explored the possibility of simultaneous assessment of co-morbid borderline personality disorder. Methods Participants were 78 consecutive female patients who were referred for evaluation of an eating disorder. All participants completed the mood and eating disorder sections of the SCID-I/P and the borderline personality disorder section of the SCID-II, in addition to the MDQ and BSDS. Predictive validity of the MDQ and BSDS was evaluated by Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis of the Area Under the Curve (AUC). Results Fifteen (19%) and twelve (15%) patients fulfilled criteria for bipolar II disorder and borderline personality disorder, respectively. The AUCs for bipolar II disorder were 0.78 (MDQ) and 0.78 (BDSD), and the AUCs for borderline personality disorder were 0.75 (MDQ) and 0.79 (BSDS). Conclusions Among patients being evaluated for eating disorders, the MDQ and BSDS show promise as screening questionnaires for both bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. PMID:23443034

  10. Congenital imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Netchine, Irène; Temple, I Karen

    2015-01-01

    their common underlying (epi)genetic aetiologies, and their basic pathogenesis and long-term clinical consequences remain largely unknown. Efforts to elucidate the aetiology of IDs are currently fragmented across Europe, and standardisation of diagnostic and clinical management is lacking. The new consortium...... EUCID.net (European network of congenital imprinting disorders) now aims to promote better clinical care and scientific investigation of imprinting disorders by establishing a concerted multidisciplinary alliance of clinicians, researchers, patients and families. By encompassing all IDs and establishing...

  11. [Dissociative disorders and affective disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montant, J; Adida, M; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Pringuey, D; Da Fonseca, D; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenology of dissociative disorders may be complex and sometimes confusing. We describe here two cases who were initially misdiagnosed. The first case concerned a 61 year-old woman, who was initially diagnosed as an isolated dissociative fugue and was actually suffering from severe major depressive episode. The second case concerned a 55 year-old man, who was suffering from type I bipolar disorder and polyvascular disease, and was initially diagnosed as dissociative fugue in a mooddestabilization context, while it was finally a stroke. Yet dissociative disorders as affective disorder comorbidity are relatively unknown. We made a review on this topic. Dissociative disorders are often studied through psycho-trauma issues. Litterature is rare on affective illness comorbid with dissociative disorders, but highlight the link between bipolar and dissociative disorders. The later comorbidity often refers to an early onset subtype with also comorbid panic and depersonalization-derealization disorder. Besides, unipolar patients suffering from dissociative symptoms have more often cyclothymic affective temperament. Despite the limits of such studies dissociative symptoms-BD association seems to correspond to a clinical reality and further works on this topic may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  12. [Affective disorders and eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakra, Eric; Belzeaux, R; Azorin, J M; Adida, M

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a frequent co-occurence of affective and eating disorders. The incidence of one disorder in patients suffering from the other disorder is well over the incidence in the general population. Several causes could explain this increased comorbidity. First, the iatrogenic origin is detailed. Indeed, psychotropic drugs, and particularly mood stabilizers, often lead to modification in eating behaviors, generally inducing weight gain. These drugs can increase desire for food, reduce baseline metabolism or decrease motor activity. Also, affective and eating disorders share several characteristics in semiology. These similarities can not only obscure the differential diagnosis but may also attest of conjoint pathophysiological bases in the two conditions. However, genetic and biological findings so far are too sparse to corroborate this last hypothesis. Nonetheless, it is noteworthy that comorbidity of affective and eating disorders worsens patients'prognosis and is associated with more severe forms of affective disorders characterized by an earlier age of onset in the disease, higher number of mood episodes and a higher suicidality. Lastly, psychotropic drugs used in affective disorders (lithium, antiepileptic mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants) are reviewed in order to weigh their efficacy in eating disorders. This could help establish the best therapeutic option when confronted to comorbidity. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  13. Obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders in obsessive-compulsive disorder and other anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2010-01-01

    There has been debate about whether obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) should be classified as one of the anxiety disorders, or should rather be categorized with obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions. The question of where OCD should be located in the diagnostic system was addressed by investigating the relationship of OCD, obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs), and anxiety disorders. We administered a structured diagnostic interview (the SCID-OCSD) for assessing putative OCSDs in patients who presented with a primary diagnosis of OCD, panic disorder with/out agoraphobia (PD) or social anxiety disorder (SAD) in an attempt to address the proposed differentiation of OCD from the other DSM-IV anxiety disorders. Patients with OCD were significantly more likely to have multiple comorbid putative OCSDs than patients with PD or SAD. Some OCSDs, i.e. any tic disorder/Tourette's disorder as well as body-focused repetitive behaviors (self-injury, trichotillomania), and certain impulsive/reward-focused disorders (kleptomania, hypersexual disorder) were more common in OCD. Some of the putative OCSDs (e.g. hypochondriasis and body dysmorphic disorder) were more common in PD and SAD, respectively. Depression had equally high comorbidity with OCD, PD, and SAD, while generalized anxiety disorder and alcohol dependence were particularly associated with SAD. These findings suggest that some putative OCSDs may be related to OCD, while some may have a closer relationship to other anxiety disorders. From a nosological perspective, it may be useful to include OCD and certain OCSDs under the rubric of an enlarged category of anxiety and OCSDs. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G; Dols, Annemiek; Al Jurdi, Rayan K; Forester, Brent P; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Beyer, John; Manes, Facundo; Rej, Soham; Rosa, Adriane R; Schouws, Sigfried NTM; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Young, Robert C; Shulman, Kenneth I

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). Methods This task force report addresses the unique aspects of OABD including epidemiology and clinical features, neuropathology and biomarkers, physical health, cognition, and care approaches. Results The report describes an expert consensus summary on OABD that is intended to advance the care of patients, and shed light on issues of relevance to BD research across the lifespan. Although there is still a dearth of research and health efforts focused on older adults with BD, emerging data has brought some answers, innovative questions, and novel perspectives related to the notion of late onset, medical comorbidity, and the vexing issue of cognitive impairment and decline. Conclusions Improving our understanding of the biological, clinical, and social underpinnings relevant to OABD is an indispensable step in building a complete map of BD across the lifespan. PMID:26384588

  15. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G; Dols, Annemiek; Al Jurdi, Rayan K; Forester, Brent P; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Beyer, John; Manes, Facundo; Rej, Soham; Rosa, Adriane R; Schouws, Sigfried Ntm; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Young, Robert C; Shulman, Kenneth I

    2015-11-01

    In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). This task force report addresses the unique aspects of OABD including epidemiology and clinical features, neuropathology and biomarkers, physical health, cognition, and care approaches. The report describes an expert consensus summary on OABD that is intended to advance the care of patients, and shed light on issues of relevance to BD research across the lifespan. Although there is still a dearth of research and health efforts focused on older adults with BD, emerging data have brought some answers, innovative questions, and novel perspectives related to the notion of late onset, medical comorbidity, and the vexing issue of cognitive impairment and decline. Improving our understanding of the biological, clinical, and social underpinnings relevant to OABD is an indispensable step in building a complete map of BD across the lifespan. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gentile, Julie P.; Dillon, Kristy S.; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide variety of what have been called “dissociative disorders,” including dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Some of these diagnoses, particularly dissociative identity disorder, are controversial and have been questioned by many clinicians over the years. The disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, but many persons who have experienced trauma rep...

  17. Balance Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder can profoundly affect daily activities and cause psychological and emotional hardship. What are the symptoms of ... that help with balance but are destroyed by aging, medications, infections, or trauma can someday be regrown ...

  18. Bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of pleasure in activities once enjoyed Loss of self-esteem Thoughts of death or suicide Trouble getting to ... other. This is called rapid cycling. Exams and Tests To diagnose bipolar disorder, the provider may do ...

  19. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  20. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss. With anorexia, a person will deny hunger and refuse to eat, practice binge eating and ... to better insure healthy eating patterns, and increases awareness and support. Related Conditions People with eating disorders ...

  1. Amnestic Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Savage, G.; Cautin, R.L.; Lilienfeld, S.O.

    2015-01-01

    Amnestic disorders may involve deficits in the encoding or storage of information in memory, or in retrieval of information from memory. Etiologies vary and include traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disease, and psychiatric illness. Different forms of amnesia can be distinguished:

  2. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) . Monosomy is another ... which there is an extra chromosome. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome): A chromosomal disorder that causes serious problems with ...

  3. Characterization of the Pathological and Biochemical Markers that Correlate to the Clinical Features of Autism. Subproject 1: The Neuropathological Markers of Abnormal Brain Development and Aging in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    gastrointestinal and sleep disorders , as well as anxiety, aggression, obsessive compulsive behavior and mood disorders observed in autism. However...e) Thickenning of the subependymal cell layer and subependymal nodular dysplasia and an indicative of active neurogenesis in autistic children ...Reduced volume of neurons in a majority of subcortical structures and some cortical regions in the brain of autistic children 4–8 years of age appear

  4. Can eating disorders cause functional gastrointestinal disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, P

    2010-12-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are very common (up to 98%) in patients with an eating disorder (ED). Boyd et al. discuss in this issue of Neurogastroenterology & Motility that FGIDs can persist independently on the outcome of the ED. Their findings leave room for speculation on the mechanisms underlying FGIDs in patients with an ED. FGIDs result from a complex interaction of biological, psychosocial and social factors. The altered eating behavior seen in EDs is strongly associated with disturbed gastrointestinal sensitivity and motor physiology. Moreover, psychiatric co-morbidities in ED patients are also frequently found in FGIDs. The motor and sensitivity disturbances together with psychiatric co-morbidities can lay the foundation of a FGID. Once established the psychological and physiological disturbances can perpetuate and strengthen each other resulting in a FGID that can persist independently of the ED that originally caused the motor and sensitivity disturbances.

  5. Eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kontić Olga; Vasiljević Nadja; Trišović Marija; Jorga Jagoda; Lakić Aneta; Jašović-Gašić Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis...

  6. Personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrer, Peter; Mulder, Roger; Crawford, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Personality disorder is now being accepted as an important condition in mainstream psychiatry across the world. Although it often remains unrecognized in ordinary practice, research studies have shown it is common, creates considerable morbidity, is associated with high costs to services and to s...... increasing evidence that some treatments, mainly psychological, are of value in this group of disorders. What is now needed is a new classification that is of greater value to clinicians, and the WPA Section on Personality Disorders is currently undertaking this task.......Personality disorder is now being accepted as an important condition in mainstream psychiatry across the world. Although it often remains unrecognized in ordinary practice, research studies have shown it is common, creates considerable morbidity, is associated with high costs to services...... and to society, and interferes, usually negatively, with progress in the treatment of other mental disorders. We now have evidence that personality disorder, as currently classified, affects around 6% of the world population, and the differences between countries show no consistent variation. We are also getting...

  7. Identification of risk loci with shared effects on five major psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph E.; Strauss, John; Strohmaier, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Findings from family and twin studies suggest that genetic contributions to psychiatric disorders do not in all cases map to present diagnostic categories. We aimed to identify specific variants underlying genetic effects shared between the five disorders in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium: a......: autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia....

  8. Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Impulse control problems Substance use disorder Suicide Many children and teens with ODD also have other mental health disorders, such as: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Conduct disorder Depression Anxiety Learning and communication disorders Treating ...

  9. Disorder Induced Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimel, Joshua; Kachman, Tal; Aragones, Juan; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Transport of active or driven particles plays a crucial role in a myriad of processes ranging from biological systems to quantum phenomena. Here we study the transport of active spinning particles in a confined substrate that contains fixed obstacles. Except for a handful of systems, a disordered environment in the form of impurities or obstacles in a material will inhibit transport, and under some circumstances lead to localization. Such phenomena has been directly seen in transport of light in disordered photonic crystals. This is an important question because many vital biological processes depend on the active transport of molecules inside cells and organisms, from molecular motors to cellular transport. In particular, it is vital to know whether disorder leads to the inhibition of transport and localization, or enhances transport. We demonstrate with experiments and simulations that, contrary to intuition, active spinning matter exhibits a disorder-induced delocalization transition dependent on the local order of the obstacles on the substrate. For the regimes studied, we always find anomalous super-diffusive transport that slowly approaches the diffusive regime in the limit of high activity. These results shed light on the effect of hydrodynamic boundary conditions and optimal transport processes in active matter in disordered environments.

  10. Paraneoplastic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes target specific areas of the nervous system with pathogenic autoantibodies or T-cell responses. Each syndrome conveys a risk of particular tumors. Expanded paraneoplastic antibody testing has led to improved diagnosis but created challenges involving appropriate interpretation of test results. Peripheral nervous system paraneoplastic disorders such as myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome involve pathogenic autoantibodies. Recently, the pathogenic mechanisms and antigens of these disorders have been further elucidated. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with onconeuronal antibodies, such as anti-Hu, have strong cancer associations and limited response to treatment. Autoimmunity to central nervous system membrane proteins, such as the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor or leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1), defines an expanding group of disorders with better prognosis and more variable cancer associations. In these diseases, the autoantibodies are either proven to be or are potentially pathogenic. An animal model of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis will allow novel treatments to be developed. Autoantibodies to intracellular synaptic antigens, such as glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), are associated with diverse disorders such as stiff person syndrome, and the pathophysiology of these diseases is unclear. Paraneoplastic disorders have diverse clinical manifestations, including weakness, sensory neuronopathy, encephalitis, epilepsy, and psychosis. Proper use of antibody testing may assist with diagnosis. Treatment may require immunotherapy and tumor treatment.

  11. Tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Davide; Mink, Jonathan W

    2013-10-01

    Primary tic disorders are complex, multifactorial disorders in which tics are accompanied by other sensory features and an array of comorbid behavioral disorders. Secondary tics are proportionally much less frequent, but their etiology is diverse. This review aims to guide clinicians in the recognition of the phenomenology, pathophysiology, and treatment of these disorders. Advances include greater phenomenologic insights, particularly of nonmotor (sensory) features; increased knowledge of disease mechanisms, particularly coming from neuropsychological, functional imaging, pathologic, and animal model studies; growing evidence on the efficacy of alpha-2 agonists and the newer generation of dopamine-modulating agents; and recent strides in the evaluation of cognitive-behavioral therapy and deep brain stimulation surgery. The correct diagnostic approach to tic disorders requires accurate historical gathering, a thorough neurologic examination, and detailed definition of the patient's psychopathologic profile. Treatment should always begin with individualized psychoeducational strategies. Although pharmacologic treatments remain beneficial for most patients, cognitive-behavioral treatments have thus far shown promising efficacy. Deep brain stimulation surgery should still be limited to adult patients refractory to pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

  12. The familial aggregation of cannabis use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikangas, Kathleen R; Li, Julan Julia; Stipelman, Brooke; Yu, Kelly; Fucito, Lisa; Swendsen, Joel; Zhang, Heping

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the familial aggregation of cannabis use disorders and other psychiatric conditions among first-degree relatives and spouses of probands with a cannabis use disorder. Controlled family study methods. Out-patient psychiatric clinics and the local community (same geographic area). Two hundred and sixty-two probands with a life-time history of cannabis use disorder, alcohol dependence, anxiety disorders or no history of any disorder, and their first-degree relatives and spouses. Cannabis use disorders and other DSM-III-R disorders in the relatives and spouses using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. Results reveal an elevated risk of life-time history of cannabis use disorders among siblings [odds ratio (OR: 3.6), adult offspring (OR): 6.9], and spouses (OR: 4.4) of probands with cannabis use disorders. There is a latent familial factor underlying cannabis use disorders that was shared partially with alcohol abuse/dependence. Comorbid mood and anxiety disorders aggregated independently from cannabis use disorders in families. Equal elevation in the magnitude of the association among the first-degree adult relatives and spouses of probands with a cannabis use disorder suggests the probable contribution of both environmental and genetic factors. These findings support a family-based approach to drug abuse intervention and the importance of future research concerning environmental mediators of familial transmission of drug abuse.

  13. Myoclonic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Eberhardt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Few movement disorders seem to make a straightforward approach to diagnosis and treatment more difficult and frustrating than myoclonus, due to its plethora of causes and its variable classifications. Nevertheless, in recent years, exciting advances have been made in the elucidation of the pathophysiology and genetic basis of many disorders presenting with myoclonus. Here, we provide a review of all of the important types of myoclonus encountered in pediatric and adult neurology, with an emphasis on the recent developments that have led to a deeper understanding of this intriguing phenomenon. An up-to-date list of the genetic basis of all major myoclonic disorders is presented. Randomized studies are scarce in myoclonus therapy, but helpful pragmatic approaches at diagnosis as well as treatment have been recently suggested.

  14. Personality disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sebastian; Heinskou, Torben; Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this naturalistic study, patients with personality disorders (N = 388) treated at Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Center, Mental Health Services, Capital Region of Denmark were allocated to two different kinds of treatment: a standardized treatment package with a preset number of treatment...... characteristics associated with clinicians' allocation of patients to the two different personality disorder services. METHODS: Patient characteristics across eight domains were collected in order to study whether there were systematic differences between patients allocated to the two different treatments...... that younger age was the most significant predictor of longer treatment replicates an earlier finding of allocation to treatment for personality disorder. Overall, this study therefore lends further support to the importance of demographic and social contextual factors in clinicians' allocation of patients...

  15. Digested disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForte, Shelly; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins is overwhelming. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a “Digested Disorder” project and represent a series of reader’s digest type articles objectively representing the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the period of April, May, and June of 2013. The papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28516028

  16. Temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area......, and may affect the quality of life of the patient. Assessment Evaluations indicate that the recently published Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) are reliable and valid. These criteria cover the most common types of TMD, which include pain-related disorders (e.g., myalgia, headache attributable to TMD......, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization...

  17. Digested disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna D; DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins grows fast. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a “Digested Disorder” project and represent a new issue of reader’s digest of the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the third quarter of 2013; i.e., during the period of June, July, and September of 2013. Similar to previous issues, the papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28232877

  18. Conversion Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacov Rofé

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder remains a mystery that has only become more complicated with the decline of the scientific status of psychoanalysis (e.g., Piper, Lillevik, & Kritzer, 2008; Rofé, 2008 and recent neurological findings suggest that this behavior is controlled by biological mechanisms (van Beilen, Vogt, & Leenders, 2010. Moreover, existing theories have difficulty explaining the efficacy of various interventions, such as psychoanalysis, behavior therapy, drug therapy and religious therapy. This article reviews research and clinical evidence pertaining to both the development and treatment of conversion disorder and shows that this seemingly incompatible evidence can be integrated within a new theory, the Rational-Choice Theory of Neurosis (RCTN; Rofé, 2010. Despite the striking differences, RCTN continues Freud's framework of thinking as it employs a new concept of repression and replaces the unconscious with self-deception. Moreover, it incorporates Freud's idea, implicitly expressed in his theory, that neurotic disorders are, in fact, rational behaviors.

  19. Comparison of depressive episodes in bipolar disorder and in major depressive disorder within bipolar disorder pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Philip B; Frankland, Andrew; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Roberts, Gloria; Corry, Justine; Wright, Adam; Loo, Colleen K; Breakspear, Michael

    2011-10-01

    identifying patients who may warrant further assessment for bipolarity. The major depressive disorder clusters potentially reflect genetic and sporadic subgroups which, if replicated independently, might enable an improved phenotypic definition of underlying bipolarity in genetic analyses.

  20. New research on anxiety disorders in the elderly and an update on evidence-based treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreescu, Carmen; Varon, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently encountered in the elderly, but they are largely undetected and untreated. Epidemiological studies indicate a prevalence ranging from 1.2 to 15 %. With the exception of generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia, which can often start in late life, most anxiety disorders in older patients are chronic and have their onset earlier in life. Anxiety disorders are an often unrecognized cause of distress, disability, and mortality risk in older adults, and they have been associated with cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cognitive decline. The mechanisms of anxiety in older adults differ from that in younger adults due to age-related neuropathology, as well as the loss and isolation so prominent in late life. Our review intends to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent research done in the field of anxiety disorders in the elderly. Recent findings in clinical research, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology, and neuropsychology are covered. An update on treatment options is discussed, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological alternatives.