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Sample records for underlying muscle weakness

  1. Gait patterns in association with underlying impairments in polio survivors with calf muscle weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Hilde E.; Bus, Sicco A.; Nollet, Frans; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to identify gait patterns in polio survivors with calf muscle weakness and associate them to underlying lower extremity impairments, which are expected to help in the search for an optimal orthosis. Unilaterally affected patients underwent barefoot 3D-gait analyses. Gait pattern

  2. Contextuality under weak assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, Andrew W; Rudolph, Terry; Wallman, Joel J; Pashayan, Hakop; Bartlett, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    The presence of contextuality in quantum theory was first highlighted by Bell, Kochen and Specker, who discovered that for quantum systems of three or more dimensions, measurements could not be viewed as deterministically revealing pre-existing properties of the system. More precisely, no model can assign deterministic outcomes to the projectors of a quantum measurement in a way that depends only on the projector and not the context (the full set of projectors) in which it appeared, despite the fact that the Born rule probabilities associated with projectors are independent of the context. A more general, operational definition of contextuality introduced by Spekkens, which we will term ‘probabilistic contextuality’, drops the assumption of determinism and allows for operations other than measurements to be considered contextual. Even two-dimensional quantum mechanics can be shown to be contextual under this generalised notion. Probabilistic noncontextuality represents the postulate that elements of an operational theory that cannot be distinguished from each other based on the statistics of arbitrarily many repeated experiments (they give rise to the same operational probabilities) are ontologically identical. In this paper, we introduce a framework that enables us to distinguish between different noncontextuality assumptions in terms of the relationships between the ontological representations of objects in the theory given a certain relation between their operational representations. This framework can be used to motivate and define a ‘possibilistic’ analogue, encapsulating the idea that elements of an operational theory that cannot be unambiguously distinguished operationally can also not be unambiguously distinguished ontologically. We then prove that possibilistic noncontextuality is equivalent to an alternative notion of noncontextuality proposed by Hardy. Finally, we demonstrate that these weaker noncontextuality assumptions are sufficient to prove

  3. An unusual cause of hypokalemic muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriano, J; Tucker, P; Kattah, J

    1983-09-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with proximal muscle weakness, cramps, and a serum potassium level of 2.7 mEq/l. During her hospitalization she was noted to use excessive quantities of a snuff preparation containing glycyrrhizinic acid, a potent mineralocorticoid analogue. With discontinuation of this substance, her potassium returned to normal values and her strength improved. This case is submitted as a hypokalemia myopathy induced by snuff dipping.

  4. Early occurrence of inspiratory muscle weakness in Parkinson's disease.

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    Guillaume Baille

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease (PD, respiratory insufficiency (including functional and muscle disorders can impact dysarthria and swallowing. Most studies of this topic have been performed retrospectively in populations of patients with advanced PD. The objective of the present study was to characterize lung function (under off-drug conditions in early-stage PD patients at baseline and then again two years later.Forty-one early-stage PD patients (mean ± SD age: 61.7 ± 7.7; mean ± SD disease duration: 1.9 ± 1.7 years were prospectively enrolled and compared with 36 age-matched healthy controls. Neurological evaluations and pulmonary function testing were performed in the off-drug condition at the inclusion visit and then two years later.Pulmonary function testing did not reveal any restrictive or obstructive disorders; at baseline, inspiratory muscle weakness was the only abnormality observed in the PD group (in 53.7% of the patients, vs. 25% in controls; p = 0.0105. The PD patients had a lower mean maximal inspiratory mouth pressure than controls and a lower sniff nasal inspiratory pressure. Two years after the initiation of chronic treatment with antiparkinsonian medications, the maximal inspiratory mouth pressure and the sniff nasal inspiratory pressure tended to be higher. Lastly, overall motor outcomes were not significantly worse in patients with inspiratory muscle weakness than in patients without inspiratory muscle weakness.Inspiratory muscle weakness seems to be common in patients with early-stage PD, and was seen to be stable over a two-year period. Additional long-term follow-up studies are required to specify the impact of this new feature of PD.

  5. Sex hormones and skeletal muscle weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipilä, Sarianna; Narici, Marco; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    in fast muscle function (power), and accumulation of fat in skeletal muscle. Further HRT raises the protein synthesis rate in skeletal muscle after resistance training, and has an anabolic effect upon connective tissue in both skeletal muscle and tendon, which influences matrix structure and mechanical...... properties. HRT influences gene expression in e.g. cytoskeletal and cell-matrix proteins, has a stimulating effect upon IGF-I, and a role in IL-6 and adipokine regulation. Despite low circulating steroid-hormone level, postmenopausal women have a high local concentration of steroidogenic enzymes in skeletal...

  6. Inspiratory muscle training in type 2 diabetes with inspiratory muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Ana Paula S; Ribeiro, Jorge P; Balzan, Fernanda Machado; Mundstock, Lorena; Ferlin, Elton Luiz; Moraes, Ruy Silveira

    2011-07-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus may present weakness of the inspiratory muscles. We tested the hypothesis that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) could improve inspiratory muscle strength, pulmonary function, functional capacity, and autonomic modulation in patients with type 2 diabetes and weakness of the inspiratory muscles. Maximal inspiratory muscle pressure (PImax) was evaluated in a sample of 148 patients with type 2 diabetes. Of these, 25 patients with PImaxinspiratory muscle endurance time, pulmonary function, peak oxygen uptake, and HR variability were evaluated before and after intervention. The prevalence of inspiratory muscle weakness was 29%. IMT significantly increased the PImax (118%) and the inspiratory muscle endurance time (495%), with no changes in pulmonary function, functional capacity, or autonomic modulation. There were no significant changes with placebo-IMT. Patients with type 2 diabetes may frequently present inspiratory muscle weakness. In these patients, IMT improves inspiratory muscle function with no consequences in functional capacity or autonomic modulation.

  7. Computer-aided visualization of muscle weakness distribution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, A.J.; Voermans, N.C.; Tuinenga, H.S.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2008-01-01

    We present a computer program for visualizing muscle weakness distribution in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Ordinal muscle strength data can be computed in the program. Data are visualized as the prime movers of the testmovements in an image of the human body and a separate image of the

  8. Biomechanical consequences of running with deep core muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Margaret E; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2018-01-23

    The deep core muscles are often neglected or improperly trained in athletes. Improper function of this musculature may lead to abnormal spinal loading, muscle strain, or injury to spinal structures, all of which have been associated with increased low back pain (LBP) risk. The purpose of this study was to identify potential strategies used to compensate for weakness of the deep core musculature during running and to identify accompanying changes in compressive and shear spinal loads. Kinematically-driven simulations of overground running were created for eight healthy young adults in OpenSim at increasing levels of deep core muscle weakness. The deep core muscles (multifidus, quadratus lumborum, psoas, and deep fascicles of the erector spinae) were weakened individually and together. The superficial longissimus thoracis was a significant compensator for 4 out of 5 weakness conditions (p strength of the deep core musculature may increase a runner's risk of developing LBP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Objective evaluation of muscle strength in infants with hypotonia and muscle weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, L.; Vlimmeren, L.A. van; Staal, J.B.; Janssen, A.J.W.M.; Otten, B.J.; Pelzer, B.J.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81

  10. [A woman with skin abnormalities and muscle weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steggink, L.C.; Hettema, M.E.; Delsing, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with progressive proximal muscle weakness and a symmetric skin rash. Physical examination demonstrated a heliotrope rash, Gottron lesions, mechanic's hands and symmetrical erythema of the face, neck and upper legs. The diagnosis

  11. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...... with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset....... there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of muscle weakness in OA progression. In contrast, the literature suggests a role for afferent sensory dysfunction in OA progression but not necessarily in OA onset. The few pilot exercise studies performed in patients who are at risk of incident OA indicate...... a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those...

  12. Neck extensor muscle weakness (Dropped head syndrome) following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, S.; Miller, R.C.; Lachance, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Dropped head syndrome is an unusual condition in which the head cannot be held upright in its normal anatomic position secondary to pronounced, isolated, neck extensor muscle weakness. Case report. A case of dropped head syndrome in a female with a history of radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma and a clinical history consistent with multiple sclerosis is presented, and potential etiologies are discussed. Conclusions. Muscular atrophy and lower motor neuron injury secondary to isolated anterior horn cell injury from radiotherapy emerge as the most likely etiology. (author)

  13. Profound Muscle Weakness and Pain after One Dose of Actonel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Badayan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO defines osteopenia as a bone density between 1 and 2.5 standard deviation (SD below the bone density of a normal young adult Iqbal 2000. Osteoporosis is defined as 2.5 SD or more below that reference point Iqbal 2000. Bisphosphonates are a group of medications used to treat osteoporosis, Padget's disease of bone, and osteopenia. We report a woman who developed profound muscle weakness and pain after one dose of Risedronate (Actonel.

  14. Hypogonadism in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship with airflow limitation, muscle weakness and systemic inflammation

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    Rasha Galal Daabis

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Hypogonadism is highly prevalent in clinically stable COPD patients and is particularly related to the severity of the airway obstruction. Systemic inflammation is present in stable COPD patients and its intensity is related to the severity of the underlying disease and it predisposes to skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. However, we failed to find a significant association between hypogonadism and muscle weakness or systemic inflammation.

  15. Non-neural Muscle Weakness Has Limited Influence on Complexity of Motor Control during Gait

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    Marije Goudriaan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD are neuromuscular disorders characterized by muscle weakness. Weakness in CP has neural and non-neural components, whereas in DMD, weakness can be considered as a predominantly non-neural problem. Despite the different underlying causes, weakness is a constraint for the central nervous system when controlling gait. CP demonstrates decreased complexity of motor control during gait from muscle synergy analysis, which is reflected by a higher total variance accounted for by one synergy (tVAF1. However, it remains unclear if weakness directly contributes to higher tVAF1 in CP, or whether altered tVAF1 reflects mainly neural impairments. If muscle weakness directly contributes to higher tVAF1, then tVAF1 should also be increased in DMD. To examine the etiology of increased tVAF1, muscle activity data of gluteus medius, rectus femoris, medial hamstrings, medial gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior were measured at self-selected walking speed, and strength data from knee extensors, knee flexors, dorsiflexors and plantar flexors, were analyzed in 15 children with CP [median (IQR age: 8.9 (2.2], 15 boys with DMD [8.7 (3.1], and 15 typical developing (TD children [8.6 (2.7]. We computed tVAF1 from 10 concatenated steps with non-negative matrix factorization, and compared tVAF1 between the three groups with a Mann-Whiney U-test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were used to determine if weakness in specific muscle groups contributed to altered tVAF1. No significant differences in tVAF1 were found between DMD [tVAF1: 0.60 (0.07] and TD children [0.65 (0.07], while tVAF1 was significantly higher in CP [(0.74 (0.09] than in the other groups (both p < 0.005. In CP, weakness in the plantar flexors was related to higher tVAF1 (r = −0.72. In DMD, knee extensor weakness related to increased tVAF1 (r = −0.50. These results suggest that the non-neural weakness in DMD had limited influence on

  16. Legitimacy Building under Weak Institutional Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejs, Anja; Harvold, Kjell; Larsen, Sanne Vammen

    2014-01-01

    Local strategies for adaptation to climate change in Denmark and Norway are discussed. In both countries, the national impetus for local adaptation is weak; it is largely left to local actors to take the initiative. The dynamics of the different approaches to climate-change adaptation at the loca...

  17. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

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    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  18. Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training and Calisthenics-and-Breathing Exercises in COPD With and Without Respiratory Muscle Weakness.

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    Basso-Vanelli, Renata P; Di Lorenzo, Valéria A Pires; Labadessa, Ivana G; Regueiro, Eloisa M G; Jamami, Mauricio; Gomes, Evelim L F D; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD may experience respiratory muscle weakness. Two therapeutic approaches to the respiratory muscles are inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises. The aims of the study are to compare the effects of inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises associated with physical training in subjects with COPD as an additional benefit of strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, thoracoabdominal mobility, physical exercise capacity, and reduction in dyspnea on exertion. In addition, these gains were compared between subjects with and without respiratory muscle weakness. 25 subjects completed the study: 13 composed the inspiratory muscle training group, and 12 composed the calisthenics-and-breathing exercises group. Subjects were assessed before and after training by spirometry, measurements of respiratory muscle strength and test of inspiratory muscle endurance, thoracoabdominal excursion measurements, and the 6-min walk test. Moreover, scores for the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale were reported. After intervention, there was a significant improvement in both groups of respiratory muscle strength and endurance, thoracoabdominal mobility, and walking distance in the 6-min walk test. Additionally, there was a decrease of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak. A difference was found between groups, with higher values of respiratory muscle strength and thoracoabdominal mobility and lower values of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak and the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale in the inspiratory muscle training group. In the inspiratory muscle training group, subjects with respiratory muscle weakness had greater gains in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. Both interventions increased exercise capacity and decreased dyspnea during physical effort. However, inspiratory muscle training was more effective in increasing inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, which could

  19. Difference in distribution of muscle weakness between myasthenia gravis and the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, PW; Sotodeh, M; Nijnuis, M; van Doorn, PA; van Engelen, BGM; Hintzen, RQ; de Kort, PLM; Kuks, JB; Twijnstra, A; de Visser, M; Visser, LH; Wokke, JH; Wintzen, AR; Verschuuren, JJ

    2002-01-01

    Background: Myasthenia gravis and the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) may have a similar distribution of muscle weakness. Deciding on a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis or LEMS on clinical grounds may therefore be difficult. Objective: To compare the localisation of initial muscle weakness

  20. Difference in distribution of muscle weakness between myasthenia gravis and the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, P.W.; Sotodeh, M.; Nijnuis, M.; Doorn, P.A. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Hintzen, R.Q.; Kort, P.L.M. de; Kuks, J.B.M.; Twijnstra, A.; Visser, M. de; Visser, L.H.; Wokke, J.H.J.; Wintzen, A.R.; Verschuuren, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myasthenia gravis and the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) may have a similar distribution of muscle weakness. Deciding on a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis or LEMS on clinical grounds may therefore be difficult. OBJECTIVE: To compare the localisation of initial muscle weakness

  1. Osteolytic Breast Cancer Causes Skeletal Muscle Weakness in an Immunocompetent Syngeneic Mouse Model

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    Jenna N. Regan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscle weakness and cachexia are significant paraneoplastic syndromes of many advanced cancers. Osteolytic bone metastases are common in advanced breast cancer and are a major contributor to decreased survival, performance, and quality of life for patients. Pathologic fracture caused by osteolytic cancer in bone (OCIB leads to a significant (32% increased risk of death compared to patients without fracture. Since muscle weakness is linked to risk of falls which are a major cause of fracture, we have investigated skeletal muscle response to OCIB. Here, we show that a syngeneic mouse model of OCIB (4T1 mammary tumor cells leads to cachexia and skeletal muscle weakness associated with oxidation of the ryanodine receptor and calcium (Ca2+ release channel (RyR1. Muscle atrophy follows known pathways via both myostatin signaling and expression of muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, atrogin-1 and MuRF1. We have identified a mechanism for skeletal muscle weakness due to increased oxidative stress on RyR1 via NAPDH oxidases [NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2 and NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4]. In addition, SMAD3 phosphorylation is higher in muscle from tumor-bearing mice, a critical step in the intracellular signaling pathway that transmits TGFβ signaling to the nucleus. This is the first time that skeletal muscle weakness has been described in a syngeneic model of OCIB and represents a unique model system in which to study cachexia and changes in skeletal muscle.

  2. A Curious Case of Proximal Muscle Weakness with Eosinophilic Polymyositis

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    Ciel Harris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic polymyositis (EPM is part of a rare disorder, eosinophilic myopathies (EM, which is a form of polymyositis characterized by the presence of eosinophils in muscle biopsy sections and occasionally blood eosinophilia. Herein, we are presenting an interesting case of eosinophilic polymyositis presenting with muscle pain with no other organ systems involved.

  3. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

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    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van, E-mail: e.segarceanu@antoniusziekenhuis.nl [Department of Internal Medicine, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A. [Department of Neurology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Pillen, Sigrid [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Biesma, Douwe H. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vogels, Oscar J.M. [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Alfen, Nens van [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  4. Progressive muscle atrophy and weakness after treatment by mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; Pillen, Sigrid; Biesma, Douwe H; Vogels, Oscar J M; van Alfen, Nens

    2012-02-01

    To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van; Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A.; Pillen, Sigrid; Biesma, Douwe H.; Vogels, Oscar J.M.; Alfen, Nens van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  6. Plantar flexor muscle weakness and fatigue in spastic cerebral palsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyroud, Daria; Armand, Stéphane; De Coulon, Geraldo; Sarah R Dias Da Silva; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy develop an important muscle weakness which might affect the aetiology and extent of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. This study evaluated the aetiology and extent of plantar flexor neuromuscular fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy. Ten patients with cerebral palsy and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals (∼20 years old, 6 females) performed four 30-s maximal isometric plantar flexions interspaced by a resting period of 2-3s to elicit a resting twitch. Maximal voluntary contraction force, voluntary activation level and peak twitch were quantified before and immediately after the fatiguing task. Before fatigue, patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than healthy individuals (341±134N vs. 858±151N, pfatiguing task (-10±23%, p>0.05), whereas it decreased by 30±12% (pmuscles of patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than their healthy peers but showed greater fatigue resistance. Cerebral palsy is a widely defined pathology that is known to result in muscle weakness. The extent and origin of muscle weakness were the topic of several previous investigations; however some discrepant results were reported in the literature regarding how it might affect the development of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. Importantly, most of the studies interested in the assessment of fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy did so with general questionnaires and reported increased levels of fatigue. Yet, exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue was quantified in just a few studies and it was found that young patients with cerebral palsy might be more fatigue resistant that their peers. Thus, it appears that (i) conflicting results exist regarding objectively-evaluated fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy and (ii) the mechanisms underlying this muscle fatigue - in comparison to those of healthy peers - remain poorly understood. The present study adds important knowledge to the field as it shows that when young adults with

  7. Cytokine genes as potential biomarkers for muscle weakness in OPMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Raz, Yotam; van der Slujis, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    been exploited in the last decade. Cytokines are released from many tissues, including skeletal muscles, but their application to monitor muscle pathology is sparse. We report that the cytokine functional group is altered in the transcriptome of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). OPMD...... is a dominant, late-onset myopathy, caused by an alanine-expansion mutation in the gene encoding for poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (expPABPN1). Here, we investigated the hypothesis that cytokines could mark OPMD disease state. We determined cytokines levels the vastus lateralis muscle from genetically...... confirmed expPABPN1 carriers at a symptomatic or a presymptomatic stage. We identified cytokine-related genes candidates from a transcriptome study in a mouse overexpressing exp PABPN1 Six cytokines were found to be consistently down-regulated in OPMD vastus lateralis muscles. Expression levels...

  8. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for preventing skeletal-muscle weakness and wasting in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Roig, Marc; Karatzanos, Eleftherios

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy may be useful in early musculoskeletal rehabilitation during acute critical illness. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of NMES for preventing skeletal-muscle weakness and wasting in critically...

  9. Simulating the effect of muscle weakness and contracture on neuromuscular control of normal gait in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Aaron S; Carty, Christopher P; Modenese, Luca; Barber, Lee A; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2018-03-01

    Altered neural control of movement and musculoskeletal deficiencies are common in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), with muscle weakness and contracture commonly experienced. Both neural and musculoskeletal deficiencies are likely to contribute to abnormal gait, such as equinus gait (toe-walking), in children with SCP. However, it is not known whether the musculoskeletal deficiencies prevent normal gait or if neural control could be altered to achieve normal gait. This study examined the effect of simulated muscle weakness and contracture of the major plantarflexor/dorsiflexor muscles on the neuromuscular requirements for achieving normal walking gait in children. Initial muscle-driven simulations of walking with normal musculoskeletal properties by typically developing children were undertaken. Additional simulations with altered musculoskeletal properties were then undertaken; with muscle weakness and contracture simulated by reducing the maximum isometric force and tendon slack length, respectively, of selected muscles. Muscle activations and forces required across all simulations were then compared via waveform analysis. Maintenance of normal gait appeared robust to muscle weakness in isolation, with increased activation of weakened muscles the major compensatory strategy. With muscle contracture, reduced activation of the plantarflexors was required across the mid-portion of stance suggesting a greater contribution from passive forces. Increased activation and force during swing was also required from the tibialis anterior to counteract the increased passive forces from the simulated dorsiflexor muscle contracture. Improvements in plantarflexor and dorsiflexor motor function and muscle strength, concomitant with reductions in plantarflexor muscle stiffness may target the deficits associated with SCP that limit normal gait. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Late-Onset Pompe Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Boentert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive myopathy with proximal muscle weakness, respiratory muscle dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy (in infants only. In patients with juvenile or adult disease onset, respiratory muscle weakness may decline more rapidly than overall neurological disability. Sleep-disordered breathing, daytime hypercapnia, and the need for nocturnal ventilation eventually evolve in most patients. Additionally, respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased cough and impaired airway clearance, increasing the risk of acute respiratory illness. Progressive respiratory muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in late-onset Pompe disease even if enzyme replacement therapy has been established. Practical knowledge of how to detect, monitor and manage respiratory muscle involvement is crucial for optimal patient care. A multidisciplinary approach combining the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, and intensive care specialists is needed. Based on the authors’ own experience in over 200 patients, this article conveys expert recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory muscle weakness and its sequelae in late-onset Pompe disease.

  11. Progressive muscle atrophy and weakness after treatment by mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, E.M. van; Dorresteijn, L.D.A.; Pillen, S.; Biesma, D.H.; Vogels, O.J.M.; Alfen, N. van

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998.

  12. Histopathologic findings in the sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis muscle of horses with vitamin E-responsive muscle atrophy and weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Holly E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Firshman, Anna M; Lucio, Michelle; Boyce, Mary K; Trumble, Troy N

    2013-04-15

    To characterize clinical findings, outcomes, muscle characteristics, and serum or muscle concentrations of α-tocopherol for horses with vitamin E-responsive signs of muscle atrophy and weakness consistent with signs of equine motor neuron disease (EMND). Retrospective case-control study. 8 affected (case) adult horses with acute (n = 3) or chronic (5) gross muscle atrophy that improved with vitamin E treatment and 14 clinically normal (control) adult horses with adequate (within reference range; 8) or low (6) muscle concentrations of α-tocopherol. Medical records were reviewed, serum and muscle concentrations of α-tocopherol were measured, and frozen biopsy specimens of sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis muscle and gluteal muscle were histologically evaluated for pathological changes. Fiber type composition and fiber diameters were assessed in gluteal muscle specimens. A myopathy that was histologically characterized by redistribution of mitochondrial enzyme stain (moth-eaten appearance) and anguloid atrophy of myofibers was evident in sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis muscle fibers of the 8 affected horses that had low serum (6/8) or skeletal muscle (5/5) concentrations of α-tocopherol; these histopathologic changes were not found in muscle specimens of control horses with low or adequate muscle concentrations of α-tocopherol. All affected horses regained strength and muscle mass within 3 months after initiation of vitamin E treatment and dietary changes. A vitamin E-deficient myopathy characterized histologically by a moth-eaten appearance in the mitochondria and anguloid myofiber atrophy in frozen sections of sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis muscle biopsy specimens was found in horses with clinical signs of EMND that were highly responsive to vitamin E treatment. This myopathy may be a specific syndrome or possibly precede the development of neurogenic muscle fiber atrophy typical of EMND.

  13. The effects of muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zeng, Zhi-Li; Tong, Jian-Hua; Zhen, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Shuang; Yu, Yan; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Whether muscle weakness is a cause, or result, of degenerative spondylolisthesis is not currently well understood. Little biomechanical evidence is available to offer an explanation for the mechanism behind exercise therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of back muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis and to tease out the biomechanical mechanism of exercise therapy. A nonlinear 3-D finite element model of L3-L5 was constructed. Forces representing global back muscles and global abdominal muscles, follower loads and an upper body weight were applied. The force of the global back muscles was reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% to simulate different degrees of back muscle weakness. An additional boundary condition which represented the loads from other muscles after exercise therapy was set up to keep the spine in a neutral standing position. Shear forces, intradiscal pressure, facet joint forces and von Mises equivalent stresses in the annuli were calculated. The intervertebral rotations of L3-L4 and L4-L5 were within the range of in vitro experimental data. The calculated intradiscal pressure of L4-L5 for standing was 0.57MPa, which is similar to previous in vivo data. With the back muscles were reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% force, the shear force moved increasingly in a ventral direction. Due to the additional stabilizing force and moment provided by boundary conditions, the shear force varied less than 15%. Reducing the force of global back muscles might lead to, or aggravate, degenerative spondylolisthesis with forward slipping from biomechanical point of view. Exercise therapy may improve the spinal biomechanical environment. However, the intrinsic correlation between back muscle weakness and degenerative spondylolisthesis needs more clinical in vivo study and biomechanical analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of joint contractures and muscle weakness in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Phu Dinh; Gandevia, Simon C; Herbert, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of joint contracture (limited passive range of joint motion) and muscle weakness in a population with multiple sclerosis (MS). A secondary aim was to establish normative data of functional tests of mobility and balance of people with MS who are still ambulant. Cross-sectional study. People with MS living in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. 330 people with MS living in metropolitan Sydney, Australia were randomly sampled on 23 July 2009 from the MS Australia register and invited to participate. Passive range of motion of large joints of the limbs and muscle strength. Tests of walking and balance were also conducted. 156 people (109 females, 47 males; mean age 54.2 years; mean time since diagnosis 14.9 years) agreed to participate and were assessed. Fifty-six per cent (56%) of participants had contracture in at least one major joint of upper or lower limb. The most common site of contracture was the ankle (43.9%). Seventy per cent (70%) of participants had muscle weakness in one or more muscle groups. As muscle weakness, joint contractures were present at early stage of MS and the prevalence was associated with the progression of the disease. These data show that in addition to muscle weakness joint contractures are highly prevalent among people with MS, especially in the ankle joint. This implicates that prevention of contracture is crucial in providing rehabilitation to people with MS.

  15. Muscle glycogen storage disease 0 presenting recurrent syncope with weakness and myalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukigara, Sayuri; Liang, Wen-Chen; Komaki, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Tokiko; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Sugie, Hideo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Nishino, Ichizo

    2012-02-01

    Muscle glycogen storage disease 0 (GSD0) is caused by glycogen depletion in skeletal and cardiac muscles due to deficiency of glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1), which is encoded by the GYS1 gene. Only two families with this disease have been identified. We report a new muscle GSD0 patient, a Japanese girl, who had been suffering from recurrent attacks of exertional syncope accompanied by muscle weakness and pain since age 5 years until she died of cardiac arrest at age 12. Muscle biopsy at age 11 years showed glycogen depletion in all muscle fibers. Her loss of consciousness was gradual and lasted for hours, suggesting that the syncope may not be simply caused by cardiac event but probably also contributed by metabolic distress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A case study of gait compensations for hip muscle weakness in idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Karen Lohmann; Kepple, Thomas M; Stanhope, Steven J

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this case series was to quantify different strategies used to compensate in gait for hip muscle weakness. An instrumented gait analysis was performed of three females diagnosed with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and compared to a healthy unimpaired subject. Lower extremity joint moments obtained from the gait analysis were used to drive an induced acceleration model which determined each moment's contribution to upright support, forward progression, and hip joint acceleration. Results showed that after midstance, the ankle plantar flexors normally provide upright support and forward progression while producing hip extension acceleration. In normal gait, the hip flexors eccentrically resist hip extension, but the hip flexor muscles of the impaired subjects (S1-3) were too weak to control extension. Instead S1-3 altered joint positions and muscle function to produce forward progression while minimizing hip extension acceleration. S1 increased knee flexion angle to decrease the hip extension effect of the ankle plantar flexors. S2 and S3 used either a knee flexor moment or gravity to produce forward progression, which had the advantage of accelerating the hip into flexion rather than extension, and decreased the demand on the hip flexors. Results showed how gait compensations for hip muscle weakness can produce independent (i.e. successful) ambulation, although at a reduced speed as compared to normal gait. Knowledge of these successful strategies can assist the rehabilitation of patients with hip muscle weakness who are unable to ambulate and potentially be used to reduce their disability.

  17. Can lumbosacral orthoses cause trunk muscle weakness? A systematic review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadinia, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Cholewicki, Jacek; Maroufi, Nader

    2017-04-01

    Wearing lumbosacral orthosis (LSO) is one of the most common treatments prescribed for conservative management of low back pain. Although the results of randomized controlled trials suggest effectiveness of LSO in reducing pain and disability in these patients, there is a concern that prolonged use of LSO may lead to trunk muscle weakness and atrophy. The present review aimed to evaluate available evidence in literature to determine whether LSO results in trunk muscle weakness or atrophy. This is a systematic review. A systematic search of electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Medline (via Ovid) followed by hand search of journals was performed. Prospective studies published in peer-reviewed journals, with full text available in English, investigating the effect of lumbar orthosis on trunk muscle activity, muscle thickness, strength or endurance, spinal force, and intra-abdominal pressure in healthy subjects or in patients with low back pain, were included. Methodological quality of selected studies was assessed by using the modified version of Downs and Black checklist. This research had no funding source, and the authors declare no conflicts of interest-associated biases. Thirty-five studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The mean and standard deviation of the quality score was 64±9.7%. Most studies investigating the effect of lumbar orthosis on electromyographic activity (EMG) of trunk muscles demonstrated a decrease or no change in the EMG parameters. A few studies reported increased muscle activity. Lumbosacral orthosis was found to have no effect on muscle strength in some studies, whereas other studies demonstrated increased muscle strength. Only one study, which included ultrasound assessment of trunk muscle stabilizers, suggested reduced thickness of the abdominal muscles and reduced cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscles. Out of eight studies that investigated spinal compression load, the load was reduced in four

  18. Preseason hamstring muscle weakness associated with hamstring muscle injury in Australian footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, J; Marsden, J; Lord, S; Garlick, D

    1997-01-01

    Hamstring muscle strain is the most prevalent injury in Australian Rules Football, accounting for 16% of playing time missed as a result of injury. Thirty-seven professional footballers from an Australian Football League team had preseason measurements of hamstring and quadriceps muscle concentric peak torque at 60, 180, and 300 deg/sec measured on a Cybex 340 dynamometer. Players were studied prospectively throughout the 1995 season. During that time, six players sustained clinically diagnosed hamstring muscle injuries that caused them to miss match-playing time. The injured hamstring muscles were all weaker than in the opposite leg in absolute values and hamstring-to-quadriceps muscle ratios. According to our t-test results, hamstring muscle injury was significantly associated with a low hamstring-to-quadriceps muscle peak torque ratio at 60 deg/sec on the injured side and a low hamstring muscle side-to-side peak torque ratio at 60 deg/sec. Flexibility (as measured by the sit-and-reach test) did not correlate with injury. Discriminant-function analysis using the two significant ratio variables resulted in a canonical correlation with injury of 0.4594 and correctly classified legs into injury groups with 77.4% success. These results indicate that preseason isokinetic testing of professional Australian Rules footballers can identify players at risk of developing hamstring muscle strains.

  19. Fatigue is associated with muscle weakness in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Knoop, H.; Bleijenberg, G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that

  20. Ankle-foot orthoses that restrict dorsiflexion improve walking in polio survivors with calf muscle weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Hilde E.; Bus, Sicco A.; Brehm, Merel-Anne; Nollet, Frans

    2014-01-01

    In polio survivors with calf muscle weakness, dorsiflexion-restricting ankle-foot orthoses (DR-AFOs) aim to improve gait in order to reduce walking-related problems such as instability or increased energy cost. However, evidence on the efficacy of DR-AFOs in polio survivors is lacking. We

  1. Histological investigations of muscle atrophy and end plates in two critically ill patients with generalized weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wokke, J.H.J.; Jennekens, F.G.I.; Oord, C.J.M. van den; Veldman, H.; Gijn, Jan van

    1988-01-01

    We describe pathological alterations at the light microscopical and ultrastructural level of motor end plates and muscle fibres in 2 critically ill patients with generalized muscular atrophy and weakness. Axonal degeneration of intramuscular nerve fibres was not conspicuous. The sural nerve in one

  2. Gower sign positive muscle weakness in a patient with short stature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 17-year-old Sudanese patient presented with short stature, generalized body aches, and proximal muscle weakness. He was seen by two orthopedic surgeons and an adult neurologist and misdiagnosed as having benign bone cysts, osteomalacia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In fact, he was suffering from severe ...

  3. Pharmacological inhibition of myostatin protects against skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness after anterior cruciate ligament tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtzel, Caroline Nw; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Grekin, Jeremy A; Khouri, Roger K; Russell, Alan J; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are among the most frequent knee injuries in sports medicine, with tear rates in the US up to 250,000 per year. Many patients who suffer from ACL tears have persistent atrophy and weakness even after considerable rehabilitation. Myostatin is a cytokine that directly induces muscle atrophy, and previous studies rodent models and patients have demonstrated an upregulation of myostatin after ACL tear. Using a preclinical rat model, our objective was to determine if the use of a bioneutralizing antibody against myostatin could prevent muscle atrophy and weakness after ACL tear. Rats underwent a surgically induced ACL tear and were treated with either a bioneutralizing antibody against myostatin (10B3, GlaxoSmithKline) or a sham antibody (E1-82.15, GlaxoSmithKline). Muscles were harvested at either 7 or 21 days after induction of a tear to measure changes in contractile function, fiber size, and genes involved in muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. These time points were selected to evaluate early and later changes in muscle structure and function. Compared to the sham antibody group, 7 days after ACL tear, myostatin inhibition reduced the expression of proteolytic genes and induced the expression of hypertrophy genes. These early changes in gene expression lead to a 22% increase in muscle fiber cross-sectional area and a 10% improvement in maximum isometric force production that were observed 21 days after ACL tear. Overall, myostatin inhibition lead to several favorable, although modest, changes in molecular biomarkers of muscle regeneration and reduced muscle atrophy and weakness following ACL tear. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2499-2505, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Muscle cramps/pain · weakness · muscle twitching · Dx?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldulaimi, Sommer

    2017-02-01

    A 39-year-old man who worked in construction presented to our clinic with complaints of muscle cramps and muscle pain that had been bothering him for several months. The cramps and pain started in both of his arms and subsequently became diffuse and generalized. He also reported an unintentional 15-pound weight loss.

  5. Increased Plin2 Expression in Human Skeletal Muscle Is Associated with Sarcopenia and Muscle Weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conte, Maria; Vasuri, Francesco; Trisolino, Giovanni; Bellavista, Elena; Santoro, Aurelia; Degiovanni, Alessio; Martucci, Ermanno; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Caporossi, Daniela; Capri, Miriam; Maier, Andrea B.; Seynnes, Olivier; Barberi, Laura; Musarò, Antonio; Narici, Marco V.; Franceschi, Claudio; Salvioli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive loss of muscle mass and strength and a concomitant fat accumulation in form of inter-muscular adipose tissue, causing skeletal muscle function decline and immobilization. Fat accumulation can also occur as intra-muscular triglycerides (IMTG) deposition in

  6. Fixation times in evolutionary games under weak selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altrock, Philipp M; Traulsen, Arne

    2009-01-01

    In evolutionary game dynamics, reproductive success increases with the performance in an evolutionary game. If strategy A performs better than strategy B, strategy A will spread in the population. Under stochastic dynamics, a single mutant will sooner or later take over the entire population or go extinct. We analyze the mean exit times (or average fixation times) associated with this process. We show analytically that these times depend on the payoff matrix of the game in an amazingly simple way under weak selection, i.e. strong stochasticity: the payoff difference Δπ is a linear function of the number of A individuals i, Δπ=u i+v. The unconditional mean exit time depends only on the constant term v. Given that a single A mutant takes over the population, the corresponding conditional mean exit time depends only on the density dependent term u. We demonstrate this finding for two commonly applied microscopic evolutionary processes.

  7. Prevalence of clinically relevant muscle weakness and its association with vitamin D status among older adults in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orces, Carlos H

    2017-10-01

    Muscle weakness and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency have been associated with adverse outcomes among older adults. However, little is known about the relationship between clinically relevant muscle weakness and 25(OH)D levels in Ecuador. To examine the prevalence of muscle weakness and its association with 25(OH)D status among subjects aged 60 years and older in Ecuador. The present study was based on data from 2205 participants in the first National Survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging. The Foundation for the National Institute of Health Sarcopenia Project criteria was used to examine muscle weakness prevalence rates. Gender-specific general linear and logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders were created to compare mean 25(OH)D concentrations and 25(OH)D deficiency across muscle strength categories, respectively. An estimated 32.2% of women and 33.4% of men had evidence of clinically relevant muscle weakness in Ecuador. In general, increased muscle weakness prevalence rates were present among Indigenous, residents in the rural Andes Mountains, underweight subjects, and those with a sedentary lifestyle. Muscle strength was significantly and directly correlated with mean 25(OH)D levels. After controlling for potential confounders, 25(OH)D deficiency prevalence rates were 31 and 43% higher among men and women with muscle weakness than those with normal strength, respectively. One-third of older adults nationwide had evidence of muscle weakness. While the present study found a significant correlation between muscle strength and 25(OH)D concentrations, further research is needed to examine whether optimizing 25(OH)D levels may improve muscle weakness among older adults.

  8. Morphological instabilities of rapidly solidified binary alloys under weak flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Katarzyna; Davis, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional printing, offers promising advantages over existing manufacturing techniques. However, it is still subject to a range of undesirable effects. One of these involves the onset of flow resulting from sharp thermal gradients within the laser melt pool, affecting the morphological stability of the solidified alloys. We examine the linear stability of the interface of a rapidly solidifying binary alloy under weak boundary-layer flow by performing an asymptotic analysis for a singular perturbation problem that arises as a result of departures from the equilibrium phase diagram. Under no flow, the problem involves cellular and pulsatile instabilities, stabilised by surface tension and attachment kinetics. We find that travelling waves appear as a result of flow and we map out the effect of flow on two absolute stability boundaries as well as on the cells and solute bands that have been observed in experiments under no flow. This work is supported by the National Institute of Standards and Technology [Grant Number 70NANB14H012].

  9. Premorbid obesity, but not nutrition, prevents critical illness-induced muscle wasting and weakness

    OpenAIRE

    Goossens, Chloë; Marques, Mirna; Derde, Sarah; Vander Perre, Sarah; Dufour, Thomas; Thiessen, Steven; Güiza, Fabian; Janssens, Thomas; Hermans, Greet; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; De Bock, Katrien; Van den Berghe, Greet; Langouche, Lies

    2017-01-01

    Background The ‘obesity paradox’ of critical illness refers to better survival with a higher body mass index. We hypothesized that fat mobilized from excess adipose tissue during critical illness provides energy more efficiently than exogenous macronutrients and could prevent lean tissue wasting. Methods In lean and premorbidly obese mice, the effect of 5 days of sepsis-induced critical illness on body weight and composition, muscle wasting, and weakness was assessed, each with fas...

  10. Muscle weakness, fatigue, and torque variability: effects of age and mobility status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent-Braun, Jane A; Callahan, Damien M; Fay, Jessica L; Foulis, Stephen A; Buonaccorsi, John P

    2014-02-01

    Whereas deficits in muscle function, particularly power production, develop in old age and are risk factors for mobility impairment, a complete understanding of muscle fatigue during dynamic contractions is lacking. We tested hypotheses related to torque-producing capacity, fatigue resistance, and variability of torque production during repeated maximal contractions in healthy older, mobility-impaired older, and young women. Knee extensor fatigue (decline in torque) was measured during 4 min of dynamic contractions. Torque variability was characterized using a novel 4-component logistic regression model. Young women produced more torque at baseline and during the protocol than older women (P torque variability differed by group (P = 0.022) and was greater in older impaired compared with young women (P = 0.010). These results suggest that increased torque variability may combine with baseline muscle weakness to limit function, particularly in older adults with mobility impairments. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Sarcolipin deletion exacerbates soleus muscle atrophy and weakness in phospholamban overexpressing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Val A Fajardo

    Full Text Available Sarcolipin (SLN and phospholamban (PLN are two small proteins that regulate the sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase pumps. In a recent study, we discovered that Pln overexpression (PlnOE in slow-twitch type I skeletal muscle fibers drastically impaired SERCA function and caused a centronuclear myopathy-like phenotype, severe muscle atrophy and weakness, and an 8 to 9-fold upregulation of SLN protein in the soleus muscles. Here, we sought to determine the physiological role of SLN upregulation, and based on its role as a SERCA inhibitor, we hypothesized that it would represent a maladaptive response that contributes to the SERCA dysfunction and the overall myopathy observed in the PlnOE mice. To this end, we crossed Sln-null (SlnKO mice with PlnOE mice to generate a PlnOE/SlnKO mouse colony and assessed SERCA function, CNM pathology, in vitro contractility, muscle mass, calcineurin signaling, daily activity and food intake, and proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results indicate that genetic deletion of Sln did not improve SERCA function nor rescue the CNM phenotype, but did result in exacerbated muscle atrophy and weakness, due to a failure to induce type II fiber compensatory hypertrophy and a reduction in total myofiber count. Mechanistically, our findings suggest that impaired calcineurin activation and resultant decreased expression of stabilin-2, and/or impaired autophagic signaling could be involved. Future studies should examine these possibilities. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the importance of SLN upregulation in combating muscle myopathy in the PlnOE mice, and since SLN is upregulated across several myopathies, our findings may reveal SLN as a novel and universal therapeutic target.

  12. Sarcolipin deletion exacerbates soleus muscle atrophy and weakness in phospholamban overexpressing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Val A; Gamu, Daniel; Mitchell, Andrew; Bloemberg, Darin; Bombardier, Eric; Chambers, Paige J; Bellissimo, Catherine; Quadrilatero, Joe; Tupling, A Russell

    2017-01-01

    Sarcolipin (SLN) and phospholamban (PLN) are two small proteins that regulate the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase pumps. In a recent study, we discovered that Pln overexpression (PlnOE) in slow-twitch type I skeletal muscle fibers drastically impaired SERCA function and caused a centronuclear myopathy-like phenotype, severe muscle atrophy and weakness, and an 8 to 9-fold upregulation of SLN protein in the soleus muscles. Here, we sought to determine the physiological role of SLN upregulation, and based on its role as a SERCA inhibitor, we hypothesized that it would represent a maladaptive response that contributes to the SERCA dysfunction and the overall myopathy observed in the PlnOE mice. To this end, we crossed Sln-null (SlnKO) mice with PlnOE mice to generate a PlnOE/SlnKO mouse colony and assessed SERCA function, CNM pathology, in vitro contractility, muscle mass, calcineurin signaling, daily activity and food intake, and proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results indicate that genetic deletion of Sln did not improve SERCA function nor rescue the CNM phenotype, but did result in exacerbated muscle atrophy and weakness, due to a failure to induce type II fiber compensatory hypertrophy and a reduction in total myofiber count. Mechanistically, our findings suggest that impaired calcineurin activation and resultant decreased expression of stabilin-2, and/or impaired autophagic signaling could be involved. Future studies should examine these possibilities. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the importance of SLN upregulation in combating muscle myopathy in the PlnOE mice, and since SLN is upregulated across several myopathies, our findings may reveal SLN as a novel and universal therapeutic target.

  13. Instabilities in rapid directional solidification under weak flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Katarzyna N.; Davis, Stephen H.; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2017-12-01

    We examine a rapidly solidifying binary alloy under directional solidification with nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics viz. the segregation coefficient and the liquidus slope are speed dependent and attachment-kinetic effects are present. Both of these effects alone give rise to (steady) cellular instabilities, mode S , and a pulsatile instability, mode P . We examine how weak imposed boundary-layer flow of magnitude |V | affects these instabilities. For small |V | , mode S becomes a traveling and the flow stabilizes (destabilizes) the interface for small (large) surface energies. For small |V | , mode P has a critical wave number that shifts from zero to nonzero giving spatial structure. The flow promotes this instability and the frequencies of the complex conjugate pairs each increase (decrease) with flow for large (small) wave numbers. These results are obtained by regular perturbation theory in powers of V far from the point where the neutral curves cross, but requires a modified expansion in powers of V1 /3 near the crossing. A uniform composite expansion is then obtained valid for all small |V | .

  14. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force of mouse fast skeletal muscle and ameliorates weakness due to nebulin-deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jeong Lee

    Full Text Available The effect of the fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, on calcium-induced force development was studied in skinned fast skeletal muscle fibers from wildtype (WT and nebulin deficient (NEB KO mice. Nebulin is a sarcomeric protein that when absent (NEB KO mouse or present at low levels (nemaline myopathy (NM patients with NEB mutations causes muscle weakness. We studied the effect of fast skeletal troponin activation on WT muscle and tested whether it might be a therapeutic mechanism to increase muscle strength in nebulin deficient muscle. We measured tension-pCa relations with and without added CK-2066260. Maximal active tension in NEB KO tibialis cranialis fibers in the absence of CK-2066260 was ∼60% less than in WT fibers, consistent with earlier work. CK-2066260 shifted the tension-calcium relationship leftwards, with the largest relative increase (up to 8-fold at low to intermediate calcium levels. This was a general effect that was present in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. At pCa levels above ∼6.0 (i.e., calcium concentrations <1 µM, CK-2066260 increased tension of NEB KO fibers to beyond that of WT fibers. Crossbridge cycling kinetics were studied by measuring k(tr (rate constant of force redevelopment following a rapid shortening/restretch. CK-2066260 greatly increased k(tr at submaximal activation levels in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. We also studied the sarcomere length (SL dependence of the CK-2066260 effect (SL 2.1 µm and 2.6 µm and found that in the NEB KO fibers, CK-2066260 had a larger effect on calcium sensitivity at the long SL. We conclude that fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force at submaximal activation in both wildtype and NEB KO fiber bundles and, importantly, that this troponin activation is a potential therapeutic mechanism for increasing force in NM and other skeletal muscle diseases with loss of muscle strength.

  15. Description of Peripheral Muscle Strength Measurement and Correlates of Muscle Weakness in Patients Receiving Prolonged Mechanical Ventilatory Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlan, Linda L.; Tracy, Mary Fran; Guttormson, Jill; Savik, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Background Intensive Care Unit Acquired Weakness (ICUAW) is a frequent complication of critical illness due to immobility and prolonged mechanical ventilatory support. Objectives To describe daily peripheral muscle strength measurement in ventilated patients and explore relationships among factors that influence ICUAW. Methods Peripheral muscle strength of 120 ventilated ICU patients (mean age 59.8 ± 15.1; 51% female; APACHE III 61.3 ± 20.7; ICU stay 10.6 ± 8.6 days) was measured daily using a standardized hand grip dynamometry protocol. Three grip measurements for each hand were recorded in pounds-force; the mean of these three assessments was used in the analysis. Correlates of ICUAW were analyzed with mixed models to explore their relationship to grip strength (age, gender, illness severity, length of ventilatory support, medications). Results Median baseline grip strength was variable yet diminished (7.7; 0-102) with either a pattern of diminishing grip strength or maintenance of the baseline low grip strength over time. Controlling for days on protocol, female gender [β = −10.4(2.5); p = dynamometry, a marker for peripheral muscle strength. Hand dynamometry is a reliable method to measure muscle strength in cooperative ICU patients and can be used in future research to ultimately develop interventions to prevent ICUAW. PMID:26523017

  16. Twitch mouth pressure for detecting respiratory muscle weakness in suspicion of neuromuscular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Dante Brasil; Desmarais, Gilbert; Falaize, Line; Ogna, Adam; Cognet, Sandrine; Louis, Bruno; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Twitch mouth pressure using magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves and an automated inspiratory trigger is a noninvasive, non-volitional assessment of diaphragmatic strength. Our aims were to validate this method in patients with suspected neuromuscular disease, to determine the best inspiratory-trigger pressure threshold, and to evaluate whether twitch mouth pressure decreased the overdiagnosis of muscle weakness frequently observed with noninvasive volitional tests. Maximal inspiratory pressure, sniff nasal pressure, and twitch mouth pressure were measured in 112 patients with restrictive disease and suspected neuromuscular disorder. Esophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures were measured in 64 of these patients to confirm or infirm inspiratory muscle weakness. Magnetic stimulation was triggered by inspiratory pressures of -1 and -5 cmH 2 O. The -5 cmH 2 O trigger produced the best correlation between twitch mouth pressure and twitch esophageal pressure (R 2  = 0.86; P neuromuscular disorder for invasive inspiratory-muscle investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Weak convergence of Jacobian determinants under asymmetric assumptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Alberico

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Let $\\Om$ be a bounded open set in $\\R^2$ sufficiently smooth and $f_k=(u_k,v_k$ and $f=(u,v$ mappings belong to the Sobolev space $W^{1,2}(\\Om,\\R^2$. We prove that if the sequence of Jacobians $J_{f_k}$ converges to a measure $\\mu$ in sense of measures andif one allows different assumptions on the two components of $f_k$ and $f$, e.g.$$u_k \\rightharpoonup u \\;\\;\\mbox{weakly in} \\;\\; W^{1,2}(\\Om \\qquad \\, v_k \\rightharpoonup v \\;\\;\\mbox{weakly in} \\;\\; W^{1,q}(\\Om$$for some $q\\in(1,2$, then\\begin{equation}\\label{0}d\\mu=J_f\\,dz.\\end{equation}Moreover, we show that this result is optimal in the sense that conclusion fails for $q=1$.On the other hand, we prove that \\eqref{0} remains valid also if one considers the case $q=1$, but it is necessary to require that $u_k$ weakly converges to $u$ in a Zygmund-Sobolev space with a slightly higher degree of regularity than $W^{1,2}(\\Om$ and precisely$$ u_k \\rightharpoonup u \\;\\;\\mbox{weakly in} \\;\\; W^{1,L^2 \\log^\\alpha L}(\\Om$$for some $\\alpha >1$.    

  18. Intense intermittent exercise provides weak stimulus for vascular endothelial growth factor secretion and capillary growth in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Passos, Madla; Bangsbo, Jens

    2013-01-01

    capillarization in the muscle but abolished the exercise induced increase in mRNA for several angiogenic factors, increased the eNOS protein levels, lowered TSP-1 protein levels in muscle but increased interstitial TSP-1 protein levels. We conclude that intense intermittent exercise provides a weak stimulus...

  19. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle weakness in adults with advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarah; Man, William D-C; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J; Wilcock, Andrew; Maddocks, Matthew

    2016-10-17

    This review is an update of a previously published review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Issue 1, 2013 on Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle weakness in adults with advanced disease.Patients with advanced progressive disease often experience muscle weakness, which can impact adversely on their ability to be independent and their quality of life. In those patients who are unable or unwilling to undertake whole-body exercise, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may be an alternative treatment to enhance lower limb muscle strength. Programmes of NMES appear to be acceptable to patients and have led to improvements in muscle function, exercise capacity, and quality of life. However, estimates regarding the effectiveness of NMES based on individual studies lack power and precision. Primary objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of NMES on quadriceps muscle strength in adults with advanced disease. Secondary objectives: to examine the safety and acceptability of NMES, and its effect on peripheral muscle function (strength or endurance), muscle mass, exercise capacity, breathlessness, and health-related quality of life. We identified studies from searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO), and PsycINFO (OVID) databases to January 2016; citation searches, conference proceedings, and previous systematic reviews. We included randomised controlled trials in adults with advanced chronic respiratory disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, or HIV/AIDS comparing a programme of NMES as a sole or adjunct intervention to no treatment, placebo NMES, or an active control. We imposed no language restriction. Two review authors independently extracted data on study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes. We assessed risk of bias using

  20. Relative contribution of different altered motor unit control to muscle weakness in stroke: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Henry; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William; Hu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Chronic muscle weakness impacts the majority of individuals after a stroke. The origins of this hemiparesis is multifaceted, and an altered spinal control of the motor unit (MU) pool can lead to muscle weakness. However, the relative contribution of different MU recruitment and discharge organization is not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine these different effects by utilizing a MU simulation with variations set to mimic the changes of MU control in stroke. Approach. Using a well-established model of the MU pool, this study quantified the changes in force output caused by changes in MU recruitment range and recruitment order, as well as MU firing rate organization at the population level. We additionally expanded the original model to include a fatigue component, which variably decreased the output force with increasing length of contraction. Differences in the force output at both the peak and fatigued time points across different excitation levels were quantified and compared across different sets of MU parameters. Main results. Across the different simulation parameters, we found that the main driving factor of the reduced force output was due to the compressed range of MU recruitment. Recruitment compression caused a decrease in total force across all excitation levels. Additionally, a compression of the range of MU firing rates also demonstrated a decrease in the force output mainly at the higher excitation levels. Lastly, changes to the recruitment order of MUs appeared to minimally impact the force output. Significance. We found that altered control of MUs alone, as simulated in this study, can lead to a substantial reduction in muscle force generation in stroke survivors. These findings may provide valuable insight for both clinicians and researchers in prescribing and developing different types of therapies for the rehabilitation and restoration of lost strength after stroke.

  1. Forearm Flexor Muscles in Children with Cerebral Palsy Are Weak, Thin and Stiff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pontén

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebral palsy (CP often develop reduced passive range of motion with age. The determining factor underlying this process is believed to be progressive development of contracture in skeletal muscle that likely changes the biomechanics of the joints. Consequently, to identify the underlying mechanisms, we modeled the mechanical characteristics of the forearm flexors acting across the wrist joint. We investigated skeletal muscle strength (Grippit® and passive stiffness and viscosity of the forearm flexors in 15 typically developing (TD children (10 boys/5 girls, mean age 12 years, range 8–18 yrs and nine children with CP Nine children (6 boys/3 girls, mean age 11 ± 3 years (yrs, range 7–15 yrs using the NeuroFlexor® apparatus. The muscle stiffness we estimate and report is the instantaneous mechanical response of the tissue that is independent of reflex activity. Furthermore, we assessed cross-sectional area of the flexor carpi radialis (FCR muscle using ultrasound. Age and body weight did not differ significantly between the two groups. Children with CP had a significantly weaker (−65%, p < 0.01 grip and had smaller cross-sectional area (−43%, p < 0.01 of the FCR muscle. Passive stiffness of the forearm muscles in children with CP was increased 2-fold (p < 0.05 whereas viscosity did not differ significantly between CP and TD children. FCR cross-sectional area correlated to age (R2 = 0.58, p < 0.01, body weight (R2 = 0.92, p < 0.0001 and grip strength (R2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001 in TD children but only to grip strength (R2 = 0.60, p < 0.05 in children with CP. We conclude that children with CP have weaker, thinner, and stiffer forearm flexors as compared to typically developing children.

  2. Structural characterization of weakly attached cross-bridges in the A*M*ATP state in permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Gu, J; Melvin, G; Yu, L C

    2002-04-01

    It is well established that in a skeletal muscle under relaxing conditions, cross-bridges exist in a mixture of four weak binding states in equilibrium (A*M*ATP, A*M*ADP*P(i), M*ATP, and M*ADP*P(i)). It has been shown that these four weak binding states are in the pathway to force generation. In the past their structural, biochemical, and mechanical properties have been characterized as a group. However, it was shown that the myosin heads in the M*ATP state exhibited a disordered distribution along the thick filament, while in the M*ADP*P(i) state they were well ordered. It follows that the structures of the weakly attached states of A*M*ATP and A*M*ADP*P(i) could well be different. Individual structures of the two attached states could not be assigned because protocol for isolating the two states has not been available until recently. In the present study, muscle fibers are reacted with N-phenylmaleimide such that ATP hydrolysis is inhibited, i.e., the cross-bridge population under relaxing conditions is distributed only between the two states of M*ATP and A*M*ATP. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction was applied to determine the structural characteristics of the attached A*M*ATP state. Because the detached state of M*ATP is disordered and does not contribute to layer line intensities, changes as a result of increasing attachment in the A*M*ATP state are attributable to that state alone. The equilibrium toward the attached state was achieved by lowering the ionic strength. The results show that upon attachment, both the myosin and the first actin associated layer lines increased intensities, while the sixth actin layer line was not significantly affected. However, the intensities remain weak despite substantial attachment. The results, together with modeling (see J. Gu, S. Xu and L. C. Yu, 2002, Biophys. J. 82:2123-2133), suggest that there is a wide range of orientation of the attached A*M*ATP cross-bridges while the myosin heads maintain some degree of helical

  3. X-ray diffraction studies of cross-bridges weakly bound to actin in relaxed skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Malinchik, S; Gilroy, D; Kraft, T; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1997-11-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained from skinned rabbit psoas muscle under relaxing and rigor conditions over a wide range of ionic strengths (50-170 mM) and temperatures (1 degree C-30 degrees C). For the first time, an intensification of the first actin-based layer line is observed in the relaxed muscle. The intensification, which increases with decreasing ionic strength at various temperatures, including 30 degrees C, parallels the formation of weakly attached cross-bridges in the relaxed muscle. However, the overall intensities of the actin-based layer lines are low. Furthermore, the level of diffuse scattering, presumably a measure of disorder among the cross-bridges, is little affected by changing ionic strength at a given temperature. The results suggest that the intensification of the first actin layer line is most likely due to the cross-bridges weakly bound to actin, and that the orientations of the weakly attached cross-bridges are hardly distinguishable from the detached cross-bridges. This suggests that the orientations of the weakly attached cross-bridges are not precisely defined with respect to the actin helix, i.e., nonstereospecific. Intensities of the myosin-based layer lines are only marginally affected by changing ionic strength, but markedly by temperature. The results could be explained if in a relaxed muscle the cross-bridges are distributed between a helically ordered and a disordered population with respect to myosin filament structure. Within the disordered population, some are weakly attached to actin and others are detached. The fraction of cross-bridges in the helically ordered assembly is primarily a function of temperature, while the distribution between the weakly attached and the detached within the disordered population is mainly affected by ionic strength. Some other notable features in the diffraction patterns include a approximately 1% decrease in the pitch of the myosin helix as the temperature is raised from 4 degrees C

  4. X-ray diffraction studies of cross-bridges weakly bound to actin in relaxed skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, S; Malinchik, S; Gilroy, D; Kraft, T; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1997-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained from skinned rabbit psoas muscle under relaxing and rigor conditions over a wide range of ionic strengths (50-170 mM) and temperatures (1 degree C-30 degrees C). For the first time, an intensification of the first actin-based layer line is observed in the relaxed muscle. The intensification, which increases with decreasing ionic strength at various temperatures, including 30 degrees C, parallels the formation of weakly attached cross-bridges in the rel...

  5. Deleting exon 55 from the nebulin gene induces severe muscle weakness in a mouse model for nemaline myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.; Buck, Danielle; de Winter, Josine M.; Ferrara, Claudia; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Jasper, Jeffrey R.; Malik, Fady I.; Meng, Hui; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Beggs, Alan H.; Labeit, Siegfried; Poggesi, Corrado; Lawlor, Michael W.; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Nebulin—a giant sarcomeric protein—plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle contractility by specifying thin filament length and function. Although mutations in the gene encoding nebulin (NEB) are a frequent cause of nemaline myopathy, the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, the mechanisms by which mutations in NEB cause muscle weakness remain largely unknown. To better understand these mechanisms, we have generated a mouse model in which Neb exon 55 is deleted (NebΔExon55) to repl...

  6. Primate ABO Gene is under Weak Positive Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Santos EVANOVICH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABO locus presents three main alleles: A, B and O. A and B encode glycosyltransferases that catalyze the addiction of an N-GalNac and D-galactose to a precursor substance (H substance, producing A and B antigens, while the O allele does not produce a functional protein. The presence of A and B antigens have been associated to resistance against infectious agents which could use them as attachment factors increasing the virulence of some parasitic agents. As these antigens are not restrict to humans, analyses them in others species, for instance non-human primates, may be crucial to understand the relationship between pathogens and ABO phenotypes. Despite of the relevance of this issue, in the last decade few studies have addressed, mainly in New World Monkeys (NWM, natural reservoir of tropical diseases in Amazon Region. In order to understand the evolution of the ABO system in the primates, it has been obtained the partial sequence of the most important exon of ABO gene (exon 7, in platyrrhini families: Atelidae, Pithecidae and Cebidae. Then, it has been compared the sequences obtained those present in the literature, and measured the selective pressure. The present results shown that residues 266 and 268 are also crucial to distinguish A and B phenotypes in the platyrrhines, such as in catarrhines, and the 266 codon is under positive selection, although the most site codons are under action of purifying selection.

  7. Muscle Weakness and Physical Disability in Older Americans: Longitudinal Findings from the U.S. Health and Retirement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchowny, K A; Clarke, P J; Peterson, M D

    2018-01-01

    Muscle weakness is an important indicator of disability, chronic disease and mortality. While we recently proposed sex/race specific grip strength cutpoints for clinical muscle weakness in a diverse, nationally representative sample of older Americans, the extent to which these cutpoints predict physical disability remains unknown. To examine whether sex/race specific muscle weakness cutpoints predict physical disability status in a nationally representative sample of Americans age 65+. We used data from the 2006-2010 Health and Retirement Study. Fully-adjusted, weighted multinomial logistic regression models were used to quantify the odds of experiencing the onset, progression or persistence of disability in activities of daily living (ADL) among weak versus non-weak individuals over a 2-year period. General community, nationally representative sample of older Americans. Population-based, community dwelling sample of older American adults aged 65-years+; 57 percent were women, 91% were White and the mean age was 75 years. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s): The primary outcome of interest was disability dynamics, defined by changes in ADL status across at 2- year period. The primary exposure was clinical muscle weakness as defined by previously identified cutpoints. Hypotheses were formulated before analyses were conducted. In this nationally representative sample (n= 8,725), 44% of individuals were classified as weak at baseline. At follow-up, 55% remained independent with no change in their ADL status, 11% had an onset of disability and 4% progressed in their disability status. The odds of experiencing an onset of ADL disability was 54% higher among weak individuals compared those who were not weak at baseline (OR= 1.54, 95% CI= 1.54, 1.5, pdisability status was 2.16 times higher among those who were weak at baseline compared to non-weak individuals (OR= 2.16, 95% CI= 2.15, 2.16, pdisability in later life. Results underscore the importance of using population

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis regulates quadriceps muscle atrophy and fiber-type alteration in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jun-Juan; Wang, Qing; Xie, Li Hua; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Sheng Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), weakness and muscle mass loss of the quadriceps muscle has been demonstrated to predict survival and mortality rates of patients. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), as a member of the TNF superfamily, has recently been identified as a key regulator of skeletal muscle wasting and metabolic dysfunction. So our aim was to study the role of TWEAK during quadriceps muscle atrophy and fiber-type transformat...

  9. Influence of inspiratory muscle weakness on inspiratory muscle training responses in chronic heart failure patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemezzo, Dayane; Fregonezi, Guilherme Augusto; Pereira, Danielle Aparecida; Britto, Raquel Rodrigues; Reid, W Darlene

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether the impact of inspiratory muscle weakness on inspiratory muscle training (IMT) affects inspiratory function and exercise capacity in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. Electronic searches were performed using the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Systematic Review, Embase, MEDLINE, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) databases up to August 2013. Articles were included if participants had CHF and were >18 years old; the design was a randomized controlled trial; intervention was IMT; measurements were of inspiratory muscle function or exercise capacity; and the articles were published in English, Portuguese, or Spanish. Of the 1455 articles identified in the database searches, 9 studies met the inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers selected and extracted information from articles and assessed the quality of the studies using the PEDro scale. The 2 reviewers discussed disagreements until consensus was achieved. Meta-analyses compared IMT with controls/sham for maximal inspiratory pressure, sustained maximal inspiratory pressure, 6-minute walk distance, peak oxygen consumption, and minute ventilation after IMT. Subgroup analyses compared those with and without muscle weakness. CHF with inspiratory muscle weakness showed greater gains in the 6-minute walk distance and peak oxygen consumption compared with those with normative maximal inspiratory pressure. The mean quality analysis score was 7.1, and scores ranged from 6 to 10. The results emphasize the importance of evaluating the inspiratory muscles to identify patients with CHF and inspiratory muscle weakness; subgroup that showed better results after IMT. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic Resource Management under Weak Property Rights : A Tale of Thieves and Trespassers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Acosta, Mauricio; Smulders, Sjak

    Using a dynamic framework with strategic interactions, we study the management of a non-renewable natural resource when property rights are generally weak. Under generally weak property rights both the resource stock and the revenues from exploiting it are imperfectly protected, due to trespassing

  11. Spasmodic muscle cramps and weakness as presenting symptoms in Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, John M; Kuntz, Nancy; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Bass, Lee M

    2013-10-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of hepatic copper metabolism that has tremendous variability in its presentation. Phenotypic diversity of the disease can lead to delayed diagnosis. We describe a case of WD in a 10-year-old boy presenting with 3 months of increasingly intense, spasmodic lower extremity muscle cramps. Physical examination revealed tenderness on calf palpation and dark flat lesions over his ankles, knees, and elbows. Initial testing revealed creatine kinase of 302 IU/L (normal 24-248 IU/L), hemoglobin of 8.9 g/dL (11.5-15.5 g/dL), aspartate aminotransferase of 114 IU/L (16-52 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase of 54 IU/L (2-30 IU/L), and myoglobinuria. Extensive evaluation of his myopathy, including MRI and muscle biopsy, was negative. Additional laboratory tests revealed a prothrombin time of 21.3 seconds (11.8-15.5 seconds), total bilirubin of 1.4 mg/dL (<1 mg/dL), direct bilirubin of 0.5 mg/dL (<0.3 mg/dL), albumin of 2.1 g/dL (3.1-4.6 g/dL), a reticulocyte percentage of 4.5% (0.5%-2.5%), a negative Coombs direct antibody test, ceruloplasmin of 3 mg/dL (21-51 mg/dL), and 24-h urine copper of 393 μg/24 h (15-60 μg/24 h). Liver biopsy showed patchy advanced fibrosis, mild inflammation, positive staining for copper, and a tissue copper concentration of 768 µg/g (10-35 μg/g). Brain MRI revealed symmetric intrinsic T1 shortening within bilateral basal ganglia. Trientene therapy was initiated for WD. Symptoms and laboratory abnormalities resolved and remain normal at 21 months' follow-up. Musculoskeletal involvement in WD is uncommon and typically defined as bone demineralization, arthropathy, or hypokalemic muscle weakness. In patients with unexplained musculoskeletal symptoms and hepatic abnormalities, a diagnosis of WD should be considered and appropriate evaluation initiated.

  12. Whole-Exome Sequencing as a diagnostic tool in a child with Atypical Episodic Muscle Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoulas, Pilar L.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Muzny, Donna; Wu, YuanQing; Wang, Min; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Brown, Chester W.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of whole-exome next-generation sequencing (WES) has been pivotal for the molecular characterization of Mendelian disease; however, the clinical application of WES has remained relatively unexplored. We describe our experience with WES as a diagnostic tool in a three-year old female patient with a two-year history of episodic muscle weakness and paroxysmal dystonia who presented following a previous extensive but unrevealing diagnostic work-up. WES was performed on the proband and her two parents. Parental exome data was used to filter de novo genomic events in the proband and suspected mutations were confirmed using di-deoxy sequencing. WES revealed a de novo non-synonymous mutation in exon 21 of the calcium channel gene CACNA1S that has been previously reported in a single patient as a rare cause of atypical hypokalemic periodic paralysis. This was unexpected, as the proband’s original differential diagnosis had included hypokalemic periodic paralysis, but clinical and laboratory features were equivocal, and standard clinical molecular testing for hypokalemic periodic paralysis and related disorders was negative. This report highlights the potential diagnostic utility of WES in clinical practice, with implications for the approach to similar diagnostic dilemmas in the future. PMID:22901280

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy rescues weakness and improves muscle pathology in mice with X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Michael W; Armstrong, Dustin; Viola, Marissa G; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Meng, Hui; Grange, Robert W; Childers, Martin K; Hsu, Cynthia P; O'Callaghan, Michael; Pierson, Christopher R; Buj-Bello, Anna; Beggs, Alan H

    2013-04-15

    No effective treatment exists for patients with X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a fatal congenital muscle disease caused by deficiency of the lipid phosphatase, myotubularin. The Mtm1δ4 and Mtm1 p.R69C mice model severely and moderately symptomatic XLMTM, respectively, due to differences in the degree of myotubularin deficiency. Contractile function of intact extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles from Mtm1δ4 mice, which produce no myotubularin, is markedly impaired. Contractile forces generated by chemically skinned single fiber preparations from Mtm1δ4 muscle were largely preserved, indicating that weakness was largely due to impaired excitation contraction coupling. Mtm1 p.R69C mice, which produce small amounts of myotubularin, showed impaired contractile function only in EDL muscles. Short-term replacement of myotubularin with a prototypical targeted protein replacement agent (3E10Fv-MTM1) in Mtm1δ4 mice improved contractile function and muscle pathology. These promising findings suggest that even low levels of myotubularin protein replacement can improve the muscle weakness and reverse the pathology that characterizes XLMTM.

  14. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Molgat-Seon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW. Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12 and healthy controls (n=12 underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p0.05. LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05. During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05. LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique.

  15. Deleting exon 55 from the nebulin gene induces severe muscle weakness in a mouse model for nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Buck, Danielle; de Winter, Josine M; Ferrara, Claudia; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Malik, Fady I; Meng, Hui; Stienen, Ger J M; Beggs, Alan H; Labeit, Siegfried; Poggesi, Corrado; Lawlor, Michael W; Granzier, Henk

    2013-06-01

    Nebulin--a giant sarcomeric protein--plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle contractility by specifying thin filament length and function. Although mutations in the gene encoding nebulin (NEB) are a frequent cause of nemaline myopathy, the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, the mechanisms by which mutations in NEB cause muscle weakness remain largely unknown. To better understand these mechanisms, we have generated a mouse model in which Neb exon 55 is deleted (Neb(ΔExon55)) to replicate a founder mutation seen frequently in patients with nemaline myopathy with Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Neb(ΔExon55) mice are born close to Mendelian ratios, but show growth retardation after birth. Electron microscopy studies show nemaline bodies--a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy--in muscle fibres from Neb(ΔExon55) mice. Western blotting studies with nebulin-specific antibodies reveal reduced nebulin levels in muscle from Neb(ΔExon55) mice, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies with tropomodulin antibodies and phalloidin reveal that thin filament length is significantly reduced. In line with reduced thin filament length, the maximal force generating capacity of permeabilized muscle fibres and single myofibrils is reduced in Neb(ΔExon55) mice with a more pronounced reduction at longer sarcomere lengths. Finally, in Neb(ΔExon55) mice the regulation of contraction is impaired, as evidenced by marked changes in crossbridge cycling kinetics and by a reduction of the calcium sensitivity of force generation. A novel drug that facilitates calcium binding to the thin filament significantly augmented the calcium sensitivity of submaximal force to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. In conclusion, we have characterized the first nebulin-based nemaline myopathy model, which recapitulates important features of the phenotype observed in patients harbouring this particular mutation, and which has severe muscle weakness caused by

  16. Deep breathing heart rate variability is associated with respiratory muscle weakness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Silva Reis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A synchronism exists between the respiratory and cardiac cycles. However, the influence of the inspiratory muscle weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD on cardiac autonomic control is unknown. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the influence of respiratory muscle strength on autonomic control in these patients. METHODS: Ten chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (69±9 years; FEV1/FVC 59±12% and FEV1 41±11% predicted and nine age-matched healthy volunteers (64±5 years participated in this study. Heart-rate variability (HRV was obtained at rest and during respiratory sinusal arrhythmia maneuver (RSA-M by electrocardiograph. RESULTS: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients demonstrated impaired cardiac autonomic modulation at rest and during RSA-M when compared with healthy subjects (p<0.05. Moreover, significant and positive correlations between maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP and the inspiratory-expiratory difference (ΔIE (r = 0.60, p<0.01 were found. CONCLUSION: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented impaired sympathetic-vagal balance at rest. In addition, cardiac autonomic control of heart rate was associated with inspiratory muscle weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Based on this evidence, future research applications of respiratory muscle training may bring to light a potentially valuable target for rehabilitation.

  17. Diaphragm Muscle Weakness Following Acute Sustained Hypoxic Stress in the Mouse Is Prevented by Pretreatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. O’Leary

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen deficit (hypoxia is a major feature of cardiorespiratory diseases characterized by diaphragm dysfunction, yet the putative role of hypoxic stress as a driver of diaphragm dysfunction is understudied. We explored the cellular and functional consequences of sustained hypoxic stress in a mouse model. Adult male mice were exposed to 8 hours of normoxia, or hypoxia (FiO2 = 0.10 with or without antioxidant pretreatment (N-acetyl cysteine, 200 mg/kg i.p.. Ventilation and metabolism were measured. Diaphragm muscle contractile function, myofibre size and distribution, gene expression, protein signalling cascades, and oxidative stress (TBARS were determined. Hypoxia caused pronounced diaphragm muscle weakness, unrelated to increased respiratory muscle work. Hypoxia increased diaphragm HIF-1α protein content and activated MAPK, mTOR, Akt, and FoxO3a signalling pathways, largely favouring protein synthesis. Hypoxia increased diaphragm lipid peroxidation, indicative of oxidative stress. FoxO3 and MuRF-1 gene expression were increased. Diaphragm 20S proteasome activity and muscle fibre size and distribution were unaffected by acute hypoxia. Pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine substantially enhanced cell survival signalling, prevented hypoxia-induced diaphragm oxidative stress, and prevented hypoxia-induced diaphragm dysfunction. Hypoxia is a potent driver of diaphragm weakness, causing myofibre dysfunction without attendant atrophy. N-acetyl cysteine protects the hypoxic diaphragm and may have application as a potential adjunctive therapy.

  18. Effect of Contralateral Strength Training on Muscle Weakness in People With Multiple Sclerosis: Proof-of-Concept Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Andrea; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Ortu, Enzo; Ginatempo, Francesca; Dragone, Daniele; Zarbo, Ignazio Roberto; de Natale, Edoardo Rosario; Mureddu, Giovanni; Bua, Guido; Deriu, Franca

    2016-06-01

    The contralateral strength training (CST) effect is a transfer of muscle performance to the untrained limb following training of the contralateral side. The aim of this study was to explore, in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) presenting marked lower limb strength asymmetry, the effectiveness of CST on management of muscle weakness of the more-affected limb following training of the less-affected limb. A single-subject research design was used. Eight individuals with MS underwent 16 to 18 high-intensity training sessions of the less-affected ankle dorsiflexor muscles. The primary outcome measure of this single-system case series was maximal strength expressed as peak moment and maximal work. Secondary outcome measures were: Six-Minute-Walk Test, Timed "Up & Go" Test, 10-Meter Timed Walk Test, and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 questionnaire. After the 6-week intervention, the contralateral more affected (untrained) limb showed a 22% to 24% increase in maximal strength. From pretest-posttest measurements, participants also performed significantly better on the clinical and functional secondary outcome measures. At the 12-week follow-up, the strength levels of the weaker untrained limb remained significantly superior to baseline levels in the majority (5 out of 8) of the outcome parameters. Considering the design used, the absence of a control group, and the sample size, these findings should be cautiously generalized and will need confirmation in a properly planned randomized controlled trial. The present proof-of-concept study shows, for the first time, the occurrence of the CST effect on muscle performance of ankle dorsiflexor muscles in people with MS. These preliminary findings reveal new potential implications for CST as a promising rehabilitation approach to those conditions where unilateral muscle weakness does not allow or makes difficult performing conventional strength training of the weaker limb. © 2016 American Physical Therapy

  19. Deletion of the Ste20-like kinase SLK in skeletal muscle results in a progressive myopathy and muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Benjamin R; Al-Zahrani, Khalid N; Dufresne, Sébastien; Belkina, Natalya; Labrèche, Cédrik; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Frenette, Jérôme; Shaw, Stephen; Sabourin, Luc A

    2017-02-02

    The Ste20-like kinase, SLK, plays an important role in cell proliferation and cytoskeletal remodeling. In fibroblasts, SLK has been shown to respond to FAK/Src signaling and regulate focal adhesion turnover through Paxillin phosphorylation. Full-length SLK has also been shown to be essential for embryonic development. In myoblasts, the overexpression of a dominant negative SLK is sufficient to block myoblast fusion. In this study, we crossed the Myf5-Cre mouse model with our conditional SLK knockout model to delete SLK in skeletal muscle. A thorough analysis of skeletal muscle tissue was undertaken in order to identify defects in muscle development caused by the lack of SLK. Isometric force analysis was performed on adult knockout mice and compared to age-matched wild-type mice. Furthermore, cardiotoxin injections were performed followed by immunohistochemistry for myogenic markers to assess the efficiency muscle regeneration following SLK deletion. We show here that early deletion of SLK from the myogenic lineage does not markedly impair skeletal muscle development but delays the regenerative process. Interestingly, adult mice (~6 months) display an increase in the proportion of central nuclei and increased p38 activation. Furthermore, mice as young as 3 months old present with decreased force generation, suggesting that the loss of SLK impairs myofiber stability and function. Assessment of structural components revealed aberrant localization of focal adhesion proteins, such as FAK and paxillin. Our data show that the loss of SLK results in unstable myofibers resulting in a progressive myopathy. Additionally, the loss of SLK resulted in a delay in muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin injections. Our results show that SLK is dispensable for muscle development and regeneration but is required for myofiber stability and optimal force generation.

  20. Gait Difficulty, Postural Instability, and Muscle Weakness Are Associated with Fear of Falling in People with Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret K. Y. Mak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the contribution of gait impairment, postural stability and muscle weakness to the level of fear of falling in people with Parkinson's disease (PD. Fifty-seven community-dwelling individuals with PD completed the study. Fear of falling was assessed by the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC scale. Postural stability and gait difficulty were determined by the posture and gait subscores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-PG. A Cybex dynamometer was used to measure isokinetic knee muscle strength. Individuals with PD achieved a mean ABC score of 73.6±19.3. In the multiple regression analysis, after accounting for basic demographics, fall history and disease severity, the UPDRS-PG score remained independently associated with the ABC score, accounting for 13.4% of the variance (P<0.001. The addition of knee muscle strength significantly improved the prediction model and accounted for an additional 7.3% of the variance in the ABC score (P<0.05. This is the first study to demonstrate that the UPDRS-PG score and knee muscle strength are important and independent determinants of the level of fear of falling in individuals with PD. Improving balance, gait stability and knee muscle strength could be crucial in promoting balance confidence in the appropriately targeted PD population.

  1. [A 34-year-old woman with delayed motor milestones, high arched palate, and proximal muscle weakness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Kitada, T; Hirasawa, E; Mori, H; Mizuno, Y

    1996-07-01

    We report a right-handed 34-year-old woman with diffuse muscle atrophy. The patient was a full-term infant of uneventful delivery, however, motor milestones were delayed in that neck control was obtained at 10 months of the age and she started to walk unassisted at 2 years of the age. Mental development was normal. She was unable to run with her mates at her kindergarten and she required a handrail when she walk up the stairs. She could not close her mouth completely at the primary school. She was unable to use a straw as a middle school pupil. Recently, she noted difficulty in raising her head from the supine position, and has become unable to walk a long distance. She was admitted to our hospital in September 17, 1994 when she was 34-year-old. On admission, general physical examination revealed that she looked slender weighing 38 kg with 149.5 cm height. She showed a high arched palate, slight scoliosis, and pes equinus. Otherwise general physical examination was unremarkable. Upon neurologic examination, she was alert and well oriented. Cranial nerves were unremarkable except for bilateral facial atrophy and moderate weakness. Her voice was of nasal quality, and swallowing was slightly difficult. No atrophy was noted in the sternocleidomastoid muscle. She showed waddling gait and positive Gowers' sign. Diffuse muscle atrophy was noted and mild to moderate weakness was presented more in the proximal part in both upper and lower extremities, however, deltoid muscles retained normal power. No ataxia was noted. All the deep tendon reflexes were lost. Sensation was intact. Routine laboratory examination was unremarkable. Serum CK was 56 IU/l. Electromyography revealed myogenic changes in the deltoid, biceps, and quadriceps muscles. A diagnostic biopsy was performed in the left biceps brachii muscle. The patient was discussed in the neurologic CPC, and the chief discussant arrived at the conclusion that the patient had nemaline myopathy. Opinions were divided among

  2. A new strength assessment to evaluate the association between muscle weakness and gait pathology in children with cerebral palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije Goudriaan

    Full Text Available The main goal of this validation study was to evaluate whether lower limb muscle weakness and plantar flexor rate of force development (RFD related to altered gait parameters in children with cerebral palsy (CP, when weakness was assessed with maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs in a gait related test position. As a subgoal, we analyzed intra- and intertester reliability of this new strength measurement method.Part 1 -Intra- and intertester reliability were determined with the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC2,1 in 10 typical developing (TD children (age: 5-15. We collected MVICs in four lower limb muscle groups to define maximum joint torques, as well as plantar flexor RFD. Part 2 -Validity of the strength assessment was explored by analyzing the relations of lower limb joint torques and RFD to a series of kinematic- and kinetic gait features, the GDI (gait deviation index, and the GDI-kinetic in 23 children with CP (GMFCS I-II; age: 5-15 and 23 TD children (age: 5-15 with Spearman's rank correlation coefficients.Part 1 -The best reliability was found for the torque data (Nm, with the highest ICC2,1 (0.951 for knee extension strength (inter and the lowest (0.693 for dorsiflexion strength (intra. For plantar flexor RFD, the most reliable window size was 300 milliseconds (ICC2,1: 0.828 (inter and 0.692 (intra. Part 2 -The children with CP were significantly weaker than the TD children (p <0.001. Weakness of the dorsiflexors and plantar flexors associated with delayed and decreased knee flexion angle during swing, respectively. No other significant correlations were found.While our new strength assessment was reliable, intra-joint correlations between weakness, RFD, and gait deviations were low. However, we found inter-joint associations, reflected by a strong association between plantar- and dorsiflexor weakness, and decreased and delayed knee flexion angle during swing.

  3. Laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mamta; Gupta, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    We present theory and numerical analysis which demonstrate laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under the weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity. Plasma equilibrium density is modified due to the ohmic heating of electrons, the collisions, and the weak relativistic-ponderomotive force during the interaction of a laser pulse with plasmas. First, within one-dimensional analysis, the longitudinal self-compression mechanism is discussed. Three-dimensional analysis (spatiotemporal) of laser pulse propagation is also investigated by coupling the self-compression with the self-focusing. In the regime in which the laser becomes self-focused due to the weak relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity, we provide results for enhanced pulse compression. The results show that the matched interplay between self-focusing and self-compression can improve significantly the temporal profile of the compressed pulse. Enhanced pulse compression can be achieved by optimizing and selecting the parameters such as collision frequency, ion-temperature, and laser intensity.

  4. Laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mamta; Gupta, D. N., E-mail: dngupta@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, North Campus, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India)

    2016-05-15

    We present theory and numerical analysis which demonstrate laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under the weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity. Plasma equilibrium density is modified due to the ohmic heating of electrons, the collisions, and the weak relativistic-ponderomotive force during the interaction of a laser pulse with plasmas. First, within one-dimensional analysis, the longitudinal self-compression mechanism is discussed. Three-dimensional analysis (spatiotemporal) of laser pulse propagation is also investigated by coupling the self-compression with the self-focusing. In the regime in which the laser becomes self-focused due to the weak relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity, we provide results for enhanced pulse compression. The results show that the matched interplay between self-focusing and self-compression can improve significantly the temporal profile of the compressed pulse. Enhanced pulse compression can be achieved by optimizing and selecting the parameters such as collision frequency, ion-temperature, and laser intensity.

  5. Landau–Zener evolution under weak measurement: manifestation of the Zeno effect under diabatic and adiabatic measurement protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novelli, Anna; Belzig, Wolfgang; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    The time evolution and the asymptotic outcome of a Landau–Zener–Stueckelberg–Majorana (LZ) process under continuous weak non-selective measurement is analyzed. We compare two measurement protocols in which the populations of either the adiabatic or the non-adiabatic levels are (continuously and weakly) monitored. The weak measurement formalism, described using a Gaussian Kraus operator, leads to a time evolution characterized by a Markovian dephasing process, which, in the non-adiabatic measurement protocol is similar to earlier studies of LZ dynamics in a dephasing environment. Casting the problem in the language of measurement theory makes it possible for us to compare diabatic and adiabatic measurement scenarios, to consider engineered dephasing as a control device and to examine the manifestation of the Zeno effect under the different measurement protocols. In particular, under measurement of the non-adiabatic populations, the Zeno effect is manifested not as a freezing of the measured system in its initial state, but rather as an approach to equal asymptotic populations of the two diabatic states. This behavior can be traced to the way by which the weak measurement formalism behaves in the strong measurement limit, with a built-in relationship between measurement time and strength. (paper)

  6. Somatic mosaicism of a point mutation in the dystrophin gene in a patient presenting with an asymmetrical muscle weakness and contractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Ginjaar, H. B.; Kneppers, A. L. J.; Bakker, E.; Breuning, M. H.; de Visser, M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a patient with somatic mosaicism of a point mutation in the dystrophin gene causing benign muscular dystrophy with an unusual asymmetrical distribution of muscle weakness and contractures. To our knowledge this is the first patient with asymmetrical weakness and contractures in an

  7. Superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-134 prevents diaphragm muscle weakness in monocrotalin-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himori, Koichi; Abe, Masami; Tatebayashi, Daisuke; Lee, Jaesik; Westerblad, Håkan; Lanner, Johanna T; Yamada, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) suffer from inspiratory insufficiency, which has been associated with intrinsic contractile dysfunction in diaphragm muscle. Here, we examined the role of redox stress in PH-induced diaphragm weakness by using the novel antioxidant, EUK-134. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control (CNT), CNT + EUK-134 (CNT + EUK), monocrotaline-induced PH (PH), and PH + EUK groups. PH was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg body weight). EUK-134 (3 mg/kg body weight/day), a cell permeable mimetic of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, was daily intraperitoneally administered starting one day after induction of PH. After four weeks, diaphragm muscles were excised for mechanical and biochemical analyses. There was a decrease in specific tetanic force in diaphragm bundles from the PH group, which was accompanied by increases in: protein expression of NADPH oxidase 2/gp91phox, SOD2, and catalase; 3-nitrotyrosine content and aggregation of actin; glutathione oxidation. Treatment with EUK-134 prevented the force decrease and the actin modifications in PH diaphragm bundles. These data show that redox stress plays a pivotal role in PH-induced diaphragm weakness. Thus, antioxidant treatment can be a promising strategy for PH patients with inspiratory failure.

  8. Mechanisms of quadriceps muscle weakness in knee joint osteoarthritis: the effects of prolonged vibration on torque and muscle activation in osteoarthritic and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, David A; McNair, Peter J; Lewis, Gwyn N

    2011-01-01

    A consequence of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is an inability to fully activate the quadriceps muscles, a problem termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). AMI leads to marked quadriceps weakness that impairs physical function and may hasten disease progression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether γ-loop dysfunction contributes to AMI in people with knee joint OA. Fifteen subjects with knee joint OA and 15 controls with no history of knee joint pathology participated in this study. Quadriceps and hamstrings peak isometric torque (Nm) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were collected before and after 20 minutes of 50 Hz vibration applied to the infrapatellar tendon. Between-group differences in pre-vibration torque were analysed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with age, gender and body mass (kg) as the covariates. If the γ-loop is intact, vibration should decrease torque and EMG levels in the target muscle; if dysfunctional, then torque and EMG levels should not change following vibration. One-sample t tests were thus undertaken to analyse whether percentage changes in torque and EMG differed from zero after vibration in each group. In addition, analyses of covariance were utilised to analyse between-group differences in the percentage changes in torque and EMG following vibration. Pre-vibration quadriceps torque was significantly lower in the OA group compared with the control group (P = 0.005). Following tendon vibration, quadriceps torque (P 0.299). Hamstrings torque and EMG amplitude were unchanged in both groups (all P > 0.204). The vibration-induced changes in quadriceps torque and EMG were significantly different between the OA and control groups (all P torque or EMG (all P > 0.554). γ-loop dysfunction may contribute to AMI in individuals with knee joint OA, partially explaining the marked quadriceps weakness and atrophy that is often observed in this population.

  9. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moral, A. del; Azanza, María J.

    2015-01-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca 2+ Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B 0 ≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f M =50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca 2+ Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons

  10. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain); Azanza, María J., E-mail: mjazanza@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B{sub 0}≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f{sub M}=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons.

  11. Increased CaVβ1a Expression with Aging Contributes to Skeletal Muscle Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jackson R.; Zheng, Zhenlin; Wang, Zhong-Min; Payne, Anthony M.; Messi, María L.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into the cytosol is a crucial part of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. E-C uncoupling, a deficit in Ca2+ release from the SR, is thought to be responsible for at least some of the loss in specific force observed in aging skeletal muscle. E-C uncoupling may be caused by alterations in expression of the voltage-dependent calcium channel α1s (CaV1.1) and β1a (CaVβ1a) subunits, both of which are necessary for E-C coupling to occur. While previous studies have found CaV1.1 expression declines in old rodents, CaVβ1a expression has not been previously examined in aging models. Western blot analysis shows a substantial increase of CaVβ1a expression over the full lifespan of FVB mice. To examine the specific effects of CaVβ1a overexpression, a CaVβ1a -YFP plasmid was electroporated in vivo into young animals. The resulting increase in expression of CaVβ1a corresponded to decline of CaV1.1 over the same time period. YFP fluorescence, used as a measure of CaVβ1a -YFP expression in individual fibers, also showed an inverse relationship with charge movement, measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Specific force was significantly reduced in young CaVβ1a - YFP electroporated muscle fibers compared to sham-electroporated, age-matched controls. siRNA interference of CaVβ1a in young muscles reduced charge movement, while charge movement in old was restored to young control levels. These studies imply CaVβ1a serves as both a positive and negative regulator CaV1.1 expression, and that endogenous overexpression of CaVβ1a during old age may play a role in the loss of specific force. PMID:19663902

  12. Increased CaVbeta1A expression with aging contributes to skeletal muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jackson R; Zheng, Zhenlin; Wang, Zhong-Min; Payne, Anthony M; Messi, María L; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2009-09-01

    Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into the cytosol is a crucial part of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Excitation-contraction uncoupling, a deficit in Ca2+ release from the SR, is thought to be responsible for at least some of the loss in specific force observed in aging skeletal muscle. Excitation-contraction uncoupling may be caused by alterations in expression of the voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha1s (CaV1.1) and beta1a (CaVbeta1a) subunits, both of which are necessary for E-C coupling to occur. While previous studies have found CaV1.1 expression declines in old rodents, CaVbeta1a expression has not been previously examined in aging models. Western blot analysis shows a substantial increase of CaVbeta1a expression over the full lifespan of Friend Virus B (FVB) mice. To examine the specific effects of CaVbeta1a overexpression, a CaVbeta1a-YFP plasmid was electroporated in vivo into young animals. The resulting increase in expression of CaVbeta1a corresponded to decline of CaV1.1 over the same time period. YFP fluorescence, used as a measure of CaVbeta1a-YFP expression in individual fibers, also showed an inverse relationship with charge movement, measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Specific force was significantly reduced in young CaVbeta1a-YFP electroporated muscle fibers compared with sham-electroporated, age-matched controls. siRNA interference of CaVbeta1a in young muscles reduced charge movement, while charge movement in old was restored to young control levels. These studies imply CaVbeta1a serves as both a positive and negative regulator CaV1.1 expression, and that endogenous overexpression of CaVbeta1a during old age may play a role in the loss of specific force.

  13. Signaling and Contract Cost Under Weak Governance : Water Service Privatization in Metro-Manila, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Raul V. Fabella

    2012-01-01

    Many supply contracts between the state and private agents in a developing country are cost-re-imbursement variety and are rolled out under weak and unreliable governance. The latter has to be provided for through higher supply cost. The state in turn can lower the contract cost by providing verifiable credible commitments of its intentions. We show using a modified the Laffont-Tirole cost-reimbursement contract model that the more reliable is the state in respect to the delivery of its contr...

  14. SORPTION BEHAVIOR OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE AND AMORPHOUS PEROXOTITANATE MATERIALS UNDER WEAKLY ACIDIC CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Elvington, M.; Click, D.

    2009-11-11

    Inorganic, titanate-based sorbents are tested with respect to adsorption of a variety of sorbates under weakly acidic conditions (pH 3). Specifically, monosodium titanate (MST) and amorphous peroxotitanate (APT) sorption characteristics are initially probed through a screening process consisting of a pair of mixed metal solutions containing a total of 29 sorbates including alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, transition metals, metalloids and nonmetals. MST and APT sorption characteristics are further analyzed individually with chromium(III) and cadmium(II) using a batch method at ambient laboratory temperature, varying concentrations of the sorbents and sorbates and contact times. Maximum sorbate loadings are obtained from the respective adsorption isotherms.

  15. Transverse signal decay under the weak field approximation: Theory and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Avery J L; Pike, G Bruce

    2017-12-01

    To derive an expression for the transverse signal time course from systems in the motional narrowing regime, such as water diffusing in blood. This was validated in silico and experimentally with ex vivo blood samples. A closed-form solution (CFS) for transverse signal decay under any train of refocusing pulses was derived using the weak field approximation. The CFS was validated via simulations of water molecules diffusing in the presence of spherical perturbers, with a range of sizes and under various pulse sequences. The CFS was compared with more conventional fits assuming monoexponential decay, including chemical exchange, using ex vivo blood Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill data. From simulations, the CFS was shown to be valid in the motional narrowing regime and partially into the intermediate dephasing regime, with increased accuracy with increasing Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill refocusing rate. In theoretical calculations of the CFS, fitting for the transverse relaxation rate (R 2 ) gave excellent agreement with the weak field approximation expression for R 2 for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequences, but diverged for free induction decay. These same results were confirmed in the ex vivo analysis. Transverse signal decay in the motional narrowing regime can be accurately described analytically. This theory has applications in areas such as tissue iron imaging, relaxometry of blood, and contrast agent imaging. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Quasiparticle explanation of ``weak thermalization'' regime under quench in a non-integrable quantum spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Ju; Motrunich, Olexei

    Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis provides one picture of thermalization in a quantum system by looking at individual eigenstates. However, it is also important to consider how local observables reach equilibrium values dynamically. Quench protocol is one of the settings to study such questions. A recent numerical study [Banuls, Cirac, and Hastings, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 050405 (2011)] of a nonintegrable quantum Ising model with longitudinal field under such quench setting found different behaviors under different initial quantum states. One particular case termed ``weak thermalization'' regime showed apparently persistent oscillations of some observables. Here we provide an explanation of such oscillations. We use perturbation theory near the ground state of the model, and identify the oscillation frequency as the quasiparticle mass. With this quasiparticle picture, we can then address the long-time behavior of the oscillations.

  17. An Improved Current Controller to ensure the robust performance of grid-connected converters under weak grid conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khazraj, Hesam; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2016-01-01

    Voltage Source Converters (VSCs) operating in very weak grids with low Short Circuit Ratio (SCR) are known to meet stability challenges. This article investigates instability of a grid connected current-controlled converter under weak grid conditions, which is often attributed to the dynamic...

  18. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  19. Muscle Weakness and Fibrosis Due to Cell Autonomous and Non-cell Autonomous Events in Collagen VI Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Noguchi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophies with collagen VI deficiency are inherited muscle disorders with a broad spectrum of clinical presentation and are caused by mutations in one of COL6A1–3 genes. Muscle pathology is characterized by fiber size variation and increased interstitial fibrosis and adipogenesis. In this study, we define critical events that contribute to muscle weakness and fibrosis in a mouse model with collagen VI deficiency. The Col6a1GT/GT mice develop non-progressive weakness from younger age, accompanied by stunted muscle growth due to reduced IGF-1 signaling activity. In addition, the Col6a1GT/GT mice have high numbers of interstitial skeletal muscle mesenchymal progenitor cells, which dramatically increase with repeated myofiber necrosis/regeneration. Our results suggest that impaired neonatal muscle growth and the activation of the mesenchymal cells in skeletal muscles contribute to the pathology of collagen VI deficient muscular dystrophy, and more importantly, provide the insights on the therapeutic strategies for collagen VI deficiency.

  20. Weak Nonlinear Double-Diffusive Magnetoconvection in a Newtonian Liquid under Temperature Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Bhadauria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with a weak nonlinear theory of double-diffusive magnetoconvection in an electrically conducting Newtonian liquid, confined between two horizontal surfaces, under a constant vertical magnetic field, and subjected to imposed time-periodic thermal boundaries. The temperature of both walls is varied time periodic in this case. The disturbances are expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of convection, which is assumed to be small. Using nonautonomous Ginzburg-Landau equation, the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers obtained analytically and studied heat and mass transport in the system. Effect of various parameters on the heat and mass transport is discussed extensively. It is found that the effect of magnetic field is to stabilize the system. Further, it is also notified that the heat and mass transport can be controlled by suitably adjusting the external parameters of the system.

  1. Characterization of focal muscle compression under impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B. J.; Sory, D. R.; Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Proud, W. G.; Williams, A.; Brown, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    In modern wars over 70% of combat wounds are to the extremities. These injuries are characterized by disruption and contamination of the limb soft tissue envelope. The extent of this tissue trauma and contamination determine the outcome of the extremity injury. In military injury, common post-traumatic complications at amputation sites include heterotopic ossification (formation of bone in soft tissue), and severe soft tissue and bone infections. We are currently developing a model of soft tissue injury that recreates pathologies observed in combat injuries. Here we present characterization of a controlled focal compression of the rabbit flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle group. The FCU was previously identified as a suitable site for studying impact injury because its muscle belly can easily be mobilized from the underlying bone without disturbing anatomical alignment in the limb. We show how macroscopic changes in tissue organization, as visualized using optical microscopy, can be correlated with data from temporally resolved traces of loading conditions.

  2. Intellectual disability, muscle weakness and characteristic face in three siblings: A newly described recessive syndrome mapping to 3p24.3-p25.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Nafissi, Shahriar; Nilipoor, Yalda; Tavasoli, Alireza; van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Bonnard, Carine; Ng, Yeng Ting; Majoie, Charles B.; Reversade, Bruno; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a sister and two brothers born to healthy Iranian parents with mild intellectual disability, progressive muscle weakness, and characteristic facies. including highly arched eyebrows, down-slanting palpebral fissures, prominent nasal bridge, prominent nose, columella extending below alae

  3. Exploring the utility of whole-exome sequencing as a diagnostic tool in a child with atypical episodic muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchard, Neil A; Murdock, David R; Magoulas, Pilar L; Bainbridge, Matthew; Muzny, Donna; Wu, YuanQing; Wang, Min; Lupski, James R; Gibbs, Richard A; Brown, Chester W

    2013-05-01

    The advent of whole-exome next-generation sequencing (WES) has been pivotal for the molecular characterization of Mendelian disease; however, the clinical applicability of WES has remained relatively unexplored. We describe our exploration of WES as a diagnostic tool in a 3½-year old female patient with a 2-year history of episodic muscle weakness and paroxysmal dystonia who presented following a previous extensive but unrevealing diagnostic work-up. WES was performed on the proband and her two parents. Parental exome data was used to filter potential de novo genomic events in the proband and suspected variants were confirmed using di-deoxy sequencing. WES revealed a de novo non-synonymous mutation in exon 21 of the calcium channel gene CACNA1S that has been previously reported in a single patient as a rare cause of atypical hypokalemic periodic paralysis. This was unexpected, as the proband's original differential diagnosis had included hypokalemic periodic paralysis, but clinical and laboratory features were equivocal, and standard clinical molecular testing for hypokalemic periodic paralysis and related disorders was negative. This report highlights the potential diagnostic utility of WES in clinical practice, with implications for the approach to similar diagnostic dilemmas in the future. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Comparative study of a muscle stiffness sensor and electromyography and mechanomyography under fatigue conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyonyoung; Jo, Sungho; Kim, Jung

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes the feasibility of a stiffness measurement for muscle contraction force estimation under muscle fatigue conditions. Bioelectric signals have been widely studied for the estimation of the contraction force for physical human-robot interactions, but the correlation between the biosignal and actual motion is decreased under fatigue conditions. Muscle stiffness could be a useful contraction force estimator under fatigue conditions because it measures the same physical quantity as the muscle contraction that generates the force. Electromyography (EMG), mechanomyography (MMG), and a piezoelectric resonance-based active muscle stiffness sensor were used to analyze the biceps brachii under isometric muscle fatigue conditions with reference force sensors at the end of the joint. Compared to EMG and MMG, the change in the stiffness signal was smaller (p fatigue condition changed fatigue conditions. This result indicates that the muscle stiffness signal is less sensitive to muscle fatigue than other biosignals. This investigation provides insights into methods of monitoring and compensating for muscle fatigue.

  5. Overview of DFIG-based Wind Power System Resonances under Weak Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yipeng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    The wind power generation techniques are continuing to develop and increasing numbers of Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG)-based wind power systems are connecting to the on-shore and off-shore grids, local standalone weak networks, and also micro grid applications. The impedances of the weak...... weak network respectively. This paper will discuss the SSR and the HFR phenomena based on the impedance modeling of the DFIG system and the weak networks, and the cause of these two resonances will be explained in details. The following factors including 1) transformer configuration; 2) different power...... networks are too large to be neglected and require careful attention. Due to the impedance interaction between the weak network and the DFIG system, both Sub- Synchronous Resonance (SSR) and High Frequency Resonance (HFR) may occur when the DFIG system is connected to the series or parallel compensated...

  6. IFLA Principles Underlying Subject Heading Languages: strenghts and weaknesses revealed by user behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Šauperl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available IFLA Principles Underlying Subject Heading Languages were published in 1995 and translated into Slovene in 2002. They try to recover the theory of indexing languages from an analysis of subject heading languages that are used in libraries around the world. These guidelines are illustrated with examples from Splošni slovenski geslovnik (Slovene General Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, and Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH. Studies on the use of LCSH by users of library catalogs were reviewed to determine weaknesses of the IFLA Principles. Changes were suggested,which would make subject retrieval easier for users. The reviewed subject heading languages reflect the needs of traditional librarians and card catalogs. These often conflict with user needs, characteristics of online catalogs and modern librarians.Subject heading languages could be improved if we would take into account the vast knowledge of user behavior and capabilities of information technology. For a better subject access to library materials, we also need to understand the processes of subject analysis and subject description.

  7. Self-similar regimes of turbulence in weakly coupled plasmas under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viciconte, Giovanni; Gréa, Benoît-Joseph; Godeferd, Fabien S.

    2018-02-01

    Turbulence in weakly coupled plasmas under compression can experience a sudden dissipation of kinetic energy due to the abrupt growth of the viscosity coefficient governed by the temperature increase. We investigate in detail this phenomenon by considering a turbulent velocity field obeying the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with a source term resulting from the mean velocity. The system can be simplified by a nonlinear change of variable, and then solved using both highly resolved direct numerical simulations and a spectral model based on the eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure. The model allows us to explore a wide range of initial Reynolds and compression numbers, beyond the reach of simulations, and thus permits us to evidence the presence of a nonlinear cascade phase. We find self-similarity of intermediate regimes as well as of the final decay of turbulence, and we demonstrate the importance of initial distribution of energy at large scales. This effect can explain the global sensitivity of the flow dynamics to initial conditions, which we also illustrate with simulations of compressed homogeneous isotropic turbulence and of imploding spherical turbulent layers relevant to inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Electron kinetics in weakly ionized helium under DC and HF applied electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, L.L.; Ferreira, C.M. (Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Centro de Electrodinamica)

    1991-04-14

    The electron kinetics in weakly ionized helium under the action of direct current (DC) and high frequency (HF) fields of angular frequency {omega} is investigated by solving the homogeneous electron Boltzmann equation using the classical two-term expansion approximation. The analysis is based on a consistent set of electron cross sections which is here derived by adjusting experimental cross section data in such a way that calculated and measured electron swarm parameters are in agreement. In the case of HF fields the analysis is based on the DC effective field approximation which is valid for {omega} > tau{sub e}{sup -1}, where tau{sub e} is the characteristic time for electron energy relaxation by collisions with the atoms. The influence of {omega} on the electron energy distribution function, transport parameters, rate coefficients and fractional power transfer is investigated and a detailed comparison of the DC and HF situations is made. It is shown that for reduced effective fields in the range 10{sup -16}-10{sup -15} V cm{sup 2}, as typically found in low-pressure discharges, the mean electron kinetic properties are nearly the same in the whole range of {omega} > tau{sub e}{sup -1} as for the DC case. (author).

  9. Effects of exogenous epibrassinolide on photosynthetic characteristics in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) seedlings under weak light stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Jiang, Weijie; Yu, Hongjun

    2010-03-24

    The effects of three concentrations (0.1, 0.01, 0.001 mg/kg) of exogenous 24-epibrassinolide on leaf photosynthesis, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, and parameters of light response curve in tomato seedlings under 150 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1) weak light stress were studied, with two tomato cultivars, 'Zhongza9', tolerant, and 'Zhongshu6', sensitive to weak light stress. The results showed that the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), maximal photochemical quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), light saturation point (LSP), and dark respiration rate (Rd) decreased remarkably under weak light, but the chlorophyll content, especially chlorophyll b (chlb) content, increased obviously compared with normal light intensity control. However, exogenous 24-epibrassinolide alleviated the decrease of leaf Pn and Fv/Fm and induced the further increase of chlb content as well as the further decrease of Rd and chla/chlb under weak light stress, which indicated that exogenous 24-epibrassinolide could enhance plant tolerance to weak light and diminish damage from weak light. However, the optimum concentrations were different between the two cultivars; 0.1 mg/kg 24-epibrassinolide showed the best induction effects in 'Zhongshu6', and the best level for 'Zhongza9' was 0.01 mg/kg 24-epibrassinolide.

  10. Nuclear Positioning in Muscle Development and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Eric eFolker; Mary eBaylies

    2013-01-01

    Muscle disease as a group is characterized by muscle weakness, muscle loss, and impaired muscle function. Although the phenotype is the same, the underlying cellular pathologies, and the molecular causes of these pathologies, are diverse. One common feature of many muscle disorders is the mispositioning of myonuclei. In unaffected individuals myonuclei are spaced throughout the periphery of the muscle fiber such that the distance between nuclei is maximized. However, in diseased muscles, th...

  11. An Objective Functional Characterisation of Head Movement Impairment in Individuals with Neck Muscle Weakness Due to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pancani

    Full Text Available Neck muscle weakness and head drop are well recognised in patients with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, but an objective characterisation of the consequent head movement impairment is lacking. The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise head movements in ALS compared to aged matched controls.We evaluated two groups, one of thirteen patients with ALS and one of thirteen age-matched controls, during the execution of a series of controlled head movements, performed while wearing two inertial sensors attached on the forehead and sternum, respectively. We quantified the differences between the two groups from the sensor data using indices of velocity, smoothness and movement coupling (intended as a measure of undesired out of plane movements.Results confirmed a general limitation in the ability of the ALS patients to perform and control head movements. High inter-patient variability was observed due to a wide range of observed functional impairment levels. The ability to extend the head backward and flex it laterally were the most compromised, with significantly lower angular velocity (P 0.8, reduced smoothness and greater presence of coupled movements with respect to the controls. A significant reduction of angular velocity (P 0.8 in extension, axial rotation and lateral flexion was observed when patients were asked to perform the movements as fast as possible.This pilot study is the first study providing a functional objective quantification of head movements in ALS. Further work involving different body areas and correlation with existing methods of evaluating neuromuscular function, such as dynamometry and EMG, is needed to explore the use of this approach as a marker of disease progression in ALS.

  12. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Akca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was

  13. Recovery from muscle weakness by exercise and FES: lessons from Masters, active or sedentary seniors and SCI patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Gava, Paolo; Hofer, Christian; Loefler, Stefan; Gargiulo, Paolo; Edmunds, Kyle; Árnadóttir, Íris Dröfn; Zampieri, Sandra; Ravara, Barbara; Gava, Francesco; Nori, Alessandra; Gobbo, Valerio; Masiero, Stefano; Marcante, Andrea; Baba, Alfonc; Piccione, Francesco; Schils, Sheila; Pond, Amber; Mosole, Simone

    2017-08-01

    Many factors contribute to the decline of skeletal muscle that occurs as we age. This is a reality that we may combat, but not prevent because it is written into our genome. The series of records from World Master Athletes reveals that skeletal muscle power begins to decline at the age of 30 years and continues, almost linearly, to zero at the age of 110 years. Here we discuss evidence that denervation contributes to the atrophy and slowness of aged muscle. We compared muscle from lifelong active seniors to that of sedentary elderly people and found that the sportsmen have more muscle bulk and slow fiber type groupings, providing evidence that physical activity maintains slow motoneurons which reinnervate muscle fibers. Further, accelerated muscle atrophy/degeneration occurs with irreversible Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a spinal cord injury in which the human leg muscles may be permanently disconnected from the nervous system with complete loss of muscle fibers within 5-8 years. We used histological morphometry and Muscle Color Computed Tomography to evaluate muscle from these peculiar persons and reveal that contraction produced by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES) recovers muscle size and function which is reversed if h-bFES is discontinued. FES also reverses muscle atrophy in sedentary seniors and modulates mitochondria in horse muscles. All together these observations indicate that FES modifies muscle fibers by increasing contractions per day. Thus, FES should be considered in critical care units, rehabilitation centers and nursing facilities when patients are unable or reluctant to exercise.

  14. Early life exposure to chronic intermittent Hypoxia Primes Increased Susceptibility to Hypoxia-Induced Weakness in Rat Sternohyoid Muscle during adulthood.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonald, Fiona B

    2016-03-01

    Intermittent hypoxia is a feature of apnea of prematurity (AOP), chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. Despite the clinical relevance, the long-term effects of hypoxic exposure in early life on respiratory control are not well defined. We recently reported that exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during postnatal development (pCIH) causes upper airway muscle weakness in both sexes, which persists for several weeks. We sought to examine if there are persistent sex-dependent effects of pCIH on respiratory muscle function into adulthood and\\/or increased susceptibility to re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in animals previously exposed to CIH during postnatal development. We hypothesized that pCIH would cause long-lasting muscle impairment and increased susceptibility to subsequent hypoxia. Within 24 h of delivery, pups and their respective dams were exposed to CIH: 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir; once every 5 min, 8 h per day for 3 weeks. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Three groups were studied: sham; pCIH; and pCIH combined with adult CIH (p+aCIH), where a subset of the pCIH-exposed pups were re-exposed to the same CIH paradigm beginning at 13 weeks. Following gas exposures, sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle isometric contractile and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. There was no apparent lasting effect of pCIH on respiratory muscle function in adults. However, in both males and females, re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in pCIH-exposed animals caused sternohyoid (but not diaphragm) weakness. Exposure to this paradigm of CIH in adulthood alone had no effect on muscle function. Persistent susceptibility in pCIH-exposed airway dilator muscle to subsequent hypoxic insult may have implications for the control of airway patency in adult humans exposed to intermittent hypoxic stress during early life.

  15. Early Life Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Primes Increased Susceptibility to Hypoxia-Induced Weakness in Rat Sternohyoid Muscle During Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona B Mcdonald

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia is a feature of apnea of prematurity, chronic lung disease and sleep apnea. Despite the clinical relevance, the long-term effects of hypoxic exposure in early life on respiratory control are not well defined. We recently reported that exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH during postnatal development (pCIH causes upper airway muscle weakness in both sexes, which persists for several weeks. We sought to examine if there are persistent sex-dependent effects of pCIH on respiratory muscle function into adulthood and/or increased susceptibility to re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in animals previously exposed to CIH during postnatal development. We hypothesized that pCIH would cause long-lasting muscle impairment and increased susceptibility to subsequent hypoxia. Within 24 hours of delivery, pups and their respective dams were exposed to CIH: 90s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir; once every 5 min, 8 hrs per day for 3 weeks. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Three groups were studied: sham; pCIH; and pCIH combined with adult CIH (p+aCIH, where a subset of the pCIH-exposed pups were re-exposed to the same CIH paradigm beginning at 13 weeks. Following gas exposures, sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle isometric contractile and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. There was no apparent lasting effect of pCIH on respiratory muscle function in adults. However, in both males and females, re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in pCIH-exposed animals caused sternohyoid (but not diaphragm weakness. Exposure to this paradigm of CIH in adulthood alone had no effect on muscle function. Persistent susceptibility in pCIH-exposed airway dilator muscle to subsequent hypoxic insult may have implications for the control of airway patency in adult humans exposed to intermittent hypoxic stress during early life.

  16. Quasiparticle explanation of the weak-thermalization regime under quench in a nonintegrable quantum spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Ju; Motrunich, Olexei I.

    2017-02-01

    The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis provides one picture of thermalization in a quantum system by looking at individual eigenstates. However, it is also important to consider how local observables reach equilibrium values dynamically. Quench protocol is one of the settings to study such questions. A recent numerical study [Bañuls, Cirac, and Hastings, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 050405 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.050405] of a nonintegrable quantum Ising model with longitudinal field under such a quench setting found different behaviors for different initial quantum states. One particular case called the "weak-thermalization" regime showed apparently persistent oscillations of some observables. Here we provide an explanation of such oscillations. We note that the corresponding initial state has low energy density relative to the ground state of the model. We then use perturbation theory near the ground state and identify the oscillation frequency as essentially a quasiparticle gap. With this quasiparticle picture, we can then address the long-time behavior of the oscillations. Upon making additional approximations which intuitively should only make thermalization weaker, we argue that the oscillations nevertheless decay in the long-time limit. As part of our arguments, we also consider a quench from a BEC to a hard-core boson model in one dimension. We find that the expectation value of a single-boson creation operator oscillates but decays exponentially in time, while a pair-boson creation operator has oscillations with a t-3 /2 decay in time. We also study dependence of the decay time on the density of bosons in the low-density regime and use this to estimate decay time for oscillations in the original spin model.

  17. Morphometric characterization of the neuromuscular junction of rodents intoxicated with 2,4-dithiobiuret: evidence that nerve terminal recycling processes contribute to muscle weakness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheuben, Mary B.; Autio, Dawn M.; Xu Youfen; Atchison, William D.

    2004-01-01

    2,4-Dithiobiuret (DTB) causes ascending motor weakness when given chronically to rodents. In muscles of animals with DTB-induced weakness, quantal release of acetylcholine (ACh) is impaired. We examined in detail the structural changes that occurred at neuromuscular junctions and their associated Schwann cells of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of male rats treated with DTB to the onset of muscle weakness, 5-8 days. Our objective was to assess the involvement of the Schwann cells and to determine the most likely primary targets of DTB. At the onset of muscle weakness, nerve terminals exhibited some enlarged regions, but did not sprout. Terminal Schwann cells became flatter and expanded to cover most of the endplate. The extent of invasion of the synaptic cleft by Schwann cell processes was not significantly different from controls; extension of Schwann cell sprouts away from the junction was not seen. Thus, the morphology of the Schwann cells, although clearly affected by DTB, does not suggest that they contribute directly to the physiological defects of DTB-treated terminals. Abnormal tubulovesicular structures or tangles of neurofilaments were clustered in the centers of about 25% of treated terminals. Fewer synaptic vesicles occupied the region opposite the postsynaptic folds. Vesicle volumes were variable and included some very large vesicles, corresponding with the variable MEPP amplitudes reported previously for terminals of DTB-treated rodents. The postsynaptic area stained by rhodamine-labeled α-bungarotoxin expanded with terminal swelling, apparently by unpleating of the postsynaptic folds. No loss of ACh receptors or spread of ACh receptors beyond terminal boundaries was detected. Morphometric data are consistent with the conclusion that DTB affects, either directly or indirectly, vesicular release of ACh and the subsequent vesicular recycling process

  18. The Evolution of and Risk Factors for Neck Muscle Atrophy and Weakness in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Li; Yao, Ji-Jin; Ma, Jun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the relationship between SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Data were retrospectively analyzed from 223 biopsy-proven NPC patients with no distant metastasis who underwent IMRT with or without chemotherapy. The volume of SCM was measured on pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRIs were conducted 1, 2, and 3 years after the completion of IMRT. Change in SCM volume was calculated and classified using the late effects of normal tissues–subjective, objective, management, and analytic system. The grade of neck muscle weakness, classified by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V 3.0, was measured 3 years after the completion of IMRT. The average SCM atrophy ratio was −10.97%, −18.65%, and −22.25% at 1, 2, and 3 years postirradiation, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated N stage and the length of time after IMRT were independent prognostic variables. There were significant associations between the degree of SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Radical IMRT can cause significant SCM atrophy in NPC patients. A more advanced N stage was associated with more severe SCM atrophy, but no difference was observed between N2 and N3. SCM atrophy progresses over time during the 3 years following IMRT. Grade of SCM atrophy is significantly associated with neck weakness. PMID:26252307

  19. Weakness of unilateral lower limb’s proximal muscle; diabetic amyotrophy coexisting with lumbar discopathy: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Eda Kurt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic amyotrophy is a relatively infrequent complication of diabetes mellitus is most often characterized by weakness of unilateral lower limb and pain. Clinical differentiation from lumbar disc herniation may be difficult. ıt was hereby presented; 64 year old male patient who has 15 year old history of diabetes mellitus and lumbar discopathy previously diagnosed. He had weakness of unilateral lower limb and pain. Patient was admitted right thigh pain and weakness of proximal lower limb muscle. The physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging and electromyographic examination of the patient was consistent with the diagnosis of diabetic amyotrophy. When diabetic amyotrophy and lumbar disc herniaton coexist as a pain source, which disease responsible from pain should be detected well and treatments should be arrenged according to responsible disease. Thus, unnecessary surgeries can be avoided.

  20. Muscle strength is only a weak to moderate predictor of gait performance in persons with late effects of polio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Brogårdh, Christina; Lexell, Jan

    2013-01-01

    To assess muscle strength in the knee extensors, knee flexors and ankle dorsiflexors in persons with late effects of polio, and determine how much muscle strength, gender, age and BMI are related to gait performance. Ninety community-dwelling ambulant persons (47 men and 43 women; mean age 64 years SD 8) with late effects of polio participated. Isokinetic concentric knee extensor and flexor muscle strength was measured at 60°/s and ankle dorsiflexor muscle strength at 30°/s. Gait performance was assessed by the Timed "Up & Go", the Comfortable and Fast Gait Speed tests, and the 6-Minute Walk test. There were significant correlations between knee extensor and flexor muscle strength and gait performance (p polio, but the strength of the relationships indicates that other factors are also important.

  1. Polyaniline: Aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants under various acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bláha, Michal, E-mail: blaha@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Jan [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-15

    Aniline was oxidized with three strong inorganic oxidants (ammonium peroxydisulfate, cerium(IV) sulfate, potassium dichromate), two weak inorganic oxidants (iron(III) chloride, silver nitrate), and one organic oxidant (p-benzoquinone) in aqueous solutions of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) of various concentration. Whereas oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate yielded high-molecular-weight conducting polyaniline (PANI) in the whole acidity range, the oxidation with cerium(IV) sulfate led also to a single product close to PANI with considerably lower molecular weight and lower conductivity. Potassium dichromate gave PANI only at high concentration of MSA. The use of iron(III) chloride yielded composite mixtures of PANI and low-molecular-weight aniline oligomers. The oxidation of aniline with silver nitrate led to composites of silver and an organic part, which was constituted either by aniline oligomers or conducting polyaniline or both. p-Benzoquinone as oxidant produced mainly aniline oligomers with poor conductivity and 2,5-dianilino-p-benzoquinone-like structure detected in FTIR and Raman spectra when oxidation proceeded with weak oxidants. A general model of oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated. - Highlights: • Comparison of aniline oxidation with oxidants of different redox potential. • UV–vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies combined with size-exclusion chromatography. • The contents of polymer and oligomers were analyzed and discussed. • General model of aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated.

  2. Connective tissue cells expressing fibro/adipogenic progenitor markers increase under chronic damage: relevance in fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation and skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Osvaldo; Rebolledo, Daniela L; Oyarzún, Juan Esteban; Olguín, Hugo C; Brandan, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Fibrosis occurs in skeletal muscle under various pathophysiological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a devastating disease characterized by fiber degeneration that results in progressive loss of muscle mass, weakness and increased extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation. Fibrosis is also observed after skeletal muscle denervation and repeated cycles of damage followed by regeneration. The ECM is synthesized largely by fibroblasts in the muscle connective tissue under normal conditions. Myofibroblasts, cells that express α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), play a role in many tissues affected by fibrosis. In skeletal muscle, fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) that express cell-surface platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFR-α) and the transcription factor Tcf4 seem to be responsible for connective tissue synthesis and are good candidates for the origin of myofibroblasts. We show that cells positive for Tcf4 and PDGFR-α are expressed in skeletal muscle under normal conditions and are increased in various skeletal muscles of mdx mice, a murine model for DMD, wild type muscle after sciatic denervation and muscle subjected to chronic damage. These cells co-label with the myofibroblast marker α-SMA in dystrophic muscle but not in normal tissue. The Tcf4-positive cells lie near macrophages mainly concentrated in dystrophic necrotic-regenerating foci. The close proximity of Tcf4-positive cells to inflammatory cells and their previously described role in muscle regeneration might reflect an active interaction between these cell types and growth factors, possibly resulting in a muscular regenerative or fibrotic condition.

  3. Emerging new tools to study and treat muscle pathologies: genetics and molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in our body, is responsible for generating the force required for movement, and is also an important thermogenic organ. Skeletal muscle is an enigmatic tissue because while on the one hand, skeletal muscle regeneration after injury is arguably one of the best-studied stem cell-dependent regenerative processes, on the other hand, skeletal muscle is still subject to many degenerative disorders with few therapeutic options in the clinic. It is important to develop new regenerative medicine-based therapies for skeletal muscle. Future therapeutic strategies should take advantage of rapidly developing technologies enabling the differentiation of skeletal muscle from human pluripotent stem cells, along with precise genome editing, which will go hand in hand with a steady and focused approach to understanding underlying mechanisms of skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and disease. In this review, I focus on highlighting the recent advances that particularly have relied on developmental and molecular biology approaches to understanding muscle development and stem cell function. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Proximal Limb Weakness in a Patient with Celiac Disease: Copper Deficiency, Gluten Sensitivity, or Both as the Underlying Cause?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Avila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease has been associated with several neurologic disorders which may result from micronutrient deficiencies, coexisting autoimmune conditions, or gluten sensitivity. Copper deficiency can produce multiple neurologic manifestations. Myeloneuropathy is the most common neurologic syndrome and it is often irreversible, despite copper replacement. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive proximal limb weakness and weight loss in the setting of untreated celiac disease without gastrointestinal symptoms. He had anemia, neutropenia, and severe hypocupremia. The pattern of weakness raised the suspicion that there was an underlying myopathy, although this was not confirmed by electrodiagnostic studies. Weakness and hematologic abnormalities resolved completely within 1 month of total parenteral nutrition with copper supplementation and a gluten-free diet. Myopathy can rarely occur in patients with celiac disease, but the mechanism is unclear. Pure proximal limb weakness has not been previously reported in copper deficiency. We propose that this may represent a novel manifestation of hypocupremia and recommend considering copper deficiency and gluten sensitivity in patients presenting with proximal limb weakness.

  5. High Frequency Resonance Damping of DFIG based Wind Power System under Weak Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yipeng; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    When operating in a micro or weak grid which has a relatively large network impedance, the Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) based wind power generation system is prone to suffer high frequency resonance due to the impedance interaction between DFIG system and the parallel compensated network...... (series RL + shunt C). In order to improve the performance of the DFIG system as well as other units and loads connected to the weak grid, the high frequency resonance needs to be effectively damped. In this paper, the proposed active damping control strategy is able to implement effective damping either...... in the Rotor Side Converter (RSC) or in the Grid Side Converter (GSC), through the introduction of virtual positive capacitor or virtual negative inductor to reshape the DFIG system impedance and mitigate the high frequency resonance. A detailed theoretical explanation on the virtual positive capacitor...

  6. Controllable nonlinearity in a dual-coupling optomechanical system under a weak-coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gui-Lei; Lü, Xin-You; Wan, Liang-Liang; Yin, Tai-Shuang; Bin, Qian; Wu, Ying

    2018-03-01

    Strong quantum nonlinearity gives rise to many interesting quantum effects and has wide applications in quantum physics. Here we investigate the quantum nonlinear effect of an optomechanical system (OMS) consisting of both linear and quadratic coupling. Interestingly, a controllable optomechanical nonlinearity is obtained by applying a driving laser into the cavity. This controllable optomechanical nonlinearity can be enhanced into a strong coupling regime, even if the system is initially in the weak-coupling regime. Moreover, the system dissipation can be suppressed effectively, which allows the appearance of phonon sideband and photon blockade effects in the weak-coupling regime. This work may inspire the exploration of a dual-coupling optomechanical system as well as its applications in modern quantum science.

  7. Delay-Dependent Response in Weakly Electric Fish under Closed-Loop Pulse Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Garcia Forlim

    Full Text Available In this paper, we apply a real time activity-dependent protocol to study how freely swimming weakly electric fish produce and process the timing of their own electric signals. Specifically, we address this study in the elephant fish, Gnathonemus petersii, an animal that uses weak discharges to locate obstacles or food while navigating, as well as for electro-communication with conspecifics. To investigate how the inter pulse intervals vary in response to external stimuli, we compare the response to a simple closed-loop stimulation protocol and the signals generated without electrical stimulation. The activity-dependent stimulation protocol explores different stimulus delivery delays relative to the fish's own electric discharges. We show that there is a critical time delay in this closed-loop interaction, as the largest changes in inter pulse intervals occur when the stimulation delay is below 100 ms. We also discuss the implications of these findings in the context of information processing in weakly electric fish.

  8. Pair of Exceptional Points in a Microdisk Cavity under an Extremely Weak Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Kullig, Julius; Wiersig, Jan

    2018-03-01

    One of the interesting features of open quantum and wave systems is the non-Hermitian degeneracy called an exceptional point, where not only energy levels but also the corresponding eigenstates coalesce. We demonstrate that such a degeneracy can appear in optical microdisk cavities by deforming the boundary extremely weakly. This surprising finding is explained by a semiclassical theory of dynamical tunneling. It is shown that the exceptional points come in nearly degenerated pairs, originating from the different symmetry classes of modes. A spatially local chirality of modes at the exceptional point is related to vortex structures of the Poynting vector.

  9. Adaptive Reactive Power Control of PV Power Plants for Improved Power Transfer Capability under Ultra-Weak Grid Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Dongsheng; Wang, Xiongfei; Liu, Fangcheng

    2018-01-01

    with the unity power factor. Then, considering the reactive power compensation from PV inverters, the minimum SCR in respect to Power Factor (PF) is derived, and the optimized coordination of the active and reactive power is exploited. It is revealed that the power transfer capability of PV power plant under......This paper analyzes the power transfer limitation of the PV power plant under the ultra-weak grid condition, i.e., when the Short-Circuit Ratio (SCR) is close to 1. It explicitly identifies that a minimum SCR of 2 is required for the PV power plant to deliver the rated active power when operating...... the ultra-weak grid is significantly improved with the low PF operation. An adaptive reactive power droop control is next proposed to effectively distribute the reactive power demands to the individual inverters, and meanwhile maximize the power transfer capacity of the PV power plant. Simulation results...

  10. The effect of torsional muscle dysfunction and surgery on eye position under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, L C; Isenberg, S J; Apt, L

    1993-01-01

    Under general anesthesia, normal eyes exhibit 2.0 degrees to 2.5 degrees of extorsion. To investigate the effect of torsional muscle dysfunction and surgery on eye position under general anesthesia, we measured the torsional change before and after torsional muscle surgery in 26 eyes of 18 patients with clinical torsional muscle dysfunction. Under general anesthesia, compared with normals, eyes with preoperative intorter overaction or extorter underaction demonstrated a significant intorsional change (P extorsion while intorter strengthening procedures and extorter weakening procedures produced measurable intorsion. Superior oblique tenotomy produced a greater net torsional change than inferior oblique weakening surgery (P < .01). Under general anesthesia, eyes with preoperative torsional muscle dysfunction exhibit torsion in the direction consistent with the dysfunction. After surgery on the torsional muscles, a measurable torsional effect can be demonstrated while the patient is still under general anesthesia.

  11. A Case of Dermatomyositis with Severe Myalgia and Muscle Weakness Testing Positive for Anti-melanoma Differentiation-associated Gene 5 Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kenji; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Suganami, Yu; Sano, Shinichi; Wakunami, Yu; Katayama, Takashi; Deguchi, Kentaro; Nagotani, Shoko; Kishida, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    We report a case of a woman with typical dermatomyositis (DM) with skin manifestations, severe myalgia and muscle weakness complicated by interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pneumomediastinum. Pneumomediastinum persisted despite treatment with immunosuppressive therapy (steroids and cyclosporine). After the test for anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) antibody came out positive, we doubled the cyclosporine dose and her condition improved. Despite typical clinical features of DM, in cases complicated by pneumomediastinum or steroid resistance, measurement of anti-MDA5 antibody may be useful for immunosuppressant dose titration.

  12. Adult onset supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, cerebellar ataxia, and neurogenic proximal muscle weakness in a brother and sister: another hexosaminidase A deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A E; Young, E P; Schon, F

    1987-01-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish brother and sister developed progressive ataxia and proximal neurogenic muscle weakness, associated with supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, in the fourth decade of life. Hexosaminidase A activity, assayed using both synthetic and natural substrates, was severely reduced in the patients' plasma, leukocytes, and skin fibroblasts. Enzyme activity in their parents was in a similar range to that seen in heterozygotes for Tay-Sachs disease. The increasing evidence for marked clinical and molecular heterogeneity in the GM2 gangliosidoses warrants their consideration in the diagnosis of multisystem degenerative neurological disorders, even if onset of symptoms is in adult life. Images PMID:2956362

  13. [WEAK COMBINED MAGNETIC FIELDS ADJUSTED TO THE PARAMETRIC RESONANCE FOR Ca2+ INTENSIFY DYSTROPHIN SYNTHESIS IN MDX MICE SKELETAL MUSCLES AFTER CELL THERAPY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, A V; Sokolov, G V; Mikhailov, V M

    2016-01-01

    The mdx mice are an X-linked myopathic mutants, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Mdx mice muscles are characterized by high level of striated muscle fibers (SMF) death followed by regeneration. As a result most SMFs of mdx mice have centrally located nuclei. The possibility of using stem cells therapy for the correction of DMD is actively being studied. One of the approaches to the usage of bone marrow stem cells for cellular therapy of DMD is the replacement of bone marrow after irradiation by X-rays. This method however does not give significant increase of dystrophin synthesis in mdx mice muscles fibers. We have tried to affect the mice after bone marrow transplantation by weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+(Ca(2+)-MF) based on the data that the weak combined magnetic fields influence on tissues regeneration. We observed a significant increase in the proportion of dystrophin-positive SMFs in group of mdx mice radiation chimera 5 Gy and 3 Gy which was additionally exposed in Ca(2+)-MF in comparison with the control mdx mice and the group of mdx mice radiation chimera 5 Gy and 3 Gy which was kept in terrestrial magnetic field 2 months after chimera preparation--up to 15.8 and 18.3%, respectively. Also, there was an accumulation of SMFs without central nuclei. These data indicate a significanly increased efficacy of cell therapy in the case of additional exposition in Ca(2+)-MF. Thus, the efficiency of bone marrow transplantation mdx mice after both in doses 3 and 5 Gy was considerably enhanced by additional exposition to Ca(2+)-MF. Apparently, such magnetic field can intensify functioning of donor's nuclei which had been incorporated into muscle fibers.

  14. Study of Various Techniques for Improving Weak and Compressible Clay Soil under a High Earth Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein A.K. M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the suitability of three soil improvement techniques for the construction of a high earth embankment on thick weak and highly compressible clay soil. The eastern approach embankment of Alhalfaya Bridge on the River Nile linking Khartoum North and Omdurman cities was chosen as a case study and a comprehensive site investigation program was carried out to determine the properties the subsurface soils. The study results showed that unless the subsurface soils have been improved they may fail or undergo excessively large settlements due to the embankment construction. Three ground improvement techniques based on the principles of the “staged construction method, SCM”, “vertical sand drain, VSD” and “sand compaction piles, SCP” of embankment foundation soil treatment are discussed and evaluated. Embankment design options based on applications of the above methods have been proposed for foundation treatment to adequately support embankment loads. A method performance evaluation based on the improvement of soil properties achieved; the time required for construction and compared estimated costs criteria was made to assess the effectiveness and expected overall performance. Adoption of any of the soil improvement techniques considered depends mainly on the most critical and decisive factor governing the embankment design. Based on the overall performance for the embankment case studied, the sand drains is considered as the most appropriate improvement method followed by the sand compaction piles technique whereas the staged construction method showed the poorest overall performance.

  15. Electro-osmosis of nematic liquid crystals under weak anchoring and second-order surface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Antarip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-07-01

    Advent of nematic liquid crystal flows has attracted renewed attention in view of microfluidic transport phenomena. Among various transport processes, electro-osmosis stands as one of the efficient flow actuation mechanisms through narrow confinements. In the present study, we explore the electrically actuated flow of an ordered nematic fluid with ionic inclusions, taking into account the influences from surface-induced elasticity and electrical double layer (EDL) phenomena. Toward this, we devise the coupled flow governing equations from fundamental free-energy analysis, considering the contributions from first- and second-order elastic, dielectric, flexoelectric, charged surface polarization, ionic and entropic energies. The present study focuses on the influence of surface charge and elasticity effects in the resulting linear electro-osmosis through a slit-type microchannel whose surfaces are chemically treated to display a homeotropic-type weak anchoring state. An optical periodic stripe configuration of the nematic director has been observed, especially for higher electric fields, wherein the Ericksen number for the dynamic study is restricted to the order of unity. Contrary to the isotropic electrolytes, the EDL potential in this case was found to be dependent on the external field strength. Through a systematic investigation, we brought out the fact that the wavelength of the oscillating patterns is dictated mainly by the external field, while the amplitude depends on most of the physical variables ranging from the anchoring strength and the flexoelectric coefficients to the surface charge density and electrical double layer thickness.

  16. Undulations in a weakly interacting mechanically generated molecular braid under tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’ Lee, D J

    2014-01-01

    We consider mechanically generated molecular braids composed of two molecules where long range interactions between them can be considered to be very weak. We describe a model that takes account of the thermal fluctuations of the braid, steric interactions between the molecules, and external mechanical forces. In this model, both sets of ends, of the two molecules, are considered to be separated by a fixed distance much larger than the radius of the braid. One set of ends is rotated to generate a braid of a certain number of pitches (or turns), while the other set remains fixed. This model may describe the situation in which the ends of each molecule are attached to a substrate and a magnetic bead; to the latter a pulling force and rotational torque can be applied. We discuss various aspects of our model. Most importantly, an expression for the free energy is given, from which equations, determining the various geometric parameters of the braid, can be obtained. By numerically solving these equations, we give predictions from the model for the external torque needed to produce a braid with a certain number of turns per bending persistence length, as well as the end to end extension of the two molecules for a given pulling force. Other geometric parameters, as well as the lateral force required to keep the ends of the two molecules apart, are also calculated. (paper)

  17. [Conformational states of NADH molecules in hydrated shell under weak electromagnetic irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotnyĭ, M A; Barabash, Iu M; Kulish, N P; Dmitrienko, O P; Kuz'menko, M O

    2015-01-01

    The work deals with spectra of capillary waves of water distillate and water solution of NADH and dynamics of NADH under electromagnetic irradiation in the range of millimeters at different space frequencies of surface wave k.

  18. Influence of muscle fiber type composition on early fat accumulation under high-fat diet challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ning; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yee, Grace M; Kitajima, Yoichiro; Katagiri, Sayaka; Kojima, Motoyasu; Anzai, Keizo; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Hamilton, James A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether differences in muscle fiber types affect early-stage fat accumulation, under high fat diet challenge in mice. Twelve healthy male C57BL/6 mice experienced with short-term (6 weeks) diet treatment for the evaluation of early pattern changes in muscular fat. The mice were randomly divided into two groups: high fat diet (n = 8) and normal control diet (n = 4). Extra- and intra-myocellular lipid (EMCL and IMCL) in lumbar muscles (type I fiber predominant) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle (type II fiber predominant) were determined using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Correlation of EMCL, IMCL and their ratio between TA and lumbar muscles was evaluated. EMCL increased greatly in both muscle types after high fat diet. IMCL in TA and lumbar muscles increased to a much lower extent, with a slightly greater increase in TA muscles. EMCLs in the 2 muscles were positively correlated (r = 0.84, p = 0.01), but IMCLs showed a negative relationship (r = -0.84, p = 0.01). In lumbar muscles, high fat diet significantly decreased type I fiber while it increased type II fiber (all p≤0.001). In TA muscle, there was no significant fiber type shifting (p>0.05). Under short-time high fat diet challenge, lipid tends to initially accumulate extra-cellularly. In addition, compared to type II dominant muscle, Type I dominant muscle was less susceptible to IMCL accumulation but more to fiber type shifting. These phenomena might reflect compensative responses of skeletal muscle to dietary lipid overload in order to regulate metabolic homeostasis.

  19. Inspiratory muscle training reduces sympathetic nervous activity and improves inspiratory muscle weakness and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Priscila R; Guerra, Grazi M; Borile, Suellen; Rondon, Maria U; Alves, Maria J; Negrão, Carlos E; Dal Lago, Pedro; Mostarda, Cristiano; Irigoyen, Maria C; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on cardiac autonomic modulation and on peripheral nerve sympathetic activity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Functional capacity, low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of heart rate variability, muscle sympathetic nerve activity inferred by microneurography, and quality of life were determined in 27 patients with CHF who had been sequentially allocated to 1 of 2 groups: (1) control group (with no intervention) and (2) IMT group. Inspiratory muscle training consisted of respiratory exercises, with inspiratory threshold loading of seven 30-minute sessions per week for a period of 12 weeks, with a monthly increase of 30% in maximal inspiratory pressure (PI(max)) at rest. Multivariate analysis was applied to detect differences between baseline and followup period. Inspiratory muscle training significantly increased PI(max) (59.2 ± 4.9 vs 87.5 ± 6.5 cmH(2)O, P = .001) and peak oxygen uptake (14.4 ± 0.7 vs 18.9 ± 0.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), P = .002); decreased the peak ventilation (VE)/carbon dioxide production (VCO(2)) ratio (35.8 ± 0.8 vs 32.5 ± 0.4, P = .001) and the VE/VCO(2) slope (37.3 ± 1.1 vs 31.3 ± 1.1, P = .004); increased the HF component (49.3 ± 4.1 vs 58.4 ± 4.2 normalized units, P = .004) and decreased the LF component (50.7 ± 4.1 vs 41.6 ± 4.2 normalized units, P = .001) of heart rate variability; decreased muscle sympathetic nerve activity (37.1 ± 3 vs 29.5 ± 2.3 bursts per minute, P = .001); and improved quality of life. No significant changes were observed in the control group. Home-based IMT represents an important strategy to improve cardiac and peripheral autonomic controls, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with CHF.

  20. The increase in health care costs associated with muscle weakness in older people without long-term illnesses in the Czech Republic: results from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffl M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Michal Steffl,1 Jan Sima,2 Kate Shiells,3 Iva Holmerova3 1Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Department of Sport Management, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; 3Centre of Expertise in Longevity and Long-term Care, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Muscle weakness and associated diseases are likely to place a considerable economic burden on government health care expenditure. Therefore, our aim for this study was to estimate the direct and indirect costs associated with muscle weakness in the Czech Republic. We applied a cost-of-illness approach using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE. Six hundred and eighty-nine participants aged 70 years and over and without any long-term illnesses were included in our study. A generalized linear model with gamma distribution was used, and odds ratio (OR was calculated in order to explore the effect of muscle weakness on direct and indirect costs. For both genders, muscle weakness had a statistically significant impact on direct costs (OR =2.11, but did not have a statistically significant impact on indirect costs (OR =1.08 or on total cost (OR =1.51. Muscle weakness had the greatest statistically significant impact on direct costs in females (OR =2.75. In conclusion, our study has shown that muscle weakness may lead to increased direct costs, and consequently place a burden on health care expenditure. Therefore, the results of this study could lead to greater interest in the prevention of muscle weakness among older people in the Czech Republic. Keywords: direct cost, indirect cost, economic burden, sarcopenia, frailty

  1. Muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, G; Bugiardini, E; Cardani, R

    2012-04-01

    Muscle biopsy is required to provide a definitive diagnosis in many neuromuscular disorders. It can be performed through an open or needle technique under local anesthesia. The major limitations of the needle biopsy technique are the sample size, which is smaller than that obtained with open biopsy, and the impossibility of direct visualization of the sampling site. However, needle biopsy is a less invasive procedure than open biopsy and is particularly indicated for diagnosis of neuromuscular disease in infancy and childhood. The biopsied muscle should be one affected by the disease but not be too weak or too atrophic. Usually, in case of proximal muscle involvement, the quadriceps and the biceps are biopsied, while under suspicion of mitochondrial disorder, the deltoid is preferred. The samples must be immediately frozen or fixed after excision to prevent loss of enzymatic reactivity, DNA depletion or RNA degradation. A battery of stainings is performed on muscle sections from every frozen muscle biopsy arriving in the pathology laboratory. Histological, histochemical, and histoenzymatic stainings are performed to evaluate fiber atrophy, morphological, and structural changes and metabolic disorders. Moreover, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis may be used for expression analysis of muscle proteins to obtain a specific diagnosis. There are myopathies that do not need muscle biopsy since a genetic test performed on a blood sample is enough for definitive diagnosis. Muscle biopsy is a useful technique which can make an enormous contribution in the field of neuromuscular disorders but should be considered and interpreted together with the patient's family and clinical history.

  2. Entrainment of noise-induced and limit cycle oscillators under weak noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Alon, Uri; Jensen, Mogens H

    2013-01-01

    , and addition of noise gives oscillations around the fixed point with fluctuating amplitude. We investigate how each class of models behaves under the external periodic forcing, taking the well-studied van der Pol equation as an example. We find that when the forcing is additive, the noise-induced oscillator...... can show only one-to-one entrainment to the external frequency, in contrast to the limit cycle oscillator which is known to entrain to any ratio. When the external forcing is multiplicative, on the other hand, the noise-induced oscillator can show entrainment to a few ratios other than one...

  3. Protocol for diaphragm pacing in patients with respiratory muscle weakness due to motor neurone disease (DiPALS: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Christopher J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motor neurone disease (MND is a devastating illness which leads to muscle weakness and death, usually within 2-3 years of symptom onset. Respiratory insufficiency is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in later stages of MND and respiratory complications are the leading cause of mortality in MND patients. Non Invasive Ventilation (NIV is the current standard therapy to manage respiratory insufficiency. Some MND patients however do not tolerate NIV due to a number of issues including mask interface problems and claustrophobia. In those that do tolerate NIV, eventually respiratory muscle weakness will progress to a point at which intermittent/overnight NIV is ineffective. The NeuRx RA/4 Diaphragm Pacing System was originally developed for patients with respiratory insufficiency and diaphragm paralysis secondary to stable high spinal cord injuries. The DiPALS study will assess the effect of diaphragm pacing (DP when used to treat patients with MND and respiratory insufficiency. Method/Design 108 patients will be recruited to the study at 5 sites in the UK. Patients will be randomised to either receive NIV (current standard care or receive DP in addition to NIV. Study participants will be required to complete outcome measures at 5 follow up time points (2, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months plus an additional surgery and 1 week post operative visit for those in the DP group. 12 patients (and their carers from the DP group will also be asked to complete 2 qualitative interviews. Discussion The primary objective of this trial will be to evaluate the effect of Diaphragm Pacing (DP on survival over the study duration in patients with MND with respiratory muscle weakness. The project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research, Health Technology Assessment (HTA Programme (project number 09/55/33 and the Motor Neurone Disease Association and the Henry Smith Charity. Trial Registration: Current controlled trials ISRCTN53817913. The

  4. Dynamic scaling of ferromagnetic micro-rod clusters under a weak magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rui; Zhu, Lu; Huang, Weijie; Mao, Leidong; Zhao, Yiping

    2016-10-12

    A controlled configurational change of micro-clusters in suspensions is essential for many smart material applications. In this paper, the dynamic process of ferromagnetic microrod clusters (FMRCs) under an external magnetic field was studied as a function of the cluster size N and the applied field B. The FMRCs rearranged from a side-by-side raft-like structure to an end-to-end chain-like structure, originating from coupled motions through the field-driven alignment of both ferromagnetic microrods and FMRCs. A theoretical model based on an extension of a zig-zag chain was developed, and both the cluster length and orientation could be characterized by a retardation time constant τ, with a relationship τ ∼ N 2 /B, which agrees well with the experimental results, τ ∼ N 2.2±0.2 /B 0.8±0.1 . Such a model can be used to predict other cluster dynamics or the magneto-elastic behavior of other soft matters consisting of FMRCs.

  5. Intellectual disability, muscle weakness and characteristic face in three siblings: A newly described recessive syndrome mapping to 3p24.3-p25.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Nafissi, Shahriar; Nilipoor, Yalda; Tavasoli, Alireza; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Bonnard, Carine; Ng, Yeng Ting; Majoie, Charles B; Reversade, Bruno; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2015-11-01

    We report on a sister and two brothers born to healthy Iranian parents with mild intellectual disability, progressive muscle weakness, and characteristic facies. including highly arched eyebrows, down-slanting palpebral fissures, prominent nasal bridge, prominent nose, columella extending below alae nasi, narrow mouth, narrow palate, and dental caries, and in one of them an inability to abduct the left eye. Electrophysiological studies showed signs of myopathy, and muscle biopsies demonstrated only nonspecific signs. Brain MRIs in two of the sibs showed leukencephalopathy with delayed myelination, frontal and parietal hyperintensities, and hippocampal atrophy in one. We have been unable to find a description of this association of features in literature. Based on the occurrence in siblings, no significant difference in phenotype between the brothers and sister, absence of manifestations in parents, and a likely consanguinity between parents we performed a homozygosity mapping. A single identical-by-descent bloc encompassing 57 genes located at 3p24.3-p25.3 was found to segregate within the family with this phenotype. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mechanistic Links Underlying the Impact of C-Reactive Protein on Muscle Mass in Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Strandberg, Emelie; Hosford-Donovan, Adrian; Atherton, Philip J; Kadi, Fawzi

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the relationship between systemic inflammation and age-related decline in muscle mass are poorly defined. The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between the systemic inflammatory marker CRP and muscle mass in elderly and to identify mechanisms by which CRP mediates its effects on skeletal muscle, in-vitro. Muscle mass and serum CRP level were determined in a cohort of 118 older women (67±1.7 years). Human muscle cells were differentiated into myotubes and were exposed to CRP. The size of myotubes was determined after immunofluorescent staining using troponin. Muscle protein synthesis was assessed using stable isotope tracers and key signalling pathways controlling protein synthesis were determined using western-blotting. We observed an inverse relationship between circulating CRP level and muscle mass (β= -0.646 (95% CI: -0.888, -0.405) pmuscle protein fractional synthetic rate of human myotubes exposed to CRP for 24 h. We also identified a CRP-mediated increased phosphorylation (pprotein synthesis. This work established for the first time mechanistic links by which chronic elevation of CRP can contribute to age-related decline in muscle function. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Resistance Training for Muscle Weakness in Multiple Sclerosis: Direct Versus Contralateral Approach in Individuals With Ankle Dorsiflexors' Disparity in Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Andrea; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Dragone, Daniele; Ginatempo, Francesca; Ortu, Enzo; De Natale, Edoardo Rosario; Mercante, Beniamina; Mureddu, Giovanni; Bua, Guido; Deriu, Franca

    2017-07-01

    To compare effects of contralateral strength training (CST) and direct strength training of the more affected ankle dorsiflexors on muscle performance and clinical functional outcomes in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) exhibiting interlimb strength asymmetry. Randomized controlled trial. University hospital. Individuals with relapsing-remitting MS (N=30) and mild-to-moderate disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤6) presenting with ankle dorsiflexors' strength disparity. Participants were randomly assigned to a CST (n=15) or direct strength training (n=15) group performing 6 weeks of maximal intensity strength training of the less or more affected dorsiflexors, respectively. Maximal strength, endurance to fatigue, and mobility outcomes were assessed before, at the intervention end, and at 12-week follow-up. Strength and fatigue parameters were measured after 3 weeks of training (midintervention). In the more affected limb of both groups, pre- to postintervention significant increases in maximal strength (P≤.006) and fatigue endurance (P≤.04) were detected along with consistent retention of these improvements at follow-up (P≤.04). At midintervention, the direct strength training group showed significant improvements (P≤.002), with no further increase at postintervention, despite training continuation. Conversely, the CST group showed nonsignificant strength gains, increasing to significance at postintervention (P≤.003). In both groups, significant pre- to postintervention improvements in mobility outcomes (P≤.03), not retained at follow-up, were observed. After 6 weeks of training, CST proved as effective as direct strength training in enhancing performance of the more affected limb with a different time course, which may have practical implications in management of severely weakened limbs where direct strength training is not initially possible. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. Muscles Activity in the elderly with Balance Impairments in walking under Dual tasks

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    Elaheh Azadian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Each step during gait requires different attention demands that will affect muscles activity. The study of changes in the timing and intensity of the muscles activity in walking with dual task has received less attention from researchers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in electromyography patterns of gait with cognitive dual tasks in balance impaired elderly. Methods: Thirty older adults were recruited for this study. People were selected through berg balance test. Subjects walked 12-meters in two conditions, normal walking and walking with a cognitive dual task. Spatial-temporal kinematic parameters were recorded through the motion analysis and muscles activities were recorded through electromyography system. The data obtained was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA at a significant level of p< 0.05.  Results: The results showed that walking under dual tasks would decrease gait speed and increase stride time and stance time. Also muscle activity in Tibialis anterior and Vastus lateralis in stance-phase would decrease significantly in dual tasks as compared with single task (p< 0.05, but timing of muscle activity would not change in dual task conditions.  Conclusions: Based on the results, it can be argued that walking under a dual task can change spatial-temporal parameters and muscle activity in gait pattern in the elderly with balance impairment. One explanation could be that the decreased control of the central nervous system on muscle activity in stance phase due to the performing of a dual task.

  9. Dynamic Stress Concentration at the Boundary of an Incision at the Plate Under the Action of Weak Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Olena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the novel technique for analysis of dynamic stress state of multi-connected infinite plates under the action of weak shock waves. For solution of the problem it uses the integral and discrete Fourier transforms. Calculation of transformed dynamic stresses at the incisions of plates is held using the boundary-integral equation method and the theory of complex variable functions. The numerical implementation of the developed algorithm is based on the method of mechanical quadratures and collocation technique. For calculation of originals of the dynamic stresses it uses modified discrete Fourier transform. The algorithm is effective in the analysis of the dynamic stress state of defective plates.

  10. In situ measurement of reaction volume and calculation of pH of weak acid buffer solutions under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Stephen K; Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2011-05-26

    Direct measurements of reaction volume, so far, have been limited to atmospheric pressure. This study describes a method for in situ reaction volume measurements under pressure using a variable volume piezometer. Reaction volumes for protonic ionization of weak acid buffering agents (MES, citric acid, sulfanilic acid, and phosphoric acid) were measured in situ under pressure up to 400 MPa at 25 °C. The methodology involved initial separation of buffering agents within the piezometer using gelatin capsules. Under pressure, the volume of the reactants was measured at 25 °C, and the contents were heated to 40 °C to dissolve the gelatin and allow the reaction to occur, and cooled to 25 °C, where the volume of products was measured. Reaction volumes were used to calculate pH of the buffer solutions as a function of pressure. The results show that the measured reaction volumes as well as the calculated pH values generally quite agree with their respective theoretically predicted values up to 100 MPa. The results of this study highlight the need for a comprehensive theory to describe the pressure behavior of ionization reactions in realistic systems especially at higher pressures.

  11. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy*

    OpenAIRE

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice ex...

  12. Transcriptional profiling of rat skeletal muscle hypertrophy under restriction of blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shouyu; Liu, Xueyun; Chen, Zhenhuang; Li, Gaoquan; Chen, Qin; Zhou, Guoqing; Ma, Ruijie; Yao, Xinmiao; Huang, Xiao

    2016-12-15

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) under low-intensity resistance training (LIRT) can produce similar effects upon muscles to that of high-intensity resistance training (HIRT) while overcoming many of the restrictions to HIRT that occurs in a clinical setting. However, the potential molecular mechanisms of BFR induced muscle hypertrophy remain largely unknown. Here, using a BFR rat model, we aim to better elucidate the mechanisms regulating muscle hypertrophy as induced by BFR and reveal possible clinical therapeutic targets for atrophy cases. We performed genome wide screening with microarray analysis to identify unique differentially expressed genes during rat muscle hypertrophy. We then successfully separated the differentially expressed genes from BRF treated soleus samples by comparing the Affymetrix rat Genome U34 2.0 array with the control. Using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) we also analyzed other related differentially expressed genes. Results suggested that muscle hypertrophy induced by BFR is essentially regulated by the rate of protein turnover. Specifically, PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways act as positive regulators in controlling protein synthesis where ubiquitin-proteasome acts as a negative regulator. This represents the first general genome wide level investigation of the gene expression profile in the rat soleus after BFR treatment. This may aid our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating and controlling muscle hypertrophy and provide support to the BFR strategies aiming to prevent muscle atrophy in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional electrical stimulation of intrinsic laryngeal muscles under varying loads in exercising horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Cheetham

    Full Text Available Bilateral vocal fold paralysis (BVCP is a life threatening condition and appears to be a good candidate for therapy using functional electrical stimulation (FES. Developing a working FES system has been technically difficult due to the inaccessible location and small size of the sole arytenoid abductor, the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA muscle. A naturally-occurring disease in horses shares many functional and etiological features with BVCP. In this study, the feasibility of FES for equine vocal fold paralysis was explored by testing arytenoid abduction evoked by electrical stimulation of the PCA muscle. Rheobase and chronaxie were determined for innervated PCA muscle. We then tested the hypothesis that direct muscle stimulation can maintain airway patency during strenuous exercise in horses with induced transient conduction block of the laryngeal motor nerve. Six adult horses were instrumented with a single bipolar intra-muscular electrode in the left PCA muscle. Rheobase and chronaxie were within the normal range for innervated muscle at 0.55±0.38 v and 0.38±0.19 ms respectively. Intramuscular stimulation of the PCA muscle significantly improved arytenoid abduction at all levels of exercise intensity and there was no significant difference between the level of abduction achieved with stimulation and control values under moderate loads. The equine larynx may provide a useful model for the study of bilateral fold paralysis.

  14. An NFC on Two-Coil WPT Link for Implantable Biomedical Sensors under Ultra-Weak Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Gong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The inductive link is widely used in implantable biomedical sensor systems to achieve near-field communication (NFC and wireless power transfer (WPT. However, it is tough to achieve reliable NFC on an inductive WPT link when the coupling coefficient is ultra-low (0.01 typically, since the NFC signal (especially for the uplink from the in-body part to the out-body part could be too weak to be detected. Traditional load shift keying (LSK requires strong coupling to pass the load modulation information to the power source. Instead of using LSK, we propose a dual-carrier NFC scheme for the weak-coupled inductive link; using binary phase shift keying (BPSK modulation, its downlink data are modulated on the power carrier (2 MHz, while its uplink data are modulated on another carrier (125 kHz. The two carriers are transferred through the same coil pair. To overcome the strong interference of the power carrier, dedicated circuits are introduced. In addition, to minimize the power transfer efficiency decrease caused by adding NFC, we optimize the inductive link circuit parameters and approach the receiver sensitivity limit. In the prototype experiments, even though the coupling coefficient is as low as 0.008, the in-body transmitter costs only 0.61 mW power carrying 10 kbps of data, and achieves a 1 × 10 - 7 bit error rate under the strong interference of WPT. This dual-carrier NFC scheme could be useful for small-sized implantable biomedical sensor applications.

  15. Mechanistic Links Underlying the Impact of C-Reactive Protein on Muscle Mass in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Wåhlin-Larsson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Mechanisms underlying the relationship between systemic inflammation and age-related decline in muscle mass are poorly defined. The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between the systemic inflammatory marker CRP and muscle mass in elderly and to identify mechanisms by which CRP mediates its effects on skeletal muscle, in-vitro. Methods: Muscle mass and serum CRP level were determined in a cohort of 118 older women (67±1.7 years. Human muscle cells were differentiated into myotubes and were exposed to CRP. The size of myotubes was determined after immunofluorescent staining using troponin. Muscle protein synthesis was assessed using stable isotope tracers and key signalling pathways controlling protein synthesis were determined using western-blotting. Results: We observed an inverse relationship between circulating CRP level and muscle mass (β= -0.646 (95% CI: -0.888, -0.405 p<0.05 and demonstrated a reduction (p < 0.05 in the size of human myotubes exposed to CRP for 72 h. We next showed that this morphological change was accompanied by a CRP-mediated reduction (p < 0.05 in muscle protein fractional synthetic rate of human myotubes exposed to CRP for 24 h. We also identified a CRP-mediated increased phosphorylation (p<0.05 of regulators of cellular energy stress including AMPK and downstream targets, raptor and ACC-β, together with decreased phosphorylation of Akt and rpS6, which are important factors controlling protein synthesis. Conclusion: This work established for the first time mechanistic links by which chronic elevation of CRP can contribute to age-related decline in muscle function.

  16. Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico com fraqueza muscular por Miastenia Gravis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with muscle weakness due to Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sâmia Araújo de Sousa Studart

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico (LES e a Miastenia Gravis (MG são doenças autoimunes cuja associação em um mesmo paciente é raramente descrita. Essas patologias compartilham algumas características como acometimento de mulheres jovens, positividade para anticorpos antinucleares, evolução em períodos de exacerbações e remissões. O presente relato de caso analisa as possíveis hipóteses diagnósticas para um quadro clínico de ptose palpebral e fraqueza muscular proximal em uma paciente portadora de lúpus recente que evoluiu com MG associada.Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and myasthenia gravis (MG are autoimmune diseases, whose association in the same patient is rarely reported. Both pathologies share the following characteristics: affect mainly young women; alternate exacerbation and remission periods; and have positive antinuclear antibody (ANA test. This case report assesses possible diagnostic hypotheses for the clinical findings of eyelid ptosis and proximal muscle weakness in a female patient recently diagnosed with SLE, who evolved with associated MG.

  17. Gender differences in emotion experience perception under different facial muscle manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Dongjun; Zou, Feng; Li, Hao; Luo, Yanyan; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Yijun

    2016-04-01

    According to embodied emotion theory, facial manipulations should modulate and initiate particular emotions. However, whether there are gender differences in emotion experience perception under different facial muscle manipulations is not clear. Therefore, we conducted two behavioral experiments to examine gender differences in emotional perception in response to facial expressions (sad, neutral, and happy) under three conditions: (1) holding a pen using only the teeth (HPT), which facilitates the muscles typically associated with smiling; (2) holding a pen using only the lips (HPL), which inhibits the muscles typically associated with smiling; and (3) a control condition--hold no pen (HNP). We found that HPT made the emotional feelings more positive, and that the change degree of female's ratings of sad facial expressions between conditions (HPL to HPT) was larger than males'. These results suggested cognition can be affected by the interaction of the stimuli and the body, especially the female. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of muscle fiber type composition on early fat accumulation under high-fat diet challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Ning; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yee, Grace M.; Kitajima, Yoichiro; Katagiri, Sayaka; Kojima, Motoyasu; Anzai, Keizo; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Hamilton, James A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether differences in muscle fiber types affect early-stage fat accumulation, under high fat diet challenge in mice. Methods: Twelve healthy male C57BL/6 mice experienced with short-term (6 weeks) diet treatment for the evaluation of early pattern changes in muscular fat. The mice were randomly divided into two groups: high fat diet (n = 8) and normal control diet (n = 4). Extra- and intra-myocellular lipid (EMCL and IMCL) in lumbar muscles (type I fiber predominant...

  19. Comments on 'Comparative diagnostic case study of east coast secondary cyclogenesis under weak versus strong synoptic-scale forcing'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccellini, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    A comment is presented on a recent paper by Pagnotti and Bosart (1984) which contrasted different forcing mechanisms for weak and strong cyclones along the east coast of the U.S., and Bosart replies. The comment argues that the paper did not give a clear definition of 'weak' upper-level forcing and did not provide sufficient evidence to support its claim that the return branch of transverse circulations may be coupled to the middle as opposed to the lower troposphere.

  20. Specific features of the planarian Dugesia tigrina regeneration and mollusk Helix albescens nociception under weak electromagnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temur'yants, N. A.; Demtsun, N. A.; Kostyuk, A. S.; Yarmolyuk, N. S.

    2012-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that weak electromagnetic shielding stimulates regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina, the stimulating intensity being dependent on both the initial state of the animals, which is determined by season, and their functional asymmetry. As has been shown, the effect of a weak electromagnetic field induces phasic changes in the nociceptive sensitivity of the mollusk Helix albescens: an increase in the sensitivity to a thermal stimulus is replaced by the development of the hypalgesic effect.

  1. Characterising skeletal muscle under large strain using eccentric and Fourier Transform-rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kristy; Cheng, Shaokoon; Jugé, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E

    2015-11-05

    Characterising the passive anisotropic properties of soft tissues has been largely limited to the linear viscoelastic regime and shear loading is rarely done in the large deformation regime, despite the physiological significance of such properties. This paper demonstrates the use of eccentric rheology, which allows the anisotropy of skeletal muscle to be investigated. The large amplitude oscillatory strain properties of skeletal muscle were also investigated using Fourier Transform-rheology. Histology was used to qualitatively assess the microstructure changes induced by large strain. Results showed that skeletal muscle was strongly anisotropic in the linear regime. The storage and loss moduli were found to be significantly different (p<0.05) between the three fibre alignment groups; for the group tested with fibres perpendicular to plane of shear was 12.3±1.3 kPa and 3.0±0.35 kPa, parallel to shear direction was 10.6±1.2 kPa and 2.4±0.23 kPa, and perpendicular to shear direction was 5.5±0.90 kPa and 1.3±0.21 kPa. The appearance and growth of higher order harmonics at large strain was different in the three testing directions indicating that the anisotropy of muscle affects skeletal muscle behaviour in the nonlinear regime. Histological analysis showed an increasing destruction of extracellular matrix and the rearrangement of fibres with increasing strain indicating mechanical damage at strains of larger than 10%. These microstructural changes could contribute to the complex nonlinear behaviour in skeletal muscle. This paper demonstrates a method of characterising the anisotropic properties in skeletal muscle under large strain whilst giving meaningful information on the physical response of tissue at various strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Incubation under fluid dynamic conditions markedly improves the structural preservation in vitro of explanted skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Carton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Explanted organs and tissues represent suitable experimental systems mimicking the functional and structural complexity of the living organism, with positive ethical and economic impact on research activities. However, their preservation in culture is generally limited, thus hindering their application as experimental models for biomedical research. In the present study, we investigated the potential of an innovative fluid dynamic culture system to improve the structural preservation in vitro of explanted mouse skeletal muscles (soleus. We used light and transmission electron microscopy to compare the morphological features of muscles maintained either in multiwell plates under conventional conditions or in a bioreactor mimicking the flow of physiological fluids. Our results demonstrate that fluid dynamic conditions markedly slowed the progressive structural deterioration of the muscle tissue occurring during the permanence in the culture medium, prolonging the preservation of some organelles such as mitochondria up to 48 h.

  3. Incubation under fluid dynamic conditions markedly improves the structural preservation in vitro of explanted skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Flavia; Calderan, Laura; Malatesta, Manuela

    2017-11-28

    Explanted organs and tissues represent suitable experimental systems mimicking the functional and structural complexity of the living organism, with positive ethical and economic impact on research activities. However, their preservation in culture is generally limited, thus hindering their application as experimental models for biomedical research. In the present study, we investigated the potential of an innovative fluid dynamic culture system to improve the structural preservation in vitro of explanted mouse skeletal muscles (soleus). We used light and transmission electron microscopy to compare the morphological features of muscles maintained either in multiwell plates under conventional conditions or in a bioreactor mimicking the flow of physiological fluids. Our results demonstrate that fluid dynamic conditions markedly slowed the progressive structural deterioration of the muscle tissue occurring during the permanence in the culture medium, prolonging the preservation of some organelles such as mitochondria up to 48 h.

  4. Weak currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite Lopes, J.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the fundamental ideas on weak currents such as CVC and PCAC and a presentation of the Cabibbo current and the neutral weak currents according to the Salam-Weinberg model and the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Miami model are given [fr

  5. Intermittent vibration protects aged muscle from mechanical and oxidative damage under prolonged compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sing Wan; Cheung, Brian Chun Ho; Pang, Bruce Tak Keung; Kwong, Ateline; Chung, Anna; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Mak, Arthur Fut Tak

    2017-04-11

    Deep tissue pressure ulcers, a serious clinical challenge originating in the muscle layer, are hardly detectable at the beginning. The challenge apparently occurs in aged subjects more frequently. As the ulcer propagates to the skin surface, it becomes very difficult to manage and can lead to fatal complications. Preventive measures are thus highly desirable. Although the complex pathological mechanisms have not been fully understood, prolonged and excessive physical challenges and oxidative stress are believed to be involved in the ulcer development. Previous reports have demonstrated that oxidative stress could compromise the mechanical properties of muscle cells, making them easier to be damaged when physical challenges are introduced. In this study, we used senescence accelerated (SAMP8) mice and its control breed (SAMR1) to examine the protective effects of intermittent vibration on aged and control muscle tissues during prolonged epidermal compression under 100mmHg for 6h. Results showed that an application of 35Hz, 0.25g intermittent vibration during compression decreased the compression-induced muscle breakdown in SAMP8 mice, as indicated histologically in terms of number of interstitial nuclei. The fact that no significant difference in muscle damage could be established in the corresponding groups in SAMR1 mice suggests that SAMR1 mice could better accommodate the compression insult than SAMP8 mice. Compression-induced oxidative damage was successfully curbed using intermittent vibration in SAMP8 mice, as indicated by 8-OHdG. A possible explanation is that the anti-oxidative defense could be maintained with intermittent vibration during compression. This was supported by the expression level of PGC-1-alpha, catalase, Gpx-1 and SOD1. Our data suggested intermittent vibration could serve as a preventive measure for deep tissue ulcer, particularly in aged subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adverse reactions to suxamethonium and other muscle relaxants under general anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vervloet, D.; Nizankowska, E.; Arnaud, A.; Senft, M.; Alazia, M.; Charpin, J.

    1983-06-01

    The mechanisms of anaphylactic reactions to muscle relaxants under general anesthesia are not completely understood. Extending an earlier study, we report 41 cases of anaphylactic shock investigated by intradermal skin tests with muscle relaxants (suxamethonium, pancuronium, gallamine, nortoxiferine), in vitro leukocyte histamine release, and Prausnitz-Kuestner tests. Intradermal tests were significantly positive at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10(5) times less than those in controls. Reproducibility tested for suxamethonium at a 1-year interval in five patients was good. Histamine release induced by muscle relaxants in Tris-albumin-Ca++-Mg++ buffer showed positive results in 8/25 instances and was inhibited by antigen excess in seven cases. Addition of 50% deuterium oxide (D2O) caused significant increase of histamine release in positive cases and induced release in all five negative cases studied. Muscle relaxant-induced histamine release was inhibited by in vitro anti-IgE leukocyte desensitization. The mean maximal histamine release dropped from 58.2% +/- 9.7 to 5.8% +/- 2 (p less than 0.01). Similarly, leukocyte desensitization also inhibited histamine release induced by anti-IgE but not by formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine or poly-L-arginine. Prausnitz-Kuestner tests were positive in five out of 21 cases studied and became negative after heat inactivation. These results confirm the usefulness of intradermal skin tests in diagnosis of patients' reaction to muscle relaxants and suggest an IgE-mediated rather than an idiosyncratic mechanism.

  7. Noninvasive measurement of lower extremity muscle oxygen extraction fraction under cuff compression paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengyan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, He; Zhao, Kai; Jin, Lixin; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Xiaoying; Fang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using a susceptibility-based MRI technique with asymmetric spin-echo (ASE) sequence to assess the lower extremity muscle oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) alternations under cuff compression paradigm. Approved by the local institutional human study committee, nine healthy young volunteers participated in this study. All the ASE scans were conducted using a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner during resting state (pre), 1-3 min (post1) and 3-5 min (post2) after a pressure of 50 mmHg above individual systolic blood pressure imposed on the thigh. Moreover, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements were performed on the same day under the same cuff compression protocol to verify the accuracy of this susceptibility-based method. In all volunteers, the mean MRI based OEF in gastrocnemius (GAS) muscle increased significantly from 0.28 ± 0.02 (pre) to 0.31 ± 0.03 (post1, P measured 1-%HbO2 (percentage of deoxyhemoglobin concentration within total hemoglobin) in GAS rose significantly from 0.29 ± 0.03 (pre) to 0.31 ± 0.04 (post1, P measuring skeletal muscle oxygenation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nuclear Positioning in Muscle Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eFolker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscle disease as a group is characterized by muscle weakness, muscle loss, and impaired muscle function. Although the phenotype is the same, the underlying cellular pathologies, and the molecular causes of these pathologies, are diverse. One common feature of many muscle disorders is the mispositioning of myonuclei. In unaffected individuals myonuclei are spaced throughout the periphery of the muscle fiber such that the distance between nuclei is maximized. However, in diseased muscles, the nuclei are often clustered within the center of the muscle cell. Although this phenotype has been acknowledged for several decades, it is often ignored as a contributor to muscle weakness. Rather, these nuclei are taken only as a sign of muscle repair. Here we review the evidence that mispositioned myonuclei are not merely a symptom of muscle disease but also a cause. Additionally, we review the working models for how myonuclei move from two different perspectives, from that of the nucleus and from that of the cytoskeleton. We further compare and contrast these mechanisms with the mechanisms of nuclear movement in other cell types both to draw general themes for nuclear movement and to identify muscle-specific considerations. Finally, we focus on factors that can be linked to muscle disease and find that genes that regulate myonuclear movement and positioning have been linked to muscular dystrophy. Although the cause-effect relationship is largely speculative, recent data indicate that the position of nuclei should no longer be considered only a means to diagnose muscle disease.

  9. An analysis of the activity and muscle fatigue of the muscles around the neck under the three most frequent postures while using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Hyun; Jung, Min-Ho; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify changes in the activity and fatigue of the splenius capitis and upper trapezius muscles, which are agonists to the muscles supporting the head, under the three postures most frequently adopted while using a smartphone. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 15 college students in their 20s. They formed a single group and had to adopt three different postures (maximum bending, middle bending, and neutral). While the 15 subjects maintained the postures, muscle activity and fatigue were measured using surface electromyography. [Results] Comparison of the muscle fatigue caused by each posture showed statistically significant differences for the right splenius capitis, left splenius capitis, and left upper trapezius muscles. In addition, maintaining the maximum bending posture while using a smartphone resulted in higher levels of fatigue in the right splenius capitis, left splenius capitis, and left upper trapezius muscles compared with those for the middle bending posture. [Conclusion] Therefore, this study suggests that individuals should bend their neck slightly when using a smartphone, rather than bending it too much, or keep their neck straight to reduce fatigue of the cervical erector muscles.

  10. Weak decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  11. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  12. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  13. Control of Power Electronic Converters in Distributed Power Generation Systems: Evaluation of Current Control Structures for Voltage Source Converters operating under Weak Grid Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Midtsund, Tarjei

    2010-01-01

    The performance of different current controller structures for Voltage Source Converters (VSC) under weak grid conditions caused by large grid impedance is investigated. The VSC is synchronized to the grid by a Phase Locked Loop (PLL). Current control techniques and PLL techniques for handling both symmetrical and asymmetrical conditions are presented and discussed. The investigated current control structures are; the conventional Proportional Integral (PI)-controller in the synchronous rotat...

  14. Tenotomy of the semitendinosus muscle under standing sedation versus general anesthesia: outcomes in 20 horses with fibrotic myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Fuentes, David G; Tatarniuk, Dane M; Caston, Stephanie S; Kersh, Kevin D; Gillen, Alex M; Hays, Ashley M

    2018-02-13

    To compare outcomes after semitendinosus tenotomy performed under standing sedation versus general anesthesia. Retrospective case series. 20 horses with fibrotic myopathy of the semitendinosus muscle. Medical records (2002-2015) of horses undergoing tenotomy of the semitendinosus muscle for the treatment of fibrotic myopathy were reviewed. Signalment, history, affected muscles, restrain method, surgical procedures, and short-term outcome as well as complications were retrieved from records. Long-term outcome (gait and athletic function) was assessed at least 6 months postoperatively by conversation with the owners. Pearson's χ 2 statistical analysis was used to compare restrain method and affected muscles with overall outcome. Significance was set at P horses and under general anesthesia in 12 horses. Follow-up period ranged from 9 months to 10 years. Gait was improved to variable degrees in 8 of 14 horses when the semitendinosus muscle alone was affected and in 4 of 6 horses when both the semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles were involved (P = .11). Six of 8 horses treated under standing sedation and 6 of 12 horses treated under general anesthesia exhibited some improvement in the characteristic fibrotic gait (P = .4473). Five of 6 athletic horses treated under standing sedation and 6 of 9 athletic horses treated under general anesthesia returned to their preinjury level of athleticism. Horses treated under standing sedation had no incisional complications; 2 of 12 horses treated under general anesthesia exhibited incisional drainage. Tenotomy of the semitendinosus muscle in horses with fibrotic myopathy leads to similar improvement in gait, whether performed under standing sedation or general anesthesia. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Weak interactions are studied from a phenomenological point of view, by using a minimal number of theoretical hypotheses. Charged-current phenomenology, and then neutral-current phenomenology are discussed. This all is described in terms of a global SU(2) symmetry plus an electromagnetic correction. The intermediate-boson hypothesis is introduced and lower bounds on the range of the weak force are inferred. This phenomenology does not yet reconstruct all the predictions of the conventional SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory. To do that requires an additional assumption of restoration of SU(2) symmetry at asymptotic energies

  16. Isometric muscle training of the spine musculature in patients with spinal bony metastases under radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rief, Harald; Jensen, Alexandra D; Bruckner, Thomas; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Osseous metastatic involvement of the spinal column affects many patients with a primary tumour disease of all entities. The consequences are pain both at rest and under exertion, impairments in going about day-to-day activities, diminished performance, the risk of pathological fractures, and neurological deficits. Palliative percutaneous radiotherapy is one of the therapeutical options available in this connection. The aim of this explorative study is to investigate the feasibility of muscle-training exercises and to evaluate the progression- and fracture-free survival time and the improvement of bone density, as well as to assess other clinical parameters such as pain, quality of life, and fatigue as secondary endpoints. This study is a prospective, randomized, monocentre, controlled explorative intervention study in the parallel-group design to determine the multidimensional effects of a course of exercises at first under physiotherapeutic instruction and subsequently performed by the patients independently for strengthening the paravertebral muscles of patients with metastases of the vertebral column parallel to their percutaneous radiotherapy. On the days of radiation treatment the patients in the control group shall be given physical treatment in the form of respiratory therapy and the so-called 'hot roll'. The patients will be randomized into one of the two groups: differentiated muscle training or physiotherapy with thirty patients in each group. The aim of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of the training programme described here. Progression-free and fracture-free survival, improved response to radiotherapy by means of bone density, and clinical parameters such as pain, quality of life, and fatigue constitute secondary study objectives. ClinicalTrials.gov: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01409720

  17. First and second law work production efficiency of a muscle cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sorguven Oner, Esra; Ozilgen, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The absolute value of the muscle efficiency and its decrease over time has vital consequences. Among other diseases, heart failure, which is the leading cause of death in developed countries, is dramatically affected by\\ud muscle weakness. This paper provides an analogy between the Carnot engine and muscle to gain insight on the muscle work production process and estimate the maximum muscle efficiency under physiological conditions. An ‘ideal\\ud muscle’ model, which operates steadily and reve...

  18. A theoretical model for oxygen transport in skeletal muscle under conditions of high oxygen demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, B J; Secomb, T W

    2001-11-01

    Oxygen transport from capillaries to exercising skeletal muscle is studied by use of a Krogh-type cylinder model. The goal is to predict oxygen consumption under conditions of high demand, on the basis of a consideration of transport processes occurring at the microvascular level. Effects of the decline in oxygen content of blood flowing along capillaries, intravascular resistance to oxygen diffusion, and myoglobin-facilitated diffusion are included. Parameter values are based on human skeletal muscle. The dependence of oxygen consumption on oxygen demand, perfusion, and capillary density are examined. When demand is moderate, the tissue is well oxygenated and consumption is slightly less than demand. When demand is high, capillary oxygen content declines rapidly with axial distance and radial oxygen transport is limited by diffusion resistance within the capillary and the tissue. Under these conditions, much of the tissue is hypoxic, consumption is substantially less than demand, and consumption is strongly dependent on capillary density. Predicted consumption rates are comparable with experimentally observed maximal rates of oxygen consumption.

  19. Muscle activation during push-ups performed under stable and unstable conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreani, Sebastien; Calatayud, Joaquin; Colado, Juan Carlos; Moya-Nájera, Diego; Triplett, N Travis; Martin, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze muscle activation when performing push-ups under different stability conditions. Physically fit young male university students ( N  = 30) performed five push-ups under stable conditions (on the floor) and using four unstable devices (wobble board, stability disc, fitness dome, and the TRX Suspension Trainer). The push-up speed was controlled using a metronome, and the testing order was randomized. The average amplitudes of the electromyographic (EMG) root mean square of the anterior deltoid (DELT), serratus anterior (SERRA), lumbar multifidus (LUMB), and rectus femoris (FEM) were recorded. The electromyographic signals were normalized to the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). No significant differences were found for the DELT [ F (4,112) = 1.978; p  = 0.130] among the conditions. However, statistically significant differences were found among the different conditions for the SERRA [ F (4,60) = 17.649; p  ups performed on the floor showed lower SERRA activation than those performed with all unstable devices. Not all unstable devices enhance muscle activation compared to traditional push-ups.

  20. Adjusting output impedance using a PI controller to improve the stability of a single-phase inverter under weak grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Jiao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Explored in this paper is the grid impedance effect on the stability of a single-phase grid connected inverter with an LC filter based on an analysis of the inverter output impedance. For a single-phase grid connected inverter, a PI controller is often used to regulate the current injected into the grid. However, the control performance can be influenced when the inverter is connected to a weak grid. Also, the utility grid has background harmonic noise, which can make the injected current distorted. Therefore, analysis of the output impedance of a single-phase grid connected inverter is important for the robustness and stability of the system. By modeling the output impedance of inverter, it can be determined that the proportional gain and integral gain of the controller have an effect on the output impedance. Analytical results show that by adjusting the PI controller parameters, the ability for harmonic reduction and stability of the system can be improved. Simulation and experiments using a 1 kW single-phase grid connected inverter verify the effectiveness of the theoretical analysis.

  1. [Clinical Benefits of Transurethral Resection Under Narrow Band Imaging for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Koji; Kobatake, Kohei; Ohara, Shinya; Kato, Masao

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the clinical benefits of transurethral resection (TUR) under narrow band imaging (NBI-TUR) for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) compared with conventional white light imaging TUR (WLI-TUR). The subjects were 172 patients with NMIBC who were followed for more than 1 year after undergoing TUR with no additional postoperative treatment. In the WLI-TUR group (n=101), lesions that were detected as positive after systematic intravesical observation under WLI were resected completely under WLI. In the NBI-TUR group (n=71), similar observations under WLI were followed by systematic intravesical observation under NBI. After multiple site biopsy under NBI, TUR was performed for all lesions that were detected as positive under NBI. The sensitivity was calculated based on the results of cystoscopy and pathology of multiple site biopsy samples under WLI and NBI in the NBITUR group. The tumor recurrence rate was analyzed in both groups. Background factors did not differ significantly between the two groups, except for the observation period (63.3 months in the WLI-TUR group vs 42.0 months in the NBI-TUR group, p<0.01). The procedure under NBI had significantly higher sensitivity (94.6% vs 75.0%, p<0.01) compared with that under WLI. The recurrence-free rate in the NBITUR group was significantly higher than that in the WLI-TUR group (p=0.013). The tumor recurrencefree rate of NBI-TUR is higher than that of conventional WLI-TUR for patients with NMIBC.

  2. Acute muscular weakness in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pablo Javier Erazo Torricelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acute muscle weakness in children is a pediatric emergency. During the diagnostic approach, it is crucial to obtain a detailed case history, including: onset of weakness, history of associated febrile states, ingestion of toxic substances/toxins, immunizations, and family history. Neurological examination must be meticulous as well. In this review, we describe the most common diseases related to acute muscle weakness, grouped into the site of origin (from the upper motor neuron to the motor unit. Early detection of hyperCKemia may lead to a myositis diagnosis, and hypokalemia points to the diagnosis of periodic paralysis. Ophthalmoparesis, ptosis and bulbar signs are suggestive of myasthenia gravis or botulism. Distal weakness and hyporeflexia are clinical features of Guillain-Barré syndrome, the most frequent cause of acute muscle weakness. If all studies are normal, a psychogenic cause should be considered. Finding the etiology of acute muscle weakness is essential to execute treatment in a timely manner, improving the prognosis of affected children.

  3. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions.

  4. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidur Rahaman

    Full Text Available While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s, the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD, ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N, denatured (D and intermediate state (X of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4 at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400 and CD ([θ]409, is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1 that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2 that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3 that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1, classical (X2 and disordered (X3, i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N.

  5. Hydrogen Production from a Methanol-Water Solution Catalyzed by an Anionic Iridium Complex Bearing a Functional Bipyridonate Ligand under Weakly Basic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kawahara, Ryoko; Aikawa, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Ryohei

    2015-07-27

    An efficient catalytic system for the production of hydrogen from a methanol-water solution has been developed using a new anionic iridium complex bearing a functional bipyridonate ligand as a catalyst. This system can be operated under mild conditions [weakly basic solution (0.046 mol L(-1) NaOH) below 100 °C] without the use of an additional organic solvent. Long-term continuous hydrogen production from a methanol-water solution catalyzed by the anionic iridium complex was also achieved. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Myoglobin extraction from mammalian skeletal muscle and oxygen affinity determination under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Traver J; Davis, Randall W

    2015-03-01

    An accurate determination of myoglobin (Mb) oxygen affinity (P50) can be difficult due to hemoglobin (Hb) contamination and autoxidation of Mb to metMb which is incapable of binding oxygen. To reduce Mb autoxidation, P50 is often measured at refrigerated temperatures. However, the temperature dependent shift in Mb oxygen affinity results in a greater oxygen affinity (lower P50) at colder temperatures than occurs at physiological temperature (ca. 37-39°C) for birds and mammals. Utilizing the temperature dependent pH shift of Tris buffer, we developed novel methods to extract Mb from vertebrate muscle samples and remove Hb contamination while minimizing globin autoxidation. Cow (Bos taurus) muscle tissue (n=5) was homogenized in buffer to form a Mb solution, and Hb contamination was removed using anion exchange chromatography. A TCS Hemox Blood Analyzer was then used to quickly generate an oxygen dissociation curve for the extracted Mb. The oxygen affinity of extracted bovine Mb was compared to commercially available horse heart Mb. The oxygen affinity of extracted cow Mb (P50=3.72±0.16 mmHg) was not statistically different from commercially prepared horse heart Mb (P50=3.71±0.10 mmHg). With high yield Mb extraction and fast generation of an oxygen dissociation curve, it was possible to consistently determine Mb P50 under physiologically relevant conditions for endothermic vertebrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Weak interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclei provide systems where the strong, electomagnetic, and weak interactions are all present. The current picture of the strong interactions is based on quarks and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The symmetry structure of this theory is SU(3)/sub C/ x SU(2)/sub W/ x U(1)/sub W/. The electroweak interactions in nuclei can be used to probe this structure. Semileptonic weak interactions are considered. The processes under consideration include beta decay, neutrino scattering and weak neutral-current interactions. The starting point in the analysis is the effective Lagrangian of the Standard Model

  8. Radio-oxidation of an EPDM elastomer under weak or strong ionising radiations: measurement and modelling of dioxygen consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dely, N.

    2005-10-01

    Usually, the irradiation of polymers under ionising radiations occurs in air that is in the presence of oxygen. This leads to a radio oxidation process and to oxygen consumption. Our material is an EPDM elastomer (ethylene propylene 1,4 hexadiene) used as insulator in control-command cables in nuclear plants (Pressurised Water Reactor). A specific device has been conceived and built up during this PhD work for measuring very small oxygen consumptions with an accuracy of around 10%. Ionising radiations used are electrons at 1 MeV and carbon ions at 11 MeV per nucleon. Under both electron and ion irradiations, the influence of oxygen pressure on oxygen consumption has been studied in a very large range: between 1 and 200 mbar. In both cases, the yield of oxygen consumption is constant in-between 200 and 5 mbar. Then, at lower pressures, it decreases appreciably. On the other hand, the oxygen consumption during ion irradiation is four times smaller than during electron irradiation. This emphasizes the role of the heterogeneity of the energy deposition at a nano-metric scale. The adjustment of the experimental results obtained during electron irradiation with the general homogeneous steady-state kinetic model has allowed extracting all the values of the kinetic parameters for the chosen mechanism of radio oxidation. The knowledge of these numbers will allow us to face our results obtained during ion irradiation with a heterogeneous kinetic model under development. (author)

  9. On the Behaviour of Porcine Adipose and Skeletal Muscle Tissues under Shock Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    regarding the dynamic tensile behaviour of skeletal muscle, Morrow et al. [6] per- formed low-rate (0.05 % s−1) tensile tests upon extensor digitorum ... longus muscles from New Zealand White rabbits. This study into the ‘passive’ properties of skeletal muscle provided data for the ultimate tensile strength

  10. Intense Geomagnetic Storms Associated with Coronal Holes Under the Weak Solar-Wind Conditions of Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, S.

    2018-02-01

    The activity of Solar Cycle 24 has been extraordinarily low. The yearly averaged solar-wind speed is also lower in Cycle 24 than in Cycles 22 and 23. The yearly averaged speed in the rising phase of Cycle 21 is as low as that of Cycle 24, although the solar activity of Cycle 21 is higher than that of Cycle 24. The relationship between the solar-wind temperature and its speed is preserved under the solar-wind conditions of Cycle 24. Previous studies have shown that only a few percent of intense geomagnetic storms (minimum Dst < -100 nT) were caused by high-speed solar-wind flows from coronal holes. We identify two geomagnetic storms associated with coronal holes within the 19 intense geomagnetic storms that took place in Cycle 24.

  11. The stability of the circadian rhythm of green finches (Carduelis chloris) under the influence of a weak electrical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintzen, T; Boese, G; Müller, M; Eichmeier, J; Ruhenstroth-Bauer, G

    1989-01-01

    Free-running activity rhythms of nine green finches (Carduelis chloris) were studied under the influence of a 10-Hz square-wave electrical field. With a field strength of magnitude of E = 2.5 V/m in the empty cage, the population had a mean period of 23.64 +/- 0.77 hr. In the same experiment, but without the electrical field, the period was 23.66 +/- 0.80 hr. These results are in contradiction to Wever's description of a field-induced shortening of the period. A series of experiments with 10-Hz pulses of the same square-wave form, yet with various field strengths (8.7 and 65.2 V/m), also gave no effects.

  12. Lecithin Prevents Cortical Cytoskeleton Reorganization in Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers under Short-Term Gravitational Disuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V Ogneva

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to prevent the cortical cytoskeleton reorganization of rat soleus muscle fibers under short-term gravitational disuse. Once a day, we injected the right soleus muscle with 0.5 ml lecithin at a concentration of 200 mg/ml and the left soleus muscle with a diluted solution in an equal volume for 3 days prior to the experiment. To simulate microgravity conditions in rats, an anti-orthostatic suspension was used according to the Ilyin-Novikov method modified by Morey-Holton et al. for 6 hours. The following groups of soleus muscle tissues were examined: "C", "C+L", "HS", and "HS+L". The transversal stiffness of rat soleus muscle fibers after 6 hours of suspension did not differ from that of the control group for the corresponding legs; there were no differences between the groups without lecithin «C» and «HS» or between the groups with lecithin "C+L" and "HS+L". However, lecithin treatment for three days resulted in an increase in cell stiffness; in the "C+L" group, cell stiffness was significantly higher by 22.7% (p < 0.05 compared with that of group "C". The mRNA content of genes encoding beta- and gamma-actin and beta-tubulin did not significantly differ before and after suspension in the corresponding groups. However, there was a significant increase in the mRNA content of these genes after lecithin treatment: the beta-actin and gamma-actin mRNA content in group "C+L" increased by 200% compared with that of group "C", and beta-tubulin increased by 100% (as well as the mRNA content of tubulin-binding proteins Ckap5, Tcp1, Cct5 and Cct7. In addition, desmin mRNA content remained unchanged in all of the experimental groups. As a result of the lecithin injections, there was a redistribution of the mRNA content of genes encoding actin monomer- and filament-binding proteins in the direction of increasing actin polymerization and filament stability; the mRNA content of Arpc3 and Lcp1 increased by 3- and 5-fold, respectively

  13. High force development augments skeletal muscle signalling in resistance exercise modes equalized for time under tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Suhr, Frank; Gutsche, Katrin; Willkomm, Lena; Kern, Julia; Jacko, Daniel; Knicker, Axel; Schiffer, Thorsten; Wackerhage, Henning; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2015-06-01

    How force development and time under tension (TUT) during resistance exercise (RE) influence anabolic signalling of skeletal muscle is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that high force development during RE is more important for post-exercise-induced signalling than submaximal and fatiguing RE with lower force development but similar TUT. Twenty-two male subjects (24 ± 6 years, 181 ± 9 cm, 79 ± 2 kg) performed three distinct RE modes in the fed state with equal TUT but distinct force output: (i) maximal eccentric RE (ECC, n = 7) three sets, eight reps, 100% eccentric dynamic force; (ii) standard RE (STD, n = 7), three sets, 10 reps, 75% dynamic force; and (iii) high fatiguing single-set RE (HIT, n = 8), 20 reps, 100% eccentric-concentric force; vastus lateralis biopsies were collected at baseline, 15, 30, 60, 240 min and 24 h after RE, and the signalling of mechanosensitive and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-related proteins was determined. The phosphorylation levels of pFAK(Tyr397), pJNK(Thr183/Tyr185), pAKT(Thr308/Ser473), pmTOR(Ser2448), p4E-BP1(Thr37/46), p70s6k(Thr389)/(Ser421/Thr424) and pS6(Ser235/236) were significantly higher in ECC than those in STD and HIT at several time points (P force development during acute RE is superior for anabolic skeletal muscle signalling than fatiguing RE with lower force output but similar TUT. Our results suggest that this response is substantially driven by the higher activation of type II myofibres during RE.

  14. Different hip rotations influence hip abductor muscles activity during isometric side-lying hip abduction in subjects with gluteus medius weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Yoon, Tae-Lim; Choi, Woo-Jeong; Choi, Sil-Ah

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the effects of different hip rotations during isometric side-lying hip abduction (SHA) in subjects with gluteus medius (Gmed) weakness by investigating the electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the Gmed, tensor fasciae latae (TFL) activity, and gluteus maximus (Gmax), and the activity ratio of the Gmed/TFL, Gmax/TFL, and Gmed/Gmax. Nineteen subjects with Gmed weakness were recruited for this study. Subjects performed three isometric hip abductions: frontal SHA with neutral hips (SHA-N), frontal SHA with hip medial rotation (SHA-MR), and frontal SHA with hip lateral rotation (SHA-LR). Surface EMG amplitude was measured to collect the EMG data from the Gmed, TFL, and Gmax. A one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine the statistical significance of the Gmed, TFL, and Gmax EMG activity and the Gmed/TFL, Gmax/TFL, and Gmed/Gmax EMG activity ratios. Gmed EMG activity was significantly greater in SHA-MR than in SHA-N. TFL EMG activity was significantly greater in SHA-LR than in SHA-N. The Gmed/TFL and Gmed/Gmax EMG activity ratios were also significantly greater in SHA-MR than in SHA-N or SHA-LR. The results of this study suggest that SHA-MR can be used as an effective method to increase Gmed activation and to decrease TFL activity during SHA exercises. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Changes in some components of the muscle lipids of three freshwater fish species under natural extreme cold and temperate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, K; Bülbül, M; Dönmez, M; Seçkin, A K

    2008-12-01

    Fatty acid composition, conjugated linoleic acid and cholesterol contents in the muscles of three freshwater fish species (Barbus plebejus escherichi, Capoeta capoeta capoeta and Rutilus rutilus) were determined under natural extreme temperate (July) and cold (January) conditions. The aim of the study was to determine whether there were differences in these components of the muscle lipids among these three fish species under extreme natural conditions. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography. Palmitic, oleic, docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids were the predominant fatty acids in all fish in both months. The percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids, n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, n - 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and eicosapentaenoic + docosahexaenoic acids in the muscle of B. plebejus escherichi and C. capoeta capoeta were significantly higher in January (P plebejus escherichi and C. capoeta capoeta. Of the three species tested, the extreme temperate and cold conditions affected B. plebejus escherichi the most.

  16. Immunosenescence of the CD8(+) T cell compartment is associated with HIV-infection, but only weakly reflects age-related processes of adipose tissue, metabolism, and muscle in antiretroviral therapy-treated HIV-infected patients and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavenier, Juliette; Langkilde, Anne; Haupt, Thomas Huneck

    2015-01-01

    ; senescence: killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1); and exhaustion: programmed death-1 (PD-1). Relationships between CD8 (+) T cell immunosenescence, exhaustion, and age-related processes were assessed using linear regressions. RESULTS: HIV-infection was strongly associated with more highly...... differentiated and mature CD8 (+) T cell phenotypes. PD-1 and KLRG1 expression did not differ between HIV(+) and Controls, but depended on differentiation and maturation stages of the cells. CD8 (+) T cell maturation was associated with age. KLRG1 expression was associated with age, metabolic syndrome, visceral...... adipose tissue, and high muscle mass. PD-1 expression was not associated with age-related parameters. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infection strongly affected CD8 (+) T cell differentiation and maturation, whereas age-related processes were only weakly associated with immune parameters. Our findings suggest that...

  17. Head-Up; An interdisciplinary, participatory and co-design process informing the development of a novel head and neck support for people living with progressive neck muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Heath; Langley, Joe; Stanton, Andy; Heron, Nicola; Clarke, Zoe; Judge, Simon; McCarthy, Avril; Squire, Gill; Quinn, Ann; Wells, Oliver; Tindale, Wendy; Baxter, Susan; Shaw, Pamela J; McDermott, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the Head-Up project, that aims to provide innovative head support to help improve posture, relieve pain and aid communication for people living with progressive neck muscle weakness. The initial focus is motor neurone disease. The case study illustrates collaborative, interdisciplinary research and new product development underpinned by participatory design. The study was initiated by a 2-day stakeholder workshop followed by early proof-of-concept modelling and patient need evidence building. The work subsequently led to a successful NIHR i4i application funding a 24-month iterative design process, patenting, CE marking and clinical evaluation. The evaluation has informed amendments to the proposed design refered to here as the Sheffield Support Snood (SSS). The outcome positively demonstrates use and performance improvements over current neck orthoses and the process of multidisciplinary and user engagement has created a sense of ownership by MND participants, who have since acted as advocates for the product.

  18. Time-lapse analysis and mathematical characterization elucidate novel mechanisms underlying muscle morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsi J Snow

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle morphogenesis transforms short muscle precursor cells into long, multinucleate myotubes that anchor to tendons via the myotendinous junction (MTJ. In vertebrates, a great deal is known about muscle specification as well as how somitic cells, as a cohort, generate the early myotome. However, the cellular mechanisms that generate long muscle fibers from short cells and the molecular factors that limit elongation are unknown. We show that zebrafish fast muscle fiber morphogenesis consists of three discrete phases: short precursor cells, intercalation/elongation, and boundary capture/myotube formation. In the first phase, cells exhibit randomly directed protrusive activity. The second phase, intercalation/elongation, proceeds via a two-step process: protrusion extension and filling. This repetition of protrusion extension and filling continues until both the anterior and posterior ends of the muscle fiber reach the MTJ. Finally, both ends of the muscle fiber anchor to the MTJ (boundary capture and undergo further morphogenetic changes as they adopt the stereotypical, cylindrical shape of myotubes. We find that the basement membrane protein laminin is required for efficient elongation, proper fiber orientation, and boundary capture. These early muscle defects in the absence of either lamininbeta1 or laminingamma1 contrast with later dystrophic phenotypes in lamininalpha2 mutant embryos, indicating discrete roles for different laminin chains during early muscle development. Surprisingly, genetic mosaic analysis suggests that boundary capture is a cell-autonomous phenomenon. Taken together, our results define three phases of muscle fiber morphogenesis and show that the critical second phase of elongation proceeds by a repetitive process of protrusion extension and protrusion filling. Furthermore, we show that laminin is a novel and critical molecular cue mediating fiber orientation and limiting muscle cell length.

  19. Rapid release of active tissue factor from human arterial smooth muscle cells under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfuss, Jan-Julius; Censarek, Petra; Fischer, Jens W; Schrör, Karsten; Weber, Artur-Aron

    2006-05-01

    Circulating tissue factor (TF) is an important determinant of coronary thrombosis. Among other cell types, such as monocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are capable of releasing TF. When studied under static conditions, SMCs do release TF, but this process is slow and, thus, cannot explain the elevated levels of circulating TF, as observed in patients with acute coronary syndromes. The present study demonstrates that cultured human mammary artery SMCs very rapidly (minutes) release active, microparticle-bound TF when exposed to flow conditions. There was a clear log-linear correlation between the shear rate (range 10 s(-1) to 1500 s(-1)) and the procoagulant activity of SMC perfusates. Flow-dependent release of TF was transient (10 minutes) and did not measurably reduce cell surface TF content. Interestingly, a time-dependent (t(1/2) 30 minutes) re-exposure of releasable TF was detected after a no-flow period. These data demonstrate that SMCs may become a pathophysiologically relevant source of TF that can be rapidly released into the circulation in situations in which endothelial damage occurs and SMCs come into a close contact with the flowing blood.

  20. Persisting weakness after withdrawal of a statin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mygland, Åse; Ljøstad, Unn; Krossnes, Bård Kronen

    2014-04-08

    An 81-year-old woman treated with simvastatin for several years followed by atorvastatin for about 1 year presented with fatigue, weakness and unsteady gait. The finding of elevated creatine kinase (CK) and symmetric muscle weakness around shoulders and hips led to suspicion of a toxic statin-associated myopathy. Atorvastatin was withdrawn, but her weakness persisted. Owing to persisting weakness, an autoimmune myopathy (myositis) was suspected, but initially disregarded since a muscle biopsy showed necrotic muscle fibres without inflammatory cell infiltrates and myositis-specific autoantibodies were absent. After 18 months with slowly progressive weakness and increasing CK values, awareness of new knowledge about autoimmunity as a cause of necrotic myopathy, led to a successful treatment trial with intravenous immunoglobulines, followed by steroids and metothrexate. Antibodies to the target enzyme of statins (HMGCR (3-hydroksy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase)) were detected in her serum, and she was diagnosed with autoimmune necrotic myositis probably triggered by atorvastatin.

  1. Mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by fatty acids: importance of the mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Amanda R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Insulin resistance condition is associated to the development of several syndromes, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. Although the factors linking insulin resistance to these syndromes are not precisely defined yet, evidence suggests that the elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA level plays an important role in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Accordantly, in vivo and in vitro exposure of skeletal muscle and myocytes to physiological concentrations of saturated fatty acids is associated with insulin resistance condition. Several mechanisms have been postulated to account for fatty acids-induced muscle insulin resistance, including Randle cycle, oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we reviewed experimental evidence supporting the involvement of each of these propositions in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids and propose an integrative model placing mitochondrial dysfunction as an important and common factor to the other mechanisms.

  2. Mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by fatty acids: importance of the mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Amanda R; Nachbar, Renato T; Gorjao, Renata; Vinolo, Marco A; Festuccia, William T; Lambertucci, Rafael H; Cury-Boaventura, Maria F; Silveira, Leonardo R; Curi, Rui; Hirabara, Sandro M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Insulin resistance condition is associated to the development of several syndromes, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. Although the factors linking insulin resistance to these syndromes are not precisely defined yet, evidence suggests that the elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) level plays an important role in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Accordantly, in vivo and in vitro exposure of skeletal muscle and myocytes to physiolog...

  3. A consistent muscle activation strategy underlies crawling and swimming in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Victoria J.; Branicky, Robyn; Yemini, Eviatar; Liewald, Jana F.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Kerr, Rex A.; Chklovskii, Dmitri B.; Schafer, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Although undulatory swimming is observed in many organisms, the neuromuscular basis for undulatory movement patterns is not well understood. To better understand the basis for the generation of these movement patterns, we studied muscle activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a range of locomotion patterns: in low viscosity fluids the undulation has a wavelength longer than the body and propagates rapidly, while in high viscosity fluids or on agar media the undulatory waves are shorter and slower. Theoretical treatment of observed behaviour has suggested a large change in force–posture relationships at different viscosities, but analysis of bend propagation suggests that short-range proprioceptive feedback is used to control and generate body bends. How muscles could be activated in a way consistent with both these results is unclear. We therefore combined automated worm tracking with calcium imaging to determine muscle activation strategy in a variety of external substrates. Remarkably, we observed that across locomotion patterns spanning a threefold change in wavelength, peak muscle activation occurs approximately 45° (1/8th of a cycle) ahead of peak midline curvature. Although the location of peak force is predicted to vary widely, the activation pattern is consistent with required force in a model incorporating putative length- and velocity-dependence of muscle strength. Furthermore, a linear combination of local curvature and velocity can match the pattern of activation. This suggests that proprioception can enable the worm to swim effectively while working within the limitations of muscle biomechanics and neural control. PMID:25551155

  4. Effects of tannic acid on performance and fatty acid composition of breast muscle in broiler chickens under heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohollah Ebrahim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One hundred twenty day-old broiler chicks (Cobb 500 were randomly assigned into 4 treatment groups to investigate the effects of tannic acid supplementation (TA on fatty acid composition in breast muscle of broilers under chronic heat exposure conditions. Five pen replicates of 6 chicks each were assigned to each of the following 4 dietary treatments: i basal diet containing no TA at 25°C (CL; ii basal diet containing no TA at 35°C (CH; iii basal diet supplemented with 1% TA at 25°C (TL; and iv basal diet supplemented with 1% TA at 35°C (TH. At the end of the 5-week experiment, breast muscle samples were collected to examine the fatty acid composition. Results showed that temperature, TA and their interaction effect significantly decreased body weight gain and feed intake. In addition, feed conversion ratio (FCR significantly increased under high temperature, and addition of TA under high temperature did not improve the FCR. The effects of temperature, TA and their interaction on the saturated and unsaturated fatty acids were not significant (P>0.05. However, monounsaturated fatty acids significantly reduced by adding TA to the diet. Generally, TA improved the fatty acid profile of breast muscle of broilers under heat stress in comparison to the heat stressed chickens, which did not receive TA. Hence, it seems that dietary TA supplementation can be applied as a biological antioxidant for poultry nutrition in hot climatic conditions.

  5. Oil/water displacement in microfluidic packed beds under weakly water-wetting conditions: competition between precursor film flow and piston-like displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Yukie; Zacarias-Hernandez, Xanat; Christensen, Magali

    2018-02-01

    Optical microscopy was used to measure depth-averaged oil distribution in a quasi-monolayer of crushed marble packed in a microfluidic channel as it was displaced by water. By calibrating the transmitted light intensity to oil thickness, we account for depth variation in the fluid distribution. Experiments reveal that oil saturation at water breakthrough decreases with increasing Darcy velocity, U_{ {w}}, between capillary numbers {Ca} = μ _{ {w}} U_{ {w}}/σ = 9× 10^{-7} and 9× 10^{-6}, where μ _{ {w}} is the dynamic viscosity of water and σ is the oil/water interfacial tension, under the conditions considered presently. In contrast, end-point (long-time) remaining oil saturation depends only weakly on U_{ {w}}. This transient dependence on velocity is attributed to the competition between precursor film flow, which controls early time invasion dynamics but is inefficient at displacing oil, and piston-like displacement, which controls ultimate oil recovery. These results demonstrate that microfluidic experiments using translucent grains and fluids are a convenient tool for quantitative investigation of sub-resolution liquid/liquid displacement in porous media.

  6. Lactate kinetics and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of healthy humans under influence of adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grip, Jonathan; Jakobsson, Towe; Hebert, Christina; Klaude, Maria; Sandström, Gustaf; Wernerman, Jan; Rooyackers, Olav

    2015-08-01

    Plasma lactate is widely used as a biomarker in critical illness. The aims of the present study were to elucidate the usefulness of a three-compartment model for muscle lactate kinetics in humans and to characterize the response to an exogenous adrenaline challenge. Repeated blood samples from artery and femoral vein together with blood flow measurements and muscle biopsies were obtained from healthy male volunteers (n=8) at baseline and during an adrenaline infusion. Concentrations of lactate and enrichment of [13C]lactate were measured and kinetics calculated. Mitochondrial activity, glycogen concentration, oxygen uptake and CO2 release were assessed. The adrenaline challenge increased plasma lactate 4-fold as a result of a greater increase in the rate of appearance (R(a)) than the increase in the rate of disappearance (R(d)). Leg muscle net release of lactate increased 3.5-fold, whereas intramuscular production had a high variation but did not change. Mitochondrial state 3 respiration increased by 30%. Glycogen concentration, oxygen uptake and CO2 production remained unchanged. In conclusion a three-compartment model gives additional information to the two-compartment model but, due to its larger variation and invasive muscle biopsy, it is less likely to become a regularly used tool in clinical research. Hyperlactataemia in response to adrenergic stimuli was driven by an elevated lactate release from skeletal muscle most probably due to a redirection of a high intramuscular turnover rather than an increased production.

  7. Effects of muscle fatigue on gait characteristics under single and dual-task conditions in young and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wehrle Anja

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle fatigue and dual-task walking (e.g., concurrent performance of a cognitive interference (CI while walking represent major fall risk factors in young and older adults. Thus, the objectives of this study were to examine the effects of muscle fatigue on gait characteristics under single and dual-task conditions in young and older adults and to determine the impact of muscle fatigue on dual-task costs while walking. Methods Thirty-two young (24.3 ± 1.4 yrs, n = 16 and old (71.9 ± 5.5 yrs, n = 16 healthy active adults participated in this study. Fatigue of the knee extensors/flexors was induced by isokinetic contractions. Subjects were tested pre and post fatigue, as well as after a 5 min rest. Tests included the assessment of gait velocity, stride length, and stride length variability during single (walking, and dual (CI+walking task walking on an instrumented walkway. Dual-task costs while walking were additionally computed. Results Fatigue resulted in significant decreases in single-task gait velocity and stride length in young adults, and in significant increases in dual-task gait velocity and stride length in older adults. Further, muscle fatigue did not affect dual-task costs during walking in young and older adults. Performance in the CI-task was improved in both age groups post-fatigue. Conclusions Strategic and/or physiologic rationale may account for the observed differences in young and older adults. In terms of strategic rationale, older adults may walk faster with longer strides in order to overcome the feeling of fatigue-induced physical discomfort as quickly as possible. Alternatively, older adults may have learned how to compensate for age-related and/or fatigue-induced muscle deficits during walking by increasing muscle power of synergistic muscle groups (e.g., hip flexors. Further, a practice and/or learning effect may have occurred from pre to post testing. Physiologic rationale may comprise motor unit

  8. Evidence of weak land-atmosphere coupling under varying bare soil conditions: Are fully coupled Darcy/Navier-Stokes models necessary for simulating soil moisture dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Trautz, A. C.; Howington, S. E.; Cihan, A.

    2017-12-01

    It is a well-established fact that the land and atmosphere form a continuum in which the individual domains are coupled by heat and mass transfer processes such as bare-soil evaporation. Soil moisture dynamics can be simulated at the representative elementary volume (REV) scale using decoupled and fully coupled Darcy/Navier-Stokes models. Decoupled modeling is an asynchronous approach in which flow and transport in the soil and atmosphere is simulated independently; the two domains are coupled out of time-step via prescribed flux parameterizations. Fully coupled modeling in contrast, solves the governing equations for flow and transport in both domains simultaneously with the use of coupling interface boundary conditions. This latter approach, while being able to provide real-time two-dimensional feedbacks, is considerably more complex and computationally intensive. In this study, we investigate whether fully coupled models are necessary, or if the simpler decoupled models can sufficiently capture soil moisture dynamics under varying land preparations. A series of intermediate-scale physical and numerical experiments were conducted in which soil moisture distributions and evaporation estimates were monitored at high spatiotemporal resolutions for different heterogeneous packing and soil roughness scenarios. All experimentation was conducted at the newly developed Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) wind tunnel-porous media user test-facility at the Colorado School of. Near-surface atmospheric measurements made during the experiments demonstrate that the land-atmosphere coupling was relatively weak and insensitive to the applied edaphic and surface conditions. Simulations with a decoupled multiphase heat and mass transfer model similarly show little sensitivity to local variations in atmospheric forcing; a single, simple flux parameterization can sufficiently capture the soil moisture dynamics (evaporation and redistribution

  9. Evoked EMG-based torque prediction under muscle fatigue in implanted neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Zhang, Qin; Guiraud, David; Fattal, Charles

    2011-10-01

    In patients with complete spinal cord injury, fatigue occurs rapidly and there is no proprioceptive feedback regarding the current muscle condition. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the muscle state and assess the expected muscle response to improve the current FES system toward adaptive force/torque control in the presence of muscle fatigue. Our team implanted neural and epimysial electrodes in a complete paraplegic patient in 1999. We carried out a case study, in the specific case of implanted stimulation, in order to verify the corresponding torque prediction based on stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) when muscle fatigue is occurring during electrical stimulation. Indeed, in implanted stimulation, the relationship between stimulation parameters and output torques is more stable than external stimulation in which the electrode location strongly affects the quality of the recruitment. Thus, the assumption that changes in the stimulation-torque relationship would be mainly due to muscle fatigue can be made reasonably. The eEMG was proved to be correlated to the generated torque during the continuous stimulation while the frequency of eEMG also decreased during fatigue. The median frequency showed a similar variation trend to the mean absolute value of eEMG. Torque prediction during fatigue-inducing tests was performed based on eEMG in model cross-validation where the model was identified using recruitment test data. The torque prediction, apart from the potentiation period, showed acceptable tracking performances that would enable us to perform adaptive closed-loop control through implanted neural stimulation in the future.

  10. The purinergic component of human bladder smooth muscle cells’ proliferation and contraction under physiological stretch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie, E-mail: kunjiewangatscu@163.com

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation and contraction. •Optimum applied stretch in vitro is 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively. •Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 is upregulated after application of stretch. •P2X2 is possibly more susceptible to stretch related changes. •Purinoceptors functioning may explain conditions with atropine resistance. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether cyclic stretch induces proliferation and contraction of human smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs), mediated by P2X purinoceptor 1 and 2 and the signal transduction mechanisms of this process. Methods: HBSMCs were seeded on silicone membrane and stretched under varying parameters; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (Frequency: 0.05 Hz, 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz). 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay was employed for proliferative studies. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. After optimal physiological stretch was established; P2X1 and P2X2 were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Specificity of purinoceptors was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (NF023 for P2X1, and A317491for P2X2), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation and contractility were observed at 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively, applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz; At 5% stretch, proliferation increased from 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023%, p < 0.05. Mean contraction at 10% stretching increased from 31.7 ± 2.3%, (control) to 78.28 ±1.45%, p < 0.05. Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 was upregulated after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.232 ± 0.051, p < 0.05 NF023) and (1.302 ± 0.021, p < 0.05 A314791) while contractility was markedly reduced (68.24 ± 2.31, p < 0.05 NF023) and (73.2 ± 2.87, p < 0.05 A314791). These findings shows that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in

  11. Effect of sound stimulion reciprocal interaction of antagonist muscles of lowe extremities in humans under vestibular loadе

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dregval

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Results of the research are evidence of changing muscles reflex activity of human lower extremity under the influence of sound stimulus of various frequency range together with the vestibular burden. The most change of the H-reflex was observed under the sound stimulus of 800 hertz. Not only the proprioceptive but auditory sensory system takes part in the regulation of the brain reflex activity. Existence of different labyrinths actions, according to the situation, on the interneuronic inhibitory ways of the postsynaptic inhibition of the salens muscle’s motoneurons is supposed.

  12. Oxygen Generating Biomaterials Preserve Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis under Hypoxic and Ischemic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    Metabolism 9 (2) 184. Sacks RD, Roy RR (1982) Architecture of the hind limb muscles of cats : functional significance. J Morphol 173: 185–195. Barclay CJ...Cell Mol Physiol 290: L127–135. Ren JM, Gulve EA, Cartee GD, Holloszy JO (1992) Hypoxia causes glycogenolysis without an increase in percent

  13. Muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique for treating long segmental lumbar spinal stenosis: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Yang; De Cheng, Wang; Wei, Wang Zong; Hui, Li

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy of muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel surgical technique with the traditional median approach.In the Orthopedics Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine Hospital, Tongzhou District, Beijing, 68 cases of lumbar spinal canal stenosis underwent surgery using the muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique and a median approach between September 2013 and February 2016. Both approaches adopted lumbar spinal canal decompression, intervertebral disk removal, cage implantation, and pedicle screw fixation. The operation time, bleeding volume, postoperative drainage volume, and preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score and Japanese Orthopedics Association score (JOA) were compared between the 2 groups.All patients were followed up for more than 1 year. No significant difference between the 2 groups was found with respect to age, gender, surgical segments. No diversity was noted in the operation time, intraoperative bleeding volume, preoperative and 1 month after the operation VAS score, preoperative and 1 month after the operation JOA score, and 6 months after the operation JOA score between 2 groups (P > .05). The amount of postoperative wound drainage (260.90 ± 160 mL vs 447.80 ± 183.60 mL, P gap approach group than in the median approach group (P gap approach under a minimally invasive channel group, the average drainage volume was reduced by 187 mL, and the average VAS score 6 months after the operation was reduced by an average of 0.48.The muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique is a feasible method to treat long segmental lumbar spinal canal stenosis. It retains the integrity of the posterior spine complex to the greatest extent, so as to reduce the adjacent spinal segmental degeneration and soft tissue trauma. Satisfactory short-term and long-term clinical results were obtained.

  14. Contractures and muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R Jon

    2016-08-01

    Contractures are one of a handful of signs in muscle disease, besides weakness and its distribution, whose presence can help guide us diagnostically, a welcome star on the horizon. Contractures are associated with several myopathies, some with important cardiac manifestations, and consequently are important to recognise; their presence may also provide us with a potential satisfying 'penny dropping' diagnostic moment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Muscle activity and low back loads under external shear and compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, J P; McGill, S M

    1995-05-01

    This study analyzed anatomic and neural control characteristics of the trunk musculature. Subjects were exposed to external shear and compressive loads with equivalent moments to evaluate activation patterns and loading on the low back. The migration of activity between the thoracic and lumbar erector spinae muscle groups was examined to determine whether the motor control system chooses to minimize joint loading by recognizing differences in moment, compression, and shear support requirements and assigning muscle activation in the most appropriate way. Loads were applied either parallel or perpendicular to the low back to create compressive or shear forces. No previous study has attempted to isolate the response of the trunk musculature with the type of external load. Eleven male subjects isometrically held an external load that was altered to create either a compressive or an anterior shear load on the low back but with equal extensor (reaction) moments (experiment 1). In a second experiment four men repeated the task with an increased range of applied loads (5-25 kg) together with measurements of intra-abdominal pressure. The tasks with a compressive external load resulted in significantly higher levels of activation for all seven electromyographic channels recorded. Intraabdominal pressure, compressive and shear joint forces were all higher in the compression loading method when equal loads and low back moments were compared. It was concluded that the motor control system does not arrange muscle activation levels in a way to minimize lumbar spinal loading at least for the relatively low levels of this study. Biomechanical models that use the objective criterion of minimum joint load may not be representative of the motor control system, at least in the low back.

  16. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fermous, Rachid, E-mail: rfermous@usthb.dz; Djebli, Mourad, E-mail: mdjebli@usthb.dz [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, USTHB, B.P. 32 Bab-Ezzouar, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  17. Measurement of weak radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsson , P

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists engaged in the measurement of weak alpha, beta, and gamma active samples; in health physics, environmental control, nuclear geophysics, tracer work, radiocarbon dating etc. It describes the underlying principles of radiation measurement and the detectors used. It also covers the sources of background, analyzes their effect on the detector and discusses economic ways to reduce the background. The most important types of low-level counting systems and the measurement of some of the more important radioisotopes are described here. In cases where more than one type can be used, the selection of the most suitable system is shown.

  18. Mappings on weakly Lindelöf and weakly regular-Lindel¨of spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Jabor Fawakhreh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the effect of mappings and some decompositions of continuity on weakly Lindelöf spaces and weakly regular-Lindelöf spaces. We show that some mappings preserve these topological properties. We also show that the image of a weakly Lindelöf space (resp. weakly regular-Lindelöf space under an almost continuous mapping is weakly Lindelöf (resp. weakly regular-Lindelöf. Moreover, the image of a weakly regular-Lindelöf space under a precontinuous and contracontinuousmapping is Lindelöf.

  19. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate muscle soreness and improve muscle protein synthesis after eccentric contractions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Mimura, Masako; Inoue, Yoshiko; Sugita, Mayu; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2015-06-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle weakness and muscle soreness, which are typical symptoms of muscle damage. Recovery from muscle damage is related to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids (LEAAs) stimulate muscle protein synthesis via activation of the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LEAAs on muscle protein synthesis and muscle soreness after eccentric contractions (EC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-11 weeks old) were administered an LEAA solution (AminoL40; containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids) at 1 g/kg body weight or distilled water (control) 30 min before and 10 min after EC. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was exposed to 500 EC by electrical stimulation under anesthesia. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR; %/h) in the TA muscle was measured by incorporating L-[ring-(2)H5] phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein. Muscle soreness was evaluated by the paw withdrawal threshold using the Randal-Selitto test with some modifications from 1 to 3 days after EC. The FSR in the EC-control group (0.147 ± 0.016 %/h) was significantly lower than in the sedentary group (0.188 ± 0.016 %/h, p soreness. Furthermore, AminoL40 administration alleviated the decreased paw withdrawal threshold. These findings suggest that LEAA supplementation improves the rate of muscle protein synthesis and ameliorates muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

  20. Mechanisms underlying enhancements in muscle force and power output during maximal cycle ergometer exercise induced by chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Morten; Kalsen, Anders; Onslev, Johan

    2015-01-01

    of muscle proteins involved in growth, ion handling, lactate production and clearance increased (P≤0.05) with the intervention in TER compared to PLA, with no change in oxidative enzymes. Our observations suggest that muscle hypertrophy is the primary mechanism underlying enhancements in muscle force......The study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial investigating mechanisms by which chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation enhances muscle force and power output during maximal cycle ergometer exercise in young men. Eighteen trained men were assigned to an experimental group (oral terbutaline 5 mg∙30...... kgbw(-1) twice daily; TER, n=9) or a control group (placebo; PLA, n=9) for a four-week intervention. No changes were observed with the intervention in PLA. Isometric muscle force of the quadriceps increased (P≤0.01) by 97±29 N (mean±SE) with the intervention in TER compared to PLA. Peak and mean power...

  1. Forensic Image Analyses of Skin and Underlying Muscles as a Tool for Postmortem Interval Delimitation: Histopathologic Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nahass, El-Shaymaa; Moselhy, Walaa A; Hassan, Nour El-Houda Y

    2017-06-01

    One of the biggest challenges for forensic pathologists is to diagnose the postmortem interval (PMI) delimitation; therefore, the aim of this study was to use a routine histopathologic examination and quantitative analysis to obtain an accurate diagnosis of PMI. The current study was done by using 24 adult male albino rats divided into 8 groups based on the scarification schedule (0, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, and 72 hours PMI). Skin specimens were collected and subjected to a routine histopathologic processing. Examination of hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections from the skin, its appendages and underlying muscles were carried out. Morphometric analysis of epidermal nuclear chromatin intensities and area percentages, reticular dermis integrated density, and sebaceous gland nuclei areas and chromatin condensation was done. Progressive histopathologic changes could be detected in epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, underlying muscles including nerve endings, and red blood cells in relation to hours PMI. Significant difference was found in epidermal nuclear chromatin intensities at different-hours PMI (at P PMI. Quantitative analysis of measurements of dermal collagen area percentages revealed a high significant difference between 0 hours PMI and 24 to 72 hours PMI (P PMI increases, sebaceous gland nuclei and nuclear chromatin condensation showed a dramatic decrease. Significant differences of sebaceous gland nuclei areas between 0 hours and different-hours PMI (P PMI.

  2. Hartman effect and weak measurements that are not really weak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovski, D.; Akhmatskaya, E.

    2011-01-01

    We show that in wave packet tunneling, localization of the transmitted particle amounts to a quantum measurement of the delay it experiences in the barrier. With no external degree of freedom involved, the envelope of the wave packet plays the role of the initial pointer state. Under tunneling conditions such ''self-measurement'' is necessarily weak, and the Hartman effect just reflects the general tendency of weak values to diverge, as postselection in the final state becomes improbable. We also demonstrate that it is a good precision, or a 'not really weak' quantum measurement: no matter how wide the barrier d, it is possible to transmit a wave packet with a width σ small compared to the observed advancement. As is the case with all weak measurements, the probability of transmission rapidly decreases with the ratio σ/d.

  3. Magnitude-dependent proliferation and contractility modulation of human bladder smooth muscle cells under physiological stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, De-Yi; Wazir, Romel; Du, Caigan; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Wei, Tang-Qiang; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and test a kind of stretch pattern which is based on modified BOSE BioDynamic system to produce optimum physiological stretch during bladder cycle. Moreover, we aimed to emphasize the effects of physiological stretch's amplitude upon proliferation and contractility of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). HBSMCs were seeded onto silicone membrane and subjected to stretch simulating bladder cycle at the range of stretches and time according to customized software on modified BOSE BioDynamic bioreactor. Morphological changes were assessed using immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscope. Cell proliferation and cell viability were determined by BrdU incorporation assay and Cell Counting Kit-8, respectively. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. RT-PCR was used to assess phenotypic and contractility markers. HBSMCs were found to show morphologically spindle-shaped and orientation at various elongations in the modified bioreactor. Stretch-induced proliferation and viability depended on the magnitude of stretch, and stretches also regulate contractility and contraction markers in a magnitude-dependent manner. We described and tested a kind of stretch pattern which delivers physiological stretch implemented during bladder cycle. The findings also showed that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent morphological, proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in vitro.

  4. Resistance exercise-induced hormonal response under the influence of delayed onset muscle soreness in men and boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullinen, T; Mero, A; Huttunen, P; Pakarinen, A; Komi, P V

    2011-12-01

    It was hypothesized that exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD)-related alterations in hormonal responses could be observed if a second exercise bout is performed soon after an identical unaccustomed bout leading to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Eight men (31 ± 7 years) and eight boys (14 ± 0 years) performed two exercise bouts (E1 and E2, with 48 h rest in between) consisting of three sets of bilateral knee extensions until exhaustion with 40% load. No differences between the groups or bouts were observed in the number of repetitions performed and maximal isometric force decline, or between groups in serum creatine kinase activity and DOMS. Decreased peak epinephrine (EPI) (-38%), growth hormone (GH) (-45%) and cortisol (COR) (-31%) concentrations were found in E2 in men (Pboys. No changes in norepinephrine and testosterone responses were found in either group. The results suggest that in men, the responses of EPI, GH and COR are attenuated when the second bout is performed under the influence of DOMS. In boys, the lack of this attenuation may not be explained by less severe EIMD. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Inhaled β-agonist therapy and respiratory muscle fatigue as under-recognised causes of lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Emily; Mazer, Jeffrey; Carino, Gerardo

    2013-10-14

    A 49-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presented with significant tachypnoea, fevers, productive cough and increased work of breathing for the previous 4 days. Laboratory data showed elevated lactate of 3.2 mEq/L. Continuous inhaled ipratropium and albuterol nebuliser treatments were administered. Lactate levels increased to 5.5 and 3.9 mEq/L, at 6 and 12 h, respectively. No infectious source was found and the lactic acidosis cleared as the patient improved. The lactic acidosis was determined to be secondary to respiratory muscle fatigue and inhaled β-agonist therapy, two under-recognised causes of lactic acidosis in patients presenting with respiratory distress. Lactic acidosis is commonly used as a clinical marker for sepsis and shock, but in the absence of tissue hypoperfusion and severe hypoxia, alternative aetiologies for elevated levels should be sought to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful medical interventions.

  6. Lung and respiratory muscle function in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübgen, Joerg-Patrick; Schultz, Cedric

    2009-06-01

    Pulmonary dysfunction is not a well-recognized feature of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence and type of pulmonary and respiratory muscle dysfunction in FSHD. Sixteen patients with moderately advanced FSHD and 16 healthy controls were evaluated. Standard lung and respiratory muscle function tests were performed. Diaphragm muscle inspiratory action was evaluated with transdiaphragmatic pressure measurements. Lung function tests showed an increased residual volume in five patients. There was a significant difference in global respiratory muscle function in patients versus controls; weakness was mild, and it affected expiratory more than inspiratory muscles. There was no significant difference in the diaphragm inspiratory action of patients versus controls. The dystrophic process that underlies FSHD did not significantly involve the muscles of the diaphragm, but it caused mild global respiratory muscle weakness that affected expiratory more than inspiratory muscles. It is probably not necessary to routinely monitor respiratory muscle function in ambulant FSHD patients who lack symptoms or signs of respiratory impairment.

  7. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masaru; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice exhibited significant resistance to denervation-induced muscle atrophy. In addition, expression of the atrogenes Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, which underlie muscle atrophy, did not increase in muscles of Smad2/3-deficient mice following denervation. We also demonstrate that serum starvation promotes Smad2/3 protein accumulation in C2C12 myogenic cells, an in vitro muscle atrophy model, an effect inhibited by IGF1 treatment. In vivo, we observed IGF1 receptor deactivation in immobilized muscle, even in the presence of normal levels of circulating IGF1. Denervation-induced muscle atrophy was accompanied by reduced glucose intake and elevated levels of branched-chain amino acids, effects that were Smad2/3-dependent. Thus, muscle immobilization attenuates IGF1 signals at the receptor rather than the ligand level, leading to Smad2/3 protein accumulation, muscle atrophy, and accompanying metabolic changes. PMID:27129272

  8. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masaru; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-06-03

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice exhibited significant resistance to denervation-induced muscle atrophy. In addition, expression of the atrogenes Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, which underlie muscle atrophy, did not increase in muscles of Smad2/3-deficient mice following denervation. We also demonstrate that serum starvation promotes Smad2/3 protein accumulation in C2C12 myogenic cells, an in vitro muscle atrophy model, an effect inhibited by IGF1 treatment. In vivo, we observed IGF1 receptor deactivation in immobilized muscle, even in the presence of normal levels of circulating IGF1. Denervation-induced muscle atrophy was accompanied by reduced glucose intake and elevated levels of branched-chain amino acids, effects that were Smad2/3-dependent. Thus, muscle immobilization attenuates IGF1 signals at the receptor rather than the ligand level, leading to Smad2/3 protein accumulation, muscle atrophy, and accompanying metabolic changes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Lack of CFTR in skeletal muscle predisposes to muscle wasting and diaphragm muscle pump failure in cystic fibrosis mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Divangahi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF patients often have reduced mass and strength of skeletal muscles, including the diaphragm, the primary muscle of respiration. Here we show that lack of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR plays an intrinsic role in skeletal muscle atrophy and dysfunction. In normal murine and human skeletal muscle, CFTR is expressed and co-localized with sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated proteins. CFTR-deficient myotubes exhibit augmented levels of intracellular calcium after KCl-induced depolarization, and exposure to an inflammatory milieu induces excessive NF-kB translocation and cytokine/chemokine gene upregulation. To determine the effects of an inflammatory environment in vivo, sustained pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was produced, and under these conditions diaphragmatic force-generating capacity is selectively reduced in Cftr(-/- mice. This is associated with exaggerated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression as well as upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1 and atrogin-1 involved in muscle atrophy. We conclude that an intrinsic alteration of function is linked to the absence of CFTR from skeletal muscle, leading to dysregulated calcium homeostasis, augmented inflammatory/atrophic gene expression signatures, and increased diaphragmatic weakness during pulmonary infection. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for CFTR in skeletal muscle function that may have major implications for the pathogenesis of cachexia and respiratory muscle pump failure in CF patients.

  10. Impaired physical function, loss of muscle mass and assessment of biomechanical properties in critical ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum

    2012-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment. A plaus......Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment....... A plausible contributor to the accentuated catabolic drive in ICU patients is a synergistic response to inflammation and inactivity leading to loss of muscle mass. As these entities are predominantly present in the early phase of ICU stay, interventions employed during this time frame may exhibit the greatest...

  11. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction from frog skeletal muscle during an isotonic twitch under a small load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugi, Haruo; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Hashizume, Hiroo.

    1978-01-01

    A time-resolved x-ray diffraction technique was used to study the time course of change in the intensity ratio Isub(1,0)/Isub(1,1) during isotonic twitch (initial sarcomere, 2.4 μm) under a small load and to determine the kinetic properties of the crossbridges responsible for muscle contraction. Isotonic twitches in four other preparations with an initial sarcomere of 2.4 μm and in two with an initial sarcomere of 2.3 μm and 2.2 μm, respectively, were examined. In each case, the intensity ratio started to decrease at stimulation, reached a minimum value of 0.8 - 1.0 within the first 20 - 30% of the shortening phase, and maintained this value until the beginning of the relaxation phase. Gradual recovery of the intensity ratio to the resting value was seen during the relaxation phase. During the recovery phase, the intensity ratio appeared to exhibit oscillatory changes. Though the extent of shortening was reduced by about 30% at the end of each experiment, the duration of the shortening phase remained almost unchanged in all the preparations examined. The time course of change in the intensity ratio was also examined during an isometric twitch in four preparations (sarcomere, 2.4 μm) with the tibial end connected to a strain gauge. The extent of internal shortening of muscle fibres against the tendons and the recording system during an isometric twitch or a tetanus at low temperatures was estimated. The intensity ratio decreased to a minimum value of 0.5 - 0.6 during the rising phase of isometric tension and started to return to the resting value after the beginning of relaxation. In both isotonic and isometric twitches, a decrease in the intensity ratio resulted from both a decrease in the 1,0 intensity and an increase in the 1,1 intensity. (J.P.N.)

  12. Antioxidant defense system state in blood plasma and heart muscle of rats under the influence of histamine and sodium hypoclorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Bishko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide spectrum of antihistamine drugs in the pharmaceutical market, however all these chemical preparations cause side effects. Therefore, new alternative ways for histamine detoxication are to be found. For this aim in our experiment sodium hypochlorite was used because its solution possesses strong oxidizing properties. The influence of histamine and sodium hypochlorite on the antioxidant defence system state of blood plasma and cardiac muscle in rats has been researched. It was shown, that the investigated factors result in the disruption of the antioxidant system. It was found that histamine injection in concentration of 1 and 8 μg/kg in plasma leads to the increase of superoxi­de dismutase activity during all the experiment. When studying enzymes, that catalyze hydroperoxides and Н2О2 decomposition it was shown that under the influence of histamine in a dose 1 μg/kg, the glutathione peroxidase activity increased on the 1st day of the experiment. However, on the 7th day of the experiment the increase of both glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity was fixed. The deviation in superoxide dismutase function in rats plasma under the action of sodium hypochlorite has been established. The activity of enzymes that decompose Н2О2 and hydroperoxides were inhibi­ted. Under the influence of histamine in the heart tissues we have stated the disturbance of superoxide dismutase work and increase of catalase activity and decrease of glutathione peroxidase activity. The influence of sodium hypochlorite on the myocardium of intact animals as well as joint influence of sodium hypochlorite and histamine result in the increase of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and lead to the conside­rable decline of activity of glutathione peroxidase.

  13. CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION INDUCES ALTERATION IN CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA IN SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS OF WISTAR RATS UNDER SWIMMING TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz C. Fernandes

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Creatine has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. In this study, we investigated the effect of oral creatine monohydrate supplementation on cross-sectional area of type I, IIA and IIB fibers of gastrocnemius, extensor digitorum longus - EDL and soleus muscles from male Wistar rats subjected to swimming training for 33 days. Four groups were set up: sedentary with no supplementation (CON, sedentary with creatine supplementation (3.3 mg creatine per g chow (CR, exercised with no supplementation (EX and exercised with supplementation (CREX. The rats performed in a special swimming pool and swam five times a week for 1 hour each day, with a extra lead weight corresponding to 15% of their body weight. At the end of 33 days, skeletal muscles of the animals were dissected and the samples got immediately frozen using liquid nitrogen. Muscle samples were allocated to slices of 10 µm by a cryostat at -20ºC, which was followed by histochemical analysis in order to identify fiber types of the muscles, and morphometrical analysis to calculate the muscle fiber areas. All groups gained body weight at the end of 33 days but there was no statistical difference among them. The EX and CREX rats had a larger food intake than the sedentary groups (CON and CR, and the CREX group had a larger food intake than CR rats. The cross-sectional area of type I and IIA fibers of the soleus muscle, type IIA and IIB fibers of EDL muscle and type IIA and IIB fibers of the white portion of gastrocnemius muscle were greater in the EX and CREX groups in comparison to sedentary rats. In addition, these fibers were greater in the CREX rats than in the EX group. There was no change in the cross sectional area of type I fibers in EDL muscle among all groups studied. Our results suggest that creatine supplementation enhances the exercise related muscle fiber hypertrophy in rodents

  14. Peak shapes of acids and bases under overloaded conditions in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, with weakly buffered mobile phases of various pH: a thermodynamic interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-01-02

    species adsorbs strongly on a first type of sites that have a high density while the ionic species adsorb preferentially on a second type of sites that have a very low density. The evolution of the peak shape when the pHWS changes from acidic to basic is well explained by the weak buffer capacity of the mobile phase used compared to the concentration of the eluted compounds.

  15. The masticatory system under varying functional load. Part 1: structural adaptation of rabbit jaw muscles to reduced masticatory load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeke, M.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Korfage, J.A.M.; Zentner, A.; Grünheid, T.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibres can change their myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform and cross-sectional area, which determine their contraction velocity and maximum force generation, respectively, to adapt to varying functional loads. In general, reduced muscle activity induces transition towards faster

  16. Effects and underlying mechanisms of curcumin on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by Chol:MβCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Li; Yang Yunbo; Tuo Qinhui; Zhu Bingyang; Chen Linxi; Zhang Liang; Liao Duanfang

    2009-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Curcumin, extracted from Curcumae longae, has been shown a variety of beneficial effects on human health, including anti-atherosclerosis by mechanisms poorly understood. In the present study, we attempted to investigate whether curcumin has any effect on VSMCs proliferation and the potential mechanisms involved. Our data showed curcumin concentration-dependently abrogated the proliferation of primary rat VSMCs induced by Chol:MβCD. To explore the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, we found that curcumin was capable of restoring caveolin-1 expression which was reduced by Chol:MβCD treatment. Moreover, curcumin abrogated the increment of phospho-ERK1/2 and nuclear accumulation of ERK1/2 in primary rat VSMCs induced by Chol:MβCD, which led to a suppression of AP-1 promoter activity stimulated by Chol:MβCD. In addition, curcumin was able to reverse cell cycle progression induced by Chol:MβCD, which was further supported by its down-regulation of cyclinD1 and E2F promoter activities in the presence of Chol:MβCD. Taking together, our data suggest curcumin inhibits Chol:MβCD-induced VSMCs proliferation via restoring caveolin-1 expression that leads to the suppression of over-activated ERK signaling and causes cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase. These novel findings support the beneficial potential of curcumin in cardiovascular disease.

  17. Weak C* Hopf Symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Rehren, K. -H.

    1996-01-01

    Weak C* Hopf algebras can act as global symmetries in low-dimensional quantum field theories, when braid group statistics prevents group symmetries. Possibilities to construct field algebras with weak C* Hopf symmetry from a given theory of local observables are discussed.

  18. The effects of different size gold nanoparticles on mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells under mechanical stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieu, Tri Minh

    Nanotechnology is an emerging and promising frontier for medicine and biomedical research due to its potential for applications such as drug delivery, imaging enhancement, and cancer treatment. While these materials may possess significant possibilities, the effects of these particles in the body and how the particles affect the cells is not fully understood. In this study, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) will be exposed to 5 and 20 nm diameter citrate AuNPs under mechanical conditions. The cytotoxicity properties of these particles will be investigated using LDH and MTT assays. Atomic force microscopy will be used to study how the size of the nanoparticles affect the mechanical properties of the VSMCs. Immunofluorescence staining for alpha actin will also be performed to enhance understanding of the phenotypic shift. The LDH and MTT cytotoxicity assay results demonstrated that neither 5 nor 20 nm diameter nanoparticles are cytotoxic to the cells. However, the mechanical properties and cell morphology of the VSMCs was altered. Under static conditions, both AuNP treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells. The size of the nanoparticles had a softening effect on elastic modulus of the cell and sign of a synthetic phenotype was observed. The VSMCs subjected to mechanical stretching exhibited higher elastic modulus compared to the static experimental groups. Again, both AuNPs treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells and signs of more synthetic phenotype was seen. However, the size of the nanoparticles did not have any influence on cell's elastic modulus unlike the static treated cells. The mechanical testing condition provided a better look at how these particles would affect the cells in vivo. While the nanoparticles are not cytotoxic to the VSMCs, they are altering the mechanical properties and phenotype of the cell.

  19. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Emerson Randolph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some muscular dystrophies. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on their embryologic origins and the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  20. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  1. Proximal Limb Weakness Reverting After CSF Diversion In Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about two young girls who developed progressive visual failure secondary to increased intracranial pressure and had significant proximal muscle weakness of limbs. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP may present with "false localizing signs", besides having headache, vomiting and papilledema. Radicular pain as a manifestation of raised ICP is rare and motor weakness attributable to polyradiculopathy is exceptional. Two patients with increased intracranial pressure without lateralizing signs′ had singnificant muscle weakness. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests did not disclose any other cause for weakness. Following theco-peritoneal shunt, in both patients, there was variable recovery of vision but the proximal weakness and symptoms of elevated ICP improved rapidly. Recognition of this uncommon manifestation of raised ICP may obviate the need for unnecessary investigation and reduce morbidity due to weakness by CSF diversion procedure.

  2. Aging related changes in determinants of muscle force generating capacity: a comparison of muscle aging in men and male rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballak, Sam B; Degens, Hans; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-03-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and force generating capacity, however the exact mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. Rodents models have often been used to enhance our understanding of mechanisms of age-related changes in human skeletal muscle. However, to what extent age-related alterations in determinants of muscle force generating capacity observed in rodents resemble those in humans has not been considered thoroughly. This review compares the effect of aging on muscle force generating determinants (muscle mass, fiber size, fiber number, fiber type distribution and muscle specific tension), in men and male rodents at similar relative age. It appears that muscle aging in male F344*BN rat resembles that in men most; 32-35-month-old rats exhibit similar signs of muscle weakness to those of 70-80-yr-old men, and the decline in 36-38-month-old rats is similar to that in men aged over 80 yrs. For male C57BL/6 mice, age-related decline in muscle force generating capacity seems to occur only at higher relative age than in men. We conclude that the effects on determinants of muscle force differ between species as well as within species, but qualitatively show the same pattern as that observed in men. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Upregulation of interleukin-1β/transforming growth factor-β1 and hypoxia relate to molecular mechanisms underlying immobilization-induced muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Junya; Nakano, Jiro; Kataoka, Hideki; Sasabe, Ryo; Goto, Kyo; Tanaka, Miho; Origuchi, Tomoki; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Okita, Minoru

    2015-09-01

    In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying muscle contracture in rats. The rats were divided into immobilization and control groups, and soleus muscles of the right and left sides were selected for analyses. The levels of CD11b and α-SMA protein, IL-1β, and TGF-β1 mRNA, and type I and III collagen protein and mRNA were significantly greater in the immobilization group than in the control group at all time-points. HIF-1α mRNA levels were significantly higher in the immobilization group at 4 weeks. Moreover, HIF-1α, α-SMA, and type I collagen levels were significantly higher at 4 weeks than at 1 and 2 weeks in the immobilization group. In the early stages of immobilization, upregulation of IL-1β/TGF-β1 via macrophages may promote fibroblast differentiation that could affect muscle contracture. The soleus muscle became hypoxic in the later stages of immobilization, suggesting that hypoxia influences the progression of muscle contracture. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Electro-weak theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1980-01-01

    By electro-weak theory is meant the unified field theory that describes both weak and electro-magnetic interactions. The development of a unified electro-weak theory is certainly the most dramatic achievement in theoretical physics to occur in the second half of this century. It puts weak interactions on the same sound theoretical footing as quantum elecrodynamics. Many theorists have contributed to this development, which culminated in the works of Glashow, Weinberg and Salam, who were jointly awarded the 1979 Nobel Prize in physics. Some of the important ideas that contributed to this development are the theory of beta decay formulated by Fermi, Parity violation suggested by Lee and Yang, and incorporated into immensely successful V-A theory of weak interactions by Sudarshan and Marshak. At the same time ideas of gauge invariance were applied to weak interaction by Schwinger, Bludman and Glashow. Weinberg and Salam then went one step further and wrote a theory that is renormalizable, i.e., all higher order corrections are finite, no mean feat for a quantum field theory. The theory had to await the development of the quark model of hadrons for its completion. A description of the electro-weak theory is given

  5. 3D Modelling and monitoring of denervated muscle under Functional Electrical Stimulation treatment and associated bone structural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical rehabilitation method for patients who have permanent and non recoverable muscle denervation in the legs was developed in the frame of the European Project RISE. The technique is based on FES and the project results shows, in these severely disabled patients, restoration of muscle tissue and function. This study propose novel methods based on image processing technique and medical modelling to monitor growth in denervated muscle treated with FES. Geometrical and structural changes in muscle and bone are studied and modelled. Secondary effects on the bone mineral density produced by the stimulation treatment and due the elicited muscle contraction are also investigated. The restoration process in DDM is an important object of discussion since there isn’t yet a complete understanding of the mechanisms regulating growth in denervated muscle. This study approaches the problem from a macroscopic point of view, developing 3-dimensional models of the whole stimulated muscles and following changes in volume, geometry and density very accurately. The method is based on the acquisition of high resolution Spiral CT scans from patients who have long-term flaccid paraplegia and the use of special image processing tools allowing tissue discriminations and muscle segmentation. Three patients were measured at different points of time during 4 years of electrical stimulation treatment. In this study is quantitatively demonstrated the influences of FES treatment on the different quadriceps bellies. The rectus femoris muscle is positioned in the middle of the quadriceps and responds (in general better to stimulation. In a patient with abundant adipose tissue surrounding the quadriceps, rectus femoris almost doubled the volume during the FES treatment while in the other bellies the changes measured were minimal. The analysis of the density shows clearly a restoration of the muscular structure in the growing muscle. The remarkable increase of

  6. The roles of proximal and distal muscles in anticipatory postural adjustments under asymmetrical perturbations and during standing on rollerskates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratori, T; Latash, M

    2000-04-01

    The study addresses two controversial issues surrounding the nature of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). The first deals with the reproducible APA patterns in proximal postural muscles and variable APA patterns reported for the muscles controlling the ankle joint (TA-SOL). We hypothesized that the TA-SOL muscles participate mainly in the compensation of lateral and rotational perturbations, in particular those associated with asymmetrical movements. The second issue deals with decreased APAs reported during both very stable and unstable standing. We hypothesized that APA changes during unstable standing might depend on the actual mechanical nature of instability. Eight healthy subjects were recruited who had had no prior experience with rollerskates. They performed series of bilateral and unilateral, flexion and extension movements during regular standing and bilateral movements during standing on rollerskates. EMG changes and shifts of the center of pressure were analyzed within a time window typical of APAs. We found that APAs in proximal muscles were decreased during unilateral shoulder movements as compared to APAs during bilateral movements but did not show right-left differences. In contrast, the distal muscles (TA-SOL) showed little involvement during bilateral movements, while a clear right-left asymmetry was seen during unilateral movements. Bilateral movements performed while standing on rollerskates were accompanied by unchanged APAs in the proximal muscle pairs and increased APAs in the TA-SOL pair. We conclude that the proximal muscles provide a general pattern counteracting expected perturbations in the anterior-posterior direction while the distal muscles deal with asymmetrical perturbations and the modulation of APAs in unusual conditions such as standing on rollerskates. There seems to be no unambiguous relation between the magnitude of APAs and the stability of standing: Depending on the exact mechanical nature of postural instability, it

  7. The masticatory system under varying functional load. Part 1: Structural adaptation of rabbit jaw muscles to reduced masticatory load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeke, Marloes; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Korfage, Joannes A M; Zentner, Andrej; Grünheid, Thorsten

    2011-08-01

    Skeletal muscle fibres can change their myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform and cross-sectional area, which determine their contraction velocity and maximum force generation, respectively, to adapt to varying functional loads. In general, reduced muscle activity induces transition towards faster fibres and a decrease in fibre cross-sectional area. In order to investigate the effect of a reduction in masticatory load on three functionally different jaw muscles, the MyHC composition and the corresponding cross-sectional area of fibres were determined in the superficial masseter, superficial temporalis, and digastric muscles of male juvenile New Zealand White rabbits that had been raised on a soft diet (n=8) from 8 to 20 weeks of age and in those of normal diet controls (n=8). Differences between groups were tested for statistical significance using a Mann-Whitney rank sum test. The proportion and cross-sectional area of fibres co-expressing MyHC-I and MyHC-cardiac alpha were significantly smaller in the masseter muscles of the animals that had been fed soft food than in those of the controls. In contrast, the proportions and cross-sectional areas of the various fibre types in the temporalis and digastric muscles did not differ significantly between the groups. The results suggest that reducing the masticatory load during development affects the contraction velocity and maximum force generation of the jaw-closing muscles that are primarily responsible for force generation during chewing. These muscles adapt structurally to the reduced functional load with changes in the MyHC composition and cross-sectional area mainly within their slow fibre compartment.

  8. A critical role for muscle ring finger-1 in acute lung injury-associated skeletal muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, D Clark; D'Alessio, Franco R; Johnston, Laura F; Kesari, Priya; Aggarwal, Neil R; Garibaldi, Brian T; Mock, Jason R; Simmers, Jessica L; DeGorordo, Antonio; Murdoch, Jared; Willis, Monte S; Patterson, Cam; Tankersley, Clarke G; Messi, Maria L; Liu, Chun; Delbono, Osvaldo; Furlow, J David; Bodine, Sue C; Cohn, Ronald D; King, Landon S; Crow, Michael T

    2012-04-15

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a debilitating condition associated with severe skeletal muscle weakness that persists in humans long after lung injury has resolved. The molecular mechanisms underlying this condition are unknown. To identify the muscle-specific molecular mechanisms responsible for muscle wasting in a mouse model of ALI. Changes in skeletal muscle weight, fiber size, in vivo contractile performance, and expression of mRNAs and proteins encoding muscle atrophy-associated genes for muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) and atrogin1 were measured. Genetic inactivation of MuRF1 or electroporation-mediated transduction of miRNA-based short hairpin RNAs targeting either MuRF1 or atrogin1 were used to identify their role in ALI-associated skeletal muscle wasting. Mice with ALI developed profound muscle atrophy and preferential loss of muscle contractile proteins associated with reduced muscle function in vivo. Although mRNA expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin1, was increased in ALI mice, only MuRF1 protein levels were up-regulated. Consistent with these changes, suppression of MuRF1 by genetic or biochemical approaches prevented muscle fiber atrophy, whereas suppression of atrogin1 expression was without effect. Despite resolution of lung injury and down-regulation of MuRF1 and atrogin1, force generation in ALI mice remained suppressed. These data show that MuRF1 is responsible for mediating muscle atrophy that occurs during the period of active lung injury in ALI mice and that, as in humans, skeletal muscle dysfunction persists despite resolution of lung injury.

  9. Hunting the weak bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of the production of weak bosons in the proton-antiproton colliding beam facilities which are currently being developed, is discussed. The production, decay and predicted properties of these particles are described. (W.D.L.).

  10. History of Weak Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  11. Unexpected weak interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Stéphane Coen and Miro Erkintalo from the University of Auckland in New Zealand talk to Nature Photonics about their surprising findings regarding a weak long-range interaction they serendipitously stumbled upon while researching temporal cavity solitons.

  12. Weakly oval electron lense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumenov, T.D.; Alizarovskaya, I.M.; Khizirova, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The method of the weakly oval electrical field getting generated by the axially-symmetrical field is shown. Such system may be designed with help of the cylindric form coaxial electrodes with the built-in quadrupole duplet. The singularity of the indicated weakly oval lense consists of that it provides the conducting both mechanical and electronic adjustment. Such lense can be useful for elimination of the near-axis astigmatism in the electron-optical system

  13. A computational model of the ionic currents, Ca2+ dynamics and action potentials underlying contraction of isolated uterine smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Chiu Tong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Uterine contractions during labor are discretely regulated by rhythmic action potentials (AP of varying duration and form that serve to determine calcium-dependent force production. We have employed a computational biology approach to develop a fuller understanding of the complexity of excitation-contraction (E-C coupling of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC. Our overall aim is to establish a mathematical platform of sufficient biophysical detail to quantitatively describe known uterine E-C coupling parameters and thereby inform future empirical investigations of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms governing normal and dysfunctional labors. From published and unpublished data we construct mathematical models for fourteen ionic currents of USMCs: Ca2+ currents (L- and T-type, Na+ current, an hyperpolarization-activated current, three voltage-gated K+ currents, two Ca2+-activated K+ current, Ca2+-activated Cl current, non-specific cation current, Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, Na+-K+ pump and background current. The magnitudes and kinetics of each current system in a spindle shaped single cell with a specified surface area:volume ratio is described by differential equations, in terms of maximal conductances, electrochemical gradient, voltage-dependent activation/inactivation gating variables and temporal changes in intracellular Ca2+ computed from known Ca2+ fluxes. These quantifications are validated by the reconstruction of the individual experimental ionic currents obtained under voltage-clamp. Phasic contraction is modeled in relation to the time constant of changing [Ca2+]i. This integrated model is validated by its reconstruction of the different USMC AP configurations (spikes, plateau and bursts of spikes, the change from bursting to plateau type AP produced by estradiol and of simultaneous experimental recordings of spontaneous AP, [Ca2+]i and phasic force. In summary, our advanced mathematical model provides a powerful tool to

  14. Improvement in upper leg muscle strength underlies beneficial effects of exercise therapy in knee osteoarthritis: secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Steultjens, M P M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Twisk, J W R; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; van der Leeden, M; Dekker, J

    2015-06-01

    Although exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate if improvements in neuromuscular factors (i.e. upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception) underlie the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Secondary analyses from a randomised controlled trial, with measurements at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 38 weeks. Rehabilitation centre. One hundred and fifty-nine patients diagnosed with knee OA. Exercise therapy. Changes in pain [numeric rating scale (NRS)] and activity limitations [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function subscale and get-up-and-go test] during the study period. Independent variables were changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee joint proprioception (i.e. motion sense) during the study period. Longitudinal regression analyses (generalised estimating equation) were performed to analyse associations between changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception with changes in pain and activity limitations. Improved muscle strength was significantly associated with reductions in NRS pain {B coefficient -2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) -3.7 to -1.4], meaning that every change of 1 unit of strength was linked to a change of -2.5 units of pain}, WOMAC physical function (-8.8, 95% CI -13.4 to -4.2) and get-up-and-go test (-1.7, 95% CI -2.4 to -1.0). Improved proprioception was not significantly associated with better outcomes of exercise therapy (P>0.05). Upper leg muscle strengthening is one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Musculus gastrocnemius tetanus kinetics in alcohol-intoxicated rats with experimentally-induced hindlimb vascular ischemia under conditions of low-frequence muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Melnychuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol intoxication and ischemic injury of skeletal muscles often accompany each other. It is shown that patients hospitalized with chronic alcoholism develop muscle fatigue. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in alcohol-dependent patients is caused by ethanol-associated myofibrillar atrophy and metabolic disbalance, while compression-ischemic lesions result from unconsciousness of the patient, in case of taking the critical alcohol dose. Therefore, the aim of this study is to discover typical m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic kinetics changes in alcohol intoxicated rats with experimentally induced vascular ischemia of hindlimb muscles under conditions of low-frequency progressive muscle fatigue. Experiments were carried out on 10 young male Wistar rats (149.5 ± 5.8 g kept under standard vivarium conditions and diet. The investigation was conducted in two phases: chronic (30 days and acute (3 hours experiment. All surgical procedures were carried out aseptically under general anesthesia. Ishemic m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic kinetic changes and force productivity in alcohol intoxicated rats were investigated in the isometric mode, with direct electrical stimulation. The fatigue of m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. was evaluated by three characteristic criteria: the first sag effect, the secondary force rise, the second sag effect. There have been 10 similar experiments: 5 series in each study group with 10 tetanic runs in each series. The highest amplitude of the native m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanus relative to isoline was taken as 100% force response. The same pattern of m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. low-frequency fatigue development was found in both rat groups under study. It is evidenced by the absence of substantial m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanus kinetics differences in alcohol intoxicated rats, compared with non-alcohol intoxicated rats during fatigue test. However, the appreciable m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic force reduction

  16. 31P-MR-spectroscopy of the skeletal muscles under load: demonstration of normal energy metabolism compared to different neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, W.; Traeber, F.; Kuhl, C.K.; Keller, E.; Rink, H.; Schild, H.H.; Karitzky, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: 31 P-MR spectroscopy of skeletal muscle under ecercise was used to obtain the range of normal variation and comparison was made for different neuromascular diseases. Methods: 41 examinations of 24 volunteers and 41 investigations in 35 patients were performed on 1.5 T MR systems (Gyroscan S15 und S15/ACSII, Philips). Localised 31 P-MR spectra of the calf muscle were obtained in time series with a resolution of 12 s. Results: Two types of muscle energy metabolism were identified from the pattern of spectroscopic time course in volunteers: While the first group was characterised by a remarkable decline to lower pH values during exercise, the second group showed only small pH shifts (minimum pH: 6.48±0.13 vs 6.87±0.07, p -6 ) although comparable workload conditions were maintained. The pH-values correlated well with blood lactate analysis. Patients with metabolic disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) showed decreased resting values of PCr/(PCr+P i ) and increased pH levels during exercise. PCr recovery was significantly delayed (0.31 vs 0.65 min -1 , p i ), altered pH time courses, and decreased PCr recovery seem to be helpful indicators for diagnosis of metabolic muscle disorders. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Relationship between quadriceps femoris muscle volume and muscle torque after anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Yu; Oda, Toshiaki; Tsukazaki, Satoshi; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Hirose, Norikazu; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain evidence to support the hypothesis that motor unit recruitment is reduced in the quadriceps femoris (QF) of patients with ACL rupture. We compared muscle torque per unit volume in the QF from injured and uninjured sides to normal subjects. If high-threshold motor unit recruitment is reduced in patients with ACL rupture, this reduction will theoretically lead to a reduction in muscle torque per unit volume compared to the control group. The subjects included 22 patients with ACL rupture and 22 subjects with no history of knee injury. To identify the muscle torque per unit volume, the isokinetic peak torque was divided by QF volume which was obtained by MRI. Tests revealed that the mean muscle torque per unit volume of the uninjured and injured sides was significantly lower than those of the control group. This study demonstrated that the values of the muscle torque per unit volume of both injured and uninjured sides of patients with ACL rupture were significantly lower than those of the control group, thereby providing indirect evidence of the hindrance of motor unit recruitment in these patients. The results of the present study also indicate that there may be bilateral QF weakness in patients with ACL rupture. Since persistent QF weakness is a significant barrier to effective rehabilitation in patients with ACL injuries, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms will allow clinicians and scientists to develop more effective therapeutic strategies for patient rehabilitation.

  18. Cellular mechanism of eccentric-induced muscle injury and its relationship with sarcomere heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-08-01

    Activity-induced muscle injury and dysfunction have been identified as key components of musculoskeletal injuries. These injuries often occur following eccentric contractions, when the muscle is under tension and stretched by a force that is greater than the force generated by the muscle. Many daily activities require muscles to perform eccentric contractions, including walking (or running) downhill or down stairs, lowering heavy objects, and landing from a jump. Injuries often occur when these activities are performed at high intensity or for prolonged periods of time. General features of eccentric-induced muscle injury are well documented and include disruption of intracellular muscle structure, prolonged muscle weakness and dysfunction, a delayed-onset muscle soreness, and inflammation. Several weeks are required for the affected tissue to fully regenerate and recover from eccentric-induced muscle injury. Possible mechanisms responsible for eccentric-induced muscle injury are activation impairment and structural disruption of the sarcomere. These two factors seem to be the main sources of eccentric-induced muscle injury. Rather than being separate mechanisms they may be complimentary and interact with each other. Therefore, in this review we will focus on the two main cellular mechanism of muscle cell injury following accustomed eccentric contraction.

  19. the sternalis muscle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-17

    Aug 17, 2009 ... scan of the chest wall was performed to gain clarity of the mam- mographic findings (Figs 1a, 1b and 2). The CT scan demonstrated a flattened band of muscle density lying anterior to the medial margin of the pectoralis muscle. This structure was separated from the underlying pectoralis muscle by a thin ...

  20. Weak radiative hyperon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.L.; Booth, E.C.; Gall, K.P.; McIntyre, E.K.; Miller, J.P.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Bassalleck, B.; Hall, J.R.; Larson, K.D.; Wolfe, D.M.; Fickinger, W.J.; Robinson, D.K.; Hallin, A.L.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Measday, D.F.; Noble, A.J.; Waltham, C.E.; Hessey, N.P.; Lowe, J.; Horvath, D.; Salomon, M.

    1990-01-01

    New measurements of the Σ + and Λ weak radiative decays are discussed. The hyperons were produced at rest by the reaction K - p → Yπ where Y = Σ + or Λ. The monoenergetic pion was used to tag the hyperon production, and the branching ratios were determined from the relative amplitudes of Σ + → pγ to Σ + → pπ 0 and Λ → nγ to Λ → nπ 0 . The photons from weak radiative decays and from π 0 decays were detected with modular NaI arrays. (orig.)

  1. Effects of antioxidant mixtures in the diet of finishing pigs on the oxidative status and shelf life of longissimus dorsi muscle packaged under modified atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, R; Stella, S; Ratti, S; Maghin, F; Tirloni, E; Corino, C

    2017-11-01

    The effect of pig dietary supplementation with an antioxidant mixture (AOX), containing vitamin E and verbascoside, on animal oxidative status, meat quality parameters, and shelf life of the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle was examined. Seventy pigs with an average live weight of 95.2 ± 1.2 kg were selected and assigned to 2 dietary treatments. The control (CTR) group was fed a commercial diet, and the AOX group was fed the same diet supplemented with the AOX, containing vitamin E and verbascoside from Verbenaceae extract, for 45 d before slaughter. At the beginning and at the end of the trial, blood samples were collected to determine oxidative status, using the Kit Radicaux Libres test. At slaughter, carcass weight was recorded and LD muscles from 10 pigs per treatment were sampled. Physical, chemical, microbiological, and sensory parameters and oxidative stability of LD muscle were assessed for up to 21 d of storage at 4°C under modified atmosphere packaging. Dietary AOX positively affected ( meat from the AOX group was comparable ( meat in appearance and aroma. A lower ( parameters were affected by dietary treatment. Overall, the present data showed that dietary AOX supplementation in pigs improved in vivo antioxidant status and exerted antioxidant and antimicrobial effects, thus enhancing the shelf life of raw pork under commercial conditions.

  2. Age-related functional changes and susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage in skeletal muscle cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Jun Choi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Depending upon external loading conditions, skeletal muscles can either shorten, lengthen, or remain at a fixed length as they produce force. Fixed-end or isometric contractions stabilize joints and allow muscles to act as active struts during locomotion. Active muscles dissipate energy when they are lengthened by an external force that exceeds their current force producing capacity. These unaccustomed eccentric activities often lead to muscle weakness, soreness, and inflammation. During aging, the ability to produce force under these conditions is reduced and appears to be due to not only reductions in muscle mass but also to alterations in the basic mechanisms of contraction. These alterations include impairments in the excitation–contraction process, and the action of the cross-bridges. Also, it is well known that age-related skeletal muscle atrophy is characterized by a preferential atrophy of fast fibers, and increased susceptibility to fast muscle fiber when aged muscles are exposed to eccentric contraction followed by the impaired recovery process has been reported. Taken together, the selective loss of fast muscle fiber in aged muscle could be affected by eccentric-induced muscle damage, which has significant implication to identify the etiology of the age-related functional changes. Therefore, in this review the alteration of age-related muscle function and its impact to/of eccentric induced muscle damage and recovery will be addressed in detail.

  3. Age-related functional changes and susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage in skeletal muscle cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Depending upon external loading conditions, skeletal muscles can either shorten, lengthen, or remain at a fixed length as they produce force. Fixed-end or isometric contractions stabilize joints and allow muscles to act as active struts during locomotion. Active muscles dissipate energy when they are lengthened by an external force that exceeds their current force producing capacity. These unaccustomed eccentric activities often lead to muscle weakness, soreness, and inflammation. During aging, the ability to produce force under these conditions is reduced and appears to be due to not only reductions in muscle mass but also to alterations in the basic mechanisms of contraction. These alterations include impairments in the excitation-contraction process, and the action of the cross-bridges. Also, it is well known that age-related skeletal muscle atrophy is characterized by a preferential atrophy of fast fibers, and increased susceptibility to fast muscle fiber when aged muscles are exposed to eccentric contraction followed by the impaired recovery process has been reported. Taken together, the selective loss of fast muscle fiber in aged muscle could be affected by eccentric-induced muscle damage, which has significant implication to identify the etiology of the age-related functional changes. Therefore, in this review the alteration of age-related muscle function and its impact to/of eccentric induced muscle damage and recovery will be addressed in detail.

  4. Electromyographic and kinetic analysis of two abdominal muscle performance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladay, Douglas E; Denegar, Craig R; Miller, Sayers J; Challis, John

    2015-01-01

    In order to accurately assess the abdominal muscles, clinicians need valid clinical measures. The double leg lowering test (DLLT) and lower abdominal muscle progression (LAMP) are two common tests of abdominal muscle performance. The purposes of this study were to determine the relation between surface electromyographic (EMG) activity during the DLLT and LAMP levels; hip joint resultant moments and DLLT and LAMP levels; and the two measures of DLLT and LAMP. Ten healthy participants were tested under both conditions. Surface EMG activity of the abdominal muscles was obtained, while pelvic movement was detected simultaneously. A moderate to strong association was found between rectus abdominus muscle activity and a moderate association with the external obliques with both test levels. For the internal oblique/transversus abdominus, a moderate and weak association was found with the DLLT and LAMP, respectively. A very strong association existed between the hip resultant joint moments (RJM) and the DLLT, while there was a weak correlation between hip RJM and the LAMP. No significant correlation was found between the DLLT and LAMP grades. This finding suggests that these tests may measure different qualities of muscle performance and provides preliminary support for their use. Further evaluation of these assessments with clinical populations is necessary.

  5. Reaching control of a full-torso, modelled musculoskeletal robot using muscle synergies emergent under reinforcement learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, A; Holland, O E

    2014-01-01

    ‘Anthropomimetic’ robots mimic both human morphology and internal structure—skeleton, muscles, compliance and high redundancy—thus presenting a formidable challenge to conventional control. Here we derive a novel controller for this class of robot which learns effective reaching actions through the sustained activation of weighted muscle synergies, an approach which draws upon compelling, recent evidence from animal and human studies, but is almost unexplored to date in the musculoskeletal robot literature. Since the effective synergy patterns for a given robot will be unknown, we derive a reinforcement-learning approach intended to allow their emergence, in particular those patterns aiding linearization of control. Using an extensive physics-based model of the anthropomimetic ECCERobot, we find that effective reaching actions can be learned comprising only two sequential motor co-activation patterns, each controlled by just a single common driving signal. Factor analysis shows the emergent muscle co-activations can be largely reconstructed using weighted combinations of only 13 common fragments. Testing these ‘candidate’ synergies as drivable units, the same controller now learns the reaching task both faster and better. (paper)

  6. Increased gain of vestibulospinal potentials evoked in neck and leg muscles when standing under height-induced postural threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, E N; Allum, J H J; Inglis, J T; Carpenter, M G

    2015-05-07

    To measure changes in amplitudes of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) elicited from neck, upper and lower limb muscles during a quiet standing task with increased postural threat achieved by manipulating surface height. Twenty eight subjects were tested while standing on a platform raised to 0.8 m and 3.2 m from the ground. Surface electromyography was recorded from the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid (SCM), biceps brachii (BB), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. Stimulation was with air-conducted short tone bursts (4 ms). After controlling for background muscle activity, VEMP amplitudes were compared between heights and correlated with changes in state anxiety, fear and arousal. VEMP amplitude significantly increased in SCM (9%) and SOL (12.7%) with increased surface height (pgains. Results demonstrate that VEMPs can be used to test different VSR pathways simultaneously during stance. Since fear and anxiety are prevalent with vestibular disorders, they should be considered as potential contributing factors for clinical vestibular outcome measures. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The association between premature plantarflexor muscle activity, muscle strength, and equinus gait in patients with various pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Katrin; Romkes, Jacqueline; Brunner, Reinald

    2013-09-01

    This study provides an overview on the association between premature plantarflexor muscle activity (PPF), muscle strength, and equinus gait in patients with various pathologies. The purpose was to evaluate whether muscular weakness and biomechanical alterations are aetiological factors for PPF during walking, independent of the underlying pathology. In a retrospective design, 716 patients from our clinical database with 46 different pathologies (orthopaedic and neurologic) were evaluated. Gait analysis data of the patients included kinematics, kinetics, electromyographic activity (EMG) data, and manual muscle strength testing. All patients were clustered three times. First, patients were grouped according to their primary pathology. Second, all patients were again clustered, this time according to their impaired joints. Third, groups of patients with normal EMG or PPF, and equinus or normal foot contact were formed to evaluate the association between PPF and equinus gait. The patient groups derived by the first two cluster methods were further subdivided into patients with normal or reduced muscle strength. Additionally, the phi correlation coefficient was calculated between PPF and equinus gait. Independent of the clustering, PPF was present in all patient groups. Weak patients revealed PPF more frequently. The correlations of PPF and equinus gait were lower than expected, due to patients with normal EMG during loading response and equinus. These patients, however, showed higher gastrocnemius activity prior to foot strike together with lower peak tibialis anterior muscle activity in loading response. Patients with PPF and a normal foot contact possibly apply the plantarflexion-knee extension couple during loading response. While increased gastrocnemius activity around foot strike seems essential for equinus gait, premature gastrocnemius activity does not necessarily produce an equinus gait. We conclude that premature gastrocnemius activity is strongly associated

  8. Diaphragm muscle fiber dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: toward a pathophysiological concept.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenheijm, C.A.C.; Heunks, L.M.A.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.

    2007-01-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is of major clinical relevance; maximum inspiratory pressure generation is an independent determinant of survival in severe COPD. Traditionally, inspiratory muscle weakness has been ascribed to

  9. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after ... It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  10. THE MAKE BREAK TEST AS A DIAGNOSTIC-TOOL IN FUNCTIONAL WEAKNESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERPLOEG, RJO; OOSTERHUIS, HJGH

    Strength was measured in four major muscle groups with a hand-held dynamometer. The "make" and "break" technique was used with and without encouragement, and fatiguability was tested in patients with organic weakness and patients with functional weakness. Patients with functional weakness could be

  11. Weakly Secure Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Kadhe, Swanand; Sprintson, Alex

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of secure distributed data storage under the paradigm of \\emph{weak security}, in which no \\emph{meaningful information} is leaked to the eavesdropper. More specifically, the eavesdropper cannot get any information about any individual message file or a small group of files. The key benefit of the weak security paradigm is that it incurs no loss in the storage capacity, which makes it practically appealing. In this paper, we present a coding scheme, using a coset codin...

  12. Synchronization of weakly coupled canard oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Köksal Ersöz, Elif; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Synchronization has been studied extensively in the context of weakly coupled oscillators using the so-called phase response curve (PRC) which measures how a change of the phase of an oscillator is affected by a small perturbation. This approach was based upon the work of Malkin, and it has been extended to relaxation oscillators. Namely, synchronization conditions were established under the weak coupling assumption, leading to a criterion for the existence of synchron...

  13. Practical approach to the patient with acute neuromuscular weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Rajeev

    2017-07-16

    Acute neuromuscular paralysis (ANMP) is a clinical syndrome characterized by rapid onset muscle weakness progressing to maximum severity within several days to weeks (less than 4 wk). Bulbar and respiratory muscle weakness may or may not be present. It is a common neurological emergency which requires immediate and careful investigations to determine the etiology because accurate diagnosis has significant impact on therapy and prognosis. Respiratory failure caused by neuromuscular weakness is considered as more critical than lung disease because its development may be insidious or subtle until sudden decompensation leads to life threatening hypoxia. Also, the arterial blood gas finding of severe hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and acidosis may not be apparent until respiratory failure is profound. Hence, the requirement for respiratory assistance should also be intensively and promptly investigated in all patients with neuromuscular disease. The disorder is classified based on the site of defect in motor unit pathway, i.e ., anterior horn cells, nerve root, peripheral nerve, neuromuscular junction or muscle. Identification of the cause is primarily based on a good medical history and detailed clinical examination supplemented with neurophysiologic investigations and sometimes few specific laboratory tests. Medical history and neurological examination should be focused on the onset, progression, pattern and severity of muscle weakness as well as cranial nerves testing and tests for autonomic dysfunction. Associated non neurological features like fever, rash or other skin lesions etc. should also be noted. Globally, Guillain-Barré syndrome is the most frequent cause of ANMP and accounts for the majority of cases of respiratory muscles weakness associated with neuromuscular disorders. Newly acquired neuromuscular weakness in intensive care unit patients consist of critical illness polyneuropathy, critical illness myopathy and drug induced neuromuscular weakness which may

  14. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C

    2015-04-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K(+) levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are "channelopathies" caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1), and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, and Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  15. Nutritional status and weakness following pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Sandra; Peterson, Mark; Gatza, Erin; Choi, Sung Won

    2016-12-01

    Survivorship after pediatric HCT has increased over the past decade. Focus on long-term care and well-being remains critical due to risk of poor dietary habits and exaggerated sedentary behavior, which can lead to muscle weakness, increased risk for obesity, and cardiometabolic disorders. Nutrition and physical activity are key factors in survivorship; however, data are limited. Comprehensive nutritional assessments, including nutrition-focused physical examination, grip strength, and food/activity surveys, were completed in 36 pediatric HCT survivors (aged 2-25 years). Patients were divided into undernutrition, normal-nutrition, and overnutrition categories. Fifty percent of participants were classified as normal nutrition, 22% undernutrition, and 28% overnutrition. Few patients met the U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommended intake for vegetables, fiber, saturated fat, and So FAS. Patients in the undernutrition group demonstrated significantly lower grip strength than those in the normal- and overnutrition groups. When grip strength was normalized to body mass, patients in the overnutrition group had the highest prevalence of weakness. Using NHANES reference data, maximum grip strength and NGS cutoffs were identified that could significantly distinguish the nutrition groups. Comprehensive nutritional assessments and grip strength measurements are feasible, non-invasive, easy to perform, and inform both under- and overnutrition in pediatric HCT survivors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Partial characterization and response under hyperregulating conditions of Na+-K+ ATPase and levamisole-sensitive alkaline phosphatase activities in chela muscle of the euryhaline crab Cyrtograpsus angulatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Andrea Pinoni

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence, characteristics and response to changes in environmental salinity of Na+-K+ ATPase and levamisole-sensitive alkaline phosphatase (AP activities were studied in chela muscle of the euryhaline crab Cyrtograpsus angulatus. Chela muscle exhibited an Na+-K+ ATPase activity which was strongly dependent on ATP concentration, pH and temperature of the reaction mixture. Maximal activity was found at 1 mM ATP, 30-37°C and pH 7.4. Levamisole-sensitive AP activity was characterised at physiological pH 7.4 and at pH 8.0. I50 for levamisole-sensitive AP activity was 8.8 mM and 8.0 mM at pH 7.4 and 8.0, respectively. At both pH levels, levamisole-sensitive AP activity exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km=3.451 mM and 6.906 mM at pH 7.4 and 8.0, respectively. Levamisole-sensitive AP activities were strongly affected by temperature, exhibiting a peak at 37ºC. In crabs acclimated to low salinity (10; hyperegulating conditions, Na+-K+ ATPase activity and levamisole-sensitive AP activity at the physiological pH were higher than in 35 psu (osmoconforming conditions. The response to low salinity suggests that both activities could be components of muscle regulatory mechanisms at the biochemical level secondary to hyperegulation of C. angulatus. The study of these activities under hyperegulating conditions contributes to a better understanding of the complexity of biochemical mechanisms underlying the adaptive process of euryhaline crabs.

  17. Increased skeletal muscle 11βHSD1 mRNA is associated with lower muscle strength in ageing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alixe H M Kilgour

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass and function with age, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Current understanding of the underlying mechanisms is limited. Glucocorticoids (GC in excess cause muscle weakness and atrophy. We hypothesized that GC may contribute to sarcopenia through elevated circulating levels or increased glucocorticoid receptor (GR signaling by increased expression of either GR or the GC-amplifying enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1 in muscle.There were 82 participants; group 1 comprised 33 older men (mean age 70.2 years, SD 4.4 and 19 younger men (22.2 years, 1.7 and group 2 comprised 16 older men (79.1 years, 3.4 and 14 older women (80.1 years, 3.7. We measured muscle strength, mid-thigh cross-sectional area, fasting morning plasma cortisol, quadriceps muscle GR and 11βHSD1 mRNA, and urinary glucocorticoid metabolites. Data were analysed using multiple linear regression adjusting for age, gender and body size.Muscle strength and size were not associated with plasma cortisol, total urinary glucocorticoids or the ratio of urinary 5β-tetrahydrocortisol +5α-tetrahydrocortisol to tetrahydrocortisone (an index of systemic 11βHSD activity. Muscle strength was associated with 11βHSD1 mRNA levels (β -0.35, p = 0.04, but GR mRNA levels were not significantly associated with muscle strength or size.Although circulating levels of GC are not associated with muscle strength or size in either gender, increased cortisol generation within muscle by 11βHSD1 may contribute to loss of muscle strength with age, a key component of sarcopenia. Inhibition of 11βHSD1 may have therapeutic potential in sarcopenia.

  18. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome increases immobility-induced neuromuscular weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Heidrun; Helming, Marc; Unterbuchner, Christoph; Lenz, Andrea; Neff, Frauke; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Blobner, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    Inflammation and immobility are comorbid etiological factors inducing muscle weakness in critically ill patients. This study establishes a rat model to examine the effect of inflammation and immobilization alone and in combination on muscle contraction, histology, and acetylcholine receptor regulation. Prospective, randomized, experimental study. Animal laboratory of a university hospital. Sprague-Dawley rats. To produce systemic inflammation, rats (n = 34) received three consecutive intravenous injections of Corynebacterium parvum on days 0, 4, and 8. Control rats (n = 21) received saline. Both groups were further divided to have one hind limb either immobilized by pinning of knee and ankle joints or sham-immobilized (surgical leg). The contralateral nonsurgical leg of each animal served as control (nonsurgical leg). After 12 days, body weight and muscle mass were significantly reduced in all C. parvum animals compared with saline-injected rats. Immobilization led to local muscle atrophy. Normalized to muscle mass, tetanic contraction was reduced in the surgical leg after immobilization (7.64 +/- 1.91 N/g) and after inflammation (8.71 +/- 2.0 N/g; both p < .05 vs. sham immobilization and saline injection, 11.03 +/- 2.26 N/g). Histology showed an increase in inflammatory cells in all C. parvum-injected animals. Immobilization in combination with C. parvum injection had an additive effect on inflammation. Acetylcholine receptors were increased in immobilized muscles and in all muscles of C. parvum-injected animals. The muscle weakness in critically ill patients can be replicated in our novel rat model. Inflammation and immobilization independently lead to muscle weakness.

  19. Qubit state tomography in a superconducting circuit via weak measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lupei; Xu, Luting; Feng, Wei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2017-03-01

    In this work we present a study on a new scheme for measuring the qubit state in a circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) system, based on weak measurement and the concept of weak value. To be applicable under generic parameter conditions, our formulation and analysis are carried out for finite-strength weak measurement, and in particular beyond the bad-cavity and weak-response limits. The proposed study is accessible to present state-of-the-art circuit QED experiments.

  20. Finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus motor neuron disease syndrome: A novel motor neuron disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Aline; Thakore, Nimish; Pioro, Erik P; Poesen, Koen; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Meijer, Inge A; Rucker, Janet C; Kissel, John T; Van Damme, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Disturbances of eye movements are infrequently encountered in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) or motor neuropathies, and there is no known syndrome that combines progressive muscle weakness with downbeat nystagmus. To describe the core clinical features of a syndrome of MND associated with downbeat nystagmus, clinical features were collected from 6 patients. All patients had slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting in combination with downbeat nystagmus, which was clinically most obvious in downward and lateral gaze. Onset was in the second to fourth decade with finger extension weakness, progressing to other distal and sometimes more proximal muscles. Visual complaints were not always present. Electrodiagnostic testing showed signs of regional motor axonal loss in all patients. The etiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Because finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus are the discriminating clinical features of this MND, we propose the name FEWDON-MND syndrome. Muscle Nerve 56: 1164-1168, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Newton Output Blocking Force under Low-Voltage Stimulation for Carbon Nanotube-Electroactive Polymer Composite Artificial Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Wen Peter; Yang, Ming-Chia; Yang, Chia-Hui; Zhong, Dai-Xuan; Hsu, Ming-Chun; Chen, YiWen

    2017-02-15

    This is a study on the development of carbon nanotube-based composite actuators using a new ionic liquid-doped electroactive ionic polymer. For scalable production purposes, a simple hot-pressing method was used. Carbon nanotube/ionic liquid-Nafion/carbon nanotube composite films were fabricated that exhibited a large output blocking force and a stable cycling life with low alternating voltage stimuli in air. Of particular interest and importance, a blocking force of 1.5 N was achieved at an applied voltage of 6 V. Operational durability was confirmed by testing in air for over 30 000 cycles (or 43 h). The superior actuation performance of the carbon nanotube/ionic liquid-Nafion/carbon nanotube composite, coupled with easy manufacturability, low driving voltage, and reliable operation, promises great potential for artificial muscle and biomimetic applications.

  2. Muscle wasting in myotonic dystrophies: a model of premature aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Judith eMateos-Aierdi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1 or Steinert’s disease and type II (DM2 are multisystem disorders of genetic origin. Progressive muscular weakness, atrophy and myotonia are the most prominent neuromuscular features of these diseases, and other clinical manifestations such as cardiomyopathy, insulin-resistance and cataracts are also common. From a clinical perspective, most DM symptoms are interpreted as a result of an accelerated aging (cataracts, muscular weakness and atrophy, cognitive decline, metabolic dysfunction, etc., including an increased risk of developing tumors. From this point of view, DM1 could be described as a progeroid syndrome since a notable age-dependent dysfunction of all systems occurs. The underlying molecular disorder in DM1 consists of the existence of a pathological (CTGn triplet expansion in the 3’ untranslated region of the DMPK gene, whereas (CCTGn repeats in the first intron of the CNBP/ZNF9 gene cause DM2. The expansions are transcribed into (CUGn and (CCUGn-containing RNA, respectively, which form secondary structures and sequester RNA-binding proteins, such as the splicing factor muscleblind-like protein (MBNL, forming nuclear aggregates known as foci. Other splicing factors, such as CUGBP, are also disrupted, leading to a spliceopathy of a large number of downstream genes linked to the clinical features of these diseases. Skeletal muscle regeneration relies on muscle progenitor cells, known as satellite cells, which are activated after muscle damage, and which proliferate and differentiate to muscle cells, thus regenerating the damaged tissue. Satellite cell dysfunction seems to be a common feature of both age-dependent muscle degeneration (sarcopenia and muscle wasting in DM and other muscle degenerative diseases. This review aims to describe the cellular, molecular and macrostructural processes involved in the muscular degeneration seen in DM patients, highlighting the similarities found with muscle aging.

  3. Pelvic floor muscle strength and sexual function in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Sacomori

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Pelvic floor (PF muscles react to sexual stimuli with increased local blood circulation and involuntary contractions during orgasm. The training of the PF musculature helps in the improvement of the female sexual function. Objective : To verify the association between PF muscle strength and sexual function in women, controlling age and parity. Method : Cross-sectional study based on associations. The study included women who attended a reference center in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, for a uterine cancer smear test. The Functional Evaluation of the Pelvic Floor and the Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire were used. Statistical procedures included Mann-Whitney U tests, Spearman correlation and Poisson Regression Analysis, with p < .05. Results : The mean age of the women (n = 177 was 39.05 years (SD = 13.3. Regarding PF function, 53.7% of participants presented weak or not palpable PF muscle function. Women with "good" muscle function (able to maintain contraction under examiner's resistance had significantly better indexes of sexual desire, excitement, lubrication and orgasm than women with weak/poor function. We identified that 52.5% of the women presented sexual dysfunction. Women with "poor" PF function and aged over 50 years had, respectively, 1.36 (CI95% 1.01 - 1.82 and 1.77 (CI95% 1.41 - 2.23 higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction than women with "good" PF function. Conclusions : Adult women with better PF muscle function also presented better sexual function.

  4. Atypical presentation of GNE myopathy with asymmetric hand weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, John Karl L.; Shrader, Joseph A.; Joe, Galen O.; McClean, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Kayla; Evers, Robert; Malicdan, May Christine V.; Ciccone, Carla; Mankodi, Ami; Huizing, Marjan; McKew, John C.; Bluemke, David A.; Gahl, William A.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    GNE myopathy is a rare autosomal recessive muscle disease caused by mutations in GNE, the gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. GNE myopathy usually manifests in early adulthood with distal myopathy that progresses slowly and symmetrically, first involving distal muscles of the lower extremities, followed by proximal muscles with relative sparing of the quadriceps. Upper extremities are typically affected later in the disease. We report a patient with GNE myopathy who presented with asymmetric hand weakness. He had considerably decreased left grip strength, atrophy of the left anterior forearm and fibro-fatty tissue replacement of left forearm flexor muscles on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was an endoscopist and thus the asymmetric hand involvement may be associated with left hand overuse in daily repetitive pinching and gripping movements, highlighting the possible impact of environmental factors on the progression of genetic muscle conditions. PMID:25182749

  5. Atypical presentation of GNE myopathy with asymmetric hand weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, John Karl L; Shrader, Joseph A; Joe, Galen O; McClean, Jeffrey C; Williams, Kayla; Evers, Robert; Malicdan, May Christine V; Ciccone, Carla; Mankodi, Ami; Huizing, Marjan; McKew, John C; Bluemke, David A; Gahl, William A; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria

    2014-12-01

    GNE myopathy is a rare autosomal recessive muscle disease caused by mutations in GNE, the gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. GNE myopathy usually manifests in early adulthood with distal myopathy that progresses slowly and symmetrically, first involving distal muscles of the lower extremities, followed by proximal muscles with relative sparing of the quadriceps. Upper extremities are typically affected later in the disease. We report a patient with GNE myopathy who presented with asymmetric hand weakness. He had considerably decreased left grip strength, atrophy of the left anterior forearm and fibro-fatty tissue replacement of left forearm flexor muscles on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was an endoscopist and thus the asymmetric hand involvement may be associated with left hand overuse in daily repetitive pinching and gripping movements, highlighting the possible impact of environmental factors on the progression of genetic muscle conditions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effects of oblique muscle surgery on the rectus muscle pulley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okanobu, Hirotaka; Kono, Reika; Ohtsuki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the position of rectus muscle pulleys in Japanese eyes and to evaluate the effect of oblique muscle surgery on rectus muscle pulleys. Quasi-coronal plane MRI was used to determine area centroids of the 4 rectus muscles. The area centroids of the rectus muscles were transformed to 2-dimensional coordinates to represent pulley positions. The effects of oblique muscle surgery on the rectus muscle pulley positions in the coronal plane were evaluated in 10 subjects with cyclovertical strabismus and, as a control, pulley locations in 7 normal Japanese subjects were calculated. The mean positions of the rectus muscle pulleys in the coronal plane did not significantly differ from previous reports on normal populations, including Caucasians. There were significant positional shifts of the individual horizontal and vertical rectus muscle pulleys in 3 (100%) patients with inferior oblique advancement, but not in eyes with inferior oblique recession and superior oblique tendon advancement surgery. The surgical cyclorotatory effect was significantly correlated with the change in the angle of inclination formed by the line connecting the vertical rectus muscles (p=0.0234), but weakly correlated with that of the horizontal rectus muscles. The most important factor that affects the pulley position is the amount of ocular torsion, not the difference in surgical procedure induced by oblique muscle surgery. (author)

  7. Why Do Abdominal Muscles Sometimes Separate during Pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which exercises would be right for you. If abdominal muscle weakness associated with diastasis recti is interfering with your daily activities, surgery might be recommended to repair the muscle ...

  8. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal

  9. A young man with progressive weakness, double vision and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    revealed double vision during lateral gaze in either direc- tion. There was, however, no overt evidence of opthalmo- plegia. The remainder of his cranial nerves were normal. He had symmetrical proximal muscle weakness of his up- per and lower limbs; this included neck flexion (MRC score. 3/5), abduction and adduction of ...

  10. Muscle edema of the lower limb determined by MRI in Asian hypokalaemic periodic paralysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bai-Xue; Yang, Qi; Li, Sheng-Yun; Wan, Min; Wang, Han; Huo, Lin-Yu; Zhao, Ethan; Ding, Yu-Chuan; Ji, Xun-Ming; Guo, Xiu-Hai

    2015-03-01

    edema was also seen in healthy subjects after exercise. In Asian hypoPP patients, muscle edema as well as the underlying abnormal ion distributions across the muscle membrane is present even during the time interval between attacks of muscle weakness. The muscles of the lower leg are more likely to be edematous than muscles of the upper leg since these muscles are more actively used in daily life. Thus, muscles subjected to high activity are more likely to be edematous and sodium-overloaded.

  11. [Changes in cell respiration of postural muscle fibers under long-term gravitational unloading after dietary succinate supplementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, I V; Veselova, O M; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    The intensity of cell respiration of the rat m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius c.m. and tibialis anterior fibers during 35-day gravitational unloading, with the addition of succinate in the diet at a dosage rate of 50 mg per 1 kg animal weight has been investigated. The gravitational unloading was modeled by antiorthostatic hindlimb suspension. The intensity of cell respiration was estimated by polarography. It was shown that the rate of oxygen consumption by soleus and gastrocnemius fibers on endogenous and exogenous substrates and with the addition of ADP decreases after the discharge. This may be associated with the transition to the glycolytic energy path due to a decrease in the EMG-activity. At the same time, the respiration rate after the addition of exogenous substrates in soleus fibers did not increase, indicating a disturbance in the function of the NCCR-section of the respiratory chain and more pronounced changes in the structure of muscle fibers. In tibialis anterior fibers, no changes in oxygen consumption velocity were observed. The introduction of succinate to the diet of rats makes it possible to prevent the negative effects of hypokinesia, although it reduces the basal level of intensity of cell respiration.

  12. Pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles in a patient with diabetic neuropathy: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Lee, Young Hwan; Jung, Kyung Jae; Park, Young Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Ok Dong [School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    Partial or complete loss of innervation of skeletal muscle leads to muscle weakness and atrophic changes, resulting in decreased muscle volume with fatty replacement. Rarely, enlargement of the affected muscle may occur, related to two processes: true hypertrophy and pseudohypertrophy. We report CT and MR findings of the pseudohypertrophy of calf muscles, especially the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, in a patient with diabetic neuropathy that showed increased muscle volume with diffuse fatty replacement and the presence of scanty muscle fibers.

  13. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  14. Attending to weak signals: the leader's challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2005-12-01

    Halverson and Isham (2003) quote sources that report the accidental death rate of simply being in a hospital is " ... four hundred times more likely than your risk of death from traveling by train, forty times higher than driving a car, and twenty times higher than flying in a commercial aircraft" (p. 13). High-reliability organizations such as nuclear power plants and aircraft carriers have been pioneers in the business of recognizing weak signals. Weike and Sutcliffe (2001) note that high-reliability organizations distinguish themselves from others because of their mindfulness which enables them to see the significance of weak signals and to give strong interventions to weak signals. To act mindfully, these organizations have an underlying mental model of continually updating, anticipating, and focusing the possibility of failure using the intelligence that weak signals provides. Much of what happens is unexpected in health care. However, with a culture that is continually looking for weak signals, and intervenes and rescues when these signals are detected, the unexpected happens less often. This is the epitome of how leaders can build a culture of safety that focuses on recognizing the weak signals to manage the unforeseen.

  15. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-02

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event.

  16. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event

  17. Fermi and the Theory of Weak Interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Can the laws of physics distinguish between the two coordinate systems? Except for the weak interaction, all other laws of physics are symmetric under mirror reflection and hence cannot be used to distinguish between the left and right coordinate systems. The significance of this left{right symmetry, as well as its violation ...

  18. Anti-atherogenic effect of trivalent chromium-loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells under hyperglycemic conditions in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Rituparna; Wen, Amy M.; Myer, Ashley B.; Czech, Tori; Sahu, Soumyadip; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Raman, Priya

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis, a major macrovascular complication associated with diabetes, poses a tremendous burden on national health care expenditure. Despite extensive efforts, cost-effective remedies are unknown. Therapies for atherosclerosis are challenged by a lack of targeted drug delivery approaches. Toward this goal, we turn to a biology-derived drug delivery system utilizing nanoparticles formed by the plant virus, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). The aim herein is to investigate the anti-atherogenic potential of the beneficial mineral nutrient, trivalent chromium, loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) under hyperglycemic conditions. A non-covalent loading protocol is established yielding CrCl3-loaded CPMV (CPMV-Cr) carrying 2000 drug molecules per particle. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that CPMV-Cr is readily taken up by HASMC in vitro. In glucose (25 mM)-stimulated cells, 100 nM CPMV-Cr inhibits HASMC proliferation concomitant to attenuated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, proliferation marker) expression. This is accompanied by attenuation in high glucose-induced phospho-p38 and pAkt expression. Moreover, CPMV-Cr inhibits the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), in glucose-stimulated HASMCs. Finally glucose-stimulated lipid uptake is remarkably abrogated by CPMV-Cr, revealed by Oil Red O staining. Together, these data provide key cellular evidence for an atheroprotective effect of CPMV-Cr in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) under hyperglycemic conditions that may promote novel therapeutic ventures for diabetic atherosclerosis.

  19. Weak interactions modulating the dimensionality in supramolecular architectures in three new nickel(II)-hydrazone complexes, magnetostructural correlation, and catalytic potential for epoxidation of alkenes under phase transfer conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Dipali; Ray, Aurkie; Pilet, Guillaume; Rizzoli, Corrado; Rosair, Georgina M; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Signorella, Sandra; Bellú, Sebastián; Mitra, Samiran

    2011-09-05

    Three different ONO donor acetyl hydrazone Schiff bases have been synthesized from the condensation of acetic hydrazide with three different carbonyl compounds: salicylaldehyde (HL(1)), 2-hydroxyacetophenone (HL(2)), and 2, 3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (HL(3)). These tridentate ligands are reacted with Ni(OOCCF(3))(2)·xH(2)O to yield three new Ni(II) complexes having distorted octahedral geometry at each Ni center: [Ni(L(1))(OOCCF(3))(CH(3)OH)](2) (1), [Ni(L(2))(OOCCF(3))(H(2)O)](2) (2), and [Ni(L(3))(L(3)H)](OOCCF(3))(H(2)O)(1.65)(CH(3)OH)(0.35) (3). The ligands and the complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis and IR and UV-vis spectroscopy, and the structures of the complexes have been established by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. 1 and 2 are centrosymmetric dinuclear complexes and are structural isomers whereas 3 is a bis chelated cationic monomer coordinated by one neutral and one monoanionic ligand. O-H···O hydrogen bonds in 3 lead to the formation of a dimer. Slight steric and electronic modifications in the ligand backbone provoke differences in the supramolecular architectures of the complexes, leading to a variety of one, two, and three-dimensional hydrogen bonded networks in complexes 1-3 respectively. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that moderate antiferromagnetic interactions operate between phenoxo bridged Ni(II) dimers in 1 and 2 whereas very weak antiferromagnetic exchange occurs through hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions in 3. All complexes are proved to be efficient catalysts for the epoxidation of alkenes by NaOCl under phase transfer condition. The efficiency of alkene epoxidation is dramatically enhanced by lowering the pH, and the reactions are supposed to involve high valent Ni(III)-OCl or Ni(III)-O· intermediates. 3 is the best epoxidation catalyst among the three complexes with 99% conversion and very high turnover number (TON, 396).

  20. Methodology for analyzing weak spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yankovich, T.L.; Swainson, I.P.

    2000-02-01

    There is considerable interest in quantifying radionuclide transfer between environmental compartments. However, in many cases, it can be a challenge to detect concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides due to their low levels in environmental samples. As a result, it is valuable to develop analytical protocols to ensure consistent analysis of the areas under weak peaks. The current study has focused on testing how reproducibly peak areas and baselines can be determined using two analytical approaches. The first approach, which can be carried out using Maestro software, involves extracting net counts under a curve without fitting a functional form to the peak, whereas the second approach, which is used by most other peak fitting programs, determines net counts from spectra by fitting a Gaussian form to the data. It was found that the second approach produces more consistent peak area and baseline measurements, with the ability to de-convolute multiple, overlapping peaks. In addition, programs, such as Peak Fit, which can be used to fit a form to spectral data, often provide goodness of fit analyses, since the Gaussian form can be described using a characteristic equation against which peak data can be tested for their statistical significance. (author)

  1. Muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvanovic, S; Vissing, J

    2014-01-01

    is related to disease duration or gender. The aim of this study was to quantify the strength of patients with MG and investigate whether it is related to disease duration. METHODS: Eight muscle groups were tested by manual muscle testing and with a hand-held dynamometer in 38 patients with generalized MG...... and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The disease duration was recorded and compared with strength measures. RESULTS: On average, muscle strength was decreased by 28% compared with controls (Pstrength measures in individual patients did not differ, suggesting that the muscle...... force reported was not subject to fatigue, but reflected fixed weakness. The male patients showed a greater reduction in muscle force in all eight muscle groups than women with MG (60% vs 77% of normal, Pstrength in shoulder abductors was most affected (51% vs 62...

  2. HDAC1 activates FoxO and is both sufficient and required for skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beharry, Adam W.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Roberts, Brandon M.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors are activated, and necessary for the muscle atrophy, in several pathophysiological conditions, including muscle disuse and cancer cachexia. However, the mechanisms that lead to FoxO activation are not well defined. Recent data from our laboratory and others indicate that the activity of FoxO is repressed under basal conditions via reversible lysine acetylation, which becomes compromised during catabolic conditions. Therefore, we aimed to determine how histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins contribute to activation of FoxO and induction of the muscle atrophy program. Through the use of various pharmacological inhibitors to block HDAC activity, we demonstrate that class I HDACs are key regulators of FoxO and the muscle-atrophy program during both nutrient deprivation and skeletal muscle disuse. Furthermore, we demonstrate, through the use of wild-type and dominant-negative HDAC1 expression plasmids, that HDAC1 is sufficient to activate FoxO and induce muscle fiber atrophy in vivo and is necessary for the atrophy of muscle fibers that is associated with muscle disuse. The ability of HDAC1 to cause muscle atrophy required its deacetylase activity and was linked to the induction of several atrophy genes by HDAC1, including atrogin-1, which required deacetylation of FoxO3a. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of class I HDACs during muscle disuse, using MS-275, significantly attenuated both disuse muscle fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Together, these data solidify the importance of class I HDACs in the muscle atrophy program and indicate that class I HDAC inhibitors are feasible countermeasures to impede muscle atrophy and weakness. PMID:24463822

  3. Standard and Null Weak Values

    OpenAIRE

    Zilberberg, Oded; Romito, Alessandro; Gefen, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Weak value (WV) is a quantum mechanical measurement protocol, proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman. It consists of a weak measurement, which is weighed in, conditional on the outcome of a later, strong measurement. Here we define another two-step measurement protocol, null weak value (NVW), and point out its advantages as compared to WV. We present two alternative derivations of NWVs and compare them to the corresponding derivations of WVs.

  4. Weak Measurement and Quantum Correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Kumar Pati

    The concept of the weak measurements, for the first time, was introduced by Aharonov et al.1. Quantum state is preselected in |ψi〉 and allowed to interact weakly with apparatus. Measurement strength can be tuned and for “small g(t)” it is called 'weak measurement'. With postselection in |ψf 〉, apparatus state is shifted by an ...

  5. Weak openness and almost openness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Rose

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Weak openness and almost openness for arbitrary functions between topological spaces are defined as duals to the weak continuity of Levine and the almost continuity of Husain respectively. Independence of these two openness conditions is noted and comparison is made between these and the almost openness of Singal and Singal. Some results dual to those known for weak continuity and almost continuity are obtained. Nearly almost openness is defined and used to obtain an improved link from weak continuity to almost continuity.

  6. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Summary Points. • Muscle pain, known as myalgia, can be in one targeted area or across many muscles, occurring with overexertion or overuse of these muscles. • Pain can be classified as acute or chronic pain and further categorized as nociceptive or neuropathic. • Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical ...

  7. Weak Weak Lensing : How Accurately Can Small Shears be Measured?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Now that weak lensing signals on the order of a percent are actively being searched for (cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, large radii in clusters...) it is important to investigate how accurately weak shears can be determined. Many systematic effects are present, and need to be

  8. Weak layer fracture: facets and depth hoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reiweger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding failure initiation within weak snow layers is essential for modeling and predicting dry-snow slab avalanches. We therefore performed laboratory experiments with snow samples containing a weak layer consisting of either faceted crystals or depth hoar. During these experiments the samples were loaded with different loading rates and at various tilt angles until fracture. The strength of the samples decreased with increasing loading rate and increasing tilt angle. Additionally, we took pictures of the side of four samples with a high-speed video camera and calculated the displacement using a particle image velocimetry (PIV algorithm. The fracture process within the weak layer could thus be observed in detail. Catastrophic failure started due to a shear fracture just above the interface between the depth hoar layer and the underlying crust.

  9. Activation of the dopamine 1 and dopamine 5 receptors increase skeletal muscle mass and force production under non-atrophying and atrophying conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of skeletal muscle mass and force production is a complex physiological process involving numerous regulatory systems. Agents that increase skeletal muscle cAMP levels have been shown to modulate skeletal muscle mass and force production. The dopamine 1 receptor and its closely related homolog, the dopamine 5 receptor, are G-protein coupled receptors that are expressed in skeletal muscle and increase cAMP levels when activated. Thus we hypothesize that activation of the dopamine 1 and/or 5 receptor will increase skeletal muscle cAMP levels thereby modulating skeletal muscle mass and force production. Methods We treated isolated mouse tibialis anterior (TA and medial gastrocnemius (MG muscles in tissue bath with the selective dopamine 1 receptor and dopamine 5 receptor agonist SKF 81297 to determine if activation of skeletal muscle dopamine 1 and dopamine 5 receptors will increase cAMP. We dosed wild-type mice, dopamine 1 receptor knockout mice and dopamine 5 receptor knockout mice undergoing casting-induced disuse atrophy with SKF 81297 to determine if activation of the dopamine 1 and dopamine 5 receptors results in hypertrophy of non-atrophying skeletal muscle and preservation of atrophying skeletal muscle mass and force production. Results In tissue bath, isolated mouse TA and MG muscles responded to SKF 81297 treatment with increased cAMP levels. Treating wild-type mice with SKF 81297 reduced casting-induced TA and MG muscle mass loss in addition to increasing the mass of non-atrophying TA and MG muscles. In dopamine 1 receptor knockout mice, extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus muscle mass and force was not preserved during casting with SKF 81297 treatment, in contrast to significant preservation of casted wild-type mouse EDL and soleus mass and EDL force with SKF 81297 treatment. Dosing dopamine 5 receptor knockout mice with SKF 81297 did not significantly preserve EDL and soleus muscle mass and force

  10. Extrapolating Weak Selection in Evolutionary Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; García, Julián; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In evolutionary games, reproductive success is determined by payoffs. Weak selection means that even large differences in game outcomes translate into small fitness differences. Many results have been derived using weak selection approximations, in which perturbation analysis facilitates the derivation of analytical results. Here, we ask whether results derived under weak selection are also qualitatively valid for intermediate and strong selection. By “qualitatively valid” we mean that the ranking of strategies induced by an evolutionary process does not change when the intensity of selection increases. For two-strategy games, we show that the ranking obtained under weak selection cannot be carried over to higher selection intensity if the number of players exceeds two. For games with three (or more) strategies, previous examples for multiplayer games have shown that the ranking of strategies can change with the intensity of selection. In particular, rank changes imply that the most abundant strategy at one intensity of selection can become the least abundant for another. We show that this applies already to pairwise interactions for a broad class of evolutionary processes. Even when both weak and strong selection limits lead to consistent predictions, rank changes can occur for intermediate intensities of selection. To analyze how common such games are, we show numerically that for randomly drawn two-player games with three or more strategies, rank changes frequently occur and their likelihood increases rapidly with the number of strategies . In particular, rank changes are almost certain for , which jeopardizes the predictive power of results derived for weak selection. PMID:24339769

  11. Comparison of gluteus medius muscle activity during functional tasks in individuals with and without osteoarthritis of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Maureen K; Stafford, Kelly; Mattacola, Carl G; Uhl, Timothy L; Giordani, Mauro

    2013-08-01

    Neuromuscular alterations have been reported for patients with osteoarthritis of the hip joint; however, the underlying cause associated with altered gluteus medius muscle function has not been examined. This study assessed electromyographic amplitudes of the gluteus medius muscles during function in patients with unilateral end-stage osteoarthritis of the hip joint compared to controls. Patients with unilateral end-stage hip joint osteoarthritis (n=13) and asymptomatic control participants (n=17) participated. Average root-mean squared muscle amplitudes represented as a percent of maximum voluntary isometric contraction for both the involved and uninvolved limb gluteus medius muscles were analyzed during step up, step down, and gait. The association between muscle activation and impact forces during stepping tasks was assessed. Patients with hip osteoarthritis exhibited increased gluteus medius muscle electromyographic amplitudes bilaterally during stair ascent, stair descent, and gait compared to controls, regardless of which limb they led. Involved limb muscle activity was inversely related to impact force during step down onto the ipsilateral limb. Patients with hip osteoarthritis demonstrated increased gluteus medius muscle activation levels during stepping tasks and gait when compared to controls. The increased activation is most likely a compensatory response to muscle weakness. Therefore, application of strengthening exercises which target the gluteal muscles should assist in neuromuscular control and result in improved strength for patients with hip joint osteoarthritis. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of American Society of Biomechanics. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative analysis of skeletal muscle mass in patients with rheumatic diseases under glucocorticoid therapy--comparison among bioelectrical impedance analysis, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Kiryu, Shigeru; Uehara, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Matsumiya, Ryo; Kuribara, Akiko; Maruyama, Takako; Tanaka, Hirotoshi

    2015-03-01

    To determine the availability of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for measurement of skeletal muscle mass in patients with rheumatic diseases and quantitatively assess skeletal muscle loss after glucocorticoid (GC) treatment. The data from 22 patients with rheumatic diseases were retrospectively obtained. The muscle mass of body segments was measured with a BIA device in terms of skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Cross-sectional area (CSA) was obtained from CT and MRI scans at the mid-thigh level using the image analysis program. We further assessed the data of three different measurements before and after GC treatment in 7 patients with rheumatic diseases. SMI of whole body was significantly correlated with estimated muscle volume and mid-thigh muscle CSA with CT and MRI (p rheumatic diseases, and CT and MRI appeared to be more accurate than BIA.

  13. Electromagnetic current in weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, E.

    1983-01-01

    In gauge models which unify weak and electromagnetic interactions, the weak neutral-current interaction also involves the electromagnetic current. The exact nature of such a component can be explored using e + e - experimental data. In recent years, the existence of a new component of the weak interaction has become firmly established, i.e., the neutral-current interaction. As such, it competes with the electromagnetic interaction whenever the particles involved are also charged, but at a very much lower rate because its effective strength is so small. Hence neutrino processes are best for the detection of the neutral-current interaction. However, in any gauge model which unifies weak and electromagnetic interactions, the weak neutral-current interaction also involves the electromagnetic current

  14. Quantification of the weakness and fatigue in thoracic outlet syndrome with isokinetic measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcakar, L; Inanici, F; Kaymak, B; Abali, G; Cetin, A; Hascelik, Z

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) complain of many subjective symptoms that are difficult to measure and quantify. In this study we have tried to assess the weakness (muscle strength) and fatigue (endurance) of these patients with an objective measurement method, isokinetic muscle testing.

  15. Gait propulsion in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and ankle plantarflexor weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, N.H.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Rooy, J.W.J. de; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is a slowly progressive hereditary disorder resulting in fatty infiltration of eventually most skeletal muscles. Weakness of trunk and leg muscles causes problems with postural balance and gait, and is associated with an increased fall risk. Although drop foot

  16. Ethanol Exposure Causes Muscle Degeneration in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Coffey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic myopathies are characterized by neuromusculoskeletal symptoms such as compromised movement and weakness. Although these symptoms have been attributed to neurological damage, EtOH may also target skeletal muscle. EtOH exposure during zebrafish primary muscle development or adulthood results in smaller muscle fibers. However, the effects of EtOH exposure on skeletal muscle during the growth period that follows primary muscle development are not well understood. We determined the effects of EtOH exposure on muscle during this phase of development. Strikingly, muscle fibers at this stage are acutely sensitive to EtOH treatment: EtOH induces muscle degeneration. The severity of EtOH-induced muscle damage varies but muscle becomes more refractory to EtOH as muscle develops. NF-kB induction in muscle indicates that EtOH triggers a pro-inflammatory response. EtOH-induced muscle damage is p53-independent. Uptake of Evans blue dye shows that EtOH treatment causes sarcolemmal instability before muscle fiber detachment. Dystrophin-null sapje mutant zebrafish also exhibit sarcolemmal instability. We tested whether Trichostatin A (TSA, which reduces muscle degeneration in sapje mutants, would affect EtOH-treated zebrafish. We found that TSA and EtOH are a lethal combination. EtOH does, however, exacerbate muscle degeneration in sapje mutants. EtOH also disrupts adhesion of muscle fibers to their extracellular matrix at the myotendinous junction: some detached muscle fibers retain beta-Dystroglycan indicating failure of muscle end attachments. Overexpression of Paxillin, which reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish deficient for beta-Dystroglycan, is not sufficient to rescue degeneration. Taken together, our results suggest that EtOH exposure has pleiotropic deleterious effects on skeletal muscle.

  17. Quadriceps weakness in a family with nemaline myopathy; influence of knee angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, K.H.L.; Gommans, I.M.P.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; de Haan, A.

    2003-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a congenital neuromuscular disorder, which primarily affects the thin filaments. Clinically the most important feature is muscle weakness; however, this weakness is poorly understood. The present investigation aimed to determine the torque angle relationship of the knee extensor

  18. A muscle model for hybrid muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klauer Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To develop model-based control strategies for Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES in order to support weak voluntary muscle contractions, a hybrid model for describing joint motions induced by concurrent voluntary-and FES induced muscle activation is proposed. It is based on a Hammerstein model – as commonly used in feedback controlled FES – and exemplarily applied to describe the shoulder abduction joint angle. Main component of a Hammerstein muscle model is usually a static input nonlinearity depending on the stimulation intensity. To additionally incorporate voluntary contributions, we extended the static non-linearity by a second input describing the intensity of the voluntary contribution that is estimated by electromyography (EMG measurements – even during active FES. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN is used to describe the static input non-linearity. The output of the ANN drives a second-order linear dynamical system that describes the combined muscle activation and joint angle dynamics. The tunable parameters are adapted to the individual subject by a system identification approach using previously recorded I/O-data. The model has been validated in two healthy subjects yielding RMS values for the joint angle error of 3.56° and 3.44°, respectively.

  19. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    assessed. METHODS: Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. RESULTS......, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles...

  20. The QpWeak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androic, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Asaturyan, A.; Averett, T.; Balewski, J.; Beaufait, J.; Beminiwattha, R. S.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Birchall, J.; Carlini, R. D.; Cornejo, J. C.; Covrig, S.; Dalton, M. M.; Davis, C. A.; Deconinck, W.; Diefenbach, J.; Dow, K.; Dowd, J. F.; Dunne, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    In May 2012, the Q p Weak collaboration completed a two year measurement program to determine the weak charge of the proton Q W p = ( 1 - 4sin 2 θ W ) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF). The experiment was designed to produce a 4.0 % measurement of the weak charge, via a 2.5 % measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in the number of elastically scattered 1.165 GeV electrons from protons, at forward angles. At the proposed precision, the experiment would produce a 0.3 % measurement of the weak mixing angle at a momentum transfer of Q 2  = 0.026 GeV 2 , making it the most precise stand alone measurement of the weak mixing angle at low momentum transfer. In combination with other parity measurements, Q p Weak will also provide a high precision determination of the weak charges of the up and down quarks. At the proposed precision, a significant deviation from the Standard Model prediction could be a signal of new physics at mass scales up to ≃ 6 TeV, whereas agreement would place new and significant constraints on possible Standard Model extensions at mass scales up to ≃ 2 TeV. This paper provides an overview of the physics and the experiment, as well as a brief look at some preliminary diagnostic and analysis data.

  1. Experimental investigations of weak definite and weak indefinite noun phrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Natalie M; Gegg-Harrison, Whitney M; Carlson, Greg N; Tanenhaus, Michael K

    2013-08-01

    Definite noun phrases typically refer to entities that are uniquely identifiable in the speaker and addressee's common ground. Some definite noun phrases (e.g., the hospital in Mary had to go the hospital and John did too) seem to violate this uniqueness constraint. We report six experiments that were motivated by the hypothesis that these "weak definite" interpretations arise in "incorporated" constructions. Experiments 1-3 compared nouns that seem to allow for a weak definite interpretation (e.g., hospital, bank, bus, radio) with those that do not (e.g., farm, concert, car, book). Experiments 1 and 2 used an instruction-following task and picture-judgment task, respectively, to demonstrate that a weak definite need not uniquely refer. In Experiment 3 participants imagined scenarios described by sentences such as The Federal Express driver had to go to the hospital/farm. Scenarios following weak definite noun phrases were more likely to include conventional activities associated with the object, whereas following regular nouns, participants were more likely to imagine scenarios that included typical activities associated with the subject; similar effects were observed with weak indefinites. Experiment 4 found that object-related activities were reduced when the same subject and object were used with a verb that does not license weak definite interpretations. In Experiment 5, a science fiction story introduced an artificial lexicon for novel concepts. Novel nouns that shared conceptual properties with English weak definite nouns were more likely to allow weak reference in a judgment task. Experiment 6 demonstrated that familiarity for definite articles and anti-familiarity for indefinite articles applies to the activity associated with the noun, consistent with predictions made by the incorporation analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct observation of syringeal muscle function in songbirds and a parrot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Goller, Franz

    2002-01-01

    . Under the experimental conditions used in this study, full constriction of the syringeal lumen could not be achieved by stimulating adductor muscles. Full closure may require simultaneous activation of extrinsic syringeal muscles or the supine positioning of the bird may have exerted excessive tension....... In parrots (cockatiels, Nymphicus hollandicus), direct observations show that even during quiet respiration the lateral tympaniform membranes (LTMs) are partially adducted into the tracheal lumen to form a narrow slot. Contraction of the superficial intrinsic muscle, m. syringealis superficialis, adducts...... the LTMs further into the tracheal lumen but does not close the syringeal aperture fully. The intrinsic deep muscle, m. syringealis profundus, abducts the LTMs through cranio-laterad movement of a paired, protruding half-ring. The weakly developed extrinsic m. sternotrachealis seems to increase tension...

  3. Resisting Weakness of the Will.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Neil

    2011-01-01

    I develop an account of weakness of the will that is driven by experimental evidence from cognitive and social psychology. I will argue that this account demonstrates that there is no such thing as weakness of the will: no psychological kind corresponds to it. Instead, weakness of the will ought to be understood as depletion of System II resources. Neither the explanatory purposes of psychology nor our practical purposes as agents are well-served by retaining the concept. I therefore suggest that we ought to jettison it, in favour of the vocabulary and concepts of cognitive psychology.

  4. Asymptotic theory of weakly dependent random processes

    CERN Document Server

    Rio, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Presenting tools to aid understanding of asymptotic theory and weakly dependent processes, this book is devoted to inequalities and limit theorems for sequences of random variables that are strongly mixing in the sense of Rosenblatt, or absolutely regular. The first chapter introduces covariance inequalities under strong mixing or absolute regularity. These covariance inequalities are applied in Chapters 2, 3 and 4 to moment inequalities, rates of convergence in the strong law, and central limit theorems. Chapter 5 concerns coupling. In Chapter 6 new deviation inequalities and new moment inequalities for partial sums via the coupling lemmas of Chapter 5 are derived and applied to the bounded law of the iterated logarithm. Chapters 7 and 8 deal with the theory of empirical processes under weak dependence. Lastly, Chapter 9 describes links between ergodicity, return times and rates of mixing in the case of irreducible Markov chains. Each chapter ends with a set of exercises. The book is an updated and extended ...

  5. Muscle channelopathies and electrophysiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherian Ajith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic syndromes and periodic paralyses are rare disorders of skeletal muscle characterized mainly by muscle stiffness or episodic attacks of weakness. Familial forms are caused by mutation in genes coding for skeletal muscle voltage ionic channels. Familial periodic paralysis and nondystrophic myotonias are disorders of skeletal muscle excitability caused by mutations in genes coding for voltage-gated ion channels. These diseases are characterized by episodic failure of motor activity due to muscle weakness (paralysis or stiffness (myotonia. Clinical studies have identified two forms of periodic paralyses: hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP, based on changes in serum potassium levels during the attacks, and three distinct forms of myotonias: paramyotonia congenita (PC, potassium-aggravated myotonia (PAM, and myotonia congenita (MC. PC and PAM have been linked to missense mutations in the SCN4A gene, which encodes α subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, whereas MC is caused by mutations in the chloride channel gene (CLCN1. Exercise is known to trigger, aggravate, or relieve symptoms. Therefore, exercise can be used as a functional test in electromyography to improve the diagnosis of these muscle disorders. Abnormal changes in the compound muscle action potential can be disclosed using different exercise tests. Five electromyographic (EMG patterns (I-V that may be used in clinical practice as guides for molecular diagnosis are discussed.

  6. WEAK SOLVABILITY FOR A CLASS OF CONTACT PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andaluzia Matei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A unilateral frictionless contact model, under the small deformationshypothesis, for static processes is considered. We model the behaviorof the material by a constitutive law stated in a subdifferentialform. The contact is described with Signorini's condition. Our studyfocuses on the weak solvability of the model, based on a weak formulation with dual Lagrange multipliers

  7. A coincidental variation of the axillary artery: the brachioradial artery and the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Konarik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery was encountered and described in a left upper limb of a male cadaver. A series of 214 upper limbs of Caucasian race was dissected. A variant artery, stemming from the very end of the axillary artery followed a superficial course distally. It passed the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm as usual radial artery, crossed ventrally to the palm and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of the brachioradial artery (incorrectly termed as the “radial artery with high origin”. Moreover, it was associated with another variation, concerning the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is essential for radiodiagnostic, surgical and traumatologic procedures. The superficially located artery brings an elevated danger of heavy bleeding in all unexpected situations, its variant branching can cause problems in radial catheterization procedures and the anomalously coursing other arterial variant poses an elevated danger in surgical procedures concerning the surgical neck of humerus.

  8. Weakly infinite-dimensional spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchuk, Vitalii V

    2007-01-01

    In this survey article two new classes of spaces are considered: m-C-spaces and w-m-C-spaces, m=2,3,...,∞. They are intermediate between the class of weakly infinite-dimensional spaces in the Alexandroff sense and the class of C-spaces. The classes of 2-C-spaces and w-2-C-spaces coincide with the class of weakly infinite-dimensional spaces, while the compact ∞-C-spaces are exactly the C-compact spaces of Haver. The main results of the theory of weakly infinite-dimensional spaces, including classification via transfinite Lebesgue dimensions and Luzin-Sierpinsky indices, extend to these new classes of spaces. Weak m-C-spaces are characterised by means of essential maps to Henderson's m-compacta. The existence of hereditarily m-strongly infinite-dimensional spaces is proved.

  9. How much muscle strength is required to walk in a crouch gait?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steele, K.M.; van der Krogt, M.M.; Schwartz, M.H.; Delp, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle weakness is commonly cited as a cause of crouch gait in individuals with cerebral palsy; however, outcomes after strength training are variable and mechanisms by which muscle weakness may contribute to crouch gait are unclear. Understanding how much muscle strength is required to walk in a

  10. The weak decay of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    Hypernuclei whose ground states are stable against strong decay are used to study two-baryon weak interactions. A review of th existing experimental data, including recent results from the AGS on /sub Λ/ 12 C and /sub Λ/ 11 B, shows that the lifetimes and branching ratios can be used to test the effective weak Hamiltonians used in the rate calculations. 10 refs., 4 figs

  11. Weakly Supervised Deep Detection Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bilen, Hakan; Vedaldi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Weakly supervised learning of object detection is an important problem in image understanding that still does not have a satisfactory solution. In this paper, we address this problem by exploiting the power of deep convolutional neural networks pre-trained on large-scale image-level classification tasks. We propose a weakly supervised deep detection architecture that modifies one such network to operate at the level of image regions, performing simultaneously region selection and classificati...

  12. Weakly compact operators and interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Maligranda, Lech

    1992-01-01

    The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. In this survey, we have collected and ordered some of this (partly very new) knowledge. We have also included some comments, remarks and examples. The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. I...

  13. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-03-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities.

  14. Weak interactions of elementary particles

    CERN Document Server

    Okun, Lev Borisovich

    1965-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 5: Weak Interaction of Elementary Particles focuses on the composition, properties, and reactions of elementary particles and high energies. The book first discusses elementary particles. Concerns include isotopic invariance in the Sakata model; conservation of fundamental particles; scheme of isomultiplets in the Sakata model; universal, unitary-symmetric strong interaction; and universal weak interaction. The text also focuses on spinors, amplitudes, and currents. Wave function, calculation of traces, five bilinear covariants,

  15. Anti-proliferative activity of oral anti-hyperglycemic agents on human vascular smooth muscle cells: thiazolidinediones (glitazones have enhanced activity under high glucose conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Dios Stephanie T

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC proliferation by oral anti-hyperglycemic agents may have a role to play in the amelioration of vascular disease in diabetes. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs inhibit vSMC proliferation but it has been reported that they anomalously stimulate [3H]-thymidine incorporation. We investigated three TZDs, two biguanides and two sulfonylureas for their ability of inhibit vSMC proliferation. People with diabetes obviously have fluctuating blood glucose levels thus we determined the effect of media glucose concentration on the inhibitory activity of TZDs in a vSMC preparation that grew considerably more rapidly under high glucose conditions. We further explored the mechanisms by which TZDs increase [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Methods VSMC proliferation was investigated by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell counting. Activation and inhibition of thymidine kinase utilized short term [3H]-thymidine uptake. Cell cycle events were analyzed by FACS. Results VSMC cells grown for 3 days in DMEM with 5% fetal calf serum under low (5 mM glucose and high (25 mM glucose increased in number by 2.5 and 4.7 fold, respectively. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone showed modest but statistically significantly greater inhibitory activity under high versus low glucose conditions (P 3H]-thymidine into DNA but did not increase cell numbers. Troglitazone inhibited serum mediated thymidine kinase induction in a concentration dependent manner. FACS analysis showed that troglitazone and rosiglitazone but not pioglitazone placed a slightly higher percentage of cells in the S phase of a growing culture. Of the biguanides, metformin had no effect on proliferation assessed as [3H]-thymidine incorporation or cell numbers whereas phenformin was inhibitory in both assays albeit at high concentrations. The sulfonylureas chlorpropamide and gliclazide had no inhibitory effect on vSMC proliferation assessed by either [3H

  16. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients suffering from acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders. PMID:27128663

  17. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  18. Functional impact of sarcopenia in respiratory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jonathan E; Greising, Sarah M; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2016-06-01

    The risk for respiratory complications and infections is substantially increased in old age, which may be due, in part, to sarcopenia (aging-related weakness and atrophy) of the diaphragm muscle (DIAm), reducing its force generating capacity and impairing the ability to perform expulsive non-ventilatory motor behaviors critical for airway clearance. The aging-related reduction in DIAm force generating capacity is due to selective atrophy of higher force generating type IIx and/or IIb muscle fibers, whereas lower force generating type I and IIa muscle fiber sizes are preserved. Fiber type specific DIAm atrophy is also seen following unilateral phrenic nerve denervation and in other neurodegenerative disorders. Accordingly, the effect of aging on DIAm function resembles that of neurodegeneration and suggests possible common mechanisms, such as the involvement of several neurotrophic factors in mediating DIAm sarcopenia. This review will focus on changes in two neurotrophic signaling pathways that represent potential mechanisms underlying the aging-related fiber type specific DIAm atrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick; Waerbeke, Ludovic van; Heavens, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening matter. The distortions are due to fluctuations in the gravitational potential, and are directly related to the distribution of matter and to the geometry and dynamics of the Universe. As a consequence, weak gravitational lensing offers unique possibilities for probing the Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe. In this review, we summarise the theoretical and observational state of the subject, focussing on the statistical aspects of weak lensing, and consider the prospects for weak lensing surveys in the future. Weak gravitational lensing surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations as they probe the unbiased non-linear matter power spectrum at modest redshifts. Most of the cosmological parameters are accurately estimated from CMB and large-scale galaxy surveys, so the focus of attention is shifting to understanding the nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the theoretical side, recent advances in the use of 3D information of the sources from photometric redshifts promise greater statistical power, and these are further enhanced by the use of statistics beyond two-point quantities such as the power spectrum. The use of 3D information also alleviates difficulties arising from physical effects such as the intrinsic alignment of galaxies, which can mimic weak lensing to some extent. On the observational side, in the next few years weak lensing surveys such as CFHTLS, VST-KIDS and Pan-STARRS, and the planned Dark Energy Survey, will provide the first weak lensing surveys covering very large sky areas and depth. In the long run even more ambitious programmes such as DUNE, the Supernova Anisotropy Probe (SNAP) and Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) are planned. Weak lensing of diffuse components such as the CMB and 21 cm emission can also

  20. Functional limb weakness and paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J; Aybek, S

    2016-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) limb weakness describes genuinely experienced limb power or paralysis in the absence of neurologic disease. The hallmark of functional limb weakness is the presence of internal inconsistency revealing a pattern of symptoms governed by abnormally focused attention. In this chapter we review the history and epidemiology of this clinical presentation as well as its subjective experience highlighting the detailed descriptions of authors at the end of the 19th and early 20th century. We discuss the relevance that physiological triggers such as injury and migraine and psychophysiological events such as panic and dissociation have to understanding of mechanism and treatment. We review many different positive diagnostic features, their basis in neurophysiological testing and present data on sensitivity and specificity. Diagnostic bedside tests with the most evidence are Hoover's sign, the hip abductor sign, drift without pronation, dragging gait, give way weakness and co-contraction. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Plane waves with weak singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Justin R.

    2003-03-01

    We study a class of time dependent solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations which are plane waves with weak null singularities. This singularity is weak in the sense that though the tidal forces diverge at the singularity, the rate of divergence is such that the distortion suffered by a freely falling observer remains finite. Among such weak singular plane waves there is a sub-class which does not exhibit large back reaction in the presence of test scalar probes. String propagation in these backgrounds is smooth and there is a natural way to continue the metric beyond the singularity. This continued metric admits string propagation without the string becoming infinitely excited. We construct a one parameter family of smooth metrics which are at a finite distance in the space of metrics from the extended metric and a well defined operator in the string sigma model which resolves the singularity. (author)

  2. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N ν ∼ 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Nonlinear waves and weak turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, V E

    1997-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers on dynamical and statistical theory of nonlinear wave propagation in dispersive conservative media. Emphasis is on waves on the surface of an ideal fluid and on Rossby waves in the atmosphere. Although the book deals mainly with weakly nonlinear waves, it is more than simply a description of standard perturbation techniques. The goal is to show that the theory of weakly interacting waves is naturally related to such areas of mathematics as Diophantine equations, differential geometry of waves, Poincaré normal forms, and the inverse scattering method.

  4. Weak interactions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1978-08-01

    Review lectures are presented on the phenomenological implications of the modern spontaneously broken gauge theories of the weak and electromagnetic interactions, and some observations are made about which high energy experiments probe what aspects of gauge theories. Basic quantum chromodynamics phenomenology is covered including momentum dependent effective quark distributions, the transverse momentum cutoff, search for gluons as sources of hadron jets, the status and prospects for the spectroscopy of fundamental fermions and how fermions may be used to probe aspects of the weak and electromagnetic gauge theory, studies of intermediate vector bosons, and miscellaneous possibilities suggested by gauge theories from the Higgs bosons to speculations about proton decay. 187 references

  5. Importance and challenges of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrinsic foot muscle weakness has been implicated in a range of foot deformities and disorders. However, to establish a relationship between intrinsic muscle weakness and foot pathology, an objective measure of intrinsic muscle strength is needed. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the anatomy and role of intrinsic foot muscles, implications of intrinsic weakness and evaluate the different methods used to measure intrinsic foot muscle strength. Method Literature was sourced from database searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PEDro and CINAHL up to June 2012. Results There is no widely accepted method of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength. Methods to estimate toe flexor muscle strength include the paper grip test, plantar pressure, toe dynamometry, and the intrinsic positive test. Hand-held dynamometry has excellent interrater and intrarater reliability and limits toe curling, which is an action hypothesised to activate extrinsic toe flexor muscles. However, it is unclear whether any method can actually isolate intrinsic muscle strength. Also most methods measure only toe flexor strength and other actions such as toe extension and abduction have not been adequately assessed. Indirect methods to investigate intrinsic muscle structure and performance include CT, ultrasonography, MRI, EMG, and muscle biopsy. Indirect methods often discriminate between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, but lack the ability to measure muscle force. Conclusions There are many challenges to accurately measure intrinsic muscle strength in isolation. Most studies have measured toe flexor strength as a surrogate measure of intrinsic muscle strength. Hand-held dynamometry appears to be a promising method of estimating intrinsic muscle strength. However, the contribution of extrinsic muscles cannot be excluded from toe flexor strength measurement. Future research should clarify the relative contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles

  6. Alterations at the cross-bridge level are associated with a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gineste, Charlotte; Ottenheijm, Coen; Le Fur, Yann; Banzet, Sébastien; Pecchi, Emilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J; Koulmann, Nathalie; Hardeman, Edna C; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg) was identified in the gene encoding α-tropomyosin slow gene (TPM3). Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg) mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8-9 month-old Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occurring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg) mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo.

  7. Voltage Weak DC Distribution Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hailu, T.G.; Mackay, L.J.; Ramirez Elizondo, L.M.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the behavior of voltage weak DC distribution systems. These systems have relatively small system capacitance. The size of system capacitance, which stores energy, has a considerable effect on the value of fault currents, control complexity, and system reliability. A number of

  8. Second threshold in weak interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1977-01-01

    The point of view that weak interactions must have a second threshold below 300 – 600 GeV is developed. Above this threshold new physics must come in. This new physics may be the Higgs system, or some other nonperturbative system possibly having some similarities to the Higgs system. The limit of

  9. Coverings, Networks and Weak Topologies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dow, A.; Junnila, H.; Pelant, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2006), s. 287-320 ISSN 0025-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/97/0216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Banach spaces * weak topologies * networks topologies Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  10. Weak lensing and dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, Dragan

    2002-01-01

    We study the power of upcoming weak lensing surveys to probe dark energy. Dark energy modifies the distance-redshift relation as well as the matter power spectrum, both of which affect the weak lensing convergence power spectrum. Some dark-energy models predict additional clustering on very large scales, but this probably cannot be detected by weak lensing alone due to cosmic variance. With reasonable prior information on other cosmological parameters, we find that a survey covering 1000 sq deg down to a limiting magnitude of R=27 can impose constraints comparable to those expected from upcoming type Ia supernova and number-count surveys. This result, however, is contingent on the control of both observational and theoretical systematics. Concentrating on the latter, we find that the nonlinear power spectrum of matter perturbations and the redshift distribution of source galaxies both need to be determined accurately in order for weak lensing to achieve its full potential. Finally, we discuss the sensitivity of the three-point statistics to dark energy

  11. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    theory by defining submanifolds weakly associated with graphs. We prove that, in a local sense, every submanifold satisfies such an association, and other general results. Finally, we study submanifolds associated with graphs either in low dimensions or belonging to some special families. Keywords. Almost Hermitian ...

  12. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We establish an interesting link between differential geometry and graph theory by defining submanifolds weakly associated with graphs. We prove that, in a local sense, every submanifold satisfies such an association, and other general results. Finally, we study submanifolds associated with graphs either in low ...

  13. Ultrasound imaging of muscle contraction of the tibialis anterior in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbertse, Kaj; Goselink, Rianne; Lassche, Saskia; Nillesen, Maartje; Sprengers, Andre; Verdonschot, Nico; van Alfen, Nens; De Korte, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and many other neuromuscular disorders there is a need for biomarkers to diagnose, quantify and longitudinally follow muscle disease. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to muscle weakness in most neuromuscular disorders are not

  14. Exercise-induced muscle modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviler, E. de; Willig, A.L.; Jehenson, P.; Duboc, D.; Syrota, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares changes in muscle proton T2 after exercise in normal subjects and in patients with muscular glycogenoses. Four patients suffering from muscular glycogenosis and eight normal volunteers were studied. Muscle T2s were measured in forearm muscles at rest and after exercise, with a 0.5-T imager. The exercise was performed with handgrips and was evaluated by P-31 spectroscopy (end-exercise decrease in pH and phosphocreatine) performed with a 2-T magnet. In normal subjects, a relative T2 increase, ranging from 14% to 44%, was observed in the exercised muscles. In the patients, who cannot produce lactate during exercise, weak pH variation occurred, and only a slight T2 increase (7% - 9%) was observed

  15. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Man, W. D-C.; Hopkinson, N.S.; Harraf, F.; Nikoletou, D.; Polkey, M. I.; Moxham, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pre...

  16. Combined MRI and ³¹P-MRS investigations of the ACTA1(H40Y mouse model of nemaline myopathy show impaired muscle function and altered energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Gineste

    Full Text Available Nemaline myopathy (NM is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1 account for ∼25% of all NM cases and are the most frequent cause of severe forms of NM. So far, the mechanisms underlying muscle weakness in NM patients remain unclear. Additionally, recent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI studies reported a progressive fatty infiltration of skeletal muscle with a specific muscle involvement in patients with ACTA1 mutations. We investigated strictly noninvasively the gastrocnemius muscle function of a mouse model carrying a mutation in the ACTA1 gene (H40Y. Skeletal muscle anatomy (hindlimb muscles and fat volumes and energy metabolism were studied using MRI and (31Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Skeletal muscle contractile performance was investigated while applying a force-frequency protocol (from 1-150 Hz and a fatigue protocol (80 stimuli at 40 Hz. H40Y mice showed a reduction of both absolute (-40% and specific (-25% maximal force production as compared to controls. Interestingly, muscle weakness was associated with an improved resistance to fatigue (+40% and an increased energy cost. On the contrary, the force frequency relationship was not modified in H40Y mice and the extent of fatty infiltration was minor and not different from the WT group. We concluded that the H40Y mouse model does not reproduce human MRI findings but shows a severe muscle weakness which might be related to an alteration of intrinsic muscular properties. The increased energy cost in H40Y mice might be related to either an impaired mitochondrial function or an alteration at the cross-bridges level. Overall, we provided a unique set of anatomic, metabolic and functional biomarkers that might be relevant for monitoring the progression of NM disease but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions at a preclinical level.

  17. Synchronization of weakly coupled canard oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal Ersöz, Elif; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Synchronization has been studied extensively in the context of weakly coupled oscillators using the so-called phase response curve (PRC) which measures how a change of the phase of an oscillator is affected by a small perturbation. This approach was based upon the work of Malkin, and it has been extended to relaxation oscillators. Namely, synchronization conditions were established under the weak coupling assumption, leading to a criterion for the existence of synchronous solutions of weakly coupled relaxation oscillators. Previous analysis relies on the fact that the slow nullcline does not intersect the fast nullcline near one of its fold points, where canard solutions can arise. In the present study we use numerical continuation techniques to solve the adjoint equations and we show that synchronization properties of canard cycles are different than those of classical relaxation cycles. In particular, we highlight a new special role of the maximal canard in separating two distinct synchronization regimes: the Hopf regime and the relaxation regime. Phase plane analysis of slow-fast oscillators undergoing a canard explosion provides an explanation for this change of synchronization properties across the maximal canard.

  18. Changes in predicted muscle coordination with subject-specific muscle parameters for individuals after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knarr, Brian A; Reisman, Darcy S; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A; Higginson, Jill S

    2014-01-01

    Muscle weakness is commonly seen in individuals after stroke, characterized by lower forces during a maximal volitional contraction. Accurate quantification of muscle weakness is paramount when evaluating individual performance and response to after stroke rehabilitation. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of subject-specific muscle force and activation deficits on predicted muscle coordination when using musculoskeletal models for individuals after stroke. Maximum force generating ability and central activation ratio of the paretic plantar flexors, dorsiflexors, and quadriceps muscle groups were obtained using burst superimposition for four individuals after stroke with a range of walking speeds. Two models were created per subject: one with generic and one with subject-specific activation and maximum isometric force parameters. The inclusion of subject-specific muscle data resulted in changes in the model-predicted muscle forces and activations which agree with previously reported compensation patterns and match more closely the timing of electromyography for the plantar flexor and hamstring muscles. This was the first study to create musculoskeletal simulations of individuals after stroke with subject-specific muscle force and activation data. The results of this study suggest that subject-specific muscle force and activation data enhance the ability of musculoskeletal simulations to accurately predict muscle coordination in individuals after stroke.

  19. Changes in Predicted Muscle Coordination with Subject-Specific Muscle Parameters for Individuals after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Knarr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle weakness is commonly seen in individuals after stroke, characterized by lower forces during a maximal volitional contraction. Accurate quantification of muscle weakness is paramount when evaluating individual performance and response to after stroke rehabilitation. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of subject-specific muscle force and activation deficits on predicted muscle coordination when using musculoskeletal models for individuals after stroke. Maximum force generating ability and central activation ratio of the paretic plantar flexors, dorsiflexors, and quadriceps muscle groups were obtained using burst superimposition for four individuals after stroke with a range of walking speeds. Two models were created per subject: one with generic and one with subject-specific activation and maximum isometric force parameters. The inclusion of subject-specific muscle data resulted in changes in the model-predicted muscle forces and activations which agree with previously reported compensation patterns and match more closely the timing of electromyography for the plantar flexor and hamstring muscles. This was the first study to create musculoskeletal simulations of individuals after stroke with subject-specific muscle force and activation data. The results of this study suggest that subject-specific muscle force and activation data enhance the ability of musculoskeletal simulations to accurately predict muscle coordination in individuals after stroke.

  20. Transition to reconstructibility in weakly coupled networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict J Lünsmann

    Full Text Available Across scientific disciplines, thresholded pairwise measures of statistical dependence between time series are taken as proxies for the interactions between the dynamical units of a network. Yet such correlation measures often fail to reflect the underlying physical interactions accurately. Here we systematically study the problem of reconstructing direct physical interaction networks from thresholding correlations. We explicate how local common cause and relay structures, heterogeneous in-degrees and non-local structural properties of the network generally hinder reconstructibility. However, in the limit of weak coupling strengths we prove that stationary systems with dynamics close to a given operating point transition to universal reconstructiblity across all network topologies.

  1. Weak neutral-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1978-08-01

    The roles of each type of experiment in establishing uniquely the values of the the neutral-current couplings of u and d quarks are analyzed together with their implications for gauge models of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. An analysis of the neutral-current couplings of electrons and of the data based on the assumption that only one Z 0 boson exists is given. Also a model-independent analysis of parity violation experiments is discussed. 85 references

  2. History of the weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    At the 'Jackfest' marking the 65th birthday of Jack Steinberger (see July/August 1986 issue, page 29), T.D. Lee gave an account of the history of the weak interactions. This edited version omits some of Lee's tributes to Steinberger, but retains the impressive insight into the subtleties of a key area of modern physics by one who played a vital role in its development. (orig./HSI).

  3. Weak neutral-current interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1978-08-01

    The roles of each type of experiment in establishing uniquely the values of the the neutral-current couplings of u and d quarks are analyzed together with their implications for gauge models of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. An analysis of the neutral-current couplings of electrons and of the data based on the assumption that only one Z/sup 0/ boson exists is given. Also a model-independent analysis of parity violation experiments is discussed. 85 references. (JFP)

  4. Evaluation of healthy muscle tissue by strain and shear wave elastography – Dependency on depth and ROI position in relation to underlying bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, Caroline; Carlsen, Jonathan Frederik; Christiansen, Iben Riishede

    2016-01-01

    and methods: Ten healthy volunteers (five males and five females) had their biceps brachii, gastrocnemius, and quadriceps muscle examined with strain- and shear wave elastography at three different depths and in regions located above bone and beside bone. Strain ratios were averaged from cine-loops of 10 s...

  5. STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF SKELETAL MUSCLE IN COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita eMathur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory disease associated with a systemic inflammatory response. Peripheral muscle dysfunction has been well characterized in individuals with COPD and results from a complex interaction between systemic and local factors. Objective: In this narrative review, we will describe muscle wasting in people with COPD, the associated structural changes, muscle regenerative capacity and possible mechanisms for muscle wasting. We will also discuss how structural changes relate to impaired muscle function and mobility in people with COPD. Key Observations: Approximately 30-40% of individuals with COPD experience muscle mass depletion. Furthermore, muscle atrophy is a predictor of physical function and mortality in this population. Associated structural changes include a decreased proportion and size of type-I fibers, reduced oxidative capacity and mitochondrial density mainly in the quadriceps. Observations related to impaired muscle regenerative capacity in individuals with COPD include a lower proportion of central nuclei in the presence or absence of muscle atrophy and decreased maximal telomere length, which has been correlated with reduced muscle cross-sectional area. Potential mechanisms for muscle wasting in COPD may include excessive production of reactive oxygen species, altered amino acid metabolism and lower expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma-coactivator 1-alpha mRNA. Despite a moderate relationship between muscle atrophy and function, impairments in oxidative metabolism only seems weakly related to muscle function. Conclusion: This review article demonstrates the cellular modifications in the peripheral muscle of people with COPD and describes the evidence of its relationship to muscle function. Future research will focus on rehabilitation strategies to improve muscle wasting and maximize function.

  6. Weakly Iπg-Closed Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, O.

    2015-01-01

    called weakly Iπg-open sets in ideal topological spaces is introduced and the notion of weakly Iπg-closed sets in ideal topologicalspaces is studied. The relationships of weakly Iπg-closed sets andvarious properties of weakly Iπg-closed sets are investigated

  7. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this observational, cross-sectional study was to quantify the potential presence of muscle weakness among patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). The influence of gender, treatment intensity and disease duration on muscle strength and disease progression was also assessed. Methods Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. Results Patients had reduced strength in all tested muscle group compared to control subjects (p<0.05). Women with gMG were stronger than men (decrease in strength 22.6% vs. 32.7% in men, P<0.05). Regional differences in muscle weakness were also evident, with proximal muscles being more affected. Interestingly, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles are the most affected muscle groups and 4) disease duration or treatment intensity alone are not predictors of loss of muscle strength in gMG. PMID:27741232

  8. How the condition of occlusal support affects the back muscle force and masticatory muscle activity?

    OpenAIRE

    石岡, 克; 河野, 正司; Ishioka, Masaru; Kohno, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine how the condition of occlusal support affects the back muscle force and masticatory muscle activity. Two groups of subjects were enlisted: sport-trained group and normal group. While electrodes of the electromyography (EMG) were attached to the surface of the masticatory muscles, each subject's back muscle force was recorded during upper body stretching using a back muscle force-measuring device. The task was performed under four different occlusal suppor...

  9. Phytochrome A, phytochrome B and HY4 are involved in hypocotyl growth responses to natural radiation in Arabidopsis: weak de-etiolation of the phyA mutant under dense canopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovsky, M.J.; Casal, J.J.; Whitelam, G.C.

    1995-01-01

    The roles of phytochrome A (phyA), phytochrome B (phyB) and a putative blue-light (BL) photoreceptor (HY4) in the control of hypocotyl growth by natural radiation were investigated using phyA, phyB and hy4 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Full sunlight inhibited hypocotyl growth to a larger extent in wild-type (WT) than in phyA, phyB and, particularly, hy4 seedlings. In WT seedlings, hypocotyl growth was promoted by selectively lowering BL irradiance, lowering red-light (R) plus far-red-light (FR) irradiance or lowering the R/FR ratio (which was achieved either by increasing FR or by reducing R). The effects of lowering BL were reduced in hy4 and exaggerated in phyA seedlings. The effects of lowering R+FR were reduced in phyA and exaggerated in hy4 seedlings. Neither phyB nor hy4 mutants responded to low R/FR ratios. Neighbouring plants reflecting FR without shading caused subtle reductions of the R/FR ratio. This signal promoted hypocotyl growth in WT but not in phyA, phyB or hy4 seedlings. Intermediate canopy shade produced similar effects in all genotypes. Under deep shade, de-etiolation was severely impaired in phyA seedlings, which died prematurely. Thus, the FR ‘high-irradiance reaction’ mediated by phyA could be important for seedling survival under dense canopies. (author)

  10. Radioisotope scanning in inflammatory muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.B.; Swift, T.R.; Spies, S.M.

    1976-06-01

    Fourteen whole-body rectilinear bone scans using technetium 99m-polyphosphate were done in nine patients with well-documented inflammatory myopathy (either polymyositis or dermatomyositis). In all nine patients the scans showed evidence of increased muscle labeling. Muscle uptake was markedly increased in one patient, moderately increased in two patients, and minimally increased in six patients. The degree of muscle labeling correlated with the severity of the muscle weakness at the time the scan was done. In four patients, who received high-dose corticosteroid treatment, muscle uptake was decreased following therapy. These findings suggest that radioisotope scanning may be useful in the diagnosis and management of patients with inflammatory muscle diseases.

  11. Catechins activate muscle stem cells by Myf5 induction and stimulate muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Byun, Mi Ran; Hwang, Jun-Ha; Park, Jung Il; Oh, Ho Taek; Kim, Hyo Kyeong; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2017-07-22

    Muscle weakness is one of the most common symptoms in aged individuals and increases risk of mortality. Thus, maintenance of muscle mass is important for inhibiting aging. In this study, we investigated the effect of catechins, polyphenol compounds in green tea, on muscle regeneration. We found that (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) activate satellite cells by induction of Myf5 transcription factors. For satellite cell activation, Akt kinase was significantly induced after ECG treatment and ECG-induced satellite cell activation was blocked in the presence of Akt inhibitor. ECG also promotes myogenic differentiation through the induction of myogenic markers, including Myogenin and Muscle creatine kinase (MCK), in satellite and C2C12 myoblast cells. Finally, EGCG administration to mice significantly increased muscle fiber size for regeneration. Taken together, the results suggest that catechins stimulate muscle stem cell activation and differentiation for muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Glucocorticoids Induce Bone and Muscle Atrophy by Tissue-Specific Mechanisms Upstream of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Amy Y; Richardson, Danielle; Cregor, Meloney; Davis, Hannah M; Au, Ernie D; McAndrews, Kevin; Zimmers, Teresa A; Organ, Jason M; Peacock, Munro; Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2017-03-01

    Glucocorticoid excess, either endogenous with diseases of the adrenal gland, stress, or aging or when administered for immunosuppression, induces bone and muscle loss, leading to osteopenia and sarcopenia. Muscle weakness increases the propensity for falling, which, combined with the lower bone mass, increases the fracture risk. The mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced bone and muscle atrophy are not completely understood. We have demonstrated that the loss of bone and muscle mass, decreased bone formation, and reduced muscle strength, hallmarks of glucocorticoid excess, are accompanied by upregulation in both tissues in vivo of the atrophy-related genes atrogin1, MuRF1, and MUSA1. These are E3 ubiquitin ligases traditionally considered muscle-specific. Glucocorticoids also upregulated atrophy genes in cultured osteoblastic/osteocytic cells, in ex vivo bone organ cultures, and in muscle organ cultures and C2C12 myoblasts/myotubes. Furthermore, glucocorticoids markedly increased the expression of components of the Notch signaling pathway in muscle in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In contrast, glucocorticoids did not increase Notch signaling in bone or bone cells. Moreover, the increased expression of atrophy-related genes in muscle, but not in bone, and the decreased myotube diameter induced by glucocorticoids were prevented by inhibiting Notch signaling. Thus, glucocorticoids activate different mechanisms in bone and muscle that upregulate atrophy-related genes. However, the role of these genes in the effects of glucocorticoids in bone is unknown. Nevertheless, these findings advance our knowledge of the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids in the musculoskeletal system and provide the basis for novel therapies to prevent glucocorticoid-induced atrophy of bone and muscle. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  13. Weak decays of heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1978-08-01

    The properties that may help to identify the two additional quark flavors that are expected to be discovered. These properties are lifetime, branching ratios, selection rules, and lepton decay spectra. It is also noted that CP violation may manifest itself more strongly in heavy particle decays than elsewhere providing a new probe of its origin. The theoretical progress in the understanding of nonleptonic transitions among lighter quarks, nonleptonic K and hyperon decay amplitudes, omega minus and charmed particle decay predictions, and lastly the Kobayashi--Maskawa model for the weak coupling of heavy quarks together with the details of its implications for topology and bottomology are treated. 48 references

  14. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Jobstvogt, N.; Böhnke-Henrichs, A.

    2016-01-01

    . Such an assessment could form the basis for improving ES thinking, further embedding it into environmental decisions and management.The Young Ecosystem Services Specialists (YESS) completed a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWOT) analysis of ES through YESS member surveys. Strengths include the approach...... environmental awareness. Threats include resistance to change, and difficulty with interdisciplinary collaboration. Consideration of SWOT themes suggested five strategic areas for developing and implementing ES.The ES concept could improve decision-making related to natural resource use, and interpretation...

  15. Dermatomyositis presenting as a paraneoplastic syndrome due to underlying breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Nicole P; Zakaria, Shaheen; Degnim, Amy C; Boughey, Judy C

    2011-02-02

    Breast cancer most often presents as a palpable mass or with an abnormal mammogram. Much less commonly, breast cancer may present as a paraneoplastic syndrome. Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare disease most often considered a complement-mediated idiopathic inflammatory myopathy manifested by classic skin findings and proximal muscle weakness. However, DM may also be due to a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with an underlying malignancy. The authors present a case report of a woman with presumed contact dermatitis who was diagnosed with breast cancer in the setting of progressive fatigue and muscle weakness. DM was subsequently diagnosed. Treatment of DM simultaneous with treatment of the breast cancer led to regression of DM. The diagnosis of DM in an adult should raise suspicion of an underlying malignancy. Breast cancer is a common disease that may rarely present with uncommon features that may divert attention from the underlying malignancy.

  16. Effects of Partial Vibration on Morphological Changes in Bone and Surrounding Muscle of Rats Under Microgravity Condition: Comparative Study by Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hyung; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Cho, Seungkwan; Kim, Seo-Hyun; Eom, Sinae; Kim, Han Sung

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders during and after spaceflight are considered as a serious health issue. In space, weight-bearing exercise recognized as the main countermeasure to bone loss, since many anti-resorptive medications have not yet been approved for spaceflight or have been unsuccessful in their limited application. We need to investigate a complementary or alternative way to prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy resulting from microgravity condition. Partial vibration was chosen because it is one of the most feasible ways to adopt safely and effectively. Moreover, although the influence of hind-limb suspension has been studied in both male and female rodents, only rarely are both genders evaluated in the same study. Thus, to further extend our knowledge, the present study performed comparative analysis between genders. A total of 36 12-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and were randomly assigned to control (CON), hind-limb suspension without vibration stimulus (HS), and hind-limb suspension with vibration stimulus (HV) groups. Hind-limb suspension has led to increasing the rate of bone loss and muscle atrophy regardless of gender. The rates of bone loss in male group obviously increased than that of female group. All structural parameters were showed significant difference between HS and HV ( p differences in female group. In female, the muscle volume with treatment of partial vibration stimulus significantly increased which compared with that of hind-limb suspension ( p differences in male group. Thus partial vibration could prevent bone loss of tibia in males and muscle atrophy in females induced by hind-limb suspension. In other words, partial vibration has positive effects on damaged musculoskeletal tissues that differ based on gender.

  17. Changes in the protein fraction of Merluccius bilinearis muscle under lactic acid bacterial fermentation using a Lactobacillus Acidophilus starter culture (ESP)

    OpenAIRE

    Elizondo, Luis J.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on the protein fraction of Merluccius bilinearis muscle was evaluated. The non-protein fraction increased progressively with corresponding decreases in the percentage protein (dry weight) indicating proteolytic activity during fermentation. Significant increases in the percentages of the amino acids cystine, isoleucine, phenylalanine and tyrosine were observed after two months of fermentation. Percentages of arginine decreased significantly aft...

  18. Getting Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re thinking about aren't possible for kids. Superheroes, of course, aren't real, and professional athletes ... can make you stronger. Why? Because you're using your muscles when you do it. Eat Strong ...

  19. Muscle cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lower leg/calf Back of the thigh (hamstrings) Front of the thigh (quadriceps) Cramps in the ... Names Cramps - muscle Images Chest stretch Groin stretch Hamstring stretch Hip stretch Thigh stretch Triceps stretch References ...

  20. A comparative analysis of the electrical activity of the abdominal muscles during traditional and Pilates-based exercises under two conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Felipe Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of Pilates-based exercises for trunk strengthening has been reported in the literature. The objective of this study was to analyze and compare the electrical activity of the rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles during a traditional abdominal exercise program and an exercise program based on the Pilates method using a ball and an elastic band. The sample was composed of 10 healthy women, non-practitioners of Pilates, who performed the traditional abdominal exercise and roll-up with the ball and elastic band. The sign was normalized by the electromyographic peak of the dynamics activity and was adjusted for 2000 samples/s; the filter was set in a frequency band from 20 to 450 Hz. In the comparison between exercises, the external oblique muscle in the concentric phase had a higher recruitment in the roll-up with the ball (P =0.042. In the comparison between muscles in each exercise, the rectus abdominis showed a higher activation in the concentric phase (P = 0.009 and in the eccentric phase (P = 0.05 of the traditional abdominal exercise. Activation percentages ranged from 15% to 22%. The traditional abdominal exercise had the largest activation percentage.

  1. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  2. Striated Muscle Function, Regeneration, and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, I.Y.; Khodabukus, A.; Bursac, N.

    2016-01-01

    As the only striated muscle tissues in the body, skeletal and cardiac muscle share numerous structural and functional characteristics, while exhibiting vastly different size and regenerative potential. Healthy skeletal muscle harbors a robust regenerative response that becomes inadequate after large muscle loss or in degenerative pathologies and aging. In contrast, the mammalian heart loses its regenerative capacity shortly after birth, leaving it susceptible to permanent damage by acute injury or chronic disease. In this review, we compare and contrast the physiology and regenerative potential of native skeletal and cardiac muscles, mechanisms underlying striated muscle dysfunction, and bioengineering strategies to treat muscle disorders. We focus on different sources for cellular therapy, biomaterials to augment the endogenous regenerative response, and progress in engineering and application of mature striated muscle tissues in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in translating muscle bioengineering strategies to clinical practice. PMID:27271751

  3. Skeletal muscle laminin and MDC1A: pathogenesis and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlik Kinga I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laminin-211 is a cell-adhesion molecule that is strongly expressed in the basement membrane of skeletal muscle. By binding to the cell surface receptors dystroglycan and integrin α7β1, laminin-211 is believed to protect the muscle fiber from damage under the constant stress of contractions, and to influence signal transmission events. The importance of laminin-211 in skeletal muscle is evident from merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A, in which absence of the α2 chain of laminin-211 leads to skeletal muscle dysfunction. MDC1A is the commonest form of congenital muscular dystrophy in the European population. Severe hypotonia, progressive muscle weakness and wasting, joint contractures and consequent impeded motion characterize this incurable disorder, which causes great difficulty in daily life and often leads to premature death. Mice with laminin α2 chain deficiency have analogous phenotypes, and are reliable models for studies of disease mechanisms and potential therapeutic approaches. In this review, we introduce laminin-211 and describe its structure, expression pattern in developing and adult muscle and its receptor interactions. We will also discuss the molecular pathogenesis of MDC1A and advances toward the development of treatment.

  4. Time—periodic weak solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Henriques de Brito

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In continuing from previous papers, where we studied the existence and uniqueness of the global solution and its asymptotic behavior as time t goes to infinity, we now search for a time-periodic weak solution u(t for the equation whose weak formulation in a Hilbert space H isddt(u′,v+δ(u′,v+αb(u,v+βa(u,v+(G(u,v=(h,vwhere: ′=d/dt; (′ is the inner product in H; b(u,v, a(u,v are given forms on subspaces U⊂W, respectively, of H; δ>0, α≥0, β≥0 are constants and α+β>0; G is the Gateaux derivative of a convex functional J:V⊂H→[0,∞ for V=U, when α>0 and V=W when α=0, hence β>0; v is a test function in V; h is a given function of t with values in H.

  5. Political corruption and weak state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author starts from the hypothesis that it is essential for the countries of the region to critically assess the synergy established between systemic, political corruption and a selectively weak, “devious” nature of the state. Moreover, the key dilemma is whether the expanded practice of political rent seeking supports the conclusion that the root of all corruption is in the very existence of the state - particularly in excessive, selective and deforming state interventions and benefits that create a fertile ground for corruption? The author argues that the destructive combination of weak government and rampant political corruption is based on scattered state intervention, while also rule the parties cartel in the executive branch subordinate to parliament, the judiciary and the police. Corrupt exchange takes place with the absence of strong institutional framework and the precise rules of the political and electoral games, control of public finances and effective political and anti-monopoly legislation and practice included. Exit from the current situation can be seen in the realization of effective anti­corruption strategy that integrates preventive and repressive measures and activities and lead to the establishment of principles of good governance. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179076: Politički identitet Srbije u regionalnom i globalnom kontekstu

  6. Weak lensing and cosmological investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, V

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years the scientific community has been dealing with the challenging issue of identifying the dark energy component. We regard weak gravitational lensing as a brand new, and extremely important, tool for cosmological investigation in this field. In fact, the features imprinted on the cosmic microwave background radiation by the lensing from the intervening distribution of matter represent a pretty unbiased estimator, and can thus be used for putting constraints on different dark energy models. This is true in particular for the magnetic-type B-modes of CMB polarization, whose unlensed spectrum at large multipoles (l approximately=1000) is very small even in presence of an amount of gravitational waves as large as currently allowed by the experiments: therefore, on these scales the lensing phenomenon is the only responsible for the observed power, and this signal turns out to be a faithful tracer of the dark energy dynamics. We first recall the formal apparatus of the weak lensing in extended t...

  7. Effects of electric stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus on slow electric activity and spike activity of fundal and antral stomach muscles in rabbits under conditions of hunger and satiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromin, A A; Zenina, O Yu

    2013-09-01

    In chronic experiments on rabbits, the effect of electric stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus on myoelectric activity of the fundal and antral parts of the stomach was studied under conditions of hunger and satiation in the absence of food. Stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation and in previously fed rabbits produced incessant seeking behavior, which was followed by reorganization of the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of muscles of the stomach body and antrum specific for hungry and satiated animals. Increased hunger motivation during electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus manifested in the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of the stomach body and antrum muscles in rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the replacement of bimodal distribution of slow wave periods to a trimodal type typical of 2-day deprivation, while transition from satiation to hunger caused by electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus was associated with a shift from monomodal distributions of slow wave periods to a bimodal type typical of 24-h deprivation. Reorganization of the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of the stomach body and antrum muscles during electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus was determined by descending inhibitory influences of food motivational excitation on activity of the myogenic pacemaker of the lesser curvature of the stomach.

  8. Medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Lee; Barrett, Rod; Lichtwark, Glen

    2012-10-11

    Individuals with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) typically experience muscle weakness. The mechanisms responsible for muscle weakness in spastic CP are complex and may be influenced by the intrinsic mechanical properties of the muscle and tendon. The purpose of this study was to investigate the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic CP. Nine relatively high functioning young adults with spastic CP (GMFCS I, 17±2 years) and 10 typically developing individuals (18±2 years) participated in the study. Active MG torque-length and Achilles tendon properties were assessed under controlled conditions on a dynamometer. EMG was recorded from leg muscles and ultrasound was used to measure MG fascicle length and Achilles tendon length during maximal isometric contractions at five ankle angles throughout the available range of motion and during passive rotations imposed by the dynamometer. Compared to the typically developing group, the spastic CP group had 33% lower active ankle plantarflexion torque across the available range of ankle joint motion, partially explained by 37% smaller MG muscle and 4% greater antagonistic co-contraction. The Achilles tendon slack length was also 10% longer in the spastic CP group. This study confirms young adults with mild spastic CP have altered muscle-tendon mechanical properties. The adaptation of a longer Achilles tendon may facilitate a greater storage and recovery of elastic energy and partially compensate for decreased force and work production by the small muscles of the triceps surae during activities such as locomotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Probing hysteretic elasticity in weakly nonlinear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haupert, Sylvain [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Renaud, Guillaume [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Riviere, Jacques [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Talmant, Maryline [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Laugier, Pascal [UPMC UNIV PARIS

    2010-12-07

    Our work is aimed at assessing the elastic and dissipative hysteretic nonlinear parameters' repeatability (precision) using several classes of materials with weak, intermediate and high nonlinear properties. In this contribution, we describe an optimized Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) measuring and data processing protocol applied to small samples. The protocol is used to eliminate the effects of environmental condition changes that take place during an experiment, and that may mask the intrinsic elastic nonlinearity. As an example, in our experiments, we identified external temperature fluctuation as a primary source of material resonance frequency and elastic modulus variation. A variation of 0.1 C produced a frequency variation of 0.01 %, which is similar to the expected nonlinear frequency shift for weakly nonlinear materials. In order to eliminate environmental effects, the variation in f{sub 0} (the elastically linear resonance frequency proportional to modulus) is fit with the appropriate function, and that function is used to correct the NRUS calculation of nonlinear parameters. With our correction procedure, we measured relative resonant frequency shifts of 10{sup -5} , which are below 10{sup -4}, often considered the limit to NRUS sensitivity under common experimental conditions. Our results show that the procedure is an alternative to the stringent control of temperature often applied. Applying the approach, we report nonlinear parameters for several materials, some with very small nonclassical nonlinearity. The approach has broad application to NRUS and other Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy approaches.

  10. Vitamin D and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2017-10-01

    Muscle weakness is a hallmark of severe vitamin D deficiency, but the effect of milder vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency on muscle mass and performance and risk of falling is uncertain. In this presentation, I review the evidence that vitamin D influences muscle mass and performance, balance, and risk of falling in older adults. Special consideration is given to the impact of both the starting 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and the dose administered on the clinical response to supplemental vitamin D in older men and women. Based on available evidence, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels vitamin D dose range of 800-1000 IU per day has been effective in many studies; lower doses have generally been ineffective and several doses above this range have increased the risk of falls. In conclusion, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels vitamin D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Weak transitions in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maturana, G.

    1984-01-01

    Some techniques to calculate the effects of the strong interactions on the matrix elements of weak processes are described. The lattice formulation of Quantum Chromodynamics is used to account for the low energy gluons, and the corresponding numerical methods are explained. The high energy contributions are included in effective lagrangians and the problem of matching the different scales related to the renormalization of the operators and wavefunctions is also discussed. The ..delta..l = 1/2 enhancement rule and the K/sup 0/-anti-K/sup 0/ are used to illustrate these techniques and the results of a numerical calculation is reported. The values obtained are very encouraging and they certainly show good qualitative agreement with the experimental values. The emphasis is on general techniques, and in particular, several improvements to this particular calculation are proposed.

  12. Weak KAM for commuting Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavidovique, M

    2010-01-01

    For two commuting Tonelli Hamiltonians, we recover the commutation of the Lax–Oleinik semi-groups, a result of Barles and Tourin (2001 Indiana Univ. Math. J. 50 1523–44), using a direct geometrical method (Stoke's theorem). We also obtain a 'generalization' of a theorem of Maderna (2002 Bull. Soc. Math. France 130 493–506). More precisely, we prove that if the phase space is the cotangent of a compact manifold then the weak KAM solutions (or viscosity solutions of the critical stationary Hamilton–Jacobi equation) for G and for H are the same. As a corollary we obtain the equality of the Aubry sets and of the Peierls barrier. This is also related to works of Sorrentino (2009 On the Integrability of Tonelli Hamiltonians Preprint) and Bernard (2007 Duke Math. J. 136 401–20)

  13. Comparable ages for the independent origins of electrogenesis in African and South American weakly electric fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Lavoué

    Full Text Available One of the most remarkable examples of convergent evolution among vertebrates is illustrated by the independent origins of an active electric sense in South American and African weakly electric fishes, the Gymnotiformes and Mormyroidea, respectively. These groups independently evolved similar complex systems for object localization and communication via the generation and reception of weak electric fields. While good estimates of divergence times are critical to understanding the temporal context for the evolution and diversification of these two groups, their respective ages have been difficult to estimate due to the absence of an informative fossil record, use of strict molecular clock models in previous studies, and/or incomplete taxonomic sampling. Here, we examine the timing of the origins of the Gymnotiformes and the Mormyroidea using complete mitogenome sequences and a parametric bayesian method for divergence time reconstruction. Under two different fossil-based calibration methods, we estimated similar ages for the independent origins of the Mormyroidea and Gymnotiformes. Our absolute estimates for the origins of these groups either slightly postdate, or just predate, the final separation of Africa and South America by continental drift. The most recent common ancestor of the Mormyroidea and Gymnotiformes was found to be a non-electrogenic basal teleost living more than 85 millions years earlier. For both electric fish lineages, we also estimated similar intervals (16-19 or 22-26 million years, depending on calibration method between the appearance of electroreception and the origin of myogenic electric organs, providing rough upper estimates for the time periods during which these complex electric organs evolved de novo from skeletal muscle precursors. The fact that the Gymnotiformes and Mormyroidea are of similar age enhances the comparative value of the weakly electric fish system for investigating pathways to evolutionary novelty

  14. Weak Approximation of SDEs by Discrete-Time Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Zähle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the martingale problem related to the solution of an SDE on the line. It is shown that the solution of this martingale problem can be approximated by solutions of the corresponding time-discrete martingale problems under some conditions. This criterion is especially expedient for establishing the convergence of population processes to SDEs. We also show that the criterion yields a weak Euler scheme approximation of SDEs under fairly weak assumptions on the driving force of the approximating processes.

  15. Weak and strong solutions for differential equations in Banach spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we give a generalization to recent results by using weak and strong measures of noncompactness. For f:[0,T]xE→E with E is a Banach space we prove that, under suitable assumptions, the Cauchy problem (fd((P) (ar((r((c(x(t)=f(t,x(t)),))(c(t/in R: =set membership[0,T],))))(r((c(x(0)=x 0 ,))(c()))))))) has at least one weak solution furthermore, with certain conditions, the Cauchy problem (P) has a solution. Next under a generalization of the compactness assumptions, we show that (P) has a solution too

  16. Integrated expression analysis of muscle hypertrophy identifies Asb2 as a negative regulator of muscle mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Jonathan R.; Watt, Kevin I.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Chaudhuri, Rima; Ryall, James G.; Cunningham, Louise; Qian, Hongwei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; James, David E.

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling network is a critical regulator of skeletal muscle mass and function and, thus, is an attractive therapeutic target for combating muscle disease, but the underlying mechanisms of action remain undetermined. We report that follistatin-based interventions (which modulate TGF-β network activity) can promote muscle hypertrophy that ameliorates aging-associated muscle wasting. However, the muscles of old sarcopenic mice demonstrate reduced response to follistatin compared with healthy young-adult musculature. Quantitative proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of young-adult muscles identified a transcription/translation signature elicited by follistatin exposure, which included repression of ankyrin repeat and SOCS box protein 2 (Asb2). Increasing expression of ASB2 reduced muscle mass, thereby demonstrating that Asb2 is a TGF-β network–responsive negative regulator of muscle mass. In contrast to young-adult muscles, sarcopenic muscles do not exhibit reduced ASB2 abundance with follistatin exposure. Moreover, preventing repression of ASB2 in young-adult muscles diminished follistatin-induced muscle hypertrophy. These findings provide insight into the program of transcription and translation events governing follistatin-mediated adaptation of skeletal muscle attributes and identify Asb2 as a regulator of muscle mass implicated in the potential mechanistic dysfunction between follistatin-mediated muscle growth in young and old muscles. PMID:27182554

  17. Activity of Ca(2+,Mg(2+-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and contraction strength of the frog skeletal muscles under the effect of organophosphorus insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Nozdrenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of an experimental study of organo­phosphorus insecticides, including pirimiphosmethyl, diazinon and chlorpyrifos caused a decline of the contraction properties in m. tibialis anterior fiber bundles of Rana temporaria, as well as sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase enzymatic activity reduction are outlined in this paper. Concentration-dependent strengths response diminishing in isolated skeletal muscle fiber bundles as a result of non-cholinergic influence of organophosphorus insecticides were found. A decrease of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase enzymatic activity in sarcoplasmic reticulum was observed after administration of each insecticide. The most significant inhibition of this enzyme was observed when using chlorpyrifos.

  18. Nuclear beta decay and the weak interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kean, D.C.

    1975-11-01

    Short notes are presented on various aspects of nuclear beta decay and weak interactions including: super-allowed transitions, parity violation, interaction strengths, coupling constants, and the current-current formalism of weak interaction. (R.L.)

  19. Weakly distributive modules. Applications to supplement submodules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we define and study weakly distributive modules as a proper generalization of distributive modules. We prove that, weakly distributive supplemented modules are amply supplemented. In a weakly distributive supplemented module every submodule has a unique coclosure. This generalizes a result of ...

  20. Fault zone fabric and fault weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collettini, C.; Niemeijer, A.; Viti, C.; Marone, C.

    2009-01-01

    Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak1–6 compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength7. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals4, high fluid pressures within the fault core8,9 and dynamic processes such as

  1. Closed proximal muscle rupture of the biceps brachii in wakeboarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Swanson, Britta L; Bannar, Stephen M

    2012-06-01

    Closed proximal muscle rupture of the biceps brachii is a rare injury. In this report, two cases of closed proximal muscle rupture of the biceps brachii after wakeboard traumas are described. Both patients presented with a swollen arm, weakness during flexion, and a mass in the affected forearm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed displacement of the biceps brachii into the forearm. The rupture was successfully treated with muscle removal in one case and muscle repair in the other. In patients with a wakeboard trauma and similar presentations, closed proximal muscle rupture of the biceps brachii should be suspected.

  2. Calf muscle hypertrophy in late onset pompe's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Suraj Menon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe's disease (glycogen storage disease Type 2, acid maltase deficiency is characterized by a progressive myopathy due to accumulation of glycogen in skeletal muscles in addition to various tissues. Late onset Pompe's disease is characterized by slowly progressive proximal myopathy with respiratory muscle involvement. We present the case of a 16-year-old female presenting with proximal muscle weakness with calf hypertrophy diagnosed to be late onset Pompe's disease. This case highlights the need to consider Pompe's disease in the differential diagnosis of calf muscle hypertrophy, in patients with proximal myopathy even without overt respiratory muscle involvement.

  3. An optimal multiple switching problem under weak assumptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Hassairi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studies the problem of optimal multiple switching in finite horizon, when the switching costs functions are continous and belong to class D. This problem is solved by means of the Snell envelope of processes.

  4. Repair of gluteus medius muscle avulsion following transgluteal hip replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Diederik; van Ooij, Andre; Haverkamp, Daniel; Morrenhof, Wim

    2011-01-01

    During a transgluteal approach to the hip joint the anterior part of the gluteus medius and minimus muscles are detached and subsequently reattached to the greater trochanter. Avulsion or rupture of these muscles may result in weak abduction, pain and/or instability. 15 patients with these symptoms

  5. Reduced muscle strength, exercise intolerance and disabling symptoms in sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcellis, R.G.; Lenssen, A.F.; de Vries, J.; Drent, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This review focuses on innovations in the field of assessment and treatment of muscle weakness and exercise intolerance in sarcoidosis and the association between these and fatigue, dyspnea and quality of life (QoL). Recent findings: Muscle strength and exercise intolerance are

  6. Strong Plate, Weak Slab Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R. I.; Stegman, D. R.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Models of mantle convection on Earth produce styles of convection that are not observed on Earth.Moreover non-Earth-like modes, such as two-sided downwellings, are the de facto mode of convection in such models.To recreate Earth style subduction, i.e. one-sided asymmetric recycling of the lithosphere, proper treatment of the plates and plate interface are required. Previous work has identified several model features that promote subduction. A free surface or pseudo-free surface and a layer of material with a relatively low strength material (weak crust) allow downgoing plates to bend and slide past overriding without creating undue stress at the plate interface. (Crameri, et al. 2012, GRL)A low viscosity mantle wedge, possibly a result of slab dehydration, decouples the plates in the system. (Gerya et al. 2007, Geo)Plates must be composed of material which, in the case of the overriding plate, are is strong enough to resist bending stresses imposed by the subducting plate and yet, as in the case of the subducting plate, be weak enough to bend and subduct when pulled by the already subducted slab. (Petersen et al. 2015, PEPI) Though strong surface plates are required for subduction such plates may present a problem when they encounter the lower mantle.As the subducting slab approaches the higher viscosity, lower mantle stresses are imposed on the tip.Strong slabs transmit this stress to the surface.There the stress field at the plate interface is modified and potentially modifies the style of convection. In addition to modifying the stress at the plate interface, the strength of the slab affects the morphology of the slab at the base of the upper mantle. (Stegman, et al 2010, Tectonophysics)Slabs that maintain a sufficient portion of their strength after being bent require high stresses to unbend or otherwise change their shape.On the other hand slabs that are weakened though the bending process are more amenable to changes in morphology. We present the results of

  7. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Lu, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Hui-Fang; Ban, Rui; Liu, Hua-Xu; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Yin, Xi; Pu, Chuan-Qiang

    2016-08-05

    Myopathies with rimmed vacuoles are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders with progressive muscle weakness and varied clinical manifestations but similar features in muscle biopsies. Here, we describe a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles in a large family with 11 patients of three generations affected. A clinical study including family history, obstetric, pediatric, and development history was recorded. Clinical examinations including physical examination, electromyography (EMG), serum creatine kinase (CK), bone X-rays, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in this family. Open muscle biopsies were performed on the proband and his mother. To find the causative gene, the whole-exome sequencing was carried out. Disease onset was from adolescence to adulthood, but the affected patients of the third generation presented an earlier onset and more severe clinical manifestations than the older generations. Clinical features were characterized as dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision. However, not every patient manifested all symptoms. Serum CK was mildly elevated and EMG indicated a myopathic pattern. Brain MRI showed cerebellum and brain stem mildly atrophy. Rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies were observed in muscle biopsy. The whole-exome sequencing was performed, but the causative gene has not been found. We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study.

  8. Transition from weak wave turbulence regime to solitonic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Roumaissa; Mordant, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    The Weak Turbulence Theory (WTT) is a statistical theory describing the interaction of a large ensemble of random waves characterized by very different length scales. For both weak non-linearity and weak dispersion a different regime is predicted where solitons propagate while keeping their shape unchanged. The question under investigation here is which regime between weak turbulence or soliton gas does the system choose ? We report an experimental investigation of wave turbulence at the surface of finite depth water in the gravity-capillary range. We tune the wave dispersion and the level of nonlinearity by modifying the depth of water and the forcing respectively. We use space-time resolved profilometry to reconstruct the deformed surface of water. When decreasing the water depth, we observe a drastic transition between weak turbulence at the weakest forcing and a solitonic regime at stronger forcing. We characterize the transition between both states by studying their Fourier Spectra. We also study the efficiency of energy transfer in the weak turbulence regime. We report a loss of efficiency of angular transfer as the dispersion of the wave is reduced until the system bifurcates into the solitonic regime. This project has recieved funding from the European Research Council (ERC, Grant Agreement No. 647018-WATU).

  9. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  10. Measurements of weak conversion lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feoktistov, A.I.; Frantsev, Yu.E.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a new methods for measuring weak conversion lines with the help of the β spectrometer of the π √ 2 type which permits to increase the reliability of the results obtained. According to this method the measurements were carried out by short series with the storage of the information obtained on the punched tape. The spectrometer magnetic field was stabilized during the measuring of the conversion spectra with the help of three nmr recorders. Instead of the dependence of the pulse calculation rate on the magnetic field value was measured the dependence of the calculation rate on the value of the voltage applied between the source and the spectrometer chamber. A short description of the automatic set-up for measuring conversion lines according to the method proposed is given. The main set-up elements are the voltage multiplexer timer, printer, scaler and the pulse analyzer. With the help of the above methods obtained is the K 1035, 8 keV 182 Ta line. It is obtained as a result of the composition of 96 measurement series. Each measurement time constitutes 640 s 12 points are taken on the line

  11. Possible Cause of Nonlinear Tension Rise in Activated Muscle Fiber during Stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochubei, P V; Bershitsky, S Yu

    2016-11-01

    Tension in contracting muscle fiber under conditions of ramp stretching rapidly increases, but after reaching a critical stretch P c sharply decreases. To find out the cause of these changes in muscle fiber tension, we stopped stretching before and after reaching P c and left the fiber stretched for 50 msec. After rapid tension drop, the transient tension rise not accompanied by fiber stiffness increase was observed only in fibers heated to 25°C and stretched to P c . Under other experimental conditions, this growth was absent. We suppose that stretch of the fiber to P c induces transition of stereo-specifically attached myosin heads to pre-power stroke state and when the stretching is stopped, they make their step on actin and generate force. When the tension reaches P c , all stereospecifically attached myosin heads turn out to be non-stereospecifically, or weakly attached to actin, and are unable to make the force-generating step.

  12. The Geometry And Significance Of Weak Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Parks, A D

    2000-01-01

    Summary: The theory of weak values for quantum mechanical observables has come to serve as a useful basis for contemporary discussions concerning such varied topics as the tunnelling-time controversy and quantum stochastic processes. An intrinsic complex-valued weak energy has recently been observed experimentally and reported in the literature. In this paper it is shown that: (a) the real and imaginary valued parts of this weak energy have geometric interpretations related to a phase acquired from parallel transport in Hilbert space and the variational dynamics occurring in the associated projective Hilbert space, respectively; (b) the weak energy defines functions which translate correlation amplitudes and probabilities in time; (c) correlation probabilities can be controlled by manipulating the weak energy and there exists a condition of weak stationarity that guarantees their time invariance; and (d) a time-weak energy uncertainty relation of the usual form prevails when a suitable set of dynamical constr...

  13. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pesta, Dominik H.; Tsirigotis, Dimitrios N.; Befroy, Douglas E.; Caballero, Daniel; Jurczak, Michael J.; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Cline, Gary W.; Dufour, Sylvie; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Carpenter, Thomas O.; Insogna, Karl; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Bergwitz, Clemens; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia can lead to muscle weakness and respiratory and heart failure, but the mechanism is unknown. To address this question, we noninvasively assessed rates of muscle ATP synthesis in hypophosphatemic mice by using in vivo saturation transfer [31P]-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. By using this approach, we found that basal and insulin-stimulated rates of muscle ATP synthetic flux (V ATP) and plasma inorganic phosphate (Pi) were reduced by 50% in mice with diet-induced hypophosphat...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy in myotonic dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Timchenko, Lubov

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) are multisystemic diseases that primarily affect skeletal muscle, causing myotonia, muscle atrophy, and muscle weakness. DM1 and DM2 pathologies are caused by expansion of CTG and CCTG repeats in non-coding regions of the genes encoding myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and Zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) respectively. These expansions cause DM pathologies through accumulation of mutant RNAs that alter RNA metabolism in p...

  15. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and muscle force for maximum isometric tetanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is a classic example of a biological soft matter . At both macro and microscopic levels, skeletal muscle is exquisitely oriented for force generation and movement. In addition to the dynamics of contracting and relaxing muscle which can be monitored with ultrasound, variations in the muscle force are also expected to be monitored. To observe such force and sideways expansion variations synchronously for the skeletal muscle a novel detection scheme has been developed. As already introduced for the detection of sideways expansion variations of the muscle, ultrasonic transducers are mounted sideways on opposing positions of the monitored muscle. To detect variations of the muscle force, angle of pull of the monitored muscle has been restricted by the mechanical pull of the sonic force sensor. Under this condition, any variation in the time-of-flight (TOF) of the transmitted ultrasonic signals can be introduced by the variation of the path length between the transducers. The observed variations of the TOF are compared to the signals obtained by ultrasound monitoring for the muscle dynamics. The general behavior of the muscle dynamics and muscle force shows almost an identical concept. Since muscle force also relates the psychological boosting-up effects, the influence of boosting-up on muscle force and muscle dynamics can also be quantified form this study. Length-tension or force-length and force-velocity relationship can also be derived quantitatively with such monitoring.

  16. Constrained Deep Weak Supervision for Histopathology Image Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhipeng; Huang, Xingyi; Chang, Eric I-Chao; Xu, Yan

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we develop a new weakly supervised learning algorithm to learn to segment cancerous regions in histopathology images. This paper is under a multiple instance learning (MIL) framework with a new formulation, deep weak supervision (DWS); we also propose an effective way to introduce constraints to our neural networks to assist the learning process. The contributions of our algorithm are threefold: 1) we build an end-to-end learning system that segments cancerous regions with fully convolutional networks (FCNs) in which image-to-image weakly-supervised learning is performed; 2) we develop a DWS formulation to exploit multi-scale learning under weak supervision within FCNs; and 3) constraints about positive instances are introduced in our approach to effectively explore additional weakly supervised information that is easy to obtain and enjoy a significant boost to the learning process. The proposed algorithm, abbreviated as DWS-MIL, is easy to implement and can be trained efficiently. Our system demonstrates the state-of-the-art results on large-scale histopathology image data sets and can be applied to various applications in medical imaging beyond histopathology images, such as MRI, CT, and ultrasound images.

  17. Muscle channelopathies and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Muscle channelopathies and related disorders are neuromuscular disorders predominantly of genetic origin which are caused by mutations in ion channels or genes that play a role in muscle excitability. They include different forms of periodic paralysis which are characterized by acute and reversible attacks of muscle weakness concomitant to changes in blood potassium levels. These disorders may also present as distinguishable myotonic syndromes (slowed muscle relaxation) which have in common lack of involvement of dystrophic changes of the muscle, in contrast to dystrophia myotonica. Recent advances have been made in the diagnosis of these different disorders, which require, in addition to a careful clinical evaluation, detailed EMG and molecular study. Although these diseases are rare, they deserve attention since patients may benefit from drugs which can dramatically improve their condition. Patients may have atypical presentations, sometimes life-threatening, which may delay a proper diagnosis, mostly in the first months of life. The creation of specialized reference centers in the Western world has greatly benefited the proper recognition of these neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Weakly time consistent concave valuations and their dual representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, B.; Schumacher, Hans

    We derive dual characterizations of two notions of weak time consistency for concave valuations, which are convex risk measures under a positive sign convention. Combined with a suitable risk aversion property, these notions are shown to amount to three simple rules for not necessarily minimal

  19. Weakly time consistent concave valuations and their dual representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berend; Schumacher, Johannes M.

    2016-01-01

    We derive dual characterizations of two notions of weak time consistency for concave valuations, which are convex risk measures under a positive sign convention. Combined with a suitable risk aversion property, these notions are shown to amount to three simple rules for not necessarily minimal

  20. Weakly nonlinear analysis of two dimensional sheared granular flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saitoh, K.; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2011-01-01

    Weakly nonlinear analysis of a two dimensional sheared granular flow is carried out under the Lees-Edwards boundary condition. We derive the time dependent Ginzburg–Landau equation of a disturbance amplitude starting from a set of granular hydrodynamic equations and discuss the bifurcation of the

  1. Enhancing robustness of multiparty quantum correlations using weak measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Uttam, E-mail: uttamsingh@hri.res.in [Quantum Information and Computation Group, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Mishra, Utkarsh, E-mail: utkarsh@hri.res.in [Quantum Information and Computation Group, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Dhar, Himadri Shekhar, E-mail: dhar.himadri@gmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Multipartite quantum correlations are important resources for the development of quantum information and computation protocols. However, the resourcefulness of multipartite quantum correlations in practical settings is limited by its fragility under decoherence due to environmental interactions. Though there exist protocols to protect bipartite entanglement under decoherence, the implementation of such protocols for multipartite quantum correlations has not been sufficiently explored. Here, we study the effect of local amplitude damping channel on the generalized Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger state, and use a protocol of optimal reversal quantum weak measurement to protect the multipartite quantum correlations. We observe that the weak measurement reversal protocol enhances the robustness of multipartite quantum correlations. Further it increases the critical damping value that corresponds to entanglement sudden death. To emphasize the efficacy of the technique in protection of multipartite quantum correlation, we investigate two proximately related quantum communication tasks, namely, quantum teleportation in a one sender, many receivers setting and multiparty quantum information splitting, through a local amplitude damping channel. We observe an increase in the average fidelity of both the quantum communication tasks under the weak measurement reversal protocol. The method may prove beneficial, for combating external interactions, in other quantum information tasks using multipartite resources. - Highlights: • Extension of weak measurement reversal scheme to protect multiparty quantum correlations. • Protection of multiparty quantum correlation under local amplitude damping noise. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum teleportation in one sender and many receivers setting. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum information splitting protocol.

  2. DRY NEEDLING INCREASES MUSCLE THICKNESS IN A SUBJECT WITH PERSISTENT MUSCLE DYSFUNCTION: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Kevin M; McMurray, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Muscle dysfunction is very common following musculoskeletal injury. There is very little evidence to suggest that muscle function may be positively impacted by soft tissue interventions, such as dry needling. The purpose of this case report is to describe the immediate effect of dry needling on muscle thickness in a subject after shoulder surgery. A 22 year-old competitive gymnast presented seven months post shoulder surgery with significant impairments and functional limitations. Previous physical therapy focused on restoration of range of motion and strength using general exercise interventions, but the subject had persistent tightness and weakness of musculature of the shoulder complex. A subject-specific physical therapy program including manual physical therapy resulted in significant initial improvement, but lack of flexibility and weakness of the rotator cuff limited progress. Dry needling was used to address persistent myofascial trigger points. Immediately after dry needling the infraspinatus, the muscle's thickness was significantly improved as measured by rehabilitative ultrasound imaging. There was a corresponding increase in force production of external rotation at 90 degrees of abduction. Minimal research exists that validates the potential of dry needling on muscle function, as assessed by muscle thickness measured using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging. The results of this case report suggest that dry needling contributed to improvement in muscle thickness and strength in a subject with muscle dysfunction following an injury. 4.

  3. Respiratory dysfunction in ventilated patients: can inspiratory muscle training help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, B; Leditschke, I A; Paratz, J D; Boots, R J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is associated with prolonged and difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. This dysfunction in ventilator-dependent patients is multifactorial: there is evidence that inspiratory muscle weakness is partially explained by disuse atrophy secondary to ventilation, and positive end-expiratory pressure can further reduce muscle strength by negatively shifting the length-tension curve of the diaphragm. Polyneuropathy is also likely to contribute to apparent muscle weakness in critically ill patients, and nutritional and pharmaceutical effects may further compound muscle weakness. Moreover, psychological influences, including anxiety, may contribute to difficulty in weaning. There is recent evidence that inspiratory muscle training is safe and feasible in selected ventilator-dependent patients, and that this training can reduce the weaning period and improve overall weaning success rates. Extrapolating from evidence in sports medicine, as well as the known effects of inspiratory muscle training in chronic lung disease, a theoretical model is proposed to describe how inspiratory muscle training enhances weaning and recovery from mechanical ventilation. Possible mechanisms include increased protein synthesis (both Type 1 and Type 2 muscle fibres), enhanced limb perfusion via dampening of a sympathetically-mediated metaboreflex, reduced lactate levels and modulation of the perception of exertion, resulting in less dyspnoea and enhanced exercise capacity.

  4. PLASTICITY OF SKELETAL MUSCLE STUDIED BY STEREOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Eržen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution provides an overview of stereological methods applied in the skeletal muscle research at the Institute of Anatomy of the Medical Faculty in Ljubljana. Interested in skeletal muscle plasticity we studied three different topics: (i expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in slow and fast muscles under experimental conditions, (ii frequency of satellite cells in young and old human and rat muscles and (iii capillary supply of rat fast and slow muscles. We analysed the expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms within slow rat soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus muscles after (i homotopic and heterotopic transplantation of both muscles, (ii low frequency electrical stimulation of the fast muscle and (iii transposition of the fast nerve to the slow muscle. The models applied were able to turn the fast muscle into a completely slow muscle, but not vice versa. One of the indicators for the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles is its satellite cell pool. The estimated parameters, number of satellite cells per unit fibre length, corrected to the reference sarcomere length (Nsc/Lfib and number of satellite cells per number of nuclei (myonuclei and satellite cell nuclei (Nsc/Nnucl indicated that the frequency of M-cadherin stained satellite cells declines in healthy old human and rat muscles compared to young muscles. To access differences in capillary densities among slow and fast muscles and slow and fast muscle fibres, we have introduced Slicer and Fakir methods, and tested them on predominantly slow and fast rat muscles. Discussing three different topics that require different approach, the present paper reflects the three decades of the development of stereological methods: 2D analysis by simple point counting in the 70's, the disector in the 80's and virtual spatial probes in the 90's. In all methods the interactive computer assisted approach was utilised.

  5. Weak boson emission in hadron collider processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.

    2007-01-01

    The O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(α) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, tt, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel

  6. Respiratory muscle training for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietberg, Marc B; Veerbeek, Janne M; Gosselink, Rik; Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin Eh

    2017-12-21

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system, affecting approximately 2.5 million people worldwide. People with MS may experience limitations in muscular strength and endurance - including the respiratory muscles, affecting functional performance and exercise capacity. Respiratory muscle weakness can also lead to diminished performance on coughing, which may result in (aspiration) pneumonia or even acute ventilatory failure, complications that frequently cause death in MS. Training of the respiratory muscles might improve respiratory function and cough efficacy. To assess the effects of respiratory muscle training versus any other type of training or no training for respiratory muscle function, pulmonary function and clinical outcomes in people with MS. We searched the Trials Register of the Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis and Rare Diseases of the Central Nervous System Group (3 February 2017), which contains trials from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, LILACS and the trial registry databases ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Two authors independently screened records yielded by the search, handsearched reference lists of review articles and primary studies, checked trial registers for protocols, and contacted experts in the field to identify further published or unpublished trials. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the efficacy of respiratory muscle training versus any control in people with MS. One reviewer extracted study characteristics and study data from included RCTs, and two other reviewers independently cross-checked all extracted data. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias with the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' assessment tool. When at least two RCTs provided data for the same type of outcome, we performed meta-analyses. We assessed the certainty of the evidence according to the GRADE approach

  7. Elementary Particles and Weak Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.; Yang, C. N.

    1957-01-01

    Some general patterns of interactions between various elementary particles are reviewed and some general questions concerning the symmetry properties of these particles are studied. Topics are included on the theta-tau puzzle, experimental limits on the validity of parity conservation, some general discussions on the consequences due to possible non-invariance under P, C, and T, various possible experimental tests on invariance under P, C, and T, a two-component theory of the neutrino, a possible law of conservation of leptons and the universal Fermi interactions, and time reversal invariance and Mach's principle. (M.H.R.)

  8. Pre-relaxation in weakly interacting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Bruno; Fagotti, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    We consider time evolution in models close to integrable points with hidden symmetries that generate infinitely many local conservation laws that do not commute with one another. The system is expected to (locally) relax to a thermal ensemble if integrability is broken, or to a so-called generalised Gibbs ensemble if unbroken. In some circumstances expectation values exhibit quasi-stationary behaviour long before their typical relaxation time. For integrability-breaking perturbations, these are also called pre-thermalisation plateaux, and emerge e.g. in the strong coupling limit of the Bose-Hubbard model. As a result of the hidden symmetries, quasi-stationarity appears also in integrable models, for example in the Ising limit of the XXZ model. We investigate a weak coupling limit, identify a time window in which the effects of the perturbations become significant and solve the time evolution through a mean-field mapping. As an explicit example we study the XYZ spin-\\frac{1}{2} chain with additional perturbations that break integrability. One of the most intriguing results of the analysis is the appearance of persistent oscillatory behaviour. To unravel its origin, we study in detail a toy model: the transverse-field Ising chain with an additional nonlocal interaction proportional to the square of the transverse spin per unit length (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 197203). Despite being nonlocal, this belongs to a class of models that emerge as intermediate steps of the mean-field mapping and shares many dynamical properties with the weakly interacting models under consideration.

  9. Anomalous baryogenesis at the weak scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, R.L. Jr.

    1991-06-01

    One of the fundamental constants of nature is the baryon asymmetry of the universe -- the ratio of the number of baryons to the entropy. This constant is about 10 -11 . In baryon- number conserving theories, this was just an initial condition. With the advent of the grand unified theories (GUTs), baryon number is no longer conserved, and this asymmetry can be generated dynamically. Unfortunately, however, there are reasons for preferring another mechanism. For example, GUTs predict proton decay which, after extensive searches, has not been found. An alternative place to look for baryogenesis is the electroweak phase transition, described by the standard model, which posses all the necessary ingredients for baryogenesis. Anomalous baryon-number violation in weak interactions becomes large at high temperatures, which offers the prospect of creating the asymmetry with the standard model or minimal extensions. This can just barely be done if certain conditions are fulfilled. CP violation must be large, which rules out the minimal standard model as the source of the asymmetry, but which is easily arranged with an extended Higgs sector. The baryon-number violating rates themselves are not exactly known, and they must be pushed to their theoretical limits. A more exact determination of these rates is needed before a definitive answer can be given. Finally, the phase transition must be at least weakly first order. Such phase transitions are accompanied by the formation and expansion of bubbles of true vacuum within the false vacuum, much like the boiling of water. As the bubbles expand, they provide a departure from thermal equilibrium, otherwise the dynamics will adjust the net baryon number to zero. The bubble expansion also provides a biasing that creates an asymmetry on the bubbles surface. Under optimal conditions, the observed asymmetry can just be produced. 31 refs., 10 figs

  10. Anomalous baryogenesis at the weak scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, R.L. Jr.

    1991-06-01

    One of the fundamental constants of nature is the baryon asymmetry of the universe -- the ratio of the number of baryons to the entropy. This constant is about 10{sup {minus}11}. In baryon- number conserving theories, this was just an initial condition. With the advent of the grand unified theories (GUTs), baryon number is no longer conserved, and this asymmetry can be generated dynamically. Unfortunately, however, there are reasons for preferring another mechanism. For example, GUTs predict proton decay which, after extensive searches, has not been found. An alternative place to look for baryogenesis is the electroweak phase transition, described by the standard model, which posses all the necessary ingredients for baryogenesis. Anomalous baryon-number violation in weak interactions becomes large at high temperatures, which offers the prospect of creating the asymmetry with the standard model or minimal extensions. This can just barely be done if certain conditions are fulfilled. CP violation must be large, which rules out the minimal standard model as the source of the asymmetry, but which is easily arranged with an extended Higgs sector. The baryon-number violating rates themselves are not exactly known, and they must be pushed to their theoretical limits. A more exact determination of these rates is needed before a definitive answer can be given. Finally, the phase transition must be at least weakly first order. Such phase transitions are accompanied by the formation and expansion of bubbles of true vacuum within the false vacuum, much like the boiling of water. As the bubbles expand, they provide a departure from thermal equilibrium, otherwise the dynamics will adjust the net baryon number to zero. The bubble expansion also provides a biasing that creates an asymmetry on the bubbles surface. Under optimal conditions, the observed asymmetry can just be produced. 31 refs., 10 figs.

  11. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  12. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  13. Building Muscles, Keeping Muscles: Protein Turnover During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Arny; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As we age we lose muscle mass and strength. The problem is a matter of use it or lose it and more - a fact to which any active senior can attest. An imbalance in the natural cycle of protein turnover may be a contributing factor to decreased muscle mass. But the answer is not so simple, since aging is associated with changes in hormones, activity levels, nutrition, and often, disease. The human body constantly uses amino acids to build muscle protein, which then breaks down and must be replaced. When protein turnover gets out of balance, so that more protein breaks down than the body can replace, the result is muscle loss. This is not just the bane of aging, however. Severely burned people may have difficulty building new muscle long after the burned skin has been repaired. Answers to why we lose muscle mass and strength - and how doctors can fix it - may come from space. Astronauts usually eat a well-balanced diet and maintain an exercise routine to stay in top health. During long-duration flight, they exercise regularly to reduce the muscle loss that results from being in a near-weightless environment. Despite these precautions, astronauts lose muscle mass and strength during most missions. They quickly recover after returning to Earth - this is a temporary condition in an otherwise healthy population. Members of the STS-107 crew are participating in a study of the effects of space flight, hormone levels, and stress on protein turnover. When we are under stress, the body responds with a change in hormone levels. Researchers hypothesize that this stress-induced change in hormones along with the near-weightlessness might result in the body synthesizing less muscle protein, causing muscles to lose their strength and size. Astronauts, who must perform numerous duties in a confined and unusual environment, experience some stress during their flight, making them excellent candidates for testing the researchers' hypothesis.

  14. Order and disorder in weakly ionised plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, T.L.; Dhar, P.K.

    1977-01-01

    The observation of some unusual radial structures in discharges in pure He and Ar in a magnetic field is reported. The structures depended on the angle between the discharge tube axis and the magnetic field direction, and support the previously proposed idea that gaseous plasma energised under certain conditions can have regions in which the electrons have an ordered spatial distribution. The weakly ionised high frequency electrodeless discharges were energised at powers between 500 W and 1 kW, coupled to the discharge from an amplifier by a 143 cm quarter-wavelength twin transmission line, connected to two copper bands, 14 cm apart, placed closely around the outside of the discharge tube. The discharge was maintained continuously between the bands in a position centrally between a pair of Helmholtz coils in a horizontal uniform magnetic field. Optical flats sealed to each end of the hard glass tubes made it possible to view the discharges axially. The tubes were 70 cm long and of internal radius 1.84 cm. A pattern of luminous and non-luminous plasma regions was observed, arranged in coaxial symmetry, the complexity of the pattern depending on the magnitude of the magnetic field. Patterns for He are shown and discussed, and comparisons are made with the patterns for Ar. Significant evidence was obtained for the presence of order in the non-luminous regions. It is thought that stationary states are formed under certain conditions, and conditions for their formation are discussed. (U.K.)

  15. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, B.M. [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L.F. [1864 Stadium Road, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Judge, A.R., E-mail: arjudge@phhp.ufl.edu [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative

  16. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.M.; Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L.F.; Judge, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative

  17. Classical field approach to quantum weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-21

    By generalizing the quantum weak measurement protocol to the case of quantum fields, we show that weak measurements probe an effective classical background field that describes the average field configuration in the spacetime region between pre- and postselection boundary conditions. The classical field is itself a weak value of the corresponding quantum field operator and satisfies equations of motion that extremize an effective action. Weak measurements perturb this effective action, producing measurable changes to the classical field dynamics. As such, weakly measured effects always correspond to an effective classical field. This general result explains why these effects appear to be robust for pre- and postselected ensembles, and why they can also be measured using classical field techniques that are not weak for individual excitations of the field.

  18. Weakly distributive modules. Applications to supplement submodules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is well-known that, if f : M → N is an isomorphism, then there is a one-to-one corres- pondence between the submodules of M and the submodules of N. Therefore, any module. (lattice) isomorphic to a weakly distributive module, is itself weakly distributive. Lemma 2.1. Let M be a weakly distributive module and f : M → N be ...

  19. Robust weak measurements on finite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollaksen, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A new weak measurement procedure is introduced for finite samples which yields accurate weak values that are outside the range of eigenvalues and which do not require an exponentially rare ensemble. This procedure provides a unique advantage in the amplification of small nonrandom signals by minimizing uncertainties in determining the weak value and by minimizing sample size. This procedure can also extend the strength of the coupling between the system and measuring device to a new regime

  20. Are weak and electromagnetic interactions unified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombey, N.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines how well the standard electroweak model agrees with experiment. Attempts to explain to a nonparticle physicist why weak and electromagnetic interactions are unified. Discusses the Glashow model (unified SU(2)xU(1)); some basic questions; an alternative viewpoint; unified theories; non-unified theories; and weak interactions as strong interactions. Concludes that SU(2)xU(1) is a good phenomenological model for weak and electromagnetic interactions in the energy region accessible to experiment

  1. Numerical test of weak turbulence theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, G. L.; Nicholson, D. R.; Shen, Mei-Mei

    1989-01-01

    The analytic theory of weak Langmuir turbulence is well known, but very little has previously been done to compare its predictions with numerical solutions of the basic dynamical evolution equations. In this paper, numerical solutions of the statistical weak turbulence theory are compared with numerical solutions of the Zakharov model of Langmuir turbulence, and good agreement in certain regimes of very weak field strength is found.

  2. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-08-10

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 276-310.

  3. Regularized inner products and weakly holomorphic Hecke eigenforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Kathrin; Kane, Ben

    2018-01-01

    We show that the image of repeated differentiation on weak cusp forms is precisely the subspace which is orthogonal to the space of weakly holomorphic modular forms. This gives a new interpretation of weakly holomorphic Hecke eigenforms. The research of the first author is supported by the Alfried Krupp Prize for Young University Teachers of the Krupp foundation and the research leading to these results receives funding from the European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP/2007-2013) / ERC Grant agreement n. 335220—AQSER. The research of the second author was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong SAR, China (project numbers HKU 27300314, 17302515, and 17316416).

  4. Age-Specific Effects of Mirror-Muscle Activity on Cross-Limb Adaptations Under Mirror and Non-Mirror Visual Feedback Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissig, Paola; Stöckel, Tino; Garry, Michael I; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Cross-limb transfer (CLT) describes the observation of bilateral performance gains due to unilateral motor practice. Previous research has suggested that CLT may be reduced, or absent, in older adults, possibly due to age-related structural and functional brain changes. Based on research showing increases in CLT due to the provision of mirror visual feedback (MVF) during task execution in young adults, our study aimed to investigate whether MVF can facilitate CLT in older adults, who are known to be more reliant on visual feedback for accurate motor performance. Participants (N = 53) engaged in a short-term training regime (300 movements) involving a ballistic finger task using their dominant hand, while being provided with either visual feedback of their active limb, or a mirror reflection of their active limb (superimposed over the quiescent limb). Performance in both limbs was examined before, during and following the unilateral training. Furthermore, we measured corticospinal excitability (using TMS) at these time points, and assessed muscle activity bilaterally during the task via EMG; these parameters were used to investigate the mechanisms mediating and predicting CLT. Training resulted in significant bilateral performance gains that did not differ as a result of age or visual feedback (both p > 0.1). Training also elicited bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability (p mirror activity in the untrained hand during training (β = 0.60). The present study suggests that older adults are capable of exhibiting CLT to a similar degree to younger adults. The prominent role of mirror activity in the untrained hand for CLT in older adults indicates that bilateral cortical activity during unilateral motor tasks is a compensatory mechanism. In this particular task, MVF did not facilitate the extent of CLT.

  5. Age-specific effects of mirror-muscle activity on cross-limb adaptations under mirror and non-mirror visual feedback conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eReissig

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross-limb transfer (CLT describes the observation of bilateral performance gains due to unilateral motor practice. Previous research has suggested that CLT may be reduced, or absent, in older adults, possibly due to age-related structural and functional brain changes. Based on research showing increases in CLT due to the provision of mirror visual feedback (MVF during task execution in young adults, our study aimed to investigate whether MVF can facilitate CLT in older adults, who are known to be more reliant on visual feedback for accurate motor performance. Participants (N = 53 engaged in a short-term training regime (300 movements involving a ballistic finger task using their dominant hand, while being provided with either visual feedback of their active limb, or a mirror reflection of their active limb (superimposed over the quiescent limb. Bilateral performance was examined before, during and following the training. Furthermore, we measured corticospinal excitability (using TMS at these time points, and assessed muscle activity bilaterally during the task via EMG; these parameters were used to investigate the mechanisms mediating and predicting CLT. Training resulted in significant bilateral performance gains that did not differ as a result of age or visual feedback (all ps > 0.1. Training also elicited bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability (p < 0.05. For younger adults, CLT was significantly predicted by performance gains in the trained hand (β = 0.47, whereas for older adults it was significantly predicted by mirror activity in the untrained hand during training (β = 0.60. The present study suggests that older adults are capable of exhibiting CLT to a similar degree to younger adults. The prominent role of mirror activity in the untrained hand for CLT in older adults indicates that bilateral cortical activity during unilateral motor tasks is a compensatory mechanism. In this particular task, MVF did not facilitate the

  6. Characteristic MRI Findings of upper Limb Muscle Involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugie

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to evaluate the relation between muscle MRI findings and upper limb weakness with grip myotonia in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1. Seventeen patients with DM1 were evaluated by manual muscle strength testing and muscle MRI of the upper limbs. Many DM1 patients presenting with decreased grasping power frequently showed high intensity signals in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP muscles on T1-weighted imaging. Patients presenting with upper limb weakness frequently also showed high intensity signals in the flexor pollicis longus, abductor pollicis longus, and extensor pollicis muscles. Disturbances of the distal muscles of the upper limbs were predominant in all DM1 patients. Some DM1 patients with a prolonged disease duration showed involvement of not only distal muscles but also proximal muscles in the upper limbs. Muscle involvement of the upper limbs on MRI strongly correlated positively with the disease duration or the numbers of CTG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide a detailed description of the distribution and severity of affected muscles of the upper limbs on MRI in patients with DM1. We conclude that muscle MRI findings are very useful for identifying affected muscles and predicting the risk of muscle weakness in the upper limbs of DM1 patients.

  7. Treatment with a corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor agonist modulates skeletal muscle mass and force production in aged and chronically ill animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Leonardo F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle weakness is associated with a variety of chronic disorders such as emphysema (EMP and congestive heart failure (CHF as well as aging. Therapies to treat muscle weakness associated with chronic disease or aging are lacking. Corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor (CRF2R agonists have been shown to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in a variety of acute conditions that lead to skeletal muscle wasting. Hypothesis We hypothesize that treating animals with a CRF2R agonist will maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in animals with chronic disease and in aged animals. Methods We utilized animal models of aging, CHF and EMP to evaluate the potential of CRF2R agonist treatment to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in aged animals and animals with CHF and EMP. Results In aged rats, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 3 months results in greater extensor digitorum longus (EDL force production, EDL mass, soleus mass and soleus force production compared to age matched untreated animals. In the hamster EMP model, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 5 months results in greater EDL force production in EMP hamsters when compared to vehicle treated EMP hamsters and greater EDL mass and force in normal hamsters when compared to vehicle treated normal hamsters. In the rat CHF model, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 3 months results in greater EDL and soleus muscle mass and force production in CHF rats and normal rats when compared to the corresponding vehicle treated animals. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the underlying physiological conditions associated with chronic diseases such as CHF and emphysema in addition to aging do not reduce the potential of CRF2R agonists to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production.

  8. Early Cyclical Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Improves Strength and Trophism by Akt Pathway Signaling in Partially Paralyzed Biceps Muscle After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Gabriel R; Santo, Caroline C do Espírito; de Machado-Pereira, Nicolas A M M; Bobinski, Franciane; Dos Santos, Adair R S; Ilha, Jocemar

    2018-03-01

    Electrical stimulation is often used to treat weakness in people with spinal cord injury (SCI); however its efficacy for increasing strength and trophism is weak, and the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic benefits are unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on muscle function, trophism, and the Akt pathway signaling involved in muscular plasticity after incomplete SCI in rats. This was an experimental study. Twenty-one adult female Wistar rats were divided into sham, SCI, and SCI plus NMES groups. In injured animals, SCI hemisection was induced by a surgical procedure at the C5-C7 level. The 5-week NMES protocol consisted of biceps brachii muscle stimulation 5 times per week, initiated 48 h after injury. Forepaw function and strength, biceps muscle trophism, and the expression of phosphorylated Akt, p70S6K, and GSK-3ß cellular anabolic pathway markers in stimulated muscle tissue were assessed. There was an increase in bicep muscle strength in the NMES group compared with the untreated SCI group, from postoperative day 21 until the end of the evaluation period. Also, there was an increase in muscle trophism in the NMES group compared with the SCI group. Forelimb function gradually recovered in both the SCI group and the NMES group, with no differences between them. Regarding muscle protein expression, the NMES group had higher values for phospho-Akt, phospho-p70S6K, and phospho-GSK-3ß than did the SCI group. The experimental findings were limited to an animal model of incomplete SCI and may not be fully generalizable to humans. Early cyclical NMES therapy was shown to increase muscle strength and induce hypertrophy after incomplete SCI in a rat model, probably by increasing phospho-Akt, phospho-p70S6K, and phospho-GSK-3ß signaling protein synthesis. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  9. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  10. Prevalence of adult Pompe disease in patients with proximal myopathic syndrome and undiagnosed muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsari, Amir; Nasimzadah, Arzoo; Thomalla, Götz; Keller, Sarah; Gerloff, Christian; Magnus, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We examined patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness and/or hyper-CKaemia and undiagnosed muscle biopsy for late onset Pompe disease (LOPD). Patients with an inconclusive limb-girdle muscle weakness who presented at our neuromuscular centre between 2005 and 2015 with undiagnosed muscle biopsies were examined by dry blood spot testing (DBS) including determination of the enzyme activity of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). In the case of depressed enzyme activity, additional gene testing of the GAA gene was carried out. Of the 340 evaluated muscle biopsies, 69 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were examined with DBS. Among those patients, 76% showed a limb-girdle muscle weakness and 14% showed a hyper-CKaemia. A diagnosis of LOPD could be established in the case of two patients (2.9%) with reduced GAA enzyme activity and proof of mutations in the GAA gene. One of the two patients presents in the muscle biopsy suggestive features of Pompe disease including vacuoles with positive acid phosphatase reaction. In summary, our results show that a muscle biopsy can be helpful in identifying LOPD patients, but vacuolation with glycogen storage can also be absent. An inconspicuous muscle biopsy does not rule out Pompe disease. Consequently, all patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness should be examined by DBS before conducting a muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Myopathy in Childhood Muscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirzinger, Lukas; Khomenko, Andrei; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm; Backhaus, Roland; Platen, Sabine; Schalke, Berthold

    2016-12-01

    Adult and pediatric patients suffering from MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) -antibody positive myasthenia gravis exhibit similar features to individuals with acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies, but they differ in several characteristics such as a predominant bulbar, respiratory and neck weakness, a generally worse disease severity and a tendency to develop muscle atrophy. Muscle atrophy is a rare phenomenon that is usually restricted to the facial muscles. We describe a girl with MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis who developed a myopathy with severe generalized muscular weakness, muscle atrophy, and myopathic changes on electromyography. This is the first published example of a generalized myopathic syndrome in myasthenia gravis. We review the relevant literature and discuss the hypothesis of a mitochondrial myopathy as a pathogenic mechanism in MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inspiratory muscle training to enhance recovery from mechanical ventilation: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Bernie M; Leditschke, I Anne; Neeman, Teresa; Boots, Robert; Paratz, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    In patients who have been mechanically ventilated, inspiratory muscles remain weak and fatigable following ventilatory weaning, which may contribute to dyspnoea and limited functional recovery. Inspiratory muscle training may improve inspiratory muscle strength and endurance following weaning, potentially improving dyspnoea and quality of life in this patient group. We conducted a randomised trial with assessor-blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. Following 48 hours of successful weaning, 70 participants (mechanically ventilated ≥7 days) were randomised to receive inspiratory muscle training once daily 5 days/week for 2 weeks in addition to usual care, or usual care (control). Primary endpoints were inspiratory muscle strength and fatigue resistance index (FRI) 2 weeks following enrolment. Secondary endpoints included dyspnoea, physical function and quality of life, post-intensive care length of stay and in-hospital mortality. 34 participants were randomly allocated to the training group and 36 to control. The training group demonstrated greater improvements in inspiratory strength (training: 17%, control: 6%, mean difference: 11%, p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences in FRI (0.03 vs 0.02, p=0.81), physical function (0.25 vs 0.25, p=0.97) or dyspnoea (-0.5 vs 0.2, p=0.22). Improvement in quality of life was greater in the training group (14% vs 2%, mean difference 12%, p=0.03). In-hospital mortality was higher in the training group (4 vs 0, 12% vs 0%, p=0.051). Inspiratory muscle training following successful weaning increases inspiratory muscle strength and quality of life, but we cannot confidently rule out an associated increased risk of in-hospital mortality. ACTRN12610001089022, results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. A note on Weak Stability Boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    García González, Fernando; Gómez Muntané, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    This paper is devoted to clarify the algorithmic definition of the weak stability boundary in the framework of the planar Restricted Three Body Problem. The role of the invariant hyperbolic manifolds associated to the central manifolds of the libration points L1 and L2, as boundary of the weak stability region, is shown Peer Reviewed

  14. Staggering towards a calculation of weak amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1988-09-01

    An explanation is given of the methods required to calculate hadronic matrix elements of the weak Hamiltonians using lattice QCD with staggered fermions. New results are presented for the 1-loop perturbative mixing of the weak interaction operators. New numerical techniques designed for staggered fermions are described. A preliminary result for the kaon B parameter is presented. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Staggering towards a calculation of weak amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1988-09-01

    An explanation is given of the methods required to calculate hadronic matrix elements of the weak Hamiltonians using lattice QCD with staggered fermions. New results are presented for the 1-loop perturbative mixing of the weak interaction operators. New numerical techniques designed for staggered fermions are described. A preliminary result for the kaon B parameter is presented. 24 refs., 3 figs

  16. Weak interaction: past answers, present questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ne'eman, Y.

    1977-02-01

    A historical sketch of the weak interaction is presented. From beta ray to pion decay, the V-A theory of Marshak and Sudarshan, CVC principle of equivalence, universality as an algebraic condition, PCAC, renormalized weak Hamiltonian in the rehabilitation of field theory, and some current issues are considered in this review. 47 references

  17. Common fixed points for weakly compatible maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    flood of papers involving contractive definition that do not require the continuity of T . This result was further generalized and extended in various ways by many authors. On the other hand Sessa [11] defined weak commutativity and proved common fixed point theorem for weakly commuting maps. Further Jungck [5] ...

  18. Optimization of strong and weak coordinates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new scheme for the geometry optimization of equilibrium and transition state structures that can be used for both strong and weak coordinates. We use a screening function that depends on atom-pair distances to differentiate strong coordinates from weak coordinates. This differentiation

  19. Moving Beyond Weak Identifiers for Proxemic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Kjeldskov, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    is significantly closer than what is actually the case. This makes the smartphone a weak identifier for applications that need to track persons. With a focus on feasible interaction design, we present a concept and prototype of a platform, which seek to support proxemic interaction beyond weak identifiers...

  20. Towards a classification of weak hand holds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimmelman, V.; Sáfár, A.; Crasborn, O.

    2016-01-01

    The two symmetrical manual articulators (the hands) in signed languages are a striking modalityspecific phonetic property. The weak hand can maintain the end position of an articulation while the other articulator continues to produce additional signs. This weak hand spreading (hold) has been

  1. Weak measurements with a qubit meter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Shengjun; Mølmer, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    We derive schemes to measure the so-called weak values of quantum system observables by coupling of the system to a qubit meter system. We highlight, in particular, the meaning of the imaginary part of the weak values, and show how it can be measured directly on equal footing with the real part...

  2. Co-activation: its association with weakness and specific neurological pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiles Charles M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Net agonist muscle strength is in part determined by the degree of antagonist co-activation. The level of co-activation might vary in different neurological disorders causing weakness or might vary with agonist strength. Aim This study investigated whether antagonist co-activation changed a with the degree of muscle weakness and b with the nature of the neurological lesion causing weakness. Methods Measures of isometric quadriceps and hamstrings strength were obtained. Antagonist (hamstring co-activation during knee extension was calculated as a ratio of hamstrings over quadriceps activity both during an isometric and during a functional sit to stand (STS task (using kinematics in groups of patients with extrapyramidal (n = 15, upper motor neuron (UMN (n = 12, lower motor neuron (LMN with (n = 18 or without (n = 12 sensory loss, primary muscle or neuromuscular junction disorder (n = 17 and in healthy matched controls (n = 32. Independent t-tests or Mann Witney U tests were used to compare between the groups. Correlations between variables were also investigated. Results In healthy subjects mean (SD co-activation of hamstrings during isometric knee extension was 11.8 (6.2% and during STS was 20.5 (12.9%. In patients, co-activation ranged from 7 to 17% during isometric knee extension and 15 to 25% during STS. Only the extrapyramidal group had lower co-activation levels than healthy matched controls (p Conclusion It is concluded that antagonist co-activation does not systematically vary with the site of neurological pathology when compared to healthy matched controls or, in most patient groups, with strength. The lower co-activation levels found in the extrapyramidal group require confirmation and further investigation. Co-activation may be relevant to individuals with muscle weakness. Within patient serial studies in the presence of changing muscle strength may help to understand these relationships more clearly.

  3. Botulinum Toxin A Injections Into Pelvic Floor Muscles Under Electromyographic Guidance for Women With Refractory High-Tone Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A 6-Month Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Darlene; El-Khawand, Dominique; Ginzburg, Natasha; Wehbe, Salim; O'Hare, Peter; Whitmore, Kristene

    2015-01-01

    High-tone pelvic floor dysfunction (HTPFD) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder for many women with significant impact on their quality of life (QoL). Our objective was to determine the efficacy of electromyography-guided onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox; Allergan, Irvine, Calif) injections in treating patient's perception of pelvic pain and improving QoL measurement scores. This is a prospective pilot open-label study of women with chronic pelvic pain and HTPFD who have failed conventional therapy between January 2011 and August 2013. Botox injections (up to 300 U) were done using needle electromyography guidance, from a transperineal approach, to localize spastic pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Data were collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injections. This included demographics; Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for pain and dyspareunia; validated questionnaires for symptoms, QoL, and sexual function; Global Response Assessment scale for pelvic pain; digital examination of PFM for tone and tenderness; and vaginal manometry. Side effects were also recorded. Out of 28 women who enrolled in the study, 21 completed the 6-month follow-up and qualified for analysis. The mean (SD) age was 35.1 (9.4) years (range, 22-50 years), and the mean (SD) body mass index was 25 (4.4). Comorbidities included interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (42.9%) and vulvodynia (66.7%). Overall, 61.9% of subjects reported improvement on Global Response Assessment at 4 weeks and 80.9% at 8, 12, and 24 weeks post injection, compared with baseline. Of the subjects who were sexually active at baseline, 58.8% (10/17), 68.8% (11/16), 80% (12/15), and 83.3% (15/18) reported less dyspareunia at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. Dyspareunia Visual Analog Scale score significantly improved at weeks 12 (5.6, P = 0.011) and 24 (5.4, P = 0.004) compared with baseline (7.8). Two of the 4 patients who avoided sexual activity at baseline secondary to dyspareunia resumed and tolerated

  4. Effect of abdominal muscle training on respiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory flows in sedentary, healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Navarro, Ximena; Gatica, Darwin; Manterola, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory muscle training is the most commonly used method to revert respiratory muscle weakness; however, the effect of protocols based on non-respiratory maneuvers has not been adequately studied in the pediatric population. The objective of this study was to establish the effect of abdominal muscle training on respiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory flows in healthy adolescents. This was a quasi-experiment. The sample was made up of healthy adolescents divided into two groups: an experimental group who completed eight weeks of active abdominal muscle training, and an equivalent control group. The following indicators were measured: abdominal muscle strength, maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), peak expiratory flow, and peak cough flow, before and after protocol completion. A value of p abdominal muscle training, MEP and peak expiratory flow increased in healthy (sedentary) adolescents. Such effects were associated with intervention-induced increases in cough peak flow. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  5. Muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey; Phillips, Lauren; Trivedi, Jaya R

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare heterogeneous diseases with marked genotypic and phenotypic variability. Despite advances in understanding of the molecular pathology of these disorders, the diverse phenotypic manifestations remain a challenge in diagnosis and therapeutics. These disorders can cause lifetime disability and affect quality of life. There is no treatment of these disorders approved by the US Food and Drug Administration at this time. Recognition and treatment of symptoms might reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. This article summarizes the clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, pathophysiology, and treatment options in nondystrophic myotonia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, and periodic paralyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hip abduction weakness in elite junior footballers is common but easy to correct quickly: a prospective sports team cohort based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osborne Hamish R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip abduction weakness has never been documented on a population basis as a common finding in a healthy group of athletes and would not normally be found in an elite adolescent athlete. This study aimed to show that hip abduction weakness not only occurs in this group but also is common and easy to correct with an unsupervised home based program. Methods A prospective sports team cohort based study was performed with thirty elite adolescent under-17 Australian Rules Footballers in the Australian Institute of Sport/Australian Football League Under-17 training academy. The players had their hip abduction performance assessed and were then instructed in a hip abduction muscle training exercise. This was performed on a daily basis for two months and then they were reassessed. Results The results showed 14 of 28 athletes who completed the protocol had marked weakness or a side-to-side difference of more than 25% at baseline. Two months later ten players recorded an improvement of ≥ 80% in their recorded scores. The mean muscle performance on the right side improved from 151 Newton (N to 202 N (p Conclusions The baseline values show widespread profound deficiencies in hip abduction performance not previously reported. Very large performance increases can be achieved, unsupervised, in a short period of time to potentially allow large clinically significant gains. This assessment should be an integral part of preparticipation screening and assessed in those with lower limb injuries. This particular exercise should be used clinically and more research is needed to determine its injury prevention and performance enhancement implications.

  7. Blind quantum computing with weak coherent pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-18

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ϵ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ϵ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ϵ-blind UBQC for any ϵ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  8. Blind Quantum Computing with Weak Coherent Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-01

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ɛ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ɛ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ɛ-blind UBQC for any ɛ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  9. Relaxion monodromy and the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibáñez, L.E.; Montero, M.; Uranga, A.M.; Valenzuela, I.

    2016-01-01

    The recently proposed relaxion models require extremely large trans-Planckian axion excursions as well as a potential explicitly violating the axion shift symmetry. The latter property is however inconsistent with the axion periodicity, which corresponds to a gauged discrete shift symmetry. A way to make things consistent is to use monodromy, i.e. both the axion and the potential parameters transform under the discrete shift symmetry. The structure is better described in terms of a 3-form field C μνρ coupling to the SM Higgs through its field strength F 4 . The 4-form also couples linearly to the relaxion, in the Kaloper-Sorbo fashion. The extremely small relaxion-Higgs coupling arises in a see-saw fashion as g≃F 4 /f, with f being the axion decay constant. We discuss constraints on this type of constructions from membrane nucleation and the Weak Gravity Conjecture. The latter requires the existence of membranes, whose too fast nucleation could in principle drive the theory out of control, unless the cut-off scale is lowered. This allows to rule out the simplest models with the QCD axion as relaxion candidate on purely theoretical grounds. We also discuss possible avenues to embed this structure into string theory.

  10. Signaling pathways controlling skeletal muscle mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerman, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle maintenance involve interplay between multiple signaling pathways. Under normal physiological conditions, a network of interconnected signals serves to control and coordinate hypertrophic and atrophic messages, culminating in a delicate balance between muscle protein synthesis and proteolysis. Loss of skeletal muscle mass, termed “atrophy”, is a diagnostic feature of cachexia seen in settings of cancer, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney disease, and burns. Cachexia increases the likelihood of death from these already serious diseases. Recent studies have further defined the pathways leading to gain and loss of skeletal muscle as well as the signaling events that induce differentiation and post-injury regeneration, which are also essential for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. In this review, we summarize and discuss the relevant recent literature demonstrating these previously undiscovered mediators governing anabolism and catabolism of skeletal muscle. PMID:24237131

  11. Esterase profile of human masseter muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D; Vilmann, H

    1988-01-01

    The esterase profile of fresh human masseter muscle was investigated by use of histochemistry and electrophoresis. The histochemical methods included reactions for alpha-naphthyl esterase, myofibrillar ATPase, reverse myofibrillar ATPase and succinic dehydrogenase. In frozen sections of the muscle...... the coloured reaction product for esterases was present both as a diffuse sarcoplasmic coloration and as distinct granules. The intensity of diffuse reaction was used to classify the muscle fibres as strongly, moderately and weakly reacting. The fibres with strong esterase activity belonged to Type I and ii......C. iM and Type II A fibres showed a moderate esterase reaction and Type II B fibres had a low activity. The electrophoretic gels stained for esterase activity showed that the human masseter muscle possesses a slow migrating double band with high enzyme activity and a cascade of faster migrating...

  12. On weakly hyperbolic spaces and a convergence-extension theorem in weakly hyperbolic spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, Pham Viet

    2002-11-01

    In this article we prove some properties of the weakly hyperbolic spaces. Moreover, a convergence-extension theorem for analytic hypersurfaces (not necessarily with normal crossings) in weakly hyperbolic spaces is given. (author)

  13. Weak associativity and deformation quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanov, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    Non-commutativity and non-associativity are quite natural in string theory. For open strings it appears due to the presence of non-vanishing background two-form in the world volume of Dirichlet brane, while in closed string theory the flux compactifications with non-vanishing three-form also lead to non-geometric backgrounds. In this paper, working in the framework of deformation quantization, we study the violation of associativity imposing the condition that the associator of three elements should vanish whenever each two of them are equal. The corresponding star products are called alternative and satisfy important for physical applications properties like the Moufang identities, alternative identities, Artin's theorem, etc. The condition of alternativity is invariant under the gauge transformations, just like it happens in the associative case. The price to pay is the restriction on the non-associative algebra which can be represented by the alternative star product, it should satisfy the Malcev identity. The example of nontrivial Malcev algebra is the algebra of imaginary octonions. For this case we construct an explicit expression of the non-associative and alternative star product. We also discuss the quantization of Malcev-Poisson algebras of general form, study its properties and provide the lower order expression for the alternative star product. To conclude we define the integration on the algebra of the alternative star products and show that the integrated associator vanishes.

  14. Weak associativity and deformation quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, V.G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-commutativity and non-associativity are quite natural in string theory. For open strings it appears due to the presence of non-vanishing background two-form in the world volume of Dirichlet brane, while in closed string theory the flux compactifications with non-vanishing three-form also lead to non-geometric backgrounds. In this paper, working in the framework of deformation quantization, we study the violation of associativity imposing the condition that the associator of three elements should vanish whenever each two of them are equal. The corresponding star products are called alternative and satisfy important for physical applications properties like the Moufang identities, alternative identities, Artin's theorem, etc. The condition of alternativity is invariant under the gauge transformations, just like it happens in the associative case. The price to pay is the restriction on the non-associative algebra which can be represented by the alternative star product, it should satisfy the Malcev identity. The example of nontrivial Malcev algebra is the algebra of imaginary octonions. For this case we construct an explicit expression of the non-associative and alternative star product. We also discuss the quantization of Malcev–Poisson algebras of general form, study its properties and provide the lower order expression for the alternative star product. To conclude we define the integration on the algebra of the alternative star products and show that the integrated associator vanishes.

  15. Weak associativity and deformation quantization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Kupriyanov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-commutativity and non-associativity are quite natural in string theory. For open strings it appears due to the presence of non-vanishing background two-form in the world volume of Dirichlet brane, while in closed string theory the flux compactifications with non-vanishing three-form also lead to non-geometric backgrounds. In this paper, working in the framework of deformation quantization, we study the violation of associativity imposing the condition that the associator of three elements should vanish whenever each two of them are equal. The corresponding star products are called alternative and satisfy important for physical applications properties like the Moufang identities, alternative identities, Artin's theorem, etc. The condition of alternativity is invariant under the gauge transformations, just like it happens in the associative case. The price to pay is the restriction on the non-associative algebra which can be represented by the alternative star product, it should satisfy the Malcev identity. The example of nontrivial Malcev algebra is the algebra of imaginary octonions. For this case we construct an explicit expression of the non-associative and alternative star product. We also discuss the quantization of Malcev–Poisson algebras of general form, study its properties and provide the lower order expression for the alternative star product. To conclude we define the integration on the algebra of the alternative star products and show that the integrated associator vanishes.

  16. Weak associativity and deformation quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriyanov, V.G., E-mail: vladislav.kupriyanov@gmail.com [CMCC-Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Non-commutativity and non-associativity are quite natural in string theory. For open strings it appears due to the presence of non-vanishing background two-form in the world volume of Dirichlet brane, while in closed string theory the flux compactifications with non-vanishing three-form also lead to non-geometric backgrounds. In this paper, working in the framework of deformation quantization, we study the violation of associativity imposing the condition that the associator of three elements should vanish whenever each two of them are equal. The corresponding star products are called alternative and satisfy important for physical applications properties like the Moufang identities, alternative identities, Artin's theorem, etc. The condition of alternativity is invariant under the gauge transformations, just like it happens in the associative case. The price to pay is the restriction on the non-associative algebra which can be represented by the alternative star product, it should satisfy the Malcev identity. The example of nontrivial Malcev algebra is the algebra of imaginary octonions. For this case we construct an explicit expression of the non-associative and alternative star product. We also discuss the quantization of Malcev–Poisson algebras of general form, study its properties and provide the lower order expression for the alternative star product. To conclude we define the integration on the algebra of the alternative star products and show that the integrated associator vanishes.

  17. Skeletal muscle performance and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieland, Michael; Trouwborst, Inez; Clark, Brian C

    2018-02-01

    The world population is ageing rapidly. As society ages, the incidence of physical limitations is dramatically increasing, which reduces the quality of life and increases healthcare expenditures. In western society, ~30% of the population over 55 years is confronted with moderate or severe physical limitations. These physical limitations increase the risk of falls, institutionalization, co-morbidity, and premature death. An important cause of physical limitations is the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass, also referred to as sarcopenia. Emerging evidence, however, clearly shows that the decline in skeletal muscle mass is not the sole contributor to the decline in physical performance. For instance, the loss of muscle strength is also a strong contributor to reduced physical performance in the elderly. In addition, there is ample data to suggest that motor coordination, excitation-contraction coupling, skeletal integrity, and other factors related to the nervous, muscular, and skeletal systems are critically important for physical performance in the elderly. To better understand the loss of skeletal muscle performance with ageing, we aim to provide a broad overview on the underlying mechanisms associated with elderly skeletal muscle performance. We start with a system level discussion and continue with a discussion on the influence of lifestyle, biological, and psychosocial factors on elderly skeletal muscle performance. Developing a broad understanding of the many factors affecting elderly skeletal muscle performance has major implications for scientists, clinicians, and health professionals who are developing therapeutic interventions aiming to enhance muscle function and/or prevent mobility and physical limitations and, as such, support healthy ageing. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  18. Traumatic avulsion of extraocular muscles: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilza Minguini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We described the clinical, surgical details and results (motor and sensory of the retrieving procedure of traumatically avulsed muscles in three patients with no previous history of strabismus or diplopia seen in the Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Campinas, Brazil. The slipped muscle portion was reinserted at the original insertion and under the remaining stump, which was sutured over the reinserted muscle. For all three cases there was recovery of single binocular vision and stereopsis.

  19. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  20. Voltage-sensor mutations in channelopathies of skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of voltage-gated ion channels cause several channelopathies of skeletal muscle, which present clinically with myotonia, periodic paralysis, or a combination of both. Expression studies have revealed both loss-of-function and gain-of-function defects for the currents passed by mutant channels. In many cases, these functional changes could be mechanistically linked to the defects of fibre excitability underlying myotonia or periodic paralysis. One remaining enigma was the basis for depolarization-induced weakness in hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) arising from mutations in either sodium or calcium channels. Curiously, 14 of 15 HypoPP mutations are at arginines in S4 voltage sensors, and recent observations show that these substitutions support an alternative pathway for ion conduction, the gating pore, that may be the source of the aberrant depolarization during an attack of paralysis. PMID:20156847

  1. Early prediction of intensive care unit-acquired weakness using easily available parameters: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieske, Luuk; Witteveen, Esther; Verhamme, Camiel; Dettling-Ihnenfeldt, Daniela S; van der Schaaf, Marike; Schultz, Marcus J; van Schaik, Ivo N; Horn, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    An early diagnosis of Intensive Care Unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW) using muscle strength assessment is not possible in most critically ill patients. We hypothesized that development of ICU-AW can be predicted reliably two days after ICU admission, using patient characteristics, early available clinical parameters, laboratory results and use of medication as parameters. Newly admitted ICU patients mechanically ventilated ≥2 days were included in this prospective observational cohort study. Manual muscle strength was measured according to the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale, when patients were awake and attentive. ICU-AW was defined as an average MRC score prediction model was developed by selecting predictors from an a-priori defined set of candidate predictors, based on known risk factors. Discriminative performance of the prediction model was evaluated, validated internally and compared to the APACHE IV and SOFA score. Of 212 included patients, 103 developed ICU-AW. Highest lactate levels, treatment with any aminoglycoside in the first two days after admission and age were selected as predictors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the prediction model was 0.71 after internal validation. The new prediction model improved discrimination compared to the APACHE IV and the SOFA score. The new early prediction model for ICU-AW using a set of 3 easily available parameters has fair discriminative performance. This model needs external validation.

  2. The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex in the Prevention of Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica D. Gumerson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are genetically diverse but share common phenotypic features of muscle weakness, degeneration, and progressive decline in muscle function. Previous work has focused on understanding how disruptions in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex result in muscular dystrophy, supporting a hypothesis that the muscle sarcolemma is fragile and susceptible to contraction-induced injury in multiple forms of dystrophy. Although benign in healthy muscle, contractions in dystrophic muscle may contribute to a higher degree of muscle damage which eventually overwhelms muscle regeneration capacity. While increased susceptibility of muscle to mechanical injury is thought to be an important contributor to disease pathology, it is becoming clear that not all DGC-associated diseases share this supposed hallmark feature. This paper outlines experimental support for a function of the DGC in preventing muscle damage and examines the evidence that supports novel functions for this complex in muscle that when impaired, may contribute to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy.

  3. EFFECT OF MUSCLE ENERGY TECHNIQUE ON FLEXIBILITY OF HAMSTRING AND CALF MUSCLES AND SPRINTING PERFORMANCE IN SPRINTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Prasad Naik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Muscle energy technique is used for restoring normal tone in hypertonic muscles, strengthening weak muscles, preparing muscle for subsequent stretching, one of the main uses of this method is to normalize joint range which may help in increase flexibility and performance in sprinters. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of muscle energy technique on flexibility of hamstrings and calf muscles and sprinting performance in sprinters. The objective of the study is to determine the muscle energy technique on hamstrings and calf muscle flexibility and sprinting performance in sprinters by using goniometer and timing of sprinting performance. Method: The study design is an experimental study in which 30 male sprinters were recruited in this study. The study sample included all male healthy sprinters, aged between 15 -30 years. All subjects received warm up, muscle energy technique and cool down exercises daily for a period of 6weeks.The outcome measures are 90°-90°popliteal angle for assessing hamstring flexibility and ROM of ankle joint for calf muscles by universal goniometer and sprinting performance time by using stopwatch. Results: Independent t-test and paired t- test are used to analyse the data. A significant difference was found between pre and post values of hamstring and calf muscle flexibility and sprinting performance after the analysis in this study. Conclusion: This study shows that there was a significant effect of MET on hamstring and calf muscle flexibility and sprinting performance.

  4. Weak and electromagnetic interactions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.

    1986-01-01

    The International Symposium W.E.I.N. 1986 brought together leading experts in the fields of nuclear and elementary particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In addition to current problems in nuclear physics (weak and electromagnetic nuclear properties, electroweak interactions in nuclei, exotic nuclei) this book presents fascinating contributions that arise from the interaction among these fields: lepton number violation and neutrino mass; muon physics; weak interactions and fundamental symmetries; fundamental decays; basic experiments for GUTs; weak interactions and astrophysics; GUTs, SUSYs and the early Universe. The book demonstrates that in this context nuclear physics promises exciting future developments. (orig.)

  5. Insulin induced alteration in post-translational modifications of histone H3 under a hyperglycemic condition in L6 skeletal muscle myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, Dhiraj G; Gupta, Jeena; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2009-06-01

    Chromatin remodelling events, especially histone modifications are proposed to form the mainstay for most of the biological processes. However, the role of these histone modifications in the progression of diabetes is still unknown. Hyperglycemia plays a major role in diabetes and its complications. The present study was undertaken to check the effect of insulin on alterations in post-translational modifications of histone H3 in L6 myoblasts under a hyperglycemic condition. We provide first evidence that insulin under hyperglycemic condition alters multiple histone modifications by enhanced production of reactive oxygen species. Insulin induces dose dependent changes in Lysine 4 and 9 methylation, Ser 10 phosphorylation and acetylation of histone H3. Interestingly, insulin induced generation of reactive oxygen species induces dephosphorylation and deacetylation of histone H3. Preincubation with catalase and DPI prevents these changes in post-translational modifications of histone H3. Furthermore, changes in histone H3 phosphorylation was found to be independent of ERK, p38, RSK2 and MSK1. Moreover, serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid attenuates insulin induced dephosphorylation and deacetylation of histone H3, suggesting a role of serine/threonine phosphatases in altering modifications of histone H3. These changes in epigenetic modifications can provide new insights into pathogenesis of diabetes.

  6. A nonlinear electrostatic potential change in the T-system of skeletal muscle detected under passive recording conditions using potentiometric dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiny, J A; Jong, D S

    1990-01-01

    Voltage-sensing dyes were used to examine the electrical behavior of the T-system under passive recording conditions similar to those commonly used to detect charge movement. These conditions are designed to eliminate all ionic currents and render the T-system potential linear with respect to the command potential applied at the surface membrane. However, we found an unexpected nonlinearity in the relationship between the dye signal from the T-system and the applied clamp potential. An additional voltage- and time-dependent optical signal appears over the same depolarizing range of potentials where change movement and mechanical activation occur. This nonlinearity is not associated with unblocked ionic currents and cannot be attributed to lack of voltage clamp control of the T-system, which appears to be good under these conditions. We propose that a local electrostatic potential change occurs in the T-system upon depolarization. An electrostatic potential would not be expected to extend beyond molecular distances of the membrane and therefore would be sensed by a charged dye in the membrane but not by the voltage clamp, which responds solely to the potential of the bulk solution. Results obtained with different dyes suggest that the location of the phenomena giving rise to the extra absorbance change is either intramembrane or at the inner surface of the T-system membrane.

  7. FGFR1 inhibits skeletal muscle atrophy associated with hindlimb suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrard Dave

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle atrophy can occur under many different conditions, including prolonged disuse or immobilization, cachexia, cushingoid conditions, secondary to surgery, or with advanced age. The mechanisms by which unloading of muscle is sensed and translated into signals controlling tissue reduction remains a major question in the field of musculoskeletal research. While the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors are synthesized by, and intimately involved in, embryonic skeletal muscle growth and repair, their role maintaining adult muscle status has not been examined. Methods We examined the effects of ectopic expression of FGFR1 during disuse-mediated skeletal muscle atrophy, utilizing hindlimb suspension and DNA electroporation in mice. Results We found skeletal muscle FGF4 and FGFR1 mRNA expression to be modified by hind limb suspension,. In addition, we found FGFR1 protein localized in muscle fibers within atrophying mouse muscle which appeared to be resistant to atrophy. Electroporation and ectopic expression of FGFR1 significantly inhibited the decrease in muscle fiber area within skeletal muscles of mice undergoing suspension induced muscle atrophy. Ectopic FGFR1 expression in muscle also significantly stimulated protein synthesis in muscle fibers, and increased protein degradation in weight bearing muscle fibers. Conclusion These results support the theory that FGF signaling can play a role in regulation of postnatal skeletal muscle maintenance, and could offer potentially novel and efficient therapeutic options for attenuating muscle atrophy during aging, illness and spaceflight.

  8. A Monte Carlo Study of Recovery of Weak Factor Loadings in Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ximenez, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    The recovery of weak factors has been extensively studied in the context of exploratory factor analysis. This article presents the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of recovery of weak factor loadings in confirmatory factor analysis under conditions of estimation method (maximum likelihood vs. unweighted least squares), sample size,…

  9. Mechanical ventilation, diaphragm weakness and weaning: A rehabilitation perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A Daniel; Smith, Barbara; Gabrielli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Most patients are easily liberated from mechanical ventilation (MV) following resolution of respiratory failure and a successful trial of spontaneous breathing, but about 25% of patients experience difficult weaning. MV use leads to cellular changes and weakness, which has been linked to weaning difficulties and has been labeled ventilator induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD). Aggravating factors in human studies with prolonged weaning include malnutrition, chronic electrolyte abnormalities, hyperglycemia, excessive resistive and elastic loads, corticosteroids, muscle relaxant exposure, sepsis and compromised cardiac function. Numerous animal studies have investigated the effects of MV on diaphragm function. Virtually all of these studies have concluded that MV use rapidly leads to VIDD and have identified cellular and molecular mechanisms of VIDD. Molecular and functional studies on the effects of MV on the human diaphragm have largely confirmed the animal results and identified potential treatment strategies. Only recently have potential VIDD treatments been tested in humans, including pharmacologic interventions and diaphragm “training”. A limited number of human studies have found that specific diaphragm training can increase respiratory muscle strength in FTW patients and facilitate weaning, but larger, multicenter trials are needed. PMID:23692928

  10. Electrical stimulation attenuates denervation and age-related atrophy in extensor digitorum longus muscles of old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Douglas E; Dennis, Robert G; Faulkner, John A

    2005-04-01

    Skeletal muscles of old rats and elderly humans lose muscle mass and maximum force. Denervation is a major cause of age-related muscle atrophy and weakness, because denervated fibers do not contract, and undergo atrophy. At any age, surgical denervation causes even more dramatic muscle atrophy and loss in force than aging does. Electrical stimulation that generates tetanic contractions of denervated muscles reduces the denervation-induced declines. We investigated whether a stimulation protocol that maintains mass and force of denervated extensor digitorum longus muscles of adult rats would also maintain these properties in denervated muscles of old rats during a 2-month period of age-induced declines in these properties. Contractile activity generated by the electrical stimulation eliminated age-related losses in muscle mass and reduced the deficit in force by 50%. These data provide support for the hypothesis that during aging, lack of contractile activity in fibers contributes to muscle atrophy and weakness.

  11. Muscle Synergy-Driven Robust Motion Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyuengbo; Iwamoto, Masami; Kakei, Shinji; Kimpara, Hideyuki

    2018-04-01

    Humans are able to robustly maintain desired motion and posture under dynamically changing circumstances, including novel conditions. To accomplish this, the brain needs to optimize the synergistic control between muscles against external dynamic factors. However, previous related studies have usually simplified the control of multiple muscles using two opposing muscles, which are minimum actuators to simulate linear feedback control. As a result, they have been unable to analyze how muscle synergy contributes to motion control robustness in a biological system. To address this issue, we considered a new muscle synergy concept used to optimize the synergy between muscle units against external dynamic conditions, including novel conditions. We propose that two main muscle control policies synergistically control muscle units to maintain the desired motion against external dynamic conditions. Our assumption is based on biological evidence regarding the control of multiple muscles via the corticospinal tract. One of the policies is the group control policy (GCP), which is used to control muscle group units classified based on functional similarities in joint control. This policy is used to effectively resist external dynamic circumstances, such as disturbances. The individual control policy (ICP) assists the GCP in precisely controlling motion by controlling individual muscle units. To validate this hypothesis, we simulated the reinforcement of the synergistic actions of the two control policies during the reinforcement learning of feedback motion control. Using this learning paradigm, the two control policies were synergistically combined to result in robust feedback control under novel transient and sustained disturbances that did not involve learning. Further, by comparing our data to experimental data generated by human subjects under the same conditions as those of the simulation, we showed that the proposed synergy concept may be used to analyze muscle synergy

  12. Current problems in the weak interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais, A

    1977-01-01

    Some reasons are discussed showing why the recent SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions is not a complete theory of these interactions, Lepton theory, charm, and the CP problem are considered. 60 references. (JFP)

  13. Current problems in the weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, A.

    1977-01-01

    Some reasons are discussed showing why the recent SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions is not a complete theory of these interactions, Lepton theory, charm, and the CP problem are considered. 60 references

  14. Weakly supervised object detection with posterior regularization

    OpenAIRE

    Bilen, Hakan; Pedersoli, Marco; Tuytelaars, Tinne

    2014-01-01

    Bilen H., Pedersoli M., Tuytelaars T., ''Weakly supervised object detection with posterior regularization'', 25th British machine vision conference - BMVC 2014, 12 pp., September 1-5, 2014, Nottingham, UK.

  15. About some distinguishing features of weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshtoev, Kh.M.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that, in contrast to strong and electromagnetic theories, additive conserved numbers (such as lepton, aromatic and another numbers) and γ 5 anomaly do not appear in the standard weak interaction theory. It means that in this interaction the additive numbers cannot be conserved. These results are the consequence of specific character of the weak interaction: the right components of spinors do not participate in this interaction. The schemes of violation of the aromatic and lepton numbers were considered

  16. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  17. Markovian bridges: Weak continuity and pathwise constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Chaumont, Loïc; Uribe Bravo, Gerónimo

    2011-01-01

    A Markovian bridge is a probability measure taken from a disintegration of the law of an initial part of the path of a Markov process given its terminal value. As such, Markovian bridges admit a natural parameterization in terms of the state space of the process. In the context of Feller processes with continuous transition densities, we construct by weak convergence considerations the only versions of Markovian bridges which are weakly continuous with respect to their parameter. We use this ...

  18. Joint and weak measurements on qubit systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.L.; Pryde, G.J.; Bartlett, S.D.; Ralph, T.C.; Wiseman, H.M.; White, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Along with the well-known concept of projective measurements, quantum mechanics allows various kinds of generalized measurement operators. Two important examples are: joint measurements on two or more quantum systems that cannot be achieved by local operations (LOCC); and weak measurements that obtain less information about a system than does a projective measurement, but with correspondingly less disturbance. Unlike the result of a strong measurement, the average value of a weak measurement of an observable (its weak value), when followed by projective postselection in a complementary basis, can lie outside the range of eigenvalues. This discrepancy is not observed in analogous classical measurements. Weak values aid the resolution of quantum paradoxes, and can simplify analysis of weakly coupled systems. We use a generalized measurement device to measure the weak value of a photon's polarization in the horizontal/vertical basis (the Stokes operator S1 = |H> weak up to 47, outside the usual range -1 ≤ S1 ≤ 1. Unlike previous observations of weak values, our measurement works by entangling two separate systems, and thus can only be described by quantum theory, not a classical wave theory. Also, we have used a two-qubit joint measurement based on a controlled-NOT gate by which certain twoqubit unentangled states can be more reliably distinguished than by using LOCC. We quantify this using a payoff function, for which the optimal LOCC measurement attains 2/3, and our experimental measurement attains 0.72 ± 0.02, close to the global optimum of 3/4. (author)

  19. Sufficient conditions for uniqueness of the weak value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressel, J; Jordan, A N

    2012-01-01

    We review and clarify the sufficient conditions for uniquely defining the generalized weak value as the weak limit of a conditioned average using the contextual values formalism introduced in Dressel, Agarwal and Jordan (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.240401). We also respond to criticism of our work by Parrott (arXiv:1105.4188v1) concerning a proposed counter-example to the uniqueness of the definition of the generalized weak value. The counter-example does not satisfy our prescription in the case of an underspecified measurement context. We show that when the contextual values formalism is properly applied to this example, a natural interpretation of the measurement emerges and the unique definition in the weak limit holds. We also prove a theorem regarding the uniqueness of the definition under our sufficient conditions for the general case. Finally, a second proposed counter-example by Parrott (arXiv:1105.4188v6) is shown not to satisfy the sufficiency conditions for the provided theorem. (paper)

  20. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Figueroa-Bonaparte

    Full Text Available Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD. The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far.We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale, respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure, daily live activities scales (Activlim and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire. We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region.T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients.Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment.Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic.