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Sample records for underlying circadian clock

  1. Circadian clock and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirvani, Minou; Khuu, Cuong; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Sand, Lars Peter; Sehic, Amer

    2018-02-01

    The circadian clock is comprised of a master component situated in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and subordinate clock genes in almost every cell of the body. The circadian clock genes and their encoded proteins govern the organism to follow the natural signals of time, and adapt to external changes in the environment. The majority of physiological processes in mammals exhibit variable circadian rhythms, which are generated and coordinated by an oscillation in the expression of the clock genes. A number of studies have reported that alteration in the expression level of clock genes is correlated with several pathological conditions, including cancer. However, little is known about the role of clock genes in homeostasis of the oral epithelium and their disturbances in oral carcinogenesis. The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the implications of clock genes in oral cancer. It has been demonstrated that the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma undergoes circadian oscillation in relation to tumor volume and proliferation rate. The circadian clock gene period ( PER)1 has been associated with oral cancer pathogenesis and it is suggested that changes in the expression of PER1 may exhibit an important role in the development, invasion, and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. However, its role remains elusive and there is a need for further research in order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the clock genes in oral cancer pathogenesis.

  2. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  3. Circadian clock and vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Norihiko; Maemura, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular functions, including blood pressure and vascular functions, show diurnal oscillation. Circadian variations have been clearly shown in the occurrence of cardiovascular events such as acute myocardial infarction. Circadian rhythm strongly influences human biology and pathology. The identification and characterization of mammalian clock genes revealed that they are expressed almost everywhere throughout the body in a circadian manner. In contrast to the central clock in the suprac...

  4. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay of circadian clock genes under environmental stress conditions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Ju; Park, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T; Park, Chung-Mo

    2014-05-19

    The circadian clock enables living organisms to anticipate recurring daily and seasonal fluctuations in their growth habitats and synchronize their biology to the environmental cycle. The plant circadian clock consists of multiple transcription-translation feedback loops that are entrained by environmental signals, such as light and temperature. In recent years, alternative splicing emerges as an important molecular mechanism that modulates the clock function in plants. Several clock genes are known to undergo alternative splicing in response to changes in environmental conditions, suggesting that the clock function is intimately associated with environmental responses via the alternative splicing of the clock genes. However, the alternative splicing events of the clock genes have not been studied at the molecular level. We systematically examined whether major clock genes undergo alternative splicing under various environmental conditions in Arabidopsis. We also investigated the fates of the RNA splice variants of the clock genes. It was found that the clock genes, including EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL) that have not been studied in terms of alternative splicing, undergo extensive alternative splicing through diverse modes of splicing events, such as intron retention, exon skipping, and selection of alternative 5' splice site. Their alternative splicing patterns were differentially influenced by changes in photoperiod, temperature extremes, and salt stress. Notably, the RNA splice variants of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) and ELF3 were degraded through the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway, whereas those of other clock genes were insensitive to NMD. Taken together, our observations demonstrate that the major clock genes examined undergo extensive alternative splicing under various environmental conditions, suggesting that alternative splicing is a molecular scheme that underlies the linkage between the clock and environmental stress

  5. The circadian clock and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrington, Hannah J; Farrow, Stuart N; Loudon, Andrew S; Ray, David W

    2014-01-01

    It is characteristic of asthma that symptoms worsen overnight, particularly in the early hours of the morning. Nocturnal symptoms in asthma are common and are an important indicator for escalation of treatment. An extensive body of research has demonstrated that nocturnal symptoms of cough and dyspnea are accompanied by circadian variations in airway inflammation and physiologic variables, including airflow limitation and airways hyper-responsiveness. The molecular apparatus that underpins circadian variations, controlled by so called 'clock' genes, has recently been characterised. Clock genes control circadian rhythms both centrally, in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain and peripherally, within every organ of the body. Here, we will discuss how clock genes regulate circadian rhythms. We will focus particularly on the peripheral lung clock and the peripheral immune clock and discuss how these might relate to both the pathogenesis and treatment of asthma.

  6. Circadian Clock, Cancer, and Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a global regulatory system that interfaces with most other regulatory systems and pathways in mammalian organisms. Investigations of the circadian clock–DNA damage response connections have revealed that nucleotide excision repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis are appreciably influenced by the clock. Although several epidemiological studies in humans and a limited number of genetic studies in mouse model systems have indicated that clock disruption may predispose mammals to cancer, well-controlled genetic studies in mice have not supported the commonly held view that circadian clock disruption is a cancer risk factor. In fact, in the appropriate genetic background, clock disruption may instead aid in cancer regression by promoting intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the clock may affect the efficacy of cancer treatment (chronochemotherapy) by modulating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as the activity of the DNA repair enzymes that repair the DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs. PMID:25302769

  7. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  8. Circadian clocks, epigenetics, and cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Selma

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between circadian rhythm and cancer has been suggested for more than a decade based on the observations that shift work and cancer incidence are linked. Accumulating evidence implicates the circadian clock in cancer survival and proliferation pathways. At the molecular level, multiple control mechanisms have been proposed to link circadian transcription and cell-cycle control to tumorigenesis.The circadian gating of the cell cycle and subsequent control of cell proliferation is an area of active investigation. Moreover, the circadian clock is a transcriptional system that is intricately regulated at the epigenetic level. Interestingly, the epigenetic landscape at the level of histone modifications, DNA methylation, and small regulatory RNAs are differentially controlled in cancer cells. This concept raises the possibility that epigenetic control is a common thread linking the clock with cancer, though little scientific evidence is known to date.This review focuses on the link between circadian clock and cancer, and speculates on the possible connections at the epigenetic level that could further link the circadian clock to tumor initiation or progression.

  9. Circadian Clocks : Running on Redox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Roenneberg, Till

    2001-01-01

    The circadian clock in all organisms is so intimately linked to light reception that it appears as if evolution has simply wired a timer into the mechanism that processes photic information. Several recent studies have provided new insights into the role of light input pathways in the circadian

  10. Evidence for Weakened Intercellular Coupling in the Mammalian Circadian Clock under Long Photoperiod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijink, M Renate; Almog, Assaf; Wit, Charlotte B; Roethler, Ori; Olde Engberink, Anneke H O; Meijer, Johanna H; Garlaschelli, Diego; Rohling, Jos H T; Michel, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    For animals living in temperate latitudes, seasonal changes in day length are an important cue for adaptations of their physiology and behavior to the altered environmental conditions. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is known as the central circadian clock in mammals, but may also play an important role in adaptations to different photoperiods. The SCN receives direct light input from the retina and is able to encode day-length by approximating the waveform of the electrical activity rhythm to the duration of daylight. Changing the overall waveform requires a reorganization of the neuronal network within the SCN with a change in the degree of synchrony between the neurons; however, the underlying mechanisms are yet unknown. In the present study we used PER2::LUC bioluminescence imaging in cultured SCN slices to characterize network dynamics on the single-cell level and we aimed to provide evidence for a role of modulations in coupling strength in the photoperiodic-induced phase dispersal. Exposure to long photoperiod (LP) induced a larger distribution of peak times of the single-cell PER2::LUC rhythms in the anterior SCN, compared to short photoperiod. Interestingly, the cycle-to-cycle variability in single-cell period of PER2::LUC rhythms is also higher in the anterior SCN in LP, and is positively correlated with peak time dispersal. Applying a new, impartial community detection method on the time series data of the PER2::LUC rhythm revealed two clusters of cells with a specific spatial distribution, which we define as dorsolateral and ventromedial SCN. Post hoc analysis of rhythm characteristics of these clusters showed larger cycle-to-cycle single-cell period variability in the dorsolateral compared to the ventromedial cluster in the anterior SCN. We conclude that a change in coupling strength within the SCN network is a plausible explanation to the observed changes in single-cell period variability, which can contribute to the photoperiod-induced phase

  11. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiko eShiga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Bünning’s observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Based on molecular and neuronal studies in Drosophila melanogaster, photoperiodic changes have been reported for expression patterns of the circadian clock genes, subcellular distribution of clock proteins, fiber distribution, or the number of plausible clock neurons in different species. Photoperiod sets peaks of per or tim mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  12. Mechanism of the circadian clock in physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    It has been well established that the circadian clock plays a crucial role in the regulation of almost every physiological process. It also plays a critical role in pathophysiological states including those of obesity and diabetes. Recent evidence has highlighted the potential for targeting the circadian clock as a potential drug target. New studies have also demonstrated the existence of “clock-independent effects” of the circadian proteins, leading to exciting new avenues of research in the circadian clock field in physiology. The goal of this review is to provide an introduction to and overview of the circadian clock in physiology, including mechanisms, targets, and role in disease states. The role of the circadian clocks in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, renal function, metabolism, the endocrine system, immune, and reproductive systems will be discussed. PMID:23576606

  13. Mini Review: Circadian Clocks, Stress and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eDumbell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both, the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions.

  14. Physiological links of circadian clock and biological clock of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Chang, Hung-Chun

    2017-07-01

    Circadian rhythms orchestrate biochemical and physiological processes in living organisms to respond the day/night cycle. In mammals, nearly all cells hold self-sustained circadian clocks meanwhile couple the intrinsic rhythms to systemic changes in a hierarchical manner. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus functions as the master pacemaker to initiate daily synchronization according to the photoperiod, in turn determines the phase of peripheral cellular clocks through a variety of signaling relays, including endocrine rhythms and metabolic cycles. With aging, circadian desynchrony occurs at the expense of peripheral metabolic pathologies and central neurodegenerative disorders with sleep symptoms, and genetic ablation of circadian genes in model organisms resembled the aging-related features. Notably, a number of studies have linked longevity nutrient sensing pathways in modulating circadian clocks. Therapeutic strategies that bridge the nutrient sensing pathways and circadian clock might be rational designs to defy aging.

  15. Coordination of the maize transcriptome by a conserved circadian clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmon Frank G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plant circadian clock orchestrates 24-hour rhythms in internal physiological processes to coordinate these activities with daily and seasonal changes in the environment. The circadian clock has a profound impact on many aspects of plant growth and development, including biomass accumulation and flowering time. Despite recent advances in understanding the circadian system of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the contribution of the circadian oscillator to important agronomic traits in Zea mays and other cereals remains poorly defined. To address this deficit, this study investigated the transcriptional landscape of the maize circadian system. Results Since transcriptional regulation is a fundamental aspect of circadian systems, genes exhibiting circadian expression were identified in the sequenced maize inbred B73. Of the over 13,000 transcripts examined, approximately 10 percent displayed circadian expression patterns. The majority of cycling genes had peak expression at subjective dawn and dusk, similar to other plant circadian systems. The maize circadian clock organized co-regulation of genes participating in fundamental physiological processes, including photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall biogenesis, and phytohormone biosynthesis pathways. Conclusions Circadian regulation of the maize genome was widespread and key genes in several major metabolic pathways had circadian expression waveforms. The maize circadian clock coordinated transcription to be coincident with oncoming day or night, which was consistent with the circadian oscillator acting to prepare the plant for these major recurring environmental changes. These findings highlighted the multiple processes in maize plants under circadian regulation and, as a result, provided insight into the important contribution this regulatory system makes to agronomic traits in maize and potentially other C4 plant species.

  16. How does general anaesthesia affect the circadian clock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Raewyn C; Warman, Guy R; Sleigh, Jamie; Ludin, Nicola M; Cheeseman, James F

    2018-02-01

    Post-operative patients experience sleep disturbances. Animal studies demonstrate that general anaesthesia (GA) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause changes in the molecular clock, indicating that anaesthesia contributes to post-operative circadian disruption. Here we review the effect of anaesthesia on the circadian clock and its rhythms in order to summarise current findings outline commonalities between studies and propose mechanisms by which effects may be mediated. 1) GA has strong effects on the main neurotransmitter systems linked with circadian control (Gamma aminobutyric acid/N-methyl-D-aspartate (GABA/NMDA)) and may act by interfering with light-entrainment of the clock. 2) Expression of the core clock gene per2 is inhibited by GA (possibly via a NMDA/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway). 3) GA's effect on circadian rhythms appears greatest when administered during animals' active phases 4) GA may have different effects when administered under free-running and entrained conditions. 5) Anaesthesia may mimic the mechanism involved in adaptation of the clock to changes in daylength. There is agreement that GA can strongly affect the circadian clock. How anaesthesia-induced changes in the molecular clock lead to changes in behaviour remains unclear. The answer, and what it may mean for patients post-operatively, will rely on systematic studies at molecular, behavioural, and clinical levels using standardised protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolism and the Circadian Clock Converge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms occur in almost all species and control vital aspects of our physiology, from sleeping and waking to neurotransmitter secretion and cellular metabolism. Epidemiological studies from recent decades have supported a unique role for circadian rhythm in metabolism. As evidenced by individuals working night or rotating shifts, but also by rodent models of circadian arrhythmia, disruption of the circadian cycle is strongly associated with metabolic imbalance. Some genetically engineered mouse models of circadian rhythmicity are obese and show hallmark signs of the metabolic syndrome. Whether these phenotypes are due to the loss of distinct circadian clock genes within a specific tissue versus the disruption of rhythmic physiological activities (such as eating and sleeping) remains a cynosure within the fields of chronobiology and metabolism. Becoming more apparent is that from metabolites to transcription factors, the circadian clock interfaces with metabolism in numerous ways that are essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:23303907

  18. Entrainment of the Neurospora circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, M; Boesl, C; Ricken, J; Messerschmitt, M; Goedel, M; Roenneberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has been systematically investigated for circadian entrainment behavior. Many aspects of synchronization can be investigated in this simple, cellular system, ranging from systematic entrainment and drivenness to masking. Clock gene expression during entrainment and entrainment

  19. Targeting the Circadian Clock to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two compounds that target components of the circadian clock killed several types of cancer cells in the lab and slowed the growth of brain cancer in mice without harming healthy cells, as this Cancer Currents post reports.

  20. Cell-permeable Circadian Clock Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Carl

    2002-01-01

    .... These 'biological clocks' are important to human physiology. For example, psychiatric and medical studies have shown that circadian rhythmicity is involved in some forms of depressive illness, 'jet lag', drug tolerance/efficacy, memory, and insomnia...

  1. Molecular components of the mammalian circadian clock

    OpenAIRE

    Buhr, Ethan D.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammals synchronize their circadian activity primarily to the cycles of light and darkness in the environment. This is achieved by ocular photoreception relaying signals to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus. Signals from the SCN cause the synchronization of independent circadian clocks throughout the body to appropriate phases. Signals that can entrain these peripheral clocks include humoral signals, metabolic factors, and body temperature. At the level of individual tissu...

  2. The circadian clock regulates auxin signaling and responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Covington

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a pervasive role in the temporal regulation of plant physiology, environmental responsiveness, and development. In contrast, the phytohormone auxin plays a similarly far-reaching role in the spatial regulation of plant growth and development. Went and Thimann noted 70 years ago that plant sensitivity to auxin varied according to the time of day, an observation that they could not explain. Here we present work that explains this puzzle, demonstrating that the circadian clock regulates auxin signal transduction. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found many auxin-induced genes are under clock regulation. We verified that endogenous auxin signaling is clock regulated with a luciferase-based assay. Exogenous auxin has only modest effects on the plant clock, but the clock controls plant sensitivity to applied auxin. Notably, we found both transcriptional and growth responses to exogenous auxin are gated by the clock. Thus the circadian clock regulates some, and perhaps all, auxin responses. Consequently, many aspects of plant physiology not previously thought to be under circadian control may show time-of-day-specific sensitivity, with likely important consequences for plant growth and environmental responses.

  3. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2013-01-01

    in the rat neocortex. Among these, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Bmal1, Nr1d1 and Dbp were found to exhibit daily rhythms. The amplitude of circadian oscillation in neocortical clock gene expression was damped and the peak delayed as compared with the SCN. Lesions of the SCN revealed that rhythmic clock gene...

  4. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  5. Circadian and Circalunar Clock Interactions in a Marine Annelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Zantke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Life is controlled by multiple rhythms. Although the interaction of the daily (circadian clock with environmental stimuli, such as light, is well documented, its relationship to endogenous clocks with other periods is little understood. We establish that the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii possesses endogenous circadian and circalunar (monthly clocks and characterize their interactions. The RNAs of likely core circadian oscillator genes localize to a distinct nucleus of the worm’s forebrain. The worm’s forebrain also harbors a circalunar clock entrained by nocturnal light. This monthly clock regulates maturation and persists even when circadian clock oscillations are disrupted by the inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/ε. Both circadian and circalunar clocks converge on the regulation of transcript levels. Furthermore, the circalunar clock changes the period and power of circadian behavior, although the period length of the daily transcriptional oscillations remains unaltered. We conclude that a second endogenous noncircadian clock can influence circadian clock function.

  6. Circadian clock-dependent and -independent posttranscriptional regulation underlies temporal mRNA accumulation in mouse liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingkui; Yeung, Jake; Gobet, Cédric; Sobel, Jonathan; Lück, Sarah; Molina, Nacho; Naef, Felix

    2018-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock coordinates physiology with environmental cycles through the regulation of daily oscillations of gene expression. Thousands of transcripts exhibit rhythmic accumulations across mouse tissues, as determined by the balance of their synthesis and degradation. While diurnally rhythmic transcription regulation is well studied and often thought to be the main factor generating rhythmic mRNA accumulation, the extent of rhythmic posttranscriptional regulation is debated, and the kinetic parameters (e.g., half-lives), as well as the underlying regulators (e.g., mRNA-binding proteins) are relatively unexplored. Here, we developed a quantitative model for cyclic accumulations of pre-mRNA and mRNA from total RNA-seq data, and applied it to mouse liver. This allowed us to identify that about 20% of mRNA rhythms were driven by rhythmic mRNA degradation, and another 15% of mRNAs regulated by both rhythmic transcription and mRNA degradation. The method could also estimate mRNA half-lives and processing times in intact mouse liver. We then showed that, depending on mRNA half-life, rhythmic mRNA degradation can either amplify or tune phases of mRNA rhythms. By comparing mRNA rhythms in wild-type and Bmal1−/− animals, we found that the rhythmic degradation of many transcripts did not depend on a functional BMAL1. Interestingly clock-dependent and -independent degradation rhythms peaked at distinct times of day. We further predicted mRNA-binding proteins (mRBPs) that were implicated in the posttranscriptional regulation of mRNAs, either through stabilizing or destabilizing activities. Together, our results demonstrate how posttranscriptional regulation temporally shapes rhythmic mRNA accumulation in mouse liver. PMID:29432155

  7. Circadian clock-dependent and -independent posttranscriptional regulation underlies temporal mRNA accumulation in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingkui; Symul, Laura; Yeung, Jake; Gobet, Cédric; Sobel, Jonathan; Lück, Sarah; Westermark, Pål O; Molina, Nacho; Naef, Felix

    2018-02-20

    The mammalian circadian clock coordinates physiology with environmental cycles through the regulation of daily oscillations of gene expression. Thousands of transcripts exhibit rhythmic accumulations across mouse tissues, as determined by the balance of their synthesis and degradation. While diurnally rhythmic transcription regulation is well studied and often thought to be the main factor generating rhythmic mRNA accumulation, the extent of rhythmic posttranscriptional regulation is debated, and the kinetic parameters (e.g., half-lives), as well as the underlying regulators (e.g., mRNA-binding proteins) are relatively unexplored. Here, we developed a quantitative model for cyclic accumulations of pre-mRNA and mRNA from total RNA-seq data, and applied it to mouse liver. This allowed us to identify that about 20% of mRNA rhythms were driven by rhythmic mRNA degradation, and another 15% of mRNAs regulated by both rhythmic transcription and mRNA degradation. The method could also estimate mRNA half-lives and processing times in intact mouse liver. We then showed that, depending on mRNA half-life, rhythmic mRNA degradation can either amplify or tune phases of mRNA rhythms. By comparing mRNA rhythms in wild-type and Bmal1 -/- animals, we found that the rhythmic degradation of many transcripts did not depend on a functional BMAL1. Interestingly clock-dependent and -independent degradation rhythms peaked at distinct times of day. We further predicted mRNA-binding proteins (mRBPs) that were implicated in the posttranscriptional regulation of mRNAs, either through stabilizing or destabilizing activities. Together, our results demonstrate how posttranscriptional regulation temporally shapes rhythmic mRNA accumulation in mouse liver. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  8. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology. PMID:26361874

  9. An epithelial circadian clock controls pulmonary inflammation and glucocorticoid action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Julie; Ince, Louise; Matthews, Laura; Mei, Junjie; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Nan; Saer, Ben; Begley, Nicola; Poolman, Toryn; Pariollaud, Marie; Farrow, Stuart; DeMayo, Francesco; Hussell, Tracy; Worthen, G Scott; Ray, David; Loudon, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The circadian system is an important regulator of immune function. Human inflammatory lung diseases frequently show time-of-day variation in symptom severity and lung function, but the mechanisms and cell types underlying these effects remain unclear. We show that pulmonary antibacterial responses are modulated by a circadian clock within epithelial club (Clara) cells. These drive circadian neutrophil recruitment to the lung via the chemokine CXCL5. Genetic ablation of the clock gene Bmal1 (also called Arntl or MOP3) in bronchiolar cells disrupts rhythmic Cxcl5 expression, resulting in exaggerated inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide and an impaired host response to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Adrenalectomy blocks rhythmic inflammatory responses and the circadian regulation of CXCL5, suggesting a key role for the adrenal axis in driving CXCL5 expression and pulmonary neutrophil recruitment. Glucocorticoid receptor occupancy at the Cxcl5 locus shows circadian oscillations, but this is disrupted in mice with bronchiole-specific ablation of Bmal1, leading to enhanced CXCL5 expression despite normal corticosteroid secretion. The therapeutic effects of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone depend on intact clock function in the airway. We now define a regulatory mechanism that links the circadian clock and glucocorticoid hormones to control both time-of-day variation and the magnitude of pulmonary inflammation and responses to bacterial infection.

  10. Cryptochrome mediates light-dependent magnetosensitivity of Drosophila's circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishi Yoshii

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Since 1960, magnetic fields have been discussed as Zeitgebers for circadian clocks, but the mechanism by which clocks perceive and process magnetic information has remained unknown. Recently, the radical-pair model involving light-activated photoreceptors as magnetic field sensors has gained considerable support, and the blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome (CRY has been proposed as a suitable molecule to mediate such magnetosensitivity. Since CRY is expressed in the circadian clock neurons and acts as a critical photoreceptor of Drosophila's clock, we aimed to test the role of CRY in magnetosensitivity of the circadian clock. In response to light, CRY causes slowing of the clock, ultimately leading to arrhythmic behavior. We expected that in the presence of applied magnetic fields, the impact of CRY on clock rhythmicity should be altered. Furthermore, according to the radical-pair hypothesis this response should be dependent on wavelength and on the field strength applied. We tested the effect of applied static magnetic fields on the circadian clock and found that flies exposed to these fields indeed showed enhanced slowing of clock rhythms. This effect was maximal at 300 muT, and reduced at both higher and lower field strengths. Clock response to magnetic fields was present in blue light, but absent under red-light illumination, which does not activate CRY. Furthermore, cry(b and cry(OUT mutants did not show any response, and flies overexpressing CRY in the clock neurons exhibited an enhanced response to the field. We conclude that Drosophila's circadian clock is sensitive to magnetic fields and that this sensitivity depends on light activation of CRY and on the applied field strength, consistent with the radical pair mechanism. CRY is widespread throughout biological systems and has been suggested as receptor for magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds. The present data establish the circadian clock of Drosophila as a model system

  11. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  12. Identification of circadian clock modulators from existing drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, T Katherine; Nakane, Yusuke; Ota, Wataru; Kobayashi, Akane; Ishiguro, Masateru; Kadofusa, Naoya; Ikegami, Keisuke; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Sudo, Masaki; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Sato, Ayato; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2018-04-17

    Chronic circadian disruption due to shift work or frequent travel across time zones leads to jet-lag and an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. The development of new pharmaceuticals to treat circadian disorders, however, is costly and hugely time-consuming. We therefore performed a high-throughput chemical screen of existing drugs for circadian clock modulators in human U2OS cells, with the aim of repurposing known bioactive compounds. Approximately 5% of the drugs screened altered circadian period, including the period-shortening compound dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA; also known as prasterone). DHEA is one of the most abundant circulating steroid hormones in humans and is available as a dietary supplement in the USA Dietary administration of DHEA to mice shortened free-running circadian period and accelerated re-entrainment to advanced light-dark (LD) cycles, thereby reducing jet-lag. Our drug screen also revealed the involvement of tyrosine kinases, ABL1 and ABL2, and the BCR serine/threonine kinase in regulating circadian period. Thus, drug repurposing is a useful approach to identify new circadian clock modulators and potential therapies for circadian disorders. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. Circadian clocks - the fall and rise of physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2005-01-01

    Circadian clocks control the daily life of most light-sensitive organisms- from cyanobacteria to humans. Molecular processes generate cellular rhythmicity, and cellular clocks in animals coordinate rhythms through interaction ( known as coupling). This hierarchy of clocks generates a complex,

  14. CLOCK Genes and Circadian Rhythmicity in Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thome

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disturbed circadian rhythms with sleep problems and disrupted diurnal activity are often seen in patients suffering from Alzheimer disease (AD. Both endogenous CLOCK genes and external Zeitgeber are responsible for the maintenance of circadian rhythmicity in humans. Therefore, modifications of the internal CLOCK system and its interactions with exogenous factors might constitute the neurobiological basis for clinically observed disruptions in rhythmicity, which often have grave consequences for the quality of life of patients and their caregivers. Presently, more and more data are emerging demonstrating how alterations of the CLOCK gene system might contribute to the pathophysiology of AD and other forms of dementia. At the same time, the impact of neuropsychiatric medication on CLOCK gene expression is under investigation.

  15. Synchrony and desynchrony in circadian clocks: impacts on learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Harini C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks evolved under conditions of environmental variation, primarily alternating light dark cycles, to enable organisms to anticipate daily environmental events and coordinate metabolic, physiological, and behavioral activities. However, modern lifestyle and advances in technology have increased the percentage of individuals working in phases misaligned with natural circadian activity rhythms. Endogenous circadian oscillators modulate alertness, the acquisition of learning, memory formation, and the recall of memory with examples of circadian modulation of memory observed across phyla from invertebrates to humans. Cognitive performance and memory are significantly diminished when occurring out of phase with natural circadian rhythms. Disruptions in circadian regulation can lead to impairment in the formation of memories and manifestation of other cognitive deficits. This review explores the types of interactions through which the circadian clock modulates cognition, highlights recent progress in identifying mechanistic interactions between the circadian system and the processes involved in memory formation, and outlines methods used to remediate circadian perturbations and reinforce circadian adaptation. PMID:26286653

  16. Photosynthetic Entrainment of the Circadian Clock Facilitates Plant Growth under Environmental Fluctuations: Perspectives from an Integrated Model of Phase Oscillator and Phloem Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Ohara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants need to avoid carbon starvation and resultant growth inhibition under fluctuating light environments to ensure optimal growth and reproduction. As diel patterns of carbon metabolism are influenced by the circadian clock, appropriate regulation of the clock is essential for plants to properly manage their carbon resources. For proper adjustment of the circadian phase, higher plants utilize environmental signals such as light or temperature and metabolic signals such as photosynthetic products; the importance of the latter as phase regulators has been recently elucidated. A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is deficient in phase response to sugar has been shown, under fluctuating light conditions, to be unable to adjust starch turnover and to realize carbon homeostasis. Whereas, the effects of light entrainment on growth and survival of higher plants are well studied, the impact of phase regulation by sugar remains unknown. Here we show that endogenous sugar entrainment facilitates plant growth. We integrated two mathematical models, one describing the dynamics of carbon metabolism in A. thaliana source leaves and the other growth of sink tissues dependent on sucrose translocation from the source. The integrated model predicted that sugar-sensitive plants grow faster than sugar-insensitive plants under constant as well as changing photoperiod conditions. We found that sugar entrainment enables efficient carbon investment for growth by stabilizing sucrose supply to sink tissues. Our results highlight the importance of clock entrainment by both exogenous and endogenous signals for optimizing growth and increasing fitness.

  17. Circadian molecular clocks tick along ontogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Bendová, Zdeňka; Sládek, Martin; El-Hennamy, Rehab; Matějů, Kristýna; Polidarová, Lenka; Sosniyenko, Serhiy; Illnerová, Helena

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, Suppl.3 (2008), S139-S148 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/08/0503; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110605; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-2004-115-4-018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian clock * ontogenesis * suprachiasmatic nucleus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  18. The circadian clock, reward and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs eAlbrecht

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available During our daily activities, we experience variations in our cognitive performance, which is often accompanied by cravings for small rewards, such as consuming coffee or chocolate. This indicates that the time of day, cognitive performance and reward may be related to one another. This review will summarize data that describes the influence of the circadian clock on addiction and mood-related behavior and put the data into perspective in relation to memory processes.

  19. The skeletal muscle circadian clock: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao R

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Reiko Nakao,1 Takeshi Nikawa,2 Katsutaka Oishi1,3,4 1Biological Clock Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST, Tsukuba, 2Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, 3Department of Applied Biological Science, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, 4Department of Computational and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan Abstract: Skeletal muscle functions in locomotion, postural support, and energy metabolism. The loss of skeletal muscle mass and function leads to diseases such as sarcopenia and metabolic disorders. Inactivity (lack of exercise and an imbalanced diet (increased fat or decreased protein intake are thought to be involved in the prevalence of such pathologies. On the other hand, recent epidemiological studies of humans have suggested that circadian disruption caused by shift work, jet lag, and sleep disorders is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Experimental studies of mice deficient in clock genes have also identified skeletal muscle defects, suggesting a molecular link between circadian clock machinery and skeletal muscle physiology. Furthermore, accumulating evidence about chronotherapy, including chronopharmacology, chrononutrition, and chronoexercise, has indicated that timing is important to optimize medical intervention for various diseases. The present review addresses current understanding of the functional roles of the molecular clock with respect to skeletal muscle and the potential of chronotherapy for diseases associated with skeletal muscle. Keywords: biological rhythm, metabolic syndrome, physical activity, neural signal, chronotherapy

  20. CLOCK phosphorylation by AKT regulates its nuclear accumulation and circadian gene expression in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Amelia K; Zhou, Wenping; Santana, Jeans M; Kyriakides, Cleo; Velazquez, Heino; Sessa, William C

    2018-03-27

    Circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) is a transcription factor which activates transcription of clock-controlled genes (CCG) by heterodimerizing with BMAL1 and binding to E-box elements on DNA. While several phosphorylation sites on CLOCK have already been identified, this study characterizes a novel phosphorylation site at Serine 845 (S836 in humans). Here we show that CLOCK is a novel AKT substrate in vitro and in cells, and this phosphorylation site is a negative regulator of CLOCK nuclear localization by acting as a binding site for 14-3-3 proteins. To examine the role of CLOCK phosphorylation in vivo, Clock S845A knock-in mice were generated using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Clock S845A mice are essentially normal with normal central circadian rhythms and hemodynamics. However, examination of core circadian gene expression from peripheral tissues demonstrated that Clock S845A mice have diminished expression of Per2, Reverba, Dbp and Npas2 in skeletal muscle and Per2, Reverba, Dbp, Per1, Rora and Npas2 in the liver during the circadian cycle. The reduction in Dbp levels is associated with reduced H3K9ac at E-boxes where CLOCK binds despite no change in total CLOCK levels. Thus, CLOCK phosphorylation by AKT on S845 regulates its nuclear translocation and the expression levels of certain core circadian genes in insulin sensitive tissues. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Plant circadian clocks increase photosynthesis, growth, survival, and competitive advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Antony N; Salathia, Neeraj; Hall, Anthony; Kévei, Eva; Tóth, Réka; Nagy, Ferenc; Hibberd, Julian M; Millar, Andrew J; Webb, Alex A R

    2005-07-22

    Circadian clocks are believed to confer an advantage to plants, but the nature of that advantage has been unknown. We show that a substantial photosynthetic advantage is conferred by correct matching of the circadian clock period with that of the external light-dark cycle. In wild type and in long- and short-circadian period mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, plants with a clock period matched to the environment contain more chlorophyll, fix more carbon, grow faster, and survive better than plants with circadian periods differing from their environment. This explains why plants gain advantage from circadian control.

  2. Transcripts from the Circadian Clock: Telling Time and Season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Brand (Karl)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe all know it when we wake mere moments before an alarm clock is scheduled to wake us: our body clock made the alarm clock redundant. This phenomenon is driven by an endogenous timer known as the biological, or circadian clock. Each revolution of the Earth about its own axis produces

  3. Mammalian TIMELESS Is Involved in Period Determination and DNA Damage-Dependent Phase Advancing of the Circadian Clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Engelen (Erik); R. Janssens (Roel); K. Yagita (Kazuhiro); V.A.J. Smits (Veronique); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); F. Tamanini (Filippo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe transcription/translation feedback loop-based molecular oscillator underlying the generation of circadian gene expression is preserved in almost all organisms. Interestingly, the animal circadian clock proteins CRYPTOCHROME (CRY), PERIOD (PER) and TIMELESS (TIM) are strongly

  4. Crosstalk between the circadian clock and innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Zhang

    Full Text Available The circadian clock integrates temporal information with environmental cues in regulating plant development and physiology. Recently, the circadian clock has been shown to affect plant responses to biotic cues. To further examine this role of the circadian clock, we tested disease resistance in mutants disrupted in CCA1 and LHY, which act synergistically to regulate clock activity. We found that cca1 and lhy mutants also synergistically affect basal and resistance gene-mediated defense against Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Disrupting the circadian clock caused by overexpression of CCA1 or LHY also resulted in severe susceptibility to P. syringae. We identified a downstream target of CCA1 and LHY, GRP7, a key constituent of a slave oscillator regulated by the circadian clock and previously shown to influence plant defense and stomatal activity. We show that the defense role of CCA1 and LHY against P. syringae is at least partially through circadian control of stomatal aperture but is independent of defense mediated by salicylic acid. Furthermore, we found defense activation by P. syringae infection and treatment with the elicitor flg22 can feedback-regulate clock activity. Together this data strongly supports a direct role of the circadian clock in defense control and reveal for the first time crosstalk between the circadian clock and plant innate immunity.

  5. Circadian clock genes universally control key agricultural traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers that enable plants to synchronize biological processes with daily and seasonal environmental conditions in order to allocate resources during the most beneficial times of day and year. The circadian clock regulates a number of central plant activities, includin...

  6. Development and entrainment of the colonic circadian clock during ontogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polidarová, Lenka; Olejníková, Lucie; Paušlyová, Lucia; Sládek, Martin; Soták, Matúš; Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 4 (2014), G346-G356 ISSN 0193-1857 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian clock * clock gene * ontogenesis * circadian entrainment Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.798, year: 2014

  7. Colour as a signal for entraining the mammalian circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Walmsley

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Twilight is characterised by changes in both quantity ("irradiance" and quality ("colour" of light. Animals use the variation in irradiance to adjust their internal circadian clocks, aligning their behaviour and physiology with the solar cycle. However, it is currently unknown whether changes in colour also contribute to this entrainment process. Using environmental measurements, we show here that mammalian blue-yellow colour discrimination provides a more reliable method of tracking twilight progression than simply measuring irradiance. We next use electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that neurons in the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock display the cone-dependent spectral opponency required to make use of this information. Thus, our data show that some clock neurons are highly sensitive to changes in spectral composition occurring over twilight and that this input dictates their response to changes in irradiance. Finally, using mice housed under photoperiods with simulated dawn/dusk transitions, we confirm that spectral changes occurring during twilight are required for appropriate circadian alignment under natural conditions. Together, these data reveal a new sensory mechanism for telling time of day that would be available to any mammalian species capable of chromatic vision.

  8. Colour As a Signal for Entraining the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Lauren; Hanna, Lydia; Mouland, Josh; Martial, Franck; West, Alexander; Smedley, Andrew R.; Bechtold, David A.; Webb, Ann R.; Lucas, Robert J.; Brown, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Twilight is characterised by changes in both quantity (“irradiance”) and quality (“colour”) of light. Animals use the variation in irradiance to adjust their internal circadian clocks, aligning their behaviour and physiology with the solar cycle. However, it is currently unknown whether changes in colour also contribute to this entrainment process. Using environmental measurements, we show here that mammalian blue–yellow colour discrimination provides a more reliable method of tracking twilight progression than simply measuring irradiance. We next use electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that neurons in the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock display the cone-dependent spectral opponency required to make use of this information. Thus, our data show that some clock neurons are highly sensitive to changes in spectral composition occurring over twilight and that this input dictates their response to changes in irradiance. Finally, using mice housed under photoperiods with simulated dawn/dusk transitions, we confirm that spectral changes occurring during twilight are required for appropriate circadian alignment under natural conditions. Together, these data reveal a new sensory mechanism for telling time of day that would be available to any mammalian species capable of chromatic vision. PMID:25884537

  9. Calcium and SOL Protease Mediate Temperature Resetting of Circadian Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Zhao, Xiaohu; Busza, Ania; Ling, Jinli; O’Neill, John S.; Emery, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks integrate light and temperature input to remain synchronized with the day/night cycle. Although light input to the clock is well studied, the molecular mechanisms by which circadian clocks respond to temperature remain poorly understood. We found that temperature phase shifts Drosophila circadian clocks through degradation of the pacemaker protein TIM. This degradation is mechanistically distinct from photic CRY-dependent TIM degradation. Thermal TIM degradation is triggered by cytosolic calcium increase and CALMODULIN binding to TIM and is mediated by the atypical calpain protease SOL. This thermal input pathway and CRY-dependent light input thus converge on TIM, providing a molecular mechanism for the integration of circadian light and temperature inputs. Mammals use body temperature cycles to keep peripheral clocks synchronized with their brain pacemaker. Interestingly, downregulating the mammalian SOL homolog SOLH blocks thermal mPER2 degradation and phase shifts. Thus, we propose that circadian thermosensation in insects and mammals share common principles. PMID:26590423

  10. The hepatic circadian clock modulates xenobiotic metabolism in mice

    OpenAIRE

    DeBruyne, Jason P; Weaver, David R; Dallmann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock generates daily cycles of gene expression that regulate physiological processes. The liver plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism, and also has been shown to possess its own cell-based clock. The liver clock is synchronized by the master clock in the brain, and a portion of rhythmic gene expression can be driven by behavior of the organism as a whole even when the hepatic clock is suppressed. So far, however, there is relatively little evidence indicating whether...

  11. Diurnal Oscillations of Soybean Circadian Clock and Drought Responsive Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G.; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans. PMID:24475115

  12. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marcolino-Gomes

    Full Text Available Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  13. Emerging roles for microRNA in the regulation of Drosophila circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yongbo; Zhang, Yong

    2018-01-16

    The circadian clock, which operates within an approximately 24-h period, is closely linked to the survival and fitness of almost all living organisms. The circadian clock is generated through a negative transcription-translation feedback loop. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs comprised of approximately 22 nucleotides that post-transcriptionally regulate target mRNA by either inducing mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. In recent years, miRNAs have been found to play important roles in the regulation of the circadian clock, especially in Drosophila. In this review, we will use fruit flies as an example, and summarize the progress achieved in the study of miRNA-mediated clock regulation. Three main aspects of the circadian clock, namely, the free-running period, locomotion phase, and circadian amplitude, are discussed in detail in the context of how miRNAs are involved in these regulations. In addition, approaches regarding the discovery of circadian-related miRNAs and their targets are also discussed. Research in the last decade suggests that miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation is crucial to the generation and maintenance of a robust circadian clock in animals. In flies, miRNAs are known to modulate circadian rhythmicity and the free-running period, as well as circadian outputs. Further characterization of miRNAs, especially in the circadian input, will be a vital step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the functions underlying miRNA-control of the circadian clock.

  14. Digital clocks: simple Boolean models can quantitatively describe circadian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozgur E; Watterson, Steven; Parton, Andrew; Binns, Nigel; Millar, Andrew J; Ghazal, Peter

    2012-09-07

    The gene networks that comprise the circadian clock modulate biological function across a range of scales, from gene expression to performance and adaptive behaviour. The clock functions by generating endogenous rhythms that can be entrained to the external 24-h day-night cycle, enabling organisms to optimally time biochemical processes relative to dawn and dusk. In recent years, computational models based on differential equations have become useful tools for dissecting and quantifying the complex regulatory relationships underlying the clock's oscillatory dynamics. However, optimizing the large parameter sets characteristic of these models places intense demands on both computational and experimental resources, limiting the scope of in silico studies. Here, we develop an approach based on Boolean logic that dramatically reduces the parametrization, making the state and parameter spaces finite and tractable. We introduce efficient methods for fitting Boolean models to molecular data, successfully demonstrating their application to synthetic time courses generated by a number of established clock models, as well as experimental expression levels measured using luciferase imaging. Our results indicate that despite their relative simplicity, logic models can (i) simulate circadian oscillations with the correct, experimentally observed phase relationships among genes and (ii) flexibly entrain to light stimuli, reproducing the complex responses to variations in daylength generated by more detailed differential equation formulations. Our work also demonstrates that logic models have sufficient predictive power to identify optimal regulatory structures from experimental data. By presenting the first Boolean models of circadian circuits together with general techniques for their optimization, we hope to establish a new framework for the systematic modelling of more complex clocks, as well as other circuits with different qualitative dynamics. In particular, we anticipate

  15. Digital clocks: simple Boolean models can quantitatively describe circadian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozgur E.; Watterson, Steven; Parton, Andrew; Binns, Nigel; Millar, Andrew J.; Ghazal, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The gene networks that comprise the circadian clock modulate biological function across a range of scales, from gene expression to performance and adaptive behaviour. The clock functions by generating endogenous rhythms that can be entrained to the external 24-h day–night cycle, enabling organisms to optimally time biochemical processes relative to dawn and dusk. In recent years, computational models based on differential equations have become useful tools for dissecting and quantifying the complex regulatory relationships underlying the clock's oscillatory dynamics. However, optimizing the large parameter sets characteristic of these models places intense demands on both computational and experimental resources, limiting the scope of in silico studies. Here, we develop an approach based on Boolean logic that dramatically reduces the parametrization, making the state and parameter spaces finite and tractable. We introduce efficient methods for fitting Boolean models to molecular data, successfully demonstrating their application to synthetic time courses generated by a number of established clock models, as well as experimental expression levels measured using luciferase imaging. Our results indicate that despite their relative simplicity, logic models can (i) simulate circadian oscillations with the correct, experimentally observed phase relationships among genes and (ii) flexibly entrain to light stimuli, reproducing the complex responses to variations in daylength generated by more detailed differential equation formulations. Our work also demonstrates that logic models have sufficient predictive power to identify optimal regulatory structures from experimental data. By presenting the first Boolean models of circadian circuits together with general techniques for their optimization, we hope to establish a new framework for the systematic modelling of more complex clocks, as well as other circuits with different qualitative dynamics. In particular, we

  16. Expression conservation within the circadian clock of a monocot: natural variation at barley Ppd-H1 affects circadian expression of flowering time genes, but not clock orthologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campoli Chiara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circadian clock is an endogenous mechanism that coordinates biological processes with daily changes in the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both agricultural productivity and evolutionary fitness. In barley, the photoperiod response regulator and flowering-time gene Ppd-H1 is orthologous to the Arabidopsis core-clock gene PRR7. However, relatively little is known about the role of Ppd-H1 and other components of the circadian clock in temperate crop species. In this study, we identified barley clock orthologs and tested the effects of natural genetic variation at Ppd-H1 on diurnal and circadian expression of clock and output genes from the photoperiod-response pathway. Results Barley clock orthologs HvCCA1, HvGI, HvPRR1, HvPRR37 (Ppd-H1, HvPRR73, HvPRR59 and HvPRR95 showed a high level of sequence similarity and conservation of diurnal and circadian expression patterns, when compared to Arabidopsis. The natural mutation at Ppd-H1 did not affect diurnal or circadian cycling of barley clock genes. However, the Ppd-H1 mutant was found to be arrhythmic under free-running conditions for the photoperiod-response genes HvCO1, HvCO2, and the MADS-box transcription factor and vernalization responsive gene Vrn-H1. Conclusion We suggest that the described eudicot clock is largely conserved in the monocot barley. However, genetic differentiation within gene families and differences in the function of Ppd-H1 suggest evolutionary modification in the angiosperm clock. Our data indicates that natural variation at Ppd-H1 does not affect the expression level of clock genes, but controls photoperiodic output genes. Circadian control of Vrn-H1 in barley suggests that this vernalization responsive gene is also controlled by the photoperiod-response pathway. Structural and functional characterization of the barley circadian clock will set the basis for future studies of the adaptive significance of the circadian clock in

  17. Temporal expression of clock genes in central and peripheral tissues of spotted munia under varying light conditions: Evidence for circadian regulation of daily physiology in a non-photoperiodic circannual songbird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Neha; Mishra, Ila; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2018-01-25

    We investigated if the duration and/or frequency of the light period affect 24-h rhythm of circadian clock genes in central and peripheral tissues of a non-photoperiodic songbird, the spotted munia (Lonchura punctulata), in which a circannual rhythm regulates the reproductive cycle. We monitored activity-rest pattern and measured 24-h mRNA oscillation of core clock (Bmal1, Clock, Per2, Cry1 and Cry2) and clock-controlled (E4bp4, Rorα and Rev-erbα) genes in the hypothalamus, retina, liver and gut of spotted munia subjected to an aberrant light-dark (LD) cycle (3.5L:3.5D; T7, T = period length of LD cycle) and continuous light (LL, 24L:0D), with controls on 24-h LD cycle (T24, 12L:12D). Munia exhibited rhythmic activity-rest pattern with period matched to T7 or T24 under an LD cycle and were arrhythmic with a scattered activity pattern and higher activity duration under LL. At the transcriptional level, both clock and clock-controlled genes showed a significant 24-h rhythm in all four tissues (except Clock in the liver) under 12L:12D, suggesting a conserved tissue-level circadian time generation in spotted munia. An exposure to 3.5L:3.5D or LL induced arrhythmicity in transcriptional oscillation of all eight genes in the hypothalamus (except Rev-erbα) and liver (except Bmal1 and Rev-erbα under T7 and Cry1 under LL). In the retina, however, all genes showed arrhythmic 24-h mRNA expression under LL, but not under T7 (except in E4bp4 and Rorα). Interestingly, unlike in the liver, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, Rorα and Rev-erbα mRNA expressions were rhythmic in the gut under both T7 (except Rorα) and LL conditions. These results showed variable relationship of internal circadian clocks with the external light environment and suggested a weak coupling of circadian clocks between the central (hypothalamus and retina) and peripheral (liver and gut) tissues. We suggest tissue-level circadian clock regulation of daily physiology and behavior in the spotted munia.

  18. Hepatic, Duodenal, and Colonic Circadian Clocks Differ in their Persistence under Conditions of Constant Light and in their Entrainment by Restricted Feeding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polidarová, Lenka; Sládek, Martin; Soták, Matúš; Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2011), s. 204-215 ISSN 0742-0528 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0321; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EC(XE) 018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian clock * clock genes * constant light * gut * liver * restricted feeding Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.028, year: 2011

  19. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uduak S. Udoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  20. Circadian clock-mediated regulation of blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, Lauren G; Gumz, Michelle L

    2017-12-02

    Most bodily functions vary over the course of a 24h day. Circadian rhythms in body temperature, sleep-wake cycles, metabolism, and blood pressure (BP) are just a few examples. These circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks located throughout the body. Light and food cues entrain these clocks to the time of day and this synchronicity contributes to the regulation of a variety of physiological processes with effects on overall health. The kidney, brain, nervous system, vasculature, and heart have been identified through the use of mouse models and clinical trials as peripheral clock regulators of BP. The dysregulation of this circadian pattern of BP, with or without hypertension, is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The mechanism of this dysregulation is unknown and is a growing area of research. In this review, we highlight research of human and mouse circadian models that has provided insight into the roles of these molecular clocks and their effects on physiological functions. Additional tissue-specific studies of the molecular clock mechanism are needed, as well as clinical studies including more diverse populations (different races, female patients, etc.), which will be critical to fully understand the mechanism of circadian regulation of BP. Understanding how these molecular clocks regulate the circadian rhythm of BP is critical in the treatment of circadian BP dysregulation and hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The clock in the cell : Entrainment of the circadian clock in Neurospora crassa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madeti Jyothi-Boesl, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    Since reports of daily leaf movements 2000 years ago, a so-called circadian clock (‘circa diem’ meaning ‘about a day’) has been described in organisms from almost all phyla. The work presented in this thesis gives special emphasis on the circadian clock in the fungus Neurospora crassa, a rather

  2. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-19

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness.

  3. Small heterodimer partner (NROB2) coordinates nutrient signaling and the circadian clock in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian rhythm regulates multiple metabolic processes and in turn is readily entrained by feeding-fasting cycles. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the peripheral clock senses nutrition availability remain largely unknown. Bile acids are under circadian control and also increase postprand...

  4. The Circadian Clock-controlled Transcriptome of Developing Soybean Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Hudson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A number of metabolic and physiological processes in plants are controlled by the circadian clock, which enables a plant to anticipate daily changes in the environment. Relatively little is known about circadian rhythms in developing seeds, which may be important for determining the extent and timing of nutrient storage in grain. Microarray expression profiling was used to identify genes expressed in developing soybean ( seeds that are controlled by the circadian clock. Genes with predicted functions in protein synthesis, fatty acid metabolism, and photosynthesis totaling 1.8% of the mRNAs detected in seed were found to be expressed in a circadian rhythm. Known circadian and light-controlled promoter elements were identified as over-represented in the promoters of clock-controlled seed genes, with the over-represented elements varying according to the phase of circadian expression. A subset of circadian-regulated genes were found to be expressed in different phases in developing seeds with respect to leaves from the same plants, many of which have roles in photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. These results help to characterize the genes and processes in seeds that may be regulated by the circadian clock, and provide some insight into organ-specific phasing of clock controlled gene expression.

  5. CLOCK Acetylates ASS1 to Drive Circadian Rhythm of Ureagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ran; Mo, Yan; Zha, Haihong; Qu, Zhipeng; Xie, Pancheng; Zhu, Zheng-Jiang; Xu, Ying; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2017-10-05

    In addition to responding to environmental entrainment with diurnal variation, metabolism is also tightly controlled by cell-autonomous circadian clock. Extensive studies have revealed key roles of transcription in circadian control. Post-transcriptional regulation for the rhythmic gating of metabolic enzymes remains elusive. Here, we show that arginine biosynthesis and subsequent ureagenesis are collectively regulated by CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) in circadian rhythms. Facilitated by BMAL1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein), CLOCK directly acetylates K165 and K176 of argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) to inactivate ASS1, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of arginine biosynthesis. ASS1 acetylation by CLOCK exhibits circadian oscillation in human cells and mouse liver, possibly caused by rhythmic interaction between CLOCK and ASS1, leading to the circadian regulation of ASS1 and ureagenesis. Furthermore, we also identified NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 9 (NDUFA9) and inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2) as acetylation substrates of CLOCK. Taken together, CLOCK modulates metabolic rhythmicity by acting as a rhythmic acetyl-transferase for metabolic enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The hepatic circadian clock fine-tunes the lipogenic response to feeding through RORα/γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Papazyan, Romeo; Damle, Manashree; Fang, Bin; Jager, Jennifer; Feng, Dan; Peed, Lindsey C.; Guan, Dongyin; Sun, Zheng; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2017-01-01

    Liver lipid metabolism is under intricate temporal control by both the circadian clock and feeding. The interplay between these two mechanisms is not clear. Here we show that liver-specific depletion of nuclear receptors RORα and RORγ, key components of the molecular circadian clock, up-regulate expression of lipogenic genes only under fed conditions at Zeitgeber time 22 (ZT22) but not under fasting conditions at ZT22 or ad libitum conditions at ZT10. RORα/γ controls circadian expression of Insig2, which keeps feeding-induced SREBP1c activation under check. Loss of RORα/γ causes overactivation of the SREBP-dependent lipogenic response to feeding, exacerbating diet-induced hepatic steatosis. These findings thus establish ROR/INSIG2/SREBP as a molecular pathway by which circadian clock components anticipatorily regulate lipogenic responses to feeding. This highlights the importance of time of day as a consideration in the treatment of liver metabolic disorders. PMID:28747429

  7. Cellular Clocks : Coupled Circadian Dispatch and Cell Division Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Roenneberg, Till

    2004-01-01

    Gating of cell division by the circadian clock is well known, yet its mechanism is little understood. Genetically tractable model systems have led to new hypotheses and questions concerning the coupling of these two cellular cycles.

  8. CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 Inhibits Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is an integral part of plant development, and the timing and progressing rate of senescence could substantially affect the yield and quality of crops. It has been known that a circadian rhythm synchronized with external environmental cues is critical for the optimal coordination of various physiological and metabolic processes. However, the reciprocal interactions between the circadian clock and leaf senescence in plants remain unknown. Here, through measuring the physiological and molecular senescence related markers of several circadian components mutants, we found that CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 inhibits leaf senescence. Further molecular and genetic studies revealed that CCA1 directly activates GLK2 and suppresses ORE1 expression to counteract leaf senescence. As plants age, the expression and periodic amplitude of CCA1 declines and thus weakens the inhibition of senescence. Our findings reveal an age-dependent circadian clock component of the process of leaf senescence.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Temperature Compensation of the Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Virshup

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An approximately 24-h biological timekeeping mechanism called the circadian clock is present in virtually all light-sensitive organisms from cyanobacteria to humans. The clock system regulates our sleep–wake cycle, feeding–fasting, hormonal secretion, body temperature, and many other physiological functions. Signals from the master circadian oscillator entrain peripheral clocks using a variety of neural and hormonal signals. Even centrally controlled internal temperature fluctuations can entrain the peripheral circadian clocks. But, unlike other chemical reactions, the output of the clock system remains nearly constant with fluctuations in ambient temperature, a phenomenon known as temperature compensation. In this brief review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the posttranslational modifications, especially a phosphoswitch mechanism controlling the stability of PER2 and its implications for the regulation of temperature compensation.

  10. Direct Repression of Evening Genes by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Mari; Takao, Saori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Taki, Kyomi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Nakamichi, Norihito

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is a biological timekeeping system that provides organisms with the ability to adapt to day-night cycles. Timing of the expression of four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR(PRR) family is crucial for proper clock function, and transcriptional control of PRRs remains incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that direct regulation of PRR5 by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) determines the repression state of PRR5 in the morning. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that CCA1 associates with three separate regions upstream of PRR5 CCA1 and its homolog LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) suppressed PRR5 promoter activity in a transient assay. The regions bound by CCA1 in the PRR5 promoter gave rhythmic patterns with troughs in the morning, when CCA1 and LHY are at high levels. Furthermore,ChIP-seq revealed that CCA1 associates with at least 449 loci with 863 adjacent genes. Importantly, this gene set contains genes that are repressed but upregulated incca1 lhy double mutants in the morning. This study shows that direct binding by CCA1 in the morning provides strong repression of PRR5, and repression by CCA1 also temporally regulates an evening-expressed gene set that includes PRR5. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  11. Diurnal Preference Predicts Phase Differences in Expression of Human Peripheral Circadian Clock Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Andrew; Gellerman, David; Ay, Ahmet; Woods, Kerri Pruitt; Filipowicz, Allan Michael; Jain, Kriti; Bearden, Neil; Ingram, Krista Kenyon

    2015-06-05

    Circadian rhythms play an integral role in human behavior, physiology and health. Individual differences in daily rhythms (chronotypes) can affect individual sleep-wake cycles, activity patterns and behavioral choices. Diurnal preference, the tendency towards morningness or eveningness among individuals, has been associated with interpersonal variation in circadian clock-related output measures, including body temperature, melatonin levels and clock gene mRNA in blood, oral mucosa, and dermal fibroblast cell cultures. Here we report gene expression data from two principal clock genes sampled from hair follicle cells, a peripheral circadian clock. Hair follicle cells from fourteen individuals of extreme morning or evening chronotype were sampled at three time points. RNA was extracted and quantitative PCR assays were used to measure mRNA expression patterns of two clock genes, Per3 and Nr1d2. We found significant differences in clock gene expression over time between chronotype groups, independent of gender or age of participants. Extreme evening chronotypes have a delay in phase of circadian clock gene oscillation relative to extreme morning types. Variation in the molecular clockwork of chronotype groups represents nearly three-hour phase differences (Per3: 2.61 hours; Nr1d2: 3.08 hours, both: 2.86) in circadian oscillations of these clock genes. The measurement of gene expression from hair follicles at three time points allows for a direct, efficient method of estimating phase shifts of a peripheral circadian clock in real-life conditions. The robust phase differences in temporal expression of clock genes associated with diurnal preferences provide the framework for further studies of the molecular mechanisms and gene-by-environment interactions underlying chronotype-specific behavioral phenomena, including social jetlag.

  12. Coordination between Differentially Regulated Circadian Clocks Generates Rhythmic Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Deniz; Young, Michael W

    2017-09-11

    Specialized groups of neurons in the brain are key mediators of circadian rhythms, receiving daily environmental cues and communicating those signals to other tissues in the organism for entrainment and to organize circadian physiology. In Drosophila , the "circadian clock" is housed in seven neuronal clusters, which are defined by their expression of the main circadian proteins, Period, Timeless, Clock, and Cycle. These clusters are distributed across the fly brain and are thereby subject to the respective environments associated with their anatomical locations. While these core components are universally expressed in all neurons of the circadian network, additional regulatory proteins that act on these components are differentially expressed, giving rise to "local clocks" within the network that nonetheless converge to regulate coherent behavioral rhythms. In this review, we describe the communication between the neurons of the circadian network and the molecular differences within neurons of this network. We focus on differences in protein-expression patterns and discuss how such variation can impart functional differences in each local clock. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of how communication within the circadian network intersects with intracellular biochemical mechanisms to ultimately specify behavioral rhythms. We propose that additional efforts are required to identify regulatory mechanisms within each neuronal cluster to understand the molecular basis of circadian behavior. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. Early evolution of the land plant circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Anna-Malin; Eklund, D Magnus; Kubota, Akane; Pederson, Eric R A; Holm, Karl; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Cronberg, Nils; Muranaka, Tomoaki; Oyama, Tokitaka; Kohchi, Takayuki; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2017-10-01

    While angiosperm clocks can be described as an intricate network of interlocked transcriptional feedback loops, clocks of green algae have been modelled as a loop of only two genes. To investigate the transition from a simple clock in algae to a complex one in angiosperms, we performed an inventory of circadian clock genes in bryophytes and charophytes. Additionally, we performed functional characterization of putative core clock genes in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha and the hornwort Anthoceros agrestis. Phylogenetic construction was combined with studies of spatiotemporal expression patterns and analysis of M. polymorpha clock gene mutants. Homologues to core clock genes identified in Arabidopsis were found not only in bryophytes but also in charophytes, albeit in fewer copies. Circadian rhythms were detected for most identified genes in M. polymorpha and A. agrestis, and mutant analysis supports a role for putative clock genes in M. polymorpha. Our data are in line with a recent hypothesis that adaptation to terrestrial life occurred earlier than previously expected in the evolutionary history of charophyte algae. Both gene duplication and acquisition of new genes was important in the evolution of the plant circadian clock, but gene loss has also contributed to shaping the clock of bryophytes. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. The hepatic circadian clock modulates xenobiotic metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruyne, Jason P; Weaver, David R; Dallmann, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The circadian clock generates daily cycles of gene expression that regulate physiological processes. The liver plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism and also has been shown to possess its own cell-based clock. The liver clock is synchronized by the master clock in the brain, and a portion of rhythmic gene expression can be driven by behavior of the organism as a whole even when the hepatic clock is suppressed. So far, however, there is relatively little evidence indicating whether the liver clock is functionally important in modulating xenobiotic metabolism. Thus, mice lacking circadian clock function in the whole body or specifically in liver were challenged with pentobarbital and acetaminophen, and pentobarbital sleep time (PBST) and acetaminophen toxicity, respectively, was assessed at different times of day in mutant and control mice. The results suggest that the liver clock is essential for rhythmic changes in xenobiotic detoxification. Surprisingly, it seems that the way in which the clock is disrupted determines the rate of xenobiotic metabolism in the liver. CLOCK-deficient mice are remarkably resistant to acetaminophen and exhibit a longer PBST, while PERIOD-deficient mice have a short PBST. These results indicate an essential role of the tissue-intrinsic peripheral circadian oscillator in the liver in regulating xenobiotic metabolism. © 2014 The Author(s).

  15. Circadian clocks : from stem cells to tissue homeostasis and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierickx, Pieterjan; Van Laake, Linda W; Geijsen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timekeeper that adapts body physiology to diurnal cycles of around 24 h by influencing a wide variety of processes such as sleep-to-wake transitions, feeding and fasting patterns, body temperature, and hormone regulation. The molecular clock

  16. Cancer/testis antigen PIWIL2 suppresses circadian rhythms by regulating the stability and activity of BMAL1 and CLOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yilu; Zheng, Xulei; Hu, Wei; Bian, Shasha; Zhang, Zhiwei; Tao, Dachang; Liu, Yunqiang; Ma, Yongxin

    2017-08-15

    Circadian rhythms are regulated by transcriptional and post-translational feedback loops generated by appropriate functions of clock proteins. Rhythmic degradation of the circadian clock proteins is critical for maintenance of the circadian oscillations. Notably, circadian clock does not work during spermatogenesis and can be disrupted in tumors. However, the underlying mechanism that suppresses circadian rhythms in germ cells and cancer cells remains largely unknown. Here we report that the cancer/testis antigen PIWIL2 can repress circadian rhythms both in the testis and cancer cells. By facilitating SRC binding with PI3K, PIWIL2 activates the PI3K-AKT pathway to phosphorylate and deactivate GSK3β, suppressing GSK3β-induced phosphorylation and degradation of circadian protein BMAL1 and CLOCK. Meanwhile, PIWIL2 can bind with E-Box sequences associated with the BMAL1/CLOCK complex to negatively regulate the transcriptional activation activity of promoters of clock-controlled genes. Taken together, our results first described a function for the germline-specific protein PIWIL2 in regulation of the circadian clock, providing a molecular link between spermatogenesis as well as tumorigenesis to the dysfunction of circadian rhythms.

  17. FAD regulates CRYPTOCHROME protein stability and circadian clock in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Arisa; Braas, Daniel; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J.

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock generates biological rhythms of metabolic and physiological processes, including the sleep-wake cycle. We previously identified a missense mutation in the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding pocket of CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2), a clock protein that causes human advanced sleep phase. This prompted us to examine the role of FAD as a mediator of the clock and metabolism. FAD stabilized CRY proteins, leading to increased protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of Riboflavin ki...

  18. The intestinal microbiota regulates body composition through NFIL3and the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhao; Kuang, Zheng; Yu, Xiaofei; Ruhn, Kelly A; Kubo, Masato; Hooper, Lora V

    2017-09-01

    The intestinal microbiota has been identified as an environmental factor that markedly affects energy storage and body-fat accumulation in mammals, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the microbiota regulates body composition through the circadian transcription factor NFIL3. Nfil3 transcription oscillates diurnally in intestinal epithelial cells, and the amplitude of the circadian oscillation is controlled by the microbiota through group 3 innate lymphoid cells, STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), and the epithelial cell circadian clock. NFIL3 controls expression of a circadian lipid metabolic program and regulates lipid absorption and export in intestinal epithelial cells. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how the intestinal microbiota regulates body composition and establish NFIL3 as an essential molecular link among the microbiota, the circadian clock, and host metabolism. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Histone lysine demethylase JARID1a activates CLOCK-BMAL1 and influences the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTacchio, Luciano; Le, Hiep D; Vollmers, Christopher; Hatori, Megumi; Witcher, Michael; Secombe, Julie; Panda, Satchidananda

    2011-09-30

    In animals, circadian oscillators are based on a transcription-translation circuit that revolves around the transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1. We found that the JumonjiC (JmjC) and ARID domain-containing histone lysine demethylase 1a (JARID1a) formed a complex with CLOCK-BMAL1, which was recruited to the Per2 promoter. JARID1a increased histone acetylation by inhibiting histone deacetylase 1 function and enhanced transcription by CLOCK-BMAL1 in a demethylase-independent manner. Depletion of JARID1a in mammalian cells reduced Per promoter histone acetylation, dampened expression of canonical circadian genes, and shortened the period of circadian rhythms. Drosophila lines with reduced expression of the Jarid1a homolog, lid, had lowered Per expression and similarly altered circadian rhythms. JARID1a thus has a nonredundant role in circadian oscillator function.

  20. Neurogenetics of Drosophila circadian clock: expect the unexpected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarabo, Patricia; Martin, Francisco A

    2017-12-01

    Daily biological rhythms (i.e. circadian) are a fundamental part of animal behavior. Numerous reports have shown disruptions of the biological clock in neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. In the latter case, only recently we have gained insight into the molecular mechanisms. After 45 years of intense study of the circadian rhtythms, we find surprising similarities among species on the molecular clock that governs biological rhythms. Indeed, Drosophila is one of the most widely used models in the study of chronobiology. Recent studies in the fruit fly have revealed unpredicted roles for the clock machinery in different aspects of behavior and physiology. Not only the central pacemaker cells do have non-classical circadian functions but also circadian genes work in other cells and tissues different from central clock neurons. In this review, we summarize these new evidences. We also recapitulate the most basic features of Drosophila circadian clock, including recent data about the inputs and outputs that connect the central pacemaker with other regions of the brain. Finally, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of using natural versus laboratory conditions.

  1. Ras-mediated deregulation of the circadian clock in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Relógio

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock.

  2. Ras-Mediated Deregulation of the Circadian Clock in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relógio, Angela; Thomas, Philippe; Medina-Pérez, Paula; Reischl, Silke; Bervoets, Sander; Gloc, Ewa; Riemer, Pamela; Mang-Fatehi, Shila; Maier, Bert; Schäfer, Reinhold; Leser, Ulf; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim; Sers, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:24875049

  3. Circadian Clock Involvement in Zooplankton Diel Vertical Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfker, N Sören; Meyer, Bettina; Last, Kim S; Pond, David W; Hüppe, Lukas; Teschke, Mathias

    2017-07-24

    Biological clocks are a ubiquitous ancient and adaptive mechanism enabling organisms to anticipate environmental cycles and to regulate behavioral and physiological processes accordingly [1]. Although terrestrial circadian clocks are well understood, knowledge of clocks in marine organisms is still very limited [2-5]. This is particularly true for abundant species displaying large-scale rhythms like diel vertical migration (DVM) that contribute significantly to shaping their respective ecosystems [6]. Here we describe exogenous cycles and endogenous rhythms associated with DVM of the ecologically important and highly abundant planktic copepod Calanus finmarchicus. In the laboratory, C. finmarchicus shows circadian rhythms of DVM, metabolism, and most core circadian clock genes (clock, period1, period2, timeless, cryptochrome2, and clockwork orange). Most of these genes also cycle in animals assessed in the wild, though expression is less rhythmic at depth (50-140 m) relative to shallow-caught animals (0-50 m). Further, peak expressions of clock genes generally occurred at either sunset or sunrise, coinciding with peak migration times. Including one of the first field investigations of clock genes in a marine species [5, 7], this study couples clock gene measurements with laboratory and field data on DVM. While the mechanistic connection remains elusive, our results imply a high degree of causality between clock gene expression and one of the planet's largest daily migrations of biomass. We thus suggest that circadian clocks increase zooplankton fitness by optimizing the temporal trade-off between feeding and predator avoidance, especially when environmental drivers are weak or absent [8]. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes in the rat retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Cailotto, Cathy; Dijk, Frederike; Bergen, Arthur; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    The circadian expression patterns of genes encoding for proteins that make up the core of the circadian clock were measured in rat retina using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Transcript levels of several genes previously used for normalization of qPCR assays were determined and the effect of

  5. Redox regulation of circadian molecular clock in chronic airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Isaac K; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2017-10-31

    At the cellular level, circadian timing is maintained by the molecular clock, a family of interacting clock gene transcription factors, nuclear receptors and kinases called clock genes. Daily rhythms in pulmonary function are dictated by the circadian timing system, including rhythmic susceptibility to the harmful effects of airborne pollutants, exacerbations in patients with chronic airway disease and the immune-inflammatory response to infection. Further, evidence strongly suggests that the circadian molecular clock has a robust reciprocal interaction with redox signaling and plays a considerable role in the response to oxidative/carbonyl stress. Disruption of the circadian timing system, particularly in airway cells, impairs pulmonary rhythms and lung function, enhances oxidative stress due to airway inhaled pollutants like cigarette smoke and airborne particulate matter and leads to enhanced inflammosenescence, inflammasome activation, DNA damage and fibrosis. Herein, we briefly review recent evidence supporting the role of the lung molecular clock and redox signaling in regulating inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage responses in lung diseases and their exacerbations. We further describe the potential for clock genes as novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of monochromatic light on circadian rhythmic expression of clock genes in the hypothalamus of chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the effect of monochromatic light on circadian clock gene expression in chick hypothalamus, a total 240 newly hatched chickens were reared under blue light (BL), green light (GL), red light (RL) and white light (WL), respectively. On the post-hatched day 14, 24-h profiles of seven core clock genes (cClock, cBmal1, cBmal2, cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3) were measured at six time points (CT 0, CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, circadian time). We found all these clock genes expressed with a significant rhythmicity in different light wavelength groups. Meanwhile, cClock and cBmal1 showed a high level under GL, and followed a corresponding high expression of cCry1. However, RL decreased the expression levels of these genes. Be consistent with the mRNA level, CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins also showed a high level under GL. The CLOCK-like immunoreactive neurons were observed not only in the SCN, but also in the non-SCN brain region such as the nucleus anterior medialis hypothalami, the periventricularis nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus and the median eminence. All these results are consistent with the auto-regulatory circadian feedback loop, and indicate that GL may play an important role on the circadian time generation and development in the chick hypothalamus. Our results also suggest that the circadian clock in the chick hypothalamus such as non-SCN brain region were involved in the regulation of photo information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical role of the circadian clock in memory formation: lessons from Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Lisa C

    2011-01-01

    Unraveling the complexities of learning and the formation of memory requires identification of the cellular and molecular processes through which neural plasticity arises as well as recognition of the conditions or factors through which those processes are modulated. With its relatively simple nervous system, the marine mollusk Aplysia californica has proven an outstanding model system for studies of memory formation and identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying learned behaviors, including classical and operant associative learning paradigms and non-associative behaviors. In vivo behavioral studies in Aplysia have significantly furthered our understanding of how the endogenous circadian clock modulates memory formation. Sensitization of the tail-siphon withdrawal reflex represents a defensive non-associative learned behavior for which the circadian clock strongly modulates intermediate and long-term memory formation. Likewise, Aplysia exhibit circadian rhythms in long-term memory, but not short-term memory, for an operant associative learning paradigm. This review focuses on circadian modulation of intermediate and long-term memory and the putative mechanisms through which this modulation occurs. Additionally, potential functions and the adaptive advantages of time of day pressure on memory formation are considered. The influence of the circadian clock on learning and memory crosses distant phylogeny highlighting the evolutionary importance of the circadian clock on metabolic, physiological, and behavioral processes. Thus, studies in a simple invertebrate model system have and will continue to provide critical mechanistic insights to complementary processes in higher organisms.

  8. Conservation of Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock genes in Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianxin; Yang, Liwen; Dai, Silan

    2014-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, circadian clock genes play important roles in photoperiod pathway by regulating the daytime expression of CONSTANS (CO), but related reports for chrysanthemum are notably limited. In this study, we isolated eleven circadian clock genes, which lie in the three interconnected negative and positive feedback loops in a wild diploid chrysanthemum, Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium. With the exception of ClELF3, ClPRR1 and ClPRR73, most of the circadian clock genes are expressed more highly in leaves than in other tested tissues. The diurnal rhythms of these circadian clock genes are similar to those of their homologs in Arabidopsis. ClELF3 and ClZTL are constitutively expressed at all time points in both assessed photoperiods. The expression succession from morning to night of the PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) gene family occurs in the order ClPRR73/ClPRR37, ClPRR5, and then ClPRR1. ClLHY is expressed during the dawn period, and ClGIs is expressed during the dusk period. The peak expression levels of ClFKF1 and ClGIs are synchronous in the inductive photoperiod. However, in the non-inductive night break (NB) condition or non-24 h photoperiod, the peak expression level of ClFKF1 is significantly changed, indicating that ClFKF1 itself or the synchronous expression of ClFKF1 and ClGIs might be essential to initiate the flowering of C. lavandulifolium. This study provides the first extensive evaluation of circadian clock genes, and it presents a useful foundation for dissecting the functions of circadian clock genes in C. lavandulifolium. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. The clock in the cell: Entrainment of the circadian clock in Neurospora crassa

    OpenAIRE

    Madeti Jyothi-Boesl, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    Since reports of daily leaf movements 2000 years ago, a so-called circadian clock (‘circa diem’ meaning ‘about a day’) has been described in organisms from almost all phyla. The work presented in this thesis gives special emphasis on the circadian clock in the fungus Neurospora crassa, a rather simple cellular system. Neurospora was used to elucidate basic clock mechanisms are that are comparable to those in more complex organisms. To that end, we investigated chronoecological questions as we...

  10. Entrainment of the mouse circadian clock: Effects of stress, exercise, and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-12-23

    The circadian clock system in mammals plays a fundamental role in maintaining homeostasis. Entrainment is an important characteristic of the internal clock, by which appropriate timing is maintained according to external daily stimuli, such as light, stress, exercise, and/or food. Disorganized entrainment or a misaligned clock time, such as jet lag, increases health disturbances. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, located in the hypothalamus, receives information about arousal stimuli, such as physical stress or exercise, and changes the clock time by modifying neural activity or the expression of circadian clock genes. Although feeding stimuli cannot entrain the central clock in a normal light-dark cycle, the central clock can partially detect the metabolic status. Local clocks in the peripheral tissues, including liver and kidney, have a strong direct response to the external stimuli of stress, exercise, and/or food that is independent of the central clock. The mechanism underlying entrainment by stress/exercise is mediated by glucocorticoids, sympathetic nerves, oxidative stress, hypoxia, pH, cytokines, and temperature. Food/nutrition-induced entrainment is mediated by fasting-induced hormonal or metabolic changes and re-feeding-induced insulin or oxyntomodulin secretion. Chrono-nutrition is a clinical application based on chronobiology research. Future studies are required to elucidate the effects of eating and nutrient composition on the human circadian clock. Here, we focus on the central and peripheral clocks mostly in rodents' studies and review the findings of recent investigations of the effects of stress, exercise, and food on the entrainment system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimal tool set for a prokaryotic circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelling, Nicolas M; Lehmann, Robert; Chaudhury, Paushali; Beck, Christian; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Axmann, Ilka M; Wiegard, Anika

    2017-07-21

    Circadian clocks are found in organisms of almost all domains including photosynthetic Cyanobacteria, whereby large diversity exists within the protein components involved. In the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 circadian rhythms are driven by a unique KaiABC protein clock, which is embedded in a network of input and output factors. Homologous proteins to the KaiABC clock have been observed in Bacteria and Archaea, where evidence for circadian behavior in these domains is accumulating. However, interaction and function of non-cyanobacterial Kai-proteins as well as homologous input and output components remain mainly unclear. Using a universal BLAST analyses, we identified putative KaiC-based timing systems in organisms outside as well as variations within Cyanobacteria. A systematic analyses of publicly available microarray data elucidated interesting variations in circadian gene expression between different cyanobacterial strains, which might be correlated to the diversity of genome encoded clock components. Based on statistical analyses of co-occurrences of the clock components homologous to Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, we propose putative networks of reduced and fully functional clock systems. Further, we studied KaiC sequence conservation to determine functionally important regions of diverged KaiC homologs. Biochemical characterization of exemplary cyanobacterial KaiC proteins as well as homologs from two thermophilic Archaea demonstrated that kinase activity is always present. However, a KaiA-mediated phosphorylation is only detectable in KaiC1 orthologs. Our analysis of 11,264 genomes clearly demonstrates that components of the Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 circadian clock are present in Bacteria and Archaea. However, all components are less abundant in other organisms than Cyanobacteria and KaiA, Pex, LdpA, and CdpA are only present in the latter. Thus, only reduced KaiBC-based or even simpler, solely KaiC-based timing systems

  12. The Circadian Binding of CLOCK Protein to the Promoter of C/ebpα Gene in Mouse Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kumpei; Shimoda, Masami; Ishida, Norio

    2013-01-01

    C/EBPα plays important roles in metabolism as well as in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Here we describe loss of the circadian oscillation of C/ebpα expression in liver of Clock mutant mice. Reporter assays indicate Clock and Bmal significantly induced C/ebpα gene expression whereas Cry suppressed. Real time reporter assays showed that two mutated E-boxes disrupted C/ebpα promoter dependent-oscillation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation suggests Clock can bind to two E-boxes in the C/ebpα promoter with a circadian manner in vivo. Thus, C/ebpα gene transcription is under circadian control of a core clock component, Clock. The data suggests that circadian disturbances may affect metabolic abnormalities through the C/ebpα pathway in liver. PMID:23505471

  13. Deficiency of circadian protein CLOCK reduces lifespan and increases age-related cataract development in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dubrovsky, Yuliya V.; Samsa, William E.; Kondratov, Roman V.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clock is implicated in the regulation of aging. The transcription factor CLOCK, a core component of the circadian system, operates in complex with another circadian clock protein BMAL1. Recently it was demonstrated that BMAL1 deficiency results in premature aging in mice. Here we investigate the aging of mice deficient for CLOCK protein. Deficiency of the CLOCK protein significantly affects longevity: the average lifespan of Clock−/− mice is reduced by 15% compared with wild type mi...

  14. Involvement of circadian clock in crowing of red jungle fowls (Gallus gallus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shuichi; Hori, Shuho; Hirose, Makiko; Iwahara, Mari; Yatsushiro, Azusa; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okamoto, Chinobu; Yayou, Ken-Ichi; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    The rhythmic locomotor behavior of flies and mice provides a phenotype for the identification of clock genes, and the underlying molecular mechanism is well studied. However, interestingly, when examining locomotor rhythm in the wild, several key laboratory-based assumptions on circadian behavior are not supported in natural conditions. The rooster crowing 'cock-a-doodle-doo' is a symbol of the break of dawn in many countries. Previously, we used domestic inbred roosters and showed that the timing of roosters' crowing is regulated by the circadian clock under laboratory conditions. However, it is still unknown whether the regulation of crowing by circadian clock is observed under natural conditions. Therefore, here we used red jungle fowls and first confirmed that similar crowing rhythms with domesticated chickens are observed in red jungle fowls under the laboratory conditions. Red jungle fowls show predawn crowing before light onset under 12:12 light : dim light conditions and the free-running rhythm of crowing under total dim light conditions. We next examined the crowing rhythms under semi-wild conditions. Although the crowing of red jungle fowls changed seasonally under semi-wild conditions, predawn crowing was observed before sunrise in all seasons. This evidence suggests that seasonally changed crowing of red jungle fowls is under the control of a circadian clock. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. The Neurospora circadian clock : simple or complex?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Crosthwaite, Susan K.; Lakin-Thomas, Patricia L.; Merrow, Martha; Økland, Merete

    2001-01-01

    The fungus Neurospora crassa is being used by a number of research groups as a model organism to investigate circadian (daily) rhythmicity. In this review we concentrate on recent work relating to the complexity of the circadian system in this organism. We discuss: the advantages of Neurospora as a

  16. Machine Learning Helps Identify CHRONO as a Circadian Clock Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Anand; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Kavakli, Ibrahim H.; Hughes, Michael E.; Baggs, Julie E.; Growe, Jacqueline; Liu, Andrew C.; Kim, Junhyong; Hogenesch, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, researchers have characterized a set of “clock genes” that drive daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. This arduous work has yielded results with far-reaching consequences in metabolic, psychiatric, and neoplastic disorders. Recent attempts to expand our understanding of circadian regulation have moved beyond the mutagenesis screens that identified the first clock components, employing higher throughput genomic and proteomic techniques. In order to further accelerate clock gene discovery, we utilized a computer-assisted approach to identify and prioritize candidate clock components. We used a simple form of probabilistic machine learning to integrate biologically relevant, genome-scale data and ranked genes on their similarity to known clock components. We then used a secondary experimental screen to characterize the top candidates. We found that several physically interact with known clock components in a mammalian two-hybrid screen and modulate in vitro cellular rhythms in an immortalized mouse fibroblast line (NIH 3T3). One candidate, Gene Model 129, interacts with BMAL1 and functionally represses the key driver of molecular rhythms, the BMAL1/CLOCK transcriptional complex. Given these results, we have renamed the gene CHRONO (computationally highlighted repressor of the network oscillator). Bi-molecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrate that CHRONO represses by abrogating the binding of BMAL1 to its transcriptional co-activator CBP. Most importantly, CHRONO knockout mice display a prolonged free-running circadian period similar to, or more drastic than, six other clock components. We conclude that CHRONO is a functional clock component providing a new layer of control on circadian molecular dynamics. PMID:24737000

  17. Modeling the emergence of circadian rhythms in a clock neuron network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Diambra

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in pacemaker cells persist for weeks in constant darkness, while in other types of cells the molecular oscillations that underlie circadian rhythms damp rapidly under the same conditions. Although much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical and cellular basis of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms leading to damped or self-sustained oscillations remain largely unknown. There exist many mathematical models that reproduce the circadian rhythms in the case of a single cell of the Drosophila fly. However, not much is known about the mechanisms leading to coherent circadian oscillation in clock neuron networks. In this work we have implemented a model for a network of interacting clock neurons to describe the emergence (or damping of circadian rhythms in Drosophila fly, in the absence of zeitgebers. Our model consists of an array of pacemakers that interact through the modulation of some parameters by a network feedback. The individual pacemakers are described by a well-known biochemical model for circadian oscillation, to which we have added degradation of PER protein by light and multiplicative noise. The network feedback is the PER protein level averaged over the whole network. In particular, we have investigated the effect of modulation of the parameters associated with (i the control of net entrance of PER into the nucleus and (ii the non-photic degradation of PER. Our results indicate that the modulation of PER entrance into the nucleus allows the synchronization of clock neurons, leading to coherent circadian oscillations under constant dark condition. On the other hand, the modulation of non-photic degradation cannot reset the phases of individual clocks subjected to intrinsic biochemical noise.

  18. Robustness of circadian clocks to daylight fluctuations: hints from the picoeucaryote Ostreococcus tauri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Thommen

    Full Text Available The development of systemic approaches in biology has put emphasis on identifying genetic modules whose behavior can be modeled accurately so as to gain insight into their structure and function. However, most gene circuits in a cell are under control of external signals and thus, quantitative agreement between experimental data and a mathematical model is difficult. Circadian biology has been one notable exception: quantitative models of the internal clock that orchestrates biological processes over the 24-hour diurnal cycle have been constructed for a few organisms, from cyanobacteria to plants and mammals. In most cases, a complex architecture with interlocked feedback loops has been evidenced. Here we present the first modeling results for the circadian clock of the green unicellular alga Ostreococcus tauri. Two plant-like clock genes have been shown to play a central role in the Ostreococcus clock. We find that their expression time profiles can be accurately reproduced by a minimal model of a two-gene transcriptional feedback loop. Remarkably, best adjustment of data recorded under light/dark alternation is obtained when assuming that the oscillator is not coupled to the diurnal cycle. This suggests that coupling to light is confined to specific time intervals and has no dynamical effect when the oscillator is entrained by the diurnal cycle. This intriguing property may reflect a strategy to minimize the impact of fluctuations in daylight intensity on the core circadian oscillator, a type of perturbation that has been rarely considered when assessing the robustness of circadian clocks.

  19. Genetics and Neurobiology of Circadian Clocks in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junghea; Lee, Choogon; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    In animals circadian behavior can be analyzed as an integrated system - beginning with genes leading ultimately to behavioral outputs. In the last decade, the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks has been unraveled primarily by the use of phenotype-driven (forward) genetic analysis in a number of model systems. Circadian oscillations are generated by a set of genes forming a transcriptional autoregulatory feedback loop. In mammals, there is a “core” set of circadian genes that form the primary negative feedback loop of the clock mechanism (Clock/Npas2, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2 and CK1ε). Another dozen candidate genes have been identified and play additional roles in the circadian gene network such as the feedback loop involving Rev-erbα. Despite this remarkable progress, it is clear that a significant number of genes that strongly influence and regulate circadian rhythms in mammals remain to be discovered and identified. As part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen using a wide range of nervous system and behavioral phenotypes, we have identified a number of new circadian mutants in mice. Here we describe a new short period circadian mutant, part-time (prtm), which is caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the Cryptochrome1 gene. We also describe a long period circadian mutant named Overtime (Ovtm). Positional cloning and genetic complementation reveal that Ovtm is encoded by the F-box protein FBXL3 a component of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The Ovtm mutation causes an isoleucine to threonine (I364T) substitution leading to a loss-of-function in FBXL3 which interacts specifically with the CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) proteins. In Ovtm mice, expression of the PERIOD proteins PER1 and PER2 is reduced; however, the CRY proteins CRY1 and CRY2 are unchanged. The loss of FBXL3 function leads to a stabilization of the CRY proteins, which in turn leads to a global transcriptional repression of the Per and

  20. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, K.; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive (‘circadian resonance hypothesis’). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural

  1. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under

  2. Circadian Clocks and the Interaction between Stress Axis and Adipose Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Kolbe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many physiological processes and most endocrine functions show fluctuations over the course of the day. These so-called circadian rhythms are governed by an endogenous network of cellular clocks and serve as an adaptation to daily and, thus, predictable changes in the organism’s environment. Circadian clocks have been described in several tissues of the stress axis and in adipose cells where they regulate the rhythmic and stimulated release of stress hormones, such as glucocorticoids, and various adipokine factors. Recent work suggests that both adipose and stress axis clock systems reciprocally influence each other and adrenal-adipose rhythms may be key players in the development and therapy of metabolic disorders. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of adrenal and adipose tissue rhythms and clocks and how they might interact to regulate energy homoeostasis and stress responses under physiological conditions. Potential chronotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of metabolic and stress disorders are discussed.

  3. New methods to assess circadian clocks in humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Marta; Sumová, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2014), s. 404-412 ISSN 0019-5189 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11474 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 22810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian * clock gene * melatonin * human Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.835, year: 2014

  4. Adaptive Significance of Circadian Rhythms-Biological Clocks and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 1. Adaptive Significance of Circadian Rhythms - Biological Clocks and Darwinian Fitness in Cyanobacteria. V Sheeba Vijay Kumar Sharma Amitabh Joshi. Research News Volume 4 Issue 1 January 1999 pp 73-75 ...

  5. Living by the clock: the circadian pacemaker in older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, M.A.; Swaab, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is considered to be a critical component of a neural oscillator system implicated in the timing of a wide variety of biological processes. The circadian cycles established by this biological clock occur throughout nature and have a period of

  6. Living by the clock: the circadian pacemaker in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Michel A.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2006-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is considered to be a critical component of a neural oscillator system implicated in the timing of a wide variety of biological processes. The circadian cycles established by this biological clock occur throughout nature and have a period of

  7. Peripheral circadian clocks are diversely affected by adrenalectomy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soták, Matúš; Bryndová, Jana; Ergang, Peter; Vagnerová, Karla; Kvapilová, Pavlína; Vodička, Martin; Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 5 (2016), s. 520-529 ISSN 0742-0528 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08304S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : adrenalectomy * circadian rhythms * corticosterone * peripheral clock Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.562, year: 2016

  8. Temporal Regulation of Cytokines by the Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhito Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several parameters of the immune system exhibit oscillations with a period of approximately 24 hours that refers to “circadian rhythms.” Such daily variations in host immune system status might evolve to maximize immune reactions at times when encounters with pathogens are most likely to occur. However, the mechanisms behind circadian immunity have not been fully understood. Recent studies reveal that the internal time keeping system “circadian clock” plays a key role in driving the daily rhythms evident in the immune system. Importantly, several studies unveil molecular mechanisms of how certain clock proteins (e.g., BMAL1 and CLOCK temporally regulate expression of cytokines. Since cytokines are crucial mediators for shaping immune responses, this review mainly summarizes the new knowledge that highlights an emerging role of the circadian clock as a novel regulator of cytokines. A greater understanding of circadian regulation of cytokines will be important to exploit new strategies to protect host against infection by efficient cytokine induction or to treat autoimmunity and allergy by ameliorating excessive activity of cytokines.

  9. Pyrethroid residue dynamics in insects depends on the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliszewska, Justyna; Piechowicz, Bartosz; Maciąga, Gabriela; Zaręba, Lech; Marcinkowska, Sonia

    2018-02-27

    Many factors may affect pesticide effectiveness against pests. One of the factors that should be considered is circadian rhythmicity. In this study, we evaluated daily variations in pyrethroid susceptibility in the house cricket, Acheta domesticus L. Crickets were exposed to a standard dose of ß-cyfluthrin at different times of a day, and pesticide residue levels were evaluated using gas chromatography. Results demonstrate that the time of pyrethroid disappearance is correlated with the circadian clock, with the highest decomposition rate at night. Furthermore, crickets also showed the highest resistance to the insecticide at night, expressed as a high survival rate. Moreover, ß-cyfluthrin induced significant changes in thermal preferences of intoxicated crickets. This is the first report showing that pyrethroid residue levels in the crickets' body depend on its circadian clock.

  10. FAD Regulates CRYPTOCHROME Protein Stability and Circadian Clock in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Arisa; Braas, Daniel; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J

    2017-04-11

    The circadian clock generates biological rhythms of metabolic and physiological processes, including the sleep-wake cycle. We previously identified a missense mutation in the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding pocket of CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2), a clock protein that causes human advanced sleep phase. This prompted us to examine the role of FAD as a mediator of the clock and metabolism. FAD stabilized CRY proteins, leading to increased protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of Riboflavin kinase (Rfk), an FAD biosynthetic enzyme, enhanced CRY degradation. RFK protein levels and FAD concentrations oscillate in the nucleus, suggesting that they are subject to circadian control. Knockdown of Rfk combined with a riboflavin-deficient diet altered the CRY levels in mouse liver and the expression profiles of clock and clock-controlled genes (especially those related to metabolism including glucose homeostasis). We conclude that light-independent mechanisms of FAD regulate CRY and contribute to proper circadian oscillation of metabolic genes in mammals. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. FAD Regulates CRYPTOCHROME Protein Stability and Circadian Clock in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisa Hirano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock generates biological rhythms of metabolic and physiological processes, including the sleep-wake cycle. We previously identified a missense mutation in the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD binding pocket of CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2, a clock protein that causes human advanced sleep phase. This prompted us to examine the role of FAD as a mediator of the clock and metabolism. FAD stabilized CRY proteins, leading to increased protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of Riboflavin kinase (Rfk, an FAD biosynthetic enzyme, enhanced CRY degradation. RFK protein levels and FAD concentrations oscillate in the nucleus, suggesting that they are subject to circadian control. Knockdown of Rfk combined with a riboflavin-deficient diet altered the CRY levels in mouse liver and the expression profiles of clock and clock-controlled genes (especially those related to metabolism including glucose homeostasis. We conclude that light-independent mechanisms of FAD regulate CRY and contribute to proper circadian oscillation of metabolic genes in mammals.

  12. Rhythms of mammalian body temperature can sustain peripheral circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven A; Zumbrunn, Gottlieb; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Preitner, Nicolas; Schibler, Ueli

    2002-09-17

    Low-amplitude temperature oscillations can entrain the phase of circadian rhythms in several unicellular and multicellular organisms, including Neurospora and Drosophila. Because mammalian body temperature is subject to circadian variations of 1 degrees C-4 degrees C, we wished to determine whether these temperature cycles could serve as a Zeitgeber for circadian gene expression in peripheral cell types. In RAT1 fibroblasts cultured in vitro, circadian gene expression could be established by a square wave temperature rhythm with a (Delta)T of 4 degrees C (12 hr 37 degrees C/12 hr 33 degrees C). To examine whether natural body temperature rhythms can also affect circadian gene expression, we first measured core body temperature cycles in the peritoneal cavities of mice by radiotelemetry. We then reproduced these rhythms with high precision in the liquid medium of cultured fibroblasts for several days by means of a homemade computer-driven incubator. While these "in vivo" temperature rhythms were incapable of establishing circadian gene expression de novo, they could maintain previously induced rhythms for multiple days; by contrast, the rhythms of control cells kept at constant temperature rapidly dampened. Moreover, circadian oscillations of environmental temperature could reentrain circadian clocks in the livers of mice, probably via the changes they imposed upon both body temperature and feeding behavior. Interestingly, these changes in ambient temperature did not affect the phase of the central circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. We postulate that both endogenous and environmental temperature cycles can participate in the synchronization of peripheral clocks in mammals.

  13. Untimely oxidative stress in β-cells leads to diabetes - Role of circadian clock in β-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Ma, K; Moulik, M; Yechoor, V

    2018-02-16

    Diabetes results from a loss of β-cell function. With the number of people with diabetes reaching epidemic proportions globally, understanding mechanisms that are contributing to this increasing prevalence is critical. One such factor has been circadian disruption, with shift-work, light pollution, jet-lag, increased screen time, all acting as potential contributory factors. Though circadian disruption has been epidemiologically associated with diabetes and other metabolic disorders for many decades, it is only recently that there has been a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Experimental circadian disruption, via manipulation of environmental or genetic factors using gene-deletion mouse models, has demonstrated the importance of circadian rhythms in whole body metabolism. Genetic disruption of core clock genes, specifically in the β-cells in mice, have, now demonstrated the importance of the intrinsic β-cell clock in regulating function. Recent work has also shown the interaction of the circadian clock and enhancers in β-cells, indicating a highly integrated regulation of transcription and cellular function by the circadian clock. Disruption of either the whole body or only the β-cell clock leads to significant impairment of mitochondrial function, uncoupling, impaired vesicular transport, oxidative stress in β-cells and finally impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and diabetes. In this review, we explore the role of the circadian clock in mitigating oxidative stress and preserving β-cell function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Synchrony and Desynchrony in Circadian Clocks: Impacts on Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Harini C.; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks evolved under conditions of environmental variation, primarily alternating light dark cycles, to enable organisms to anticipate daily environmental events and coordinate metabolic, physiological, and behavioral activities. However, modern lifestyle and advances in technology have increased the percentage of individuals working in…

  15. SCA1+ Cells from the Heart Possess a Molecular Circadian Clock and Display Circadian Oscillations in Cellular Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan C. Du Pré

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell antigen 1-positive (SCA1+ cells (SPCs have been investigated in cell-based cardiac repair and pharmacological research, although improved cardiac function after injection has been variable and the mode of action remains unclear. Circadian (24-hr rhythms are biorhythms regulated by molecular clocks that play an important role in (pathophysiology. Here, we describe (1 the presence of a molecular circadian clock in SPCs and (2 circadian rhythmicity in SPC function. We isolated SPCs from human fetal heart and found that these cells possess a molecular clock based on typical oscillations in core clock components BMAL1 and CRY1. Functional analyses revealed that circadian rhythmicity also governs SPC proliferation, stress tolerance, and growth factor release, with large differences between peaks and troughs. We conclude that SPCs contain a circadian molecular clock that controls crucial cellular functions. Taking circadian rhythms into account may improve reproducibility and outcome of research and therapies using SPCs.

  16. The Importance of the Circadian Clock in Regulating Plant Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin A Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are the primary energy source for plant development. Plants synthesize sucrose in source organs and transport them to sink organs during plant growth. This metabolism is sensitive to environmental changes in light quantity, quality, and photoperiod. In the daytime, the synthesis of sucrose and starch accumulates, and starch is degraded at nighttime. The circadian clock genes provide plants with information on the daily environmental changes and directly control many developmental processes, which are related to the path of primary metabolites throughout the life cycle. The circadian clock mechanism and processes of metabolism controlled by the circadian rhythm were studied in the model plant Arabidopsis and in the crops potato and rice. However, the translation of molecular mechanisms obtained from studies of model plants to crop plants is still difficult. Crop plants have specific organs such as edible seed and tuber that increase the size or accumulate valuable metabolites by harvestable metabolic components. Human consumers are interested in the regulation and promotion of these agriculturally significant crops. Circadian clock manipulation may suggest various strategies for the increased productivity of food crops through using environmental signal or overcoming environmental stress.

  17. The circadian clock modulates anti-cancer properties of curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Ashapurna; Sharma, Vishal P.; Sarkar, Arindam B.; Sekar, M. Chandra; Samuel, Karunakar; Geusz, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Curcuminoids of the spice turmeric and their enhanced derivatives have much potential as cancer treatments. They act on a wide variety of biological pathways, including those regulating cell division and circadian rhythms. It is known that circadian clocks can modify cancer therapy effectiveness, according to studies aimed at optimizing treatments based on the circadian cycle. It is therefore important to determine whether treatments with curcumin or similar chemotherapeutic agents are regulated by circadian timing. Similarly, it is important to characterize any effects of curcumin on timing abilities of the circadian clocks within cancer cells. We examined the circadian clock’s impact on the timing of cell death and cell division in curcumin-treated C6 rat glioma cells through continuous video microscopy for several days. To evaluate its persistence and distribution in cancer cells, curcumin was localized within cell compartments by imaging its autofluorescence. Finally, HPLC and spectroscopy were used to determine the relative stabilities of the curcumin congeners demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin that are present in turmeric. Circadian rhythms in cell death were observed in response to low (5 μM) curcumin, reaching a peak several hours before the peak in rhythmic expression of mPER2 protein, a major circadian clock component. These results revealed a sensitive phase of the circadian cycle that could be effectively targeted in patient therapies based on curcumin or its analogs. Curcumin fluorescence was observed in cell compartments at least 24 h after treatment, and the two congeners displayed greater stability than curcumin in cell culture medium. We propose a mechanism whereby curcuminoids act in a sustained manner, over several days, despite their tendency to degrade rapidly in blood and other aqueous media. During cancer therapy, curcumin or its analogs should be delivered to tumor cells at the optimal phase for highest efficacy after identifying

  18. Animal activity around the clock with no overt circadian rhythms: patterns, mechanisms and adaptive value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Guy; Barnes, Brian M.; Gerkema, Menno P.; Helm, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are ubiquitous in many organisms. Animals that are forced to be active around the clock typically show reduced performance, health and survival. Nevertheless, we review evidence of animals showing prolonged intervals of activity with attenuated or nil overt circadian rhythms and no apparent ill effects. We show that around-the-clock and ultradian activity patterns are more common than is generally appreciated, particularly in herbivores, in animals inhabiting polar regions and habitats with constant physical environments, in animals during specific life-history stages (such as migration or reproduction), and in highly social animals. The underlying mechanisms are diverse, but studies suggest that some circadian pacemakers continue to measure time in animals active around the clock. The prevalence of around-the-clock activity in diverse animals and habitats, and an apparent diversity of underlying mechanisms, are consistent with convergent evolution. We suggest that the basic organizational principles of the circadian system and its complexity encompass the potential for chronobiological plasticity. There may be trade-offs between benefits of persistent daily rhythms versus plasticity, which for reasons still poorly understood make overt daily arrhythmicity functionally adaptive only in selected habitats and for selected lifestyles. PMID:23825202

  19. Non-circadian expression masking clock-driven weak transcription rhythms in U2OS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hoffmann

    Full Text Available U2OS cells harbor a circadian clock but express only a few rhythmic genes in constant conditions. We identified 3040 binding sites of the circadian regulators BMAL1, CLOCK and CRY1 in the U2OS genome. Most binding sites even in promoters do not correlate with detectable rhythmic transcript levels. Luciferase fusions reveal that the circadian clock supports robust but low amplitude transcription rhythms of representative promoters. However, rhythmic transcription of these potentially clock-controlled genes is masked by non-circadian transcription that overwrites the weaker contribution of the clock in constant conditions. Our data suggest that U2OS cells harbor an intrinsically rather weak circadian oscillator. The oscillator has the potential to regulate a large number of genes. The contribution of circadian versus non-circadian transcription is dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and may determine the apparent complexity of the circadian transcriptome.

  20. Daily changes in temperature, not the circadian clock, regulate growth rate in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick A Matos

    Full Text Available Plant growth is commonly regulated by external cues such as light, temperature, water availability, and internal cues generated by the circadian clock. Changes in the rate of growth within the course of a day have been observed in the leaves, stems, and roots of numerous species. However, the relative impact of the circadian clock on the growth of grasses has not been thoroughly characterized. We examined the influence of diurnal temperature and light changes, and that of the circadian clock on leaf length growth patterns in Brachypodium distachyon using high-resolution time-lapse imaging. Pronounced changes in growth rate were observed under combined photocyles and thermocycles or with thermocycles alone. A considerably more rapid growth rate was observed at 28°C than 12°C, irrespective of the presence or absence of light. In spite of clear circadian clock regulated gene expression, plants exhibited no change in growth rate under conditions of constant light and temperature, and little or no effect under photocycles alone. Therefore, temperature appears to be the primary cue influencing observed oscillations in growth rate and not the circadian clock or photoreceptor activity. Furthermore, the size of the leaf meristem and final cell length did not change in response to changes in temperature. Therefore, the nearly five-fold difference in growth rate observed across thermocycles can be attributed to proportionate changes in the rate of cell division and expansion. A better understanding of the growth cues in B. distachyon will further our ability to model metabolism and biomass accumulation in grasses.

  1. Insulin post-transcriptionally modulates Bmal1 protein to affect the hepatic circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Fabin; Sun, Xiujie; Ma, Xiang; Wu, Rong; Zhang, Deyi; Chen, Yaqiong; Xu, Qian; Wu, Yuting; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Although food availability is a potent synchronizer of the peripheral circadian clock in mammals, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that hepatic Bmal1, a core transcription activator of the molecular clock, is post-transcriptionally regulated by signals from insulin, an important hormone that is temporally controlled by feeding. Insulin promotes postprandial Akt-mediated Ser42-phosphorylation of Bmal1 to induce its dissociation from DNA, interaction with 14-3-3 protein and subsequently nuclear exclusion, which results in the suppression of Bmal1 transcriptional activity. Inverted feeding cycles not only shift the phase of daily insulin oscillation, but also elevate the amplitude due to food overconsumption. This enhanced and reversed insulin signalling initiates the reset of clock gene rhythms by altering Bmal1 nuclear accumulation in mouse liver. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of insulin signalling in regulating peripheral circadian rhythms. PMID:27576939

  2. Melanopsin resets circadian rhythms in cells by inducing clock gene Period1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shuhei; Uehara, Tomoe; Matsuo, Minako; Kikuchi, Yo; Numano, Rika

    2014-02-01

    The biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes are under the control of internal clocks with the period of approximately 24 hr, circadian rhythms. The expression of clock gene Period1 (Per1) oscillates autonomously in cells and is induced immediately after a light pulse. Per1 is an indispensable member of the central clock system to maintain the autonomous oscillator and synchronize environmental light cycle. Per1 expression could be detected by Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP plasmid DNA in which firefly luciferase and Green Fluorescence Protein were rhythmically expressed under the control of the mouse Per1 promoter in order to monitor mammalian circadian rhythms. Membrane protein, MELANOPSIN is activated by blue light in the morning on the retina and lead to signals transduction to induce Per1 expression and to reset the phase of circadian rhythms. In this report Per1 induction was measured by reporter signal assay in Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP fibroblast cell at the input process of circadian rhythms. To the result all process to reset the rhythms by Melanopsin is completed in single cell like in the retina projected to the central clock in the brain. Moreover, the phase of circadian rhythm in Per1∷luc cells is synchronized by photo-activated Melanopsin, because the definite peak of luciferase activity in one dish was found one day after light illumination. That is an available means that physiological circadian rhythms could be real-time monitor as calculable reporter (bioluminescent and fluorescent) chronological signal in both single and groups of cells.

  3. Robustness from flexibility in the fungal circadian clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akman Ozgur E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robustness is a central property of living systems, enabling function to be maintained against environmental perturbations. A key challenge is to identify the structures in biological circuits that confer system-level properties such as robustness. Circadian clocks allow organisms to adapt to the predictable changes of the 24-hour day/night cycle by generating endogenous rhythms that can be entrained to the external cycle. In all organisms, the clock circuits typically comprise multiple interlocked feedback loops controlling the rhythmic expression of key genes. Previously, we showed that such architectures increase the flexibility of the clock's rhythmic behaviour. We now test the relationship between flexibility and robustness, using a mathematical model of the circuit controlling conidiation in the fungus Neurospora crassa. Results The circuit modelled in this work consists of a central negative feedback loop, in which the frequency (frq gene inhibits its transcriptional activator white collar-1 (wc-1, interlocked with a positive feedback loop in which FRQ protein upregulates WC-1 production. Importantly, our model reproduces the observed entrainment of this circuit under light/dark cycles with varying photoperiod and cycle duration. Our simulations show that whilst the level of frq mRNA is driven directly by the light input, the falling phase of FRQ protein, a molecular correlate of conidiation, maintains a constant phase that is uncoupled from the times of dawn and dusk. The model predicts the behaviour of mutants that uncouple WC-1 production from FRQ's positive feedback, and shows that the positive loop enhances the buffering of conidiation phase against seasonal photoperiod changes. This property is quantified using Kitano's measure for the overall robustness of a regulated system output. Further analysis demonstrates that this functional robustness is a consequence of the greater evolutionary flexibility conferred on

  4. Drosophila: An Emergent Model for Delineating Interactions between the Circadian Clock and Drugs of Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliza K. De Nobrega

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous circadian oscillators orchestrate rhythms at the cellular, physiological, and behavioral levels across species to coordinate activity, for example, sleep/wake cycles, metabolism, and learning and memory, with predictable environmental cycles. The 21st century has seen a dramatic rise in the incidence of circadian and sleep disorders with globalization, technological advances, and the use of personal electronics. The circadian clock modulates alcohol- and drug-induced behaviors with circadian misalignment contributing to increased substance use and abuse. Invertebrate models, such as Drosophila melanogaster, have proven invaluable for the identification of genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying highly conserved processes including the circadian clock, drug tolerance, and reward systems. In this review, we highlight the contributions of Drosophila as a model system for understanding the bidirectional interactions between the circadian system and the drugs of abuse, alcohol and cocaine, and illustrate the highly conserved nature of these interactions between Drosophila and mammalian systems. Research in Drosophila provides mechanistic insights into the corresponding behaviors in higher organisms and can be used as a guide for targeted inquiries in mammals.

  5. CULLIN-3 controls TIMELESS oscillations in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Grima

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic circadian clocks rely on transcriptional feedback loops. In Drosophila, the PERIOD (PER and TIMELESS (TIM proteins accumulate during the night, inhibit the activity of the CLOCK (CLK/CYCLE (CYC transcriptional complex, and are degraded in the early morning. The control of PER and TIM oscillations largely depends on post-translational mechanisms. They involve both light-dependent and light-independent pathways that rely on the phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of the clock proteins. SLMB, which is part of a CULLIN-1-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, is required for the circadian degradation of phosphorylated PER. We show here that CULLIN-3 (CUL-3 is required for the circadian control of PER and TIM oscillations. Expression of either Cul-3 RNAi or dominant negative forms of CUL-3 in the clock neurons alters locomotor behavior and dampens PER and TIM oscillations in light-dark cycles. In constant conditions, CUL-3 deregulation induces behavioral arrhythmicity and rapidly abolishes TIM cycling, with slower effects on PER. CUL-3 affects TIM accumulation more strongly in the absence of PER and forms protein complexes with hypo-phosphorylated TIM. In contrast, SLMB affects TIM more strongly in the presence of PER and preferentially associates with phosphorylated TIM. CUL-3 and SLMB show additive effects on TIM and PER, suggesting different roles for the two ubiquitination complexes on PER and TIM cycling. This work thus shows that CUL-3 is a new component of the Drosophila clock, which plays an important role in the control of TIM oscillations.

  6. Sexual Differentiation of Circadian Clock Function in the Adrenal Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloehn, Ian; Pillai, Savin B; Officer, Laurel; Klement, Claire; Gasser, Paul J; Evans, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in glucocorticoid production are associated with increased responsiveness of the adrenal gland in females. However, the adrenal-intrinsic mechanisms that establish sexual dimorphic function remain ill defined. Glucocorticoid production is gated at the molecular level by the circadian clock, which may contribute to sexual dimorphic adrenal function. Here we examine sex differences in the adrenal gland using an optical reporter of circadian clock function. Adrenal glands were cultured from male and female Period2::Luciferase (PER2::LUC) mice to assess clock function in vitro in real time. We confirm that there is a pronounced sex difference in the intrinsic capacity to sustain PER2::LUC rhythms in vitro, with higher amplitude rhythms in adrenal glands collected from males than from females. Changes in adrenal PER2::LUC rhythms over the reproductive life span implicate T as an important factor in driving sex differences in adrenal clock function. By directly manipulating hormone levels in adult mice in vivo, we demonstrate that T increases the amplitude of PER2::LUC rhythms in adrenal glands of both male and female mice. In contrast, we find little evidence that ovarian hormones modify adrenal clock function. Lastly, we find that T in vitro can increase the amplitude of PER2::LUC rhythms in male adrenals but not female adrenals, which suggests the existence of sex differences in the mechanisms of T action in vivo. Collectively these results reveal that activational effects of T alter circadian timekeeping in the adrenal gland, which may have implications for sex differences in stress reactivity and stress-related disorders.

  7. Circadian Biology: Uncoupling Human Body Clocks by Food Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Celine; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-07-10

    Synchrony of circadian rhythms between tissues/organs appears critical for health. A new study reports that meal timing, a modifiable temporal cue for the circadian system, can selectively uncouple circadian rhythms in metabolic physiology from the central circadian clock in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Combination of Light and Melatonin Time Cues for Phase Advancing the Human Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Photic and non-photic stimuli have been shown to shift the phase of the human circadian clock. We examined how photic and non-photic time cues may be combined by the human circadian system by assessing the phase advancing effects of one evening dose of exogenous melatonin, alone and in combination with one session of morning bright light exposure. Design: Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind circadian protocol. The effects of four conditions, dim light (∼1.9 lux, ∼0.6 Watts/m2)-placebo, dim light-melatonin (5 mg), bright light (∼3000 lux, ∼7 Watts/m2)-placebo, and bright light-melatonin on circadian phase was assessed by the change in the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) prior to and following treatment under constant routine conditions. Melatonin or placebo was administered 5.75 h prior to habitual bedtime and 3 h of bright light exposure started 1 h prior to habitual wake time. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory environment free of time cues. Participants: Thirty-six healthy participants (18 females) aged 22 ± 4 y (mean ± SD). Results: Morning bright light combined with early evening exogenous melatonin induced a greater phase advance of the DLMO than either treatment alone. Bright light alone and melatonin alone induced similar phase advances. Conclusion: Information from light and melatonin appear to be combined by the human circadian clock. The ability to combine circadian time cues has important implications for understanding fundamental physiological principles of the human circadian timing system. Knowledge of such principles is important for designing effective countermeasures for phase-shifting the human circadian clock to adapt to jet lag, shift work, and for designing effective treatments for circadian sleep-wakefulness disorders. Citation: Burke TM; Markwald RR; Chinoy ED; Snider JA; Bessman SC; Jung CM; Wright Jr KP. Combination of light and melatonin time cues for phase advancing the human circadian

  9. Regulation of circadian clock transcriptional output by CLOCK:BMAL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Alexandra J; Menet, Jerome S

    2018-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock relies on the transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 to coordinate the rhythmic expression of 15% of the transcriptome and control the daily regulation of biological functions. The recent characterization of CLOCK:BMAL1 cistrome revealed that although CLOCK:BMAL1 binds synchronously to all of its target genes, its transcriptional output is highly heterogeneous. By performing a meta-analysis of several independent genome-wide datasets, we found that the binding of other transcription factors at CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers likely contribute to the heterogeneity of CLOCK:BMAL1 transcriptional output. While CLOCK:BMAL1 rhythmic DNA binding promotes rhythmic nucleosome removal, it is not sufficient to generate transcriptionally active enhancers as assessed by H3K27ac signal, RNA Polymerase II recruitment, and eRNA expression. Instead, the transcriptional activity of CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers appears to rely on the activity of ubiquitously expressed transcription factors, and not tissue-specific transcription factors, recruited at nearby binding sites. The contribution of other transcription factors is exemplified by how fasting, which effects several transcription factors but not CLOCK:BMAL1, either decreases or increases the amplitude of many rhythmically expressed CLOCK:BMAL1 target genes. Together, our analysis suggests that CLOCK:BMAL1 promotes a transcriptionally permissive chromatin landscape that primes its target genes for transcription activation rather than directly activating transcription, and provides a new framework to explain how environmental or pathological conditions can reprogram the rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes.

  10. Immunoreactivities to three circadian clock proteins in two ground crickets suggest interspecific diversity of the circadian clock structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shao, Q. M.; Sehadová, H.; Ichihara, N.; Sehnal, František; Takeda, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2006), s. 118-131 ISSN 0748-7304 Grant - others:Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JP) JSPS 99L01205; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JP) ID No. P 04197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : circadian rhythm * photoperiodic clock * cryptochrome (CRY) Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.633, year: 2006

  11. On the genetic basis of temperature compensation of circadian clocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (Feldman and Hoyle 1973), the molecular mechanisms regulating circadian rhythms began to become clear. The consensus view is that the molecular mechanism underlying circadian rhythms involves two interlocked feedback loops based on transcription-translation controls (Sharma 2003a). Since the identification of ...

  12. The endogenous circadian clock programs animals to eat at certain times of the 24-hour day: What if we ignore the clock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Turek, Fred W

    2018-04-16

    The discovery of the molecular mechanisms underlying the circadian clock, which functions in virtually every cell throughout the body to coordinate biological processes to anticipate and better adapt to daily rhythmic changes in the environment, is one of the major biomedical breakthroughs in the 20th century. Twenty years after this breakthrough, the biomedical community is now at a new frontier to incorporate the circadian clock mechanisms into many areas of biomedical research, as studies continue to reveal an important role of the circadian clock in a wide range of biological functions and diseases. A forefront of this exciting area is the research of interactions between the clock and energy metabolism. In this review, we summarize animal and human studies linking disruptions of the circadian clock, either environmental or genetic, to metabolic dysfunctions associated with obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic disorders. We also discuss how these advances in circadian biology may pave the way to revolutionize clinical practice in the era of precision medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Involvement of posttranscriptional regulation ofClockin the emergence of circadian clock oscillation during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Yasuhiro; Koike, Nobuya; Ohashi, Munehiro; Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Meng, Qing Jun; Minami, Yoichi; Hara, Masayuki; Hisatomi, Moe; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2017-09-05

    Circadian clock oscillation emerges in mouse embryo in the later developmental stages. Although circadian clock development is closely correlated with cellular differentiation, the mechanisms of its emergence during mammalian development are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate an essential role of the posttranscriptional regulation of Clock subsequent to the cellular differentiation for the emergence of circadian clock oscillation in mouse fetal hearts and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). In mouse fetal hearts, no apparent oscillation of cell-autonomous molecular clock was detectable around E10, whereas oscillation was clearly visible in E18 hearts. Temporal RNA-sequencing analysis using mouse fetal hearts reveals many fewer rhythmic genes in E10-12 hearts (63, no core circadian genes) than in E17-19 hearts (483 genes), suggesting the lack of functional circadian transcriptional/translational feedback loops (TTFLs) of core circadian genes in E10 mouse fetal hearts. In both ESCs and E10 embryos, CLOCK protein was absent despite the expression of Clock mRNA, which we showed was due to Dicer/Dgcr8 -dependent translational suppression of CLOCK. The CLOCK protein is required for the discernible molecular oscillation in differentiated cells, and the posttranscriptional regulation of Clock plays a role in setting the timing for the emergence of the circadian clock oscillation during mammalian development.

  14. NPAS2 Compensates for Loss of CLOCK in Peripheral Circadian Oscillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Landgraf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 are the major transcriptional activators of the mammalian circadian clock. Because the paralog NPAS2 can substitute for CLOCK in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master circadian pacemaker, CLOCK-deficient mice maintain circadian rhythms in behavior and in tissues in vivo. However, when isolated from the SCN, CLOCK-deficient peripheral tissues are reportedly arrhythmic, suggesting a fundamental difference in circadian clock function between SCN and peripheral tissues. Surprisingly, however, using luminometry and single-cell bioluminescence imaging of PER2 expression, we now find that CLOCK-deficient dispersed SCN neurons and peripheral cells exhibit similarly stable, autonomous circadian rhythms in vitro. In CLOCK-deficient fibroblasts, knockdown of Npas2 leads to arrhythmicity, suggesting that NPAS2 can compensate for loss of CLOCK in peripheral cells as well as in SCN. Our data overturn the notion of an SCN-specific role for NPAS2 in the molecular circadian clock, and instead indicate that, at the cellular level, the core loops of SCN neuron and peripheral cell circadian clocks are fundamentally similar.

  15. Regulation of behavioral circadian rhythms and clock protein PER1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Bédard, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous 24-hour rhythms are generated by circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock...

  16. Bone Resorption Is Regulated by Circadian Clock in Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Takeshi; Xu, Cheng; Ochi, Hiroki; Nakazato, Ryota; Yamada, Daisuke; Nakamura, Saki; Kodama, Ayumi; Shimba, Shigeki; Mieda, Michihiro; Fukasawa, Kazuya; Ozaki, Kakeru; Iezaki, Takashi; Fujikawa, Koichi; Yoneda, Yukio; Numano, Rika; Hida, Akiko; Tei, Hajime; Takeda, Shu; Hinoi, Eiichi

    2017-04-01

    We have previously shown that endochondral ossification is finely regulated by the Clock system expressed in chondrocytes during postnatal skeletogenesis. Here we show a sophisticated modulation of bone resorption and bone mass by the Clock system through its expression in bone-forming osteoblasts. Brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein 1 (Bmal1) and Period1 (Per1) were expressed with oscillatory rhythmicity in the bone in vivo, and circadian rhythm was also observed in cultured osteoblasts of Per1::luciferase transgenic mice. Global deletion of murine Bmal1, a core component of the Clock system, led to a low bone mass, associated with increased bone resorption. This phenotype was recapitulated by the deletion of Bmal1 in osteoblasts alone. Co-culture experiments revealed that Bmal1-deficient osteoblasts have a higher ability to support osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ]-induced receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (Rankl) expression was more strongly enhanced in both Bmal1-deficient bone and cultured osteoblasts, whereas overexpression of Bmal1/Clock conversely inhibited it in osteoblasts. These results suggest that bone resorption and bone mass are regulated at a sophisticated level by osteoblastic Clock system through a mechanism relevant to the modulation of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -induced Rankl expression in osteoblasts. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  17. Circadian rhythms of fetal liver transcription persist in the absence of canonical circadian clock gene expression rhythms in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwei Li

    Full Text Available The cellular circadian clock and systemic cues drive rhythmicity in the transcriptome of adult peripheral tissues. However, the oscillating status of the circadian clocks in fetal tissues, and their response to maternal cues, are less clear. Most clock genes do not cycle in fetal livers from mice and rats, although tissue level rhythms rapidly emerge when fetal mouse liver explants are cultured in vitro. Thus, in the fetal mouse liver, the circadian clock does not oscillate at the cellular level (but is induced to oscillate in culture. To gain a comprehensive overview of the clock status in the fetal liver during late gestation, we performed microarray analyses on fetal liver tissues. In the fetal liver we did not observe circadian rhythms of clock gene expression or many other transcripts known to be rhythmically expressed in the adult liver. Nevertheless, JTK_CYCLE analysis identified some transcripts in the fetal liver that were rhythmically expressed, albeit at low amplitudes. Upon data filtering by coefficient of variation, the expression levels for transcripts related to pancreatic exocrine enzymes and zymogen secretion were found to undergo synchronized daily fluctuations at high amplitudes. These results suggest that maternal cues influence the fetal liver, despite the fact that we did not detect circadian rhythms of canonical clock gene expression in the fetal liver. These results raise important questions on the role of the circadian clock, or lack thereof, during ontogeny.

  18. Role for circadian clock genes in seasonal timing: testing the Bünning hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Pegoraro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A major question in chronobiology focuses around the "Bünning hypothesis" which implicates the circadian clock in photoperiodic (day-length measurement and is supported in some systems (e.g. plants but disputed in others. Here, we used the seasonally-regulated thermotolerance of Drosophila melanogaster to test the role of various clock genes in day-length measurement. In Drosophila, freezing temperatures induce reversible chill coma, a narcosis-like state. We have corroborated previous observations that wild-type flies developing under short photoperiods (winter-like exhibit significantly shorter chill-coma recovery times (CCRt than flies that were raised under long (summer-like photoperiods. Here, we show that arrhythmic mutant strains, per01, tim01 and ClkJrk, as well as variants that speed up or slow down the circadian period, disrupt the photoperiodic component of CCRt. Our results support an underlying circadian function mediating seasonal daylength measurement and indicate that clock genes are tightly involved in photo- and thermo-periodic measurements.

  19. Characterisation, analysis of expression and localisation of circadian clock genes from the perspective of photoperiodism in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberà, Miquel; Collantes-Alegre, Jorge Mariano; Martínez-Torres, David

    2017-04-01

    Aphids are typical photoperiodic insects that switch from viviparous parthenogenetic reproduction typical of long day seasons to oviparous sexual reproduction triggered by the shortening of photoperiod in autumn yielding an overwintering egg in which an embryonic diapause takes place. While the involvement of the circadian clock genes in photoperiodism in mammals is well established, there is still some controversy on their participation in insects. The availability of the genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum places this species as an excellent model to investigate the involvement of the circadian system in the aphid seasonal response. In the present report, we have advanced in the characterisation of the circadian clock genes and showed that these genes display extensive alternative splicing. Moreover, the expression of circadian clock genes, analysed at different moments of the day, showed a robust cycling of central clock genes period and timeless. Furthermore, the rhythmic expression of these genes was shown to be rapidly dampened under DD (continuous darkness conditions), thus supporting the model of a seasonal response based on a heavily dampened circadian oscillator. Additionally, increased expression of some of the circadian clock genes under short-day conditions suggest their involvement in the induction of the aphid seasonal response. Finally, in situ localisation of transcripts of genes period and timeless in the aphid brain revealed the site of clock neurons for the first time in aphids. Two groups of clock cells were identified: the Dorsal Neurons (DN) and the Lateral Neurons (LN), both in the protocerebrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The circadian clock-associated gene zea mays gigantea1 affects maize developmental transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The circadian clock is the internal timing mechanism that allows plants to make developmental decisions in accordance with environmental conditions. The genes of the maize circadian clock are not well defined. Gigantea (gi) genes are conserved across flowering plants, including maize. In model plant...

  1. Diurnal modulation of pacemaker potentials and calcium current in the mammalian circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennartz, C.M.A.; De Jeu, M.T.G.; Bos, N.P.A.; Schaap, J.; Geurtsen, A.M.S.

    2002-01-01

    The central biological clock of the mammalian brain is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This hypothalamic region contains neurons that generate a circadian rhythm on a single-cell basis. Clock cells transmit their circadian timing signals to other brain areas by diurnal modulation of their

  2. Direct regulation of myocardial triglyceride metabolism by the cardiomyocyte circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maintenance of circadian alignment between an organism and its environment is essential to ensure metabolic homeostasis. Synchrony is achieved by cell autonomous circadian clocks. Despite a growing appreciation of the integral relation between clocks and metabolism, little is known regarding the dir...

  3. The Clock Gene Rev-Erbα Regulates Methamphetamine Actions on Circadian Timekeeping in the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaberry, Nora L; Mateo, Maria; Mendoza, Jorge

    2017-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are strongly affected by drugs. In rodents, chronic methamphetamine (METH) intake changes circadian activity rhythms, mainly by altering light synchronization that generates the expression of a free-running rhythm with a period longer than 24 h and a second behavioral component that is independent of the main suprachiasmatic (SCN) clock. Although a number of clock genes do not appear to be involved in the effects of METH on circadian behavior, the molecular clockwork controlling these changes is still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the role of the clock gene Rev-Erbα in METH-induced behavioral and molecular responses using knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Chronic intake of METH alters period circadian behavior of wild-type mice. However, in mice lacking the clock gene Rev-Erbα METH had no effect on their behavioral rhythms. Furthermore, PER2 bioluminescence rhythms in two extra-SCN brain oscillators, the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the habenula, were altered by METH in wild type but not in KO mice. Together, the present results implicate Rev-Erbα in the modulation of the circadian responses to METH and may provide a better comprehension into the mechanisms underlying circadian alterations provoked by drug addiction.

  4. Evidence for widespread dysregulation of circadian clock progression in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilts, Jarrod; Chen, Guanhua; Hughey, Jacob J

    2018-01-01

    The ubiquitous daily rhythms in mammalian physiology are guided by progression of the circadian clock. In mice, systemic disruption of the clock can promote tumor growth. In vitro , multiple oncogenes can disrupt the clock. However, due to the difficulties of studying circadian rhythms in solid tissues in humans, whether the clock is disrupted within human tumors has remained unknown. We sought to determine the state of the circadian clock in human cancer using publicly available transcriptome data. We developed a method, called the clock correlation distance (CCD), to infer circadian clock progression in a group of samples based on the co-expression of 12 clock genes. Our method can be applied to modestly sized datasets in which samples are not labeled with time of day and coverage of the circadian cycle is incomplete. We used the method to define a signature of clock gene co-expression in healthy mouse organs, then validated the signature in healthy human tissues. By then comparing human tumor and non-tumor samples from twenty datasets of a range of cancer types, we discovered that clock gene co-expression in tumors is consistently perturbed. Subsequent analysis of data from clock gene knockouts in mice suggested that perturbed clock gene co-expression in human cancer is not caused solely by the inactivation of clock genes. Furthermore, focusing on lung cancer, we found that human lung tumors showed systematic changes in expression in a large set of genes previously inferred to be rhythmic in healthy lung. Our findings suggest that clock progression is dysregulated in many solid human cancers and that this dysregulation could have broad effects on circadian physiology within tumors. In addition, our approach opens the door to using publicly available data to infer circadian clock progression in a multitude of human phenotypes.

  5. The clock gene cycle plays an important role in the circadian clock of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryu, Outa; Karpova, Svetlana G; Tomioka, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    To dissect the molecular oscillatory mechanism of the circadian clock in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, we have cloned a cDNA of the clock gene cycle (Gb'cyc) and analyzed its structure and function. Gb'cyc contains four functional domains, i.e. bHLH, PAS-A, PAS-B and BCTR domains, and is expressed rhythmically in light dark cycles, peaking at mid night. The RNA interference (RNAi) of Clock (Gb'Clk) and period (Gb'per) reduced the Gb'cyc mRNA levels and abolished the rhythmic expression, suggesting that the rhythmic expression of Gb'cyc is regulated by a mechanism including Gb'Clk and Gb'per. These features are more similar to those of mammalian orthologue of cyc (Bmal1) than those of Drosophila cyc. A single treatment with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) of Gb'cyc effectively knocked down the Gb'cyc mRNA level and abolished its rhythmic expression. The cyc RNAi failed to disrupt the locomotor rhythm, but lengthened its free-running period in constant darkness (DD). It is thus likely that Gb'cyc is involved in the circadian clock machinery of the cricket. The cyc RNAi crickets showed a rhythmic expression of Gb'per and timeless (Gb'tim) in the optic lobe in DD, explaining the persistence of the locomotor rhythm. Surprisingly, cyc RNAi revealed a rhythmic expression of Gb'Clk in DD which is otherwise rather constitutively expressed in the optic lobe. These facts suggest that the cricket might have a unique clock oscillatory mechanism in which both Gb'cyc and Gb'Clk are rhythmically controlled and that under abundant expression of Gb'cyc the rhythmic expression of Gb'Clk may be concealed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clocks for sex: loss of circadian rhythms in ants after mating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Lone, Shahnaz Rahman; Goel, Anubhuthi

    This paper describes experiments on the locomotor activity rhythm of queens of the ant species Camponotus compressus, which were performed to investigate the consequences of mating on circadian clocks. Locomotor activity rhythm of virgin and mated queens was monitored individually under constant conditions of the laboratory. The locomotor activity rhythm of virgin queens entrained to a 24 h (12:12 h) laboratory light/dark (LD) cycle and free-ran under constant dim red light (RR) with a free-running period (τ) of approximately 24 h. The locomotor activity of the mated queens on the other hand was arrhythmic during the period when they were laying eggs, and robust rhythmicity appeared soon after the egg-laying phase was over. The τ of the locomotor activity rhythm of mated queens was significantly greater than that of virgin queens. These results are contrary to the commonly held belief that the role of circadian clocks in ant queens ceases after mating flights, thus suggesting that circadian clocks of ant queens are adaptively plastic and display activity patterns, perhaps depending on their physiological state and tasks in the colony.

  7. Gremlin-2 is a BMP antagonist that is regulated by the circadian clock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Gossan, Nicole; Lu, Yinhui

    2014-01-01

    knowledge of tendon gene regulation is essential for a complete understanding of FCT biology. Here we show autonomous circadian rhythms in mouse tendon and primary human tenocytes, controlled by an intrinsic molecular circadian clock. Time-series microarrays identified the first circadian transcriptome...

  8. Domestication selected for deceleration of the circadian clock in cultivated tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Niels A.; Wijnen, Cris L.; Srinivasan, Arunkumar; Ryngajllo, M.; Ofner, I.; Lin, Tao; Ranjan, Aashish; West, Donelly; Maloof, J.N.; Sinha, Neelima R.; Huang, Sanwen; Zamir, Dani; Jimenez-Gomez, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a critical regulator of plant physiology and development, controlling key agricultural traits in crop plants1. In addition, natural variation in circadian rhythms is important for local adaptation2, 3, 4. However, quantitative modulation of circadian rhythms due to artificial

  9. Circadian-clock system in mouse liver affected by insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Tseng, Huey-Lin; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2013-07-01

    Circadian rhythms are exhibited in the physiological and behavioral processes of all mammals; they are generated by intracellular levels of circadian oscillators, which are named as a set of circadian-clock genes. These genes compose the transcriptional/translational feedback loops to regulate not only circadian rhythmicity, but also energy metabolism. Previous studies have shown that obesity and diabetes cause the dysregulation of the circadian-clock system, and vice versa. However, some diabetes subjects are lean with insulin resistance and the mechanisms of insulin resistance without obesity are much less well known. Therefore, whether insulin resistance alone is enough to influence the expression of circadian-clock genes is uncertain. This study employs a neonatal streptozotocin (STZ)-treated paradigm in mice to model the molecular and physiological progress of nonobese insulin resistance. A single injection of STZ into 2-d-old male C57BL/6 mice induces nonobese, hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic conditions, and the levels of gene expression in the liver by a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction are then measured. Although the levels of Bmal1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1), Per2 (period 2), and Cry1 (cryptochrome 1) mRNA expression in the liver change during the progress of insulin resistance conditions, the gene expression patterns still show circadian rhythmicity. This study suggests that changes in the hepatic circadian-clock gene expression mark an early event in the metabolic disruption associated with insulin resistance. Furthermore, 2 wks of treatment with the thiazolidinedione, pioglitazone, fully resolve the dysfunction in metabolic parameters and the changes in circadian-clock gene expression from early insulin resistance conditions. These results indicate that the circadian-clock system is sensitive to insulin resistance, and that treatment with thiazolidinediones can resolve changes in the circadian-clock system in a timely

  10. Peripheral CLOCK regulates target-tissue glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity in a circadian fashion in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Charmandari

    Full Text Available Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the "master" circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral "slave" counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans.We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs as non-synchronized controls.GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo.Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night.

  11. Peripheral CLOCK Regulates Target-Tissue Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity in a Circadian Fashion in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.; Lambrou, George I.; Pavlaki, Aikaterini; Koide, Hisashi; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Kino, Tomoshige

    2011-01-01

    Context and Objective Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the “master” circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral “slave” counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. Design and Participants We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs) as non-synchronized controls. Results GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. Conclusions Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night. PMID:21980503

  12. A central role for ubiquitination within a circadian clock protein modification code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina eStojkovic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms, endogenous cycles of about 24 h in physiology, are generated by a master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and other clocks located in the brain and peripheral tissues. Circadian disruption is known to increase the incidence of various illnesses, such as mental disorders, metabolic syndrome and cancer. At the molecular level, periodicity is established by a set of clock genes via autoregulatory translation-transcription feedback loops. This clock mechanism is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination, which set the pace of the clock. Ubiquitination in particular has been found to regulate the stability of core clock components, but also other clock protein functions. Mutation of genes encoding ubiquitin ligases can cause either elongation or shortening of the endogenous circadian period. Recent research has also started to uncover roles for deubiquitination in the molecular clockwork. Here we review the role of the ubiquitin pathway in regulating the circadian clock and we propose that ubiquitination is a key element in a clock protein modification code that orchestrates clock mechanisms and circadian behavior over the daily cycle.

  13. Transcriptional architecture and chromatin landscape of the core circadian clock in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Nobuya; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Huang, Hung-Chung; Kumar, Vivek; Lee, Choogon; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2012-10-19

    The mammalian circadian clock involves a transcriptional feed back loop in which CLOCK and BMAL1 activate the Period and Cryptochrome genes, which then feedback and repress their own transcription. We have interrogated the transcriptional architecture of the circadian transcriptional regulatory loop on a genome scale in mouse liver and find a stereotyped, time-dependent pattern of transcription factor binding, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment, RNA expression, and chromatin states. We find that the circadian transcriptional cycle of the clock consists of three distinct phases: a poised state, a coordinated de novo transcriptional activation state, and a repressed state. Only 22% of messenger RNA (mRNA) cycling genes are driven by de novo transcription, suggesting that both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms underlie the mammalian circadian clock. We also find that circadian modulation of RNAPII recruitment and chromatin remodeling occurs on a genome-wide scale far greater than that seen previously by gene expression profiling.

  14. Interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian clock system: Importance for metabolic health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Latre, Aleix; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Background While additional research is needed, a number of large epidemiological studies show an association between circadian disruption and metabolic disorders. Specifically, obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and other signs of metabolic syndrome all have been linked to circadian disruption in humans. Studies in other species support this association and generally reveal that feeding that is not in phase with the external light/dark cycle, as often occurs with night or rotating shift workers, is disadvantageous in terms of energy balance. As food is a strong driver of circadian rhythms in the periphery, understanding how nutrient metabolism drives clocks across the body is important for dissecting out why circadian misalignment may produce such metabolic effects. A number of circadian clock proteins as well as their accessory proteins (such as nuclear receptors) are highly sensitive to nutrient metabolism. Macronutrients and micronutrients can function as zeitgebers for the clock in a tissue-specific way and can thus impair synchrony between clocks across the body, or potentially restore synchrony in the case of circadian misalignment. Circadian nuclear receptors are particularly sensitive to nutrient metabolism and can alter tissue-specific rhythms in response to changes in the diet. Finally, SNPs in human clock genes appear to be correlated with diet-specific responses and along with chronotype eventually may provide valuable information from a clinical perspective on how to use diet and nutrition to treat metabolic disorders. Scope of review This article presents a background of the circadian clock components and their interrelated metabolic and transcriptional feedback loops, followed by a review of some recent studies in humans and rodents that address the effects of nutrient metabolism on the circadian clock and vice versa. We focus on studies in which results suggest that nutrients provide an opportunity to restore or, alternatively

  15. Circadian clock dysfunction and psychiatric disease: could fruit flies have a say?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Agostino Zordan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence of a link between the circadian system and psychiatric diseases. Studies in humans and mammals suggest that environmental and/or genetic disruption of the circadian system lead to an increased liability to psychiatric disease. Disruption of clock genes and/or the clock network might be related to the etiology of these pathologies; also, some genes, known for their circadian clock functions, might be associated to mental illnesses through clock-independent pleiotropy. Here we examine the features which we believe make Drosophila melanogaster a model apt to study the role of the circadian clock in psychiatric disease. Despite differences in the organization of the clock system, the molecular architecture of the Drosophila and mammalian circadian oscillators are comparable and many components are evolutionarily related. In addition, Drosophila has a rather complex nervous system, which shares much at the cell and neurobiological level with humans, i.e. a tripartite brain, the main neurotransmitter systems, and behavioral traits: circadian behavior, learning and memory, motivation, addiction, social behavior. There is evidence that the Drosophila brain shares some homologies with the vertebrate cerebellum, basal ganglia and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, the dysfunctions of which have been tied to mental illness. We discuss Drosophila in comparison to mammals with reference to the: organization of the brain and neurotransmitter systems; architecture of the circadian clock; clock-controlled behaviors. We sum up current knowledge on behavioral endophenotypes which are amenable to modeling in flies, such as defects involving sleep, cognition, or social interactions and discuss the relationship of the circadian system to these traits. Finally, we consider if Drosophila could be a valuable asset to understand the relationship between circadian clock malfunction and psychiatric disease.

  16. Circadian Clock Dysfunction and Psychiatric Disease: Could Fruit Flies have a Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, Mauro Agostino; Sandrelli, Federica

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence of a link between the circadian system and psychiatric diseases. Studies in humans and mammals suggest that environmental and/or genetic disruption of the circadian system leads to an increased liability to psychiatric disease. Disruption of clock genes and/or the clock network might be related to the etiology of these pathologies; also, some genes, known for their circadian clock functions, might be associated to mental illnesses through clock-independent pleiotropy. Here, we examine the features which we believe make Drosophila melanogaster a model apt to study the role of the circadian clock in psychiatric disease. Despite differences in the organization of the clock system, the molecular architecture of the Drosophila and mammalian circadian oscillators are comparable and many components are evolutionarily related. In addition, Drosophila has a rather complex nervous system, which shares much at the cell and neurobiological level with humans, i.e., a tripartite brain, the main neurotransmitter systems, and behavioral traits: circadian behavior, learning and memory, motivation, addiction, social behavior. There is evidence that the Drosophila brain shares some homologies with the vertebrate cerebellum, basal ganglia, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, the dysfunctions of which have been tied to mental illness. We discuss Drosophila in comparison to mammals with reference to the: organization of the brain and neurotransmitter systems; architecture of the circadian clock; clock-controlled behaviors. We sum up current knowledge on behavioral endophenotypes, which are amenable to modeling in flies, such as defects involving sleep, cognition, or social interactions, and discuss the relationship of the circadian system to these traits. Finally, we consider if Drosophila could be a valuable asset to understand the relationship between circadian clock malfunction and psychiatric disease.

  17. Polyporus and Bupleuri radix effectively alter peripheral circadian clock phase acutely in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hiroaki; Sukigara, Haruna; Tahara, Yu; Saito, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Mayu; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-07-01

    In mammals, daily physiological events are precisely regulated by an internal circadian clock system. An important function of this system is to readjust the phase of the clock daily. In Japan, traditional herb medicines, so-called crude drugs (Shoyaku), are widely used for many diseases, and some are reported to affect circadian clock impairment, suggesting that some of them might have an ability to modify clock gene expression rhythms. Therefore, from selected 40 crude drugs, finding candidates that control the circadian clock phases was the first purpose of this study. As there are several crude drugs used for liver- and/or kidney-related diseases, the second aim of the present study was to find some crude drugs affecting liver/kidney circadian clock in vivo. To assess phase changes in the daily circadian rhythm, bioluminescence from the core clock gene product Period 2 was continuously monitored in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in some peripheral tissues (kidney, liver, and submandibular gland) of PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice in vivo. In our screening, Polyporus and Bupleuri radix were found to be good candidates to effectively manipulate the peripheral circadian clock phase acutely, with stimulation time-of-day dependency in vitro as well as in vivo. Interestingly, Polyporus and Bupleuri radix are traditional herb medicines use for treating edema and promoting diuresis, and for chronic hepatitis, respectively. These crude drugs may be therefore good modulators of the circadian peripheral clocks including liver and kidney, and circadian clock genes become new molecular targets for these crude drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Timing of neuropeptide coupling determines synchrony and entrainment in the mammalian circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Ananthasubramaniam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Robust synchronization is a critical feature of several systems including the mammalian circadian clock. The master circadian clock in mammals consists of about 20000 'sloppy' neuronal oscillators within the hypothalamus that keep robust time by synchronization driven by inter-neuronal coupling. The complete understanding of this synchronization in the mammalian circadian clock and the mechanisms underlying it remain an open question. Experiments and computational studies have shown that coupling individual oscillators can achieve robust synchrony, despite heterogeneity and different network topologies. But, much less is known regarding the mechanisms and circuits involved in achieving this coupling, due to both system complexity and experimental limitations. Here, we computationally study the coupling mediated by the primary coupling neuropeptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and its canonical receptor, VPAC2R, using the transcriptional elements and generic mode of VIP-VPAC2R signaling. We find that synchrony is only possible if VIP (an inducer of Per expression is released in-phase with activators of Per expression. Moreover, anti-phasic VIP release suppresses coherent rhythms by moving the network into a desynchronous state. Importantly, experimentally observed rhythms in VPAC2R have little effect on network synchronization, but can improve the amplitude of the SCN network rhythms while narrowing the network entrainment range. We further show that these findings are valid across several computational network models. Thus, we identified a general design principle to achieve robust synchronization: An activating coupling agent, such as VIP, must act in-phase with the activity of core-clock promoters. More generally, the phase of coupling is as critical as the strength of coupling from the viewpoint of synchrony and entrainment.

  19. Circadian clock gene Per2 is not necessary for the photoperiodic response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Ikegami

    Full Text Available In mammals, light information received by the eyes is transmitted to the pineal gland via the circadian pacemaker, i.e., the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Melatonin secreted by the pineal gland at night decodes night length and regulates seasonal physiology and behavior. Melatonin regulates the expression of the β-subunit of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; Tshb in the pars tuberalis (PT of the pituitary gland. Long day-induced PT TSH acts on ependymal cells in the mediobasal hypothalamus to induce the expression of type 2 deiodinase (Dio2 and reduce type 3 deiodinase (Dio3 that are thyroid hormone-activating and hormone-inactivating enzymes, respectively. The long day-activated thyroid hormone T3 regulates seasonal gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion. It is well established that the circadian clock is involved in the regulation of photoperiodism. However, the involvement of the circadian clock gene in photoperiodism regulation remains unclear. Although mice are generally considered non-seasonal animals, it was recently demonstrated that mice are a good model for the study of photoperiodism. In the present study, therefore, we examined the effect of changing day length in Per2 deletion mutant mice that show shorter wheel-running rhythms under constant darkness followed by arhythmicity. Although the amplitude of clock gene (Per1, Cry1 expression was greatly attenuated in the SCN, the expression profile of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, a rate-limiting melatonin synthesis enzyme, was unaffected in the pineal gland, and robust photoperiodic responses of the Tshb, Dio2, and Dio3 genes were observed. These results suggested that the Per2 clock gene is not necessary for the photoperiodic response in mice.

  20. Analysis of precision in chemical oscillators: implications for circadian clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Eysmond, Thomas; De Simone, Alessandro; Naef, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical reaction networks often exhibit spontaneous self-sustained oscillations. An example is the circadian oscillator that lies at the heart of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology in most organisms including humans. While the period of these oscillators evolved so that it resonates with the 24 h daily environmental cycles, the precision of the oscillator (quantified via the Q factor) is another relevant property of these cell-autonomous oscillators. Since this quantity can be measured in individual cells, it is of interest to better understand how this property behaves across mathematical models of these oscillators. Current theoretical schemes for computing the Q factors show limitations for both high-dimensional models and in the vicinity of Hopf bifurcations. Here, we derive low-noise approximations that lead to numerically stable schemes also in high-dimensional models. In addition, we generalize normal form reductions that are appropriate near Hopf bifurcations. Applying our approximations to two models of circadian clocks, we show that while the low-noise regime is faithfully recapitulated, increasing the level of noise leads to species-dependent precision. We emphasize that subcomponents of the oscillator gradually decouple from the core oscillator as noise increases, which allows us to identify the subnetworks responsible for robust rhythms. (paper)

  1. SKIP is a component of the spliceosome linking alternative splicing and the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-08-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5' and 3' splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level.

  2. Simple sequence repeats provide a substrate for phenotypic variation in the Neurospora crassa circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd P Michael

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available WHITE COLLAR-1 (WC-1 mediates interactions between the circadian clock and the environment by acting as both a core clock component and as a blue light photoreceptor in Neurospora crassa. Loss of the amino-terminal polyglutamine (NpolyQ domain in WC-1 results in an arrhythmic circadian clock; this data is consistent with this simple sequence repeat (SSR being essential for clock function.Since SSRs are often polymorphic in length across natural populations, we reasoned that investigating natural variation of the WC-1 NpolyQ may provide insight into its role in the circadian clock. We observed significant phenotypic variation in the period, phase and temperature compensation of circadian regulated asexual conidiation across 143 N. crassa accessions. In addition to the NpolyQ, we identified two other simple sequence repeats in WC-1. The sizes of all three WC-1 SSRs correlated with polymorphisms in other clock genes, latitude and circadian period length. Furthermore, in a cross between two N. crassa accessions, the WC-1 NpolyQ co-segregated with period length.Natural variation of the WC-1 NpolyQ suggests a mechanism by which period length can be varied and selected for by the local environment that does not deleteriously affect WC-1 activity. Understanding natural variation in the N.crassa circadian clock will facilitate an understanding of how fungi exploit their environments.

  3. Determining the Effect of Cryptochrome Loss and Circadian Clock Disruption on Tumorigenesis in Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gauger, Michele A

    2007-01-01

    .... We have previously reported that circadian clock disruption by loss of Cryptochrome expression does not cause DNA damage checkpoint or repair defects in mammalian fibroblasts, nor does it cause...

  4. Circadian oscillations of molecular clock components in the cerebellar cortex of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The central circadian clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the circadian clockwork of the SCN constitutes a self-sustained autoregulatory feedback mechanism reflected by the rhythmic expression of clock genes. However......, recent studies have shown the presence of extrahypothalamic oscillators in other areas of the brain including the cerebellum. In the present study, the authors unravel the cerebellar molecular clock by analyzing clock gene expression in the cerebellum of the rat by use of radiochemical in situ...... hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The authors here show that all core clock genes, i.e., Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Clock, Arntl, and Nr1d1, as well as the clock-controlled gene Dbp, are expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of the cerebellar cortex. Among...

  5. Cell type-specific functions of period genes revealed by novel adipocyte and hepatocyte circadian clock models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidambaram Ramanathan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In animals, circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior result from coherent rhythmic interactions between clocks in the brain and those throughout the body. Despite the many tissue specific clocks, most understanding of the molecular core clock mechanism comes from studies of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN of the hypothalamus and a few other cell types. Here we report establishment and genetic characterization of three cell-autonomous mouse clock models: 3T3 fibroblasts, 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and MMH-D3 hepatocytes. Each model is genetically tractable and has an integrated luciferase reporter that allows for longitudinal luminescence recording of rhythmic clock gene expression using an inexpensive off-the-shelf microplate reader. To test these cellular models, we generated a library of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against a panel of known clock genes and evaluated their impact on circadian rhythms. Knockdown of Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, and Cry2 each resulted in similar phenotypes in all three models, consistent with previous studies. However, we observed cell type-specific knockdown phenotypes for the Period and Rev-Erb families of clock genes. In particular, Per1 and Per2, which have strong behavioral effects in knockout mice, appear to play different roles in regulating period length and amplitude in these peripheral systems. Per3, which has relatively modest behavioral effects in knockout mice, substantially affects period length in the three cellular models and in dissociated SCN neurons. In summary, this study establishes new cell-autonomous clock models that are of particular relevance to metabolism and suitable for screening for clock modifiers, and reveals previously under-appreciated cell type-specific functions of clock genes.

  6. The Importance of Stochastic Effects for Explaining Entrainment in the Zebrafish Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela Heussen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a pivotal role in modulating physiological processes and has been implicated, either directly or indirectly, in a range of pathological states including cancer. Here we investigate how the circadian clock is entrained by external cues such as light. Working with zebrafish cell lines and combining light pulse experiments with simulation efforts focused on the role of synchronization effects, we find that even very modest doses of light exposure are sufficient to trigger some entrainment, whereby a higher light intensity or duration correlates with strength of the circadian signal. Moreover, we observe in the simulations that stochastic effects may be considered an essential feature of the circadian clock in order to explain the circadian signal decay in prolonged darkness, as well as light initiated resynchronization as a strong component of entrainment.

  7. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Atypical expression of circadian clock genes in denervated mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Reiko; Yamamoto, Saori; Horikawa, Kazumasa; Yasumoto, Yuki; Nikawa, Takeshi; Mukai, Chiaki; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2015-05-01

    The central circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus synchronizes peripheral clocks through neural and humoral signals in most mammalian tissues. Here, we analyzed the effects of unilateral sciatic denervation on the expression of circadian clock- and clock-controlled genes in the gastrocnemius muscles of mice twice per day on days 0, 3, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after denervation and six times on each of days 7 and 28 after denervation to assess the regulation mechanism of the circadian clock in skeletal muscle. Sciatic denervation did not affect systemic circadian rhythms since core body temperature (Day 7), corticosterone secretion (Days 7 and 28), and hepatic clock gene expression remained intact (Days 7 and 28). Expression levels of most circadian clock-related genes such as Arntl, Per1, Rora, Nr1d1 and Dbp were reduced in accordance with the extent of muscle atrophy, although circadian Per2 expression was significantly augmented (Day 28). Cosinor analysis revealed that the circadian expression of Arntl (Days 7 and 28) and Dbp (Day 28) was phase advanced in denervated muscle. The mRNA expression of Clock was significantly increased in denervated muscle on Day 3 when the severe atrophy was absent, and it was not affected by atrophic progression for 28 days. Sciatic denervation did not affect the expression of these genes in the contralateral muscle (Days 7 and 28), suggesting that humoral changes were not involved in denervation-induced muscle clock disruption. We then analyzed genome-wide gene expression using microarrays to determine the effects of disrupting the molecular clock in muscle on circadian rhythms at Day 7. Among 478 circadian genes, 313 lost rhythmicity in the denervated muscles. These denervation-sensitive genes included the lipid metabolism-related genes, Nrip1, Bbs1, Ptgis, Acot1, Scd2, Hpgd, Insig1, Dhcr24, Ldlr and Mboat1. Our findings revealed that sciatic denervation disrupts the circadian expression of clock and clock

  9. Compensation for intracellular environment in expression levels of mammalian circadian clock genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Ritsuko; Okamoto, Akihiko; Node, Koichi; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-02-07

    The circadian clock is driven by transcriptional oscillation of clock genes in almost all body cells. To investigate the effect of cell type-specific intracellular environment on the circadian machinery, we examined gene expression profiles in five peripheral tissues. As expected, the phase relationship between expression rhythms of nine clock genes was similar in all tissues examined. We also compared relative expression levels of clock genes among tissues, and unexpectedly found that quantitative variation remained within an approximately three-fold range, which was substantially smaller than that of metabolic housekeeping genes. Interestingly, circadian gene expression was little affected even when fibroblasts were cultured with different concentrations of serum. Together, these findings support a hypothesis that expression levels of clock genes are quantitatively compensated for the intracellular environment, such as redox potential and metabolite composition. However, more comprehensive studies are required to reach definitive conclusions.

  10. Altered expression of circadian clock genes in polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelousi, Anna; Nasiri-Ansari, Narjes; Spilioti, Eliana; Mantzou, Emilia; Kalotyxou, Vasiliki; Chrousos, George; Kaltsas, Gregory; Kassi, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Circadian timing system is a highly conserved, ubiquitous molecular "clock" which creates internal circadian rhythmicity. Dysregulation of clock genes expression is associated with various diseases including immune dysregulation. In this study we investigated the circadian pattern of Clock-related genes in patients with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III (PAS type III). Nineteen patients diagnosed with PAS type III and 12 healthy controls were enrolled. mRNA and protein expression of Clock-related genes (CLOCK, BMAL1, ROR and Per-1,-2,-3), as well as the GR-a and the GILZ genes were determined by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analysis from blood samples drawn at 8 pm and 8am. Serum cortisol and TSH, as well as plasma ACTH, were measured by chemiluminescence. There were no statistical significant differences in the metabolic profile, cortisol, ACTH and TSH levels between patients and controls. Patients with PAS type III expressed higher transcript levels of CLOCK, BMAL1 and Per-1 in the evening than in the morning (p = 0.03, p = 0.029, p = 0.013, respectively), while the ratios (R pm/am ) of GR-a, CLOCK, BMAL1, and Per-3 mRNA levels were statistically different between patients and controls. Cortisol circadian variation (F pm/am ) was positively correlated with GILZ mRNA circadian pattern (R pm/am ) in the patient group and with the GR-a mRNA (R pm/am ) in the control group. Our findings suggest that there is an aberrant circadian rhythm of Clock-related genes in patients with PAS type III. The disruption of the expression of 4 circadian Clock-related genes could indicate a possible association with the pathogenesis of the disease.

  11. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  12. The Trade-Off Mechanism in Mammalian Circadian Clock Model with Two Time Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie; Kang, Xiaxia; Yang, Ling

    Circadian clock is an autonomous oscillator which orchestrates the daily rhythms of physiology and behaviors. This study is devoted to explore how a positive feedback loop affects the dynamics of mammalian circadian clock. We simplify an experimentally validated mathematical model in our previous work, to a nonlinear differential equation with two time delays. This simplified mathematical model incorporates the pacemaker of mammalian circadian clock, a negative primary feedback loop, and a critical positive auxiliary feedback loop, Rev-erbα/Cry1 loop. We perform analytical studies of the system. Delay-dependent conditions for the asymptotic stability of the nontrivial positive steady state of the model are investigated. We also prove the existence of Hopf bifurcation, which leads to self-sustained oscillation of mammalian circadian clock. Our theoretical analyses show that the oscillatory regime is reduced upon the participation of the delayed positive auxiliary loop. However, further simulations reveal that the auxiliary loop can enable the circadian clock gain widely adjustable amplitudes and robust period. Thus, the positive auxiliary feedback loop may provide a trade-off mechanism, to use the small loss in the robustness of oscillation in exchange for adaptable flexibility in mammalian circadian clock. The results obtained from the model may gain new insights into the dynamics of biological oscillators with interlocked feedback loops.

  13. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Bracci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers.

  14. The circadian clock in immune cells controls the magnitude of Leishmania parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Silke; Dubeau-Laramée, Geneviève; Ohm, Hyejee; Labrecque, Nathalie; Olivier, Martin; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2017-09-07

    The intracellular parasite Leishmania uses neutrophils and macrophages as host cells upon infection. These immune cells harbour their own intrinsic circadian clocks, known to influence many aspects of their functions. Therefore, we tested whether the host circadian clocks regulate the magnitude of Leishmania major infection in mice. The extent of parasitic infection varied over 24 h in bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro and in two different in vivo models, footpad and peritoneal cavity infection. In vivo this was paralleled by time of day-dependent neutrophil and macrophage infiltration to the infection site and rhythmic chemokine expression. Thus, rhythmic parasitic infection observed in vivo was likely initiated by the circadian expression of chemoattractants and the subsequent rhythmic infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. Importantly, all rhythms were abolished in clock-deficient macrophages and when mice lacking the circadian clock in immune cells were infected. Therefore we demonstrated a critical role for the circadian clocks in immune cells in modulating the magnitude of Leishmania infection. To our knowledge this is the first report showing that the circadian clock controls infection by protozoan parasites in mammals. Understanding the timed regulation of host-parasite interactions will allow developing better prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to fight off vector-borne diseases.

  15. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, Massimo; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Barbaresi, Mariella; Manzella, Nicola; Tomasetti, Marco; Gaetani, Simona; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Santarelli, Lory

    2016-01-01

    The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers. PMID:27128899

  16. Genetic Disruption of the Core Circadian Clock Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Sarah M.; Phan, Trongha X.; Saraf, Amit; Chen, Xuanmao; Storm, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Perturbing the circadian system by electrolytically lesioning the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or varying the environmental light:dark schedule impairs memory, suggesting that memory depends on the circadian system. We used a genetic approach to evaluate the role of the molecular clock in memory. Bmal1[superscript -/-] mice, which are arrhythmic…

  17. Circadian clocks and life-history related traits: is pupation height ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. pupation height; pupariation; life-history evolution; circadian clocks; circadian organization; Drosophila melanogaster. .... The role of hormonal influences on the regulation of this gene is, however, not yet known. Incidentally, it is known that the eclosion rhythm in the populations used in this study entrains to.

  18. Disruption of the Circadian Clock in Mice Increases Intestinal Permeability and Promotes Alcohol-Induced Hepatic Pathology and Inflammation.

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    Keith C Summa

    Full Text Available The circadian clock orchestrates temporal patterns of physiology and behavior relative to the environmental light:dark cycle by generating and organizing transcriptional and biochemical rhythms in cells and tissues throughout the body. Circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate the physiology and function of the gastrointestinal tract. Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier enables the translocation of proinflammatory bacterial products, such as endotoxin, across the intestinal wall and into systemic circulation; a process that has been linked to pathologic inflammatory states associated with metabolic, hepatic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases - many of which are commonly reported in shift workers. Here we report, for the first time, that circadian disorganization, using independent genetic and environmental strategies, increases permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier (i.e., gut leakiness in mice. Utilizing chronic alcohol consumption as a well-established model of induced intestinal hyperpermeability, we also found that both genetic and environmental circadian disruption promote alcohol-induced gut leakiness, endotoxemia and steatohepatitis, possibly through a mechanism involving the tight junction protein occludin. Circadian organization thus appears critical for the maintenance of intestinal barrier integrity, especially in the context of injurious agents, such as alcohol. Circadian disruption may therefore represent a previously unrecognized risk factor underlying the susceptibility to or development of alcoholic liver disease, as well as other conditions associated with intestinal hyperpermeability and an endotoxin-triggered inflammatory state.

  19. The Circadian Clock Gene BMAL1 Coordinates Intestinal RegenerationSummary

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    Kyle Stokes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The gastrointestinal syndrome is an illness of the intestine caused by high levels of radiation. It is characterized by extensive loss of epithelial tissue integrity, which initiates a regenerative response by intestinal stem and precursor cells. The intestine has 24-hour rhythms in many physiological functions that are believed to be outputs of the circadian clock: a molecular system that produces 24-hour rhythms in transcription/translation. Certain gastrointestinal illnesses are worsened when the circadian rhythms are disrupted, but the role of the circadian clock in gastrointestinal regeneration has not been studied. Methods: We tested the timing of regeneration in the mouse intestine during the gastrointestinal syndrome. The role of the circadian clock was tested genetically using the BMAL1 loss of function mouse mutant in vivo, and in vitro using intestinal organoid culture. Results: The proliferation of the intestinal epithelium follows a 24-hour rhythm during the gastrointestinal syndrome. The circadian clock runs in the intestinal epithelium during this pathologic state, and the loss of the core clock gene, BMAL1, disrupts both the circadian clock and rhythmic proliferation. Circadian activity in the intestine involves a rhythmic production of inflammatory cytokines and subsequent rhythmic activation of the JNK stress response pathway. Conclusions: Our results show that a circadian rhythm in inflammation and regeneration occurs during the gastrointestinal syndrome. The study and treatment of radiation-induced illnesses, and other gastrointestinal illnesses, should consider 24-hour timing in physiology and pathology. Keywords: Intestine, Circadian Rhythms, Gastrointestinal Syndrome, TNF, Intestinal Stem Cells

  20. The human circadian clock's seasonal adjustment is disrupted by daylight saving time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Juda, Myriam; Merrow, Martha; Roenneberg, Till

    2007-01-01

    A quarter of the world's population is subjected to a 1 hr time change twice a year (daylight saving time, DST). This reflects a change in social clocks, not environmental ones (e.g., dawn). The impact of DST is poorly understood. Circadian clocks use daylight to synchronize (entrain) to the

  1. Potential Roles of Dec and Bmal1 Genes in Interconnecting Circadian Clock and Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fuyuki; Kohsaka, Akira; Bhawal, Ujjal K; Muragaki, Yasuteru

    2018-03-08

    The daily rhythm of mammalian energy metabolism is subject to the circadian clock system, which is made up of the molecular clock machinery residing in nearly all cells throughout the body. The clock genes have been revealed not only to form the molecular clock but also to function as a mediator that regulates both circadian and metabolic functions. While the circadian signals generated by clock genes produce metabolic rhythms, clock gene function is tightly coupled to fundamental metabolic processes such as glucose and lipid metabolism. Therefore, defects in the clock genes not only result in the dysregulation of physiological rhythms but also induce metabolic disorders including diabetes and obesity. Among the clock genes, Dec1 ( Bhlhe40 / Stra13 / Sharp2 ), Dec2 ( Bhlhe41 / Sharp1 ), and Bmal1 ( Mop3 / Arntl ) have been shown to be particularly relevant to the regulation of energy metabolism at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. This paper reviews our current knowledge of the roles of Dec1 , Dec2 , and Bmal1 in coordinating the circadian and metabolic pathways.

  2. Regulation of behavioral circadian rhythms and clock protein PER1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP2

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    Yaoming Yang

    2012-06-01

    Endogenous 24-hour rhythms are generated by circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock feedback mechanism. Previous work has focused on the role of ubiquitin ligases in the clock mechanism. Here we show a role for the rhythmically-expressed deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific peptidase 2 (USP2 in clock function. Mice with a deletion of the Usp2 gene (Usp2 KO display a longer free-running period of locomotor activity rhythms and altered responses of the clock to light. This was associated with altered expression of clock genes in synchronized Usp2 KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts and increased levels of clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1. USP2 can be coimmunoprecipitated with several clock proteins but directly interacts specifically with PER1 and deubiquitinates it. Interestingly, this deubiquitination does not alter PER1 stability. Taken together, our results identify USP2 as a new core component of the clock machinery and demonstrate a role for deubiquitination in the regulation of the circadian clock, both at the level of the core pacemaker and its response to external cues.

  3. Evaluating the Autonomy of the Drosophila Circadian Clock in Dissociated Neuronal Culture

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    Virginie Sabado

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian behavioral rhythms offer an excellent model to study intricate interactions between the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of behavior. In mammals, pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN generate rhythms cell-autonomously, which are synchronized by the network interactions within the circadian circuit to drive behavioral rhythms. However, whether this principle is universal to circadian systems in animals remains unanswered. Here, we examined the autonomy of the Drosophila circadian clock by monitoring transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms of individual clock neurons in dispersed culture with time-lapse microscopy. Expression patterns of the transcriptional reporter show that CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC-mediated transcription is constantly active in dissociated clock neurons. In contrast, the expression profile of the post-transcriptional reporter indicates that PERIOD (PER protein levels fluctuate and ~10% of cells display rhythms in PER levels with periods in the circadian range. Nevertheless, PER and TIM are enriched in the cytoplasm and no periodic PER nuclear accumulation was observed. These results suggest that repression of CLK/CYC-mediated transcription by nuclear PER is impaired, and thus the negative feedback loop of the molecular clock is incomplete in isolated clock neurons. We further demonstrate that, by pharmacological assays using the non-amidated form of neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF, which could be specifically secreted from larval LNvs and adult s-LNvs, downstream events of the PDF signaling are partly impaired in dissociated larval clock neurons. Although non-amidated PDF is likely to be less active than the amidated one, these results point out the possibility that alteration in PDF downstream signaling may play a role in dampening of molecular rhythms in isolated clock neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that Drosophila clocks are weak oscillators that need to be in the

  4. The Arabidopsis sickle mutant exhibits altered circadian clock responses to cool tempatures and tempature-dependent alternative splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate and respond to daily changes in ambient temperature. Mechanisms establishing the timing of circadian rhythms in Arabidopsis thaliana through temperature entrainment remain unclear. Also incompletely understood is the temperature compensation mechanism ...

  5. Free access to a running-wheel advances the phase of behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms and peripheral molecular clocks in mice.

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    Yuki Yasumoto

    Full Text Available Behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms are controlled by endogenous oscillators in animals. Voluntary wheel-running in rodents is thought to be an appropriate model of aerobic exercise in humans. We evaluated the effects of chronic voluntary exercise on the circadian system by analyzing temporal profiles of feeding, core body temperature, plasma hormone concentrations and peripheral expression of clock and clock-controlled genes in mice housed under sedentary (SED conditions or given free access to a running-wheel (RW for four weeks. Voluntary wheel-running activity advanced the circadian phases of increases in body temperature, food intake and corticosterone secretion in the mice. The circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes was tissue- and gene-specifically affected in the RW mice. The temporal expression of E-box-dependent circadian clock genes such as Per1, Per2, Nr1d1 and Dbp were slightly, but significantly phase-advanced in the liver and white adipose tissue, but not in brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Peak levels of Per1, Per2 and Nr1d1 expression were significantly increased in the skeletal muscle of RW mice. The circadian phase and levels of hepatic mRNA expression of the clock-controlled genes that are involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism significantly differed between SED and RW mice. These findings indicated that endogenous clock-governed voluntary wheel-running activity provides feedback to the central circadian clock that systemically governs behavioral and physiological rhythms.

  6. Genomic and Physiological Characterization of the Mutant time for coffee within the Arabidopsis thaliana Circadian Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Villarreal, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    ircadian clocks are internal timekeepers that provide organisms with a sense of time. These oscillators, which are entrained by external stimuli, predict the daily day/night transitions and have a periodicity of about 24 hours. The Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock is composed of interconnected transcriptional-translational feedback loops. The morning expressed elements CCA1 and LHY, which are clock controlled and light inducible, repress the transcription of the evening element TOC1. At d...

  7. Interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian clock system: Importance for metabolic health

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    Aleix Ribas-Latre

    2016-03-01

    Major conclusions: Targeted use of specific nutrients based on chronotype has the potential for immense clinical utility in the future. Macronutrients and micronutrients have the ability to function as zeitgebers for the clock by activating or modulating specific clock proteins or accessory proteins (such as nuclear receptors. Circadian clock control by nutrients can be tissue-specific. With a better understanding of the mechanisms that support nutrient-induced circadian control in specific tissues, human chronotype and SNP information might eventually be used to tailor nutritional regimens for metabolic disease treatment and thus be an important part of personalized medicine's future.

  8. Expression of circadian clock genes in human colorectal adenoma and carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Tomoyuki; Okayama, Hirokazu; Saitou, Masaru; Sugeno, Hidekazu; Yoshimoto, Nobuhiro; Takebayashi, Yuji; Ohki, Shinji; Takenoshita, Seiichi

    2017-11-01

    Circadian rhythms are fundamental biological systems in most organisms. Epidemiological and animal studies have demonstrated that disruption of circadian rhythms is linked to tumor progression and mammalian tumorigenesis. However, the clinical significance of in situ clock gene expression in precancerous and cancerous colorectal lesions remains unknown. The present study aimed to investigate mRNA transcript levels of circadian clock genes within human colorectal cancer and adenoma tissue sections. Using in situ hybridization, the expression of key clock genes, including period circadian protein homolog ( Per ) 1 and 2, cryptochrome 1 ( Cry1 ), circadian locomoter output cycles protein kaput ( Clock ), brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1 ( Bmal1 ) and casein kinase 1ε ( CK1 ε) were retrospectively examined in 51 cases of colorectal carcinoma and 10 cases of adenoma. The expression of clock genes was almost undetectable in the majority of adenomas, whereas positive expression of clock genes was observed in 27-47% of carcinomas. Notably, positive Per1 , Per2 and Clock staining in colorectal carcinomas were each significantly associated with a larger tumor size (P=0.012, P=0.011 and P=0.009, respectively). Tumors with positive Per2 and Clock expression tended to exhibit deeper depth of invasion and were generally more advanced than tumors that did not express these genes (P=0.052 and P=0.064, respectively). However, no statistically significant association was observed between clock gene expression and clinicopathological variables, including histopathological differentiation, lymph node metastasis, depth of invasion or disease stage, although Per2 -positive tumors tended to be associated with poorer overall survival (P=0.060). The results of the current study suggest that dysregulated expression of clock genes may be important in human colorectal tumorigenesis.

  9. Central and peripheral circadian clocks and their role in Alzheimer's disease

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    Ruchi Chauhan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and cellular oscillations constitute an internal clock that tracks the time of day and permits organisms to optimize their behaviour and metabolism to suit the daily demands they face. The workings of this internal clock become impaired with age. In this review, we discuss whether such age-related impairments in the circadian clock interact with age-related neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. Findings from mouse and fly models of Alzheimer's disease have accelerated our understanding of the interaction between neurodegeneration and circadian biology. These models show that neurodegeneration likely impairs circadian rhythms either by damaging the central clock or by blocking its communication with other brain areas and with peripheral tissues. The consequent sleep and metabolic deficits could enhance the susceptibility of the brain to further degenerative processes. Thus, circadian dysfunction might be both a cause and an effect of neurodegeneration. We also discuss the primary role of light in the entrainment of the central clock and describe important, alternative time signals, such as food, that play a role in entraining central and peripheral circadian clocks. Finally, we propose how these recent insights could inform efforts to develop novel therapeutic approaches to re-entrain arrhythmic individuals with neurodegenerative disease.

  10. Expression of the Circadian Clock Genes Pert, Per2 in Sporadic, Familial Breast Tumors

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    Sherry L. Winter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence implicating aberrant circadian clock expression in the development of cancer. Based on our initial experiments identifying a putative interaction between BRCA1, the clock proteins Per1, Per2, as well as the reported involvement of the circadian clock in the development of cancer, we have performed an expression analysis of the circadian clock genes Per1, Per2 in both sporadic, familial primary breast tumors, normal breast tissues using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Significantly decreased levels of Per1 were observed between sporadic tumors, normal samples (P < .00001, as well as a further significant decrease between familial, sporadic breast tumors for both Per1 (P < .00001, Per2 (P < .00001. Decreased Per1 was also associated with estrogen receptor negativity (53% vs 15%, P = .04. These results suggest a role for both Perl, Per2 in normal breast function, show for the first time that deregulation of the circadian clock may be an important factor in the development of familial breast cancer. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle, on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis, potentially promoting carcinogenesis.

  11. Assembly of a comprehensive regulatory network for the mammalian circadian clock: a bioinformatics approach.

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    Robert Lehmann

    Full Text Available By regulating the timing of cellular processes, the circadian clock provides a way to adapt physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. In mammals, a light-entrainable master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN controls peripheral clocks that are present in virtually every body cell. Defective circadian timing is associated with several pathologies such as cancer and metabolic and sleep disorders. To better understand the circadian regulation of cellular processes, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline encompassing the analysis of high-throughput data sets and the exploitation of published knowledge by text-mining. We identified 118 novel potential clock-regulated genes and integrated them into an existing high-quality circadian network, generating the to-date most comprehensive network of circadian regulated genes (NCRG. To validate particular elements in our network, we assessed publicly available ChIP-seq data for BMAL1, REV-ERBα/β and RORα/γ proteins and found strong evidence for circadian regulation of Elavl1, Nme1, Dhx6, Med1 and Rbbp7 all of which are involved in the regulation of tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we identified Ncl and Ddx6, as targets of RORγ and REV-ERBα, β, respectively. Most interestingly, these genes were also reported to be involved in miRNA regulation; in particular, NCL regulates several miRNAs, all involved in cancer aggressiveness. Thus, NCL represents a novel potential link via which the circadian clock, and specifically RORγ, regulates the expression of miRNAs, with particular consequences in breast cancer progression. Our findings bring us one step forward towards a mechanistic understanding of mammalian circadian regulation, and provide further evidence of the influence of circadian deregulation in cancer.

  12. Association between circadian clock genes and diapause incidence in Drosophila triauraria.

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    Hirokazu Yamada

    Full Text Available Diapause is an adaptive response triggered by seasonal photoperiodicity to overcome unfavorable seasons. The photoperiodic clock is a system that controls seasonal physiological processes, but our knowledge about its physiological mechanisms and genetic architecture remains incomplete. The circadian clock is another system that controls daily rhythmic physiological phenomena. It has been argued that there is a connection between the two clocks. To examine the genetic connection between them, we analyzed the associations of five circadian clock genes (period, timeless, Clock, cycle and cryptochrome with the occurrence of diapause in Drosophila triauraria, which shows a robust reproductive diapause with clear photoperiodicity. Non-diapause strains found in low latitudes were compared in genetic crosses with the diapause strain, in which the diapause trait is clearly dominant. Single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion analyses of the five circadian clock genes in backcross progeny revealed that allelic differences in timeless and cryptochrome between the strains were additively associated with the differences in the incidence of diapause. This suggests that there is a molecular link between certain circadian clock genes and the occurrence of diapause.

  13. Circadian timekeeping : from basic clock function to implications for health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Eliane Alinda

    2016-01-01

    In modern society, circadian rhythms and sleep are often disturbed, which may negatively affect health. This thesis examines these associations and focuses on the basic functioning of sleep and the circadian system in mice and in humans. Circadian rhythms are orchestrated by ~20,000 neurons in the

  14. A functional genomics strategy reveals clockwork orange as a transcriptional regulator in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akira; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Yamada, Rikuhiro G; Houl, Jerry; Uno, Kenichiro D; Kasukawa, Takeya; Dauwalder, Brigitte; Itoh, Taichi Q; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Ueda, Ryu; Hardin, Paul E; Tanimura, Teiichi; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2007-07-01

    The Drosophila circadian clock consists of integrated autoregulatory feedback loops, making the clock difficult to elucidate without comprehensively identifying the network components in vivo. Previous studies have adopted genome-wide screening for clock-controlled genes using high-density oligonucleotide arrays that identified hundreds of clock-controlled genes. In an attempt to identify the core clock genes among these candidates, we applied genome-wide functional screening using an RNA interference (RNAi) system in vivo. Here we report the identification of novel clock gene candidates including clockwork orange (cwo), a transcriptional repressor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix ORANGE family. cwo is rhythmically expressed and directly regulated by CLK-CYC through canonical E-box sequences. A genome-wide search for its target genes using the Drosophila genome tiling array revealed that cwo forms its own negative feedback loop and directly suppresses the expression of other clock genes through the E-box sequence. Furthermore, this negative transcriptional feedback loop contributes to sustaining a high-amplitude circadian oscillation in vivo. Based on these results, we propose that the competition between cyclic CLK-CYC activity and the adjustable threshold imposed by CWO keeps E-box-mediated transcription within the controllable range of its activity, thereby rendering a Drosophila circadian clock capable of generating high-amplitude oscillation.

  15. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Malik

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ. Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte

  16. Ketogenic diet disrupts the circadian clock and increases hypofibrinolytic risk by inducing expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Doi, Ryosuke; Ishida, Norio; Kadota, Koji; Horie, Shuichi

    2009-10-01

    Metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity are considered risk factors for cardiovascular diseases by increasing levels of blood plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Ketogenic diets (KDs) have been used as an approach to weight loss in both obese and nonobese individuals. We examined circadian changes in plasma PAI-1 and its mRNA expression levels in tissues from mice fed with a KD (KD mice), to evaluate its effects on fibrinolytic functions. Two weeks on the kDa increased plasma levels of free fatty acids and ketones accompanied by hypoglycemia in mice. Plasma PAI-1 concentrations were extremely elevated in accordance with mRNA expression levels in the heart and liver, but not in the kidneys of KD mice. Circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA was phase-advanced for 4.7, 7.9, and 7.8 hours in the heart, kidney, and adipose tissues, respectively, as well as that of circadian genes mPer2 and DBP in KD mice, suggesting that peripheral clocks were phase-advanced by ketosis despite feeding ad libitum under a periodic light-dark cycle. The circadian clock that regulates behavioral activity rhythms was also phase-advanced, and its free-running period was significantly shortened in KD mice. Our findings suggest that ketogenic status increases hypofibrinolytic risk by inducing abnormal circadian expression of PAI-1.

  17. Entrainment of the Human Circadian Clock to the Natural Light-Dark Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth P.; McHill, Andrew W.; Birks, Brian R.; Griffin, Brandon R.; Rusterholz, Thomas; Chinoy, Evan D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The electric light is one of the most important human inventions. Sleep and other daily rhythms in physiology and behavior however, evolved in the natural light-dark cycle[1] and electrical lighting is thought to have disrupted these rhythms. Yet how much the age of electrical lighting has altered the human circadian clock is unknown. Here we show that electrical lighting and the constructed environment is associated with reduced exposure to sunlight during the day, increased light exposure after sunset, and a delayed timing of the circadian clock as compared to a summer natural 14h40min:9h20min light-dark cycle camping. Furthermore, we find that after exposure to only natural light, the internal circadian clock synchronizes to solar time such that the beginning of the internal biological night occurs at sunset and the end of the internal biological night occurs before wake time just after sunrise. In addition, we find that later chronotypes show larger circadian advances when exposed to only natural light, making the timing of their internal clocks in relation to the light-dark cycle more similar to earlier chronotypes. These findings have important implications for understanding how modern light exposure patterns contribute to late sleep schedules and may disrupt sleep and circadian clocks. PMID:23910656

  18. Mini screening of kinase inhibitors affecting period-length of mammalian cellular circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagita, Kazuhiro; Yamanaka, Iori; Koinuma, Satoshi; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Uchiyama, Yasuo

    2009-06-27

    In mammalian circadian rhythms, the transcriptional-translational feedback loop (TTFL) consisting of a set of clock genes is believed to elicit the circadian clock oscillation. The TTFL model explains that the accumulation and degradation of mPER and mCRY proteins control the period-length (tau) of the circadian clock. Although recent studies revealed that the Casein Kinase I epsilon delta (CKI epsilon delta) regulates the phosphorylation of mPER proteins and the circadian period-length, other kinases are also likely to contribute the phosphorylation of mPER. Here, we performed small scale screening using 84 chemical compounds known as kinase inhibitors to identify candidates possibly affecting the circadian period-length in mammalian cells. Screening by this high-throughput real-time bioluminescence monitoring system revealed that the several chemical compounds apparently lengthened the cellular circadian clock oscillation. These compounds are known as inhibitors against kinases such as Casein Kinase II (CKII), PI3-kinase (PI3K) and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) in addition to CKI epsilon delta. Although these kinase inhibitors may have some non-specific effects on other factors, our mini screening identified new candidates contributing to period-length control in mammalian cells.

  19. Diel pattern of circadian clock and storage protein gene expression in leaves and during seed filling in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Julia; Terry, Marta I; Martos-Fuentes, Marina; Letourneux, Lisa; Ruiz-Hernández, Victoria; Fernández, Juan A; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2018-02-14

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is an important source of protein supply for animal and human nutrition. The major storage globulins VICILIN and LEGUMIN (LEG) are synthesized from several genes including LEGA, LEGB, LEGJ and CVC (CONVICILIN). The current hypothesis is that the plant circadian core clock genes are conserved in a wide array of species and that primary metabolism is to a large extent controlled by the plant circadian clock. Our aim was to investigate a possible link between gene expression of storage proteins and the circadian clock. We identified cowpea orthologues of the core clock genes VunLHY, VunTOC1, VunGI and VunELF3, the protein storage genes VunLEG, VunLEGJ, and VunCVC as well as nine candidate reference genes used in RT-PCR. ELONGATION FACTOR 1-A (ELF1A) resulted the most suitable reference gene. The clock genes VunELF3, VunGI, VunTOC1 and VunLHY showed a rhythmic expression profile in leaves with a typical evening/night and morning/midday phased expression. The diel patterns were not completely robust and only VungGI and VungELF3 retained a rhythmic pattern under free running conditions of darkness. Under field conditions, rhythmicity and phasing apparently faded during early pod and seed development and was regained in ripening pods for VunTOC1 and VunLHY. Mature seeds showed a rhythmic expression of VunGI resembling leaf tissue under controlled growth chamber conditions. Comparing time windows during developmental stages we found that VunCVC and VunLEG were significantly down regulated during the night in mature pods as compared to intermediate ripe pods, while changes in seeds were non-significant due to high variance. The rhythmic expression under field conditions was lost under growth chamber conditions. The core clock gene network is conserved in cowpea leaves showing a robust diel expression pattern except VunELF3 under growth chamber conditions. There appears to be a clock transcriptional reprogramming in pods and seeds compared to

  20. An autonomous circadian clock in the inner mouse retina regulated by dopamine and GABA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Xiang Ruan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the mammalian retinal circadian clock on retinal physiology and function is widely recognized, yet the cellular elements and neural regulation of retinal circadian pacemaking remain unclear due to the challenge of long-term culture of adult mammalian retina and the lack of an ideal experimental measure of the retinal circadian clock. In the current study, we developed a protocol for long-term culture of intact mouse retinas, which allows retinal circadian rhythms to be monitored in real time as luminescence rhythms from a PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC clock gene reporter. With this in vitro assay, we studied the characteristics and location within the retina of circadian PER2::LUC rhythms, the influence of major retinal neurotransmitters, and the resetting of the retinal circadian clock by light. Retinal PER2::LUC rhythms were routinely measured from whole-mount retinal explants for 10 d and for up to 30 d. Imaging of vertical retinal slices demonstrated that the rhythmic luminescence signals were concentrated in the inner nuclear layer. Interruption of cell communication via the major neurotransmitter systems of photoreceptors and ganglion cells (melatonin and glutamate and the inner nuclear layer (dopamine, acetylcholine, GABA, glycine, and glutamate did not disrupt generation of retinal circadian PER2::LUC rhythms, nor did interruption of intercellular communication through sodium-dependent action potentials or connexin 36 (cx36-containing gap junctions, indicating that PER2::LUC rhythms generation in the inner nuclear layer is likely cell autonomous. However, dopamine, acting through D1 receptors, and GABA, acting through membrane hyperpolarization and casein kinase, set the phase and amplitude of retinal PER2::LUC rhythms, respectively. Light pulses reset the phase of the in vitro retinal oscillator and dopamine D1 receptor antagonists attenuated these phase shifts. Thus, dopamine and GABA act at the molecular level of PER

  1. cGMP-dependent protein kinase I, the circadian clock, sleep and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Robert; Hölter, Sabine M; Weindl, Karin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Langmesser, Sonja; Gerling, Andrea; Feil, Susanne; Albrecht, Urs

    2009-07-01

    The second messenger cGMP controls cardiovascular and gastrointestinal homeostasis in mammals. However, its physiological relevance in the nervous system is poorly understood.1 Now, we have reported that the cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PRKG1) is implicated in the regulation of the timing and quality of sleep and wakefulness.2Prkg1 mutant mice showed altered distribution of sleep and wakefulness as well as reduction in rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) duration and in non-REMS consolidation. Furthermore, the ability to sustain waking episodes was compromised. These observations were also reflected in wheel-running and drinking activity. A decrease in electroencephalogram power in the delta frequency range (1-4 Hz) under baseline conditions was observed, which was normalized after sleep deprivation. Together with the finding that circadian clock amplitude is reduced in Prkg1 mutants these results indicate a decrease of the wake-promoting output of the circadian system affecting sleep. Because quality of sleep might affect learning we tested Prkg1 mutants in several learning tasks and find normal spatial learning but impaired object recognition memory in these animals. Our findings indicate that Prkg1 impinges on circadian rhythms, sleep and distinct aspects of learning.

  2. Drosophila Clock Is Required in Brain Pacemaker Neurons to Prevent Premature Locomotor Aging Independently of Its Circadian Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Vaccaro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks control many self-sustained rhythms in physiology and behavior with approximately 24-hour periodicity. In many organisms, oxidative stress and aging negatively impact the circadian system and sleep. Conversely, loss of the clock decreases resistance to oxidative stress, and may reduce lifespan and speed up brain aging and neurodegeneration. Here we examined the effects of clock disruptions on locomotor aging and longevity in Drosophila. We found that lifespan was similarly reduced in three arrhythmic mutants (ClkAR, cyc0 and tim0 and in wild-type flies under constant light, which stops the clock. In contrast, ClkAR mutants showed significantly faster age-related locomotor deficits (as monitored by startle-induced climbing than cyc0 and tim0, or than control flies under constant light. Reactive oxygen species accumulated more with age in ClkAR mutant brains, but this did not appear to contribute to the accelerated locomotor decline of the mutant. Clk, but not Cyc, inactivation by RNA interference in the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF-expressing central pacemaker neurons led to similar loss of climbing performance as ClkAR. Conversely, restoring Clk function in these cells was sufficient to rescue the ClkAR locomotor phenotype, independently of behavioral rhythmicity. Accelerated locomotor decline of the ClkAR mutant required expression of the PDF receptor and correlated to an apparent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the posterior protocerebral lateral 1 (PPL1 clusters. This neuronal loss was rescued when the ClkAR mutation was placed in an apoptosis-deficient background. Impairing dopamine synthesis in a single pair of PPL1 neurons that innervate the mushroom bodies accelerated locomotor decline in otherwise wild-type flies. Our results therefore reveal a novel circadian-independent requirement for Clk in brain circadian neurons to maintain a subset of dopaminergic cells and avoid premature locomotor aging in Drosophila.

  3. Clinical Trial of Exercise on Circadian Clock Resetting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czeisler, Charles

    2001-01-01

    ...: test the hypothesis that multiple nightly bouts of exercise will induce significant delays in the endogenous circadian rhythms of core body temperature, plasma melatonin, reaction time, alertness...

  4. Identification of the molecular components of a Tigriopus californicus (Crustacea, Copepoda) circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Katherine T; Christie, Andrew E

    2014-12-01

    Copepods of the genus Tigriopus have been proposed as marine models for investigations of environmental perturbation. One rapidly increasing anthropogenic stressor for intertidal organisms is light pollution. Given the sensitivity of circadian rhythms to exogenous light, the genes/proteins of a Tigriopus circadian pacemaker represent a potential system for investigating the influences of artificial light sources on circadian behavior in an intertidal species. Here, the molecular components of a putative Tigriopus californicus circadian clock were identified using publicly accessible transcriptome data; the recently deduced circadian proteins of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus were used as a reference. Transcripts encoding homologs of all commonly recognized ancestral arthropod core clock proteins were identified (i.e. CLOCK, CRYPTOCHROME 2, CYCLE, PERIOD and TIMELESS), as were ones encoding proteins likely to modulate the core clock (i.e. CASEIN KINASE II, CLOCKWORK ORANGE, DOUBLETIME, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 1, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A, SHAGGY, SUPERNUMERARY LIMBS and VRILLE) or to act as inputs to it (i.e. CRYPTOCHROME 1). PAR DOMAIN PROTEIN 1 was the only circadian-associated protein not identified in Tigriopus; it appears absent in Calanus too. These data represent just the third full set of molecular components for a crustacean circadian pacemaker (Daphnia pulex and C. finmarchicus previously), and only the second obtained from transcribed sequences (C. finmarchicus previously). Given Tigriopus' proposed status as a model for investigating the influences of anthropogenic stressors in the marine environment, these data provide the first suite of gene/protein targets for understanding how light pollution may influence circadian physiology and behavior in an intertidal organism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamical mechanism of Bmal 1 / Rev- erbα loop in circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, the circadian clock is driven by multiple integrated transcriptional feedback loops involving three kinds of central clock-controlled elements (CCEs): E-boxes, D-boxes and ROR-elements. With the aid of CCEs, the concentrations of the active proteins are approximated by the delayed concentrations of mRNAs, which simplifies the circadian system drastically. The regulatory loop composed by BMAL1 and REV-ERB- α plays important roles in circadian clock. With delay differential equations, we gave a mathematical model of this loop and investigated its dynamical mechanisms. Specially, we theoretically provided the sufficient conditions for sustained oscillation of the loop with Hopf bifurcation theory. The total of delays determines the emergence of oscillators, which explains the crucial roles of delays in circadian clock revealed by biological experiments. Numerically, we studied the amplitude and period against the variations of delays and the degradation rates. The different sensitivities of amplitude and period on these factors provide ideas to adjust the amplitude or period of circadian oscillators.

  6. Interplay between Dioxin-Mediated Signaling and Circadian Clock: A Possible Determinant in Metabolic Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rotation of the earth on its axis creates the environment of a 24 h solar day, which organisms on earth have used to their evolutionary advantage by integrating this timing information into their genetic make-up in the form of a circadian clock. This intrinsic molecular clock is pivotal for maintenance of synchronized homeostasis between the individual organism and the external environment to allow coordinated rhythmic physiological and behavioral function. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR is a master regulator of dioxin-mediated toxic effects, and is, therefore, critical in maintaining adaptive responses through regulating the expression of phase I/II drug metabolism enzymes. AhR expression is robustly rhythmic, and physiological cross-talk between AhR signaling and circadian rhythms has been established. Increasing evidence raises a compelling argument that disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms contributes to the development of disease, including sleep disorders, metabolic disorders and cancers. Similarly, exposure to environmental pollutants through air, water and food, is increasingly cited as contributory to these same problems. Thus, a better understanding of interactions between AhR signaling and the circadian clock regulatory network can provide critical new insights into environmentally regulated disease processes. This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of the reciprocal interactions between dioxin-mediated AhR signaling and the circadian clock including how these pathways relate to health and disease, with emphasis on the control of metabolic function.

  7. Defence responses of arabidopsis thaliana to infection by pseudomonas syringae are regulated by the circadian clock

    KAUST Repository

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav

    2011-10-31

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime. © 2011 Bhardwaj et al.

  8. Restoration of self-sustained circadian rhythmicity by the mutant Clock allele in mice in constant illumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, K; Oklejewicz, M; Daan, S

    2002-01-01

    Mice mutant for the Clock gene display abnormal circadian behavior characterized by long circadian periods and a tendency to become rapidly arrhythmic in constant darkness (DID). To investigate whether this result is contingent on the absence of light, the authors studied the circadian behavior of

  9. Alteration of the Circadian Clock in Children with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Marta; Nevšímalová, S.; Příhodová, I.; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 2 (2012), E312-E318 ISSN 0021-972X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11474 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD309/08/H079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : melatonin * circadian clock * clock genes * Smith-Magenis syndrome Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 6.430, year: 2012

  10. Modelling of intercellular synchronization in the Drosophila circadian clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun-Wei, Wang; Ai-Min, Chen; Jia-Jun, Zhang; Zhan-Jiang, Yuan; Tian-Shou, Zhou

    2009-01-01

    In circadian rhythm generation, intercellular signaling factors are shown to play a crucial role in both sustaining intrinsic cellular rhythmicity and acquiring collective behaviours across a population of circadian neurons. However, the physical mechanism behind their role remains to be fully understood. In this paper, we propose an indirectly coupled multicellular model for the synchronization of Drosophila circadian oscillators combining both intracellular and intercellular dynamics. By simulating different experimental conditions, we find that such an indirect coupling way can synchronize both heterogeneous self-sustained circadian neurons and heterogeneous mutational damped circadian neurons. Moreover, they can also be entrained to ambient light-dark (LD) cycles depending on intercellular signaling. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  11. Circadian rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and clock gene expression during simulated night shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Francine O; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2007-11-01

    The synchronization of peripheral circadian oscillators in humans living on atypical sleep/wake schedules is largely unknown. In this night shift work simulation, we evaluate clock gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) relative to reliable markers of the central circadian pacemaker. Participants were placed on a 10-hr delayed sleep/wake schedule simulating nighttime work followed by a daytime sleep episode. Baseline, intermediate and final circadian evaluations were performed in the temporal isolation laboratory. Five healthy candidates, 18-30 years. Polychromatic white light of (mean +/-SEM) 6,036 +/-326 lux (approximately 17,685 +/-955 W/m2) during night shifts; dim light exposure after each night shift; an 8-hr sleep/darkness episode beginning 2 hrs after the end of each night shift. Melatonin and cortisol in plasma; clock genes HPER1, HPER2 and HBMAL1 RNA in PBMCs. Following 9 days on the night schedule, hormonal rhythms were adapted to the shifted schedule. HPER1 and HPER2 expression in PBMCs displayed significant circadian rhythmicity, which was in a conventional relationship with the shifted sleep/wake schedule. Changes in the pattern of clock gene expression were apparent as of 3 days on the shifted sleep/wake schedule. This preliminary study is the first documentation of the effects of a shifted sleep/wake schedule on the circadian expression of both peripheral circadian oscillators in PBMCs and centrally-driven hormonal rhythms. In light of evidence associating clock gene expression with tissue function, the study of peripheral circadian oscillators has important implications for understanding medical disorders affecting night shift workers.

  12. Environmental disruption of the circadian clock leads to altered sleep and immune responses in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Derrick J; Savenkova, Marina I; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, one of the most salient outputs of the circadian (daily) clock is the timing of the sleep-wake cycle. Modern industrialized society has led to a fundamental breakdown in the relationship between our endogenous timekeeping systems and the solar day, disrupting normal circadian rhythms. We have argued that disrupted circadian rhythms could lead to changes in allostatic load, and the capacity of organisms to respond to other environmental challenges. In this set of studies, we apply a model of circadian disruption characterized in our lab in which mice are housed in a 20h long day, with 10h of light and 10h of darkness. We explored the effects of this environmental disruption on sleep patterns, to establish if this model results in marked sleep deprivation. Given the interaction between circadian, sleep, and immune systems, we further probed if our model of circadian disruption also alters the innate immune response to peripheral bacterial endotoxin challenge. Our results demonstrate that this model of circadian disruption does not lead to marked sleep deprivation, but instead affects the timing and quality of sleep. We also show that while circadian disruption does not lead to basal changes in the immune markers we explored, the immune response is affected, both in the brain and the periphery. Together, our findings further strengthen the important role of the circadian timing system in sleep regulation and immune responses, and provide evidence that disrupting the circadian clock increases vulnerability to further environmental stressors, including immunological challenges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Havaux, Michel; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. PMID:27354555

  14. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Havaux, Michel; Riefler, Michael; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Circadian dysregulation of clock genes: clues to rapid treatments in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunney, B G; Li, J Z; Walsh, D M; Stein, R; Vawter, M P; Cartagena, P; Barchas, J D; Schatzberg, A F; Myers, R M; Watson, S J; Akil, H; Bunney, W E

    2015-02-01

    Conventional antidepressants require 2-8 weeks for a full clinical response. In contrast, two rapidly acting antidepressant interventions, low-dose ketamine and sleep deprivation (SD) therapy, act within hours to robustly decrease depressive symptoms in a subgroup of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Evidence that MDD may be a circadian-related illness is based, in part, on a large set of clinical data showing that diurnal rhythmicity (sleep, temperature, mood and hormone secretion) is altered during depressive episodes. In a microarray study, we observed widespread changes in cyclic gene expression in six regions of postmortem brain tissue of depressed patients matched with controls for time-of-death (TOD). We screened 12 000 transcripts and observed that the core clock genes, essential for controlling virtually all rhythms in the body, showed robust 24-h sinusoidal expression patterns in six brain regions in control subjects. In MDD patients matched for TOD with controls, the expression patterns of the clock genes in brain were significantly dysregulated. Some of the most robust changes were seen in anterior cingulate (ACC). These findings suggest that in addition to structural abnormalities, lesion studies, and the large body of functional brain imaging studies reporting increased activation in the ACC of depressed patients who respond to a wide range of therapies, there may be a circadian dysregulation in clock gene expression in a subgroup of MDDs. Here, we review human, animal and neuronal cell culture data suggesting that both low-dose ketamine and SD can modulate circadian rhythms. We hypothesize that the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and SD may act, in part, to reset abnormal clock genes in MDD to restore and stabilize circadian rhythmicity. Conversely, clinical relapse may reflect a desynchronization of the clock, indicative of a reactivation of abnormal clock gene function. Future work could involve identifying specific small

  16. Circadian modification network of a core clock driver BMAL1 to harmonize physiology from brain to peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaru, Teruya; Takamatsu, Ken

    2018-01-03

    Circadian clocks dictate various physiological functions by brain SCN (a central clock) -orchestrating the temporal harmony of peripheral clocks of tissues/organs in the whole body, with adaptability to environments by resetting their timings. Dysfunction of this circadian adaptation system (CAS) occasionally causes/exacerbates diseases. CAS is based on cell-autonomous molecular clocks, which oscillate via a core transcriptional/translational feedback loop with clock genes/proteins, e.g., BMAL1: CLOCK circadian transcription driver and CRY1/2 and PER1/2 suppressors, and is modulated by various regulatory loops including clock protein modifications. Among mutants with a single clock gene, BMAL1-deficient mice exhibit the most drastic loss of circadian functions. Here, we highlight on numerous circadian protein modifications of mammalian BMAL1, e.g., multiple phosphorylations, SUMOylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, O-GlcNAcylation and S-nitrosylation, which mutually interplay to control molecular clocks and coordinate physiological functions from the brain to peripheral tissues through the input and output of the clocks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cross-talk between the circadian clock and the cell cycle in cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soták, Matúš; Sumová, Alena; Pácha, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2014), s. 221-232 ISSN 0785-3890 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08304S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : apoptosis * cancer * cell cycle * circadian clock * MAPK cascade * proliferation * Wnt signaling Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.886, year: 2014

  18. Insulin-FOXO3 signaling modulates circadian rhythms via regulation of clock transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaves, I.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Schellevis, R.; Nijman, R.M.; Groot Koerkamp, M.; Holstege, F.C.P.; Smidt, M.P.; Hoekman, M.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are responsive to external and internal cues, light and metabolism being among the most important. In mammals, the light signal is sensed by the retina and transmitted to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) master clock [1], where it is integrated into the molecular oscillator via

  19. Metabolic Rhythms of the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp ATCC 51142 Correlate with Modeled Dynamics of Circadian Clock

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červený, Jan; Nedbal, Ladislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 24 (2009), s. 295-303 ISSN 0748-7304 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/09/1284 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : circadian clock * cyanobacteria * model * photosynthesis * respiration Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.418, year: 2009

  20. Selective Inhibition of Casein Kinase 1 epsilon Minimally Alters Circadian Clock Period

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walton, K. M.; Fisher, K.; Rubitski, D.; Marconi, M.; Meng, Q.-J.; Sládek, Martin; Adams, J.; Bass, M.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Butler, T.; Griffor, M.; Rajamohan, F.; Serpa, M.; Chen, Y.; Claffey, M.; Hastings, M.; Loudon, A.; Maywood, E.; Ohren, J.; Doran, A.; Wager, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 2 (2009), s. 430-439 ISSN 0022-3565 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian clock * casein kinase 1 epsilon * inhibitor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.093, year: 2009

  1. Mechanisms of hormonal regulation of the peripheral circadian clock in the colon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polidarová, Lenka; Houdek, Pavel; Sládek, Martin; Novosadová, Zuzana; Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-16 ISSN 0742-0528 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-07711S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08304S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian clock * colon * entrainment Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 2.562, year: 2016

  2. WNT Takes Two to Tango: Molecular Links between the Circadian Clock and the Cell Cycle in Adult Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu-Ura, Toru; Moore, Sean R; Hong, Christian I

    2018-02-01

    Like two dancers, the circadian clock and cell cycle are biological oscillators engaged in bidirectional communication, resulting in circadian clock-gated cell division cycles in species ranging from cyanobacteria to mammals. The identified mechanisms for this phenomenon have expanded beyond intracellular molecular coupling components to include intercellular connections. However, detailed molecular mechanisms, dynamics, and physiological functions of the circadian clock and cell cycle as coupled oscillators remain largely unknown. In this review, we discuss current understanding of this connection in light of recent findings that have uncovered intercellular coupling between the circadian clock in Paneth cells and the cell cycle in intestinal stem cells via WNT signaling. This extends the impact of circadian rhythms regulating the timing of cell divisions beyond the intracellular domain of homogenous cell populations into dynamic, multicellular systems. In-depth understanding of the molecular links and dynamics of these two oscillators will identify potential targets and temporal regimens for effective chronotherapy.

  3. Postnatal Ontogenesis of the Islet Circadian Clock Plays a Contributory Role in β-Cell Maturation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, Kuntol; Qian, Jingyi; Gaonkar, Krutika Satish; Dhawan, Sangeeta; Colwell, Christopher S; Matveyenko, Aleksey V

    2018-03-02

    Development of cell replacement therapies in diabetes requires understanding of the molecular underpinnings of β-cell maturation. Circadian clock regulates diverse cellular functions important for regulation of β-cell function and turnover. However postnatal ontogenesis of the islet circadian clock and its potential role in β-cell maturation remain unknown. To address this, we studied wild type Sprague Dawley as well as Period1 luciferase transgenic rats ( Per1 :LUC) to determine circadian clock function, clock protein expression and diurnal insulin secretion during islet development and maturation process. We additionally studied β-cell-specific Bmal1 deficient mice to elucidate potential role of this key circadian transcription factor in β-cell functional and transcriptional maturation. We report that emergence of the islet circadian clock 1) occurs during early postnatal period, 2) depends on the establishment of global behavioral circadian rhythms and 3) leads to the induction of diurnal insulin secretion and gene expression. Islet cell maturation was also characterized by induction in the expression of circadian transcription factor BMAL1, deletion of which altered postnatal development of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and associated transcriptional network. Postnatal development of the islet circadian clock contributes to early life β-cell maturation and should be considered for optimal design of future β-cell replacement strategies in diabetes. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Control of daily transcript oscillations in Drosophila by light and the circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Wijnen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional circuits of circadian clocks control physiological and behavioral rhythms. Light may affect such overt rhythms in two ways: (1 by entraining the clock circuits and (2 via clock-independent molecular pathways. In this study we examine the relationship between autonomous transcript oscillations and light-driven transcript responses. Transcript profiles of wild-type and arrhythmic mutant Drosophila were recorded both in the presence of an environmental photocycle and in constant darkness. Systematic autonomous oscillations in the 12- to 48-h period range were detectable only in wild-type flies and occurred preferentially at the circadian period length. However, an extensive program of light-driven expression was confirmed in arrhythmic mutant flies. Many light-responsive transcripts are preferentially expressed in the compound eyes and the phospholipase C component of phototransduction, NORPA (no receptor potential, is required for their light-dependent regulation. Although there is evidence for the existence of multiple molecular clock circuits in cyanobacteria, protists, plants, and fungi, Drosophila appears to possess only one such system. The sustained photic expression responses identified here are partially coupled to the circadian clock and may reflect a mechanism for flies to modulate functions such as visual sensitivity and synaptic transmission in response to seasonal changes in photoperiod.

  5. Dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock: theoretical anti-jitter network and controlled chaos.

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    Hassan M Fathallah-Shaykh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Electronic clocks exhibit undesirable jitter or time variations in periodic signals. The circadian clocks of humans, some animals, and plants consist of oscillating molecular networks with peak-to-peak time of approximately 24 hours. Clockwork orange (CWO is a transcriptional repressor of Drosophila direct target genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Theory and data from a model of the Drosophila circadian clock support the idea that CWO controls anti-jitter negative circuits that stabilize peak-to-peak time in light-dark cycles (LD. The orbit is confined to chaotic attractors in both LD and dark cycles and is almost periodic in LD; furthermore, CWO diminishes the Euclidean dimension of the chaotic attractor in LD. Light resets the clock each day by restricting each molecular peak to the proximity of a prescribed time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The theoretical results suggest that chaos plays a central role in the dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock and that a single molecule, CWO, may sense jitter and repress it by its negative loops.

  6. Dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock: theoretical anti-jitter network and controlled chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M

    2010-10-13

    Electronic clocks exhibit undesirable jitter or time variations in periodic signals. The circadian clocks of humans, some animals, and plants consist of oscillating molecular networks with peak-to-peak time of approximately 24 hours. Clockwork orange (CWO) is a transcriptional repressor of Drosophila direct target genes. Theory and data from a model of the Drosophila circadian clock support the idea that CWO controls anti-jitter negative circuits that stabilize peak-to-peak time in light-dark cycles (LD). The orbit is confined to chaotic attractors in both LD and dark cycles and is almost periodic in LD; furthermore, CWO diminishes the Euclidean dimension of the chaotic attractor in LD. Light resets the clock each day by restricting each molecular peak to the proximity of a prescribed time. The theoretical results suggest that chaos plays a central role in the dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock and that a single molecule, CWO, may sense jitter and repress it by its negative loops.

  7. Drosophila spaghetti and doubletime link the circadian clock and light to caspases, apoptosis and tauopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Means

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While circadian dysfunction and neurodegeneration are correlated, the mechanism for this is not understood. It is not known if age-dependent circadian dysfunction leads to neurodegeneration or vice-versa, and the proteins that mediate the effect remain unidentified. Here, we show that the knock-down of a regulator (spag of the circadian kinase Dbt in circadian cells lowers Dbt levels abnormally, lengthens circadian rhythms and causes expression of activated initiator caspase (Dronc in the optic lobes during the middle of the day or after light pulses at night. Likewise, reduced Dbt activity lengthens circadian period and causes expression of activated Dronc, and a loss-of-function mutation in Clk also leads to expression of activated Dronc in a light-dependent manner. Genetic epistasis experiments place Dbt downstream of Spag in the pathway, and Spag-dependent reductions of Dbt are shown to require the proteasome. Importantly, activated Dronc expression due to reduced Spag or Dbt activity occurs in cells that do not express the spag RNAi or dominant negative Dbt and requires PDF neuropeptide signaling from the same neurons that support behavioral rhythms. Furthermore, reduction of Dbt or Spag activity leads to Dronc-dependent Drosophila Tau cleavage and enhanced neurodegeneration produced by human Tau in a fly eye model for tauopathy. Aging flies with lowered Dbt or Spag function show markers of cell death as well as behavioral deficits and shortened lifespans, and even old wild type flies exhibit Dbt modification and activated caspase at particular times of day. These results suggest that Dbt suppresses expression of activated Dronc to prevent Tau cleavage, and that the circadian clock defects confer sensitivity to expression of activated Dronc in response to prolonged light. They establish a link between the circadian clock factors, light, cell death pathways and Tau toxicity, potentially via dysregulation of circadian neuronal remodeling in

  8. Deleting the Arntl clock gene in the granular layer of the mouse cerebellum: impact on the molecular circadian clockwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, Tenna; Carstensen, Mikkel Bloss; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2017-07-14

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus houses the central circadian clock and is characterized by the timely regulated expression of clock genes. However, neurons of the cerebellar cortex also contain a circadian oscillator with circadian expression of clock genes being controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus. It has been suggested that the cerebellar circadian oscillator is involved in food anticipation, but direct molecular evidence of the role of the circadian oscillator of the cerebellar cortex is currently unavailable. To investigate the hypothesis that the circadian oscillator of the cerebellum is involved in circadian physiology and food anticipation, we therefore by use of Cre-LoxP technology generated a conditional knockout mouse with the core clock gene Arntl deleted specifically in granule cells of the cerebellum, since expression of clock genes in the cerebellar cortex is mainly located in this cell type. We here report that deletion of Arntl heavily influences the molecular clock of the cerebellar cortex with significantly altered and arrhythmic expression of other central clock and clock-controlled genes. On the other hand, daily expression of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was unaffected. Telemetric registrations in different light regimes did not detect significant differences in circadian rhythms of running activity and body temperature between Arntl conditional knockout mice and controls. Furthermore, food anticipatory behavior did not differ between genotypes. These data suggest that Arntl is an essential part of the cerebellar oscillator; however, the oscillator of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex does not control traditional circadian parameters or food anticipation. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Expression patterns of a circadian clock gene are associated with age-related polyethism in harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingram Krista K

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in sociogenomics allow for comparative analyses of molecular mechanisms regulating the development of social behavior. In eusocial insects, one key aspect of their sociality, the division of labor, has received the most attention. Age-related polyethism, a derived form of division of labor in ants and bees where colony tasks are allocated among distinct behavioral phenotypes, has traditionally been assumed to be a product of convergent evolution. Previous work has shown that the circadian clock is associated with the development of behavior and division of labor in honeybee societies. We cloned the ortholog of the clock gene, period, from a harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex occidentalis and examined circadian rhythms and daily activity patterns in a species that represents an evolutionary origin of eusociality independent of the honeybee. Results Using real time qPCR analyses, we determined that harvester ants have a daily cyclic expression of period and this rhythm is endogenous (free-running under dark-dark conditions. Cyclic expression of period is task-specific; foragers have strong daily fluctuations but nest workers inside the nest do not. These patterns correspond to differences in behavior as activity levels of foragers show a diurnal pattern while nest workers tend to exhibit continuous locomotor activity at lower levels. In addition, we found that foragers collected in the early fall (relative warm, long days exhibit a delay in the nightly peak of period expression relative to foragers collected in the early spring (relative cold, short days. Conclusion The association of period mRNA expression levels with harvester ant task behaviors suggests that the development of circadian rhythms is associated with the behavioral development of ants. Thus, the circadian clock pathway may represent a conserved 'genetic toolkit' that has facilitated the parallel evolution of age-related polyethism and task allocation in

  10. Indirect effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 on the peripheral circadian clocks in mice.

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    Hitoshi Ando

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks in peripheral tissues are powerfully entrained by feeding. The mechanisms underlying this food entrainment remain unclear, although various humoral and neural factors have been reported to affect peripheral clocks. Because glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, which is rapidly secreted in response to food ingestion, influences multiple humoral and neural signaling pathways, we suggest that GLP-1 plays a role in the food entrainment of peripheral clocks. To test this, we compared the effects of exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, on mRNA expression of the clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Nr1d1, Per1, Per2, and Cry1 with those of refeeding. In addition, we investigated whether exendin-4 could affect the rhythms of the peripheral clocks. In male C57BL/6J mice, although refeeding rapidly (within 2 h altered mRNA levels of Per1 and Per2 in the liver and that of Per1 in adipose tissue, a single i.p. injection of exendin-4 did not cause such changes. However, unlike the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39, exendin-4 significantly influenced Per1 mRNA levels in the liver at 12 h after injection. Moreover, pretreatment with exendin-4 affected the rapid-feeding-induced change in Per1 not only in the liver, but also in adipose tissue, without effect on food intake. Furthermore, during light-phase restricted feeding, repeated dosing of exendin-4 at the beginning of the dark phase profoundly influenced both the food intake and daily rhythms of clock gene expression in peripheral tissues. Thus, these results suggest that exendin-4 modulates peripheral clocks via multiple mechanisms different from those of refeeding.

  11. Indirect effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 on the peripheral circadian clocks in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hitoshi; Ushijima, Kentarou; Fujimura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks in peripheral tissues are powerfully entrained by feeding. The mechanisms underlying this food entrainment remain unclear, although various humoral and neural factors have been reported to affect peripheral clocks. Because glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which is rapidly secreted in response to food ingestion, influences multiple humoral and neural signaling pathways, we suggest that GLP-1 plays a role in the food entrainment of peripheral clocks. To test this, we compared the effects of exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, on mRNA expression of the clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Nr1d1, Per1, Per2, and Cry1) with those of refeeding. In addition, we investigated whether exendin-4 could affect the rhythms of the peripheral clocks. In male C57BL/6J mice, although refeeding rapidly (within 2 h) altered mRNA levels of Per1 and Per2 in the liver and that of Per1 in adipose tissue, a single i.p. injection of exendin-4 did not cause such changes. However, unlike the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39), exendin-4 significantly influenced Per1 mRNA levels in the liver at 12 h after injection. Moreover, pretreatment with exendin-4 affected the rapid-feeding-induced change in Per1 not only in the liver, but also in adipose tissue, without effect on food intake. Furthermore, during light-phase restricted feeding, repeated dosing of exendin-4 at the beginning of the dark phase profoundly influenced both the food intake and daily rhythms of clock gene expression in peripheral tissues. Thus, these results suggest that exendin-4 modulates peripheral clocks via multiple mechanisms different from those of refeeding.

  12. The Circadian Clock Regulates Adipogenesis by a Per3 Crosstalk Pathway to Klf15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Costa, Maria José; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Ji, Lijuan; Morgan, Stefanie L; Feldman, Brian J

    2017-11-28

    The generation of new adipocytes from precursor cells (adipogenesis) has implications for systemic metabolism and is a commonly used model for studying the process of cell differentiation in vitro. Previous studies from us and others suggested that the peripheral circadian clock can influence adipogenesis in vitro, but the mechanisms driving this activity and the relevance for adipogenesis in vivo are unknown. Here we reveal that mouse adipocyte precursor cells (APCs) contain a circadian clock that oscillates in vivo. We expose context-specific features of the clock in APCs: expression of the canonical core clock component Per1 does not significantly oscillate, whereas the lesser-understood paralog Per3 has a prominent rhythm. We discovered that deletion of Per3 promotes adipogenesis in vivo by a clock output pathway in which PER3 and BMAL1 directly regulate Klf15 expression. These findings demonstrate that Per3 has a major role in the APC clock and regulates adipogenesis in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A role for the PERIOD:PERIOD homodimer in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Landskron

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks in eukaryotes rely on transcriptional feedback loops, in which clock genes repress their own transcription resulting in molecular oscillations with a period of approximately 24 h. In Drosophila, the clock proteins Period (PER and Timeless (TIM operate in such a feedback loop, whereby they first accumulate in the cytoplasm of clock cells as a heterodimer. Nuclear translocation of the complex or the individual PER and TIM proteins is followed by repression of per and tim transcription, whereby PER seems to act as the prime repressor. We found that in addition to PER:TIM complexes, functional PER:PER homodimers exist in flies. Specific disruption of PER homodimers results in drastically impaired behavioral and molecular rhythmicity, pointing the biological importance of this clock protein complex. Analysis of PER subcellular distribution and repressor competence in the PER dimer mutant revealed defects in PER nuclear translocation and a disruption of rhythmic period transcription. The striking similarity of these phenotypes with that of reduced CKII activity suggests that the formation or function of the PER dimer is closely linked to this kinase. Our results confirm a previous structural model for PER and provide strong evidence that PER homodimers are important for circadian clock function.

  14. period -1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-08

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  15. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Takashi; Block, Gene D; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca(2+)]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated channel is one of the targets. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Caffeine does not entrain the circadian clock but improves daytime alertness in blind patients with non-24-hour rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Hilaire, Melissa A; Lockley, Steven W

    2015-06-01

    Totally blind individuals are highly likely to suffer from Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder due to a failure of light to reset the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. In this outpatient case series, we investigated whether daily caffeine administration could entrain the circadian pacemaker in non-entrained blind patients to alleviate symptoms of non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder. Three totally blind males (63.0 ± 7.5 years old) were studied at home over ~4 months. Urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) rhythms were measured for 48 h every 1-2 weeks. Participants completed daily sleep-wake logs, and rated their alertness and mood using nine-point scales every ~2-4 h while awake on urine sampling days. Caffeine capsules (150 mg per os) were self-administered daily at 10 a.m. for approximately one circadian beat cycle based on each participant's endogenous circadian period τ and compared to placebo (n = 2) or no treatment (n = 1) in a single-masked manner. Non-24-h aMT6s rhythms were confirmed in all three participants (τ range = 24.32-24.57 h). Daily administration of 150 mg caffeine did not entrain the circadian clock. Caffeine treatment significantly improved daytime alertness at adverse circadian phases (p caffeine was able to improve daytime alertness acutely and may therefore provide temporary symptomatic relief, the inability of caffeine to correct the underlying circadian disorder means that an entraining agent is required to treat Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder in the blind appropriately. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A survey of genomic studies supports association of circadian clock genes with bipolar disorder spectrum illnesses and lithium response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J McCarthy

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD have led to a search for genetic abnormalities in circadian "clock genes" associated with BD. However, no significant clock gene findings have emerged from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. At least three factors could account for this discrepancy: complex traits are polygenic, the organization of the clock is more complex than previously recognized, and/or genetic risk for BD may be shared across multiple illnesses. To investigate these issues, we considered the clock gene network at three levels: essential "core" clock genes, upstream circadian clock modulators, and downstream clock controlled genes. Using relaxed thresholds for GWAS statistical significance, we determined the rates of clock vs. control genetic associations with BD, and four additional illnesses that share clinical features and/or genetic risk with BD (major depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity. Then we compared the results to a set of lithium-responsive genes. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were both enriched among core clock genes but not among upstream clock modulators. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were also enriched among pervasively rhythmic clock-controlled genes but not among genes that were less pervasively rhythmic or non-rhythmic. Our analysis reveals previously unrecognized associations between clock genes and BD-spectrum illnesses, partly reconciling previously discordant results from past GWAS and candidate gene studies.

  18. A Survey of Genomic Studies Supports Association of Circadian Clock Genes with Bipolar Disorder Spectrum Illnesses and Lithium Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael J.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Kelsoe, John R.; Welsh, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD) have led to a search for genetic abnormalities in circadianclock genes” associated with BD. However, no significant clock gene findings have emerged from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). At least three factors could account for this discrepancy: complex traits are polygenic, the organization of the clock is more complex than previously recognized, and/or genetic risk for BD may be shared across multiple illnesses. To investigate these issues, we considered the clock gene network at three levels: essential “core” clock genes, upstream circadian clock modulators, and downstream clock controlled genes. Using relaxed thresholds for GWAS statistical significance, we determined the rates of clock vs. control genetic associations with BD, and four additional illnesses that share clinical features and/or genetic risk with BD (major depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity). Then we compared the results to a set of lithium-responsive genes. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were both enriched among core clock genes but not among upstream clock modulators. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were also enriched among pervasively rhythmic clock-controlled genes but not among genes that were less pervasively rhythmic or non-rhythmic. Our analysis reveals previously unrecognized associations between clock genes and BD-spectrum illnesses, partly reconciling previously discordant results from past GWAS and candidate gene studies. PMID:22384149

  19. Circadian clocks, rhythmic synaptic plasticity and the sleep-wake cycle in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idan eElbaz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock and homeostatic processes are fundamental mechanisms that regulate sleep. Surprisingly, despite decades of research, we still do not know why we sleep. Intriguing hypotheses suggest that sleep regulates synaptic plasticity and consequently has a beneficial role in learning and memory. However, direct evidence is still limited and the molecular regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. The zebrafish provides a powerful vertebrate model system that enables simple genetic manipulation, imaging of neuronal circuits and synapses in living animals, and the monitoring of behavioral performance during day and night. Thus, the zebrafish has become an attractive model to study circadian and homeostatic processes that regulate sleep. Zebrafish clock- and sleep-related genes have been cloned, neuronal circuits that exhibit circadian rhythms of activity and synaptic plasticity have been studied, and rhythmic behavioral outputs have been characterized. Integration of this data could lead to a better understanding of sleep regulation. Here, we review the progress of circadian clock and sleep studies in zebrafish with special emphasis on the genetic and neuroendocrine mechanisms that regulate rhythms of melatonin secretion, structural synaptic plasticity, locomotor activity and sleep.

  20. Circadian clocks, rhythmic synaptic plasticity and the sleep-wake cycle in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Idan; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Gothilf, Yoav; Appelbaum, Lior

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock and homeostatic processes are fundamental mechanisms that regulate sleep. Surprisingly, despite decades of research, we still do not know why we sleep. Intriguing hypotheses suggest that sleep regulates synaptic plasticity and consequently has a beneficial role in learning and memory. However, direct evidence is still limited and the molecular regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. The zebrafish provides a powerful vertebrate model system that enables simple genetic manipulation, imaging of neuronal circuits and synapses in living animals, and the monitoring of behavioral performance during day and night. Thus, the zebrafish has become an attractive model to study circadian and homeostatic processes that regulate sleep. Zebrafish clock- and sleep-related genes have been cloned, neuronal circuits that exhibit circadian rhythms of activity and synaptic plasticity have been studied, and rhythmic behavioral outputs have been characterized. Integration of this data could lead to a better understanding of sleep regulation. Here, we review the progress of circadian clock and sleep studies in zebrafish with special emphasis on the genetic and neuroendocrine mechanisms that regulate rhythms of melatonin secretion, structural synaptic plasticity, locomotor activity and sleep.

  1. Circadian Clock in a Mouse Colon Tumor Regulates Intracellular Iron Levels to Promote Tumor Progression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Matsunaga, Naoya; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Hiroki; Hamamura, Kengo; Tsuruta, Akito; Tsurudome, Yuya; Ogino, Takashi; Hara, Yukinori; Suzuki, Takuya; Hyodo, Kenji; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; To, Hideto; Aramaki, Hironori; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an important biological catalyst and is critical for DNA synthesis during cell proliferation. Cellular iron uptake is enhanced in tumor cells to support increased DNA synthesis. Circadian variations in DNA synthesis and proliferation have been identified in tumor cells, but their relationship with intracellular iron levels is unclear. In this study, we identified a 24-h rhythm in iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) levels in colon-26 tumors implanted in mice. Our findings suggest that IRP2 regulates the 24-h rhythm of transferrin receptor 1 (Tfr1) mRNA expression post-transcriptionally, by binding to RNA stem-loop structures known as iron-response elements. We also found that Irp2 mRNA transcription is promoted by circadian clock genes, including brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (BMAL1) and the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) heterodimer. Moreover, growth in colon-26(Δ19) tumors expressing the clock-mutant protein (CLOCKΔ19) was low compared with that in wild-type colon-26 tumor. The time-dependent variation of cellular iron levels, and the proliferation rate in wild-type colon-26 tumor was decreased by CLOCKΔ19 expression. Our findings suggest that circadian organization contributes to tumor cell proliferation by regulating iron metabolism in the tumor. PMID:26797126

  2. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  3. On the genetic basis of temperature compensation of circadian clocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Rhythms 1, 187–198. Mattern D. L., Forman L. R. and Brody S. 1982 Circadian rhythms in Neurospora crassa: a mutation affecting tempera- ture compensation. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 825–829. Sawyer L, Hennessy M. J., Peixoto A. A., Rosato E., Parkinson. H., Costa R. and Kyriacou C. P. 1997 Natural variation in a.

  4. Impact of heart-specific disruption of the circadian clock on systemic glucose metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomomi; Kohsaka, Akira; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Thein, Zaw Lin; Le, Hue Thi; Waki, Hidefumi; Gouraud, Sabine S; Ihara, Hayato; Nakanishi, Masako; Sato, Fuyuki; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Maeda, Masanobu

    2017-12-22

    The daily rhythm of glucose metabolism is governed by the circadian clock, which consists of cell-autonomous clock machineries residing in nearly every tissue in the body. Disruption of these clock machineries either environmentally or genetically induces the dysregulation of glucose metabolism. Although the roles of clock machineries in the regulation of glucose metabolism have been uncovered in major metabolic tissues, such as the pancreas, liver, and skeletal muscle, it remains unknown whether clock function in non-major metabolic tissues also affects systemic glucose metabolism. Here, we tested the hypothesis that disruption of the clock machinery in the heart might also affect systemic glucose metabolism, because heart function is known to be associated with glucose tolerance. We examined glucose and insulin tolerance as well as heart phenotypes in mice with heart-specific deletion of Bmal1, a core clock gene. Bmal1 deletion in the heart not only decreased heart function but also led to systemic insulin resistance. Moreover, hyperglycemia was induced with age. Furthermore, heart-specific Bmal1-deficient mice exhibited decreased insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt in the liver, thus indicating that Bmal1 deletion in the heart causes hepatic insulin resistance. Our findings revealed an unexpected effect of the function of clock machinery in a non-major metabolic tissue, the heart, on systemic glucose metabolism in mammals.

  5. The human body circadian: How the biologic clock influences sleep and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2000-01-01

    Diurnal, nocturnal or seasonal modes of behavior are not passive responses to changes in the environment; rather, they are generated by an endogenous circadian pacemaker, entrained by a few environmental cues like lightdark cycles. Circadian clock mechanisms involve periodic gene expression, synchronized by a hierarchically superior structure located in mammals in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei. Cycles of sleep and wakefulness are the most conspicuous circadian rhythm. Since modern humans use artificial light to extend their period of wakefulness and activity into the evening hours, they adhere to a shortnight sleep schedule with a highly consolidated and efficient sleep. As shown by studies in artificial long nights, modern humans may be sleepdeprived. Humans have also increasingly insulated themselves from the natural cycles of light and darkness. Still, the human circadian pacemaker has conserved a capacity to detect seasonal changes in day length. A mood disorder involving a recurring autumn or winter depression (seasonal affective disorder, SAD) is related to latitude, with the number of cases increasing with distance from the equator. SAD is ameliorated by using brilliant light. In nonseasonal depression, mood typically fluctuates daily, with improvement over the course of the day, and various physiological functions exhibit an altered circadian pattern, suggesting a link with circadian disruption. Treatment of circadian rhythm disorders, whether precipitated by intrinsic factors (e.g., sleep disorders, blindness, mental disorders, aging) or by extrinsic factors (e.g., jet lag, shift work) has led to the development of a new type of agents called "chronobiotics," among which melatonin is the prototype.

  6. Effect of monochromatic light on circadian rhythmic expression of clock genes and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase in chick retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Bian, Jiang; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2017-01-01

    Birds have more developed visual function. They not only have the ability to detect light and darkness but also have the color vision. Previous study showed that monochromatic light influenced avian physiological processes, which were controlled by clock genes. Therefore, bird's eye is a good model to studying the impact of color of light on circadian rhythms. Avian retina is one of the most important central oscillations. The study was designed to investigate the effect of color of light on the expression of clock genes and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) mRNA expression in chick retina. A total of 240 post-hatching day (P) 0 broiler chickens were exposed to blue (BL), green (GL), red (RL) and white light (WL) from a LED system under a light-dark cycle 12L:12D for 14 d. The results show that the significant daily variations existed in the gene expression of cBmal1, cBmal2, cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3, but not for cClock under four light treatments. The genes cBmal1, cCry1, cPer2 and cPer3 presented circadian rhythmic expression under the various monochromatic lights. When compared with WL, GL elevated the expression of positive regulators of cellular clock (cBmal1, cBmal2 and cClock) and cAanat mRNA level, whereas RL increased the mRNA levels of negative regulators of cellular clock (cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3) and decreased the cAanat mRNA expression in the retina. These results demonstrated that monochromatic light affect the periodic expression levels of the biological clock mRNA by positive and negative feedback loop interactions, GL activated the transcription of cAanat; while RL suppressed the transcription of cAanat. Thereby, color of light regulates ocular cAanat expression by affecting on expression of cellular clock regulators.

  7. Dissection of the couplings between cellular messengers and the circadian clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Jian; Edmunds, L.N.

    1995-12-01

    It has been known in recent years that living cells can exhibit circadian rhythms in totally different physiological processes. Intracellular messengers were demonstrated to mediate the entrained pathways linking rhythmic components between circadian clock and its output signalling. Levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in synchronized cells, and activities of the two key enzymes (AC and PDE) responsible for the cyclic AMP metabolism were measured by applying the isotopic techniques. Bimodal circadian oscillations of the messenger levels and the enzyme activities were disclosed in LD: 12, 12 cycle and constant darkness, as well as in the dividing and non-dividing cultures of the Euglena ZC mutant. Interference experiments with the enzyme activator and inhibitor such as forskolin, 8-Br-cGMP and LY 83583, and analysis of the cell division cycle (CDC) and coupling messengers suggested that the peak pulse of cyclic AMP, circadian oscillation of the AC-cAMP-PDE system and phase-dependent regulation by cyclic GMP might be important coupling factors in downstream mediation between the circadian clock and the CDC. (7 figs.)

  8. Cognitive dysfunction, elevated anxiety and reduced cocaine response in circadian clock-deficient cryptochrome knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri eDe Bundel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock comprises a set of genes involved in cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops that orchestrate the expression of a range of downstream genes, driving circadian patterns of behavior. Cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, anxiety disorders and substance abuse disorders have been associated with disruptions in circadian rhythm and circadian clock genes, but the causal relationship of these associations is still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigate the effect of genetic disruption of the circadian clock, through deletion of both paralogs of the core gene cryptochrome (Cry1 and Cry2. Mice lacking Cry1 and Cry2 (Cry1-/-Cry2-/- displayed attenuated dark phase and novelty-induced locomotor activity. Moreover, they showed impaired recognition memory but intact fear memory. Depression-related behaviors in the forced swim test or sucrose preference tests were unaffected but Cry1-/-Cry2-/- mice displayed increased anxiety in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Finally, hyperlocomotion and striatal phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK induced by a single cocaine administration are strongly reduced in Cry1-/-Cry2-/- mice. Interestingly, only some behavioral measures were affected in mice lacking either Cry1 or Cry2. Notably, recognition memory was impaired in both Cry1-/-Cry2+/+ and Cry1+/+Cry2-/- mice. Moreover, we further observed elevated anxiety in Cry1-/-Cry2+/+ and Cry1+/+Cry2-/- mice. Our data indicate that beyond their role in the control of circadian rhythm, cryptochrome genes have a direct influence in cognitive function, anxiety-related behaviors and sensitivity to psychostimulant drugs.

  9. Selective entrainment of the Drosophila circadian clock to daily gradients in environmental temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goda Tadahiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian clocks are internal daily time keeping mechanisms that allow organisms to anticipate daily changes in their environment and to organize their behavior and physiology in a coherent schedule. Although circadian clocks use temperature compensation mechanisms to maintain the same pace over a range of temperatures, they are also capable of synchronizing to daily temperature cycles. This study identifies key properties of this process. Results Gradually ramping daily temperature cycles are shown here to synchronize behavioral and molecular daily rhythms in Drosophila with a remarkable efficiency. Entrainment to daily temperature gradients of amplitudes as low as 4°C persisted even in the context of environmental profiles that also included continuous gradual increases or decreases in absolute temperature. To determine which elements of daily temperature gradients acted as the key determinants of circadian activity phase, comparative analyses of daily temperature gradients with different wave forms were performed. The phases of ascending and descending temperature acted together as key determinants of entrained circadian phase. In addition, circadian phase was found to be modulated by the relative temperature of release into free running conditions. Release at or close to the trough temperature of entrainment consistently resulted in phase advances. Re-entrainment to daily temperature gradients after large phase shifts occurred relatively slowly and required several cycles, allowing flies to selectively respond to periodic rather than anecdotal signals. The temperature-entrained phase relationship between clock gene expression rhythms and locomotor activity rhythms strongly resembled that previously observed for light entrainment. Moreover, daily temperature gradient and light/dark entrainment reinforced each other if the phases of ascending and descending temperature were in their natural alignment with the light and

  10. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity leads to cell type-specific effects on the molecular circadian clock and time-dependent reduction of glioma cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Charles S; Kim, Sam Moon; Karunarathna, Nirmala; Neuendorff, Nichole; Gerard Toussaint, L; Earnest, David J; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2018-01-10

    The circadian clock is the basis for biological time keeping in eukaryotic organisms. The clock mechanism relies on biochemical signaling pathways to detect environmental stimuli and to regulate the expression of clock-controlled genes throughout the body. MAPK signaling pathways function in both circadian input and output pathways in mammals depending on the tissue; however, little is known about the role of p38 MAPK, an established tumor suppressor, in the mammalian circadian system. Increased expression and activity of p38 MAPK is correlated with poor prognosis in cancer, including glioblastoma multiforme; however, the toxicity of p38 MAPK inhibitors limits their clinical use. Here, we test if timed application of the specific p38 MAPK inhibitor VX-745 reduces glioma cell invasive properties in vitro. The levels and rhythmic accumulation of active phosphorylated p38 MAPK in different cell lines were determined by western blots. Rhythmic luciferase activity from clock gene luciferase reporter cells lines was used to test the effect of p38 MAPK inhibition on clock properties as determined using the damped sine fit and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Nonlinear regression and Akaike's information criteria were used to establish rhythmicity. Boyden chamber assays were used to measure glioma cell invasiveness following time-of-day-specific treatment with VX-745. Significant differences were established using t-tests. We demonstrate the activity of p38 MAPK cycles under control of the clock in mouse fibroblast and SCN cell lines. The levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK were significantly reduced in clock-deficient cells, indicating that the circadian clock plays an important role in activation of this pathway. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with VX-745 led to cell-type-specific period changes in the molecular clock. In addition, phosphorylated p38 MAPK levels were rhythmic in HA glial cells, and high and arrhythmic in invasive IM3 glioma cells. We show that inhibition of

  11. Circadian clock regulation of mRNA translation through eukaryotic elongation factor eEF-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Stephen Z.; Castillo, Kathrina; Sachs, Matthew S.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock has a profound effect on gene regulation, controlling rhythmic transcript accumulation for up to half of expressed genes in eukaryotes. Evidence also exists for clock control of mRNA translation, but the extent and mechanisms for this regulation are not known. In Neurospora crassa, the circadian clock generates daily rhythms in the activation of conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways when cells are grown in constant conditions, including rhythmic activation of the well-characterized p38 osmosensing (OS) MAPK pathway. Rhythmic phosphorylation of the MAPK OS-2 (P-OS-2) leads to temporal control of downstream targets of OS-2. We show that osmotic stress in N. crassa induced the phosphorylation of a eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2) kinase, radiation sensitivity complementing kinase-2 (RCK-2), and that RCK-2 is necessary for high-level phosphorylation of eEF-2, a key regulator of translation elongation. The levels of phosphorylated RCK-2 and phosphorylated eEF-2 cycle in abundance in wild-type cells but not in cells deleted for OS-2 or the core clock component FREQUENCY (FRQ). Translation extracts from cells grown in constant conditions show decreased translational activity in the late subjective morning, coincident with the peak in eEF-2 phosphorylation, and rhythmic translation of glutathione S-transferase (GST-3) from constitutive mRNA levels in vivo is dependent on circadian regulation of eEF-2 activity. In contrast, rhythms in phosphorylated eEF-2 levels are not necessary for rhythms in accumulation of the clock protein FRQ, indicating that clock control of eEF-2 activity promotes rhythmic translation of specific mRNAs. PMID:27506798

  12. Association of circadian rhythm genes ARNTL/BMAL1 and CLOCK with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavtar, Polona; Rudolf, Gorazd; Maver, Aleš; Hodžić, Alenka; Starčević Čizmarević, Nada; Živković, Maja; Šega Jazbec, Saša; Klemenc Ketiš, Zalika; Kapović, Miljenko; Dinčić, Evica; Raičević, Ranko; Sepčić, Juraj; Lovrečić, Luca; Stanković, Aleksandra; Ristić, Smiljana; Peterlin, Borut

    2018-01-01

    Prevalence of multiple sclerosis varies with geographic latitude. We hypothesized that this fact might be partially associated with the influence of latitude on circadian rhythm and consequently that genetic variability of key circadian rhythm regulators, ARNTL and CLOCK genes, might contribute to the risk for multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to analyse selected polymorphisms of ARNTL and CLOCK, and their association with multiple sclerosis. A total of 900 Caucasian patients and 1024 healthy controls were compared for genetic signature at 8 SNPs, 4 for each of both genes. We found a statistically significant difference in genotype (ARNTL rs3789327, P = 7.5·10-5; CLOCK rs6811520 P = 0.02) distributions in patients and controls. The ARNTL rs3789327 CC genotype was associated with higher risk for multiple sclerosis at an OR of 1.67 (95% CI 1.35-2.07, P = 0.0001) and the CLOCK rs6811520 genotype CC at an OR of 1.40 (95% CI 1.13-1.73, P = 0.002). The results of this study suggest that genetic variability in the ARNTL and CLOCK genes might be associated with risk for multiple sclerosis.

  13. Effects of caffeine on the human circadian clock in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Tina M.; Markwald, Rachel R.; McHill, Andrew W.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Snider, Jesse A.; Bessman, Sara C.; Jung, Christopher M.; O’Neill, John S.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine’s wakefulness-promoting and sleep-disrupting effects are well established, yet whether caffeine affects human circadian timing is unknown. Here we show that evening caffeine consumption delays the human circadian melatonin rhythm in vivo, and chronic application of caffeine lengthens the circadian period of molecular oscillations in vitro primarily via an adenosine receptor/cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism. In a double-blind, placebo controlled, ~49-day long within-subject study, we found the equivalent amount of caffeine as that in a double espresso 3 hours before habitual bedtime induced a phase delay of the circadian melatonin rhythm in humans by ~40 minutes. This magnitude of delay was nearly half of the magnitude of the phase-delaying response induced by exposure to 3-hours of evening bright-light (~3000 lux; ~7 Watts/m2) that began at habitual bedtime. Furthermore, using human osteosarcoma U2OS cells expressing clock gene luciferase reporters, we found a dose-dependent lengthening of circadian period by caffeine. By pharmacological dissection and siRNA knockdown we established that perturbation of adenosine receptor signaling, but not ryanodine receptor or phosphodiesterase activity, is sufficient to account for caffeine’s effects on cellular timekeeping. We also used a cyclic AMP biosensor to show that caffeine increased cyclic AMP levels, indicating that caffeine can influence a core component of the cellular circadian clock. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that caffeine influences human circadian timing and gives new insight into how the world’s most widely consumed psychoactive drug impacts upon human physiology. PMID:26378246

  14. Circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of Neochloris oleoabundans under nitrogen limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, de L.; Schepers, L.W.; Cuaresma Franco, M.; Barbosa, M.J.; Martens, D.E.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock schedules processes in microalgae cells at suitable times in the day/night cycle. To gain knowledge about these biological time schedules, Neochloris oleoabundans was grown under constant light conditions and nitrogen limitation. Under these constant conditions, the only variable

  15. Circadian expression of the clock gene Per2 is altered in the ruin lizard (Podarcis sicula) when temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Maria Chiara; Jacobmeier, Birgit; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foà, Augusto; Albrecht, Urs

    2005-02-18

    When exposed to the cold, the body temperature of the ruin lizard (Podarcis sicula), an ectothermic vertebrate, comes into equilibrium with that low environmental temperature. During this time, the behavioral output of the circadian clock, locomotor activity, disappears. We tested the activity of the circadian clockwork at low temperature (6 degrees C) by following the expression of one of its essential components, the Period2 (Per2) gene. Here we show that lizard Per2 (lPer2) expression, which is rhythmic and paralleling the behavioral rhythm of locomotor activity at higher temperature (29 degrees C), becomes constantly high at low temperature. When lizards are re-exposed to high temperature, rhythmic lPer2 expression is re-established after 2 days of adaptation and coincides with onset of locomotor activity. The alteration of the lPer2 expression pattern at low temperature indicates that the activity of the molecular feedback loop is modified under these conditions.

  16. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks

  17. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Biochemistry Biophysics Department, Oregon State University (United States); Moreau, Régis [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Hagen, Tory, E-mail: Tory.Hagen@oregonstate.edu [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Biochemistry Biophysics Department, Oregon State University (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  18. Mathematical model of the Drosophila circadian clock: loop regulation and transcriptional integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M; Bona, Jerry L; Kadener, Sebastian

    2009-11-04

    Eukaryotic circadian clocks include interconnected positive and negative feedback loops. The clock-cycle dimer (CLK-CYC) and its homolog, CLK-BMAL1, are key transcriptional activators of central components of the Drosophila and mammalian circadian networks, respectively. In Drosophila, negative loops include period-timeless and vrille; positive loops include par domain protein 1. Clockwork orange (CWO) is a recently discovered negative transcription factor with unusual effects on period, timeless, vrille, and par domain protein 1. To understand the actions of this protein, we introduced a new system of ordinary differential equations to model regulatory networks. The model is faithful in the sense that it replicates biological observations. CWO loop actions elevate CLK-CYC; the transcription of direct targets responds by integrating opposing signals from CWO and CLK-CYC. Loop regulation and integration of opposite transcriptional signals appear to be central mechanisms as they also explain paradoxical effects of period gain-of-function and null mutations.

  19. The Root Growth-Regulating Brevicompanine Natural Products Modulate the Plant Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montaigu, Amaury; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Krahn, Jan H; Suliman, Mohamed N S; Halder, Vivek; de Ansorena, Elisa; Nickel, Sabrina; Schlicht, Markus; Plíhal, Ondřej; Kubiasová, Karolina; Radová, Lenka; Kracher, Barbara; Tóth, Réka; Kaschani, Farnusch; Coupland, George; Kombrink, Erich; Kaiser, Markus

    2017-06-16

    Plant growth regulating properties of brevicompanines (Brvs), natural products of the fungus Penicillium brevicompactum, have been known for several years, but further investigations into the molecular mechanism of their bioactivity have not been performed. Following chemical synthesis of brevicompanine derivatives, we studied their activity in the model plant Arabidopsis by a combination of plant growth assays, transcriptional profiling, and numerous additional bioassays. These studies demonstrated that brevicompanines cause transcriptional misregulation of core components of the circadian clock, whereas other biological read-outs were not affected. Brevicompanines thus represent promising chemical tools for investigating the regulation of the plant circadian clock. In addition, our study also illustrates the potential of an unbiased -omics-based characterization of bioactive compounds for identifying the often cryptic modes of action of small molecules.

  20. Repeated manganese administration produced abnormal expression of circadian clock genes in the hypothalamus and liver of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Fan, Ximin; Luo, Ying; Song, Sheng; Liu, Jie; Fan, Qiyuan

    2017-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) neurotoxicity displays non-motor dysfunction and motor impairment like Parkinson's disease (PD), and is called as Manganism. Circadian disruption is a non-motor symptom found in PD and Manganism. Clock genes are essential to drive and maintain circadian rhythm, but little is known about Mn exposure on circadian clock genes expression. Both the brain and liver are targets of Mn, we hypothesize that repeated Mn administration could affect clock gene expression in the hypothalamus and livers. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected Mn 2+ 1mg and 5mg/kg as MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O, every other day for 30 days. Mn neurotoxicity was evaluated by behavioral changes and loss of dopaminergic neurons via immunohistochemistry. The expression of circadian clock genes was determined via RT-qPCR. Repeated Mn administration dose-dependently retarded the body weight gain, impaired the rotarod activity, decreased the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, and activated microglia in the brain. Expressions of circadian core genes brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (Bmal1), locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) and neuronal PAS domain protein2 (Npas2), and clock feedback gene cryptochrome1 (Cry1), period genes (Per1 and Per2) in the hypothalamus and liver were decreased after exposure to Mn in a dose-dependent manner, while expressions of clock-targeted genes nuclear receptor Rev-Erbα (Nr1d1) and D-box-binding protein (Dbp) were increased. Peripheral clock in the liver appears to be more susceptible to Mn-induced abnormal clock gene expression. In summary, repeated Mn administration produced dysregulation of circadian clock gene expressions in both the brain and liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Chronotype and Tissue-Specific Alterations of Circadian Clock Function in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládek, Martin; Polidarová, Lenka; Nováková, Marta; Parkanová, Daniela; Sumová, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 10 (2012), e46951 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668; GA ČR(CZ) GPP305/10/P244 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : SHR * circadian system * clock gene * metabolism * colon * liver * suprachiasmatic nucleus Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  2. Alteration of the circadian clock in children with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Marta; Nevsímalová, Sona; Príhodová, Iva; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2012-02-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is associated with sleep disturbances and disrupted melatonin production. The study aimed to ascertain whether the sleep and melatonin production anomalies in SMS patients may be due to an alteration of the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock. Five SMS patients (3-17 yr old) and five healthy age-matched control subjects were involved in the study. Saliva and buccal scrub samples were collected every 4 h during a 24-h period. Daily profiles of melatonin were determined in saliva using a direct double-antibody radioimmunoassay. Daily profiles of clock gene mRNA levels (Per1, Per2, and Rev-erbα) were determined in buccal scrub samples by RT-PCR. In controls, melatonin levels were elevated during the nighttime and very low during the daytime. Daily profiles of clock genes, Per1, Per2, and Rev-erbα, mRNA levels in buccal mucosa exhibited significant and mutually synchronized circadian variations (Per1 and Rev-erbα: P < 0.001; Per2: P < 0.05); the mRNA levels were elevated during the daytime and decreased during the nighttime. In SMS patients, melatonin profiles were significantly altered compared with controls, being phase reversed, phase advanced, depressed, or abolished. Only Per1 and Rev-erbα mRNA profiles exhibited significant circadian rhythms (P < 0.05); the Per2 expression exhibited high variability, and the profile was out of phase with the other clock genes. Our findings suggest that the anomalies in melatonin profiles of SMS patients might be due to a disturbance of the molecular circadian clockwork.

  3. Photoperiod Modulates Fast Delayed Rectifier Potassium Currents in the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Farajnia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One feature of the mammalian circadian clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, is its ability to measure day length and thereby contribute to the seasonal adaptation of physiology and behavior. The timing signal from the SCN, namely the 24 hr pattern of electrical activity, is adjusted according to the photoperiod being broader in long days and narrower in short days. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and gamma-aminobutyric acid play a crucial role in intercellular communication within the SCN and contribute to the seasonal changes in phase distribution. However, little is known about the underlying ionic mechanisms of synchronization. The present study was aimed to identify cellular mechanisms involved in seasonal encoding by the SCN. Mice were adapted to long-day (light–dark 16:8 and short-day (light–dark 8:16 photoperiods and membrane properties as well as K+ currents activity of SCN neurons were measured using patch-clamp recordings in acute slices. Remarkably, we found evidence for a photoperiodic effect on the fast delayed rectifier K+ current, that is, the circadian modulation of this ion channel’s activation reversed in long days resulting in 50% higher peak values during the night compared with the unaltered day values. Consistent with fast delayed rectifier enhancement, duration of action potentials during the night was shortened and afterhyperpolarization potentials increased in amplitude and duration. The slow delayed rectifier, transient K+ currents, and membrane excitability were not affected by photoperiod. We conclude that photoperiod can change intrinsic ion channel properties of the SCN neurons, which may influence cellular communication and contribute to photoperiodic phase adjustment.

  4. Insights into the role of the habenular circadian clock in addiction

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    Nora L Salaberry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a brain disease involving alterations in anatomy and functional neural communication. Drug intake and toxicity show daily rhythms in both humans and rodents. Evidence concerning the role of clock genes in drug intake has been previously reported. However, the implication of a timekeeping brain locus is much less known. The epithalamic lateral habenula (LHb is now emerging as a key nucleus in drug intake and addiction. This brain structure modulates the activity of dopaminergic neurons from the ventral tegmental area, a central part of the reward system. Moreover, the LHb has circadian properties: LHb cellular activity (i.e., firing rate and clock genes expression oscillates in a 24h range, and the nucleus is affected by photic stimulation and has anatomical connections with the main circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Here, we describe the current insights on the role of the LHb as a circadian oscillator and its possible implications on the rhythmic regulation of the dopaminergic activity and drug intake. This data could inspire new strategies to treat drug addiction, considering circadian timing as a principal factor.

  5. Signals from the brainstem sleep/wake centers regulate behavioral timing via the circadian clock.

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    Sabra M Abbott

    Full Text Available Sleep-wake cycling is controlled by the complex interplay between two brain systems, one which controls vigilance state, regulating the transition between sleep and wake, and the other circadian, which communicates time-of-day. Together, they align sleep appropriately with energetic need and the day-night cycle. Neural circuits connect brain stem sites that regulate vigilance state with the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master circadian clock, but the function of these connections has been unknown. Coupling discrete stimulation of pontine nuclei controlling vigilance state with analytical chemical measurements of intra-SCN microdialysates in mouse, we found significant neurotransmitter release at the SCN and, concomitantly, resetting of behavioral circadian rhythms. Depending upon stimulus conditions and time-of-day, SCN acetylcholine and/or glutamate levels were augmented and generated shifts of behavioral rhythms. These results establish modes of neurochemical communication from brain regions controlling vigilance state to the central circadian clock, with behavioral consequences. They suggest a basis for dynamic integration across brain systems that regulate vigilance states, and a potential vulnerability to altered communication in sleep disorders.

  6. Circadian Clock Protein Content and Daily Rhythm of Locomotor Activity Are Altered after Chronic Exposure to Lead in Rat

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    Mariam Sabbar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead exposure has been reported to produce many clinical features, including parkinsonism. However, its consequences on the circadian rhythms are still unknown. Here we aimed to examine the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity following lead intoxication and investigate the mechanisms by which lead may induce alterations of circadian rhythms in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with lead or sodium acetate (10 mg/kg/day, i.p. during 4 weeks. Both groups were tested in the “open field” to quantify the exploratory activity and in the rotarod to evaluate motor coordination. Then, animals were submitted to continuous 24 h recordings of locomotor activity under 14/10 Light/dark (14/10 LD cycle and in complete darkness (DD. At the end of experiments, the clock proteins BMAL1, PER1-2, and CRY1-2 were assayed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN using immunohistochemistry. We showed that lead significantly reduced the number of crossing in the open field, impaired motor coordination and altered the daily locomotor activity rhythm. When the LD cycle was advanced by 6 h, both groups adjusted their daily locomotor activity to the new LD cycle with high onset variability in lead-intoxicated rats compared to controls. Lead also led to a decrease in the number of immunoreactive cells (ir- of BMAL1, PER1, and PER2 without affecting the number of ir-CRY1 and ir-CRY2 cells in the SCN. Our data provide strong evidence that lead intoxication disturbs the rhythm of locomotor activity and alters clock proteins expression in the SCN. They contribute to the understanding of the mechanism by which lead induce circadian rhythms disturbances.

  7. Clock frequency estimation under spontaneous emission

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    Qin, Xi-Zhou; Huang, Jia-Hao; Zhong, Hong-Hua; Lee, Chaohong

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of a driven two-level system under spontaneous emission and its application in clock frequency estimation. By using the Lindblad equation to describe the system, we analytically obtain its exact solutions, which show three different regimes: Rabi oscillation, damped oscillation, and overdamped decay. From the analytical solutions, we explore how the spontaneous emission affects the clock frequency estimation. We find that under a moderate spontaneous emission rate, the transition frequency can still be inferred from the Rabi oscillation. Our results enable potential practical applications in frequency measurement and quantum control under decoherence.

  8. Rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes in the preovulatory ovarian follicles of the laying hen.

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    Zhichao Zhang

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is reported to play a role in the ovaries in a variety of vertebrate species, including the domestic hen. However, the ovary is an organ that changes daily, and the laying hen maintains a strict follicular hierarchy. The aim of this study was to examine the spatial-temporal expression of several known canonical clock genes in the granulosa and theca layers of six hierarchy follicles. We demonstrated that the granulosa cells (GCs of the F1-F3 follicles harbored intrinsic oscillatory mechanisms in vivo. In addition, cultured granulosa cells (GCs from F1 follicles exposed to luteinizing hormone (LH synchronization displayed Per2 mRNA oscillations, whereas, the less mature GCs (F5 plus F6 displayed no circadian change in Per2 mRNA levels. Cultures containing follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH combined with LH expressed levels of Per2 mRNA that were 2.5-fold higher than those in cultures with LH or FSH alone. These results show that there is spatial specificity in the localization of clock cells in hen preovulatory follicles. In addition, our results support the hypothesis that gonadotropins provide a cue for the development of the functional cellular clock in immature GCs.

  9. Loss of CLOCK Results in Dysfunction of Brain Circuits Underlying Focal Epilepsy.

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    Li, Peijun; Fu, Xiaoqin; Smith, Nathan A; Ziobro, Julie; Curiel, Julian; Tenga, Milagros J; Martin, Brandon; Freedman, Samuel; Cea-Del Rio, Christian A; Oboti, Livio; Tsuchida, Tammy N; Oluigbo, Chima; Yaun, Amanda; Magge, Suresh N; O'Neill, Brent; Kao, Amy; Zelleke, Tesfaye G; Depositario-Cabacar, Dewi T; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Knoblach, Susan; Ho, Chen-Ying; Corbin, Joshua G; Goodkin, Howard P; Vicini, Stefano; Huntsman, Molly M; Gaillard, William D; Valdez, Gregorio; Liu, Judy S

    2017-10-11

    Because molecular mechanisms underlying refractory focal epilepsy are poorly defined, we performed transcriptome analysis on human epileptogenic tissue. Compared with controls, expression of Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) is decreased in epileptogenic tissue. To define the function of CLOCK, we generated and tested the Emx-Cre; Clock flox/flox and PV-Cre; Clock flox/flox mouse lines with targeted deletions of the Clock gene in excitatory and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing inhibitory neurons, respectively. The Emx-Cre; Clock flox/flox mouse line alone has decreased seizure thresholds, but no laminar or dendritic defects in the cortex. However, excitatory neurons from the Emx-Cre; Clock flox/flox mouse have spontaneous epileptiform discharges. Both neurons from Emx-Cre; Clock flox/flox mouse and human epileptogenic tissue exhibit decreased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Finally, video-EEG of Emx-Cre; Clock flox/flox mice reveals epileptiform discharges during sleep and also seizures arising from sleep. Altogether, these data show that disruption of CLOCK alters cortical circuits and may lead to generation of focal epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clockwork orange encodes a transcriptional repressor important for circadian-clock amplitude in Drosophila.

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    Lim, Chunghun; Chung, Brian Y; Pitman, Jena L; McGill, Jermaine J; Pradhan, Suraj; Lee, Jongbin; Keegan, Kevin P; Choe, Joonho; Allada, Ravi

    2007-06-19

    Gene transcription is a central timekeeping process in animal clocks. In Drosophila, the basic helix-loop helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription-factor heterodimer, CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC), transcriptionally activates the clock components period (per), timeless (tim), Par domain protein 1 (Pdp1), and vrille (vri), which feed back and regulate distinct features of CLK/CYC function. Microarray studies have identified numerous rhythmically expressed transcripts, some of which are potential direct CLK targets. Here we demonstrate a circadian function for one such target, a bHLH-Orange repressor, CG17100/CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO). cwo is rhythmically expressed, and levels are reduced in Clk mutants, suggesting that cwo is CLK activated in vivo. cwo mutants display reduced-amplitude molecular and behavioral rhythms with lengthened periods. Molecular analysis suggests that CWO acts, in part, by repressing CLK target genes. We propose that CWO acts as a transcriptional and behavioral rhythm amplifier.

  11. clockwork orange encodes a transcriptional repressor important for circadian clock amplitude in Drosophila

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    Lim, Chunghun; Chung, Brian Y.; Pitman, Jena L.; McGill, Jermaine J.; Pradhan, Suraj; Lee, Jongbin; Keegan, Kevin P.; Choe, Joonho; Allada, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gene transcription is a central timekeeping process in animal clocks. In Drosophila, the basic helix-loop helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription factor heterodimer, CLOCK (CLK)/CYCLE(CYC) transcriptionally activates the clock components period (per), timeless (tim), Par domain protein 1 (Pdp1), and vrille (vri) that feedback and regulate distinct features of CLK/CYC function [1]. Microarray studies have identified numerous rhythmically expressed transcripts [2-7], some of which are potential direct CLK targets [7]. Here we demonstrate a circadian function for one such target, a bHLH-Orange repressor CG17100/CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO). cwo is rhythmically expressed and levels are reduced in Clk mutants, suggesting that cwo is CLK-activated in vivo. cwo mutants display reduced amplitude molecular and behavioral rhythms with lengthened periods. Molecular analysis suggests CWO acts, in part, by repressing CLK target genes. We propose that CWO acts as a transcriptional and behavioral rhythm amplifier. PMID:17555964

  12. Perinatal development of human circadian rhythms: role of the foetal biological clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmiran, M.; Kok, J. H.; Boer, K.; Wolf, H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of circadian rhythms and the neuronal mechanisms underlying their generation (particularly the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus) were reviewed. Based on perinatal animal studies and data from human foetuses and/or preterm infants it was concluded that human circadian

  13. Circadian Rhythms and Clock Genes in Reproduction: Insights From Behavior and the Female Rabbit’s Brain

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    Mario Caba

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Clock gene oscillations are necessary for a successful pregnancy and parturition, but little is known about their function during lactation, a period demanding from the mother multiple physiological and behavioral adaptations to fulfill the requirements of the offspring. First, we will focus on circadian rhythms and clock genes in reproductive tissues mainly in rodents. Disruption of circadian rhythms or proper rhythmic oscillations of clock genes provoke reproductive problems, as found in clock gene knockout mice. Then, we will focus mainly on the rabbit doe as this mammal nurses the young just once a day with circadian periodicity. This daily event synchronizes the behavior and the activity of specific brain regions critical for reproductive neuroendocrinology and maternal behavior, like the preoptic area. This region shows strong rhythms of the PER1 protein (product of the Per1 clock gene associated with circadian nursing. Additionally, neuroendocrine cells related to milk production and ejections are also synchronized to daily nursing. A threshold of suckling is necessary to entrain once a day nursing; this process is independent of milk output as even virgin does (behaving maternally following anosmia can display circadian nursing behavior. A timing motivational mechanism may regulate such behavior as mesolimbic dopaminergic cells are entrained by daily nursing. Finally, we will explore about the clinical importance of circadian rhythms. Indeed, women in chronic shift-work schedules show problems in their menstrual cycles and pregnancies and also have a high risk of preterm delivery, making this an important field of translational research.

  14. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure

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    Maria Luisa eGuerriero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-hour day/night cycle.Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks.Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less studied.

  15. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Maria L.; Akman, Ozgur E.; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian) rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-h day/night cycle. Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks. Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less well studied. PMID:25374576

  16. Temporal requirements of the fragile X mental retardation protein in modulating circadian clock circuit synaptic architecture

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    Cheryl L Gatto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Loss of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene function is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders, characterized by attention disorder, hyperactivity and disruption of circadian activity cycles. Pursuit of effective intervention strategies requires determining when the FMR1 product (FMRP is required in the regulation of neuronal circuitry controlling these behaviors. In the well-characterized Drosophila disease model, loss of the highly conserved dFMRP causes circadian arrhythmicity and conspicuous abnormalities in the circadian clock circuitry. Here, a novel Sholl Analysis was used to quantify over-elaborated synaptic architecture in dfmr1-null small ventrolateral neurons (sLNvs, a key subset of clock neurons. The transgenic Gene-Switch system was employed to drive conditional neuronal dFMRP expression in the dfmr1-null mutant background in order to dissect temporal requirements within the clock circuit. Introduction of dFMRP during early brain development, including the stages of neurogenesis, neuronal fate specification and early pathfinding, provided no rescue of dfmr1 mutant phenotypes. Similarly, restoring normal dFMRP expression in the adult failed to restore circadian circuit architecture. In sharp contrast, supplying dFMRP during a transient window of very late brain development, wherein synaptogenesis and substantial subsequent synaptic reorganization (e.g. use-dependent pruning occur, provided strong morphological rescue to reestablish normal sLNvs synaptic arbors. We conclude that dFMRP plays a developmentally restricted role in sculpting synaptic architecture in these neurons that cannot be compensated for by later reintroduction of the protein at maturity.

  17. Circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of Neochloris oleoabundans under nitrogen limitation.

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    de Winter, Lenneke; Schepers, Lutz W; Cuaresma, Maria; Barbosa, Maria J; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H

    2014-10-10

    The circadian clock schedules processes in microalgae cells at suitable times in the day/night cycle. To gain knowledge about these biological time schedules, Neochloris oleoabundans was grown under constant light conditions and nitrogen limitation. Under these constant conditions, the only variable was the circadian clock. The results were compared to previous work done under nitrogen-replete conditions, in order to determine the effect of N-limitation on circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of N. oleoabundans. The circadian clock was not affected by nitrogen-limitation, and cell division was timed in the natural night, despite of constant light conditions. However, because of nitrogen-limitation, not the entire population was able to divide every day. Two subpopulations were observed, which divided alternately every other day. This caused oscillations in biomass yield and composition. Starch and total fatty acids (TFA) were accumulated during the day. Also, fatty acid composition changed during the cell cycle. Neutral lipids were built up during the day, especially in cells that were arrested in their cell cycle (G2 and G3). These findings give insight in the influence of circadian rhythms on the cell cycle and biomass composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of circadian clock genes and environmental factors on cognitive aging in old adults in a Taiwanese population.

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    Lin, Eugene; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Liu, Yu-Li; Yang, Albert C; Kao, Chung-Feng; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2017-04-11

    Previous animal studies have indicated associations between circadian clock genes and cognitive impairment . In this study, we assessed whether 11 circadian clockgenes are associated with cognitive aging independently and/or through complex interactions in an old Taiwanese population. We also analyzed the interactions between environmental factors and these genes in influencing cognitive aging. A total of 634 Taiwanese subjects aged over 60 years from the Taiwan Biobank were analyzed. Mini-Mental State Examinations (MMSE) were administered to all subjects, and MMSE scores were used to evaluate cognitive function. Our data showed associations between cognitive aging and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4 key circadian clock genes, CLOCK rs3749473 (p = 0.0017), NPAS2 rs17655330 (p = 0.0013), RORA rs13329238 (p = 0.0009), and RORB rs10781247 (p = 7.9 x 10-5). We also found that interactions between CLOCK rs3749473, NPAS2 rs17655330, RORA rs13329238, and RORB rs10781247 affected cognitive aging (p = 0.007). Finally, we investigated the influence of interactions between CLOCK rs3749473, RORA rs13329238, and RORB rs10781247 with environmental factors such as alcohol consumption, smoking status, physical activity, and social support on cognitive aging (p = 0.002 ~ 0.01). Our study indicates that circadian clock genes such as the CLOCK, NPAS2, RORA, and RORB genes may contribute to the risk of cognitive aging independently as well as through gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  19. The mPer2 clock gene modulates cocaine actions in the mouse circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brager, Allison J; Stowie, Adam C; Prosser, Rebecca A; Glass, J David

    2013-04-15

    Cocaine is a potent disruptor of photic and non-photic pathways for circadian entrainment of the master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These actions of cocaine likely involve its modulation of molecular (clock gene) components for SCN clock timekeeping. At present, however, the physiological basis of such an interaction is unclear. To address this question, we compared photic and non-photic phase-resetting responses between wild-type (WT) and Per2 mutant mice expressing nonfunctional PER2 protein to systemic and intra-SCN cocaine administrations. In the systemic trials, cocaine was administered i.p. (20 mg/kg) either at midday or prior to a light pulse in the early night to assess its non-photic and photic behavioral phase-resetting actions, respectively. In the intra-SCN trial, cocaine was administered by reverse microdialysis at midday to determine if the SCN is a direct target for its non-photic phase-resetting action. Non-photic phase-advancing responses to i.p. cocaine at midday were significantly (∼3.5-fold) greater in Per2 mutants than WTs. However, the phase-advancing action of intra-SCN cocaine perfusion at midday did not differ between genotypes. In the light pulse trial, Per2 mutants exhibited larger photic phase-delays than did WTs, and the attenuating action of cocaine on this response was proportionately larger than in WTs. These data indicate that the Per2 clock gene is a potent modulator of cocaine's actions in the circadian system. With regard to non-photic phase-resetting, the SCN is confirmed as a direct target of cocaine action; however, Per2 modulation of this effect likely occurs outside of the SCN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dissecting Daily and Circadian Expression Rhythms of Clock-Controlled Genes in Human Blood.

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    Lech, Karolina; Ackermann, Katrin; Revell, Victoria L; Lao, Oscar; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    The identification and investigation of novel clock-controlled genes (CCGs) has been conducted thus far mainly in model organisms such as nocturnal rodents, with limited information in humans. Here, we aimed to characterize daily and circadian expression rhythms of CCGs in human peripheral blood during a sleep/sleep deprivation (S/SD) study and a constant routine (CR) study. Blood expression levels of 9 candidate CCGs (SREBF1, TRIB1, USF1, THRA1, SIRT1, STAT3, CAPRIN1, MKNK2, and ROCK2), were measured across 48 h in 12 participants in the S/SD study and across 33 h in 12 participants in the CR study. Statistically significant rhythms in expression were observed for STAT3, SREBF1, TRIB1, and THRA1 in samples from both the S/SD and the CR studies, indicating that their rhythmicity is driven by the endogenous clock. The MKNK2 gene was significantly rhythmic in the S/SD but not the CR study, which implies its exogenously driven rhythmic expression. In addition, we confirmed the circadian expression of PER1, PER3, and REV-ERBα in the CR study samples, while BMAL1 and HSPA1B were not significantly rhythmic in the CR samples; all 5 genes previously showed significant expression in the S/SD study samples. Overall, our results demonstrate that rhythmic expression patterns of clock and selected clock-controlled genes in human blood cells are in part determined by exogenous factors (sleep and fasting state) and in part by the endogenous circadian timing system. Knowledge of the exogenous and endogenous regulation of gene expression rhythms is needed prior to the selection of potential candidate marker genes for future applications in medical and forensic settings. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Cryptochromes define a novel circadian clock mechanism in monarch butterflies that may underlie sun compass navigation.

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    Haisun Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, a process that is important for successful navigation. We therefore evaluated the monarch clockwork by focusing on the functions of a Drosophila-like cryptochrome (cry, designated cry1, and a vertebrate-like cry, designated cry2, that are both expressed in the butterfly and by placing these genes in the context of other relevant clock genes in vivo. We found that similar temporal patterns of clock gene expression and protein levels occur in the heads, as occur in DpN1 cells, of a monarch cell line that contains a light-driven clock. CRY1 mediates TIMELESS degradation by light in DpN1 cells, and a light-induced TIMELESS decrease occurs in putative clock cells in the pars lateralis (PL in the brain. Moreover, monarch cry1 transgenes partially rescue both biochemical and behavioral light-input defects in cry(b mutant Drosophila. CRY2 is the major transcriptional repressor of CLOCK:CYCLE-mediated transcription in DpN1 cells, and endogenous CRY2 potently inhibits transcription without involvement of PERIOD. CRY2 is co-localized with clock proteins in the PL, and there it translocates to the nucleus at the appropriate time for transcriptional repression. We also discovered CRY2-positive neural projections that oscillate in the central complex. The results define a novel, CRY-centric clock mechanism in the monarch in which CRY1 likely functions as a blue-light photoreceptor for entrainment, whereas CRY2 functions within the clockwork as the transcriptional repressor of a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Our data further suggest that CRY2 may have a dual role in the monarch butterfly's brain-as a core clock element and as an output that regulates circadian activity in the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass.

  2. A role for the clock period circadian regulator 2 gene in regulating the clock gene network in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Yiran; Zhao, Qin; Yang, Kai; Zheng, Gang; Lv, Xiaoqing; Su, Xiaoli

    2018-04-01

    Clock genes are the core of the circadian rhythms in the human body and are important in regulating normal physiological functions. To date, research has indicated that the clock gene, period circadian clock 2 ( PER2 ), is downregulated in numerous types of cancer, and that it is associated with cancer occurrence and progression via the regulation of various downstream cell cycle genes. However, it remains unclear whether the decreased expression of PER2 influences the expression of other clock genes in cancer cells. In the present study, short hairpin RNA interference was used to knockdown PER2 effectively in human oral squamous cell carcinoma SCC15 cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the mRNA expression levels of various clock genes and revealed that, following the knockdown of PER2 in SCC15 cells, the mRNA expression levels of PER3 , brain and muscle ARNT-like 1, deleted in esophageal cancer (DEC)1, DEC2 , cryptochrome circadian clock ( CRY )2, timeless circadian clock, retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-alpha and neuronal PAS domain protein 2 were significantly downregulated, while the mRNA expression levels of PER1 and nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group D member 1 were significantly upregulated. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that proliferation was enhanced and apoptosis was reduced following PER2 knockdown in SCC15 cells (Pclock genes of the clock gene network in cancer cells. This is of great significance in elucidating the molecular function and tumor suppression mechanism of PER2 .

  3. Velocity response curves support the role of continuous entrainment in circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie R; Webb, Alexis B; Smith, Katherine S; Petzold, Linda R; Doyle, Francis J

    2010-04-01

    Circadian clocks drive endogenous oscillations in organisms across the tree of life. The Earth's daily light/dark cycle entrains these clocks to the environment. Two major theories of light entrainment have been presented in the literature. The discrete theory emphasizes the instantaneous phase-shifting behavior of short pulses of light, and the continuous theory emphasizes changes to the period of oscillations in constant-light conditions. Historically, the primary tool for predicting and understanding discrete entrainment has been the PRC, which measures discrete adjustments to the clock's phase. The authors present a unified theory, which relies on a velocity response curve (VRC), similar in shape to a PRC, but that describes continuous adjustments to the clock's speed. The VRC explains data from both discrete and continuous light experiments and is therefore an invaluable tool to understand entrainment. The authors relate VRC features to specific entrainment behaviors, such as seasonal adjustments to the phase of entrainment. Furthermore, they estimate a VRC from PRC data and successfully reproduce additional PRC data. Finally, they entrain a VRC-based model to natural light/dark cycles, demonstrating the unified theory's ability to predict clock behavior in the face of a fluctuating signal. The results indicate that a VRC-based model not only provides a comprehensive understanding of entrainment but also has excellent predictive capabilities.

  4. Synchronizing an aging brain: can entraining circadian clocks by food slow Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Brianne A

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a global epidemic. Unfortunately, we are still without effective treatments or a cure for this disease, which is having devastating consequences for patients, their families, and societies around the world. Until effective treatments are developed, promoting overall health may hold potential for delaying the onset or preventing neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In particular, chronobiological concepts may provide a useful framework for identifying the earliest signs of age-related disease as well as inexpensive and noninvasive methods for promoting health. It is well reported that AD is associated with disrupted circadian functioning to a greater extent than normal aging. However, it is unclear if the central circadian clock (i.e., the suprachiasmatic nucleus) is dysfunctioning, or whether the synchrony between the central and peripheral clocks that control behavior and metabolic processes are becoming uncoupled. Desynchrony of rhythms can negatively affect health, increasing morbidity and mortality in both animal models and humans. If the uncoupling of rhythms is contributing to AD progression or exacerbating symptoms, then it may be possible to draw from the food-entrainment literature to identify mechanisms for re-synchronizing rhythms to improve overall health and reduce the severity of symptoms. The following review will briefly summarize the circadian system, its potential role in AD, and propose using a feeding-related neuropeptide, such as ghrelin, to synchronize uncoupled rhythms. Synchronizing rhythms may be an inexpensive way to promote healthy aging and delay the onset of neurodegenerative disease such as AD.

  5. Circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 in the chromatoid body, a RNA processing granule of male germ cells.

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    Rita L Peruquetti

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex differentiation process that involves genetic and epigenetic regulation, sophisticated hormonal control, and extensive structural changes in male germ cells. RNA nuclear and cytoplasmic bodies appear to be critical for the progress of spermatogenesis. The chromatoid body (CB is a cytoplasmic organelle playing an important role in RNA post-transcriptional and translation regulation during the late steps of germ cell differentiation. The CB is also important for fertility determination since mutations of genes encoding its components cause infertility by spermatogenesis arrest. Targeted ablation of the Bmal1 and Clock genes, which encode central regulators of the circadian clock also result in fertility defects caused by problems other than spermatogenesis alterations. We show that the circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 are localized in the CB in a stage-specific manner of germ cells. Both BMAL1 and CLOCK proteins physically interact with the ATP-dependent DEAD-box RNA helicase MVH (mouse VASA homolog, a hallmark component of the CB. BMAL1 is differentially expressed during the spermatogenic cycle of seminiferous tubules, and Bmal1 and Clock deficient mice display significant CB morphological alterations due to BMAL1 ablation or low expression. These findings suggest that both BMAL1 and CLOCK contribute to CB assembly and physiology, raising questions on the role of the circadian clock in reproduction and on the molecular function that CLOCK and BMAL1 could potentially have in the CB assembly and physiology.

  6. Circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 in the chromatoid body, a RNA processing granule of male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruquetti, Rita L; de Mateo, Sara; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex differentiation process that involves genetic and epigenetic regulation, sophisticated hormonal control, and extensive structural changes in male germ cells. RNA nuclear and cytoplasmic bodies appear to be critical for the progress of spermatogenesis. The chromatoid body (CB) is a cytoplasmic organelle playing an important role in RNA post-transcriptional and translation regulation during the late steps of germ cell differentiation. The CB is also important for fertility determination since mutations of genes encoding its components cause infertility by spermatogenesis arrest. Targeted ablation of the Bmal1 and Clock genes, which encode central regulators of the circadian clock also result in fertility defects caused by problems other than spermatogenesis alterations. We show that the circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 are localized in the CB in a stage-specific manner of germ cells. Both BMAL1 and CLOCK proteins physically interact with the ATP-dependent DEAD-box RNA helicase MVH (mouse VASA homolog), a hallmark component of the CB. BMAL1 is differentially expressed during the spermatogenic cycle of seminiferous tubules, and Bmal1 and Clock deficient mice display significant CB morphological alterations due to BMAL1 ablation or low expression. These findings suggest that both BMAL1 and CLOCK contribute to CB assembly and physiology, raising questions on the role of the circadian clock in reproduction and on the molecular function that CLOCK and BMAL1 could potentially have in the CB assembly and physiology.

  7. Circadian clock of Aedes aegypti: effects of blood-feeding, insemination and RNA interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Carla; Rivas, Gustavo Bueno da S; Lima, José BP; Bruno, Rafaela Vieira; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2013-01-01

    Mosquitoes are the culprits of some of the most important vector borne diseases. A species’ potential as a vector is directly dependent on their pattern of behaviour, which is known to change according to the female’s physiological status such as whether the female is virgin/mated and unfed/blood-fed. However, the molecular mechanism triggered by and/or responsible for such modulations in behaviour is poorly understood. Clock genes are known to be responsible for the control of circadian behaviour in several species. Here we investigate the impact mating and blood-feeding have upon the expression of these genes in the mosquito Aedes aegypti . We show that blood intake, but not insemination, is responsible for the down-regulation of clock genes. Using RNA interference, we observe a slight reduction in the evening activity peak in the fourth day after dstim injection. These data suggest that, as in Drosophila , clock gene expression, circadian behaviour and environmental light regimens are interconnected in Ae. aegypti . PMID:24473806

  8. Light and circadian regulation of clock components aids flexible responses to environmental signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Laura E; Hodge, Sarah K; van Ooijen, Gerben; Troein, Carl; Akman, Ozgur E; Millar, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock measures time across a 24 h period, increasing fitness by phasing biological processes to the most appropriate time of day. The interlocking feedback loop mechanism of the clock is conserved across species; however, the number of loops varies. Mathematical and computational analyses have suggested that loop complexity affects the overall flexibility of the oscillator, including its responses to entrainment signals. We used a discriminating experimental assay, at the transition between different photoperiods, in order to test this proposal in a minimal circadian network (in Ostreococcus tauri) and a more complex network (in Arabidopsis thaliana). Transcriptional and translational reporters in O. tauri primarily tracked dawn or dusk, whereas in A. thaliana, a wider range of responses were observed, consistent with its more flexible clock. Model analysis supported the requirement for this diversity of responses among the components of the more complex network. However, these and earlier data showed that the O. tauri network retains surprising flexibility, despite its simple circuit. We found that models constructed from experimental data can show flexibility either from multiple loops and/or from multiple light inputs. Our results suggest that O. tauri has adopted the latter strategy, possibly as a consequence of genomic reduction. PMID:24842166

  9. The mammalian circadian clock gene Per2 modulates cell death in response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Magnone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Living in the earth’s oxygenated environment forced organisms to develop strategies to cope with the damaging effects of molecular oxygen known as reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here we show that Per2, a molecular component of the mammalian circadian clock, is involved in regulating a cell’s response to oxidative stress. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs containing a mutation in the Per2 gene are more resistant to cytotoxic effects mediated by ROS than wild type cells which is paralleled by an altered regulation of bcl-2 expression in Per2 mutant MEFs. The elevated survival rate and alteration of NADH/NAD+ ratio in the mutant cells is reversed by introduction of the wild type Per2 gene. Interestingly, clock synchronized cells display a time dependent sensitivity to paraquat, a ROS inducing agent. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock is involved in regulating the fate of a cell to survive or to die in response to oxidative stress, which could have implications for cancer development and the aging process.

  10. The Mammalian circadian clock gene per2 modulates cell death in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Maria Chiara; Langmesser, Sonja; Bezdek, April Candice; Tallone, Tiziano; Rusconi, Sandro; Albrecht, Urs

    2014-01-01

    Living in the earth's oxygenated environment forced organisms to develop strategies to cope with the damaging effects of molecular oxygen known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we show that Per2, a molecular component of the mammalian circadian clock, is involved in regulating a cell's response to oxidative stress. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) containing a mutation in the Per2 gene are more resistant to cytotoxic effects mediated by ROS than wild-type cells, which is paralleled by an altered regulation of bcl-2 expression in Per2 mutant MEFs. The elevated survival rate and alteration of NADH/NAD(+) ratio in the mutant cells is reversed by introduction of the wild-type Per2 gene. Interestingly, clock synchronized cells display a time dependent sensitivity to paraquat, a ROS inducing agent. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock is involved in regulating the fate of a cell to survive or to die in response to oxidative stress, which could have implications for cancer development and the aging process.

  11. α1B-Adrenergic receptor signaling controls circadian expression of Tnfrsf11b by regulating clock genes in osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Hirai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous and biological oscillations that occur with a period of <24 h. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker is localized in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and is linked to peripheral tissues through neural and hormonal signals. In the present study, we investigated the physiological function of the molecular clock on bone remodeling. The results of loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments both indicated that the rhythmic expression of Tnfrsf11b, which encodes osteoprotegerin (OPG, was regulated by Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also showed that REV-ERBα negatively regulated Tnfrsf11b as well as Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We systematically investigated the relationship between the sympathetic nervous system and the circadian clock in osteoblasts. The administration of phenylephrine, a nonspecific α1-adrenergic receptor (AR agonist, stimulated the expression of Tnfrsf11b, whereas the genetic ablation of α1B-AR signaling led to the alteration of Tnfrsf11b expression concomitant with Bmal1 and Per2 in bone. Thus, this study demonstrated that the circadian regulation of Tnfrsf11b was regulated by the clock genes encoding REV-ERBα (Nr1d1 and Bmal1 (Bmal1, also known as Arntl, which are components of the core loop of the circadian clock in osteoblasts.

  12. The physiological period length of the human circadian clock in vivo is directly proportional to period in human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Pagani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diurnal behavior in humans is governed by the period length of a circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the brain hypothalamus. Nevertheless, the cell-intrinsic mechanism of this clock is present in most cells of the body. We have shown previously that for individuals of extreme chronotype ("larks" and "owls", clock properties measured in human fibroblasts correlated with extreme diurnal behavior. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we have measured circadian period in human primary fibroblasts taken from normal individuals and, for the first time, compared it directly with physiological period measured in vivo in the same subjects. Human physiological period length was estimated via the secretion pattern of the hormone melatonin in two different groups of sighted subjects and one group of totally blind subjects, each using different methods. Fibroblast period length was measured via cyclical expression of a lentivirally delivered circadian reporter. Within each group, a positive linear correlation was observed between circadian period length in physiology and in fibroblast gene expression. Interestingly, although blind individuals showed on average the same fibroblast clock properties as sighted ones, their physiological periods were significantly longer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the period of human circadian behaviour is mostly driven by cellular clock properties in normal individuals and can be approximated by measurement in peripheral cells such as fibroblasts. Based upon differences among sighted and blind subjects, we also speculate that period can be modified by prolonged unusual conditions such as the total light deprivation of blindness.

  13. A circadian clock in Antarctic krill: an endogenous timing system governs metabolic output rhythms in the euphausid species Euphausia superba.

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    Mathias Teschke

    Full Text Available Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, shapes the structure of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Its central position in the food web, the ongoing environmental changes due to climatic warming, and increasing commercial interest on this species emphasize the urgency of understanding the adaptability of krill to its environment. Krill has evolved rhythmic physiological and behavioral functions which are synchronized with the daily and seasonal cycles of the complex Southern Ocean ecosystem. The mechanisms, however, leading to these rhythms are essentially unknown. Here, we show that krill possesses an endogenous circadian clock that governs metabolic and physiological output rhythms. We found that expression of the canonical clock gene cry2 was highly rhythmic both in a light-dark cycle and in constant darkness. We detected a remarkable short circadian period, which we interpret as a special feature of the krill's circadian clock that helps to entrain the circadian system to the extreme range of photoperiods krill is exposed to throughout the year. Furthermore, we found that important key metabolic enzymes of krill showed bimodal circadian oscillations (∼9-12 h period in transcript abundance and enzymatic activity. Oxygen consumption of krill showed ∼9-12 h oscillations that correlated with the temporal activity profile of key enzymes of aerobic energy metabolism. Our results demonstrate the first report of an endogenous circadian timing system in Antarctic krill and its likely link to metabolic key processes. Krill's circadian clock may not only be critical for synchronization to the solar day but also for the control of seasonal events. This study provides a powerful basis for the investigation into the mechanisms of temporal synchronization in this marine key species and will also lead to the first comprehensive analyses of the circadian clock of a polar marine organism through the entire photoperiodic cycle.

  14. Daily Light Exposure Patterns Reveal Phase and Period of the Human Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelders, Tom; Beersma, Domien G M; Gordijn, Marijke C M; Hut, Roelof A; Wams, Emma J

    2017-06-01

    Light is the most potent time cue that synchronizes (entrains) the circadian pacemaker to the 24-h solar cycle. This entrainment process is an interplay between an individual's daily light perception and intrinsic pacemaker period under free-running conditions. Establishing individual estimates of circadian phase and period can be time-consuming. We show that circadian phase can be accurately predicted (SD = 1.1 h for dim light melatonin onset, DLMO) using 9 days of ambulatory light and activity data as an input to Kronauer's limit-cycle model for the human circadian system. This approach also yields an estimated circadian period of 24.2 h (SD = 0.2 h), with longer periods resulting in later DLMOs. A larger amount of daylight exposure resulted in an earlier DLMO. Individuals with a long circadian period also showed shorter intervals between DLMO and sleep timing. When a field-based estimation of tau can be validated under laboratory studies in a wide variety of individuals, the proposed methods may prove to be essential tools for individualized chronotherapy and light treatment for shift work and jetlag applications. These methods may improve our understanding of fundamental properties of human circadian rhythms under daily living conditions.

  15. Warm Water Bath Stimulates Phase-Shifts of the Peripheral Circadian Clocks in PER2::LUCIFERASE Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks in the peripheral tissues of mice are known to be entrained by pulse stimuli such as restricted feeding, novel wheel running, and several other agents. However, there are no reports on high temperature pulse-mediated entrainment on the phase-shift of peripheral clocks in vivo. Here we show that temperature treatment of mice for two days at 41°C, instead of 37°C, for 1–2 h during the inactive period, using a temperature controlled water bath stimulated phase-advance of peripheral clocks in the kidney, liver, and submandibular gland of PER2::LUCIFERASE mice. On the other hand, treatment for 2 days at 35°C ambient room temperature for 2 h did not cause a phase-advance. Maintenance of mice at 41°C in a water bath, sustained the core body temperature at 40–41°C. However, the use of 37°C water bath or the 35°C ambient room temperature elevated the core body temperature to 38.5°C, suggesting that at least a core body temperature of 40–41°C is necessary to cause phase-advance under light-dark cycle conditions. The temperature pulse stimulation at 41°C, instead of 37°C water bath for 2 h led to the elevated expression of Per1 and Hsp70 in the peripheral tissue of mice. In summary, the present study demonstrates that transient high temperature pulse using water bath during daytime causes phase-advance in mouse peripheral clocks in vivo. The present results suggest that hot water bath may affect the phase of peripheral clocks. PMID:24933288

  16. The flavo-enzyme xanthine oxidase is under circadian control in the marine alga Gonyaulax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tzu-Shing; Roenneberg, Till

    2002-02-01

    The activity of xanthine oxidoreductases (xanthine oxidase, XO, EC 1.2.3.2 and xanthine dehydrogenase, XDH, EC 1.1.1.204) in partially purified extracts of Gonyaulax polyedra was measured over 24 h both in a light:dark cycle and in constant light. This is the first demonstration of xanthine oxidoreductase in a unicellular alga. The activity of the O2-dependent form (XO) was found to be 15 times higher in light than in darkness. The same time-of-day specific differences persisted in constant light, demonstrating a control of XO by the circadian clock. In contrast, the activity of the NAD-dependent form (XDH) is not under circadian control. Because pharmacological inhibition of XO also blocks the effect of blue light on the Gonyaulax circadian clock, the possible relationship between XO and light reception in this unicellular alga will be discussed.

  17. Circadian Clock genes Per2 and clock regulate steroid production, cell proliferation, and luteinizing hormone receptor transcription in ovarian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takashi, E-mail: shimizut@obihiro.ac.jp [Graduate School of Animal and Food Hygiene, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Hirai, Yuko; Murayama, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Akio [Graduate School of Animal and Food Hygiene, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Miyazaki, Hitoshi [Gene Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Miyazaki, Koyomi [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) Central 6, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression. {yields}Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom. {yields} Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. {yields}Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. {yields} The expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. -- Abstract: Circadian Clock genes are associated with the estrous cycle in female animals. Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression in follicle-stimulating hormone FSH-treated granulosa cells. Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom, whereas Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. Similarly, expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. Our data provide a new insight that Per2 and Clock have different action on ovarian granulosa cell functions.

  18. Circadian clock of Drosophila montana is adapted to high variation in summer day lengths and temperatures prevailing at high latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauranen, Hannele; Ala-Honkola, Outi; Kankare, Maaria; Hoikkala, Anneli

    2016-06-01

    Photoperiodic regulation of the circadian rhythms in insect locomotor activity has been studied in several species, but seasonal entrainment of these rhythms is still poorly understood. We have traced the entrainment of activity rhythm of northern Drosophila montana flies in a climate chamber mimicking the photoperiods and day and night temperatures that the flies encounter in northern Finland during the summer. The experiment was started by transferring freshly emerged females into the chamber in early and late summer conditions to obtain both non-diapausing and diapausing females for the studies. The locomotor activity of the females and daily changes in the expression levels of two core circadian clock genes, timeless and period, in their heads were measured at different times of summer. The study revealed several features in fly rhythmicity that are likely to help the flies to cope with high variation in the day length and temperature typical to northern summers. First, both the non-diapausing and the diapausing females showed evening activity, which decreased towards the short day length as observed in the autumn in nature. Second, timeless and period genes showed concordant daily oscillations and seasonal shifts in their expression level in both types of females. Contrary to Drosophila melanogaster, oscillation profiles of these genes were similar to each other in all conditions, including the extremely long days in early summer and the cool temperatures in late summer, and their peak expression levels were not locked to lights-off transition in any photoperiod. Third, the diapausing females were less active than the non-diapausing ones, in spite of their younger age. Overall, the study showed that D. montana clock functions well under long day conditions, and that both the photoperiod and the daily temperature cycles are important zeitgebers for seasonal changes in the circadian rhythm of this species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Circadian clocks and antiaging: do non-aging microalgae like Euglena reveal anything?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Ken; Beneragama, Chalinda K

    2010-04-01

    Microalgae that divide symmetrically in all aspects do not age. While the evolutionary reason for this is obvious, little attention has been paid to the mechanistic explanations. A great deal of study involving many research fields would be needed to explain the mechanisms if we suppose that the immortality results from a lifelong sufficiency of defense from stress or from an essential part of counteracting age-accompanied damage accumulation. Additionally, little is known about the relationships between homeostasis and circadian clocks in antiaging, although each of these has been studied separately. Here, we present a conceptual generalization of those relationships, as suggested by evidence from non-aging microalgae, mainly Euglena. The circadian gating of mitosis and circadian temporal coordination may respectively reduce radiation- and disharmony-induced stress in which homeostasis cannot be involved, whereas circadian resistance rhythms may greatly help homeostatic defense from radiation- and metabolism-induced stress. We also briefly sketch mammalian aging research to compare the current status of knowledge with that of algal antiaging. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypergravity disruption of homeorhetic adaptations to lactation in rat dams include changes in circadian clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Casey

    2012-04-01

    Altered gravity load induced by spaceflight (microgravity and centrifugation (hypergravity is associated with changes in circadian, metabolic, and reproductive systems. Exposure to 2-g hypergravity (HG during pregnancy and lactation decreased rate of mammary metabolic activity and increased pup mortality. We hypothesize HG disrupted maternal homeorhetic responses to pregnancy and lactation are due to changes in maternal metabolism, hormone concentrations, and maternal behavior related to gravity induced alterations in circadian clocks. Effect of HG exposure on mammary, liver and adipose tissue metabolism, plasma hormones and maternal behavior were analyzed in rat dams from mid-pregnancy (Gestational day [G]11 through early lactation (Postnatal day [P]3; comparisons were made across five time-points: G20, G21, P0 (labor and delivery, P1 and P3. Blood, mammary, liver, and adipose tissue were collected for analyzing plasma hormones, glucose oxidation to CO2 and incorporation into lipids, or gene expression. Maternal behavioral phenotyping was conducted using time-lapse videographic analyses. Dam and fetal-pup body mass were significantly reduced in HG in all age groups. HG did not affect labor and delivery; however, HG pups experienced a greater rate of mortality. PRL, corticosterone, and insulin levels and receptor genes were altered by HG. Mammary, liver and adipose tissue metabolism and expression of genes that regulate lipid metabolism were altered by HG exposure. Exposure to HG significantly changed expression of core clock genes in mammary and liver and circadian rhythms of maternal behavior. Gravity load alterations in dam's circadian system may have impacted homeorhetic adaptations needed for a successful lactation.

  1. Independent Control of Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Flowering Time by the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, Miguel A.; Trénor, Marta; Weigel, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Flowering of the facultative long-day plant Arabidopsis is controlled by several endogenous and environmental factors, among them gibberellins (GAs) and day length. The promotion of flowering by long days involves an endogenous clock that interacts with light cues provided by the environment. Light, and specifically photoperiod, is also known to regulate the biosynthesis of GAs, but the effects of GAs and photoperiod on flowering are at least partially separable. Here, we have used a short-period mutant, toc1, to investigate the role of the circadian clock in the control of flowering time by GAs and photoperiod. We show that toc1 affects expression of several floral regulators and a GA biosynthetic gene, but that these effects are independent. PMID:12481060

  2. Differences in circadian rhythmicity in CLOCK 3111T/C genetic variants in moderate obese women as assessed by thermometry, actimetry and body position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics is behind our circadian machinery. CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput) 3111T/C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been previously related to obesity and weight loss. However, phenotypic association and functionality of CLOCK 3111 locus is still unknown. The aim of this stu...

  3. The circadian oscillator of the cerebral cortex: molecular, biochemical and behavioral effects of deleting the Arntl clock gene in cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bering, Tenna; Carstensen, Mikkel Bloss; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2018-01-01

    A molecular circadian oscillator resides in neurons of the cerebral cortex, but its role is unknown. Using the Cre-LoxP method, we have here abolished the core clock gene Arntl in those neurons. This mouse represents the first model carrying a deletion of a circadian clock component specifically...

  4. Circadian clocks and life-history related traits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In D. melanogaster, the observation of greater pupation height under constant darkness than under constant light has been explained by the hypothesis that light has an inhibitory effect on larval wandering behaviour, preventing larvae from crawling higher up the walls of culture vials prior to pupation. If this is the only role of ...

  5. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Lippert

    Full Text Available From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC. Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT. Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH.

  6. System-driven and oscillator-dependent circadian transcription in mice with a conditionally active liver clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Kornmann

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a master pacemaker in neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and clocks of a similar molecular makeup in most peripheral body cells. Peripheral oscillators are self-sustained and cell autonomous, but they have to be synchronized by the SCN to ensure phase coherence within the organism. In principle, the rhythmic expression of genes in peripheral organs could thus be driven not only by local oscillators, but also by circadian systemic signals. To discriminate between these mechanisms, we engineered a mouse strain with a conditionally active liver clock, in which REV-ERBalpha represses the transcription of the essential core clock gene Bmal1 in a doxycycline-dependent manner. We examined circadian liver gene expression genome-wide in mice in which hepatocyte oscillators were either running or arrested, and found that the rhythmic transcription of most genes depended on functional hepatocyte clocks. However, we discovered 31 genes, including the core clock gene mPer2, whose expression oscillated robustly irrespective of whether the liver clock was running or not. By contrast, in liver explants cultured in vitro, circadian cycles of mPer2::luciferase bioluminescence could only be observed when hepatocyte oscillators were operational. Hence, the circadian cycles observed in the liver of intact animals without functional hepatocyte oscillators were likely generated by systemic signals. The finding that rhythmic mPer2 expression can be driven by both systemic cues and local oscillators suggests a plausible mechanism for the phase entrainment of subsidiary clocks in peripheral organs.

  7. Circadian calcium feeding regime in laying hens related to zinc concentration, gene expression of circadian clock, calcium transporters and oxidative status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue; Liu, Yilin; Meng, Tiantian; Xie, Chunyan; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2018-03-08

    The study was conducted to investigate the effects of different circadian calcium feeding regimes on parameters of Zn status and gene expression of circadian clock, calcium transporters and oxidative status in laying hens. In total, 180 of 41-weeks Brown Hy-line laying hens were assigned randomly into three groups, 1-CON group (Control Ca, diets contained 3.4% Ca at both 0730 and 1530 h), 2-HL group (High-low Ca, diets contained 3.6%-3.2% Ca respectively) and 3-LH group (Low-high Ca, diets contained 3.2%-3.6% Ca respectively), which were fed a certain amount of control diet at 0730 h and 1530 h. Blood, tibia, jejunum and kidney samples were collected at 4 h intervals with initial starting at 0800 h after 10 weeks of experiment. Compared with the CON group: 1) the serum zinc in HL group increased at 2000 h, but lower at 1600 h in LH group (P clock genes including CLOCK and BMAL1 expression of HL group were down-regulated at 0000 h and 1600 h, as well as CLOCK, BMAL1, Cry2, Per3 and calcium transporter gene NCX1 in LH group at 2000 h (P CLOCK, Cry1, Cry2 and Per3 of LH group were up-regulated at 0400 h, CLOCK at 0000 h as well, while CLOCK at 2000 h were down-regulated (P clock, calcium transport and antioxidative capacity, and circadian calcium feeding regimes may therefore be considered with regard to improving the calcium usability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Breathing around the clock: an overview of the circadian pattern of respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, Jacopo P

    2004-03-01

    This article reviews human and animal studies about the circadian patterns of physiological variables involved with the respiratory function. Some measures reflecting the mechanical properties of the lungs, such as functional residual capacity, forced expiratory volumes and airway resistance, change periodically with the time of the day. Also resting pulmonary ventilation (V(E)), tidal volume, and breathing rate follow circadian patterns. In humans, these patterns occur independently of the daily changes in activity, whereas, to some extent, they are linked to changes in the state of arousal. Differently, in some rodents, the circadian oscillations of the breathing pattern occur independently of the daily rhythms of either activity or state of arousal. Recent measurements of the breathing pattern for unlimited periods of time in undisturbed animals have indicated that the circadian changes occur in close temporal phase with those of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and body temperature. However, none of these variables can fully explain the circadian pattern of breathing, the origin of which remains unclear. Both in humans and in rats the V(E) responses to hypercapnia or hypoxia differ at various times of the day. In rats, the daily differences in V(E) responses are buffered by changes in metabolic rate, such that, unlike humans, the hyperventilation (defined as the increase in ventilation-metabolism ratio) remains constant throughout the 24 h. The presence of a biological clock is a major advantage in the adaptation to the environment, although it forces some variables to deviate periodically from their mean value. In humans, these deviations become apparent in conditions of hypoxia. Hence, a daily time-window exists in which the respiratory system is less capable of responding to challenges, a factor which may contribute to the findings that some cardio-respiratory symptoms and diseases peak at particular times of the day.

  9. The regulations and role of circadian clock and melatonin in uterine receptivity and pregnancy-An immunological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Gene Chi Wai; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jianzhang; Wu, Fangrong; Liu, Yingyu; Wang, Chi Chiu; Cheong, Ying; Li, Tin Chiu

    2017-08-01

    During normal pregnancy, the mechanism by which the fetus escapes immunological rejection by the maternal womb remains elusive. Given the biological complexities, the immunological mechanism is unlikely to be simply an allograft response in acceptance or rejection of the early pregnancy. Circadian clock responsible for the mammalian circadian rhythm is an endogenously generated rhythm associated with almost all physiological processes including reproduction. There is now growing evidence to suggest that the circadian clocks are intricately linked to the immune system and pregnancy. When perturbed, the role of immune cells can be affected on maintaining the enriched vascular system needed for placentation. This alteration can be triggered by the irregular production of maternal and placental melatonin. Hence, the role of circadian rhythm modulators such as melatonin offers intriguing opportunities for therapy. In this review, we evaluate the complex interaction between the circadian clock and melatonin within the immune system and their roles in the circadian regulation and maintenance of normal pregnancy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Circadian CLOCK gene polymorphisms in relation to sleep patterns and obesity in African Americans: findings from the Jackson heart study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riestra, Pia; Gebreab, Samson Y; Xu, Ruihua; Khan, Rumana J; Gaye, Amadou; Correa, Adolfo; Min, Nancy; Sims, Mario; Davis, Sharon K

    2017-06-23

    Circadian rhythms regulate key biological processes and the dysregulation of the intrinsic clock mechanism affects sleep patterns and obesity onset. The CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles protein kaput) gene encodes a core transcription factor of the molecular circadian clock influencing diverse metabolic pathways, including glucose and lipid homeostasis. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the associations between CLOCK single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and body mass index (BMI). We also evaluated the association of SNPs with BMI related factors such as sleep duration and quality, adiponectin and leptin, in 2962 participants (1116 men and 1810 women) from the Jackson Heart Study. Genotype data for the selected 23 CLOCK gene SNPS was obtained by imputation with IMPUTE2 software and reference phase data from the 1000 genome project. Genetic analyses were conducted with PLINK RESULTS: We found a significant association between the CLOCK SNP rs2070062 and sleep duration, participants carriers of the T allele showed significantly shorter sleep duration compared to non-carriers after the adjustment for individual proportions of European ancestry (PEA), socio economic status (SES), body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption and smoking status that reach the significance threshold after multiple testing correction. In addition, we found nominal associations of the CLOCK SNP rs6853192 with longer sleep duration and the rs6820823, rs3792603 and rs11726609 with BMI. However, these associations did not reach the significance threshold after correction for multiple testing. In this work, CLOCK gene variants were associated with sleep duration and BMI suggesting that the effects of these polymorphisms on circadian rhythmicity may affect sleep duration and body weight regulation in Africans Americans.

  11. The Aging Clock and Circadian Control of Metabolism and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria P. Belancio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that aging is characterized by a gradual decline in the efficiency and accuracy of biological processes, leading to deterioration of physiological functions and development of age-associated diseases. Age-dependent accumulation of genomic instability and development of metabolic syndrome are well-recognized components of the aging phenotype, both of which have been extensively studied. Existing findings strongly support the view that the integrity of the cellular genome and metabolic function can be influenced by light at night (LAN and associated suppression of circadian melatonin production. While LAN is reported to accelerate aging by promoting age-associated carcinogenesis in several animal models, the specific molecular mechanism(s of its action are not fully understood. Here, we review literature supporting a connection between LAN-induced central circadian disruption of peripheral circadian rhythms and clock function, LINE-1 retrotransposon-associated genomic instability, metabolic deregulation, and aging. We propose that aging is a progressive decline in the stability, continuity and synchronization of multi-frequency oscillations in biological processes to a temporally disorganized state. By extension, healthy aging is the ability to maintain the most consistent, stable and entrainable rhythmicity and coordination of these oscillations, at the molecular, cellular, and systemic levels.

  12. Modeling of regulatory networks: theory and applications in the study of the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Elizabeth Y; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M

    2011-01-01

    Biological networks can be very complex. Mathematical modeling and simulation of regulatory networks can assist in resolving unanswered questions about these complex systems, which are often impossible to explore experimentally. The network regulating the Drosophila circadian clock is particularly amenable to such modeling given its complexity and what we call the clockwork orange (CWO) anomaly. CWO is a protein whose function in the network as an indirect activator of genes per, tim, vri, and pdp1 is counterintuitive--in isolated experiments, CWO inhibits transcription of these genes. Although many different types of modeling frameworks have recently been applied to the Drosophila circadian network, this chapter focuses on the application of continuous deterministic dynamic modeling to this network. In particular, we present three unique systems of ordinary differential equations that have been used to successfully model different aspects of the circadian network. The last model incorporates the newly identified protein CWO, and we explain how this model's unique mathematical equations can be used to explore and resolve the CWO anomaly. Finally, analysis of these equations gives rise to a new network regulatory rule, which clarifies the unusual role of CWO in this dynamical system. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Circadian Clocks for All Meal-Times: Anticipation of 2 Daily Meals in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Kent, Brianne A.; Chan, Sofina; Patton, Danica F.; Weinberg, Alexander; Parfyonov, Maksim

    2012-01-01

    Anticipation of a daily meal in rats has been conceptualized as a rest-activity rhythm driven by a food-entrained circadian oscillator separate from the pacemaker generating light-dark (LD) entrained rhythms. Rats can also anticipate two daily mealtimes, but whether this involves independently entrained oscillators, one ‘continuously consulted’ clock, cue-dependent non-circadian interval timing or a combination of processes, is unclear. Rats received two daily meals, beginning 3-h (meal 1) and 13-h (meal 2) after lights-on (LD 14∶10). Anticipatory wheel running began 68±8 min prior to meal 1 and 101±9 min prior to meal 2 but neither the duration nor the variability of anticipation bout lengths exhibited the scalar property, a hallmark of interval timing. Meal omission tests in LD and constant dark (DD) did not alter the timing of either bout of anticipation, and anticipation of meal 2 was not altered by a 3-h advance of meal 1. Food anticipatory running in this 2-meal protocol thus does not exhibit properties of interval timing despite the availability of external time cues in LD. Across all days, the two bouts of anticipation were uncorrelated, a result more consistent with two independently entrained oscillators than a single consulted clock. Similar results were obtained for meals scheduled 3-h and 10-h after lights-on, and for a food-bin measure of anticipation. Most rats that showed weak or no anticipation to one or both meals exhibited elevated activity at mealtime during 1 or 2 day food deprivation tests in DD, suggesting covert operation of circadian timing in the absence of anticipatory behavior. A control experiment confirmed that daytime feeding did not shift LD-entrained rhythms, ruling out displaced nocturnal activity as an explanation for daytime activity. The results favor a multiple oscillator basis for 2-meal anticipatory rhythms and provide no evidence for involvement of cue-dependent interval timing. PMID:22355393

  14. Multiple circadian transcriptional elements cooperatively regulate cell-autonomous transcriptional oscillation ofPeriod3, a mammalian clock gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Ritsuko; Akashi, Makoto

    2017-09-29

    Cell-autonomous oscillation in clock gene expression drives circadian rhythms. The development of comprehensive analytical techniques, such as bioinformatics and ChIP-sequencing, has enabled the genome-wide identification of potential circadian transcriptional elements that regulate the transcriptional oscillation of clock genes. However, detailed analyses using traditional biochemical and molecular-biological approaches, such as binding and reporter assays, are still necessary to determine whether these potential circadian transcriptional elements are actually functional and how significantly they contribute to driving transcriptional oscillation. Here, we focused on the molecular mechanism of transcriptional oscillations in the mammalian clock gene Period3 ( Per3 ). The PER3 protein is essential for robust peripheral clocks and is a key component in circadian output processes. We found three E box-like elements located upstream of human Per3 transcription start sites that additively contributed to cell-autonomous transcriptional oscillation. However, we also found that Per3 is still expressed in a circadian manner when all three E box-like elements are functionally impaired. We noted that Per3 transcription was activated by the synergistic actions of two D box-like elements and the three E box-like elements, leading to a drastic increase in circadian amplitude. Interestingly, circadian expression of Per3 was completely disrupted only when all five transcriptional elements were functionally impaired. These results indicate that three E box-like and two D box-like elements cooperatively and redundantly regulate cell-autonomous transcriptional oscillation of Per3 . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Evolution of robust circadian clocks in Drosophila melanogaster populations reared in constant dark for over 330 generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindey, Radhika; Varma, Vishwanath; Nikhil, K. L.; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Robustness is considered to be an important feature of biological systems which may evolve when the functionality of a trait is associated with higher fitness across multiple environmental conditions. Thus, the ability to maintain stable biological phenotypes across environments is thought to be of adaptive value. Previously, we have reported higher intrinsic activity levels (activity levels of free-running rhythm in constant darkness) and power of rhythm (as assessed by amplitude of the periodogram) in Drosophila melanogaster populations (stocks) reared in constant darkness (DD stocks) as compared to those reared in constant light (LL stocks) and 12:12-h light-dark cycles (LD stocks) for over 19 years (˜330 generations). In the current study, we intended to examine whether the enhanced levels of activity observed in DD stocks persist under various environments such as photoperiods, ambient temperatures, non-24-h light-dark (LD) cycles, and semi-natural conditions (SN). We found that DD stocks largely retain their phenotype of enhanced activity levels across most of the above-mentioned environments suggesting the evolution of robust circadian clocks in DD stocks. Furthermore, we compared the peak activity levels of the three stocks across different environmental conditions relative to their peaks in constant darkness and found that the change in peak activity levels upon entrainment was not significantly different across the three stocks for any of the examined environmental conditions. This suggests that the enhancement of activity levels in DD stocks is not due to differential sensitivity to environment. Thus, these results suggest that rearing in constant darkness (DD) leads to evolution of robust circadian clocks suggesting a possible adaptive value of possessing such rhythms under constant dark environments.

  16. There Is No Association Between the Circadian Clock Gene HPER3 and Cognitive Dysfunction After Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt Hansen, Melissa; Simon Rasmussen, Lars; Jespersgaard, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    The specific clock-gene PERIOD3 is important with regard to circadian rhythmicity, sleep homeostasis, and cognitive function. The allele PER3(5/5) has been associated with worse cognitive performance in response to sleep deprivation. We hypothesized that patients with the PER3(5/5) genotype would...

  17. QUASIMODO, a novel GPI-anchored zona pellucida protein involved in light input to the Drosophila circadian clock

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, K. F.; Peschel, N.; Závodská, Radka; Sehadová, Hana; Stanewsky, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 9 (2011), s. 719-729 ISSN 0960-9822 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : QUASIMODO * Drosophila * circadian clock Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 9.647, year: 2011

  18. Melatonin administered during the fetal stage affects circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus but not in the liver

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Houdek, Pavel; Polidarová, Lenka; Nováková, Marta; Matějů, Kristýna; Kubík, Štěpán; Sumová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 2 (2015), s. 131-144 ISSN 1932-8451 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ontogenesis * circadian system * suprachiasmatic nuclei * clock gene * melatonin Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.529, year: 2015

  19. Sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiate photic resetting of the master circadian clock in a diurnal rodent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar Jha, Pawan; Bouâouda, Hanan; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Dumont, Stephanie; Fuchs, Fanny; Goumon, Yannick; Bourgin, Patrice; Kalsbeek, A.; Challet, Etienne

    Circadian rhythms in nocturnal and diurnal mammals are primarily synchronized to local time by the light-dark cycle. However, non-photic factors, such as behavioural arousal and metabolic cues, can also phase-shift the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and/or reduce the synchronizing

  20. Sleep Deprivation and Caffeine Treatment Potentiate Photic Resetting of the Master Circadian Clock in a Diurnal Rodent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jha, Pawan Kumar; Bouâouda, Hanan; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Dumont, Stephanie; Fuchs, Fanny; Goumon, Yannick; Bourgin, Patrice; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in nocturnal and diurnal mammals are primarily synchronized to local time by the light/dark cycle. However, nonphotic factors, such as behavioral arousal and metabolic cues, can also phase shift the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCNs) and/or reduce the synchronizing

  1. AKIN10 Activity as a Cellular Link Between Metabolism and Circadian-Clock Entrainment in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Villarreal, Alfredo; Davis, Amanda M; Davis, Seth J

    2017-12-12

    AKIN10, the catalytic subunit of the Snf1 (sucrose non-fermenting 1)-related kinase 1 (SnRK1) complex, acts as an energy sensor in plants. We showed that AKIN10-induced expression affects the pace of the circadian clock and particularly the phase of expression of GIGANTEA (GI). The AKIN10 effect on period length required TIME FOR COFFEE (TIC), a circadian-clock component with developmental and metabolic roles. Here we expand on the possible interactions between AKIN10, whose activity is involved in transcriptional reprogramming, and clock elements GI and TIC. We hypothesize how they could participate in clock entrainment through a metabolic signal derived from carbon pools and starch metabolism. Additionally, we consider further the role of cellular energy status to the clock through the formation of a hypothetical protein complex. We also demonstrate the role of AKIN10, but not its sequence-related kinase AKIN11, on clock periodicity. Altogether we present a model of action of these elements in metabolic-related clock entrainment.

  2. Usf1, a suppressor of the circadian Clock mutant, reveals the nature of the DNA-binding of the CLOCK:BMAL1 complex in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Kumar, Vivek; Koike, Nobuya; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Chong, Jason; Buhr, Ethan D; Whiteley, Andrew R; Low, Sharon S; Omura, Chiaki; Fenner, Deborah; Owens, Joseph R; Richards, Marc; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Hong, Hee-Kyung; Vitaterna, Martha H; Bass, Joseph; Pletcher, Mathew T; Wiltshire, Tim; Hogenesch, John; Lowrey, Phillip L; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and molecular approaches have been critical for elucidating the mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. Here, we demonstrate that the ClockΔ19 mutant behavioral phenotype is significantly modified by mouse strain genetic background. We map a suppressor of the ClockΔ19 mutation to a ∼900 kb interval on mouse chromosome 1 and identify the transcription factor, Usf1, as the responsible gene. A SNP in the promoter of Usf1 causes elevation of its transcript and protein in strains that suppress the Clock mutant phenotype. USF1 competes with the CLOCK:BMAL1 complex for binding to E-box sites in target genes. Saturation binding experiments demonstrate reduced affinity of the CLOCKΔ19:BMAL1 complex for E-box sites, thereby permitting increased USF1 occupancy on a genome-wide basis. We propose that USF1 is an important modulator of molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in mammals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00426.001 PMID:23580255

  3. The Circadian Clock Gene Bmal1 Controls Thyroid Hormone-Mediated Spectral Identity and Cone Photoreceptor Function

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    Onkar B. Sawant

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks regulate various aspects of photoreceptor physiology, but their contribution to photoreceptor development and function is unclear. Cone photoreceptors are critical for color vision. Here, we define the molecular function of circadian activity within cone photoreceptors and reveal a role for the clock genes Bmal1 and Per2 in regulating cone spectral identity. ChIP analysis revealed that BMAL1 binds to the promoter region of the thyroid hormone (TH-activating enzyme type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2 and thus regulates the expression of Dio2. TH treatment resulted in a partial rescue of the phenotype caused by the loss of Bmal1, thus revealing a functional relationship between Bmal1 and Dio2 in establishing cone photoreceptor identity. Furthermore, Bmal1 and Dio2 are required to maintain cone photoreceptor functional integrity. Overall, our results suggest a mechanism by which circadian proteins can locally regulate the availability of TH and influence tissue development and function.

  4. Role of Inflammatory Signaling in the Differential Effects of Saturated and Poly-unsaturated Fatty Acids on Peripheral Circadian Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sam-Moon; Neuendorff, Nichole; Chapkin, Robert S; Earnest, David J

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory signaling may play a role in high-fat diet (HFD)-related circadian clock disturbances that contribute to systemic metabolic dysregulation. Therefore, palmitate, the prevalent proinflammatory saturated fatty acid (SFA) in HFD and the anti-inflammatory, poly-unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), were analyzed for effects on circadian timekeeping and inflammatory responses in peripheral clocks. Prolonged palmitate, but not DHA, exposure increased the period of fibroblast Bmal1-dLuc rhythms. Acute palmitate treatment produced phase shifts of the Bmal1-dLuc rhythm that were larger in amplitude as compared to DHA. These phase-shifting effects were time-dependent and contemporaneous with rhythmic changes in palmitate-induced inflammatory responses. Fibroblast and differentiated adipocyte clocks exhibited cell-specific differences in the time-dependent nature of palmitate-induced shifts and inflammation. DHA and other inhibitors of inflammatory signaling (AICAR, cardamonin) repressed palmitate-induced proinflammatory responses and phase shifts of the fibroblast clock, suggesting that SFA-mediated inflammatory signaling may feed back to modulate circadian timekeeping in peripheral clocks. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Pyrexia transient receptor potential channel mediates circadian clock synchronization to low temperature cycles in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Werner; Simoni, Alekos; Gentile, Carla; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2013-10-07

    Circadian clocks are endogenous approximately 24 h oscillators that temporally regulate many physiological and behavioural processes. In order to be beneficial for the organism, these clocks must be synchronized with the environmental cycles on a daily basis. Both light : dark and the concomitant daily temperature cycles (TCs) function as Zeitgeber ('time giver') and efficiently entrain circadian clocks. The temperature receptors mediating this synchronization have not been identified. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels function as thermo-receptors in animals, and here we show that the Pyrexia (Pyx) TRP channel mediates temperature synchronization in Drosophila melanogaster. Pyx is expressed in peripheral sensory organs (chordotonal organs), which previously have been implicated in temperature synchronization. Flies deficient for Pyx function fail to synchronize their behaviour to TCs in the lower range (16-20°C), and this deficit can be partially rescued by introducing a wild-type copy of the pyx gene. Synchronization to higher TCs is not affected, demonstrating a specific role for Pyx at lower temperatures. In addition, pyx mutants speed up their clock after being exposed to TCs. Our results identify the first TRP channel involved in temperature synchronization of circadian clocks.

  6. Rapid Adjustment of Circadian Clocks to Simulated Travel to Time Zones across the Globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elizabeth M; Gorman, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Daily rhythms in mammalian physiology and behavior are generated by a central pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the timing of which is set by light from the environment. When the ambient light-dark cycle is shifted, as occurs with travel across time zones, the SCN and its output rhythms must reset or re-entrain their phases to match the new schedule-a sluggish process requiring about 1 day per hour shift. Using a global assay of circadian resetting to 6 equidistant time-zone meridians, we document this characteristically slow and distance-dependent resetting of Syrian hamsters under typical laboratory lighting conditions, which mimic summer day lengths. The circadian pacemaker, however, is additionally entrainable with respect to its waveform (i.e., the shape of the 24-h oscillation) allowing for tracking of seasonally varying day lengths. We here demonstrate an unprecedented, light exposure-based acceleration in phase resetting following 2 manipulations of circadian waveform. Adaptation of circadian waveforms to long winter nights (8 h light, 16 h dark) doubled the shift response in the first 3 days after the shift. Moreover, a bifurcated waveform induced by exposure to a novel 24-h light-dark-light-dark cycle permitted nearly instant resetting to phase shifts from 4 to 12 h in magnitude, representing a 71% reduction in the mismatch between the activity rhythm and the new photocycle. Thus, a marked enhancement of phase shifting can be induced via nonpharmacological, noninvasive manipulation of the circadian pacemaker waveform in a model species for mammalian circadian rhythmicity. Given the evidence of conserved flexibility in the human pacemaker waveform, these findings raise the promise of flexible resetting applicable to circadian disruption in shift workers, frequent time-zone travelers, and any individual forced to adjust to challenging schedules. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Circadian Clock Proteins and Melatonin Receptors in Neurons and Glia of the Sapajus apella Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila M. Guissoni Campos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations of brain proteins in circadian rhythms are important for determining several cellular and physiological processes in anticipation of daily and seasonal environmental rhythms. In addition to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the primary central oscillator, the cerebellum shows oscillations in gene and protein expression. The variety of local circuit rhythms that the cerebellar cortex contains influences functions such as motivational processes, regulation of feeding, food anticipation, language, and working memory. The molecular basis of the cerebellar oscillator has been demonstrated by “clock gene” expression within cells of the cerebellar layers. Genetic and epidemiological evidence suggests that disruption of circadian rhythms in humans can lead to many pathological conditions. Despite this importance, data about clock gene and protein expression in the cerebellum of diurnal (day-active species, specifically primates, is currently poorly explored, mainly in regard to cellular identity, as well as the relationship with other molecules also involved in cerebellar functions. These studies could contribute to clarification of the possible mechanisms behind cerebellar rhythmicity. Considering that calcium binding proteins (CaBPs play crucial roles in preserving and modulating cerebellar functions and that clock gene expression can be controlled by afferent projections or paracrine circadian signals such as the hormone melatonin, the present study aimed to describe cellular identities, distribution patterns and day/night expression changes in PER1, PER2, CaBPs, and MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in the cerebellar cortex of a diurnal primate using conventional fluorescence and peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemical techniques. PER1 and PER2 immunoreactive (IR cells were observed in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, and MT1 and MT2 receptors were localized around Purkinje cells in the Pj layer in Bergmann cells. This identity

  8. Origin of the Animal Circadian Clock: Diurnal and Light-Entrained Gene Expression in the Sponge Amphimedon queenslandica

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    Katia Jindrich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a molecular network that coordinates organismal behavior and physiology with daily environmental changes in the day-night cycle. In eumetazoans (bilaterians + cnidarians, this network appears to be largely conserved, yet different from other known eukaryotic circadian networks. To determine if the eumetazoan circadian network has an older origin, we ask here whether orthologs comprising this network are expressed in a manner consistent with a role in regulating circadian patterns in a representative of an earlier-branching animal lineage, the sponge Amphimedon queenslandica. The A. queenslandica genome encodes orthologs of many eumetazoan circadian genes, including two cryptochrome genes that encode flavoproteins, three Timeout genes, and two PAR-bZIP and seven bHLH-PAS transcription factor genes. There is no apparent Cycle ortholog, although we can identify three closely related ARNT genes. Of the putative circadian genes, only AqPARa and AqCry2 have a consistent oscillating diurnal expression profile, and the rhythmic expression of both these genes is partially lost when the animals are exposed to constant light or darkness. Expression of the other putative circadian genes, in particular AqClock, is neither diurnally-oscillating nor light-dependent. AqPARa and AqCry2 are also temporally and spatially co-expressed throughout embryonic and larval development. Transcripts of these genes are enriched first in cells comprising the larval posterior pigment ring, which is a simple photosensory organ that is responsible for the negative phototactic behavior displayed by larvae, and subsequently in the larval epithelial and subepithelial layers. The combined findings of no clear Cycle ortholog and of PAR-bZIP and cryptochrome being the only orthologs expressed in a pattern consistent with a circadian role suggests that either (i the ancestral metazoan circadian network was simpler than the eumetazoan network, or (ii that this

  9. The Timing of the Circadian Clock and Sleep Differ between Napping and Non-Napping Toddlers.

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    Lameese D Akacem

    Full Text Available The timing of the internal circadian clock shows large inter-individual variability across the lifespan. Although the sleep-wakefulness pattern of most toddlers includes an afternoon nap, the association between napping and circadian phase in early childhood remains unexplored. This study examined differences in circadian phase and sleep between napping and non-napping toddlers. Data were collected on 20 toddlers (34.2±2.0 months; 12 females; 15 nappers. Children followed their habitual napping and non-napping sleep schedules (monitored with actigraphy for 5 days before an in-home salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO assessment. On average, napping children fell asleep during their nap opportunities on 3.6±1.2 of the 5 days before the DLMO assessment. For these napping children, melatonin onset time was 38 min later (p = 0.044; d = 0.93, actigraphically-estimated bedtime was 43 min later (p = 0.014; d = 1.24, sleep onset time was 59 min later (p = 0.006; d = 1.46, and sleep onset latency was 16 min longer (p = 0.030; d = 1.03 than those not napping. Midsleep and wake time did not differ by napping status. No difference was observed in the bedtime, sleep onset, or midsleep phase relationships with DLMO; however, the wake time phase difference was 47 min smaller for napping toddlers (p = 0.029; d = 1.23. On average, nappers had 69 min shorter nighttime sleep durations (p = 0.006; d = 1.47 and spent 49 min less time in bed (p = 0.019; d = 1.16 than non-nappers. Number of days napping was correlated with melatonin onset time (r = 0.49; p = 0.014. Our findings indicate that napping influences individual variability in melatonin onset time in early childhood. The delayed bedtimes of napping toddlers likely permits light exposure later in the evening, thereby delaying the timing of the clock and sleep. Whether the early developmental trajectory of circadian phase involves an advance associated with the decline in napping is a question

  10. Clock-dependent and system-driven oscillators interact in the suprachiasmatic nuclei to pace mammalian circadian rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Abitbol

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks drive biological rhythms with a period of approximately 24 hours and keep in time with the outside world through daily resetting by environmental cues. While this external entrainment has been extensively investigated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN, the role of internal systemic rhythms, including daily fluctuations in core temperature or circulating hormones remains debated. Here, we show that lactating mice, which exhibit dampened systemic rhythms, possess normal molecular clockwork but impaired rhythms in both heat shock response gene expression and electrophysiological output in their SCN. This suggests that body rhythms regulate SCN activity downstream of the clock. Mathematical modeling predicts that systemic feedback upon the SCN functions as an internal oscillator that accounts for in vivo and ex vivo observations. Thus we are able to propose a new bottom-up hierarchical organization of circadian timekeeping in mammals, based on the interaction in the SCN between clock-dependent and system-driven oscillators.

  11. Circadian clock genes Per1 and Per2 regulate the response of metabolism-associated transcripts to sleep disruption.

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    Jana Husse

    Full Text Available Human and animal studies demonstrate that short sleep or poor sleep quality, e.g. in night shift workers, promote the development of obesity and diabetes. Effects of sleep disruption on glucose homeostasis and liver physiology are well documented. However, changes in adipokine levels after sleep disruption suggest that adipocytes might be another important peripheral target of sleep. Circadian clocks regulate metabolic homeostasis and clock disruption can result in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The finding that sleep and clock disruption have very similar metabolic effects prompted us to ask whether the circadian clock machinery may mediate the metabolic consequences of sleep disruption. To test this we analyzed energy homeostasis and adipocyte transcriptome regulation in a mouse model of shift work, in which we prevented mice from sleeping during the first six hours of their normal inactive phase for five consecutive days (timed sleep restriction--TSR. We compared the effects of TSR between wild-type and Per1/2 double mutant mice with the prediction that the absence of a circadian clock in Per1/2 mutants would result in a blunted metabolic response to TSR. In wild-types, TSR induces significant transcriptional reprogramming of white adipose tissue, suggestive of increased lipogenesis, together with increased secretion of the adipokine leptin and increased food intake, hallmarks of obesity and associated leptin resistance. Some of these changes persist for at least one week after the end of TSR, indicating that even short episodes of sleep disruption can induce prolonged physiological impairments. In contrast, Per1/2 deficient mice show blunted effects of TSR on food intake, leptin levels and adipose transcription. We conclude that the absence of a functional clock in Per1/2 double mutants protects these mice from TSR-induced metabolic reprogramming, suggesting a role of the circadian timing system in regulating the physiological effects

  12. Investigation of the Phaseolus vulgaris circadian clock and the repressive role of the PvTOC1 factor by a newly established in vitro system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeou, Angeliki; Roussis, Andreas; Prombona, Anastasia

    2018-03-01

    The circadian clock is crucial for the synchronization of an organism's physiology and metabolism with the geophysical time. In plants, previous work on the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has identified various differing aspects of clock function compared to the widely studied Arabidopsis thaliana clock. However, transformation of legumes for the study of the circadian clock regulatory mechanisms is extremely laborious. In the present work, we describe an easy-to-follow and rapid method of preparing bean leaf protoplasts with high transformation potential and a functional circadian clock. In this system, we show that application of trichostatin A differentially changes the expression levels of several clock genes. More importantly, we investigate the effect of the clock protein PvTOC1 (Phaseolus vulgaris TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1) on the activity of bean circadian promoters. We present new evidence on the function of PvTOC1 as a repressor of the promoter activity of its own gene, mediated by its conserved CCT (CONSTANS, CO-LIKE and TOC1) domain. Using our protoplast system we were able to uncover functions of the bean circadian clock and to identify an additional target of the PvTOC1clock transcription factor, not previously reported. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Atorvastatin alters the expression of genes related to bile acid metabolism and circadian clock in livers of mice

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    Wen-Kai Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim Atorvastatin is a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor used for hyperlipidemia. Atorvastatin is generally safe but may induce cholestasis. The present study aimed to examine the effects of atorvastatin on hepatic gene expression related to bile acid metabolism and homeostasis, as well as the expression of circadian clock genes in livers of mice. Methods Adult male mice were given atorvastatin (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, po daily for 30 days, and blood biochemistry, histopathology, and gene expression were examined. Results Repeated administration of atorvastatin did not affect animal body weight gain or liver weights. Serum enzyme activities were in the normal range. Histologically, the high dose of atorvastatin produced scattered swollen hepatocytes, foci of feathery-like degeneration, together with increased expression of Egr-1 and metallothionein-1. Atorvastatin increased the expression of Cyp7a1 in the liver, along with FXR and SHP. In contract, atorvastatin decreased the expression of bile acid transporters Ntcp, Bsep, Ostα, and Ostβ. The most dramatic change was the 30-fold induction of Cyp7a1. Because Cyp7a1 is a circadian clock-controlled gene, we further examined the effect of atorvastatin on clock gene expression. Atorvastatin increased the expression of clock core master genes Bmal1 and Npas2, decreased the expression of clock feedback genes Per2, Per3, and the clock targeted genes Dbp and Tef, whereas it had no effect on Cry1 and Nr1d1 expression. Conclusion Repeated administration of atorvastatin affects bile acid metabolism and markedly increases the expression of the bile acid synthesis rate-limiting enzyme gene Cyp7a1, together with alterations in the expression of circadian clock genes.

  14. Natural variation in CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 is associated with flowering time in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hankuil; Li, Xiaonan; Lee, Seong Ho; Nou, Ill-Sup; Lim, Yong Pyo; Hur, Yoonkang

    2017-05-01

    Flowering time is a very important agronomic trait and the development of molecular markers associated with this trait can facilitate crop breeding. CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), a core oscillator component of circadian rhythms that affect metabolic pathways in plants, has been implicated in flowering time control in species of Brassica. CCA1 gene sequences from three Brassica rapa inbred lines, showing either early flowering or late flowering phenotypes, were analyzed and a high level of sequence variation was identified, especially within the fourth intron. Using this information, three PCR primer sets were designed and tested using various inbred lines of B. rapa. The usage of InDel markers was further validated by evaluation of flowering time and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Both methods, PCR and HRM, validated the use of newly developed markers. Additional sequence analyses of Brassica plants with diploid (AA, BB, or CC) and allotetraploid genomes further confirmed a large number of sequence polymorphisms in the CCA1 gene, including insertions/deletions in the fourth intron. Our results demonstrated that sequence variations in CCA1 can be used to develop valuable trait-related molecular markers for Brassica crop breeding.

  15. Synchronization of biological clock neurons by light and peripheral feedback systems promotes circadian rhythms and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashna eRamkisoensing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-hour rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm, and these changes play a major role in the ability to adapt to seasonal changes. Both aging and sleep deprivation negatively affect the circadian amplitude of the SCN, whereas behavioral activity (i.e., exercise has a positive effect on amplitude. Given that the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm is essential for achieving robust rhythmicity in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms that underlie neuronal synchronization warrant further study. A growing body of evidence suggests that the functional integrity of the SCN contributes to health, well-being, cognitive performance, and alertness; in contrast, deterioration of the 24-hour rhythm is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease, cancer, depression, and sleep disorders.

  16. Time is honey: circadian clocks of bees and flowers and how their interactions may influence ecological communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Guy; Bar-Shai, Noam; Cytter, Yotam; Green, Rachel

    2017-11-19

    The interactions between flowering plants and insect pollinators shape ecological communities and provide one of the best examples of coevolution. Although these interactions have received much attention in both ecology and evolution, their temporal aspects are little explored. Here we review studies on the circadian organization of pollination-related traits in bees and flowers. Research, mostly with the honeybee, Apis mellifera , has implicated the circadian clock in key aspects of their foraging for flower rewards. These include anticipation, timing of visits to flowers at specified locations and time-compensated sun-compass orientation. Floral rhythms in traits such as petal opening, scent release and reward availability also show robust daily rhythms. However, in only few studies was it possible to adequately determine whether these oscillations are driven by external time givers such as light and temperature cycles, or endogenous circadian clocks. The interplay between the timing of flower and pollinator rhythms may be ecologically significant. Circadian regulation of pollination-related traits in only few species may influence the entire pollination network and thus affect community structure and local biodiversity. We speculate that these intricate chronobiological interactions may be vulnerable to anthropogenic effects such as the introduction of alien invasive species, pesticides or environmental pollutants.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wild clocks: integrating chronobiology and ecology to understand timekeeping in free-living animals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. cGMP-phosphodiesterase inhibition enhances photic responses and synchronization of the biological circadian clock in rodents.

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    Santiago A Plano

    Full Text Available The master circadian clock in mammals is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and is synchronized by several environmental stimuli, mainly the light-dark (LD cycle. Light pulses in the late subjective night induce phase advances in locomotor circadian rhythms and the expression of clock genes (such as Per1-2. The mechanism responsible for light-induced phase advances involves the activation of guanylyl cyclase (GC, cGMP and its related protein kinase (PKG. Pharmacological manipulation of cGMP by phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibition (e.g., sildenafil increases low-intensity light-induced circadian responses, which could reflect the ability of the cGMP-dependent pathway to directly affect the photic sensitivity of the master circadian clock within the SCN. Indeed, sildenafil is also able to increase the phase-shifting effect of saturating (1200 lux light pulses leading to phase advances of about 9 hours, as well as in C57 a mouse strain that shows reduced phase advances. In addition, sildenafil was effective in both male and female hamsters, as well as after oral administration. Other PDE inhibitors (such as vardenafil and tadalafil also increased light-induced phase advances of locomotor activity rhythms and accelerated reentrainment after a phase advance in the LD cycle. Pharmacological inhibition of the main downstream target of cGMP, PKG, blocked light-induced expression of Per1. Our results indicate that the cGMP-dependent pathway can directly modulate the light-induced expression of clock-genes within the SCN and the magnitude of light-induced phase advances of overt rhythms, and provide promising tools to design treatments for human circadian disruptions.

  18. Circadian clock gene expression in the coral Favia fragum over diel and lunar reproductive cycles.

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    Kenneth D Hoadley

    Full Text Available Natural light cycles synchronize behavioral and physiological cycles over varying time periods in both plants and animals. Many scleractinian corals exhibit diel cycles of polyp expansion and contraction entrained by diel sunlight patterns, and monthly cycles of spawning or planulation that correspond to lunar moonlight cycles. The molecular mechanisms for regulating such cycles are poorly understood. In this study, we identified four molecular clock genes (cry1, cry2, clock and cycle in the scleractinian coral, Favia fragum, and investigated patterns of gene expression hypothesized to be involved in the corals' diel polyp behavior and lunar reproductive cycles. Using quantitative PCR, we measured fluctuations in expression of these clock genes over both diel and monthly spawning timeframes. Additionally, we assayed gene expression and polyp expansion-contraction behavior in experimental corals in normal light:dark (control or constant dark treatments. Well-defined and reproducible diel patterns in cry1, cry2, and clock expression were observed in both field-collected and the experimental colonies maintained under control light:dark conditions, but no pattern was observed for cycle. Colonies in the control light:dark treatment also displayed diel rhythms of tentacle expansion and contraction. Experimental colonies in the constant dark treatment lost diel patterns in cry1, cry2, and clock expression and displayed a diminished and less synchronous pattern of tentacle expansion and contraction. We observed no pattern in cry1, cry2, clock, or cycle expression correlated with monthly spawning events suggesting these genes are not involved in the entrainment of reproductive cycles to lunar light cycles in F. fragum. Our results suggest a molecular clock mechanism, potentially similar to that in described in fruit flies, exists within F. fragum.

  19. Expression of circadian core clock genes in fibroblasts of human gingiva and periodontal ligament is modulated by L-Mimosine and hypoxia in monolayer and spheroid cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjić, Klara; Kurzmann, Christoph; Moritz, Andreas; Agis, Hermann

    2017-07-01

    The circadian clock is involved in a plethora of physiological processes including bone formation and tooth development. While expression of circadian core clock genes was observed in various tissues, their role in the periodontium is unclear. We hypothesized that periodontal cells express circadian core clock genes and that their levels are modulated by hypoxia mimetic agents and hypoxia. Fibroblasts of human gingiva (GF) and periodontal ligament (PDLF) in monolayer and spheroid cultures were treated with the hypoxia mimetic agent L-Mimosine (L-MIM) or hypoxia. Reverse transcription and quantitative PCR were performed to assess the impact on mRNA levels of the circadian core clock genes Clock, Bmal1, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2, and Per3. GF and PDLF expressed Clock, Bmal1, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2, and Per3 in monolayer and spheroid cultures. In monolayer cultures, L-MIM significantly reduced Clock, Cry2, and Per3 mRNA expression in GF and Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per3 in PDLF. Hypoxia significantly reduced Clock, Cry2, and Per3 in GF and Cry1, Cry2, and Per3 in PDLF. In spheroid cultures, L-MIM significantly decreased Clock, Cry1, Cry2, and Per3 in GF and PDLF. Hypoxia significantly decreased Cry2 and Per3 in GF and Clock and Per3 in PDLF. GF and PDLF express circadian core clock genes. The hypoxia mimetic agent L-MIM and hypoxic conditions can decrease the expression of Clock, Cry1-2 and Per1 and Per3. The specific response depends on cell type and culture model. Future studies will show how this effect contributes to periodontal health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The timing of the human circadian clock is accurately represented by the core body temperature rhythm following phase shifts to a three-cycle light stimulus near the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, M. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    A double-stimulus experiment was conducted to evaluate the phase of the underlying circadian clock following light-induced phase shifts of the human circadian system. Circadian phase was assayed by constant routine from the rhythm in core body temperature before and after a three-cycle bright-light stimulus applied near the estimated minimum of the core body temperature rhythm. An identical, consecutive three-cycle light stimulus was then applied, and phase was reassessed. Phase shifts to these consecutive stimuli were no different from those obtained in a previous study following light stimuli applied under steady-state conditions over a range of circadian phases similar to those at which the consecutive stimuli were applied. These data suggest that circadian phase shifts of the core body temperature rhythm in response to a three-cycle stimulus occur within 24 h following the end of the 3-day light stimulus and that this poststimulus temperature rhythm accurately reflects the timing of the underlying circadian clock.

  1. The Circadian expression of Piezo1, TRPV4, Connexin26, and VNUT, associated with the expression levels of the clock genes in mouse primary cultured urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Tatsuya; Mitsui, Takahiko; Nakamura, Yuki; Kanda, Mie; Tsuchiya, Sachiko; Kira, Satoru; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Norifumi; Hirayama, Yuri; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Yoichi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Nakao, Atsuhito; Takeda, Masayuki; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2017-09-07

    To investigate circadian gene expressions in the mouse bladder urothelium to establish an experimental model and study the functions of the circadian rhythm. The gene expression rhythms of the clock genes, mechano-sensors such as Piezo1 and TRPV4, ATP release mediated molecules (ARMM) such as Cx26 and VNUT were investigated in mouse primary cultured urothelial cells (UCs) of wild-type (WT) and Clock mutant (Clock Δ19 /Δ 19 ) mice using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting analysis. The long-term oscillation of the clock genes in UC was investigated by measuring bioluminescence from UC isolated from Period2 luciferase knock-in mice (Per2::luc) and Per2::luc with Clock Δ19 /Δ 19 using a luminometer. The mRNA expression rhythms after treatment with Clock short interfering RNA (siRNA) were also measured to compare differences between Clock point mutations and Clock deficiency. The UCs from WT mice showed the time-dependent gene expressions for clock genes, mechano-sensors, and ARMM. The abundances of the products of these genes also correlated with the mRNA expression rhythms in UCs. The bioluminescence of Per2::Luc in UCs showed a circadian rhythm. By contrast, all the gene expressions rhythms observed in WT mice were abrogated in the Clock Δ19 /Δ 19 mice. Transfection with Clock siRNA in UCs had the same effect as the Clock mutation. We demonstrated that the time-dependent gene expressions, including clock genes, mechano-sensors, and ARMM, were reproducible in UCs. These findings demonstrated that UCs have the potential to progress research into the circadian functions of the lower urinary tract regulated by clock genes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The role of circadian clock genes in the photoperiodic timer of the linden bug Pyrrhocoris apterus during the nymphal stage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotwica-Rolinska, Joanna; Pivarčiová, Lenka; Vaněčková, Hana; Doležel, David

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2017), s. 266-273 ISSN 0307-6962 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-23681S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316790 - INsecTIME Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : activity of nympha * circadian clock gene * Clock gene Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 1.364, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/phen.12197/abstract

  3. Genetic adaptation of the human circadian clock to day-length latitudinal variations and relevance for affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Diego; Pozzoli, Uberto; Cagliani, Rachele; Tresoldi, Claudia; Menozzi, Giorgia; Riva, Stefania; Guerini, Franca R; Comi, Giacomo P; Bolognesi, Elisabetta; Bresolin, Nereo; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    The temporal coordination of biological processes into daily cycles is a common feature of most living organisms. In humans, disruption of circadian rhythms is commonly observed in psychiatric diseases,including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and autism. Light therapy is the most effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder and circadian-related treatments sustain antidepressant response in bipolar disorder patients. Day/night cycles represent a major circadian synchronizing signal and vary widely with latitude. We apply a geographically explicit model to show that out-of-Africa migration, which led humans to occupy a wide latitudinal area, affected the evolutionary history of circadian regulatory genes. The SNPs we identify using this model display consistent signals of natural selection using tests based on population genetic differentiation and haplotype homozygosity. Signals of natural selection driven by annual photoperiod variation are detected for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and restless leg syndrome risk variants, in line with the circadian component of these conditions. Our results suggest that human populations adapted to life at different latitudes by tuning their circadian clock systems. This process also involves risk variants for neuropsychiatric conditions, suggesting possible genetic modulators for chronotherapies and candidates for interaction analysis with photoperiod-related environmental variables, such as season of birth, country of residence, shift-work or lifestyle habits.

  4. Different mechanisms of adjustment to a change of the photoperiod in the suprachiasmatic and liver circadian clocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosniyenko, Serhiy; Parkanová, Daniela; Illnerová, Helena; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 298, č. 4 (2010), R959-R971 ISSN 0363-6119 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0321 Grant - others:EC(XE) 018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian system * clock gene * photoperiod Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.284, year: 2010

  5. REVEILLE8 and PSEUDO-REPONSE REGULATOR5 form a negative feedback loop within the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

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    Reetika Rawat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms provide organisms with an adaptive advantage, allowing them to regulate physiological and developmental events so that they occur at the most appropriate time of day. In plants, as in other eukaryotes, multiple transcriptional feedback loops are central to clock function. In one such feedback loop, the Myb-like transcription factors CCA1 and LHY directly repress expression of the pseudoresponse regulator TOC1 by binding to an evening element (EE in the TOC1 promoter. Another key regulatory circuit involves CCA1 and LHY and the TOC1 homologs PRR5, PRR7, and PRR9. Purification of EE-binding proteins from plant extracts followed by mass spectrometry led to the identification of RVE8, a homolog of CCA1 and LHY. Similar to these well-known clock genes, expression of RVE8 is circadian-regulated with a dawn phase of expression, and RVE8 binds specifically to the EE. However, whereas cca1 and lhy mutants have short period phenotypes and overexpression of either gene causes arrhythmia, rve8 mutants have long-period and RVE8-OX plants have short-period phenotypes. Light input to the clock is normal in rve8, but temperature compensation (a hallmark of circadian rhythms is perturbed. RVE8 binds to the promoters of both TOC1 and PRR5 in the subjective afternoon, but surprisingly only PRR5 expression is perturbed by overexpression of RVE8. Together, our data indicate that RVE8 promotes expression of a subset of EE-containing clock genes towards the end of the subjective day and forms a negative feedback loop with PRR5. Thus RVE8 and its homologs CCA1 and LHY function close to the circadian oscillator but act via distinct molecular mechanisms.

  6. Asymmetric expression level of clock genes in left vs. right nasal mucosa in humans with and without allergies and in rats: Circadian characteristics and possible contribution to nasal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Kyun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Hag

    2018-01-01

    Numerous peripheral tissues possess self-sustaining daily biologic rhythms that are regulated at the molecular level by clock genes such as PER1, PER2, CLOCK, and BMAL1. Physiological function of nasal mucosa exhibits rhythmic variability to a day-night environmental cycle. Nevertheless, little is known of the expression and distribution pattern of clock genes in nasal mucosa. The present study investigates the expression level and distribution pattern of PER1, PER2, CLOCK, and BMAL1 genes in nasal mucosa of healthy controls, allergic rhinitis patients, and normal rats. In human and rat nasal mucosa, the levels of these genes are asymmetrically expressed in nasal mucosa derived from right and left cavities in normal controls, allergic patients, and rat. In human nasal mucosa, the expression levels of these genes were higher in the decongested side than the congested mucosa. In rat nasal mucosa, these clock genes are expressed in a rhythmic circadian manner under the regular light/dark cycles. The expression levels of MUC5AC, a key mucin genes produced in superficial epithelium, are higher in decongested side than that congested side in human nasal mucosa. In rat nasal mucosa, MUC5AC levels showed a circadian rhythm which was associated with different expression levels in nasal mucosa derived from the right and left nasal cavities. Taken together with these results, the present study shows that the clock genes such as PER1, PER2, CLOCK, and BMAL1 are present in human and rat nasal mucosa, and suggest that these clock genes may control the pathophysiological function of nasal mucosa as circadian oscillators and affect the maintenance of the nasal cycle.

  7. Circadian mechanisms of food anticipatory rhythms in rats fed once or twice daily: clock gene and endocrine correlates.

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    Danica F Patton

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks in many brain regions and peripheral tissues are entrained by the daily rhythm of food intake. Clocks in one or more of these locations generate a daily rhythm of locomotor activity that anticipates a regular mealtime. Rats and mice can also anticipate two daily meals. Whether this involves 1 or 2 circadian clocks is unknown. To gain insight into how the circadian system adjusts to 2 daily mealtimes, male rats in a 12∶12 light-dark cycle were fed a 2 h meal either 4 h after lights-on or 4 h after lights-off, or a 1 h meal at both times. After 30 days, brain, blood, adrenal and stomach tissue were collected at 6 time points. Multiple clock genes from adrenals and stomachs were assayed by RT-PCR. Blood was assayed for corticosterone and ghrelin. Bmal1 expression was quantified in 14 brain regions by in situ hybridization. Clock gene rhythms in adrenal and stomach from day-fed rats oscillated in antiphase with the rhythms in night-fed rats, and at an intermediate phase in rats fed twice daily. Corticosterone and ghrelin in 1-meal rats peaked at or prior to the expected mealtime. In 2-meal rats, corticosterone peaked only prior the nighttime meal, while ghrelin peaked prior to the daytime meal and then remained elevated. The olfactory bulb, nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum, cerebellum and arcuate nucleus exhibited significant daily rhythms of Bmal1 in the night-fed groups that were approximately in antiphase in the day-fed groups, and at intermediate levels (arrhythmic in rats anticipating 2 daily meals. The dissociations between anticipatory activity and the peripheral clocks and hormones in rats anticipating 2 daily meals argue against a role for these signals in the timing of behavioral rhythms. The absence of rhythmicity at the tissue level in brain regions from rats anticipating 2 daily meals support behavioral evidence that circadian clock cells in these tissues may reorganize into two populations coupled to different

  8. Does the clock make the poison? Circadian variation in response to pesticides.

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    Louisa A Hooven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian clocks govern daily physiological and molecular rhythms, and putative rhythms in expression of xenobiotic metabolizing (XM genes have been described in both insects and mammals. Such rhythms could have important consequences for outcomes of chemical exposures at different times of day. To determine whether reported XM gene expression rhythms result in functional rhythms, we examined daily profiles of enzyme activity and dose responses to the pesticides propoxur, deltamethrin, fipronil, and malathion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Published microarray expression data were examined for temporal patterns. Male Drosophila were collected for ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD, esterase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, and, and uridine 5'-diphosphoglucosyltransferase (UGT enzyme activity assays, or subjected to dose-response tests at four hour intervals throughout the day in both light/dark and constant light conditions. Peak expression of several XM genes cluster in late afternoon. Significant diurnal variation was observed in ECOD and UGT enzyme activity, however, no significant daily variation was observed in esterase or GST activity. Daily profiles of susceptibility to lethality after acute exposure to propoxur and fipronil showed significantly increased resistance in midday, while susceptibility to deltamethrin and malathion varied little. In constant light, which interferes with clock function, the daily variation in susceptibility to propoxur and in ECOD and UGT enzyme activity was depressed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Expression and activities of specific XM enzymes fluctuate during the day, and for specific insecticides, the concentration resulting in 50% mortality varies significantly during the day. Time of day of chemical exposure should be an important consideration in experimental design, use of pesticides, and human risk assessment.

  9. Histamine 1 receptor-Gβγ-cAMP/PKA-CFTR pathway mediates the histamine-induced resetting of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Kim, Young-Beom; Kim, Woong Bin; Lee, Seung Won; Oh, Seog Bae; Han, Hee-Chul; Lee, C Justin; Colwell, Christopher S; Kim, Yang In

    2016-05-06

    Recent evidence indicates that histamine, acting on histamine 1 receptor (H1R), resets the circadian clock in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) through the activation of CaV1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from ryanodine receptor-mediated internal stores. In the current study, we explored the underlying mechanisms with various techniques including Ca(2+)- and Cl(-)-imaging and extracellular single-unit recording. Our hypothesis was that histamine causes Cl(-) efflux through cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to elicit membrane depolarization needed for the activation of CaV1.3 Ca(2+) channels in SCN neurons. We found that histamine elicited Cl(-) efflux and increased [Ca(2+)]i in dissociated mouse SCN cells. Both of these events were suppressed by bumetanide [Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter isotype 1 (NKCC1) blocker], CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhibitor), gallein (Gβγ protein inhibitor) and H89 [protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor]. By itself, H1R activation with 2-pyridylethylamine increased the level of cAMP in the SCN and this regulation was prevented by gallein. Finally, histamine-evoked phase shifts of the circadian neural activity rhythm in the mouse SCN slice were blocked by bumetanide, CFTRinh-172, gallein or H89 and were not observed in NKCC1 or CFTR KO mice. Taken together, these results indicate that histamine recruits the H1R-Gβγ-cAMP/PKA pathway in the SCN neurons to activate CaV1.3 channels through CFTR-mediated Cl(-) efflux and ultimately to phase-shift the circadian clock. This pathway and NKCC1 may well be potential targets for agents designed to treat problems resulting from the disturbance of the circadian system.

  10. Smith-Magenis syndrome results in disruption of CLOCK gene transcription and reveals an integral role for RAI1 in the maintenance of circadian rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen R; Zies, Deborah; Mullegama, Sureni V; Grotewiel, Michael S; Elsea, Sarah H

    2012-06-08

    Haploinsufficiency of RAI1 results in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), a disorder characterized by intellectual disability, multiple congenital anomalies, obesity, neurobehavioral abnormalities, and a disrupted circadian sleep-wake pattern. An inverted melatonin rhythm (i.e., melatonin peaks during the day instead of at night) and associated sleep-phase disturbances in individuals with SMS, as well as a short-period circadian rhythm in mice with a chromosomal deletion of Rai1, support SMS as a circadian-rhythm-dysfunction disorder. However, the molecular cause of the circadian defect in SMS has not been described. The circadian oscillator temporally orchestrates metabolism, physiology, and behavior largely through transcriptional modulation. Data support RAI1 as a transcriptional regulator, but the genes it might regulate are largely unknown. Investigation into the role that RAI1 plays in the regulation of gene transcription and circadian maintenance revealed that RAI1 regulates the transcription of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a key component of the mammalian circadian oscillator that transcriptionally regulates many critical circadian genes. Data further show that haploinsufficiency of RAI1 and Rai1 in SMS fibroblasts and the mouse hypothalamus, respectively, results in the transcriptional dysregulation of the circadian clock and causes altered expression and regulation of multiple circadian genes, including PER2, PER3, CRY1, BMAL1, and others. These data suggest that heterozygous mutation of RAI1 and Rai1 leads to a disrupted circadian rhythm and thus results in an abnormal sleep-wake cycle, which can contribute to an abnormal feeding pattern and dependent cognitive performance. Finally, we conclude that RAI1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CLOCK, pinpointing a novel and important role for this gene in the circadian oscillator. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure of the frequency-interacting RNA helicase: a protein interaction hub for the circadian clock

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    Conrad, Karen S.; Hurley, Jennifer M.; Widom, Joanne; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-06-23

    In the Neurospora crassa circadian clock, a protein complex of frequency (FRQ), casein kinase 1a (CK1a), and the FRQ-interacting RNA Helicase (FRH) rhythmically represses gene expression by the white-collar complex (WCC). FRH crystal structures in several conformations and bound to ADP/RNA reveal differences between FRH and the yeast homolog Mtr4 that clarify the distinct role of FRH in the clock. The FRQ-interacting region at the FRH N-terminus has variable structure in the absence of FRQ. A known mutation that disrupts circadian rhythms (R806H) resides in a positively charged surface of the KOW domain, far removed from the helicase core. Here, we show that changes to other similarly located residues modulate interactions with the WCC and FRQ. A V142G substitution near the N-terminus also alters FRQ and WCC binding to FRH, but produces an unusual short clock period. Finally, these data support the assertion that FRH helicase activity does not play an essential role in the clock, but rather FRH acts to mediate contacts among FRQ, CK1a and the WCC through interactions involving its N-terminus and KOW module.

  12. Geography of the circadian gene clock and photoperiodic response in western North American populations of the threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, C.; Unruh, L.; Zimmerman, C.; Bradshaw, W. E.; Holzapfel, C. M.; Cresko, W. A.

    2014-01-01

    The gene clock is a core component of the daily circadian oscillator in flies and mammals. This gene gained renewed interest over a decade ago when the C-terminus of the Clock protein was found to include polyglutamine repeat domains (PolyQ). Since that time, several studies have used variation in PolyQ as a proxy for variation in circadian function. Furthermore, conjectures were made about the possible role of this variation in photoperiodic control of seasonal timing in birds and fishes, generally with questionable results. Herein, we use controlled laboratory experiments to show that Oregon and Alaskan threespine stickleback, collected from populations that differ by 18° of latitude, show no significant variation in length of the polyglutamine domain of clock, or in photoperiodic response within or between latitudes despite the fact that male and female sticklebacks are photoperiodic at both latitudes. Hence, we urge caution when interpreting variation in the PolyQ domain of the clock gene in the context of seasonal activities or in relationship to photoperiodism along geographical gradients. PMID:23464546

  13. A circadian clock-regulated toggle switch explains AtGRP7 and AtGRP8 oscillations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schmal

    Full Text Available The circadian clock controls many physiological processes in higher plants and causes a large fraction of the genome to be expressed with a 24h rhythm. The transcripts encoding the RNA-binding proteins AtGRP7 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glycine Rich Protein 7 and AtGRP8 oscillate with evening peaks. The circadian clock components CCA1 and LHY negatively affect AtGRP7 expression at the level of transcription. AtGRP7 and AtGRP8, in turn, negatively auto-regulate and reciprocally cross-regulate post-transcriptionally: high protein levels promote the generation of an alternative splice form that is rapidly degraded. This clock-regulated feedback loop has been proposed to act as a molecular slave oscillator in clock output. While mathematical models describing the circadian core oscillator in Arabidopsis thaliana were introduced recently, we propose here the first model of a circadian slave oscillator. We define the slave oscillator in terms of ordinary differential equations and identify the model's parameters by an optimization procedure based on experimental results. The model successfully reproduces the pertinent experimental findings such as waveforms, phases, and half-lives of the time-dependent concentrations. Furthermore, we obtain insights into possible mechanisms underlying the observed experimental dynamics: the negative auto-regulation and reciprocal cross-regulation via alternative splicing could be responsible for the sharply peaking waveforms of the AtGRP7 and AtGRP8 mRNA. Moreover, our results suggest that the AtGRP8 transcript oscillations are subordinated to those of AtGRP7 due to a higher impact of AtGRP7 protein on alternative splicing of its own and of the AtGRP8 pre-mRNA compared to the impact of AtGRP8 protein. Importantly, a bifurcation analysis provides theoretical evidence that the slave oscillator could be a toggle switch, arising from the reciprocal cross-regulation at the post-transcriptional level. In view of this

  14. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II modulates mPer1 and mPer2 gene induction and influences phase shifts of the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Henrik; Werner, Claudia; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Mayser, Helmut; Feil, Robert; Seeliger, Mathias W; Hofmann, Franz; Albrecht, Urs

    2003-04-29

    In mammals, the master circadian clock that drives many biochemical, physiological, and behavioral rhythms is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Generation and maintenance of circadian rhythmicity rely on complex interlocked transcriptional/translational feedback loops involving a set of clock genes. Among the molecular components driving the mammalian circadian clock are the Period 1 and 2 (mPer1 and mPer2) genes. Because the periodicity of the clock is not exactly 24 hr, it has to be adjusted periodically. The major stimulus for adjustment (resetting) of the clock is nocturnal light. It evokes activation of signaling pathways in the SCN that ultimately lead to expression of mPer1 and mPer2 genes conveying adjustment of the clock. We show that mice deficient in cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII, also known as PKGII), despite regular retinal function, are defective in resetting the circadian clock, as assessed by changes in the onset of wheel running activity after a light pulse. At the molecular level, light induction of mPer2 in the SCN is strongly reduced in the early period of the night, whereas mPer1 induction is elevated in cGKII-deficient mice. Additionally, we show that light induction of cfos and light-dependent phosphorylation of CREB at serine 133 are not affected in these animals. cGKII plays a role in the clock-resetting mechanism. In particular, the ability to delay clock phase is affected in cGKII-deficient mice. It seems that the signaling pathway involving cGKII influences in an opposite manner the light-induced induction of mPer1 and mPer2 genes and thereby influences the direction of a phase shift of the circadian clock.

  15. Circadian Gene CLOCK Affects Drug-Resistant Gene Expression and Cell Proliferation in Ovarian Cancer SKOV3/DDP Cell Lines Through Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Jin, Long; Sui, Yu-Xia; Han, Li-Li; Liu, Jia-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Abnormal autophagy regulation affects the chemoresistance of ovarian cancer, during which the circadian gene clock may play a major role. In this study, RNA interference plasmid pSUPER-Clock and overexpression plasmid pcDNA3.1-Clock of CLOCK were used to stably transfect the SKOV3/DDP cells by lipofection. Upon screening, the in vitro transfected cell lines with pSUPER-Clock, the autophagy level, and G 0 /G 1 phase cells were significantly reduced, and the expression levels of Clock, LC3, P-gp, and MRP2 were inhibited. In contrast, the autophagy level and G 0 /G 1 phase cells in cell lines transfected with pcDNA3.1-Clock were significantly increased, and the expressions of Clock, LC3, P-gp, and MRP2 were enhanced. In comparison with the untransfected control group showed the percentage of apoptotic cells in SKOV3/DDP cell lines of Clock interfering expression group after cisplatin treatment was significantly increased while the survival was substantially reduced. These results indicated that inhibiting the circadian gene Clock expression can reverse the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer SKOV3/DDP cell lines by affecting the protein expression of drug resistance genes during which autophagy plays an important role. The CLOCK gene may be designated as a novel candidate for targeted gene therapy in drug-resistant ovarian cancer.

  16. Heritable circadian period length in a wild bird population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, B.; Visser, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Timing is essential, but circadian clocks, which play a crucial role in timekeeping, are almost unaddressed in evolutionary ecology. A key property of circadian clocks is their free-running period length (τ), i.e. the time taken for a full cycle under constant conditions. Under laboratory

  17. Targeted Recruitment of the Basal Transcriptional Machinery by LNK Clock Components Controls the Circadian Rhythms of Nascent RNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Gil, Sergio; Grasser, Klaus D; Mas, Paloma

    2018-04-04

    The rhythms of steady-state mRNA expression pervade nearly all circadian systems. However, the mechanisms behind the rhythmic transcriptional synthesis and its correlation with circadian expression remain fully unexplored, particularly in plants. Here, we discovered a multi-functional protein complex that orchestrates the rhythms of transcriptional activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of the circadian oscillator genes TOC1 (TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1/PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR1) and PRR5 (PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR5) initially relies on the modular function of the clock-related factor RVE8: its MYB domain provides the DNA binding specificity, while its LCL domain recruits the clock components, LNKs, to target promoters. LNKs, in turn, specifically interact with RNA Polymerase II and the transcript elongation FACT complex to rhythmically co-occupy the target loci. The functional interaction of these components is central for chromatin status, transcript initiation and elongation, as well as proper rhythms in nascent RNAs. Our findings thus explain how genome readout of environmental information ultimately results in rhythmic changes of gene expression. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

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    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  19. Disruption of the Circadian Clock Alters Antioxidative Defense via the SIRT1-BMAL1 Pathway in 6-OHDA-Induced Models of Parkinson’s Disease

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    Yali Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and is known to involve circadian dysfunction and oxidative stress. Although antioxidative defense is regulated by the molecular circadian clock, few studies have examined their function in PD and their regulation by silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1. We hypothesize that reduced antioxidative activity in models of PD results from dysfunction of the molecular circadian clock via the SIRT1 pathway. We treated rats and SH-SY5Y cells with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and measured the expression of core circadian clock and associated nuclear receptor genes using real-time quantitative PCR as well as levels of SIRT1, brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1 (BMAL1, and acetylated BMAL1 using Western blotting. We found that 6-OHDA treatment altered the expression patterns of clock and antioxidative molecules in vivo and in vitro. We also detected an increased ratio of acetylated BMAL1:BMAL1 and a decreased level of SIRT1. Furthermore, resveratrol, an activator of SIRT1, decreased the acetylation of BMAL1 and inhibited its binding with CRY1, thereby reversing the impaired antioxidative activity induced by 6-OHDA. These results suggest that a dysfunctional circadian clock contributes to an abnormal antioxidative response in PD via a SIRT1-dependent BMAL1 pathway.

  20. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Verwey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease. For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms.

  1. Expression of circadian clock genes and proteins in urothelial cancer is related to cancer-associated genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litlekalsoy, Jorunn; Rostad, Kari; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Hostmark, Jens G.; Laerum, Ole Didrik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate invasive and metastatic potential of urothelial cancer by investigating differential expression of various clock genes/proteins participating in the 24 h circadian rhythms and to compare these gene expressions with transcription of other cancer-associated genes. Twenty seven paired samples of tumour and benign tissue collected from patients who underwent cystectomy were analysed and compared to 15 samples of normal bladder tissue taken from patients who underwent cystoscopy for benign prostate hyperplasia (unrelated donors). Immunohistochemical analyses were made for clock and clock-related proteins. In addition, the gene-expression levels of 22 genes (clock genes, casein kinases, oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cytokeratins) were analysed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Considerable up- or down-regulation and altered cellular distribution of different clock proteins, a reduction of casein kinase1A1 (CSNK1A1) and increase of casein kinase alpha 1 E (CSNK1E) were found. The pattern was significantly correlated with simultaneous up-regulation of stimulatory tumour markers, and a down-regulation of several suppressor genes. The pattern was mainly seen in aneuploid high-grade cancers. Considerable alterations were also found in the neighbouring bladder mucosa. The close correlation between altered expression of various clock genes and common tumour markers in urothelial cancer indicates that disturbed function in the cellular clock work may be an important additional mechanism contributing to cancer progression and malignant behaviour. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2580-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  2. Melatonin promotes circadian rhythm-induced proliferation through Clock/histone deacetylase 3/c-Myc interaction in mouse adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Gan, Lu; Luo, Dan; Sun, Chao

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin is synthesized in the pineal gland and controls circadian rhythm of peripheral adipose tissue, resulting in changes in body weight. Although core regulatory components of clock rhythmicity have been defined, insight into the mechanisms of circadian rhythm-mediated proliferation in adipose tissue is still limited. Here, we showed that melatonin (20 mg/kg/d) promoted circadian and proliferation processes in white adipose tissue. The circadian amplitudes of brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 1 (Bmal1, PMyc (PMyc and then directly stimulated c-Myc transcription. Moreover, Clock physically interacted with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) and formed a complex with c-Myc to promote adipocyte proliferation. Melatonin also attenuated circadian disruption and promoted adipocyte proliferation in chronic jet-lagged mice and obese mice. Thus, our study found that melatonin promoted adipocyte proliferation by forming a Clock/HDAC3/c-Myc complex and subsequently driving the circadian amplitudes of proliferation genes. Our data reveal a novel mechanism that links circadian rhythm to cell proliferation in adipose tissue. These findings also identify a new potential means for melatonin to prevent and treat sleep deprivation-caused obesity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Shell neurons of the master circadian clock coordinate the phase of tissue clocks throughout the brain and body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer A; Suen, Ting-Chung; Callif, Ben L; Mitchell, Andrew S; Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Baker, Kimberly M; Kloehn, Ian; Baba, Kenkichi; Teubner, Brett J W; Ehlen, J Christopher; Paul, Ketema N; Bartness, Timothy J; Tosini, Gianluca; Leise, Tanya; Davidson, Alec J

    2015-06-23

    Daily rhythms in mammals are programmed by a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN contains two main compartments (shell and core), but the role of each region in system-level coordination remains ill defined. Herein, we use a functional assay to investigate how downstream tissues interpret region-specific outputs by using in vivo exposure to long day photoperiods to temporally dissociate the SCN. We then analyze resulting changes in the rhythms of clocks located throughout the brain and body to examine whether they maintain phase synchrony with the SCN shell or core. Nearly all of the 17 tissues examined in the brain and body maintain phase synchrony with the SCN shell, but not the SCN core, which indicates that downstream oscillators are set by cues controlled specifically by the SCN shell. Interestingly, we also found that SCN dissociation diminished the amplitude of rhythms in core clock gene and protein expression in brain tissues by 50-75 %, which suggests that light-driven changes in the functional organization of the SCN markedly influence the strength of rhythms in downstream tissues. Overall, our results reveal that body clocks receive time-of-day cues specifically from the SCN shell, which may be an adaptive design principle that serves to maintain system-level phase relationships in a changing environment. Further, we demonstrate that lighting conditions alter the amplitude of the molecular clock in downstream tissues, which uncovers a new form of plasticity that may contribute to seasonal changes in physiology and behavior.

  4. Sleep Deprivation and Caffeine Treatment Potentiate Photic Resetting of the Master Circadian Clock in a Diurnal Rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pawan Kumar; Bouâouda, Hanan; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Dumont, Stephanie; Fuchs, Fanny; Goumon, Yannick; Bourgin, Patrice; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2017-04-19

    Circadian rhythms in nocturnal and diurnal mammals are primarily synchronized to local time by the light/dark cycle. However, nonphotic factors, such as behavioral arousal and metabolic cues, can also phase shift the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCNs) and/or reduce the synchronizing effects of light in nocturnal rodents. In diurnal rodents, the role of arousal or insufficient sleep in these functions is still poorly understood. In the present study, diurnal Sudanian grass rats, Arvicanthis ansorgei , were aroused at night by sleep deprivation (gentle handling) or caffeine treatment that both prevented sleep. Phase shifts of locomotor activity were analyzed in grass rats transferred from a light/dark cycle to constant darkness and aroused in early night or late night. Early night, but not late night, sleep deprivation induced a significant phase shift. Caffeine on its own induced no phase shifts. Both sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiated light-induced phase delays and phase advances in response to a 30 min light pulse, respectively. Sleep deprivation in early night, but not late night, potentiated light-induced c-Fos expression in the ventral SCN. Caffeine treatment in midnight triggered c-Fos expression in dorsal SCN. Both sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiated light-induced c-Fos expression in calbindin-containing cells of the ventral SCN in early and late night. These findings indicate that, in contrast to nocturnal rodents, behavioral arousal induced either by sleep deprivation or caffeine during the sleeping period potentiates light resetting of the master circadian clock in diurnal rodents, and activation of calbindin-containing suprachiasmatic cells may be involved in this effect. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Arousing stimuli have the ability to regulate circadian rhythms in mammals. Behavioral arousal in the sleeping period phase shifts the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and/or slows down the photic

  5. Effects of prd circadian clock mutations on FRQ-less rhythms in Neurospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Lakin-Thomas, Patricia

    2010-04-01

    Rhythmic conidiation (spore formation) in Neurospora crassa provides a model system for investigating the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythmicity. A feedback loop involving the frq, wc-1, and wc-2 gene products (FRQ/ WCC) is an important component of the mechanism; however, rhythmic conidiation can still be observed when these gene products are absent. The nature of the oscillator(s) that drives this FRQ-less rhythmicity (FLO) is an important question in Neurospora circadian biology. We have looked for interactions between FRQ/WCC and FLO by assaying the effects on FRQ-less rhythms of mutations known to affect the period in the presence of FRQ. We assayed 4 prd mutations (prd-1, prd-2, prd-3, and prd-4) under 2 conditions in frq(null) strains: long-period free-running rhythms in chol-1 strains grown without choline, and heat-entrainable rhythms in choline-sufficient conditions. We found effects of all 4 mutations on both types of FRQ-less rhythms. The greatest effects were seen with prd-1 and prd-2, which abolished free-running rhythms in the chol-1; frq(10) backgrounds and significantly affected entrained peak timing under heat-entrainment conditions in frq( 10) backgrounds. The prd-3 and prd-4 mutations had more subtle effects on period and stability of free-running rhythms in the chol-1; frq(10) backgrounds and had little effect on peak timing under heat-entrainment conditions in frq(10) backgrounds. These results, along with previously published evidence for effects of prd mutations on other FRQ-less rhythms, suggest that either there are common components shared between the FRQ/WCC oscillator and several FRQ-less oscillators or that there is a single oscillator driving all conidiation rhythms. We favor a model of the Neurospora circadian system in which a single FRQ-less oscillator drives conidiation and interacts with the FRQ/WCC feedback loop; the output or amplitude of the FRQ-less oscillator can be affected by many gene products and metabolic

  6. USP2-45 Is a Circadian Clock Output Effector Regulating Calcium Absorption at the Post-Translational Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pouly

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock influences most aspects of physiology and behavior through the transcriptional control of a wide variety of genes, mostly in a tissue-specific manner. About 20 clock-controlled genes (CCGs oscillate in virtually all mammalian tissues and are generally considered as core clock components. One of them is Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 2 (Usp2, whose status remains controversial, as it may be a cogwheel regulating the stability or activity of core cogwheels or an output effector. We report here that Usp2 is a clock output effector related to bodily Ca2+ homeostasis, a feature that is conserved across evolution. Drosophila with a whole-body knockdown of the orthologue of Usp2, CG14619 (dUsp2-kd, predominantly die during pupation but are rescued by dietary Ca2+ supplementation. Usp2-KO mice show hyperabsorption of dietary Ca2+ in small intestine, likely due to strong overexpression of the membrane scaffold protein NHERF4, a regulator of the Ca2+ channel TRPV6 mediating dietary Ca2+ uptake. In this tissue, USP2-45 is found in membrane fractions and negatively regulates NHERF4 protein abundance in a rhythmic manner at the protein level. In clock mutant animals (Cry1/Cry2-dKO, rhythmic USP2-45 expression is lost, as well as the one of NHERF4, confirming the inverse relationship between USP2-45 and NHERF4 protein levels. Finally, USP2-45 interacts in vitro with NHERF4 and endogenous Clathrin Heavy Chain. Taken together these data prompt us to define USP2-45 as the first clock output effector acting at the post-translational level at cell membranes and possibly regulating membrane permeability of Ca2+.

  7. The Circadian Molecular Clock Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis by Controlling the Timing of Cell-Cycle Entry and Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Bouchard-Cannon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The subgranular zone (SGZ of the adult hippocampus contains a pool of quiescent neural progenitor cells (QNPs that are capable of entering the cell cycle and producing newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control the timing and extent of adult neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we show that QNPs of the adult SGZ express molecular-clock components and proliferate in a rhythmic fashion. The clock proteins PERIOD2 and BMAL1 are critical for proper control of neurogenesis. The absence of PERIOD2 abolishes the gating of cell-cycle entrance of QNPs, whereas genetic ablation of bmal1 results in constitutively high levels of proliferation and delayed cell-cycle exit. We use mathematical model simulations to show that these observations may arise from clock-driven expression of a cell-cycle inhibitor that targets the cyclin D/Cdk4-6 complex. Our findings may have broad implications for the circadian clock in timing cell-cycle events of other stem cell populations throughout the body.

  8. Identification of a novel circadian clock modulator controlling BMAL1 expression through a ROR/REV-ERB-response element-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Lee, Seungbeom; Chung, Sooyoung; Park, Noheon; Son, Gi Hoon; An, Hongchan; Jang, Jaebong; Chang, Dong-Jo; Suh, Young-Ger; Kim, Kyungjin

    2016-01-15

    Circadian rhythms, biological oscillations with a period of about 24 h, are maintained by an innate genetically determined time-keeping system called the molecular circadian clockwork. Despite the physiological and clinical importance of the circadian clock, development of small molecule modulators targeting the core clock machinery has only recently been initiated. BMAL1, a core clock gene, is controlled by a ROR/REV-ERB-response element (RORE)-dependent mechanism, which plays an important role in stabilizing the period of the molecular circadian clock. Therefore, we aimed to identify a novel small molecule modulator that regulates Bmal1 gene expression in RORE-dependency, thereby influencing the molecular feedback loop of the circadian clock. For this purpose, we carried out a cell-based screen of more than 1000 drug-like compounds, using a luciferase reporter driven by the proximal region of the mouse Bmal1 promoter. One compound, designated KK-S6, repressed the RORE-dependent transcriptional activity of the mBmal1 promoter and reduced endogenous BMAL1 protein expression. More importantly, KK-S6 significantly altered the amplitude of circadian oscillations of Bmal1 and Per2 promoter activities in a dose-dependent manner, but barely affected the period length. KK-S6 effectively decreased mRNA expression of metabolic genes acting downstream of REV-ERBα, Pai-1 and Citrate synthase, that contain RORE cis-element in their promoter. KK-S6 likely acts in a RORE-dependent manner by reinforcing the REV-ERBα activity, though not by the same mechanism as known REV-ERB agonists. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that KK-S6 functions as a novel modulator of the amplitude of molecular circadian rhythms by influencing RORE-mediated BMAL1 expression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Circadian Tick-Talking Across the Neuroendocrine System and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei Circuits: The Enigmatic Communication Between the Molecular and Electrical Membrane Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, M D C

    2015-07-01

    As with many processes in nature, appropriate timing in biological systems is of paramount importance. In the neuroendocrine system, the efficacy of hormonal influence on major bodily functions, such as reproduction, metabolism and growth, relies on timely communication within and across many of the brain's homeostatic systems. The activity of these circuits is tightly orchestrated with the animal's internal physiological demands and external solar cycle by a master circadian clock. In mammals, this master clock is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where the ensemble activity of thousands of clock neurones generates and communicates circadian time cues to the rest of the brain and body. Many regions of the brain, including areas with neuroendocrine function, also contain local daily clocks that can provide feedback signals to the SCN. Although much is known about the molecular processes underpinning endogenous circadian rhythm generation in SCN neurones and, to a lesser extent, extra-SCN cells, the electrical membrane clock that acts in partnership with the molecular clockwork to communicate circadian timing across the brain is poorly understood. The present review focuses on some circadian aspects of reproductive neuroendocrinology and processes involved in circadian rhythm communication in the SCN, aiming to identify key gaps in our knowledge of cross-talk between our daily master clock and neuroendocrine function. The intention is to highlight our surprisingly limited understanding of their interaction in the hope that this will stimulate future work in these areas. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Neuroendocrinology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  11. Differences in circadian rhythmicity in CLOCK 3111T/C genetic variants in moderate obese women as assessed by thermometry, actimetry and body position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandín, C; Martinez-Nicolas, A; Ordovás, J M; Ros Lucas, J A; Castell, P; Silvente, T; Madrid, J A; Garaulet, M

    2013-08-01

    Genetics is behind our circadian machinery. CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput) 3111T/C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been previously related to obesity and weight loss. However, phenotypic association and functionality of CLOCK 3111 locus is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine, in free-living conditions, if the presence of CLOCK 3111C in overweight women could be related to (a) circadian disorders, and (b) changes in sleep quality, to improve understanding of the previously demonstrated associations with obesity and reduced weight loss of the C carriers. Wrist temperature, actimetry and position (TAP) and TAP variables were measured as markers of circadian functionality during 8 consecutive days. A rest-activity and food diary was also completed, whereas sleep quality was determined by domiciliary polysomnography. We recruited 85 women who were overweight with body mass index (BMI) of 28.59±4.30 kg m(-2) and age 43±12 years. From this sample, we found that 43 women were carrying the minor allele (C) for CLOCK 3111T/C SNP and 42 women were TT carriers (major allele carriers). Both groups of patients were matched for number, age, obesity parameters and energy intake. Compared with TT subjects, who showed more robust circadian rhythm profiles, patients with the C allele displayed significant circadian abnormalities: lower amplitude and greater fragmentation of the rhythm, a less stable circadian pattern and a significantly weakened circadian function, as assessed by the circadian function index (CFI). C subjects were also less active, started their activities later in the morning and were sleepier during the day, showing a delayed acrophase that characterizes 'evening-type' subjects. C genetic variants in CLOCK 3111T/C display a less robust circadian rhythm than TT and a delayed acrophase that characterizes 'evening-type' subjects. We support the notion that identifying CLOCK genotypes in patients may assist the

  12. Association between light at night, melatonin secretion, sleep deprivation, and the internal clock: Health impacts and mechanisms of circadian disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, Yvan; Reinberg, Alain; Touitou, David

    2017-03-15

    Exposure to Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) results in a disruption of the circadian system, which is deleterious to health. In industrialized countries, 75% of the total workforce is estimated to have been involved in shift work and night work. Epidemiologic studies, mainly of nurses, have revealed an association between sustained night work and a 50-100% higher incidence of breast cancer. The potential and multifactorial mechanisms of the effects include the suppression of melatonin secretion by ALAN, sleep deprivation, and circadian disruption. Shift and/or night work generally decreases the time spent sleeping, and it disrupts the circadian time structure. In the long run, this desynchronization is detrimental to health, as underscored by a large number of epidemiological studies that have uncovered elevated rates of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular risks, obesity, mood disorders and age-related macular degeneration. It amounts to a public health issue in the light of the very substantial number of individuals involved. The IARC has classified shift work in group 2A of "probable carcinogens to humans" since "they involve a circadian disorganization". Countermeasures to the effects of ALAN, such as melatonin, bright light, or psychotropic drugs, have been proposed as a means to combat circadian clock disruption and improve adaptation to shift and night work. We review the evidence for the ALAN impacts on health. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding to combat the detrimental properties of exposure to ALAN and develop strategies of prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic deletion of the circadian clock transcription factor BMAL1 and chronic alcohol consumption differentially alter hepatic glycogen in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Uduak S; Valcin, Jennifer A; Swain, Telisha M; Filiano, Ashley N; Gamble, Karen L; Young, Martin E; Bailey, Shannon M

    2018-03-01

    Multiple metabolic pathways exhibit time-of-day-dependent rhythms that are controlled by the molecular circadian clock. We have shown that chronic alcohol is capable of altering the molecular clock and diurnal oscillations in several elements of hepatic glycogen metabolism ( 19 , 44 ). Herein, we sought to determine whether genetic disruption of the hepatocyte clock differentially impacts hepatic glycogen content in chronic alcohol-fed mice. Male hepatocyte-specific BMAL1 knockout (HBK) and littermate controls were fed control or alcohol-containing diets for 5 wk to alter hepatic glycogen content. Glycogen displayed a significant diurnal rhythm in livers of control genotype mice fed the control diet. While rhythmic, alcohol significantly altered the diurnal oscillation of glycogen in livers of control genotype mice. The glycogen rhythm was mildly altered in livers of control-fed HBK mice. Importantly, glycogen content was arrhythmic in livers of alcohol-fed HBK mice. Consistent with these changes in hepatic glycogen content, we observed that some glycogen and glucose metabolism genes were differentially altered by chronic alcohol consumption in livers of HBK and littermate control mice. Diurnal rhythms in glycogen synthase (mRNA and protein) were significantly altered by alcohol feeding and clock disruption. Alcohol consumption significantly altered Gck, Glut2, and Ppp1r3g rhythms in livers of control genotype mice, with diurnal rhythms of Pklr, Glut2, Ppp1r3c, and Ppp1r3g further disrupted (dampened or arrhythmic) in livers of HBK mice. Taken together, these findings show that chronic alcohol consumption and hepatocyte clock disruption differentially influence the diurnal rhythm of glycogen and various key glycogen metabolism-related genes in the liver. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We report that circadian clock disruption exacerbates alcohol-mediated alterations in hepatic glycogen. We observed differential responsiveness in diurnal rhythms of glycogen and glycogen

  14. Lab mice in the field: unorthodox daily activity and effects of a dysfunctional circadian clock allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daan, Serge; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Albrecht, Urs; Schmutz, Isabelle; Daan, Moritz; Daan, Berte; Rienks, Froukje; Poletaeva, Inga; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Vyssotski, Alexei; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2011-04-01

    Daily patterns of animal behavior are potentially of vast functional importance. Fitness benefits have been identified in nature by the association between individual timing and survival or by the fate of individuals after experimental deletion of their circadian pacemaker. The recent advances in unraveling the molecular basis of circadian timing enable new approaches to natural selection on timing. The investigators report on the effect and fate of the mutant Per2(Brdm1) allele in 4 replicate populations of house mice in a seminatural outside environment over 2 years. This allele is known to compromise circadian organization and entrainment and to cause multiple physiological disturbances. Mice (N=250) bred from Per2(Brdm1) heterozygotes were implanted subcutaneously with transponders and released in approximately Mendelian ratios in four 400 m(2) pens. An electronic system stored the times of all visits to feeders of each individual. The study first demonstrates that mice are not explicitly nocturnal in this natural environment. Feeding activity was predominantly and sometimes exclusively diurnal and spread nearly equally over day and night under the protective snow cover in winter. The effect of Per2(Brdm1) on activity timing is negligible compared to seasonal changes in all genotypes. Second, the Per2(Brdm1) allele did not have persistent negative effects on fitness. In the first year, the allele gradually became less frequent by reducing survival. New cohorts captured had the same Per2(Brdm1) frequency as the survivors from previous cohorts, consistent with an absence of an effect on reproduction. In the second year, the allele recovered to about its initial frequency (0.54). These changes in selective advantage were primarily due to female mice, as females lived longer and the sex ratio dropped to about 25% males in the population. While it is unknown which selective advantage led to the recovery, the results caution against inferences from laboratory

  15. Diverse development and higher sensitivity of the circadian clocks to changes in maternal-feeding regime in a rat model of cardio-metabolic disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olejníková, Lucie; Polidarová, Lenka; Paušlyová, Lucia; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 4 (2015), s. 531-547 ISSN 0742-0528 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Grant - others:Program interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M200111202 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian clock * clock gene * colon * liver * SHR * supraciasmatic nucleus Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.540, year: 2015

  16. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 7. Circadian Rhythms - From Daily Rhythms to Biological Clocks. Koustubh M Vaze Vijay Kumar Sharma. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 7 July 2013 pp 662- ... Keywords. Circadian rhythms; biological clocks; geophysical cycles; entrainment.

  17. “What watch?... such much!” Complexity and evolution of circadian clocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2002-01-01

    This review uses three examples to summarise our knowledge about the complexity and the evolution of circadian systems. The first example describes the ecology of unicellular algae, which use their circadian system to optimise the daily exploitation of resources that are spatially separated. The

  18. Evolutionary history of the PER3 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR): idiosyncratic aspect of primate molecular circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Flávia Cal; Ribeiro, Amanda Oliveira; Tufik, Sérgio; Torres, Laila Brito; Oliveira, José Américo; Mello, Luiz Eugênio Araújo Moraes; Cavalcante, Jeferson Souza; Pedrazzoli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The PER3 gene is one of the clock genes, which function in the core mammalian molecular circadian system. A variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) locus in the 18th exon of this gene has been strongly associated to circadian rhythm phenotypes and sleep organization in humans, but it has not been identified in other mammals except primates. To better understand the evolution and the placement of the PER3 VNTR in a phylogenetical context, the present study enlarges the investigation about the presence and the structure of this variable region in a large sample of primate species and other mammals. The analysis of the results has revealed that the PER3 VNTR occurs exclusively in simiiforme primates and that the number of copies of the primitive unit ranges from 2 to 11 across different primate species. Two transposable elements surrounding the 18th exon of PER3 were found in primates with published genome sequences, including the tarsiiforme Tarsius syrichta, which lacks the VNTR. These results suggest that this VNTR may have evolved in a common ancestor of the simiiforme branch and that the evolutionary copy number differentiation of this VNTR may be associated with primate simiiformes sleep and circadian phenotype patterns.

  19. Evolutionary history of the PER3 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR: idiosyncratic aspect of primate molecular circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Cal Sabino

    Full Text Available The PER3 gene is one of the clock genes, which function in the core mammalian molecular circadian system. A variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR locus in the 18th exon of this gene has been strongly associated to circadian rhythm phenotypes and sleep organization in humans, but it has not been identified in other mammals except primates. To better understand the evolution and the placement of the PER3 VNTR in a phylogenetical context, the present study enlarges the investigation about the presence and the structure of this variable region in a large sample of primate species and other mammals. The analysis of the results has revealed that the PER3 VNTR occurs exclusively in simiiforme primates and that the number of copies of the primitive unit ranges from 2 to 11 across different primate species. Two transposable elements surrounding the 18th exon of PER3 were found in primates with published genome sequences, including the tarsiiforme Tarsius syrichta, which lacks the VNTR. These results suggest that this VNTR may have evolved in a common ancestor of the simiiforme branch and that the evolutionary copy number differentiation of this VNTR may be associated with primate simiiformes sleep and circadian phenotype patterns.

  20. Circadian signaling in the Northern krill Meganyctiphanes norvegica: In silico prediction of the protein components of a putative clock system using a publicly accessible transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; Yu, Andy; Pascual, Micah G

    2018-02-01

    The Northern krill Meganyctiphanes norvegica is a significant component of the zooplankton community in many regions of the North Atlantic Ocean. In the areas it inhabits, M. norvegica is of great importance ecologically, as it is both a major consumer of phytoplankton/small zooplankton and is a primary food source for higher-level consumers. One behavior of significance for both feeding and predator avoidance in Meganyctiphanes is diel vertical migration (DVM), i.e., a rising from depth at dusk and a return to depth at dawn. In this and other euphausiids, an endogenous circadian pacemaker is thought, at least in part, to control DVM. Currently, there is no information concerning the identity of the genes/proteins that comprise the M. norvegica circadian system. In fact, there is little information concerning the molecular underpinnings of circadian rhythmicity in crustaceans generally. Here, a publicly accessible transcriptome was used to identify the molecular components of a putative Meganyctiphanes circadian system. A complete set of core clock proteins was deduced from the M. norvegica transcriptome (clock, cryptochrome 2, cycle, period and timeless), as was a large suite of proteins that likely function as modulators of the core clock (e.g., doubletime), or serves as inputs to it (cryptochrome 1) or outputs from it (pigment dispersing hormone). This is the first description of a "complete" (core clock through putative output pathway signals) euphausiid clock system, and as such, provides a foundation for initiating molecular investigations of circadian signaling in M. norvegica and other krill species, including how clock systems may regulate DVM and other behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Clock genes, ADHD and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogavero, Floriana; Jager, Amanda; Glennon, Jeffrey C

    2016-11-09

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is frequently associated with comorbid aggression and sleep disturbances. The sleep/wake cycle is under the control of the circadian system which is moderated by clock genes. Clock genes can regulate the transcription of monoamine oxidase A, which is involved in the degradation of monoamines. Disturbances in monoamine interaction with clock genes in those with monoamine gene polymorphisms may regulate susceptibility of ADHD and comorbid aggression/sleep disturbances. While monoamines influence circadian rhythm and clock gene expression, circadian rhythm components modulate aggressive behavior, and altered clock genes expression have been associated with ADHD. We propose a mechanism by which circadian rhythm and clock gene expression may influence ADHD and comorbid aggression through the modulation of neurotransmitters. The role of clock genes in ADHD patients with comorbid aggression awaits further research; therefore we also indicate directions for future studies to help increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms in ADHD with comorbid aggression and sleep disturbances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A putative flowering-time-related Dof transcription factor gene, JcDof3, is controlled by the circadian clock in Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Yang, Ming-Feng; Zhang, Wen-Peng; Chen, Fan; Shen, Shi-Hua

    2011-12-01

    Plant-specific DNA-binding transcription factors with one finger (Dof) perform important roles in several biological processes. A yeast one-hybrid cDNA library of Jatropha curcas was used to identify Dof-type transcription factors. JcDof3, isolated from the library as a full-length cDNA, encoded a protein of 518 amino acids and contained a highly conserved Dof domain. Yeast one-hybrid systems and subcellular localization assays confirmed that JcDof3 was a typical transcription factor. In contrast to arrhythmic expression at basal level in etiolated cotyledons under continuous dark conditions, the circadian oscillations of JcDof3 transcripts were observed under long day, short day or continuous light regimes. A phylogenetic analysis showed that JcDof3 was clustered into the same clade with CYCLING DOF FACTOR (CDF), which interacts with F-box protein to regulate photoperiodic flowering. Moreover, a yeast two-hybrid assay showed that JcDof3 also interacted with F-box proteins. Our results suggest that JcDof3 is a circadian clock regulated gene, and might be involved in the flowering time regulation of J. curcas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    significance. (right) Vijay Kumar Sharma is a Professor at the. Evolutionary and. Organismal Biology Unit,. JNCASR, Bangalore. His major research interests presently are in understand- ing circadian organization of fruit flies and ants, adaptive significance of circadian clocks, neurogenetics of circadian egg-laying rhythm.

  4. Influence of the core circadian gene "Clock" on obesity and leptin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoping; Yang, Shuhong; Zou, Yan; Cheng, Shuting; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Zhengrong; Liu, Yanyou

    2013-01-23

    Alterations in metabolism could be due to cell-autonomous effects associated with altered expression of Clock in central nervous system feeding centers and/or peripheral tissues involved in metabolism. Clock mutant mice are hyperphagic and obese, which indicates that Clock is related to obesity. In the present study, we used intracerebroventricular injection of recombinant adenoviral vector harboring Clock genes to explore the role of Clock on diet induced obesity and the mechanisms involved in leptin resistance and leptin signaling in mice. The results demonstrated that expression of Clock in the arcuate nucleus of diet induced obesity mice was down-regulated. The recombinant adenoviral vector harboring Clock genes could reduce obesity indexes of diet induced obesity mice including body weight, BMI and total fat mass, attenuate hyperleptinemia, increase leptin sensitivity and decrease accumulated suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in the arcuate nucleus. These results indicate that Clock plays an important role on obesity, which may be involved in leptin resistance and regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in arcuate nucleus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Clock represses preadipocytes adipogenesis via GILZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhu; Xu, Lirong; Cai, Tingting; Yuan, Gongsheng; Sun, Ning; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe

    2017-12-26

    Adiposity is a worldwide health threat that needs to be prevented. Circadian gene Clock (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) is closely correlated to adiposity; for example, weight gain, adipocytes size expansion, and serum lipid level rise in Clock Δ19 mice compared to C57BL/6J mice. However, the precise role of Clock during adipogenic differentiation is unknown. Herein, the circadian gene Clock is shown to regulate adipogenesis mediated by GILZ. Clock-mediated attenuation and upregulation influenced lipid synthesis and affected the levels of adipogenic transcriptional factors, C/EBP-β, C/EBP-α, PPAR-γ, and FABP4, both in vivo and in vitro (primary adipose-derived stromal cells and 3T3-L1 cells). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, reporter gene assay, and serum shock assay found that Clock transcriptionally regulated the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Furthermore, GILZ attenuation could relieve the inhibitory effect of Clock on lipid synthesis and GILZ overexpression also reduced the promotion role of Clock attenuation in adipogenesis suggesting that Clock inhibits adipogenic differentiation of preadipocytes via GILZ. The current results demonstrate how circadian genes are likely to regulate adiposity, affecting the adipogenic differentiation process, as well as, increasing the fat cells number. Therefore, this study may provide novel insights into the underlying mechanism explaining the correlation between Clock mutation and adiposity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Sustained activation of GABAA receptors in the suprachiasmatic nucleus mediates light-induced phase delays of the circadian clock: a novel function of ionotropic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Daniel L; Ehlen, J Christopher; Larkin, Tony E; McNeill, John K; Pamplin, John R; Walker, Colton A; Walker, Phillip V; Dhanraj, Daryl R; Albers, H Elliott

    2015-07-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) contains a circadian clock that generates endogenous rhythmicity and entrains that rhythmicity with the day-night cycle. The neurochemical events that transduce photic input within the SCN and mediate entrainment by resetting the molecular clock have yet to be defined. Because GABA is contained in nearly all SCN neurons we tested the hypothesis that GABA serves as this signal in studies employing Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Activation of GABAA receptors was found to be necessary and sufficient for light to induce phase delays of the clock. Remarkably, the sustained activation of GABAA receptors for more than three consecutive hours was necessary to phase-delay the clock. The duration of GABAA receptor activation required to induce phase delays would not have been predicted by either the prevalent theory of circadian entrainment or by expectations regarding the duration of ionotropic receptor activation necessary to produce functional responses. Taken together, these data identify a novel neurochemical mechanism essential for phase-delaying the 'master' circadian clock within the SCN as well as identifying an unprecedented action of an amino acid neurotransmitter involving the sustained activation of ionotropic receptors. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Using Higher-Order Dynamic Bayesian Networks to Model Periodic Data from the Circadian Clock of Arabidopsis Thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Rónán; Edwards, Kieron D.; O'Neill, John S.; Aitken, Stuart; Millar, Andrew J.; Girolami, Mark

    Modelling gene regulatory networks in organisms is an important task that has recently become possible due to large scale assays using technologies such as microarrays. In this paper, the circadian clock of Arabidopsis thaliana is modelled by fitting dynamic Bayesian networks to luminescence data gathered from experiments. This work differs from previous modelling attempts by using higher-order dynamic Bayesian networks to explicitly model the time lag between the various genes being expressed. In order to achieve this goal, new techniques in preprocessing the data and in evaluating a learned model are proposed. It is shown that it is possible, to some extent, to model these time delays using a higher-order dynamic Bayesian network.

  8. Regulated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis: A global analysis of differential control by hormones and the circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Pamela J. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2010-03-18

    The long-term goal of this research was to better understand the influence of mRNA stability on gene regulation, particularly in response to hormones and the circadian clock. The primary aim of this project was to examine this using DNA microarrays, small RNA analysis and other approaches. We accomplished these objectives, although we were only able to detect small changes in mRNA stability in response to these stimuli. However, the work also contributed to a major breakthrough allowing the identification of small RNAs on a genomic scale in eukaryotes. Moreover, the project prompted us to develop a new way to analyze mRNA decay genome wide. Thus, the research was hugely successful beyond our objectives.

  9. Carbon partitioning in Arabidopsis thaliana is a dynamic process controlled by the plants metabolic status and its circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölling, Katharina; Thalmann, Matthias; Müller, Antonia; Jenny, Camilla; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2015-10-01

    Plant growth involves the coordinated distribution of carbon resources both towards structural components and towards storage compounds that assure a steady carbon supply over the complete diurnal cycle. We used (14) CO2 labelling to track assimilated carbon in both source and sink tissues. Source tissues exhibit large variations in carbon allocation throughout the light period. The most prominent change was detected in partitioning towards starch, being low in the morning and more than double later in the day. Export into sink tissues showed reciprocal changes. Fewer and smaller changes in carbon allocation occurred in sink tissues where, in most respects, carbon was partitioned similarly, whether the sink leaf assimilated it through photosynthesis or imported it from source leaves. Mutants deficient in the production or remobilization of leaf starch exhibited major alterations in carbon allocation. Low-starch mutants that suffer from carbon starvation at night allocated much more carbon into neutral sugars and had higher rates of export than the wild type, partly because of the reduced allocation into starch, but also because of reduced allocation into structural components. Moreover, mutants deficient in the plant's circadian system showed considerable changes in their carbon partitioning pattern suggesting control by the circadian clock. © 2015 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Lab mice in the field : Unorthodox daily activity and effects of a dysfunctional circadian clock allele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Albrecht, Urs; Schmutz, Isabelle; Daan, Moritz; Daan, Berte; Rienks, Froukje; Poletaeva, Inga; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Vyssotski, Alexei; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Omo, Giacomo Dell’

    Daily patterns of animal behavior are potentially of vast functional importance. Fitness benefits have been identified in nature by the association between individual timing and survival or by the fate of individuals after experimental deletion of their circadian pacemaker. The recent advances in

  11. Lab mice in the field: unorthodox daily activity and effects of a dysfunctional circadian clock allele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, S.; Spoelstra, K.; Albrecht, U.; Schmutz, I.; Daan, M.; Daan, B.; Rienks, F.; Poletaeva, I.; Dell'Omo, G.; Vyssotski, A.; Lipp, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Daily patterns of animal behavior are potentially of vast functional importance. Fitness benefits have been identified in nature by the association between individual timing and survival or by the fate of individuals after experimental deletion of their circadian pacemaker. The recent advances in

  12. A Functional Analysis of Circadian Pacemakers in Nocturnal Rodents. IV. Entrainment : Pacemaker as Clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pittendrigh, Colin S.; Daan, Serge

    1976-01-01

    1. In the first part of the paper, the model of non-parametric entrainment of circadian pacemakers is tested for the case of nocturnal rodents. The model makes use of the available data on freerunning period (τ) in constant darkness and on phase response curves (PRC) for short light pulses. It is

  13. The precision of circadian clocks : Assessment and analysis in Syrian hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, S; Oklejewicz, M

    2003-01-01

    Locomotor activity recordings of Syrian hamsters were systematically analyzed to estimate the precision of the overt circadian activity rhythm in constant darkness. Phase variation, i.e., the standard deviation of phase markers around the regression line, varied with the definition of phase.

  14. Real-time monitoring of circadian clock oscillations in primary cultures of mammalian cells using Tol2 transposon-mediated gene transfer strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanaka Iori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circadian rhythm in mammals is orchestrated by a central pacemaker in the brain, but most peripheral tissues contain their own intrinsic circadian oscillators. The circadian rhythm is a fundamental biological system in mammals involved in the regulation of various physiological functions such as behavior, cardiovascular functions and energy metabolism. Thus, it is important to understand the correlation between circadian oscillator and physiological functions in peripheral tissues. However, it is still difficult to investigate the molecular oscillator in primary culture cells. Results In this study, we used a novel Tol2 transposon based Dbp promoter or Bmal1 promoter driven luciferase reporter vector system to detect and analyze the intrinsic molecular oscillator in primary culture cells (mouse embryonic fibroblasts, fetal bovine heart endothelial cells and rat astrocytes. The results showed circadian molecular oscillations in all examined primary culture cells. Moreover, the phase relationship between Dbp promoter driven and Bmal1 promoter driven molecular rhythms were almost anti-phase, which suggested that these reporters appropriately read-out the intrinsic cellular circadian clock. Conclusions Our results indicate that gene transfer strategy using the Tol2 transposon system of a useful and safe non-viral vector is a powerful tool for investigating circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues.

  15. Sensitivity to Pigment-Dispersing Factor (PDF) Is Cell-Type Specific among PDF-Expressing Circadian Clock Neurons in the Madeira Cockroach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrich, Julia; Giese, Maria; Shen, Wen; Zhang, Yi; Voss, Alexandra; Popov, Cyril; Stengl, Monika; Wei, HongYing

    2018-02-01

    Transplantation studies have pinpointed the circadian clock of the Madeira cockroach to the accessory medulla (AME) of the brain's optic lobes. The AME is innervated by approximately 240 adjacent neuropeptidergic neurons, including 12 pigment-dispersing factor (PDF)-expressing neurons anterior to the AME (aPDFMEs). Four of the aPDFMEs project contralaterally, controlling locomotor activity rhythms of the night-active cockroach. The present in vitro Ca 2+ imaging analysis focuses on contralaterally projecting AME neurons and their responses to PDF, GABA, and acetylcholine (ACh). First, rhodamine-dextran backfills from the contralateral optic stalk identified contralaterally projecting AME neurons, which were then dispersed in primary cell cultures. After characterization of PDF, GABA, and ACh responses, PDF immunocytochemistry identified ipsilaterally and contralaterally projecting PDFMEs. All PDF-sensitive clock neurons, PDF-immunoreactive clock neurons, and the majority of ipsilaterally and contralaterally projecting cells were excited by ACh. GABA inhibited all PDF-expressing clock neurons, and about half of other ipsilaterally projecting and most contralaterally projecting clock neurons. For the first time, we identified PDF autoreceptors in PDF-secreting cockroach circadian pacemakers. The medium-sized aPDFMEs and all other contralaterally projecting PDF-sensitive clock cells were inhibited by PDF. The ipsilaterally remaining small PDF-sensitive clock cells were activated by PDF. Only the largest aPDFME did not express PDF autoreceptors. We hypothesize that opposing PDF signaling generates 2 different ensembles of clock cells with antiphasic activity, regulating and maintaining a constant phase relationship between rest and activity cycles of the night-active cockroach.

  16. The trouble with circadian clock dysfunction: multiple deleterious effects on the brain and body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinski, Erin L; Deibel, Scott H; McDonald, Robert J

    2014-03-01

    This review consolidates research employing human correlational and experimental work across brain and body with experimental animal models to provide a more complete representation of how circadian rhythms influence almost all aspects of life. In doing so, we will cover the morphological and biochemical pathways responsible for rhythm generation as well as interactions between these systems and others (e.g., stress, feeding, reproduction). The effects of circadian disruption on the health of humans, including time of day effects, cognitive sequelae, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, diet, obesity, food preferences, mood disorders, and cancer will also be discussed. Subsequently, experimental support for these largely correlational human studies conducted in non-human animal models will be described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The promoter activities of sucrose phosphate synthase genes in rice, OsSPS1 and OsSPS11, are controlled by light and circadian clock, but not by sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madoka eYonekura

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although sucrose plays a role in sugar sensing and its signaling pathway, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the expressions of plant sucrose-related genes. Our previous study on the expression of the sucrose phosphate synthase gene family in rice (OsSPSs suggested the involvement of sucrose sensing and/or circadian rhythm in the transcriptional regulation of OsSPS. To examine whether the promoters of OsSPSs can be controlled by sugars and circadian clock, we produced transgenic rice plants harboring a promoter–luciferase construct for OsSPS1 or OsSPS11 and analyzed the changes in the promoter activities by monitoring bioluminescence from intact transgenic plants in real time. Transgenic plants fed sucrose, glucose, or mannitol under continuous light conditions showed no changes in bioluminescence intensity; meanwhile, the addition of sucrose increased the concentration of sucrose in the plants, and the mRNA levels of OsSPS remained constant. These results suggest that these OsSPS promoters may not be regulated by sucrose levels in the tissues. Next, we investigated the changes in the promoter activities under 12-h light/12-h dark cycles and continuous light conditions. Under the light–dark cycle, both OsSPS1 and OsSPS11 promoter activities were low in the dark and increased rapidly after the beginning of the light period. When the transgenic rice plants were moved to the continuous light condition, both POsSPS1::LUC and POsSPS11::LUC reporter plants exhibited circadian bioluminescence rhythms; bioluminescence peaked during the subjective day with a 27-h period: in the early morning as for OsSPS1 promoter and midday for OsSPS11 promoter. These results indicate that these OsSPS promoters are controlled by both light illumination and circadian clock and that the regulatory mechanism of promoter activity differs between the 2 OsSPS genes.

  18. Cells have sex chromosomes and circadian clocks: Implications for organismal level functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Rae

    2018-04-01

    A great number of stakeholders have a keen interest in issues surrounding sex differences. These participants in the discourse often use the same evidence to draw opposite conclusions, with implications for individuals and society as a whole. One part of the maelstrom and associated emotionality derives from confounds between the concepts of "sex" vs. "gender", even among professionals. Here, the oft-repeated point is made that evidence for gender differences can't be derived from the animal research, once the generally accepted conception of gender as a process unique to humans, is acknowledged. Nevertheless, considered at a more general level, the developmental and epigenetic mechanisms that give rise to differences in behavior among individuals and groups is exquisitely explored in animal studies but relatively poorly in research on humans. The focus on animal research here, starts with the fact that virtually each cell of the body has sex chromosomes (XX and XY), along with the intracellular genetic and cytoplasmic mechanisms associated with circadian (circa-about, dies-day) timing. The consequences of these sex×circadian interactions for physiology and behavior at cellular and higher levels of organization are considered in systems where compelling evidence is available. These include sex differences in the circadian timing system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and in metabolism. The evidence highlights sex differences in cells throughout the body and thus has implications for higher level processes and systems such as sleep/wake patterns. In a more general sense, they point to mechanisms that could give rise to gender differences. In summary, the viewpoint presented here is that the circadian timing system can be used very elegantly to explore the contributions of genetic and hormonal sex differences on biological systems at many levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Neurohormones as putative circadian clock output signals in the central nervous system of two cricket species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sehadová, H.; Shao, Q. M.; Sehnal, František; Takeda, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 328, č. 1 (2007), s. 239-255 ISSN 0302-766X Grant - others:Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JP) 99L01205; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JP) ID No. P04197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : circadian rhythm * corazonin * CCAP Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.613, year: 2007

  20. Working against our endogenous circadian clock: Breast cancer and electric lighting in the modern world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard G

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence increases rapidly as societies industrialize. Many changes occur during the industrialization process, one of which is a dramatic alteration in the lighted environment from a sun-based system to an electricity-based system. Increasingly, the natural dark period at night is being seriously eroded for the bulk of humanity. Based on the fact that light during the night can suppress melatonin, and also disrupt the circadian rhythm, it was proposed in 1987 that increasing use of electricity to light the night accounts in part for the rising risk of breast cancer globally. Predictions from the theory include: non-day shift work increases risk, blindness lowers risk, long sleep duration lowers risk, and population level community nighttime light level co-distributes with breast cancer incidence. Thus far, studies of these predictions are consistent in support of the theory. A new avenue of research has been on function of circadian genes and whether these are related to breast cancer risk. In particular, a length variant of Per3 (5-VNTR) has been associated with increased risk in young women, and this same 5-VNTR variant has also been found to predict morning diurnal type and shorter sleep duration compared to the 4-VNTR variant. An important question is how an effect of light-at-night (LAN) exposure on breast cancer risk might be modified by polymorphisms and/or epigenetic alterations in the circadian genes, and conversely whether light-at-night exposure (e.g., shift work) can induce deleterious epigenetic changes in these genes.

  1. A circadian clock in the olfactory bulb anticipates feeding during food anticipatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahum Nolasco

    Full Text Available Rabbit pups ingest food, in this case milk, once a day with circadian periodicity and are a natural model of food anticipatory activity. During nursing, several sensory systems receive information about properties of the food, one of them being the olfactory system, which has received little attention in relation to synchronization by food. In addition, the olfactory bulb has a circadian pacemaker that exhibits rhythms independently of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, but the biological functions of these rhythms are largely unknown. In the present contribution, we hypothesized that circadian suckling of milk synchronizes rhythms in the olfactory bulb. To this aim we explored by immunohistochemistry, rhythms of FOS and PER1 proteins, as indicators of activation and reporter of oscillations, respectively, through a complete 24-h cycle in periglomerular, mitral and granular cell layers of both the main and the accessory olfactory bulb. Subjects were 7-day-old rabbit pups scheduled to nurse during the night (02:00 h or day (10:00 h, and also fasted subjects, to explore the possible persistence of oscillations. In the three layers of the main olfactory bulb, FOS was high at time of nursing, then further increased 1.5 h afterward, and then decreased to increase again in advance of the next nursing bout. This pattern persisted, without the postprandial increase, in fasted subjects with a shift in subjects nursed at 02:00. PER1 was increased 2-8 h after nursing and this increase persisted in most cell layers, with a shift, in fasted subjects. In the accessory olfactory bulb we only observed a consistent pattern of FOS expression in the mitral cell layer of nursed subjects, similar to that of the main olfactory bulb. We conclude that the main olfactory bulb is synchronized during milk ingestion, but during fasting its oscillations perhaps are modulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, as proposed for rodents.

  2. Poor Sleep Quality Is Associated with Dawn Phenomenon and Impaired Circadian Clock Gene Expression in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. We investigated whether poor sleep quality is associated with both dawn phenomenon and impaired circadian clock gene expression in subjects with diabetes. Methods. 81 subjects with diabetes on continuous glucose monitoring were divided into two groups according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The magnitude of dawn phenomenon was quantified by its increment from nocturnal nadir to prebreakfast. Peripheral leucocytes were sampled from 81 subjects with diabetes and 28 normal controls at 09:00. Transcript levels of circadian clock genes (BMAL1, PER1, PER2, and PER3 were determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results. The levels of HbA1c and fasting glucose and the magnitude of dawn phenomenon were significantly higher in the diabetes group with poor sleep quality than that with good sleep quality. Peripheral leucocytes from subjects with poor sleep quality expressed significantly lower transcript levels of BMAL1 and PER1 compared with those with good sleep quality. Poor sleep quality was significantly correlated with magnitude of dawn phenomenon. Multiple linear regression showed that sleep quality and PER1 were significantly independently correlated with dawn phenomenon. Conclusions. Dawn phenomenon is associated with sleep quality. Furthermore, mRNA expression of circadian clock genes is dampened in peripheral leucocytes of subjects with poor sleep quality.

  3. Time-of-day- and light-dependent expression of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian clock.

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    Harrod H Ling

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are driven by the biological clock that operates endogenously but can also be entrained to the light-dark cycle of the environment. In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, which is composed of individual cellular oscillators that are driven by a set of core clock genes interacting in transcriptional/translational feedback loops. Light signals can trigger molecular events in the SCN that ultimately impact on the phase of expression of core clock genes to reset the master pacemaker. While transcriptional regulation has received much attention in the field of circadian biology in the past, other mechanisms including targeted protein degradation likely contribute to the clock timing and entrainment process. In the present study, proteome-wide screens of the murine SCN led to the identification of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4, a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component of the N-end rule pathway, as a time-of-day-dependent and light-inducible protein. The spatial and temporal expression pattern of UBR4 in the SCN was subsequently characterized by immunofluorescence microscopy. UBR4 is expressed across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the SCN in a time-of-day-dependent fashion. UBR4 is localized exclusively to arginine vasopressin (AVP-expressing neurons of the SCN shell. Upon photic stimulation in the early subjective night, the number of UBR4-expressing cells within the SCN increases. This study is the first to identify a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component, UBR4, in the murine SCN and to implicate the N-end rule degradation pathway as a potential player in regulating core clock mechanisms and photic entrainment.

  4. Control of Rest:Activity by a Dopaminergic Ultradian Oscillator and the Circadian Clock

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    Clément Bourguignon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There is long-standing evidence for rhythms in locomotor activity, as well as various other aspects of physiology, with periods substantially shorter than 24 h in organisms ranging from fruit flies to humans. These ultradian oscillations, whose periods frequently fall between 2 and 6 h, are normally well integrated with circadian rhythms; however, they often lack the period stability and expression robustness of the latter. An adaptive advantage of ultradian rhythms has been clearly demonstrated for the common vole, suggesting that they may have evolved to confer social synchrony. The cellular substrate and mechanism of ultradian rhythm generation have remained elusive so far, however recent findings—the subject of this review—now indicate that ultradian locomotor rhythms rely on an oscillator based on dopamine, dubbed the dopaminergic ultradian oscillator (DUO. These findings also reveal that the DUO period can be lengthened from <4 to >48 h by methamphetamine treatment, suggesting that the previously described methamphetamine-sensitive (circadian oscillator represents a long-period manifestation of the DUO.

  5. Modeling the effects of cell cycle M-phase transcriptional inhibition on circadian oscillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Kang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous time-keeping systems that temporally organize biological processes. Gating of cell cycle events by a circadian clock is a universal observation that is currently considered a mechanism serving to protect DNA from diurnal exposure to ultraviolet radiation or other mutagens. In this study, we put forward another possibility: that such gating helps to insulate the circadian clock from perturbations induced by transcriptional inhibition during the M phase of the cell cycle. We introduced a periodic pulse of transcriptional inhibition into a previously published mammalian circadian model and simulated the behavior of the modified model under both constant darkness and light-dark cycle conditions. The simulation results under constant darkness indicated that periodic transcriptional inhibition could entrain/lock the circadian clock just as a light-dark cycle does. At equilibrium states, a transcriptional inhibition pulse of certain periods was always locked close to certain circadian phases where inhibition on Per and Bmal1 mRNA synthesis was most balanced. In a light-dark cycle condition, inhibitions imposed at different parts of a circadian period induced different degrees of perturbation to the circadian clock. When imposed at the middle- or late-night phase, the transcriptional inhibition cycle induced the least perturbations to the circadian clock. The late-night time window of least perturbation overlapped with the experimentally observed time window, where mitosis is most frequent. This supports our hypothesis that the circadian clock gates the cell cycle M phase to certain circadian phases to minimize perturbations induced by the latter. This study reveals the hidden effects of the cell division cycle on the circadian clock and, together with the current picture of genome stability maintenance by circadian gating of cell cycle, provides a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon of circading gating of

  6. Effects of simulated microgravity on circadian rhythm of caudal arterial pressure and heart rate in rats and their underlying mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CHEN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the circadian rhythm of rats' caudal arterial pressure and heart rate, and their underlying mechanism. Methods  Eighteen male SD rats (aged 8 weeks were randomly assigned to control (CON and tail suspension (SUS group (9 each. Rats with tail suspension for 28 days were adopted as the animal model to simulate microgravity. Caudal arterial pressure and heart rate of rats were measured every 3 hours. The circadian difference of abdominal aorta contraction was measured by aortic ring test. Western blotting was performed to determine and compare the protein expression level of clock genes such as Per2 (Period2, Bmal1 (Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocatorlike and dbp (D element binding protein in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and abdominal aorta of rats in CON and SUS group at different time points. Results  Compared with CON group, the caudal arterial pressure, both systolic and diastolic pressure, decreased significantly and the diurnal variability disappeared, meanwhile the heart rate increased obviously and also the diurnal variability disappeared in rats of SUS group. Compared with CON group, the contraction reactivity of abdominal aorta decreased with disappearence of the diurnal variability, and also the clock genes expression in SCN and abdominal aorta showed no diurnal variability in rats of SUS group. Conclusion  Simulated microgravity may lead to circadian rhythm disorders in rats' cardiovascular system, which may be associated with the changes of the clock genes expression. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.06

  7. Sumoylation controls CLOCK-BMAL1-mediated clock resetting via CBP recruitment in nuclear transcriptional foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yool; Chun, Sung Kook; Kim, Kyungjin

    2015-10-01

    CLOCK-BMAL1 is a key transcription factor complex of the molecular clock system that generates circadian gene expression and physiology in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that sumoylation of BMAL1 mediates the rapid activation of CLOCK-BMAL1 by CREB-binding protein (CBP) in nuclear foci and also the resetting of the circadian clock. Under physiological conditions, a bimolecular fluorescence complementation-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BiFC-FRET) assay revealed that CLOCK-BMAL1 rapidly dimerized and formed a ternary complex with CBP in discrete nuclear foci in response to serum stimuli. We found that the formation of this ternary complex requires sumoylation of BMAL1 by SUMO3. These processes were abolished by both the ectopic expression of the SUMP2/3-specific protease, SUSP1, and mutation of the major sumoylation site (Lys259) of BMAL1. Moreover, molecular inhibition of BMAL1 sumoylation abrogated acute Per1 transcription and severely dampened the circadian gene oscillation triggered by clock synchronization stimuli. Taken together, these findings suggest that sumoylation plays a critical role in the spatiotemporal co-activation of CLOCK-BMAL1 by CBP for immediate-early Per induction and the resetting of the circadian clock. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Histamine resets the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus through the H1R-CaV 1.3-RyR pathway in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Kim, Young-Beom; Kim, Woong Bin; Yoon, Bo-Eun; Shen, Feng-Yan; Lee, Seung Won; Soong, Tuck-Wah; Han, Hee-Chul; Colwell, Christopher S; Lee, C Justin; Kim, Yang In

    2015-10-01

    Histamine, a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator implicated in the control of arousal state, exerts a potent phase-shifting effect on the circadian clock in the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In this study, the mechanisms by which histamine resets the circadian clock in the mouse SCN were investigated. As a first step, Ca(2+) -imaging techniques were used to demonstrate that histamine increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]i ) in acutely dissociated SCN neurons and that this increase is blocked by the H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonist pyrilamine, the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nimodipine. The histamine-induced Ca(2+) transient is reduced, but not blocked, by application of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) blocker dantrolene. Immunohistochemical techniques indicated that CaV 1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed mainly in the somata of SCN cells along with the H1R, whereas CaV 1.2 channels are located primarily in the processes. Finally, extracellular single-unit recordings demonstrated that the histamine-elicited phase delay of the circadian neural activity rhythm recorded from SCN slices is blocked by pyrilamine, nimodipine and the knockout of CaV 1.3 channel. Again, application of dantrolene reduced but did not block the histamine-induced phase delays. Collectively, these results indicate that, to reset the circadian clock, histamine increases [Ca(2+) ]i in SCN neurons by activating CaV 1.3 channels through H1R, and secondarily by causing Ca(2+) -induced Ca(2+) release from RyR-mediated internal stores. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Expressions of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 are under the circadian control in the mouse large intestine: implications in intestinal permeability and susceptibility to colitis.

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    Oh-oka Kyoko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. METHODS: The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2(m/m. In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2(m/m mice. RESULTS: The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2(m/m mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2(m/m mice. mPer2(m/m mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis.

  10. Effects of circadian clock genes and health-related behavior on metabolic syndrome in a Taiwanese population: Evidence from association and interaction analysis.

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    Eugene Lin

    Full Text Available Increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS has been associated with the circadian clock genes. In this study, we assessed whether 29 circadian clock-related genes (including ADCYAP1, ARNTL, ARNTL2, BHLHE40, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1D, CSNK1E, GSK3B, HCRTR2, KLF10, NFIL3, NPAS2, NR1D1, NR1D2, PER1, PER2, PER3, REV1, RORA, RORB, RORC, SENP3, SERPINE1, TIMELESS, TIPIN, VIP, and VIPR2 are associated with MetS and its individual components independently and/or through complex interactions in a Taiwanese population. We also analyzed the interactions between environmental factors and these genes in influencing MetS and its individual components. A total of 3,000 Taiwanese subjects from the Taiwan Biobank were assessed in this study. Metabolic traits such as waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose were measured. Our data showed a nominal association of MetS with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in five key circadian clock genes including ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB; but none of these SNPs persisted significantly after performing Bonferroni correction. Moreover, we identified the effect of GSK3B rs2199503 on high fasting glucose (P = 0.0002. Additionally, we found interactions among the ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, RORA rs8034880, and RORB rs972902 SNPs influenced MetS (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002. Finally, we investigated the influence of interactions between ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, and RORB rs972902 with environmental factors such as alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity on MetS and its individual components (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002. Our study indicates that circadian clock genes such as ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB genes may contribute to the risk of MetS independently as well as through gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  11. Disruption of adolescents' circadian clock: The vicious circle of media use, exposure to light at night, sleep loss and risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, Yvan; Touitou, David; Reinberg, Alain

    2016-11-01

    Although sleep is a key element in adolescent development, teens are spending increasing amounts of time online with health risks related to excessive use of electronic media (computers, smartphones, tablets, consoles…) negatively associated with daytime functioning and sleep outcomes. Adolescent sleep becomes irregular, shortened and delayed in relation with later sleep onset and early waking time due to early school starting times on weekdays which results in rhythm desynchronization and sleep loss. In addition, exposure of adolescents to the numerous electronic devices prior to bedtime has become a great concern because LEDs emit much more blue light than white incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent bulbs and have therefore a greater impact on the biological clock. A large number of adolescents move to evening chronotype and experience a misalignment between biological and social rhythms which, added to sleep loss, results in e.g. fatigue, daytime sleepiness, behavioral problems and poor academic achievement. This paper on adolescent circadian disruption will review the sensitivity of adolescents to light including LEDs with the effects on the circadian system, the crosstalk between the clock and the pineal gland, the role of melatonin, and the behavior of some adolescents(media use, alcohol consumption, binge drinking, smoking habits, stimulant use…). Lastly, some practical recommendations and perspectives are put forward. The permanent social jet lag resulting in clock misalignment experienced by a number of adolescents should be considered as a matter of public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Circadian rhythms in human performance and mood under constant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Berga, S. L.; Jarrett, D. B.; Begley, A. E.; Kupfer, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between circadian performance rhythms and rhythms in rectal temperature, plasma cortisol, plasma melatonin, subjective alertness and well-being. Seventeen healthy young adults were studied under 36 h of 'unmasking' conditions (constant wakeful bedrest, temporal isolation, homogenized 'meals') during which rectal temperatures were measured every minute, and plasma cortisol and plasma melatonin measured every 20 min. Hourly subjective ratings of global vigour (alertness) and affect (well-being) were obtained followed by one of two performance batteries. On odd-numbered hours performance (speed and accuracy) of serial search, verbal reasoning and manual dexterity tasks was assessed. On even-numbered hours, performance (% hits, response speed) was measured at a 25-30 min visual vigilance task. Performance of all tasks (except search accuracy) showed a significant time of day variation usually with a nocturnal trough close to the trough in rectal temperature. Performance rhythms appeared not to reliably differ with working memory load. Within subjects, predominantly positive correlations emerged between good performance and higher temperatures and better subjective alertness; predominantly negative correlations between good performance and higher plasma levels of cortisol and melatonin. Temperature and cortisol rhythms correlated with slightly more performance measures (5/7) than did melatonin rhythms (4/7). Global vigour correlated about as well with performance (5/7) as did temperature, and considerably better than global affect (1/7). In conclusion: (1) between-task heterogeneity in circadian performance rhythms appeared to be absent when the sleep/wake cycle was suspended; (2) temperature (positively), cortisol and melatonin (negatively) appeared equally good as circadian correlates of performance, and (3) subjective alertness correlated with performance rhythms as well as (but not better than) body temperature, suggesting that

  13. Role of PPARα in the Control of Torpor through FGF21-NPY Pathway: From Circadian Clock to Seasonal Change in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Ishida

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In nature, hibernating animals encounter fasting, cold temperature and short day seasonally. Torpor is a state of decreased physiological activity in an animal, usually characterized by a reduced body temperature and rate of metabolism to adapt such a severe environment. Ablation of the central clock synchronizer, the suprachiasmatic nucleus in brain, abolishes torpor, a hibernation-like state, implicating the circadian clock involved in this seasonal change. Biologists knows well the energy source of daily heterotherms/hibernators changed from glucose to lipids in winter. Here we review several lines of evidence of a master transcriptional regulator in lipid catabolism, PPARα, in the control of torpor through FGF21-NPY pathway. This indicate the importance of circadian—and photoperiod—regulation of PPARα to tell seasons in our body.

  14. Circadian clocks and life-history related traits: is pupation height ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In D. melanogaster, the observation of greater pupation height under constant darkness than under constant light has been explained by the hypothesis that light has an inhibitory effect on larval wandering behaviour, preventing larvae from crawling higher up the walls of culture vials prior to pupation. If this is the only role of ...

  15. Molecular clock integration of brown adipose tissue formation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Deokhwa; Yechoor, Vijay K.; Ma, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The circadian clock is an essential time-keeping mechanism that entrains internal physiology to environmental cues. Despite the well-established link between the molecular clock and metabolic homeostasis, an intimate interplay between the clock machinery and the metabolically active brown adipose tissue (BAT) is only emerging. Recently, we came to appreciate that the formation and metabolic functions of BAT, a key organ for body temperature maintenance, are under an orchestrated circ...

  16. Combined Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulations Unlock Unprecedented Temporal Elasticity and Reveal Phase-Specific Modulation of the Molecular Circadian Clock of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Andrew P; Chesham, Johanna E; Hastings, Michael H

    2016-09-07

    activity of the CK1ε isoform. In conclusion, extreme period manipulation reveals unprecedented elasticity and temporal structure of the SCN circadian oscillation. The master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) encodes time-of-day information that allows mammals to predict and thereby adapt to daily environmental cycles. Using combined genetic and pharmacological interventions, we assessed the temporal elasticity of the SCN network. Despite having evolved to generate a 24 h circadian period, we show that the molecular clock is surprisingly elastic, able to reversibly sustain coherent periods between ≤17 and >42 h at the levels of individual cells and the overall circuit. Using quantitative techniques to analyze these extreme periodicities, we reveal that the oscillator progresses as a sequence of distinct stages. These findings reveal new properties of how the SCN functions as a network and should inform biological and mathematical analyses of circadian timekeeping. Copyright © 2016 Patton et al.

  17. Phase delaying the human circadian clock with a single light pulse and moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode: no influence of iris color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Jillian L; Smith, Mark R; Choi, Ho-Sun; Eastman, Charmane I

    2009-07-17

    Light exposure in the late evening and nighttime and a delay of the sleep/dark episode can phase delay the circadian clock. This study assessed the size of the phase delay produced by a single light pulse combined with a moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode for one day. Because iris color or race has been reported to influence light-induced melatonin suppression, and we have recently reported racial differences in free-running circadian period and circadian phase shifting in response to light pulses, we also tested for differences in the magnitude of the phase delay in subjects with blue and brown irises. Subjects (blue-eyed n = 7; brown eyed n = 6) maintained a regular sleep schedule for 1 week before coming to the laboratory for a baseline phase assessment, during which saliva was collected every 30 minutes to determine the time of the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Immediately following the baseline phase assessment, which ended 2 hours after baseline bedtime, subjects received a 2-hour bright light pulse (~4,000 lux). An 8-hour sleep episode followed the light pulse (i.e. was delayed 4 hours from baseline). A final phase assessment was conducted the subsequent night to determine the phase shift of the DLMO from the baseline to final phase assessment.Phase delays of the DLMO were compared in subjects with blue and brown irises. Iris color was also quantified from photographs using the three dimensions of red-green-blue color axes, as well as a lightness scale. These variables were correlated with phase shift of the DLMO, with the hypothesis that subjects with lighter irises would have larger phase delays. The average phase delay of the DLMO was -1.3 +/- 0.6 h, with a maximum delay of ~2 hours, and was similar for subjects with blue and brown irises. There were no significant correlations between any of the iris color variables and the magnitude of the phase delay. A single 2-hour bright light pulse combined with a moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode

  18. Phase delaying the human circadian clock with a single light pulse and moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode: no influence of iris color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Ho-Sun

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Light exposure in the late evening and nighttime and a delay of the sleep/dark episode can phase delay the circadian clock. This study assessed the size of the phase delay produced by a single light pulse combined with a moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode for one day. Because iris color or race has been reported to influence light-induced melatonin suppression, and we have recently reported racial differences in free-running circadian period and circadian phase shifting in response to light pulses, we also tested for differences in the magnitude of the phase delay in subjects with blue and brown irises. Methods Subjects (blue-eyed n = 7; brown eyed n = 6 maintained a regular sleep schedule for 1 week before coming to the laboratory for a baseline phase assessment, during which saliva was collected every 30 minutes to determine the time of the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO. Immediately following the baseline phase assessment, which ended 2 hours after baseline bedtime, subjects received a 2-hour bright light pulse (~4,000 lux. An 8-hour sleep episode followed the light pulse (i.e. was delayed 4 hours from baseline. A final phase assessment was conducted the subsequent night to determine the phase shift of the DLMO from the baseline to final phase assessment. Phase delays of the DLMO were compared in subjects with blue and brown irises. Iris color was also quantified from photographs using the three dimensions of red-green-blue color axes, as well as a lightness scale. These variables were correlated with phase shift of the DLMO, with the hypothesis that subjects with lighter irises would have larger phase delays. Results The average phase delay of the DLMO was -1.3 ± 0.6 h, with a maximum delay of ~2 hours, and was similar for subjects with blue and brown irises. There were no significant correlations between any of the iris color variables and the magnitude of the phase delay. Conclusion A single 2-hour bright light

  19. Flexibility of the C-terminal, or CII, ring of KaiC governs the rhythm of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Kuo, Nai-Wei; Tseng, Roger; LiWang, Andy

    2011-08-30

    In the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator, KaiA and KaiB alternately stimulate autophosphorylation and autodephosphorylation of KaiC with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. KaiA activates autophosphorylation by selectively capturing the A loops of KaiC in their exposed positions. The A loops and sites of phosphorylation, residues S431 and T432, are located in the CII ring of KaiC. We find that the flexibility of the CII ring governs the rhythm of KaiC autophosphorylation and autodephosphorylation and is an example of dynamics-driven protein allostery. KaiA-induced autophosphorylation requires flexibility of the CII ring. In contrast, rigidity is required for KaiC-KaiB binding, which induces a conformational change in KaiB that enables it to sequester KaiA by binding to KaiA's linker. Autophosphorylation of the S431 residues around the CII ring stabilizes the CII ring, making it rigid. In contrast, autophosphorylation of the T432 residues offsets phospho-S431-induced rigidity to some extent. In the presence of KaiA and KaiB, the dynamic states of the CII ring of KaiC executes the following circadian rhythm: CII STflexible → CIISpTflexible → CIIpSpTrigid → CIIpSTvery-rigid → CIISTflexible. Apparently, these dynamic states govern the pattern of phosphorylation, ST → SpT → pSpT → pST → ST. CII-CI ring-on-ring stacking is observed when the CII ring is rigid, suggesting a mechanism through which the ATPase activity of the CI ring is rhythmically controlled. SasA, a circadian clock-output protein, binds to the CI ring. Thus, rhythmic ring stacking may also control clock-output pathways.

  20. The mammalian retina as a clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  1. Hepatic gene therapy rescues high-fat diet responses in circadianClockmutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Kovac, Judit; Kolbe, Isa; Ehrhardt, Lea; Leliavski, Alexei; Husse, Jana; Salinas, Gabriela; Lingner, Thomas; Tsang, Anthony H; Barclay, Johanna L; Oster, Henrik

    2017-06-01

    Circadian Clock gene mutant mice show dampened 24-h feeding rhythms and an increased sensitivity to high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Restricting HFD access to the dark phase counteracts its obesogenic effect in wild-type mice. The extent to which altered feeding rhythms are causative for the obesogenic phenotype of Clock mutant mice, however, remains unknown. Metabolic parameters of wild-type (WT) and Clock Δ19 mutant mice (MT) were investigated under ad libitum and nighttime restricted HFD feeding. Liver circadian clock function was partially rescued by hydrodynamic tail vein delivery of WT- Clock DNA vectors in mutant mice and transcriptional, metabolic, endocrine and behavioral rhythms studied. Nighttime-restricted feeding restored food intake, but not body weight regulation in MT mice under HFD, suggesting Clock -dependent metabolic dysregulation downstream of circadian appetite control. Liver-directed Clock gene therapy partially restored liver circadian oscillator function and transcriptome regulation without affecting centrally controlled circadian behaviors. Under HFD, MT mice with partially restored liver clock function (MT-LR) showed normalized body weight gain, rescued 24-h food intake rhythms, and WT-like energy expenditure. This was associated with decreased nighttime leptin and daytime ghrelin levels, reduced hepatic lipid accumulation, and improved glucose tolerance. Transcriptome analysis revealed that hepatic Clock rescue in MT mice affected a range of metabolic pathways. Liver Clock gene therapy improves resistance against HFD-induced metabolic impairments in mice with circadian clock disruption. Restoring or stabilizing liver clock function might be a promising target for therapeutic interventions in obesity and metabolic disorders.

  2. Circadian clocks : Translation lost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, T; Merrow, M

    2005-01-01

    One of the big questions in biological rhythms research is how a stable and precise circa-24 hour oscillation is generated on the molecular level. While increasing complexity seemed to be the key, a recent report suggests that circa-24 hour rhythms can be generated by just four molecules incubated

  3. Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ coordinately protect the circadian clock and normal metabolic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Anne Skovsø; Feng, Dan; Everett, Logan J

    2012-01-01

    to relatively subtle changes upon loss of either subtype alone. These findings establish the two Rev-erbs as major regulators of both clock function and metabolism, displaying a level of subtype collaboration that is unusual among nuclear receptors but common among core clock proteins, protecting the organism...

  4. Bmal1 and Beta cell clock are required for adaptation to circadian disruption, and their loss of function leads to oxidative stress-induced Beta cell failure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian disruption has deleterious effects on metabolism. Global deletion of Bmal1, a core clock gene, results in Beta cell dysfunction and diabetes. However, it is unknown if this is due to loss of cell-autonomous function of Bmal1 in Beta cells. To address this, we generated mice with Beta cell ...

  5. Circadian genes, rhythms and the biology of mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Colleen A

    2007-05-01

    For many years, researchers have suggested that abnormalities in circadian rhythms may underlie the development of mood disorders such as bipolar disorder (BPD), major depression and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Furthermore, some of the treatments that are currently employed to treat mood disorders are thought to act by shifting or "resetting" the circadian clock, including total sleep deprivation (TSD) and bright light therapy. There is also reason to suspect that many of the mood stabilizers and antidepressants used to treat these disorders may derive at least some of their therapeutic efficacy by affecting the circadian clock. Recent genetic, molecular and behavioral studies implicate individual genes that make up the clock in mood regulation. As well, important functions of these genes in brain regions and neurotransmitter systems associated with mood regulation are becoming apparent. In this review, the evidence linking circadian rhythms and mood disorders, and what is known about the underlying biology of this association, is presented.

  6. Melatonin is required for the circadian regulation of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Avni V; Mosser, Eric A; Oikonomou, Grigorios; Prober, David A

    2015-03-18

    Sleep is an evolutionarily conserved behavioral state whose regulation is poorly understood. A classical model posits that sleep is regulated by homeostatic and circadian mechanisms. Several factors have been implicated in mediating the homeostatic regulation of sleep, but molecules underlying the circadian mechanism are unknown. Here we use animals lacking melatonin due to mutation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (aanat2) to show that melatonin is required for circadian regulation of sleep in zebrafish. Sleep is dramatically reduced at night in aanat2 mutants maintained in light/dark conditions, and the circadian regulation of sleep is abolished in free-running conditions. We find that melatonin promotes sleep downstream of the circadian clock as it is not required to initiate or maintain circadian rhythms. Additionally, we provide evidence that melatonin may induce sleep in part by promoting adenosine signaling, thus potentially linking circadian and homeostatic control of sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Circadian Rhythms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Keywords. Circadian rhythms, biological clocks, geophysical cycles, en- trainment. Living organisms ranging from bacteria to human beings exhibit 24-h rhythms in various behaviours and physiological processes. Matching of the period of such rhythms with that of the daily environmental cycles gives an impression that.

  8. Nutrition and the circadian timing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenvers, Dirk Jan; Jonkers, Cora F.; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2012-01-01

    Life on earth has evolved under the daily rhythm of light and dark. Consequently, most creatures experience a daily rhythm in food availability. In this review, we first introduce the mammalian circadian timing system, consisting of a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral

  9. What the Clock Tells the Eye: Lessons from an Ancient Arthropod

    OpenAIRE

    Battelle, B.-A.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian changes in visual sensitivity have been observed in a wide range of species, vertebrates, and invertebrates, but the processes impacted and the underlying mechanisms largely are unexplored. Among arthropods, effects of circadian signals on vision have been examined in most detail in the lateral compound eye (LE) of the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, a chelicerate arthropod. As a consequence of processes influenced by a central circadian clock, Limulus can see at night ...

  10. Orchestration of thiamin biosynthesis and central metabolism by combined action of the thiamin pyrophosphate riboswitch and the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocobza, Samuel E; Malitsky, Sergey; Araújo, Wagner L; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Meir, Sagit; Shapira, Michal; Fernie, Alisdair R; Aharoni, Asaph

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding small molecules and thereby autonomously control intracellular levels of these metabolites. Although riboswitch-based mechanisms have been examined extensively, the integration of their activity with global physiology and metabolism has been largely overlooked. Here, we explored the regulation of thiamin biosynthesis and the consequences of thiamin pyrophosphate riboswitch deficiency on metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that thiamin biosynthesis is largely regulated by the circadian clock via the activity of the THIAMIN C SYNTHASE (THIC) promoter, while the riboswitch located at the 3' untranslated region of this gene controls overall thiamin biosynthesis. Surprisingly, the results also indicate that the rate of thiamin biosynthesis directs the activity of thiamin-requiring enzymes and consecutively determines the rate of carbohydrate oxidation via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and pentose-phosphate pathway. Our model suggests that in Arabidopsis, the THIC promoter and the thiamin-pyrophosphate riboswitch act simultaneously to tightly regulate thiamin biosynthesis in a circadian manner and consequently sense and control vital points of core cellular metabolism.

  11. Orchestration of Thiamin Biosynthesis and Central Metabolism by Combined Action of the Thiamin Pyrophosphate Riboswitch and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocobza, Samuel E.; Malitsky, Sergey; Araújo, Wagner L.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Meir, Sagit; Shapira, Michal; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Aharoni, Asaph

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding small molecules and thereby autonomously control intracellular levels of these metabolites. Although riboswitch-based mechanisms have been examined extensively, the integration of their activity with global physiology and metabolism has been largely overlooked. Here, we explored the regulation of thiamin biosynthesis and the consequences of thiamin pyrophosphate riboswitch deficiency on metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that thiamin biosynthesis is largely regulated by the circadian clock via the activity of the THIAMIN C SYNTHASE (THIC) promoter, while the riboswitch located at the 3′ untranslated region of this gene controls overall thiamin biosynthesis. Surprisingly, the results also indicate that the rate of thiamin biosynthesis directs the activity of thiamin-requiring enzymes and consecutively determines the rate of carbohydrate oxidation via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and pentose-phosphate pathway. Our model suggests that in Arabidopsis, the THIC promoter and the thiamin-pyrophosphate riboswitch act simultaneously to tightly regulate thiamin biosynthesis in a circadian manner and consequently sense and control vital points of core cellular metabolism. PMID:23341335

  12. Entrainment of the Circadian Clock in Neural Stem Cells by Epidermal Growth Factor is Closely Associated with ERK1/2-mediated Induction of Multiple Clock-related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Asuka; Yomoda, Ryo; Kimura, Syunya; Tsushima, Chisato; Takouda, Jun; Sawauchi, Miho; Maekawa, Tomoko; Ohta, Hidenobu; Nishino, Satoshi; Kurita, Masatake; Mano, Nariyasu; Osumi, Noriko; Moriya, Takahiro

    2018-03-06

    The mitotic activity of certain tissues in the body is closely associated with circadian clock function. However, the effects of growth factors on the molecular clockwork are not fully understood. Stimulation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with epidermal growth factor (EGF), a well-known mitogen, is known to cause synchronized cell cycle progression with a period of approximately 24 h, closely associated with the Per2 gene expression rhythm. Here, we examined the effects of EGF on the molecular clockwork of NSCs. Treatment of cultured NSCs derived from embryonic mouse forebrain with EGF (20 ng/mL) caused a phase shift in the PER2::LUCIFERASE bioluminescence rhythm in a stimulation time-dependent manner. The EGF phase-response curve differed from that of forskolin (FK)-a well-known chemical resetting stimulus-both in the advance/delay ratio and stimulation time-dependency. PCR array analysis followed by quantitative PCR validation demonstrated that EGF treatment transiently induced multiple clock-related genes including Per1, Per2, Dec1, e4bp4, and Noct, whereas FK treatment induced a limited number of genes (Per1 and Dec1), suggesting that the mode of entrainment of NSC molecular clock was different for EGF and FK. EGF led to gene induction in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that de novo protein synthesis is unnecessary. Pretreatment with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 significantly suppressed the acute induction of Per2, Dec1, and Noct by EGF and also abolished the EGF-induced phase shift of the PER2::LUCIFERASE rhythm in NSCs. These results suggest a unique effect of EGF on the molecular clockwork of NSCs. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clock genes alterations and endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelousi, Anna; Kassi, Eva; Nasiri-Ansari, Narjes; Weickert, Martin O; Randeva, Harpal; Kaltsas, Gregory

    2018-03-25

    Various endocrine signals oscillate over the 24-hour period and so does the responsiveness of target tissues. These daily oscillations do not occur solely in response to external stimuli but are also under the control of an intrinsic circadian clock. We searched the PubMed database to identify studies describing the associations of clock genes with endocrine diseases. Various human single nucleotide polymorphisms of BMAL1 and CLOCK genes exhibited significant associations with type 2 diabetes mellitus. ARNTL2 gene expression and upregulation of BMAL1 and PER1 were associated with the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Thyroid hormones modulated PER2 expression in a tissue specific way whereas BMAL1 regulated the expression of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase in specific tissues. Adrenal gland and adrenal adenoma expressed PER1, PER2, CRY2, CLOCK, and BMAL1 genes. Adrenal sensitivity to adrenocorticotrophin was also affected by circadian oscilliations. A significant correlation between the expression of propio-melanocorticotrophin and PER 2 as well as between prolactin and CLOCK was found in corticotroph and lactosomatotroph cells, respectively, in the pituitary. Clock genes and especially BMAL1 showed an important role in fertility whereas estradiol and androgens exhibited tissue-specific effects on clock gene expression. Metabolic disorders were also associated with circadian dysregulation according to studies in shift workers. Clock genes are associated with various endocrine disorders through complex mechanisms. However data on humans are scarce. Moreover, clock genes exhibit a tissue-specific expression representing an additional level of regulation. Their specific role in endocrine disorders and their potential implications remain to be further clarified. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Circadian period integrates network information through activation of the BMP signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban J Beckwith

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms use biological clocks to maintain their internal temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila, circadian regulation of locomotor behavior is controlled by ∼150 neurons; among them, neurons expressing the PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF set the period of locomotor behavior under free-running conditions. To date, it remains unclear how individual circadian clusters integrate their activity to assemble a distinctive behavioral output. Here we show that the BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN (BMP signaling pathway plays a crucial role in setting the circadian period in PDF neurons in the adult brain. Acute deregulation of BMP signaling causes period lengthening through regulation of dClock transcription, providing evidence for a novel function of this pathway in the adult brain. We propose that coherence in the circadian network arises from integration in PDF neurons of both the pace of the cell-autonomous molecular clock and information derived from circadian-relevant neurons through release of BMP ligands.

  15. Molecular clock integration of brown adipose tissue formation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Deokhwa; Yechoor, Vijay K; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is an essential time-keeping mechanism that entrains internal physiology to environmental cues. Despite the well-established link between the molecular clock and metabolic homeostasis, an intimate interplay between the clock machinery and the metabolically active brown adipose tissue (BAT) is only emerging. Recently, we came to appreciate that the formation and metabolic functions of BAT, a key organ for body temperature maintenance, are under an orchestrated circadian clock regulation. Two complementary studies from our group uncover that the cell-intrinsic clock machinery exerts concerted control of brown adipogenesis with consequent impacts on adaptive thermogenesis, which adds a previously unappreciated temporal dimension to the regulatory mechanisms governing BAT development and function. The essential clock transcriptional activator, Bmal1, suppresses adipocyte lineage commitment and differentiation, whereas the clock repressor, Rev-erbα, promotes these processes. This newly discovered temporal mechanism in fine-tuning BAT thermogenic capacity may enable energy utilization and body temperature regulation in accordance with external timing signals during development and functional recruitment. Given the important role of BAT in whole-body metabolic homeostasis, pharmacological interventions targeting the BAT-modulatory activities of the clock circuit may offer new avenues for the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders, particularly those associated with circadian dysregulation.

  16. An evolutionary fitness enhancement conferred by the circadian system in cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Peijun; Woelfle, Mark A.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are found in a wide variety of organisms from cyanobacteria to mammals. Many believe that the circadian clock system evolved as an adaption to the daily cycles in light and temperature driven by the rotation of the earth. Studies on the cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, have confirmed that the circadian clock in resonance with environmental cycles confers an adaptive advantage to cyanobacterial strains with different clock properties when grown in competition under light–dark cycles. The results thus far suggest that in a cyclic environment, the cyanobacterial strains whose free running periods are closest to the environmental period are the most fit and the strains lacking a functional circadian clock are at a competitive disadvantage relative to strains with a functional clock. In contrast, the circadian system provides little or no advantage to cyanobacteria grown in competition in constant light. To explain the potential mechanism of this clock-mediated enhancement in fitness in cyanobacteria, several models have been proposed; these include the limiting resource model, the diffusible inhibitor model and the cell-to-cell communication model. None of these models have been excluded by the currently available experimental data and the mechanistic basis of clock-mediated fitness enhancement remains elusive

  17. Selection during crop diversification involves correlated evolution of the circadian clock and ecophysiological traits in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarkhunova, Yulia; Edwards, Christine E; Ewers, Brent E; Baker, Robert L; Aston, Timothy Llewellyn; McClung, C Robertson; Lou, Ping; Weinig, Cynthia

    2016-04-01

    Crop selection often leads to dramatic morphological diversification, in which allocation to the harvestable component increases. Shifts in allocation are predicted to impact (as well as rely on) physiological traits; yet, little is known about the evolution of gas exchange and related anatomical features during crop diversification. In Brassica rapa, we tested for physiological differentiation among three crop morphotypes (leaf, turnip, and oilseed) and for correlated evolution of circadian, gas exchange, and phenological traits. We also examined internal and surficial leaf anatomical features and biochemical limits to photosynthesis. Crop types differed in gas exchange; oilseed varieties had higher net carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance relative to vegetable types. Phylogenetically independent contrasts indicated correlated evolution between circadian traits and both gas exchange and biomass accumulation; shifts to shorter circadian period (closer to 24 h) between phylogenetic nodes are associated with higher stomatal conductance, lower photosynthetic rate (when CO2 supply is factored out), and lower biomass accumulation. Crop type differences in gas exchange are also associated with stomatal density, epidermal thickness, numbers of palisade layers, and biochemical limits to photosynthesis. Brassica crop diversification involves correlated evolution of circadian and physiological traits, which is potentially relevant to understanding mechanistic targets for crop improvement. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. A Functional Analysis of Circadian Pacemakers in Nocturnal Rodents. V. Pacemaker Structure : A Clock for All Seasons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pittendrigh, Colin S.; Daan, Serge

    1976-01-01

    1. This paper is an attempt to integrate in a general model the major findings reported earlier in this series on: lability and history dependence of circadian period, τ; dependence of τ and α on light intensity as described in Aschoffs Rule; the interrelationships between τ and phase response

  19. Distribution of circadian clock-related proteins in the cephalic nervous system of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sehadová, Hana; Markova, E. P.; Sehnal, František; Takeda, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2004), s. 466-482 ISSN 0748-7304 Grant - others:JSPS(JP) 99L01205 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : circadian rhythm * PER * CYC Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.979, year: 2004

  20. A network of (autonomic) clock outputs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Perreau-Lenz, S.; Buijs, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is composed of thousands of oscillator neurons, each of which is dependent on the cell-autonomous action of a defined set of circadian clock genes. A major question is still how these individual oscillators are organized into a biological clock

  1. A network of (autonomic) clock outputs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Perreau-Lenz, S.; Buijs, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is composed of thousands of oscillator neurons, each dependent on the cell-autonomous action of a defined set of circadian clock genes. A major question is still how these individual oscillators are organized into a biological clock that

  2. Extra-hypothalamic brain clocks in songbirds: Photoperiodic state dependent clock gene oscillations in night-migratory blackheaded buntings, Emberiza melanocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devraj; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-04-01

    The avian circadian pacemaker system is comprised of independent clocks in the retina, pineal and hypothalamus, as shown by daily and circadian oscillations of core clock genes (Per2, Cry1, Bmal1 and Clock) in several birds including migratory blackheaded buntings (Emberiza melanocephala). This study investigated the extra-hypothalamic brain circadian clocks in blackheaded buntings, and measured Per2, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1 and Clock mRNA expressions at 4h intervals over 24h beginning 1h after light-on in the left and right telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum, the brain regions involved in several physiological and cognitive functions. Because of seasonal alterations in the circadian clock dependent brain functions, we measured daily clock gene oscillations in buntings photoperiod-induced with the non-migratory state under short days (SDnM), and the pre-migratory (LDpM), migratory (LDM) and post-migratory (refractory, LDR) states under long days. Daily Per2 oscillations were not altered with changes in the photoperiodic states, except for about 2-3h phase difference in the optic tectum between the SDnM and LDpM states. However, there were about 3-5h differences in the phase and 2 to 4 fold change in the amplitude of daily Bmal1 and Cry1 mRNA oscillations between the photoperiod-induced states. Further, Cry2 and Clock genes lacked a significant oscillation, except in Cb (Cry2) and TeO and Rt (Clock) under LDR state. Overall, these results show the presence of circadian clocks in extra-hypothalamic brain regions of blackheaded buntings, and suggest tissue-dependent alterations in the waveforms of mRNA oscillations with transitions in the photoperiod-induced seasonal states in a long-day species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Photoperiodic Modulation of Circadian Clock and Reproductive Axis Gene Expression in the Pre-Pubertal European Sea Bass Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute S T Martins

    Full Text Available The acquisition of reproductive competence requires the activation of the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG axis, which in most vertebrates, including fishes, is initiated by changes in photoperiod. In the European sea bass long-term exposure to continuous light (LL alters the rhythm of reproductive hormones, delays spermatogenesis and reduces the incidence of precocious males. In contrast, an early shift from long to short photoperiod (AP accelerates spermatogenesis. However, how photoperiod affects key genes in the brain to trigger the onset of puberty is still largely unknown. Here, we investigated if the integration of the light stimulus by clock proteins is sufficient to activate key genes that trigger the BPG axis in the European sea bass. We found that the clock genes clock, npas2, bmal1 and the BPG genes gnrh, kiss and kissr share conserved transcription factor frameworks in their promoters, suggesting co-regulation. Other gene promoters of the BGP axis were also predicted to be co-regulated by the same frameworks. Co-regulation was confirmed through gene expression analysis of brains from males exposed to LL or AP photoperiod compared to natural conditions: LL fish had suppressed gnrh1, kiss2, galr1b and esr1, while AP fish had stimulated npas2, gnrh1, gnrh2, kiss2, kiss1rb and galr1b compared to NP. It is concluded that fish exposed to different photoperiods present significant expression differences in some clock and reproductive axis related genes well before the first detectable endocrine and morphological responses of the BPG axis.

  4. Shifting the circadian rhythm of feeding in mice induces gastrointestinal, metabolic and immune alterations which are influenced by ghrelin and the core clock gene Bmal1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorien Laermans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In our 24-hour society, an increasing number of people are required to be awake and active at night. As a result, the circadian rhythm of feeding is seriously compromised. To mimic this, we subjected mice to restricted feeding (RF, a paradigm in which food availability is limited to short and unusual times of day. RF induces a food-anticipatory increase in the levels of the hunger hormone ghrelin. We aimed to investigate whether ghrelin triggers the changes in body weight and gastric emptying that occur during RF. Moreover, the effect of genetic deletion of the core clock gene Bmal1 on these physiological adaptations was studied. METHODS: Wild-type, ghrelin receptor knockout and Bmal1 knockout mice were fed ad libitum or put on RF with a normal or high-fat diet (HFD. Plasma ghrelin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Gastric contractility was studied in vitro in muscle strips and in vivo (13C breath test. Cytokine mRNA expression was quantified and infiltration of immune cells was assessed histologically. RESULTS: The food-anticipatory increase in plasma ghrelin levels induced by RF with normal chow was abolished in HFD-fed mice. During RF, body weight restoration was facilitated by ghrelin and Bmal1. RF altered cytokine mRNA expression levels and triggered contractility changes resulting in an accelerated gastric emptying, independent from ghrelin signaling. During RF with a HFD, Bmal1 enhanced neutrophil recruitment to the stomach, increased gastric IL-1α expression and promoted gastric contractility changes. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study demonstrating that ghrelin and Bmal1 regulate the extent of body weight restoration during RF, whereas Bmal1 controls the type of inflammatory infiltrate and contractility changes in the stomach. Disrupting the circadian rhythm of feeding induces a variety of diet-dependent metabolic, immune and gastrointestinal alterations, which may explain the higher prevalence of obesity and

  5. Single-Cell Transcriptional Analysis Reveals Novel Neuronal Phenotypes and Interaction Networks Involved in the Central Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, James; Zhu, Haisun; O'Sullivan, Sean; Ogunnaike, Babatunde A; Weaver, David R; Schwaber, James S; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell heterogeneity confounds efforts to understand how a population of cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function. This complexity is prominent in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Here, individual neurons exhibit a remarkable amount of asynchronous behavior and transcriptional heterogeneity. However, SCN neurons are able to generate precisely coordinated synaptic and molecular outputs that synchronize the body to a common circadian cycle by organizing into cellular networks. To understand this emergent cellular network property, it is important to reconcile single-neuron heterogeneity with network organization. In light of recent studies suggesting that transcriptionally heterogeneous cells organize into distinct cellular phenotypes, we characterized the transcriptional, spatial, and functional organization of 352 SCN neurons from mice experiencing phase-shifts in their circadian cycle. Using the community structure detection method and multivariate analytical techniques, we identified previously undescribed neuronal phenotypes that are likely to participate in regulatory networks with known SCN cell types. Based on the newly discovered neuronal phenotypes, we developed a data-driven neuronal network structure in which multiple cell types interact through known synaptic and paracrine signaling mechanisms. These results provide a basis from which to interpret the functional variability of SCN neurons and describe methodologies toward understanding how a population of heterogeneous single cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function.

  6. Single-cell Transcriptional Analysis Reveals Novel Neuronal Phenotypes and Interaction Networks involved In the Central Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Park

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell heterogeneity confounds efforts to understand how a population of cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function. This complexity is prominent in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Here, individual neurons exhibit a remarkable amount of asynchronous behavior and transcriptional heterogeneity. However, SCN neurons are able to generate precisely coordinated synaptic and molecular outputs that synchronize the body to a common circadian cycle by organizing into cellular networks. To understand this emergent cellular network property, it is important to reconcile single-neuron heterogeneity with network organization. In light of recent studies suggesting that transcriptionally heterogeneous cells organize into distinct cellular phenotypes, we characterized the transcriptional, spatial, and functional organization of 352 SCN neurons from mice experiencing phase-shifts in their circadian cycle. Using the community structure detection method and multivariate analytical techniques, we identified previously undescribed neuronal phenotypes that are likely to participate in regulatory networks with known SCN cell types. Based on the newly discovered neuronal phenotypes, we developed a data-driven neuronal network structure in which multiple cell types interact through known synaptic and paracrine signaling mechanisms. These results provide a basis from which to interpret the functional variability of SCN neurons and describe methodologies towards understanding how a population of heterogeneous single cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function.

  7. Clock gene variation is associated with breeding phenology and maybe under directional selection in the migratory barn swallow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Caprioli

    Full Text Available In diverse taxa, photoperiodic responses that cause seasonal physiological and behavioural shifts are controlled by genes, including the vertebrate Clock orthologues, that encode for circadian oscillator mechanisms. While the genetic network behind circadian rhythms is well described, relatively few reports exist of the phenological consequences of and selection on Clock genes in the wild. Here, we investigated variation in breeding phenology in relation to Clock genetic diversity in a long-distance migratory bird, the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica.In a sample of 922 adult barn swallows from a single population breeding in Italy we found one very common (Q(7 and three rare (Q(5, Q(6, Q(8 length variants of a functionally significant polyglutamine repeat. Rare (2.9% Q(7/Q(8 heterozygous females, but not males, bred significantly later than common (91.5% Q(7/Q(7 females, consistent with the expectation that 'long' alleles cause late breeding, as observed in a resident population of another bird species. Because breeding date depends on arrival date from migration, present results suggest that the association between breeding date and Clock might be mediated by migration phenology. In addition, fecundity selection appears to be operating against Q(7/Q(8 because late migrating/breeding swallows have fewer clutches per season, and late breeding has additional negative selection effects via reduced offspring longevity. Genotype frequencies varied marginally non-significantly with age, as Q(7/Q(8 frequency showed a 4-fold reduction in old individuals. This result suggests negative viability selection against Q(7/Q(8, possibly mediated by costs of late breeding.This is the first study of migratory birds showing an association between breeding phenology and Clock genotype and suggesting that negative selection occurs on a phenologically deviant genotype. Low polymorphism at Clock may constrain microevolutionary phenological response to changing climate

  8. Effective Domain Partitioning for Multi-Clock Domain IP Core Wrapper Design under Power Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Thomas Edison; Yoneda, Tomokazu; Zhao, Danella; Fujiwara, Hideo

    The rapid advancement of VLSI technology has made it possible for chip designers and manufacturers to embed the components of a whole system onto a single chip, called System-on-Chip or SoC. SoCs make use of pre-designed modules, called IP-cores, which provide faster design time and quicker time-to-market. Furthermore, SoCs that operate at multiple clock domains and very low power requirements are being utilized in the latest communications, networking and signal processing devices. As a result, the testing of SoCs and multi-clock domain embedded cores under power constraints has been rapidly gaining importance. In this research, a novel method for designing power-aware test wrappers for embedded cores with multiple clock domains is presented. By effectively partitioning the various clock domains, we are able to increase the solution space of possible test schedules for the core. Since previous methods were limited to concurrently testing all the clock domains, we effectively remove this limitation by making use of bandwidth conversion, multiple shift frequencies and properly gating the clock signals to control the shift activity of various core logic elements. The combination of the above techniques gains us greater flexibility when determining an optimal test schedule under very tight power constraints. Furthermore, since it is computationally intensive to search the entire expanded solution space for the possible test schedules, we propose a heuristic 3-D bin packing algorithm to determine the optimal wrapper architecture and test schedule while minimizing the test time under power and bandwidth constraints.

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons mediate sleep-specific circadian output in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Michael; Hughes, Michael E; Raccuglia, Davide; Felix, Mario; Li, Michael; Barnett, Gregory; Duah, Janelle; Nitabach, Michael N

    2014-11-17

    Imbalances in amount and timing of sleep are harmful to physical and mental health. Therefore, the study of the underlying mechanisms is of great biological importance. Proper timing and amount of sleep are regulated by both the circadian clock and homeostatic sleep drive. However, very little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates sleep. In this study, we describe a novel role for diuretic hormone 31 (DH31), the fly homolog of the vertebrate neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, as a circadian wake-promoting signal that awakens the fly in anticipation of dawn. Analysis of loss-of-function and gain-of-function Drosophila mutants demonstrates that DH31 suppresses sleep late at night. DH31 is expressed by a subset of dorsal circadian clock neurons that also express the receptor for the circadian neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF). PDF secreted by the ventral pacemaker subset of circadian clock neurons acts on PDF receptors in the DH31-expressing dorsal clock neurons to increase DH31 secretion before dawn. Activation of PDF receptors in DH31-positive DN1 specifically affects sleep and has no effect on circadian rhythms, thus constituting a dedicated locus for circadian regulation of sleep. We identified a novel signaling molecule (DH31) as part of a neuropeptide relay mechanism for circadian control of sleep. Our results indicate that outputs of the clock controlling sleep and locomotor rhythms are mediated via distinct neuronal pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Melatonin, clock genes and mitochondria in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Rahim, Ibtissem; Acuña-Fernández, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Marisol; Solera-Marín, Jorge; Sayed, Ramy K A; Díaz-Casado, María E; Rusanova, Iryna; López, Luis C; Escames, Germaine

    2017-11-01

    After the characterization of the central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the expression of clock genes was identified in several peripheral tissues including the immune system. The hierarchical control from the central clock to peripheral clocks extends to other functions including endocrine, metabolic, immune, and mitochondrial responses. Increasing evidence links the disruption of the clock genes expression with multiple diseases and aging. Chronodisruption is associated with alterations of the immune system, immunosenescence, impairment of energy metabolism, and reduction of pineal and extrapineal melatonin production. Regarding sepsis, a condition coursing with an exaggerated response of innate immunity, experimental and clinical data showed an alteration of circadian rhythms that reflects the loss of the normal oscillation of the clock. Moreover, recent data point to that some mediators of the immune system affects the normal function of the clock. Under specific conditions, this control disappears reactivating the immune response. So, it seems that clock gene disruption favors the innate immune response, which in turn induces the expression of proinflammatory mediators, causing a further alteration of the clock. Here, the clock control of the mitochondrial function turns off, leading to a bioenergetic decay and formation of reactive oxygen species that, in turn, activate the inflammasome. This arm of the innate immunity is responsible for the huge increase of interleukin-1β and entrance into a vicious cycle that could lead to the death of the patient. The broken clock is recovered by melatonin administration, that is accompanied by the normalization of the innate immunity and mitochondrial homeostasis. Thus, this review emphasizes the connection between clock genes, innate immunity and mitochondria in health and sepsis, and the role of melatonin to maintain clock homeostasis.

  11. Interaction between stress responses and circadian metabolism in metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Kim, Hyunbae; Ali, Arushana; Zheng, Ze; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-09-01

    Circadian rhythms play crucial roles in orchestrating diverse physiological processes that are critical for health and disease. Dysregulated circadian rhythms are closely associated with various human metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Modern lifestyles are frequently associated with an irregular circadian rhythm, which poses a significant risk to public health. While the central clock has a set periodicity, circadian oscillators in peripheral organs, particularly in the liver, can be entrained by metabolic alterations or stress cues. At the molecular level, the signal transduction pathways that mediate stress responses interact with, and are often integrated with, the key determinants of circadian oscillation, to maintain metabolic homeostasis under physiological or pathological conditions. In the liver, a number of nuclear receptors or transcriptional regulators, which are regulated by metabolites, hormones, the circadian clock, or environmental stressors, serve as direct links between stress responses and circadian metabolism. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the interactions between stress responses (the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, the oxidative stress response, and the inflammatory response) and circadian metabolism, and the role of these interactions in the development of metabolic diseases.

  12. Clock Genes and Altered Sleep–Wake Rhythms: Their Role in the Development of Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annaëlle Charrier

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the circadian clocks network (central and peripheral oscillators controls circadian rhythms and orchestrates the expression of a range of downstream genes, allowing the organism to anticipate and adapt to environmental changes. Beyond their role in circadian rhythms, several studies have highlighted that circadian clock genes may have a more widespread physiological effect on cognition, mood, and reward-related behaviors. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms in core circadian clock genes have been associated with psychiatric disorders (such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, the underlying mechanisms of these associations remain to be ascertained and the cause–effect relationships are not clearly established. The objective of this article is to clarify the role of clock genes and altered sleep–wake rhythms in the development of psychiatric disorders (sleep problems are often observed at early onset of psychiatric disorders. First, the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms are described. Then, the relationships between disrupted circadian rhythms, including sleep–wake rhythms, and psychiatric disorders are discussed. Further research may open interesting perspectives with promising avenues for early detection and therapeutic intervention in psychiatric disorders.

  13. Clock Genes and Altered Sleep-Wake Rhythms: Their Role in the Development of Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Annaëlle; Olliac, Bertrand; Roubertoux, Pierre; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2017-04-29

    In mammals, the circadian clocks network (central and peripheral oscillators) controls circadian rhythms and orchestrates the expression of a range of downstream genes, allowing the organism to anticipate and adapt to environmental changes. Beyond their role in circadian rhythms, several studies have highlighted that circadian clock genes may have a more widespread physiological effect on cognition, mood, and reward-related behaviors. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms in core circadian clock genes have been associated with psychiatric disorders (such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). However, the underlying mechanisms of these associations remain to be ascertained and the cause-effect relationships are not clearly established. The objective of this article is to clarify the role of clock genes and altered sleep-wake rhythms in the development of psychiatric disorders (sleep problems are often observed at early onset of psychiatric disorders). First, the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms are described. Then, the relationships between disrupted circadian rhythms, including sleep-wake rhythms, and psychiatric disorders are discussed. Further research may open interesting perspectives with promising avenues for early detection and therapeutic intervention in psychiatric disorders.

  14. Long-Lasting Effect of Perinatal Exposure to L-tryptophan on Circadian Clock of Primary Cell Lines Established from Male Offspring Born from Mothers Fed on Dietary Protein Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Elizabeth; Guzman-Quevedo, Omar; Delacourt, Nellie; da Silva Aragão, Raquel; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; de Souza, Sandra Lopes; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco; Kaeffer, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Maternal undernutrition programs metabolic adaptations which are ultimately detrimental to adult. L-tryptophan supplementation was given to manipulate the long-term sequelae of early-life programming by undernutrition and explore whether cultured cells retain circadian clock dysregulation. Methods Male rat pups from mothers fed on low protein (8%, LP) or control (18%, CP) diet were given, one hour before light off, an oral bolus of L-tryptophan (125 mg/kg) between Day-12 and Day-21 of age. Body weight, food intake, blood glucose along with the capacity of colonization of primary cells from biopsies were measured during the young (45–55 days) and adult (110–130 days) phases. Circadian clock oscillations were re-induced by a serum shock over 30 hours on near-confluent cell monolayers to follow PERIOD1 and CLOCK proteins by Fluorescent Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (FLISA) and period1 and bmal1 mRNA by RT-PCR. Cell survival in amino acid-free conditions were used to measure circadian expression of MAP-LC3B, MAP-LC3B-FP and Survivin. Results Tryptophan supplementation did not alter body weight gain nor feeding pattern. By three-way ANOVA of blood glucose, sampling time was found significant during all phases. A significant interaction between daily bolus (Tryptophan, saline) and diets (LP, CP) were found during young (p = 0.0291) and adult (p = 0.0285) phases. In adult phase, the capacity of colonization at seeding of primary cells was twice lower for LP rats. By three-way ANOVA of PERIOD1 perinuclear/nuclear immunoreactivity during young phase, we found a significant effect of diets (p = 0.049), daily bolus (ptryptophan supplementation can be monitored non-invasively by circadian sampling of blood D-glucose and on the expression of PERIOD1 protein in established primary cell lines. PMID:23460795

  15. PPARα is a potential therapeutic target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Kudo, Takashi; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ishida, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Recent progress at the molecular level has revealed that nuclear receptors play an important role in the generation of mammalian circadian rhythms. To examine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is involved in the regulation of circadian behavioral rhythms in mammals, we evaluated the locomotor activity of mice administered with the hypolipidemic PPARα ligand, bezafibrate. Circadian locomotor activity was phase-advanced about 3 h in mice given bezafibrate under light-dark (LD) conditions. Transfer from LD to constant darkness did not change the onset of activity in these mice, suggesting that bezafibrate advanced the phase of the endogenous clock. Surprisingly, bezafibrate also advanced the phase in mice with lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; the central clock in mammals). The circadian expression of clock genes such as period2, BMAL1, and Rev-erbα was also phase-advanced in various tissues (cortex, liver, and fat) without affecting the SCN. Bezafibrate also phase-advanced the activity phase that is delayed in model mice with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) due to a Clock gene mutation. Our results indicated that PPARα is involved in circadian clock control independently of the SCN and that PPARα could be a potent target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders including DSPS