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Sample records for underlying chromatin structure

  1. Parallel Evolution of Chromatin Structure Underlying Metabolic Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian; Guo, Xiaoxian; Cai, Pengli; Cheng, Xiaozhi; Piškur, Jure; Ma, Yanhe; Jiang, Huifeng; Gu, Zhenglong

    2017-11-01

    Parallel evolution occurs when a similar trait emerges in independent evolutionary lineages. Although changes in protein coding and gene transcription have been investigated as underlying mechanisms for parallel evolution, parallel changes in chromatin structure have never been reported. Here, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a distantly related yeast species, Dekkera bruxellensis, are investigated because both species have independently evolved the capacity of aerobic fermentation. By profiling and comparing genome sequences, transcriptomic landscapes, and chromatin structures, we revealed that parallel changes in nucleosome occupancy in the promoter regions of mitochondria-localized genes led to concerted suppression of mitochondrial functions by glucose, which can explain the metabolic convergence in these two independent yeast species. Further investigation indicated that similar mutational processes in the promoter regions of these genes in the two independent evolutionary lineages underlay the parallel changes in chromatin structure. Our results indicate that, despite several hundred million years of separation, parallel changes in chromatin structure, can be an important adaptation mechanism for different organisms. Due to the important role of chromatin structure changes in regulating gene expression and organism phenotypes, the novel mechanism revealed in this study could be a general phenomenon contributing to parallel adaptation in nature. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Chromatin Structure and Function

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    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  3. Toxoplasma gondii gene expression is under the control of regulatory pathways acting through chromatin structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bougdour A.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The activity state of a gene is determined by a complex regulatory network of co-acting factors affecting the structure of the chromatin into which the gene is embedded. While significant changes of the transcriptome occur during cell differentiation in apicomplexan parasites, basic mechanisms controlling gene expression are still unknown. Recent studies support and expand the concept of the chromatin environment being key factor for the control of transcriptional activity in these lower eukaryotes organisms. Here, we review recent advances in the field of epigenetic gene regulation in Toxoplasma gondii, the model apicomplexan.

  4. Effects of fast neutrons on chromatin: dependence on chromatin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Dept. of Molecular Genetics, V. Babes National Inst., Bd. Timisoara, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [Dept. of Cyclotron, H. Hulubei National Inst., Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01

    The effects of fast neutrons (10-100 Gy) on chromatin extracted from normal (liver of Wistar rats) and tumor (Walker carcinosarcoma maintained on Wistar rats) tissues were compared. The spectroscopic assays used were (i) chromatin intrinsic fluorescence, (ii) time-resolved fluorescence of chromatin-proflavine complexes, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For both normal and tumor chromatin, the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence specific for acidic and basic proteins decreased with increasing dose. The relative contributions of the excited-state lifetime of proflavine bound to chromatin were reduced upon fast-neutron irradiation, indicating a decrease in the proportion of chromatin DNA available for ligand binding. The Forster energy transfer efficiencies were also modified by irradiation. These effects were larger for chromatin from tumor tissue. In the range 0-100 Gy, fast neutrons induced alterations in DNA and acidic and basic proteins, as well as in global chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of chromatin extracted from tumor tissue seems to be higher than that of chromatin extracted from normal tissue, probably because of its higher euchromatin (loose)-heterochromatin (compact) ratio. (author)

  5. UV-induced structural changes in chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, H.; Zimmer, C.; Vengerov, Yu.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    UV-induced structural alterations of chromatin were studied by means of CD, electron microscopic, and gel electrophoretic measurements. The results indicate that chromatin undergoes serious structural changes after irradiation even at very low fluences. In the low fluence range the structural transitions from the higher ordered chromatin structure to the unfolded state occur without detectable changes in the content of histone H1 and of the core histones. Histone H1 disappears only at fluences above 10 kJ/m 2 . Furthermore, DNA in chromatin is much more sensitive against UV-irradiation and shows a higher degree of strand scission relative to free DNA. While fragmentation in free DNA occurs at fluences above 15 kJ/m 2 , it occurs even at 5.5 kJ/m 2 in the case of chromatin. The biological meaning of the observed UV-induced structural alterations of chromatin is discussed. (author)

  6. Molecular structures guide the engineering of chromatin.

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    Tekel, Stefan J; Haynes, Karmella A

    2017-07-27

    Chromatin is a system of proteins, RNA, and DNA that interact with each other to organize and regulate genetic information within eukaryotic nuclei. Chromatin proteins carry out essential functions: packing DNA during cell division, partitioning DNA into sub-regions within the nucleus, and controlling levels of gene expression. There is a growing interest in manipulating chromatin dynamics for applications in medicine and agriculture. Progress in this area requires the identification of design rules for the chromatin system. Here, we focus on the relationship between the physical structure and function of chromatin proteins. We discuss key research that has elucidated the intrinsic properties of chromatin proteins and how this information informs design rules for synthetic systems. Recent work demonstrates that chromatin-derived peptide motifs are portable and in some cases can be customized to alter their function. Finally, we present a workflow for fusion protein design and discuss best practices for engineering chromatin to assist scientists in advancing the field of synthetic epigenetics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Capturing Structural Heterogeneity in Chromatin Fibers.

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    Ekundayo, Babatunde; Richmond, Timothy J; Schalch, Thomas

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin fiber organization is implicated in processes such as transcription, DNA repair and chromosome segregation, but how nucleosomes interact to form higher-order structure remains poorly understood. We solved two crystal structures of tetranucleosomes with approximately 11-bp DNA linker length at 5.8 and 6.7 Å resolution. Minimal intramolecular nucleosome-nucleosome interactions result in a fiber model resembling a flat ribbon that is compatible with a two-start helical architecture, and that exposes histone and DNA surfaces to the environment. The differences in the two structures combined with electron microscopy reveal heterogeneous structural states, and we used site-specific chemical crosslinking to assess the diversity of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions through identification of structure-sensitive crosslink sites that provide a means to characterize fibers in solution. The chromatin fiber architectures observed here provide a basis for understanding heterogeneous chromatin higher-order structures as they occur in a genomic context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

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    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  9. Statistical physics of nucleosome positioning and chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Genomic DNA is packaged into chromatin in eukaryotic cells. The fundamental building block of chromatin is the nucleosome, a 147 bp-long DNA molecule wrapped around the surface of a histone octamer. Arrays of nucleosomes are positioned along DNA according to their sequence preferences and folded into higher-order chromatin fibers whose structure is poorly understood. We have developed a framework for predicting sequence-specific histone-DNA interactions and the effective two-body potential responsible for ordering nucleosomes into regular higher-order structures. Our approach is based on the analogy between nucleosomal arrays and a one-dimensional fluid of finite-size particles with nearest-neighbor interactions. We derive simple rules which allow us to predict nucleosome occupancy solely from the dinucleotide content of the underlying DNA sequences.Dinucleotide content determines the degree of stiffness of the DNA polymer and thus defines its ability to bend into the nucleosomal superhelix. As expected, the nucleosome positioning rules are universal for chromatin assembled in vitro on genomic DNA from baker's yeast and from the nematode worm C.elegans, where nucleosome placement follows intrinsic sequence preferences and steric exclusion. However, the positioning rules inferred from in vivo C.elegans chromatin are affected by global nucleosome depletion from chromosome arms relative to central domains, likely caused by the attachment of the chromosome arms to the nuclear membrane. Furthermore, intrinsic nucleosome positioning rules are overwritten in transcribed regions, indicating that chromatin organization is actively managed by the transcriptional and splicing machinery.

  10. A computer lab exploring evolutionary aspects of chromatin structure and dynamics for an undergraduate chromatin course*.

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    Eirín-López, José M

    2013-01-01

    The study of chromatin constitutes one of the most active research fields in life sciences, being subject to constant revisions that continuously redefine the state of the art in its knowledge. As every other rapidly changing field, chromatin biology requires clear and straightforward educational strategies able to efficiently translate such a vast body of knowledge to the classroom. With this aim, the present work describes a multidisciplinary computer lab designed to introduce undergraduate students to the dynamic nature of chromatin, within the context of the one semester course "Chromatin: Structure, Function and Evolution." This exercise is organized in three parts including (a) molecular evolutionary biology of histone families (using the H1 family as example), (b) histone structure and variation across different animal groups, and (c) effect of histone diversity on nucleosome structure and chromatin dynamics. By using freely available bioinformatic tools that can be run on common computers, the concept of chromatin dynamics is interactively illustrated from a comparative/evolutionary perspective. At the end of this computer lab, students are able to translate the bioinformatic information into a biochemical context in which the relevance of histone primary structure on chromatin dynamics is exposed. During the last 8 years this exercise has proven to be a powerful approach for teaching chromatin structure and dynamics, allowing students a higher degree of independence during the processes of learning and self-assessment. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Ligation-mediated PCR for chromatin-structure analysis of interphase and metaphase chromatin.

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    Hershkovitz, M; Riggs, A D

    1997-02-01

    Chromatin structure is becoming increasingly recognized as important for a full understanding of gene function and cell memory. With regard to cell memory, which involves the transfer of chromatin-encoded epigenetic information from one cell generation to another, the detailed structure of metaphase chromatin is of crucial importance. In this paper we describe methods for the use of dimethyl sulfate, DNase I, and potassium permanganate for in vivo footprinting and chromatin analysis, with special emphasis on studies of metaphase cells. We review the use of ligation-mediated PCR for the analysis of chromatin, including the human phosphoglycerate kinase promoter, and also report initial studies of a matrix attachment region near the human beta-interferon gene.

  12. Effect of chromatin structure on quantitative ultrasound parameters.

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    Pasternak, Maurice; Doss, Lilian; Farhat, Golnaz; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Kim, Christina Hyunjung; Kolios, Michael; Tran, William Tyler; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2017-03-21

    High-frequency ultrasound (~20 MHz) techniques were investigated using in vitro and ex vivo models to determine whether alterations in chromatin structure are responsible for ultrasound backscatter changes in biological samples. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and their isolated nuclei were exposed to various chromatin altering treatments. These included 10 different ionic environments, DNA cleaving and unfolding agents, as well as DNA condensing agents. Raw radiofrequency (RF) data was used to generate quantitative ultrasound parameters from spectral and form factor analyses. Chromatin structure was evaluated using electron microscopy. Results indicated that trends in quantitative ultrasound parameters mirrored trends in biophysical chromatin structure parameters. In general, higher ordered states of chromatin compaction resulted in increases to ultrasound paramaters of midband fit, spectral intercept, and estimated scatterer concentration, while samples with decondensed forms of chromatin followed an opposite trend. Experiments with isolated nuclei demonstrated that chromatin changes alone were sufficient to account for these observations. Experiments with ex vivo samples indicated similar effects of chromatin structure changes. The results obtained in this research provide a mechanistic explanation for ultrasound investigations studying scattering from cells and tissues undergoing biological processes affecting chromatin.

  13. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

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    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  14. Dynamic reorganization of open chromatin underlies diverse transcriptomes during spermatogenesis

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    Maezawa, So; Yukawa, Masashi; Alavattam, Kris G; Barski, Artem

    2018-01-01

    Abstract During spermatogenesis, germ cells undergo massive cellular reconstruction and dynamic chromatin remodeling to facilitate highly diverse transcriptomes, which are required for the production of functional sperm. However, it remains unknown how germline chromatin is organized to promote the dynamic, complex transcriptomes of spermatogenesis. Here, using ATAC-seq, we establish the varied landscape of open chromatin during spermatogenesis. We identify the reorganization of accessible chromatin in intergenic and intronic regions during the mitosis-to-meiosis transition. During the transition, mitotic-type open chromatin is closed while the de novo formation of meiotic-type open chromatin takes place. Contrastingly, differentiation processes such as spermatogonial differentiation and the meiosis-to-postmeiosis transition involve chromatin closure without the de novo formation of accessible chromatin. In spermiogenesis, the germline-specific Polycomb protein SCML2 promotes the closure of open chromatin at autosomes for gene suppression. Paradoxically, we identify the massive de novo formation of accessible chromatin when the sex chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and this is also mediated by SCML2. These results reveal meiotic sex chromosome inactivation as an active process for chromatin organization. Together, our results unravel the genome-wide, dynamic reorganization of open chromatin and reveal mechanisms that underlie diverse transcriptomes during spermatogenesis. PMID:29126117

  15. Chromatin Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Episomes.

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    Lieberman, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    EBV latent infection is characterized by a highly restricted pattern of viral gene expression. EBV can establish latent infections in multiple different tissue types with remarkable variation and plasticity in viral transcription and replication. During latency, the viral genome persists as a multi-copy episome, a non-integrated-closed circular DNA with nucleosome structure similar to cellular chromosomes. Chromatin assembly and histone modifications contribute to the regulation of viral gene expression, DNA replication, and episome persistence during latency. This review focuses on how EBV latency is regulated by chromatin and its associated processes.

  16. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

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    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model.

  17. Structure of centromere chromatin: from nucleosome to chromosomal architecture.

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    Schalch, Thomas; Steiner, Florian A

    2017-08-01

    The centromere is essential for the segregation of chromosomes, as it serves as attachment site for microtubules to mediate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. In most organisms, the centromere is restricted to one chromosomal region that appears as primary constriction on the condensed chromosome and is partitioned into two chromatin domains: The centromere core is characterized by the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A (also called cenH3) and is required for specifying the centromere and for building the kinetochore complex during mitosis. This core region is generally flanked by pericentric heterochromatin, characterized by nucleosomes containing H3 methylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me) that are bound by heterochromatin proteins. During mitosis, these two domains together form a three-dimensional structure that exposes CENP-A-containing chromatin to the surface for interaction with the kinetochore and microtubules. At the same time, this structure supports the tension generated during the segregation of sister chromatids to opposite poles. In this review, we discuss recent insight into the characteristics of the centromere, from the specialized chromatin structures at the centromere core and the pericentromere to the three-dimensional organization of these regions that make up the functional centromere.

  18. A Computer Lab Exploring Evolutionary Aspects of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics for an Undergraduate Chromatin Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    The study of chromatin constitutes one of the most active research fields in life sciences, being subject to constant revisions that continuously redefine the state of the art in its knowledge. As every other rapidly changing field, chromatin biology requires clear and straightforward educational strategies able to efficiently translate such a…

  19. Evaluation of sperm chromatin structure in boar semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaszewska Dorota

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to evaluate sperm chromatin structure in the semen of insemination boars. Preparations of semen were stained with acridine orange, aniline blue, and chromomycin A3. Abnormal protamination occurred more frequently in young individuals whose sexual development was not yet complete, but may also be an individual trait. This possibility is important to factor into the decision regarding further exploitation of insemination boars. Thus a precise assessment of abnormalities in the protamination process would seem to be expedient as a tool supplementing morphological and molecular evaluation of semen. Disruptions in nucleoprotein structure can be treated as indicators of the biological value of sperm cells.

  20. Chromatin stiffening underlies enhanced locus mobility after DNA damage in budding yeast.

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    Herbert, Sébastien; Brion, Alice; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Lelek, Mickaël; Veillet, Adeline; Lelandais, Benoît; Parmar, Jyotsana; Fernández, Fabiola García; Almayrac, Etienne; Khalil, Yasmine; Birgy, Eleonore; Fabre, Emmanuelle; Zimmer, Christophe

    2017-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce a cellular response that involves histone modifications and chromatin remodeling at the damaged site and increases chromosome dynamics both locally at the damaged site and globally in the nucleus. In parallel, it has become clear that the spatial organization and dynamics of chromosomes can be largely explained by the statistical properties of tethered, but randomly moving, polymer chains, characterized mainly by their rigidity and compaction. How these properties of chromatin are affected during DNA damage remains, however, unclear. Here, we use live cell microscopy to track chromatin loci and measure distances between loci on yeast chromosome IV in thousands of cells, in the presence or absence of genotoxic stress. We confirm that DSBs result in enhanced chromatin subdiffusion and show that intrachromosomal distances increase with DNA damage all along the chromosome. Our data can be explained by an increase in chromatin rigidity, but not by chromatin decondensation or centromeric untethering only. We provide evidence that chromatin stiffening is mediated in part by histone H2A phosphorylation. Our results support a genome-wide stiffening of the chromatin fiber as a consequence of DNA damage and as a novel mechanism underlying increased chromatin mobility. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

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    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  2. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

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    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  3. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation

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    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  4. Salt and divalent cations affect the flexible nature of the natural beaded chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, J

    1977-01-01

    A natural chromatin containing simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA and histone has been used to examine changes in chromatin structure caused by various physical and chemical treatments. We find that histone H1 depleted chromatin is more compact in solutions of 0.15M NaCl or 2 mM MgCl2 than in 0.01 M NaCl...

  5. LINE retrotransposon RNA is an essential structural and functional epigenetic component of a core neocentromeric chromatin.

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    Anderly C Chueh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified and characterized the phenomenon of ectopic human centromeres, known as neocentromeres. Human neocentromeres form epigenetically at euchromatic chromosomal sites and are structurally and functionally similar to normal human centromeres. Recent studies have indicated that neocentromere formation provides a major mechanism for centromere repositioning, karyotype evolution, and speciation. Using a marker chromosome mardel(10 containing a neocentromere formed at the normal chromosomal 10q25 region, we have previously mapped a 330-kb CENP-A-binding domain and described an increased prevalence of L1 retrotransposons in the underlying DNA sequences of the CENP-A-binding clusters. Here, we investigated the potential role of the L1 retrotransposons in the regulation of neocentromere activity. Determination of the transcriptional activity of a panel of full-length L1s (FL-L1s across a 6-Mb region spanning the 10q25 neocentromere chromatin identified one of the FL-L1 retrotransposons, designated FL-L1b and residing centrally within the CENP-A-binding clusters, to be transcriptionally active. We demonstrated the direct incorporation of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts into the CENP-A-associated chromatin. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts led to a reduction in CENP-A binding and an impaired mitotic function of the 10q25 neocentromere. These results indicate that LINE retrotransposon RNA is a previously undescribed essential structural and functional component of the neocentromeric chromatin and that retrotransposable elements may serve as a critical epigenetic determinant in the chromatin remodelling events leading to neocentromere formation.

  6. ChromEMT: Visualizing 3D chromatin structure and compaction n interphase and mitotic cells

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    Ou, Horng D.; Phan, Sébastien; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Thor, Andrea; Ellisman, Mark H.; O’Shea, Clodagh C.

    2017-01-01

    The chromatin structure of DNA determines genome compaction and activity in the nucleus. On the basis of in vitro structures and electron microscopy (EM) studies, the hierarchical model is that 11-nanometer DNA-nucleosome polymers fold into 30- and subsequently into 120- and 300-to 700-nanometer fibers and mitotic chromosomes. To visualize chromatin in situ, we identified a fluorescent dye that stains DNA with an osmiophilic polymer and selectively enhances its contrast in EM. Using ChromEMT (ChromEM tomography), we reveal the ultrastructure and three-dimensional (3D) organization of individual chromatin polymers, megabase domains, and mitotic chromosomes. We show that chromatin is a disordered 5- to 24-nanometer-diameter curvilinear chain that is packed together at different 3D concentration distributions in interphase and mitosis. Chromatin chains have many different particle arrangements and bend at various lengths to achieve structural compaction and high packing densities. PMID:28751582

  7. An evolutionary consequence of dosage compensation on Drosophila melanogaster female X-chromatin structure?

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    Oliver Brian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X chromosomes are subject to dosage compensation in Drosophila males. Dosage compensation requires cis sequence features of the X chromosome that are present in both sexes by definition and trans acting factors that target chromatin modifying machinery to the X specifically in males. The evolution of this system could result in neutral X chromatin changes that will be apparent in females. Results We find that the general chromatin structure of female X chromosomes is distinct from autosomes. Additionally, specific histone marks associated with dosage compensation and active chromatin marks on the male X chromosome are also enriched on the X chromosomes of females, albeit to a lesser degree. Conclusions Our data indicate that X chromatin structure is fundamentally different from autosome structure in both sexes. We suggest that the differences between the X chromosomes and autosomes in females are a consequence of mechanisms that have evolved to ensure sufficient X chromosome expression in the soma of males.

  8. Differential Chromatin Structure Encompassing Replication Origins in Transformed and Normal Cells

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    Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Chan, Man Kid

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the chromatin structure encompassing replication origins in transformed and normal cells. Analysis of the global levels of histone H3 acetylated at K9&14 (open chromatin) and histone H3 trimethylated at K9 (closed chromatin) revealed a higher ratio of open to closed chromatin in the transformed cells. Also, the trithorax and polycomb group proteins, Brg-1 and Bmi-1, respectively, were overexpressed and more abundantly bound to chromatin in the transformed cells. Quantitative comparative analyses of episomal and in situ chromosomal replication origin activity as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, using specific antibodies targeting members of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) as well as open/closed chromatin markers encompassing both episomal and chromosomal origins, revealed that episomal origins had similar levels of in vivo activity, nascent DNA abundance, pre-RC protein association, and elevated open chromatin structure at the origin in both cell types. In contrast, the chromosomal origins corresponding to 20mer1, 20mer2, and c-myc displayed a 2- to 3-fold higher activity and pre-RC protein abundance as well as higher ratios of open to closed chromatin and of Brg-1 to Bmi-1 in the transformed cells, whereas the origin associated with the housekeeping lamin B2 gene exhibited similar levels of activity, pre-RC protein abundance, and higher ratios of open to closed chromatin and of Brg-1 to Bmi-1 in both cell types. Nucleosomal positioning analysis, using an MNase-Southern blot assay, showed that all the origin regions examined were situated within regions of inconsistently positioned nucleosomes, with the nucleosomes being spaced farther apart from each other prior to the onset of S phase in both cell types. Overall, the results indicate that cellular transformation is associated with differential epigenetic regulation, whereby chromatin structure is more open, rendering replication origins more accessible to initiator

  9. Structure of plant nuclear and ribosomal DNA containing chromatin.

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    Leber, B; Hemleben, V

    1979-11-10

    Digestion of plant chromatin from Brassica pekinensis and Matthiola incana with staphylococcus nuclease leads to a DNA repeat of 175 plus or minus 8 and a core size of 140 base pairs. DNase I digestion results in multiples of 10 bases. Ribosomal RNN genes were studied as a model system for active plant chromatin because of their great redundancy and their high transcriptional activity in growing and differentiating tissues. The actively transcribed genes were identified by nascent RNA of ribosomal origin still attached to its matrix DNA. Hybridization techniques were used to demonstrate that even transcriptionally active gene sequences are present in nuclease generated chromatin subunits. Comparison of the DNase I kinetics of chromatin digestion with the amount of ribosomal RNA genes which is available for hybridization at the given times indicated that ribosomal RNA genes are digested, but not preferentially degraded by DNase I.

  10. Adenovirus chromatin structure at different stages of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniell, E.; Groff, D.E.; Fedor, M.J.

    1981-12-01

    The authors investigated the structure of adenovirus deoxyribonecleic acid (DNA)-protein complexes in nuclei of infected cells by using micrococal nuclease. Parental (infecting) DNA was digested into multimers which had a unit fragment size that was indistinguishable from the size of the nucleosomal repeat of cellular chromatin. This pattern was maintained in parental DNA throughout infection. Similar repeating units were detected in hamster cells that were nonpermissive for human adenovirus and in cells pretreated with n-butyrate. Late in infection, the pattern of digestion of viral DNA was determined by two different experimental approaches. Nuclear DNA was electrophoresed, blotted, and hybridized with labeled viral sequences; in this procedure all virus-specific DNA was detected. This technique revealed a diffuse protected band of viral DNA that was smaller than 160 base pairs, but no discrete multimers. All regions of the genome were represented in the protected DNA. To examine the nuclease protection of newly replicated viral DNA, infected cells were labeled with (/sup 3/)thymidine after blocking of cellular DNA synthesis but not viral DNA synthesis. With this procedure they identified a repeating unit which was distinctly different from the cellular nucleosomal repeat. The authors found broad bands with midpoints at 200, 400, and 600 base pairs, as well as the limit digest material revealed by blotting. High-resolution acrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the viral species comprised a series of closely spaced bands ranging in size from less than 30 to 250 base pairs.

  11. 3D Chromatin Structures of Mature Gametes and Structural Reprogramming during Mammalian Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yuwen; Xu, Yanan; Chen, Xuepeng; Feng, Songjie; Liu, Zhenbo; Sun, Yaoyu; Yao, Xuelong; Li, Fangzhen; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Lei; Chen, Haojie; Du, Zhenhai; Xie, Wei; Xu, Xiaocui; Huang, Xingxu; Liu, Jiang

    2017-07-13

    High-order chromatin structure plays important roles in gene expression regulation. Knowledge of the dynamics of 3D chromatin structures during mammalian embryo development remains limited. We report the 3D chromatin architecture of mouse gametes and early embryos using an optimized Hi-C method with low-cell samples. We find that mature oocytes at the metaphase II stage do not have topologically associated domains (TADs). In sperm, extra-long-range interactions (>4 Mb) and interchromosomal interactions occur frequently. The high-order structures of both the paternal and maternal genomes in zygotes and two-cell embryos are obscure but are gradually re-established through development. The establishment of the TAD structure requires DNA replication but not zygotic genome activation. Furthermore, unmethylated CpGs are enriched in A compartment, and methylation levels are decreased to a greater extent in A compartment than in B compartment in embryos. In summary, the global reprogramming of chromatin architecture occurs during early mammalian development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. New insights into nucleosome and chromatin structure: an ordered state or a disordered affair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Karolin; Dechassa, Mekonnen L.; Tremethick, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The compaction of genomic DNA into chromatin has profound implications for the regulation of key processes such as transcription, replication and DNA repair. Nucleosomes, the repeating building blocks of chromatin, vary in the composition of their histone protein components. This is the result of the incorporation of variant histones and post-translational modifications of histone amino acid side chains. The resulting changes in nucleosome structure, stability and dynamics affect the compaction of nucleosomal arrays into higher-order structures. It is becoming clear that chromatin structures are not nearly as uniform and regular as previously assumed. This implies that chromatin structure must also be viewed in the context of specific biological functions. PMID:22722606

  13. Chromatin structure and dynamics in hot environments: architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases of thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visone, Valeria; Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Valenti, Anna; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-25

    In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya) chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair). Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C), chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  14. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  15. Modulation of chromatin structure by the FACT histone chaperone complex regulates HIV-1 integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Julien; Lesbats, Paul; Mauro, Eric; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lopez, Angelica P; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Ruff, Marc; Llano, Manuel; Delelis, Olivier; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2017-07-28

    Insertion of retroviral genome DNA occurs in the chromatin of the host cell. This step is modulated by chromatin structure as nucleosomes compaction was shown to prevent HIV-1 integration and chromatin remodeling has been reported to affect integration efficiency. LEDGF/p75-mediated targeting of the integration complex toward RNA polymerase II (polII) transcribed regions ensures optimal access to dynamic regions that are suitable for integration. Consequently, we have investigated the involvement of polII-associated factors in the regulation of HIV-1 integration. Using a pull down approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we have selected the FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) complex as a new potential cofactor of HIV-1 integration. FACT is a histone chaperone complex associated with the polII transcription machinery and recently shown to bind LEDGF/p75. We report here that a tripartite complex can be formed between HIV-1 integrase, LEDGF/p75 and FACT in vitro and in cells. Biochemical analyzes show that FACT-dependent nucleosome disassembly promotes HIV-1 integration into chromatinized templates, and generates highly favored nucleosomal structures in vitro. This effect was found to be amplified by LEDGF/p75. Promotion of this FACT-mediated chromatin remodeling in cells both increases chromatin accessibility and stimulates HIV-1 infectivity and integration. Altogether, our data indicate that FACT regulates HIV-1 integration by inducing local nucleosomes dissociation that modulates the functional association between the incoming intasome and the targeted nucleosome.

  16. Chromatin degradation under the effect of differentiation inductors and γ-radiation on thymus lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldatenkov, V.A.; Sorokina, N.I.; Filippovich, I.V.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical inductors of differentiation were shown to cause chromatin degradation in thymus lymphocytes. This process was prevented by the protein synthesis inhibitors. The fragments formed after the effect of chemical differentiation inductors on thymocytes were fully identical to chromatin internucleosome degradation products formed in the exposed cells. Chromatin degradation under the effect of chemical differentiation inductors was most pronounced in a more radiosensitive thymocyte fraction

  17. Putative molecular mechanism underlying sperm chromatin remodelling is regulated by reproductive hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill-Sharma Manjeet Kaur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The putative regulatory role of the male reproductive hormones in the molecular mechanism underlying chromatin condensation remains poorly understood. In the past decade, we developed two adult male rat models wherein functional deficits of testosterone or FSH, produced after treatments with 20 mg/Kg/d of cyproterone acetate (CPA per os, for a period of 15 days or 3 mg/Kg/d of fluphenazine decanoate (FD subcutaneously, for a period of 60 days, respectively, affected the rate of sperm chromatin decondensation in vitro. These rat models have been used in the current study in order to delineate the putative roles of testosterone and FSH in the molecular mechanism underlying remodelling of sperm chromatin. Results We report that deficits of both testosterone and FSH affected the turnover of polyubiquitylated histones and led to their accumulation in the testis. Functional deficits of testosterone reduced expression of MIWI, the 5-methyl cap binding RNA-binding protein (PIWIlike murine homologue of the Drosophila protein PIWI/P-element induced wimpy testis containing a PAZ/Piwi-Argonaut-Zwille domain and levels of histone deacetylase1 (HDAC1, ubiquitin ligating enzyme (URE-B1/E3, 20S proteasome α1 concomitant with reduced expression of ubiquitin activating enzyme (ube1, conjugating enzyme (ube2d2, chromodomain Y like protein (cdyl, bromodomain testis specific protein (brdt, hdac6 (histone deacetylase6, androgen-dependent homeobox placentae embryonic protein (pem/RhoX5, histones h2b and th3 (testis-specific h3. Functional deficits of FSH reduced the expression of cdyl and brdt genes in the testis, affected turnover of ubiquitylated histones, stalled the physiological DNA repair mechanism and culminated in spermiation of DNA damaged sperm. Conclusions We aver that deficits of both testosterone and FSH differentially affected the process of sperm chromatin remodelling through subtle changes in the ‘chromatin condensation

  18. The global relationship between chromatin physical topology, fractal structure, and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Tiwari, A; Ruhoff, P T

    2017-01-01

    in an empty space, but in a highly complex, interrelated, and dense nanoenvironment that profoundly influences chemical interactions. We explored the relationship between the physical nanoenvironment of chromatin and gene transcription in vitro. We analytically show that changes in the fractal dimension, D...... show that the increased heterogeneity of physical structure of chromatin due to increase in fractal dimension correlates with increased heterogeneity of gene networks. These findings indicate that the higher order folding of chromatin topology may act as a molecular-pathway independent code regulating...

  19. Chromatin structure in the unicellular algae Olisthodiscus luteus, Crypthecodinium cohnii and Peridiniun balticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P J; Burghardt, R C

    1980-01-01

    Isolated nuclei of the unicellular alga Olisthodiscus luteus, the uninucleate dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii and the binucleate dinoflagellate Peridinium balticum were lysed and deposited on grids by the microcentrifugation technique. The ultrastructure of the released chromatin fibers was compared to that of mouse liver nuclei. Chromatin from nuclei of Olisthodiscus luteus and the "eukaryotic" nuclei of Peridinium balticum, appeared as linear arrays of regularly repeating subunits which were identical in size and morphology to mouse nucleosomes. In contrast, the chromatin fibers from Crypthecodinium cohnii nuclei appeared as smoothe threads with a diameter of about 6.5 nm. Nuclear preparations containing mixtures of "dinokaryotic" and "eukaryotic" nuclei of Peridinium balticum also contained smooth fibers which most likely originated from the dinokaryotic nuclei. These and other results demonstrating the presence of nucleosomes in lower eukaryotes suggest that the subunit structure of chromatin arose very early in the evolution of the eukaryotic cell.

  20. Global Quantitative Modeling of Chromatin Factor Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is the driver of gene regulation, yet understanding the molecular interactions underlying chromatin factor combinatorial patterns (or the “chromatin codes”) remains a fundamental challenge in chromatin biology. Here we developed a global modeling framework that leverages chromatin profiling data to produce a systems-level view of the macromolecular complex of chromatin. Our model ultilizes maximum entropy modeling with regularization-based structure learning to statistically dissect dependencies between chromatin factors and produce an accurate probability distribution of chromatin code. Our unsupervised quantitative model, trained on genome-wide chromatin profiles of 73 histone marks and chromatin proteins from modENCODE, enabled making various data-driven inferences about chromatin profiles and interactions. We provided a highly accurate predictor of chromatin factor pairwise interactions validated by known experimental evidence, and for the first time enabled higher-order interaction prediction. Our predictions can thus help guide future experimental studies. The model can also serve as an inference engine for predicting unknown chromatin profiles — we demonstrated that with this approach we can leverage data from well-characterized cell types to help understand less-studied cell type or conditions. PMID:24675896

  1. Chromatin structure and epigenetics of tumour cells: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Krejčí, Jana; Hájek, R.; Harničarová, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 51-61 ISSN 1871-529X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0978 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC; LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : tumour cells * chromatin * radiation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  2. Chromatin structure and replication origins: determinants of chromosome replication and nuclear organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Owen K; Aladjem, Mirit I

    2014-10-09

    The DNA replication program is, in part, determined by the epigenetic landscape that governs local chromosome architecture and directs chromosome duplication. Replication must coordinate with other biochemical processes occurring concomitantly on chromatin, such as transcription and remodeling, to insure accurate duplication of both genetic and epigenetic features and to preserve genomic stability. The importance of genome architecture and chromatin looping in coordinating cellular processes on chromatin is illustrated by two recent sets of discoveries. First, chromatin-associated proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery were shown to affect the timing of DNA replication. These chromatin-associated proteins could be working in concert, or perhaps in competition, with the transcriptional machinery and with chromatin modifiers to determine the spatial and temporal organization of replication initiation events. Second, epigenetic interactions are mediated by DNA sequences that determine chromosomal replication. In this review, we summarize recent findings and current models linking spatial and temporal regulation of the replication program with epigenetic signaling. We discuss these issues in the context of the genome's three-dimensional structure with an emphasis on events occurring during the initiation of DNA replication. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of the interaction of valproic acid with histone H1 in solution and in chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargolzaei, Javad; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Mollaei, Hossein; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh

    2017-06-01

    Histone H1 is a basic chromosomal protein which links adjacent nucleosomes in chromatin structure. Valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, is widely used as an antiepileptic drug for the treatment of various cancers. In this study the interaction between VPA and histone H1, chromatin and DNA in solution was investigated employing spectroscopic techniques. The results showed that VPA binds cooperatively to histone H1 and chromatin but exhibited very weak interaction with DNA. The association constants demonstrated higher affinity of VPA to H1 compared to chromatin. Fluorescence emission intensity was reduced by quenching value (Ksv) of 2.3 and 0.83 for H1 and chromatin respectively. VPA also altered ellipticity of chromatin and H1 at 220nm indicating increase in α-helix content of H1/chromatin proteins suggesting that the protein moiety of chromatin is the site of VPA action. Moreover, thermal denaturation revealed hypochromicity in chromatin Tm profiles with small shift in Tm values without any significant change in DNA pattern. It is concluded that VPA, apart from histone deacetylase inhibition activity, binds strongly to histone H1 in chromatin structure, demonstrating that VPA may also exert its anticancer activity by influencing chromatin proteins which opens new insight into the mechanism of VPA action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multimerization of Drosophila sperm protein Mst77F causes a unique condensed chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Nils; Kaiser, Sophie; Ostwal, Yogesh; Riedel, Dietmar; Stützer, Alexandra; Nikolov, Miroslav; Rathke, Christina; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Despite insights on the cellular level, the molecular details of chromatin reorganization in sperm development, which involves replacement of histone proteins by specialized factors to allow ultra most condensation of the genome, are not well understood. Protamines are dispensable for DNA condensation during Drosophila post-meiotic spermatogenesis. Therefore, we analyzed the interaction of Mst77F, another very basic testis-specific protein with chromatin and DNA as well as studied the molecular consequences of such binding. We show that Mst77F on its own causes severe chromatin and DNA aggregation. An intrinsically unstructured domain in the C-terminus of Mst77F binds DNA via electrostatic interaction. This binding results in structural reorganization of the domain, which induces interaction with an N-terminal region of the protein. Via putative cooperative effects Mst77F is induced to multimerize in this state causing DNA aggregation. In agreement, overexpression of Mst77F results in chromatin aggregation in fly sperm. Based on these findings we postulate that Mst77F is crucial for sperm development by giving rise to a unique condensed chromatin structure. PMID:25735749

  5. Concerted Flexibility of Chromatin Structure, Methylome, and Histone Modifications along with Plant Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of chromosome structure within the interphase nucleus, as well as the patterns of methylome and histone modifications, represent intersecting layers that influence genome accessibility and function. This review is focused on the plastic nature of chromatin structure and epigenetic marks in association to stress situations. The use of chemical compounds (epigenetic drugs or T-DNA-mediated mutagenesis affecting epigenetic regulators (epi-mutants are discussed as being important tools for studying the impact of deregulated epigenetic backgrounds on gene function and phenotype. The inheritability of epigenetic marks and chromatin configurations along successive generations are interpreted as a way for plants to “communicate” past experiences of stress sensing. A mechanistic understanding of chromatin and epigenetics plasticity in plant response to stress, including tissue- and genotype-specific epigenetic patterns, may help to reveal the epigenetics contributions for genome and phenotype regulation.

  6. Binding of DNA-bending non-histone proteins destabilizes regular 30-nm chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Gaurav; Jain, Ishutesh; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2017-01-01

    Why most of the in vivo experiments do not find the 30-nm chromatin fiber, well studied in vitro, is a puzzle. Two basic physical inputs that are crucial for understanding the structure of the 30-nm fiber are the stiffness of the linker DNA and the relative orientations of the DNA entering/exiting nucleosomes. Based on these inputs we simulate chromatin structure and show that the presence of non-histone proteins, which bind and locally bend linker DNA, destroys any regular higher order structures (e.g., zig-zag). Accounting for the bending geometry of proteins like nhp6 and HMG-B, our theory predicts phase-diagram for the chromatin structure as a function of DNA-bending non-histone protein density and mean linker DNA length. For a wide range of linker lengths, we show that as we vary one parameter, that is, the fraction of bent linker region due to non-histone proteins, the steady-state structure will show a transition from zig-zag to an irregular structure—a structure that is reminiscent of what is observed in experiments recently. Our theory can explain the recent in vivo observation of irregular chromatin having co-existence of finite fraction of the next-neighbor (i + 2) and neighbor (i + 1) nucleosome interactions. PMID:28135276

  7. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Soldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, revealing interplays between neighbouring PTMs and enabling screens for their readers in a comprehensive and quantitative fashion. Here we provide an overview of the recent achievements of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of histone post-translational modifications, histone variants, and global interactomes at specific chromatin regions. This synopsis emphasizes how the advances in high resolution MS, from “Bottom Up” to “Top Down” analysis, together with the uptake of quantitative proteomics methods by chromatin biologists, have made MS a well-established method in the epigenetics field, enabling the acquisition of original information, highly complementary to that offered by more conventional, antibody-based, assays.

  8. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo...... (NZBxNZW)F1 and MRL-lpr/lpr mice and from five patients with lupus nephritis were analysed by immunofluorescence, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and co-localization TUNEL IEM. Affinity of chromatin fragments for membrane structures was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Results demonstrated (i...... were present in capillary lumina in glomeruli and skin of all nephritic individuals. Thus, chromatin-IgG complexes accounting for lupus nephritis seem to reach skin through circulation, but other undetermined factors are required for these complexes to deposit within skin membranes....

  9. Metaphase chromosome analysis by ligation-mediated PCR: heritable chromatin structure and a comparison of active and inactive X chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hershkovitz, M; Riggs, A D

    1995-01-01

    We report that ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) can be used for high-resolution study of metaphase chromosomes, and we discuss the role of metaphase chromatin structure in the preservation of differentiated cell states. The X chromosome-linked human PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) promoter region was investigated, and euchromatic active X chromosome (Xa) metaphase chromatin was compared with interphase Xa chromatin and to heterochromatic inactive X chromosome (Xi) metaphase and interphase chrom...

  10. Metaphase chromosome analysis by ligation-mediated PCR: heritable chromatin structure and a comparison of active and inactive X chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, M; Riggs, A D

    1995-03-14

    We report that ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) can be used for high-resolution study of metaphase chromosomes, and we discuss the role of metaphase chromatin structure in the preservation of differentiated cell states. The X chromosome-linked human PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) promoter region was investigated, and euchromatic active X chromosome (Xa) metaphase chromatin was compared with interphase Xa chromatin and to heterochromatic inactive X chromosome (Xi) metaphase and interphase chromatin. We find that (i) good-quality data at single-nucleotide resolution can be obtained by LMPCR analysis of dimethyl sulfate-treated intact metaphase cells; (ii) transcription factors present on the Xa promoter of interphase chromatin are not present on metaphase chromatin, establishing that the transcription complex on the PGK1 promoter must form de novo each cell generation; and (iii) the dimethyl sulfate reactivity pattern of Xa and Xi chromatin at metaphase is very similar to that of naked DNA. These results are discussed in the context of models for heritable chromatin structure and epigenetic mechanisms for cell memory, and they are also relevant to more general aspects of chromatin structure and differences between euchromatin and heterochromatin.

  11. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Structure of the CENP-A nucleosome and its implications for centromeric chromatin architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres are dictated by the epigenetic inheritance of the centromeric nucleosome containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, CENP-A. The structure of the CENP-A nucleosome has been considered to be the fundamental architecture of the centromeric chromatin. Controversy exists in the literature regarding the CENP-A nucleosome structures, with octasome, hemisome, compact octasome, hexasome, and tetrasome models being reported. Some of these CENP-A nucleosome models may correspond to transient intermediates for the assembly of the mature CENP-A nucleosome; however, their significances are still unclear. Therefore, the structure of the mature CENP-A nucleosome has been eagerly awaited. We reconstituted the human CENP-A nucleosome with its cognate centromeric DNA fragment, and determined its crystal structure. In this review, we describe the structure and the physical properties of the CENP-A nucleosome, and discuss their implications for centromeric chromatin architecture.

  13. Nuclear chromatin variations in human spermatozoa undergoing swim-up and cryopreservation evaluated by the flow cytometric sperm chromatin structure assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, M; Cordelli, E; Leter, G; Lombardo, F; Lenzi, A; Gandini, L

    1999-01-01

    The sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) is a flow cytometric (FCM) technique which exploits the metachromatic properties of Acridine Orange to monitor the susceptibility of sperm chromatin DNA to in-situ acid denaturation. SCSA was used to study the chromatin structure variations of human spermatozoa in semen, both before and after swim-up and after cryopreservation. Semen samples were provided by 19 healthy normozoospermic subjects attending pre-marriage checks. Each sample was divided into three aliquots: the first aliquot was evaluated without further treatment, the second underwent swim-up, and the third was stored according to standard cryopreservation techniques in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. Samples were also analysed by light and fluorescence microscopy (after Acridine Orange staining to evaluate the number of green fluorescent sperm heads), and by computer-assisted semen analysis. The results showed that post-rise spermatozoa represent a subpopulation characterized by a general improvement of the morphological (reduction of the percentage of abnormal forms and heads, increase of the green head sperm percentage) and kinetic parameters. This subpopulation also exhibited improved chromatin structure properties, confirming that these cells have the best structural and functional characteristics, indicative of optimal fertilizing ability. On the other hand, overall sperm quality deteriorates after cryopreservation. When thawed spermatozoa underwent an additional swim-up round, a general improvement of nuclear maturity was seen in the post-rise spermatozoa.

  14. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  15. High-Resolution Mapping of Chromatin Conformation in Cardiac Myocytes Reveals Structural Remodeling of the Epigenome in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Chapski, Douglas J; Schmitt, Anthony D; Kimball, Todd H; Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Balderas, Enrique; Pellegrini, Matteo; Shih, Tsai-Ting; Soehalim, Elizabeth; Liem, David; Ping, Peipei; Galjart, Niels J; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Ren, Bing; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2017-10-24

    Cardiovascular disease is associated with epigenomic changes in the heart; however, the endogenous structure of cardiac myocyte chromatin has never been determined. To investigate the mechanisms of epigenomic function in the heart, genome-wide chromatin conformation capture (Hi-C) and DNA sequencing were performed in adult cardiac myocytes following development of pressure overload-induced hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac-specific deletion of CTCF (a ubiquitous chromatin structural protein) were generated to explore the role of this protein in chromatin structure and cardiac phenotype. Transcriptome analyses by RNA-seq were conducted as a functional readout of the epigenomic structural changes. Depletion of CTCF was sufficient to induce heart failure in mice, and human patients with heart failure receiving mechanical unloading via left ventricular assist devices show increased CTCF abundance. Chromatin structural analyses revealed interactions within the cardiac myocyte genome at 5-kb resolution, enabling examination of intra- and interchromosomal events, and providing a resource for future cardiac epigenomic investigations. Pressure overload or CTCF depletion selectively altered boundary strength between topologically associating domains and A/B compartmentalization, measurements of genome accessibility. Heart failure involved decreased stability of chromatin interactions around disease-causing genes. In addition, pressure overload or CTCF depletion remodeled long-range interactions of cardiac enhancers, resulting in a significant decrease in local chromatin interactions around these functional elements. These findings provide a high-resolution chromatin architecture resource for cardiac epigenomic investigations and demonstrate that global structural remodeling of chromatin underpins heart failure. The newly identified principles of endogenous chromatin structure have key implications for epigenetic therapy. © 2017 The Authors.

  16. HiTAD: detecting the structural and functional hierarchies of topologically associating domains from chromatin interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; Cui, Wang; Peng, Cheng

    2017-11-02

    A current question in the high-order organization of chromatin is whether topologically associating domains (TADs) are distinct from other hierarchical chromatin domains. However, due to the unclear TAD definition in tradition, the structural and functional uniqueness of TAD is not well studied. In this work, we refined TAD definition by further constraining TADs to the optimal separation on global intra-chromosomal interactions. Inspired by this constraint, we developed a novel method, called HiTAD, to detect hierarchical TADs from Hi-C chromatin interactions. HiTAD performs well in domain sensitivity, replicate reproducibility and inter cell-type conservation. With a novel domain-based alignment proposed by us, we defined several types of hierarchical TAD changes which were not systematically studied previously, and subsequently used them to reveal that TADs and sub-TADs differed statistically in correlating chromosomal compartment, replication timing and gene transcription. Finally, our work also has the implication that the refinement of TAD definition could be achieved by only utilizing chromatin interactions, at least in part. HiTAD is freely available online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Disconnect between alcohol-induced alterations in chromatin structure and gene transcription in a mouse embryonic stem cell model of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Kylee J; Wang, Haiqing; Bedi, Yudhishtar S; Skiles, William M; Chang, Richard Cheng-An; Golding, Michael C

    2017-05-01

    Alterations to chromatin structure induced by environmental insults have become an attractive explanation for the persistence of exposure effects into subsequent life stages. However, a growing body of work examining the epigenetic impact that alcohol and other drugs of abuse exert consistently notes a disconnection between induced changes in chromatin structure and patterns of gene transcription. Thus, an important question is whether perturbations in the 'histone code' induced by prenatal exposures to alcohol implicitly subvert gene expression, or whether the hierarchy of cellular signaling networks driving development is such that they retain control over the transcriptional program. To address this question, we examined the impact of ethanol exposure in mouse embryonic stem cells cultured under 2i conditions, where the transcriptional program is rigidly enforced through the use of small molecule inhibitors. We find that ethanol-induced changes in post-translational histone modifications are dose-dependent, unique to the chromatin modification under investigation, and that the extent and direction of the change differ between the period of exposure and the recovery phase. Similar to in vivo models, we find post-translational modifications affecting histone 3 lysine 9 are the most profoundly impacted, with the signature of exposure persisting long after alcohol has been removed. These changes in chromatin structure associate with dose-dependent alterations in the levels of transcripts encoding Dnmt1, Uhrf1, Tet1, Tet2, Tet3, and Polycomb complex members Eed and Ezh2. However, in this model, ethanol-induced changes to the chromatin template do not consistently associate with changes in gene transcription, impede the process of differentiation, or affect the acquisition of monoallelic patterns of expression for the imprinted gene Igf2R. These findings question the inferred universal relevance of epigenetic changes induced by drugs of abuse and suggest that changes

  18. Chromatin structure influence the sensitivity of DNA to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin acts as a natural hindrance in DNA-damage recognition, repair and recovery. Histone and their variants undergo differential post-translational modification(s) and regulate chromatin structure to facilitate DNA damage response (DDR). During the presentation we will discuss the importance of chromatin organization and histone modification(s) during IR-induced DNA damage response in human liver cells. Our data shows G1-phase specific decrease of H3 serine10 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage is coupled with chromatin compaction in repair phase of DDR. The loss of H3Ser10P during DNA damage shows an inverse correlation with gain of γH2AX from a same mono-nucleosome in a dose-dependent manner. The loss of H3Ser10P is a universal phenomenon as it is independent of origin of cell lines and nature of genotoxic agents in G1 phase cells. The reversible reduction of H3Ser10P is mediated by opposing activities of phosphatase, MKP1 and kinase, MSK1 of the MAP kinase pathway. The present study suggests distinct reversible histone marks are associated with G1-phase of cell cycle and plays a critical role in chromatin organization which may facilitate differential sensitivity against radiation. Thus, the study raises the possibility of combinatorial modulation of H3Ser10P and histone acetylation with specific inhibitors to target the radio-resistant cancer cells in G1-phase and thus may serve as promising targets for cancer therapy. (author)

  19. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-01

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  20. FANCJ couples replication past natural fork barriers with maintenance of chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Rebekka A; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2013-04-01

    Defective DNA repair causes Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare childhood cancer-predisposing syndrome. At least 15 genes are known to be mutated in FA; however, their role in DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we show that the FANCJ helicase promotes DNA replication in trans by counteracting fork stalling on replication barriers, such as G4 quadruplex structures. Accordingly, stabilization of G4 quadruplexes in ΔFANCJ cells restricts fork movements, uncouples leading- and lagging-strand synthesis and generates small single-stranded DNA gaps behind the fork. Unexpectedly, we also discovered that FANCJ suppresses heterochromatin spreading by coupling fork movement through replication barriers with maintenance of chromatin structure. We propose that FANCJ plays an essential role in counteracting chromatin compaction associated with unscheduled replication fork stalling and restart, and suppresses tumorigenesis, at least partially, in this replication-specific manner.

  1. Inferring 3D chromatin structure using a multiscale approach based on quaternions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudai, Claudia; Salerno, Emanuele; Zoppè, Monica; Tonazzini, Anna

    2015-07-29

    The knowledge of the spatial organisation of the chromatin fibre in cell nuclei helps researchers to understand the nuclear machinery that regulates DNA activity. Recent experimental techniques of the type Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C, or similar) provide high-resolution, high-throughput data consisting in the number of times any possible pair of DNA fragments is found to be in contact, in a certain population of cells. As these data carry information on the structure of the chromatin fibre, several attempts have been made to use them to obtain high-resolution 3D reconstructions of entire chromosomes, or even an entire genome. The techniques proposed treat the data in different ways, possibly exploiting physical-geometric chromatin models. One popular strategy is to transform contact data into Euclidean distances between pairs of fragments, and then solve a classical distance-to-geometry problem. We developed and tested a reconstruction technique that does not require translating contacts into distances, thus avoiding a number of related drawbacks. Also, we introduce a geometrical chromatin chain model that allows us to include sound biochemical and biological constraints in the problem. This model can be scaled at different genomic resolutions, where the structures of the coarser models are influenced by the reconstructions at finer resolutions. The search in the solution space is then performed by a classical simulated annealing, where the model is evolved efficiently through quaternion operators. The presence of appropriate constraints permits the less reliable data to be overlooked, so the result is a set of plausible chromatin configurations compatible with both the data and the prior knowledge. To test our method, we obtained a number of 3D chromatin configurations from Hi-C data available in the literature for the long arm of human chromosome 1, and validated their features against known properties of gene density and transcriptional activity. Our

  2. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlmann-Diaz, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 10 5 copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G 0 , the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes

  3. Characterization of Chromatin Structure-associated Histone Modifications in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Pyo Hong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure and dynamics that are influenced by epigenetic marks, such as histone modification and DNA methylation, play a crucial role in modulating gene transcription. To understand the relationship between histone modifications and regulatory elements in breast cancer cells, we compared our chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq histone modification patterns for histone H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K9/16ac, and H3K27me3 in MCF-7 cells with publicly available formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE-chip signals in human chromosomes 8, 11, and 12, identified by a method called FAIRE. Active regulatory elements defined by FAIRE were highly associated with active histone modifications, like H3K4me3 and H3K9/16ac, especially near transcription start sites. The H3K9/16ac-enriched genes that overlapped with FAIRE signals (FAIRE-H3K9/14ac were moderately correlated with gene expression levels. We also identified functional sequence motifs at H3K4me1-enriched FAIRE sites upstream of putative promoters, suggesting that regulatory elements could be associated with H3K4me1 to be regarded as distal regulatory elements. Our results might provide an insight into epigenetic regulatory mechanisms explaining the association of histone modifications with open chromatin structure in breast cancer cells.

  4. Higher-order chromatin structure in DSB induction, repair and misrepair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 704, 1-3 (2010), s. 88-100 ISSN 1383-5742 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 919; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040802; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA double strand breaks * DSB repair * higher-order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 8.741, year: 2010

  5. Chromatin structure influences the sensitivity of DNA to gamma-radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1783, č. 12 (2008), s. 2398-2414 ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P349; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040802; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : sensitivity to DNA double- strand breaks induction * DSB repair * higher-order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.893, year: 2008

  6. Genome instability in the context of chromatin structure and fragile sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Galiová-Šustáčková, Gabriela; Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Jugová, Alžbeta; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2010), s. 181-194 ISSN 1045-4403 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 919; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC; LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene amplification * fragile sites * chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2010

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of chromatin structure from interaction frequency data using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dostie Josée

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-range interactions between regulatory DNA elements such as enhancers, insulators and promoters play an important role in regulating transcription. As chromatin contacts have been found throughout the human genome and in different cell types, spatial transcriptional control is now viewed as a general mechanism of gene expression regulation. Chromosome Conformation Capture Carbon Copy (5C and its variant Hi-C are techniques used to measure the interaction frequency (IF between specific regions of the genome. Our goal is to use the IF data generated by these experiments to computationally model and analyze three-dimensional chromatin organization. Results We formulate a probabilistic model linking 5C/Hi-C data to physical distances and describe a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC approach called MCMC5C to generate a representative sample from the posterior distribution over structures from IF data. Structures produced from parallel MCMC runs on the same dataset demonstrate that our MCMC method mixes quickly and is able to sample from the posterior distribution of structures and find subclasses of structures. Structural properties (base looping, condensation, and local density were defined and their distribution measured across the ensembles of structures generated. We applied these methods to a biological model of human myelomonocyte cellular differentiation and identified distinct chromatin conformation signatures (CCSs corresponding to each of the cellular states. We also demonstrate the ability of our method to run on Hi-C data and produce a model of human chromosome 14 at 1Mb resolution that is consistent with previously observed structural properties as measured by 3D-FISH. Conclusions We believe that tools like MCMC5C are essential for the reliable analysis of data from the 3C-derived techniques such as 5C and Hi-C. By integrating complex, high-dimensional and noisy datasets into an easy to interpret ensemble of three

  8. Three-dimensional modeling of chromatin structure from interaction frequency data using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Mathieu; Fraser, James; Ferraiuolo, Maria A; Dostie, Josée; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2011-10-25

    Long-range interactions between regulatory DNA elements such as enhancers, insulators and promoters play an important role in regulating transcription. As chromatin contacts have been found throughout the human genome and in different cell types, spatial transcriptional control is now viewed as a general mechanism of gene expression regulation. Chromosome Conformation Capture Carbon Copy (5C) and its variant Hi-C are techniques used to measure the interaction frequency (IF) between specific regions of the genome. Our goal is to use the IF data generated by these experiments to computationally model and analyze three-dimensional chromatin organization. We formulate a probabilistic model linking 5C/Hi-C data to physical distances and describe a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach called MCMC5C to generate a representative sample from the posterior distribution over structures from IF data. Structures produced from parallel MCMC runs on the same dataset demonstrate that our MCMC method mixes quickly and is able to sample from the posterior distribution of structures and find subclasses of structures. Structural properties (base looping, condensation, and local density) were defined and their distribution measured across the ensembles of structures generated. We applied these methods to a biological model of human myelomonocyte cellular differentiation and identified distinct chromatin conformation signatures (CCSs) corresponding to each of the cellular states. We also demonstrate the ability of our method to run on Hi-C data and produce a model of human chromosome 14 at 1Mb resolution that is consistent with previously observed structural properties as measured by 3D-FISH. We believe that tools like MCMC5C are essential for the reliable analysis of data from the 3C-derived techniques such as 5C and Hi-C. By integrating complex, high-dimensional and noisy datasets into an easy to interpret ensemble of three-dimensional conformations, MCMC5C allows researchers to

  9. The protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK changes the topology of chromatin and reduces the efficiency of DNA replication in a chromatin-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexiadis, V; Waldmann, T; Andersen, Jens S.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of chromatin regulates the genetic activity of the underlying DNA sequence. We report here that the protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK, which is involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, induces alterations of the superhelical density of DNA in chromatin. The change in topology...... protein substantially reduces the replication efficiency of chromatin but not of naked DNA templates....

  10. Large-Scale Chromatin Structure-Function Relationships during the Cell Cycle and Development: Insights from Replication Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, Vishnu; Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Sima, Jiao; Gilbert, David M

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome architecture has received a lot of attention since the recent development of genome-scale methods to measure chromatin interactions (Hi-C), enabling the first sequence-based models of chromosome tertiary structure. A view has emerged of chromosomes as a string of structural units (topologically associating domains; TADs) whose boundaries persist through the cell cycle and development. TADs with similar chromatin states tend to aggregate, forming spatially segregated chromatin compartments. However, high-resolution Hi-C has revealed substructure within TADs (subTADs) that poses a challenge for models that attribute significance to structural units at any given scale. More than 20 years ago, the DNA replication field independently identified stable structural (and functional) units of chromosomes (replication foci) as well as spatially segregated chromatin compartments (early and late foci), but lacked the means to link these units to genomic map units. Genome-wide studies of replication timing (RT) have now merged these two disciplines by identifying individual units of replication regulation (replication domains; RDs) that correspond to TADs and are arranged in 3D to form spatiotemporally segregated subnuclear compartments. Furthermore, classifying RDs/TADs by their constitutive versus developmentally regulated RT has revealed distinct classes of chromatin organization, providing unexpected insight into the relationship between large-scale chromosome structure and function. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Exposure to Hycanthone alters chromatin structure around specific gene functions and specific repeats in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRoquis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic plathyhelminth responsible for intestinal schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis, a disease affecting 67 million people worldwide and causing an important economic burden. The schistosomicides hycanthone, and its later proxy oxamniquine, were widely used for treatments in endemic areas during the 20th century. Recently, the mechanism of action, as well as the genetic origin of a stably and Mendelian inherited resistance for both drugs was elucidated in two strains. However, several observations suggested early on that alternative mechanisms might exist, by which resistance could be induced for these two drugs in sensitive lines of schistosomes. This induced resistance appeared rapidly, within the first generation, but was metastable (not stably inherited. Epigenetic inheritance could explain such a phenomenon and we therefore re-analyzed the historical data with our current knowledge of epigenetics. In addition, we performed new experiments such as ChIP-seq on hycanthone treated worms. We found distinct chromatin structure changes between sensitive worms and induced resistant worms from the same strain. No specific pathway was discovered, but genes in which chromatin structure modification were observed are mostly associated with transport and catabolism, which makes sense in the context of the elimination of the drug. Specific differences were observed in the repetitive compartment of the genome. We finally describe what types of experiments are needed to understand the complexity of heritability that can be based on genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms for drug resistance in schistosomes.

  12. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Stypula-Cyrus

    Full Text Available Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  13. Analysis of active and inactive X chromosome architecture reveals the independent organization of 30 nm and large-scale chromatin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Catherine; Sproul, Duncan; Hamilton, Charlotte; Gilbert, Nick

    2010-11-12

    Using a genetic model, we present a high-resolution chromatin fiber analysis of transcriptionally active (Xa) and inactive (Xi) X chromosomes packaged into euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin. Our results show that gene promoters have an open chromatin structure that is enhanced upon transcriptional activation but the Xa and the Xi have similar overall 30 nm chromatin fiber structures. Therefore, the formation of facultative heterochromatin is dependent on factors that act at a level above the 30 nm fiber and transcription does not alter bulk chromatin fiber structures. However, large-scale chromatin structures on Xa are decondensed compared with the Xi and transcription inhibition is sufficient to promote large-scale chromatin compaction. We show a link between transcription and large-scale chromatin packaging independent of the bulk 30 nm chromatin fiber and propose that transcription, not the global compaction of 30 nm chromatin fibers, determines the cytological appearance of large-scale chromatin structures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: The physics of chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessel, Helmut

    2003-05-01

    Recent progress has been made in the understanding of the physical properties of chromatin - the dense complex of DNA and histone proteins that occupies the nuclei of plant and animal cells. Here I will focus on the two lowest levels of the hierarchy of DNA folding into the chromatin complex. (i) The nucleosome, the chromatin repeating unit consisting of a globular aggregate of eight histone proteins with the DNA wrapped around it: its overcharging, the DNA unwrapping transition, the 'sliding' of the octamer along the DNA. (ii) The 30 nm chromatin fibre, the necklace-like structure of nucleosomes connected via linker DNA: its geometry, its mechanical properties under stretching and its response to changing ionic conditions. I will stress that chromatin combines two seemingly contradictory features: (1) high compaction of DNA within the nuclear envelope and, at the same time, (2) accessibility to genes, promoter regions and gene regulatory sequences.

  15. Early aberrations in chromatin dynamics in embryos produced under In vitro conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Rahul Shahaji; Østrup, Olga; Strejcek, Frantisek

    2012-01-01

    In vitro production of porcine embryos by means of in vitro fertilization (IVF) or somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is limited by great inefficienciy. The present study investigated chromatin and nucleolar dynamics in porcine embryos developed in vivo (IV) and compared this physiological...

  16. Reprogramming chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensberger, Andreas Hasso; Svejstrup, Jesper Qualmann

    2012-01-01

    attributed to high kinetic barriers that affect all cells equally and can only be overcome by rare stochastic events. The barriers to reprogramming are likely to involve transformations of chromatin state because (i) inhibitors of chromatin-modifying enzymes can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming...... and (ii) knockdown or knock-out of chromatin-modifying enzymes can lower the efficiency of reprogramming. Here, we review the relationship between chromatin state transformations (chromatin reprogramming) and cellular reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors...

  17. Small human sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification are pocket-like nuclear concavities linked to chromatin condensation failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitrelle, F; Albert, M; Petit, J-M; Ferfouri, F; Wainer, R; Bergere, M; Bailly, M; Vialard, F; Selva, J

    2013-08-01

    Since an embryo's ability to grow to the blastocyst stage and implant can be improved by selection of a normal spermatozoon with a vacuole-free head, this study set out to determine the nature of small sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification (>×6300). For 15 infertile men with various sperm profiles, high-magnification microscopy was used to select motile, morphometrically normal spermatozoa with no vacuoles (n=450) or more than two small vacuoles (each of which occupied less than 4% of the head's area; n=450). Spermatozoa acrosome reaction status and degree of chromatin condensation were analysed. Three-dimensional deconvolution microscopy was used to accurately image the nucleus and acrosome at all depths in all spermatozoa. In all 450 spermatozoa with small vacuoles, the latter were seen to be abnormal, DNA-free nuclear concavities. Spermatozoa with small vacuoles were significantly more likely than vacuole-free spermatozoa to have noncondensed chromatin (39.8% versus 9.3%, respectively; Pvacuoles observed under high magnification are pocket-like nuclear concavities related to failure of chromatin condensation. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The chromatin structure of the lysozyme GAS41 origin of DNA replication changes during the cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATRIN ZIMMERMANN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a rapid and simple protocol using lysolecithin for mapping HS sites in vivo. The protocol is based on partial digestion with DNase I of exponentially growing cells following permeabilization by short treatment with lysolecithin. Using this protocol, we analyzed the chromatin structure of the region surrounding two overlapping elements, an origin of bidirectional DNA replication and the GAS41 promoter, in chicken myelomonocytic HD11 cells arrested in G0, G0 and S phases as well as at the G0/S border. The results show that the chromatin of this region became more nuclease sensitive when cells were arrested in G0 phase and that this change in chromatin structure was reversible after the cells began to enter S phase

  19. Maintenance of genome stability in plants: repairing DNA double strand breaks and chromatin structure stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit eRoy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells are subject to high levels of DNA damage resulting from plant’s obligatory dependence on sunlight and the associated exposure to environmental stresses like solar UV radiation, high soil salinity, drought, chilling injury and other air and soil pollutants including heavy metals and metabolic byproducts from endogenous processes. The irreversible DNA damages, generated by the environmental and genotoxic stresses affect plant growth and development, reproduction and crop productivity. Thus, for maintaining genome stability, plants have developed an extensive array of mechanisms for the detection and repair of DNA damages. This review will focus recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms regulating plant genome stability in the context of repairing of double stand breaks and chromatin structure maintenance.

  20. Regulation of HIV-1 latency by chromatin structure and nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusic, Marina; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-02-13

    Current antiretroviral therapies fail to cure HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) infection because HIV-1 persists as a transcriptionally inactive provirus in resting memory CD4(+) T cells. Multiple molecular events are known to regulate HIV-1 gene expression, yet the mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of latency remain incompletely understood. Here we summarize different molecular aspects of viral latency, from its establishment in resting CD4(+) T cells to the mechanisms involved in the reactivation of latent viral reservoirs. We focus on the relevance of chromatin structure and nuclear architecture in determining the transcriptional fate of integrated HIV-1 genomes, in light of recent findings indicating that proximity to specific subnuclear neighborhoods regulates HIV-1 gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Systematic determination of replication activity type highlights interconnections between replication, chromatin structure and nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkash-Amar, Shlomit; David, Yaara; Polten, Andreas; Hezroni, Hadas; Eldar, Yonina C; Meshorer, Eran; Yakhini, Zohar; Simon, Itamar

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication is a highly regulated process, with each genomic locus replicating at a distinct time of replication (ToR). Advances in ToR measurement technology enabled several genome-wide profiling studies that revealed tight associations between ToR and general genomic features and a remarkable ToR conservation in mammals. Genome wide studies further showed that at the hundreds kb-to-megabase scale the genome can be divided into constant ToR regions (CTRs) in which the replication process propagates at a faster pace due to the activation of multiple origins and temporal transition regions (TTRs) in which the replication process propagates at a slower pace. We developed a computational tool that assigns a ToR to every measured locus and determines its replication activity type (CTR versus TTR). Our algorithm, ARTO (Analysis of Replication Timing and Organization), uses signal processing methods to fit a constant piece-wise linear curve to the measured raw data. We tested our algorithm and provide performance and usability results. A Matlab implementation of ARTO is available at http://bioinfo.cs.technion.ac.il/people/zohar/ARTO/. Applying our algorithm to ToR data measured in multiple mouse and human samples allowed precise genome-wide ToR determination and replication activity type characterization. Analysis of the results highlighted the plasticity of the replication program. For example, we observed significant ToR differences in 10-25% of the genome when comparing different tissue types. Our analyses also provide evidence for activity type differences in up to 30% of the probes. Integration of the ToR data with multiple aspects of chromosome organization characteristics suggests that ToR plays a role in shaping the regional chromatin structure. Namely, repressive chromatin marks, are associated with late ToR both in TTRs and CTRs. Finally, characterization of the differences between TTRs and CTRs, with matching ToR, revealed that TTRs are associated with

  2. Systematic determination of replication activity type highlights interconnections between replication, chromatin structure and nuclear localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomit Farkash-Amar

    Full Text Available DNA replication is a highly regulated process, with each genomic locus replicating at a distinct time of replication (ToR. Advances in ToR measurement technology enabled several genome-wide profiling studies that revealed tight associations between ToR and general genomic features and a remarkable ToR conservation in mammals. Genome wide studies further showed that at the hundreds kb-to-megabase scale the genome can be divided into constant ToR regions (CTRs in which the replication process propagates at a faster pace due to the activation of multiple origins and temporal transition regions (TTRs in which the replication process propagates at a slower pace. We developed a computational tool that assigns a ToR to every measured locus and determines its replication activity type (CTR versus TTR. Our algorithm, ARTO (Analysis of Replication Timing and Organization, uses signal processing methods to fit a constant piece-wise linear curve to the measured raw data. We tested our algorithm and provide performance and usability results. A Matlab implementation of ARTO is available at http://bioinfo.cs.technion.ac.il/people/zohar/ARTO/. Applying our algorithm to ToR data measured in multiple mouse and human samples allowed precise genome-wide ToR determination and replication activity type characterization. Analysis of the results highlighted the plasticity of the replication program. For example, we observed significant ToR differences in 10-25% of the genome when comparing different tissue types. Our analyses also provide evidence for activity type differences in up to 30% of the probes. Integration of the ToR data with multiple aspects of chromosome organization characteristics suggests that ToR plays a role in shaping the regional chromatin structure. Namely, repressive chromatin marks, are associated with late ToR both in TTRs and CTRs. Finally, characterization of the differences between TTRs and CTRs, with matching ToR, revealed that TTRs are

  3. BL-Hi-C is an efficient and sensitive approach for capturing structural and regulatory chromatin interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhengyu; Li, Guipeng; Wang, Zejun; Djekidel, Mohamed Nadhir; Li, Yanjian; Qian, Min-Ping; Zhang, Michael Q; Chen, Yang

    2017-11-20

    In human cells, DNA is hierarchically organized and assembled with histones and DNA-binding proteins in three dimensions. Chromatin interactions play important roles in genome architecture and gene regulation, including robustness in the developmental stages and flexibility during the cell cycle. Here we propose in situ Hi-C method named Bridge Linker-Hi-C (BL-Hi-C) for capturing structural and regulatory chromatin interactions by restriction enzyme targeting and two-step proximity ligation. This method improves the sensitivity and specificity of active chromatin loop detection and can reveal the regulatory enhancer-promoter architecture better than conventional methods at a lower sequencing depth and with a simpler protocol. We demonstrate its utility with two well-studied developmental loci: the beta-globin and HOXC cluster regions.

  4. Structural Modeling of GR Interactions with the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex and C/EBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muratcioglu, Serena; Presman, Diego M; Pooley, John R

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a steroid-hormone-activated transcription factor that modulates gene expression. Transcriptional regulation by the GR requires dynamic receptor binding to specific target sites located across the genome. This binding remodels the chromatin structure to allow in...

  5. The influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks: a study using nuclear and nucleoid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungman, M.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks, the alkaline unwinding technique was applied to nuclear and nucleoid monolayers. These chromatin substrates were prepared by treating human fibroblasts grown as monolayers with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 and varying concentrations of cations. The chromatin structure was modified either by a stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins by extraction in increasing concentrations of monovalent salt, or by the addition or deletion of mono- and divalent cations to condense or decondense the chromatin, respectively. It was found that the stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins from the chromatin dramatically increased the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. The DNA-bound proteins showed a qualitative difference in their ability to protect the DNA where proteins removed by salt concentrations above 1.0 M exerted the greatest protection. Furthermore, the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks was found to be 6 times lower in condensed chromatin than in decondensed chromatin and about 80 times lower than in protein-depleted chromatin. It is concluded that the presence of DNA-bound proteins and the folding of the chromatin into higher-order structures protect the DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks

  6. The Correlation of Interphase Chromatin Structure with the Radiation-Induced Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchange Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Purgason, Ashley M.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromosome aberrations induced by radiation and chromatin folding, we reconstructed three dimensional structure of chromosome 3 and measured the physical distances between different regions of the chromosome. Previously, we have investigated the location of breaks involved in inter- and intrachromosomal type exchange events in human chromosome 3, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, we reported that intra-chromosome exchanges occurred preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11 regions, and the breaks involving in inter-chromosome exchanges occurred in two regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions are located on the same arm of the chromosome. In this study, human epithelial cells were fixed at G1 phase and the interphase cells were hybridized using the XCyte3 mBAND kit from MetaSystems. The z-section images of chromosome 3 were captured with a Leica and an LSM 510 Meta laser scanning confocal microscopes. A total of 100 chromosomes were analyzed. The reconstruction of three dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 with six different colored regions was achieved using the Imaris software. The relative distance between different regions was measured as well. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. The data showed that, in majority of the cells, the regions containing 3p21 and 3q11 are colocalized in the center of the chromosome, whereas, the regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome are either physically wrapping outside the chromosome center or with arms sticking out. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation

  7. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...... synthesis is perturbed, cells can suffer loss of both genome and epigenome integrity with severe consequences for the organism....

  8. Additive scaling law for structural organization of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iashina, E. G.; Velichko, E. V.; Filatov, M. V.; Bouwman, W. G.; Duif, C. P.; Brulet, A.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) on nuclei of chicken erythrocytes demonstrates the cubic dependence of the scattering intensity Q-3 in the range of momentum transfer Q ∈10-3-10-2nm-1 . Independent spin-echo SANS measurements give the spin-echo function, which is well described by the exponential law in a range of sizes (3 ×102) -(3 ×104) nm. Both experimental dependences reflect the nature of the structural organization of chromatin in the nucleus of a living cell, which corresponds to the correlation function γ (r )=ln(ξ /r ) for r <ξ , where ξ =(3.69 ±0.07 ) ×103 nm, the size of the nucleus. It has the specific scaling property of the logarithmic fractal γ (r /a )=γ (r )+ln(a ), i.e., the scaling down by a gives an additive constant to the correlation function, which distinguishes it from the mass fractal, which is characterized by multiplicative constant.

  9. Effects of X-irradiation on mouse testicular cells and sperm chromatin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, B.L.; Jost, L.K.; Erickson, K.R.; Tajiran, M.A.; Evenson, D.P. [South Dakota State Univ., Sioux Falls, SD (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The testicular regions of male mice were exposed to x-ray doses ranging from 0 to 400 rads. Forty days after exposure the mice were killed and the testes and cauda epididymal sperm removed surgically. Flow cytometric measurements of acridine orange stained testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular cell types following x-ray killing of stem cells. Cauda epididymal sperm were analyzed by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), a flow cytometric measurement of the susceptibility of the sperm nuclear DNA to in situ acid denaturation. The SCSA detected increased susceptibility to DNA denaturation in situ after 12.5 rads of x-ray exposure, with significant increases following 25 rads. Abnormal sperm head morphology was not significantly increased until the testes were exposed to 60 rads of x-rays. These data suggest that the SCSA is currently the most sensitive, noninvasive method of detecting x-ray damage to testicular stem spermatogonia. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Remodeling of the chromatin structure of the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD locus and upregulation of FSHD-related gene 1 (FRG1 expression during human myogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marozzi Anna

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder associated with the partial deletion of integral numbers of 3.3 kb D4Z4 DNA repeats within the subtelomere of chromosome 4q. A number of candidate FSHD genes, adenine nucleotide translocator 1 gene (ANT1, FSHD-related gene 1 (FRG1, FRG2 and DUX4c, upstream of the D4Z4 array (FSHD locus, and double homeobox chromosome 4 (DUX4 within the repeat itself, are upregulated in some patients, thus suggesting an underlying perturbation of the chromatin structure. Furthermore, a mouse model overexpressing FRG1 has been generated, displaying skeletal muscle defects. Results In the context of myogenic differentiation, we compared the chromatin structure and tridimensional interaction of the D4Z4 array and FRG1 gene promoter, and FRG1 expression, in control and FSHD cells. The FRG1 gene was prematurely expressed during FSHD myoblast differentiation, thus suggesting that the number of D4Z4 repeats in the array may affect the correct timing of FRG1 expression. Using chromosome conformation capture (3C technology, we revealed that the FRG1 promoter and D4Z4 array physically interacted. Furthermore, this chromatin structure underwent dynamic changes during myogenic differentiation that led to the loosening of the FRG1/4q-D4Z4 array loop in myotubes. The FRG1 promoter in both normal and FSHD myoblasts was characterized by H3K27 trimethylation and Polycomb repressor complex binding, but these repression signs were replaced by H3K4 trimethylation during differentiation. The D4Z4 sequences behaved similarly, with H3K27 trimethylation and Polycomb binding being lost upon myogenic differentiation. Conclusion We propose a model in which the D4Z4 array may play a critical chromatin function as an orchestrator of in cis chromatin loops, thus suggesting that this repeat may play a role in coordinating gene expression.

  11. Combining Low Temperature Fluorescence DNA-Hybridization, Immunostaining, and Super-Resolution Localization Microscopy for Nano-Structure Analysis of ALU Elements and Their Influence on Chromatin Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krufczik, Matthias; Sievers, Aaron; Hausmann, Annkathrin; Lee, Jin-Ho; Hildenbrand, Georg; Schaufler, Wladimir; Hausmann, Michael

    2017-05-07

    Immunostaining and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are well established methods for specific labelling of chromatin in the cell nucleus. COMBO-FISH (combinatorial oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization) is a FISH method using computer designed oligonucleotide probes specifically co-localizing at given target sites. In combination with super resolution microscopy which achieves spatial resolution far beyond the Abbe Limit, it allows new insights into the nano-scaled structure and organization of the chromatin of the nucleus. To avoid nano-structural changes of the chromatin, the COMBO-FISH labelling protocol was optimized omitting heat treatment for denaturation of the target. As an example, this protocol was applied to ALU elements-dispersed short stretches of DNA which appear in different kinds in large numbers in primate genomes. These ALU elements seem to be involved in gene regulation, genomic diversity, disease induction, DNA repair, etc. By computer search, we developed a unique COMBO-FISH probe which specifically binds to ALU consensus elements and combined this DNA-DNA labelling procedure with heterochromatin immunostainings in formaldehyde-fixed cell specimens. By localization microscopy, the chromatin network-like arrangements of ALU oligonucleotide repeats and heterochromatin antibody labelling sites were simultaneously visualized and quantified. This novel approach which simultaneously combines COMBO-FISH and immunostaining was applied to chromatin analysis on the nanoscale after low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation exposure at different doses. Dose-correlated curves were obtained from the amount of ALU representing signals, and the chromatin re-arrangements during DNA repair after irradiation were quantitatively studied on the nano-scale. Beyond applications in radiation research, the labelling strategy of immunostaining and COMBO-FISH with localization microscopy will also offer new potentials for analyses of subcellular

  12. Neuron-specific chromatin remodeling: a missing link in epigenetic mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, memory, and intellectual disability disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Wood, Marcelo A

    2014-05-01

    Long-term memory formation requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression. Until recently nucleosome remodeling, one of the major epigenetic mechanisms for controlling gene expression, had been largely unexplored in the field of neuroscience. Nucleosome remodeling is carried out by chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) that interact with DNA and histones to physically alter chromatin structure and ultimately regulate gene expression. Human exome sequencing and gene wide association studies have linked mutations in CRC subunits to intellectual disability disorders, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, how mutations in CRC subunits were related to human cognitive disorders was unknown. There appears to be both developmental and adult specific roles for the neuron specific CRC nBAF (neuronal Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor). nBAF regulates gene expression required for dendritic arborization during development, and in the adult, contributes to long-term potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We propose that the nBAF complex is a novel epigenetic mechanism for regulating transcription required for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory processes and that impaired nBAF function may result in human cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of chromatin structure modulation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A on the radio-sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschini, Roberta, E-mail: meschini@unitus.it; Morucci, Elisa; Berni, Andrea; Lopez-Martinez, Wilner; Palitti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Role of chromatin compaction on chromosomal instability. • Reduced radiation-induced clastogenicity in Ataxia telangiectasia cell lines. • Histone tails hyperacetylation reduces heterochromatin content favouring DSBs repair. - Abstract: At present, a lot is known about biochemical aspects of double strand breaks (DBS) repair but how chromatin structure affects this process and the sensitivity of DNA to DSB induction is still an unresolved question. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients are characterised by very high sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents such as ionising radiation. This radiosensitivity is revealed with an enhancement of chromosomal instability as a consequence of defective DNA repair for a small fraction of breaks located in the heterochromatin, where they are less accessible. Besides, recently it has been reported that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) mediated signalling modifies chromatin structure. In order to study the impact of chromatin compaction on the chromosomal instability of A-T cells, the response to trichostatin-A, an histone deacetylase inhibitor, in normal and A-T lymphoblastoid cell lines was investigated testing its effect on chromosomal aberrations, cell cycle progression, DNA damage and repair after exposure to X-rays. The results suggest that the response to both trichostatin-A pre- and continuous treatments is independent of the presence of either functional or mutated ATM protein, as the reduction of chromosomal damage was found also in the wild-type cell line. The presence of trichostatin-A before exposure to X-rays could give rise to prompt DNA repair functioning on chromatin structure already in an open conformation. Differently, trichostatin-A post-treatment causing hyperacetylation of histone tails and reducing the heterochromatic DNA content might diminish the requirement for ATM and favour DSBs repair reducing chromosomal damage only in A-T cells. This fact could suggest that trichostatin-A post

  14. Integration of Kinase and Calcium Signaling at the Level of Chromatin Underlies Inducible Gene Activation in T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Brignall, Ruth; Cauchy, Pierre; Bevington, Sarah L.; Gorman, Bethany; Pisco, Angela O.; Bagnall, James; Boddington, Christopher; Rowe, William; England, Hazel; Rich, Kevin; Schmidt, Lorraine; Dyer, Nigel P.; Travis, Mark A.; Ott, Sascha; Jackson, Dean A.

    2017-01-01

    TCR signaling pathways cooperate to activate the inducible transcription factors NF-B, NFAT and AP-1. Here, using the calcium ionophore ionomycin and/or PMA on Jurkat T cells, we show that the gene expression program associated with activation of TCR signaling is closely related to specific chromatin landscapes. We find that calcium and kinase signaling cooperate to induce chromatin remodeling at ~2100 chromatin regions, which demonstrate enriched binding motifs for inducible factors and cor...

  15. H3 clipping activity of glutamate dehydrogenase is regulated by stefin B and chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Papita; Chauhan, Sakshi; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2014-12-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase has been recently identified as a tissue-specific histone H3-specific clipping enzyme. We have previously shown that it cleaves free as well as chromatin-bound histone H3. However, the physiological significance of this enzyme is still not clear. The present study aimed to improve our understanding of its significance in vivo. Using biochemical and cell biological approaches, we show that glutamate dehydrogenase is primarily associated with euchromatin, and it re-localizes from the nuclear periphery to the nucleolus upon DNA damage. The cysteine protease inhibitor stefin B regulates the H3 clipping activity of the enzyme. Chromatin structure and certain histone modifications influence H3 clipping activity. Interestingly, we also observed that an in vivo truncated form of H3 lacks H3K56 acetylation, which is a code for the DNA damage response. Together, these results suggest that glutamate dehydrogenase is a euchromatin-associated enzyme, and its H3 clipping activity is regulated by chromatin structure, histone modifications and an in vivo inhibitor. In response to DNA damage, it re-localizes to the nuclei, and hence may be involved in regulation of gene expression in vivo. © 2014 FEBS.

  16. APPLICATION OF THE SPERM CHROMATIN STRUCTURE ASSAY TO THE TEPLICE PROGRAM SEMEN STUDIES: A NEW METHOD FOR EVALUATING SPERM NUCLEAR CHROMATIN DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACTA measure of sperm chromatin integrity was added to the routine semen end points evaluated in the Teplice Program male reproductive health studies. To address the hypothesis that exposure to periods of elevated air pollution may be associated with abnormalities in sp...

  17. Glia-specific enhancers and chromatin structure regulate NFIA expression and glioma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Stacey M; Carlson, Jeffrey C; Zhu, Wenyi; Chaboub, Lesley S; Kang, Peng; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Clovis, Yoanne M; Lozzi, Brittney E; McEvilly, Robert J; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Creighton, Chad J; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Mohila, Carrie A; Deneen, Benjamin

    2017-11-01

    Long-range enhancer interactions critically regulate gene expression, yet little is known about how their coordinated activities contribute to CNS development or how this may, in turn, relate to disease states. By examining the regulation of the transcription factor NFIA in the developing spinal cord, we identified long-range enhancers that recapitulate NFIA expression across glial and neuronal lineages in vivo. Complementary genetic studies found that Sox9-Brn2 and Isl1-Lhx3 regulate enhancer activity and NFIA expression in glial and neuronal populations. Chromatin conformation analysis revealed that these enhancers and transcription factors form distinct architectures within these lineages in the spinal cord. In glioma models, the glia-specific architecture is present in tumors, and these enhancers are required for NFIA expression and contribute to glioma formation. By delineating three-dimensional mechanisms of gene expression regulation, our studies identify lineage-specific chromatin architectures and associated enhancers that regulate cell fate and tumorigenesis in the CNS.

  18. Expression and chromatin structures of cellulolytic enzyme gene regulated by heterochromatin protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiujun; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, homologue HepA in Penicillium oxalicum) binding is associated with a highly compact chromatin state accompanied by gene silencing or repression. HP1 loss leads to the derepression of gene expression. We investigated HepA roles in regulating cellulolytic enzyme gene expression, as an increasingly number of studies have suggested that cellulolytic enzyme gene expression is not only regulated by transcription factors, but is also affected by the chromat...

  19. Chromatin fine structure profiles for a developmentally regulated gene: reorganization of the lysozyme locus before trans-activator binding and gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kontaraki, Joanna; Chen, Hsiu-Hua; Riggs, Arthur; Bonifer, Constanze

    2000-01-01

    The chicken lysozyme locus is activated in a stepwise fashion during myeloid differentiation. We have used this locus as a model to study at high resolution changes in chromatin structure both in chicken cell lines representing various stages of macrophage differentiation and in primary cells from transgenic mice. In this study we have addressed the question of whether chromatin rearrangements can be detected in myeloid precursor cells at a stage well before overt transcription of the lysozym...

  20. Radiation breakage of DNA: a model based on random-walk chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Sachs, R. K.

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo computer software, called DNAbreak, has recently been developed to analyze observed non-random clustering of DNA double strand breaks in chromatin after exposure to densely ionizing radiation. The software models coarse-grained configurations of chromatin and radiation tracks, small-scale details being suppressed in order to obtain statistical results for larger scales, up to the size of a whole chromosome. We here give an analytic counterpart of the numerical model, useful for benchmarks, for elucidating the numerical results, for analyzing the assumptions of a more general but less mechanistic "randomly-located-clusters" formalism, and, potentially, for speeding up the calculations. The equations characterize multi-track DNA fragment-size distributions in terms of one-track action; an important step in extrapolating high-dose laboratory results to the much lower doses of main interest in environmental or occupational risk estimation. The approach can utilize the experimental information on DNA fragment-size distributions to draw inferences about large-scale chromatin geometry during cell-cycle interphase.

  1. Impact of nuclear organization and chromatin structure on DNA repair and genome stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    The non-random organization of the eukaryotic cell nucleus and the folding of genome in chromatin more or less condensed can influence many functions related to DNA metabolism, including genome stability. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious DNA damages for the cells. To preserve genome integrity, eukaryotic cells thus developed DSB repair mechanisms conserved from yeast to human, among which homologous recombination (HR) that uses an intact homologous sequence to repair a broken chromosome. HR can be separated in two sub-pathways: Gene Conversion (GC) transfers genetic information from one molecule to its homologous and Break Induced Replication (BIR) establishes a replication fork than can proceed until the chromosome end. My doctorate work was focused on the contribution of the chromatin context and 3D genome organization on DSB repair. In S. cerevisiae, nuclear organization and heterochromatin spreading at sub-telomeres can be modified through the overexpression of the Sir3 or sir3A2Q mutant proteins. We demonstrated that reducing the physical distance between homologous sequences increased GC rates, reinforcing the notion that homology search is a limiting step for recombination. We also showed that hetero-chromatinization of DSB site fine-tunes DSB resection, limiting the loss of the DSB ends required to perform homology search and complete HR. Finally, we noticed that the presence of heterochromatin at the donor locus decreased both GC and BIR efficiencies, probably by affecting strand invasion. This work highlights new regulatory pathways of DNA repair. (author) [fr

  2. Chromatin fine structure profiles for a developmentally regulated gene: reorganization of the lysozyme locus before trans-activator binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaraki, J; Chen, H H; Riggs, A; Bonifer, C

    2000-08-15

    The chicken lysozyme locus is activated in a stepwise fashion during myeloid differentiation. We have used this locus as a model to study at high resolution changes in chromatin structure both in chicken cell lines representing various stages of macrophage differentiation and in primary cells from transgenic mice. In this study we have addressed the question of whether chromatin rearrangements can be detected in myeloid precursor cells at a stage well before overt transcription of the lysozyme gene begins. In addition to restriction enzyme accessibility assays and DMS footprinting, we have applied new, very sensitive techniques to assay for chromatin changes. Particularly informative was UV photofootprinting, using terminal transferase-dependent PCR and nonradioactive detection. We find that the basic chromatin structure in lysozyme nonexpressing hematopoietic precursor cells is highly similar to the pattern found in fully differentiated lysozyme-expressing cells. In addition, we find that only in nonexpressing cells are dimethylsulfate footprints and UV photofootprints affected by trichostatin, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. These results are interpreted to mean that most chromatin pattern formation is complete before the binding of end-stage trans-activators, supporting the notion that heritable chromatin structure is central to the stable epigenetic programs that guide development.

  3. Chromatin fine structure profiles for a developmentally regulated gene: reorganization of the lysozyme locus before trans-activator binding and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaraki, Joanna; Chen, Hsiu-Hua; Riggs, Arthur; Bonifer, Constanze

    2000-01-01

    The chicken lysozyme locus is activated in a stepwise fashion during myeloid differentiation. We have used this locus as a model to study at high resolution changes in chromatin structure both in chicken cell lines representing various stages of macrophage differentiation and in primary cells from transgenic mice. In this study we have addressed the question of whether chromatin rearrangements can be detected in myeloid precursor cells at a stage well before overt transcription of the lysozyme gene begins. In addition to restriction enzyme accessibility assays and DMS footprinting, we have applied new, very sensitive techniques to assay for chromatin changes. Particularly informative was UV photofootprinting, using terminal transferase-dependent PCR and nonradioactive detection. We find that the basic chromatin structure in lysozyme nonexpressing hematopoietic precursor cells is highly similar to the pattern found in fully differentiated lysozyme-expressing cells. In addition, we find that only in nonexpressing cells are dimethylsulfate footprints and UV photofootprints affected by trichostatin, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. These results are interpreted to mean that most chromatin pattern formation is complete before the binding of end-stage trans-activators, supporting the notion that heritable chromatin structure is central to the stable epigenetic programs that guide development. PMID:10950873

  4. The protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK changes the topology of chromatin and reduces the efficiency of DNA replication in a chromatin-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexiadis, V; Waldmann, T; Andersen, Jens S.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of chromatin regulates the genetic activity of the underlying DNA sequence. We report here that the protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK, which is involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, induces alterations of the superhelical density of DNA in chromatin. The change in topology...

  5. Chromatin dynamics in genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote ...... of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage.......Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote...... access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance...

  6. The formation and modification of chromatin-like structure of human parvovirus B19 regulate viral genome replication and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanzhou; Hao, Sujuan; Zhang, Junmei; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Hanzhong; Guan, Wuxiang

    2017-03-15

    B19 virus (B19V) is a single stranded virus in the genus of Erythroparvovirus in the family of Parvoviridae. One of the limiting steps of B19V infection is the replication of viral genome which affected the alternative processing of its RNA. Minute virus of mice (MVM) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been reported to form chromatin-like structure within hours after infection of cells. However, the role of chromatin-like structure is unclear. In the present study, we found that B19V formed chromatin-like structure after 12h when B19V infectious clone was co-transfected with pHelper plasmid to HEK293T cells. Interestingly, the inhibitor of DNA methyl-transferase (5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine, DAC) inhibited not only the formation of chromatin-like structure, but also the replication of the viral genomic DNA. More importantly, the splicing of the second intron at splice acceptor sites (A2-1, and A2-2) were reduced and polyadenylation at (pA)p increased when transfected HEK293T cells were treated with DAC. Our results showed that the formation and modification of chromatin-like structure are a new layer to regulate B19V gene expression and RNA processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet...... the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...... landscape may be stably maintained even in the face of dramatic changes in chromatin structure....

  8. Integration of Kinase and Calcium Signaling at the Level of Chromatin Underlies Inducible Gene Activation in T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignall, Ruth; Cauchy, Pierre; Bevington, Sarah L; Gorman, Bethany; Pisco, Angela O; Bagnall, James; Boddington, Christopher; Rowe, William; England, Hazel; Rich, Kevin; Schmidt, Lorraine; Dyer, Nigel P; Travis, Mark A; Ott, Sascha; Jackson, Dean A; Cockerill, Peter N; Paszek, Pawel

    2017-10-15

    TCR signaling pathways cooperate to activate the inducible transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, and AP-1. In this study, using the calcium ionophore ionomycin and/or PMA on Jurkat T cells, we show that the gene expression program associated with activation of TCR signaling is closely related to specific chromatin landscapes. We find that calcium and kinase signaling cooperate to induce chromatin remodeling at ∼2100 chromatin regions, which demonstrate enriched binding motifs for inducible factors and correlate with target gene expression. We found that these regions typically function as inducible enhancers. Many of these elements contain composite NFAT/AP-1 sites, which typically support cooperative binding, thus further reinforcing the need for cooperation between calcium and kinase signaling in the activation of genes in T cells. In contrast, treatment with PMA or ionomycin alone induces chromatin remodeling at far fewer regions (∼600 and ∼350, respectively), which mostly represent a subset of those induced by costimulation. This suggests that the integration of TCR signaling largely occurs at the level of chromatin, which we propose plays a crucial role in regulating T cell activation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Quantitative FLIM-FRET Microscopy to Monitor Nanoscale Chromatin Compaction In Vivo Reveals Structural Roles of Condensin Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Llères

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available How metazoan genomes are structured at the nanoscale in living cells and tissues remains unknown. Here, we adapted a quantitative FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer-based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM approach to assay nanoscale chromatin compaction in living organisms. Caenorhabditis elegans was chosen as a model system. By measuring FRET between histone-tagged fluorescent proteins, we visualized distinct chromosomal regions and quantified the different levels of nanoscale compaction in meiotic cells. Using RNAi and repetitive extrachromosomal array approaches, we defined the heterochromatin state and showed that its architecture presents a nanoscale-compacted organization controlled by Heterochromatin Protein-1 (HP1 and SETDB1 H3-lysine-9 methyltransferase homologs in vivo. Next, we functionally explored condensin complexes. We found that condensin I and condensin II are essential for heterochromatin compaction and that condensin I additionally controls lowly compacted regions. Our data show that, in living animals, nanoscale chromatin compaction is controlled not only by histone modifiers and readers but also by condensin complexes.

  10. Environmental toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation as detected by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA[reg])

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, Donald P.; Wixon, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Studies over the past two decades have clearly shown that reproductive toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation. This DNA fragmentation can usually be detected prior to observing alterations of metaphase chromosomes in embryos. Thus, Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA)-detected DNA damage is viewed as the molecular precursor to later gross chromosome damage observed under the light microscope. SCSA measurements of animal or human sperm consist of first obtaining a fresh or flash frozen neat semen sample in LN2 or dry ice. Samples are then sent to a SCSA diagnostic laboratory where the samples are thawed, diluted to ∼1-2 x 106 sperm/ml, treated for 30 s with a pH 1.2 detergent buffer and then stained with acridine orange (AO). The low pH partially denatures DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks and the AO-ssDNA fluoresces red while the AO-dsDNA fluoresces green. Flow cytometry measurements of 5000 sperm/sample provide statistically robust data on the ratio of red to green sperm, the extent of the DNA fragmentation and the standard deviations of measures. Numerous experiments on rodents treated with reproductive toxicants clearly showed that SCSA measures are highly dose responsive and have a very low CV. Different agents that act on germ cells at various stages of development usually showed sperm DNA fragmentation when that germ cell fraction arrived in the epididymis or ejaculate. Some of these treated samples were capable of successful in vitro fertilization but with frequent embryo failure. A 2-year longitudinal study of men living a valley town with a reported abnormal level of infertility and spontaneous miscarriages and also a seasonal atmospheric smog pollution, showed, for the first time, that SCSA measurements of human sperm DNA fragmentation were detectable and correlated with dosage of air pollution while the classical semen measures were not correlated. Also, young men spraying pesticides without protective gear are at an increased risk for elevated

  11. Dynamic reorganization of chromatin structure and selective DNA demethylation prior to stable enhancer complex formation during differentiation of primary hematopoietic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagoh, Hiromi; Melnik, Svitlana; Lefevre, Pascal; Chong, Suyinn; Riggs, Arthur D; Bonifer, Constanze

    2004-04-15

    In order to gain insights in the true molecular mechanisms involved in cell fate decisions, it is important to study the molecular details of gene activation where such decisions occur, which is at the level of the chromatin structure of individual genes. In the study presented here we addressed this issue and examined the dynamic development of an active chromatin structure at the chicken lysozyme locus during the differentiation of primary myeloid cells from transgenic mouse bone marrow. Using in vivo footprinting we found that stable enhancer complex assembly and high-level gene expression are late events in cell differentiation. However, even before the onset of gene expression and stable transcription factor binding, specific chromatin alterations are observed. This includes changes in DNA topology and the selective demethylation of CpG dinucleotides located in the cores of critical transcription factor binding sites, but not in flanking DNA. These results firmly support the idea that epigenetic programs guiding blood cell differentiation are engraved into the chromatin of lineage-specific genes and that such chromatin changes are implemented before cell lineage specification.

  12. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wong

    Full Text Available In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  13. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, we discuss the dynamic organization of eukaryotic genes into chromatin. Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene ...

  14. Function of chromatin structure and dynamics in DNA damage, repair and misrepair: gamma-rays and protons in action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježková, L.; Falk, Martin; Falková, Iva; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Štefančíková, Lenka; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Lukášová, Emilie; Boreyko, A.; Krasavin, E.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 83, SI (2014), s. 128-136 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12039; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12008 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : DNA double- strand breaks * Higher-order chromatin structure and DSB repair * Formation of chromosomal translocations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  15. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  16. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zing Tsung-Yeh Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS and DNA structure (DS properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  17. CRISPR-based strategies for studying regulatory elements and chromatin structure in mammalian gene control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cia-Hin; Suh, Yousin

    2017-12-01

    The development of high-throughput methods has enabled the genome-wide identification of putative regulatory elements in a wide variety of mammalian cells at an unprecedented resolution. Extensive genomic studies have revealed the important role of regulatory elements and genetic variation therein in disease formation and risk. In most cases, there is only correlative evidence for the roles of these elements and non-coding changes within these elements in pathogenesis. With the advent of genome- and epigenome-editing tools based on the CRISPR technology, it is now possible to test the functional relevance of the regulatory elements and alterations on a genomic scale. Here, we review the various CRISPR-based strategies that have been developed to functionally validate the candidate regulatory elements in mammals as well as the non-coding genetic variants found to be associated with human disease. We also discuss how these synthetic biology tools have helped to elucidate the role of three-dimensional nuclear architecture and higher-order chromatin organization in shaping functional genome and controlling gene expression.

  18. Chromatin modifications and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Gupta, Arun; Misra, Hari S.; Albuquerque, Kevin; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: (1) non-homologous end joining, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but post-translational modification of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modifications by the respective chromatin modifying factors that occur during the DNA damage response.

  19. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D; Panyutin, Igor G

    2016-01-02

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC.

  20. Coactivators p300 and CBP maintain the identity of mouse embryonic stem cells by mediating long-range chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Xu, Yifeng; Chew, Kai-Khen; Chen, Xi; Ng, Huck-Hui; Matsudaira, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Master transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog are required to maintain the pluripotency and self-renewal of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by regulating a specific transcriptional network. A few other transcription factors have been shown to be important in ESCs by interacting with these master transcription factors; however, little is known about the transcriptional mechanisms regulated by coregulators (coactivators and corepressors). In this study, we examined the function of two highly homologous coactivators, p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP), in ESCs. We find that these two coactivators play redundant roles in maintaining the undifferentiated state of ESCs. They are recruited by Nanog through physical interaction to Nanog binding loci, mediating the formation of long-range chromatin looping structures, which is essential to maintain ESC-specific gene expression. Further functional studies reveal that the p300/CBP binding looping fragments contain enhancer activities, suggesting that the formation of p300/CBP-mediated looping structures may recruit distal enhancers to create a concentration of factors for the transcription activation of genes that are involved in self-renewal and pluripotency. Overall, these results provide a total new insight into the transcriptional regulation mechanism of coactivators p300 and CBP in ESCs, which is important in maintaining self-renewal and pluripotency, by mediating the formation of higher order chromosome structures. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Bacterial-Chromatin Structural Proteins Regulate the Bimodal Expression of the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE Pathogenicity Island in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Leh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE encodes a type 3 secretion system (T3SS essential for pathogenesis. This pathogenicity island comprises five major operons (LEE1 to LEE5, with the LEE5 operon encoding T3SS effectors involved in the intimate adherence of bacteria to enterocytes. The first operon, LEE1, encodes Ler (LEE-encoded regulator, an H-NS (nucleoid structuring protein paralog that alleviates the LEE H-NS silencing. We observed that the LEE5 and LEE1 promoters present a bimodal expression pattern, depending on environmental stimuli. One key regulator of bimodal LEE1 and LEE5 expression is ler expression, which fluctuates in response to different growth conditions. Under conditions in vitro considered to be equivalent to nonoptimal conditions for virulence, the opposing regulatory effects of H-NS and Ler can lead to the emergence of two bacterial subpopulations. H-NS and Ler share nucleation binding sites in the LEE5 promoter region, but H-NS binding results in local DNA structural modifications distinct from those generated through Ler binding, at least in vitro. Thus, we show how two nucleoid-binding proteins can contribute to the epigenetic regulation of bacterial virulence and lead to opposing bacterial fates. This finding implicates for the first time bacterial-chromatin structural proteins in the bimodal regulation of gene expression.

  2. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  3. Structural changes in single chromatin fibers induced by tension and torsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, He

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the right-handed helical structure of DNA, 61 years have passed. The DNA molecule, which encodes genetic information, is also found twisted into coils. This extra twist of the helical structure, called supercoiling, plays important roles in both DNA compaction and gene

  4. BCL-3 attenuation of TNFA expression involves an incoherent feed-forward loop regulated by chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Walker

    Full Text Available Induction of genes is rarely an isolated event; more typically occurring as part of a web of parallel interactions, or motifs, which act to refine and control gene expression. Here, we define an Incoherent Feed-forward Loop motif in which TNFα-induced NF-κB signalling activates expression of the TNFA gene itself and also controls synthesis of the negative regulator BCL-3. While sharing a common inductive signal, the two genes have distinct temporal expression profiles. Notably, while the TNFA gene promoter is primed to respond immediately to activated NF-κB in the nucleus, induction of BCL3 expression only occurs after a time delay of about 1h. We show that this time delay is defined by remodelling of the BCL3 gene promoter, which is required to activate gene expression, and characterise the chromatin delayed induction of BCL3 expression using mathematical models. The models show how a delay in inhibitor production effectively uncouples the rate of response to inflammatory cues from the final magnitude of inhibition. Hence, within this regulatory motif, a delayed (incoherent feed-forward loop together with differential rates of TNFA (fast and BCL3 (slow mRNA turnover provide robust, pulsatile expression of TNFα . We propose that the structure of the BCL-3-dependent regulatory motif has a beneficial role in modulating expression dynamics and the inflammatory response while minimising the risk of pathological hyper-inflammation.

  5. Bromodomain proteins: repairing DNA damage within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Li-Ya; Gong, Fade; Miller, Kyle M

    2017-10-05

    Genome surveillance and repair, termed the DNA damage response (DDR), functions within chromatin. Chromatin-based DDR mechanisms sustain genome and epigenome integrity, defects that can disrupt cellular homeostasis and contribute to human diseases. An important chromatin DDR pathway is acetylation signalling which is controlled by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes, which regulate acetylated lysines within proteins. Acetylated proteins, including histones, can modulate chromatin structure and provide molecular signals that are bound by acetyl-lysine binders, including bromodomain (BRD) proteins. Acetylation signalling regulates several DDR pathways, as exemplified by the preponderance of HATs, HDACs and BRD proteins that localize at DNA breaks to modify chromatin for lesion repair. Here, we explore the involvement of acetylation signalling in the DDR, focusing on the involvement of BRD proteins in promoting chromatin remodelling to repair DNA double-strand breaks. BRD proteins have widespread DDR functions including chromatin remodelling, chromatin modification and transcriptional regulation. We discuss mechanistically how BRD proteins read acetylation signals within chromatin to trigger DDR and chromatin activities to facilitate genome-epigenome maintenance. Thus, DDR pathways involving BRD proteins represent key participants in pathways that preserve genome-epigenome integrity to safeguard normal genome and cellular functions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Higher-Order Chromatin Organisation in Cell Nuclei: Structure and Function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozubek, Stanislav; Lukášová, Emilie; Bártová, Eva; Kozubek, Michal; Skalníková, M.; Jirsová, Pavla; Koutná, I.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2000), s. 1145 ISSN 0739-1102. [Mendel - Brno 2000. DNA Structure and Interactions. Their Biological Roles and Implications in Biomedicine and Biotechnologies. 19.07.2000-23.07.2000, Brno] Institutional research plan: CEZ:A17/98:Z5-004-9-ii Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  7. The Drosophila melanogaster CHD1 chromatin remodeling factor modulates global chromosome structure and counteracts HP1a and H3K9me2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Lakshmi; McDaniel, Ivy E; Engie, Liana; Armstrong, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    CHD1 is a conserved chromatin remodeling factor that localizes to active genes and functions in nucleosome assembly and positioning as well as histone turnover. Mouse CHD1 is required for the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency while human CHD1 may function as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the action of CHD1 on higher order chromatin structure in differentiated cells, we examined the consequences of loss of CHD1 and over-expression of CHD1 on polytene chromosomes from salivary glands of third instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We observed that chromosome structure is sensitive to the amount of this remodeler. Loss of CHD1 resulted in alterations of chromosome structure and an increase in the heterochromatin protein HP1a, while over-expression of CHD1 disrupted higher order chromatin structure and caused a decrease in levels of HP1a. Over-expression of an ATPase inactive form of CHD1 did not result in severe chromosomal defects, suggesting that the ATPase activity is required for this in vivo phenotype. Interestingly, changes in CHD1 protein levels did not correlate with changes in the levels of the euchromatin mark H3K4me3 or elongating RNA Polymerase II. Thus, while CHD1 is localized to transcriptionally active regions of the genome, it can function to alter the levels of HP1a, perhaps through changes in methylation of H3K9.

  8. The Drosophila melanogaster CHD1 chromatin remodeling factor modulates global chromosome structure and counteracts HP1a and H3K9me2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Bugga

    Full Text Available CHD1 is a conserved chromatin remodeling factor that localizes to active genes and functions in nucleosome assembly and positioning as well as histone turnover. Mouse CHD1 is required for the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency while human CHD1 may function as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the action of CHD1 on higher order chromatin structure in differentiated cells, we examined the consequences of loss of CHD1 and over-expression of CHD1 on polytene chromosomes from salivary glands of third instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We observed that chromosome structure is sensitive to the amount of this remodeler. Loss of CHD1 resulted in alterations of chromosome structure and an increase in the heterochromatin protein HP1a, while over-expression of CHD1 disrupted higher order chromatin structure and caused a decrease in levels of HP1a. Over-expression of an ATPase inactive form of CHD1 did not result in severe chromosomal defects, suggesting that the ATPase activity is required for this in vivo phenotype. Interestingly, changes in CHD1 protein levels did not correlate with changes in the levels of the euchromatin mark H3K4me3 or elongating RNA Polymerase II. Thus, while CHD1 is localized to transcriptionally active regions of the genome, it can function to alter the levels of HP1a, perhaps through changes in methylation of H3K9.

  9. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm -3 salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author)

  10. Important hydrodynamic and spectroscopic techniques in the field of chromatin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olins, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Combining hydrodynamic and spectroscopic techniques in the study of conformational states of ..nu../sub 1/ induced by a variety of perturbants has led us to a general coneption: the two structural domains of ..nu../sub 1/ (i.e., the DNA-rich outer shell and the ..cap alpha..-helix-rich apolar histone core) exhibit differential responsiveness. In general, the ..cap alpha..-helical regions are more resistant, than DNA conformation or ..nu../sub 1/ size and shape, to the perturbing effects of urea, decreased ionic strength and pH, trypsin treatment, or a variety of water-miscible organic solvents. There are a number of reasonable conceptual models to explain this differential responsiveness of the structural domains of ..nu../sub 1/.

  11. Chromatin organization at the nuclear periphery as revealed by image analysis of structured illumination microscopy data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišerová, Jindřiška; Efenberková, Michaela; Sieger, T.; Maninová, Miloslava; Uhlířová, Jana; Hozák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 12 (2017), s. 2066-2077 ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-08835Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Structured illumination * Image analysis * Chromation * Nucleus * Histone modification * Nuclear pore complexes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.431, year: 2016

  12. Structural Damage Assessment under Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Martinez, Israel

    Structural damage assessment has applications in the majority of engineering structures and mechanical systems ranging from aerospace vehicles to manufacturing equipment. The primary goals of any structural damage assessment and health monitoring systems are to ascertain the condition of a structure and to provide an evaluation of changes as a function of time as well as providing an early-warning of an unsafe condition. There are many structural heath monitoring and assessment techniques developed for research using numerical simulations and scaled structural experiments. However, the transition from research to real-world structures has been rather slow. One major reason for this slow-progress is the existence of uncertainty in every step of the damage assessment process. This dissertation research involved the experimental and numerical investigation of uncertainty in vibration-based structural health monitoring and development of robust detection and localization methods. The basic premise of vibration-based structural health monitoring is that changes in structural characteristics, such as stiffness, mass and damping, will affect the global vibration response of the structure. The diagnostic performance of vibration-based monitoring system is affected by uncertainty sources such as measurement errors, environmental disturbances and parametric modeling uncertainties. To address diagnostic errors due to irreducible uncertainty, a pattern recognition framework for damage detection has been developed to be used for continuous monitoring of structures. The robust damage detection approach developed is based on the ensemble of dimensional reduction algorithms for improved damage-sensitive feature extraction. For damage localization, the determination of an experimental structural model was performed based on output-only modal analysis. An experimental model correlation technique is developed in which the discrepancies between the undamaged and damaged modal data are

  13. Chromatin structure influence of DNA damage measurements by four assays: pulsed- and constant-field gel electrophoresis, DNA precipitation and non-denaturing filter elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodek, D.; Olive, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The of elution of DNA during non-denaturing filter elution (NFE) often correlates with cell sensitivity to radiation. The elution rate is influenced by two cellular factors: chromatin structure and the number of DNA-strand breaks (DSBs) produced in an intact cell by ionizing radiation. To determine which of the above factors is relevant to cell radiosensitivity, four assays were used to measure induction of DNA damage in three cell lines varying in radiosensitivity (V79, CHO, and L5178Y-R). Each of the assays, neutral filter elution (NFE), DNA precipitation, constant (CFGE) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have different physical basis for DNA damage measurement and might be differently affected by chromatin structure. Three of the methods used to measure DNA double-strand breaks gave different results: NFE was dependent on cell type and location of DNA relative to the replication fork, gel electrophoresis was independent of cell type but was affected by proximity to the replication fork, and the precipitation assay was independent of both cell type and replication status. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis produced the same results and constant field gel electrophoresis for 3 cell lines examined. Only NFE showed differences in sensitivity which correlated with cell survival following irradiation. The results suggest that three is the same initial amount of DSBs in cells from all three lines and that the sensitivity to radiation is determined by some additional factors, probably chromatin structure. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs

  14. Transcription factors operate TATA switches via rotational remodeling of local columnar chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-12-01

    Our earlier study on the nucleosomes containing TBP binding sites (TATA boxes) indicated that generally the same sequence, which harbors the TATA box, encodes simultaneously an alternative rotational setting of the box, so that the TATA element is either exposed (position "minor groove out") or hidden in position "minor groove in". The sequence elements (dinucleotides) residing on the inner surface of DNA in contact with histone octamers are identified by calculating YR tracks in the promoter regions of the genes - periodically reappearing YR elements, at distances of 10-11 bases from one another. Non-YR elements of the YR tracks are also verified by nucleosome mapping procedure based on alternation of runs of purines with runs of pyrimidines. The tracks observed in yeast promoter regions are found to split into two, passing further downstream either through the TATA element or 4-6 bases toward the tail of the box. The points of splitting which play the role of TATA switches are located in close vicinity or within the transcription factor binding sites. This suggests the regulatory function of transcription factors changing the YR tracks by over- or under-twisting DNA induced by their binding.

  15. Molecular basis for the redox control of nuclear transport of the structural chromatin protein Hmgb1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, George; Talcott, Katherine E.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.; Crabb, John W.; Sears, Jonathan E.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress can induce a covalent disulfide bond between protein and peptide thiols that is reversible through enzymatic catalysis. This process provides a post-translational mechanism for control of protein function and may also protect thiol groups from irreversible oxidation. High mobility group protein B1 (Hmgb1), a DNA-binding structural chromosomal protein and transcriptional co-activator was identified as a substrate of glutaredoxin. Hmgb1 contains 3 cysteines, Cys23, 45, and 106. In mild oxidative conditions, Cys23 and Cys45 readily form an intramolecular disulfide bridge, whereas Cys106 remains in the reduced form. The disulfide bond between Cys23 and Cys45 is a target of glutathione-dependent reduction by glutaredoxin. Endogenous Hmgb1 as well as GFP-tagged wild-type Hmgb1 co-localize in the nucleus of CHO cells. While replacement of Hmgb1 Cys23 and/or 45 with serines did not affect the nuclear distribution of the mutant proteins, Cys106-to-Ser and triple cysteine mutations impaired nuclear localization of Hmgb1. Our cysteine targeted mutational analysis suggests that Cys23 and 45 induce conformational changes in response to oxidative stress, whereas Cys106 appears to be critical for the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Hmgb1

  16. Genome-wide analysis of chromatin structures in Trypanosoma brucei using high-resolution MNase-ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, Carolin; Siegel, T Nicolai

    2017-09-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are the basis for many important cellular mechanisms like the regulation of gene expression or replication. Knowledge about the precise genomic locations of DNA-protein interactions is important because it provides insight into the regulation of these processes. Recently, we have adapted an approach that combines micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion of chromatin with chromatin immunoprecipitation in Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we describe in detail how this method can be used to map the genome-wide distribution of nucleosomes or other DNA-binding proteins at high resolution in T. brucei. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chromatin and nucleosome dynamics in DNA damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Michael H; Gasser, Susan M

    2017-11-15

    Chromatin is organized into higher-order structures that form subcompartments in interphase nuclei. Different categories of specialized enzymes act on chromatin and regulate its compaction and biophysical characteristics in response to physiological conditions. We present an overview of the function of chromatin structure and its dynamic changes in response to genotoxic stress, focusing on both subnuclear organization and the physical mobility of DNA. We review the requirements and mechanisms that cause chromatin relocation, enhanced mobility, and chromatin unfolding as a consequence of genotoxic lesions. An intriguing link has been established recently between enhanced chromatin dynamics and histone loss. © 2017 Hauer and Gasser; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Retention of the Native Epigenome in Purified Mammalian Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas H Ehrensberger

    Full Text Available A protocol is presented for the isolation of native mammalian chromatin as fibers of 25-250 nucleosomes under conditions that preserve the natural epigenetic signature. The material is composed almost exclusively of histones and DNA and conforms to the structure expected by electron microscopy. All sequences probed for were retained, indicating that the material is representative of the majority of the genome. DNA methylation marks and histone marks resembled the patterns observed in vivo. Importantly, nucleosome positions also remained largely unchanged, except on CpG islands, where nucleosomes were found to be unstable. The technical challenges of reconstituting biochemical reactions with native mammalian chromatin are discussed.

  19. A new non-catalytic role for ubiquitin ligase RNF8 in unfolding higher-order chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Acs, Klara; Ackermann, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 orchestrate DNA damage signalling through the ubiquitylation of histone H2A and the recruitment of downstream repair factors. Here, we demonstrate that RNF8, but not RNF168 or the canonical H2A ubiquitin ligase RNF2, mediates extensive chromatin decondensatio...

  20. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  1. Chromatin is wonderful stuff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin molecules have properties that set them aside from all other biomacromolecules in the cell. (i) Chromosomes, which are single chromatin molecules, are the largest macromolecules in eukaryotic cells. (ii) Chromatin molecules carry the cell's genetic and epigenetic information and all

  2. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene expression in which RNA synthesis occurs from the DNA (gene) template in a series of.

  3. Chromatin dynamics resolved with force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chien, Fan-Tso

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is organized in chromatin fibers composed of nucleosomes as structural units. A nucleosome contains 1.7 turns of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer and is connected to the adjacent nucleosomes with linker DNA. The folding of chromatin fibers effectively increases

  4. Bacterial-Chromatin Structural Proteins Regulate the Bimodal Expression of the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE) Pathogenicity Island in EnteropathogenicEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leh, Hervé; Khodr, Ahmad; Bouger, Marie-Christine; Sclavi, Bianca; Rimsky, Sylvie; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie

    2017-08-08

    In enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) encodes a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) essential for pathogenesis. This pathogenicity island comprises five major operons ( LEE1 to LEE5 ), with the LEE5 operon encoding T3SS effectors involved in the intimate adherence of bacteria to enterocytes. The first operon, LEE1 , encodes Ler (LEE-encoded regulator), an H-NS (nucleoid structuring protein) paralog that alleviates the LEE H-NS silencing. We observed that the LEE5 and LEE1 promoters present a bimodal expression pattern, depending on environmental stimuli. One key regulator of bimodal LEE1 and LEE5 expression is ler expression, which fluctuates in response to different growth conditions. Under conditions in vitro considered to be equivalent to nonoptimal conditions for virulence, the opposing regulatory effects of H-NS and Ler can lead to the emergence of two bacterial subpopulations. H-NS and Ler share nucleation binding sites in the LEE5 promoter region, but H-NS binding results in local DNA structural modifications distinct from those generated through Ler binding, at least in vitro Thus, we show how two nucleoid-binding proteins can contribute to the epigenetic regulation of bacterial virulence and lead to opposing bacterial fates. This finding implicates for the first time bacterial-chromatin structural proteins in the bimodal regulation of gene expression. IMPORTANCE Gene expression stochasticity is an emerging phenomenon in microbiology. In certain contexts, gene expression stochasticity can shape bacterial epigenetic regulation. In enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), the interplay between H-NS (a nucleoid structuring protein) and Ler (an H-NS paralog) is required for bimodal LEE5 and LEE1 expression, leading to the emergence of two bacterial subpopulations (with low and high states of expression). The two proteins share mutual nucleation binding sites in the LEE5 promoter region. In vitro , the binding of H

  5. Map of open and closed chromatin domains in Drosophila genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milon, Beatrice; Sun, Yezhou; Chang, Weizhong; Creasy, Todd; Mahurkar, Anup; Shetty, Amol; Nurminsky, Dmitry; Nurminskaya, Maria

    2014-11-18

    Chromatin compactness has been considered a major determinant of gene activity and has been associated with specific chromatin modifications in studies on a few individual genetic loci. At the same time, genome-wide patterns of open and closed chromatin have been understudied, and are at present largely predicted from chromatin modification and gene expression data. However the universal applicability of such predictions is not self-evident, and requires experimental verification. We developed and implemented a high-throughput analysis for general chromatin sensitivity to DNase I which provides a comprehensive epigenomic assessment in a single assay. Contiguous domains of open and closed chromatin were identified by computational analysis of the data, and correlated to other genome annotations including predicted chromatin "states", individual chromatin modifications, nuclear lamina interactions, and gene expression. While showing that the widely trusted predictions of chromatin structure are correct in the majority of cases, we detected diverse "exceptions" from the conventional rules. We found a profound paucity of chromatin modifications in a major fraction of closed chromatin, and identified a number of loci where chromatin configuration is opposite to that expected from modification and gene expression patterns. Further, we observed that chromatin of large introns tends to be closed even when the genes are expressed, and that a significant proportion of active genes including their promoters are located in closed chromatin. These findings reveal limitations of the existing predictive models, indicate novel mechanisms of epigenetic regulation, and provide important insights into genome organization and function.

  6. Interaction of a common painkiller piroxicam and copper-piroxicam with chromatin causes structural alterations accompanied by modulation at the epigenomic/genomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sathi; Sanyal, Sulagna; Chakraborty, Payal; Das, Chandrima; Sarkar, Munna

    2017-08-01

    NSAIDs are the most common class of painkillers and anti-inflammatory agents. They also show other functions like chemoprevention and chemosuppression for which they act at the protein but not at the genome level since they are mostly anions at physiological pH, which prohibit their approach to the poly-anionic DNA. Complexing the drugs with bioactive metal obliterate their negative charge and allow them to bind to the DNA, thereby, opening the possibility of genome level interaction. To test this hypothesis, we present the interaction of a traditional NSAID, Piroxicam and its copper complex with core histone and chromatin. Spectroscopy, DLS, and SEM studies were applied to see the effect of the interaction on the structure of histone/chromatin. This was coupled with MTT assay, immunoblot analysis, confocal microscopy, micro array analysis and qRT-PCR. The interaction of Piroxicam and its copper complex with histone/chromatin results in structural alterations. Such structural alterations can have different biological manifestations, but to test our hypothesis, we have focused only on the accompanied modulations at the epigenomic/genomic level. The complex, showed alteration of key epigenetic signatures implicated in transcription in the global context, although Piroxicam caused no significant changes. We have correlated such alterations caused by the complex with the changes in global gene expression and validated the candidate gene expression alterations. Our results provide the proof of concept that DNA binding ability of the copper complexes of a traditional NSAID, opens up the possibility of modulations at the epigenomic/genomic level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA-repair, chromosome alterations and chromatin structure under environmental pollutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, H.

    1988-06-01

    54 abstracts, 20 of which are within the INIS scope, are presented. The papers are dealing with the influence of some chemicals, environmental pollutants as well as drugs, on the process of DNA repair after ionizing irradiation. Some advanced techniques of detecting genotoxic properties and some papers on the influence of DNA repair on cell differentiation were presented. Genetic changes in man, animals and plants as a consequence of the Chernobylsk accident were described

  8. Chromatin Dynamics of the mouse β-globin locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); E. de Boer (Ernie); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLately it has become more clear that (subtle) changes in 3D organization of chromatin can either trigger transcription or silence genes or gene clusters. It has also been postulated that due to changes in chromatin structure, a change in chromatin accessibility of transcription factors

  9. The Locus Control Region Is Necessary for Gene Expression in the Human β-Globin Locus but Not the Maintenance of an Open Chromatin Structure in Erythroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reik, Andreas; Telling, Agnes; Zitnik, Galynn; Cimbora, Daniel; Epner, Elliot; Groudine, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Studies in many systems have led to the model that the human β-globin locus control region (LCR) regulates the transcription, chromatin structure, and replication properties of the β-globin locus. However the precise mechanisms of this regulation are unknown. We have developed strategies to use homologous recombination in a tissue culture system to examine how the LCR regulates the locus in its natural chromosomal environment. Our results show that when the functional components of the LCR, as defined by transfection and transgenic studies, are deleted from the endogenous β-globin locus in an erythroid background, transcription of all β-globin genes is abolished in every cell. However, formation of the remaining hypersensitive site(s) of the LCR and the presence of a DNase I-sensitive structure of the β-globin locus are not affected by the deletion. In contrast, deletion of 5′HS5 of the LCR, which has been suggested to serve as an insulator, has only a minor effect on β-globin transcription and does not influence the chromatin structure of the locus. These results show that the LCR as currently defined is not necessary to keep the locus in an “open” conformation in erythroid cells and that even in an erythroid environment an open locus is not sufficient to permit transcription of the β-like globin genes. PMID:9742116

  10. H2B ubiquitylation is part of chromatin architecture that marks exon-intron structure in budding yeast

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shieh, Grace S.

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background The packaging of DNA into chromatin regulates transcription from initiation through 3\\' end processing. One aspect of transcription in which chromatin plays a poorly understood role is the co-transcriptional splicing of pre-mRNA. Results Here we provide evidence that H2B monoubiquitylation (H2BK123ub1) marks introns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genome-wide map of H2BK123ub1 in this organism reveals that this modification is enriched in coding regions and that its levels peak at the transcribed regions of two characteristic subgroups of genes. First, long genes are more likely to have higher levels of H2BK123ub1, correlating with the postulated role of this modification in preventing cryptic transcription initiation in ORFs. Second, genes that are highly transcribed also have high levels of H2BK123ub1, including the ribosomal protein genes, which comprise the majority of intron-containing genes in yeast. H2BK123ub1 is also a feature of introns in the yeast genome, and the disruption of this modification alters the intragenic distribution of H3 trimethylation on lysine 36 (H3K36me3), which functionally correlates with alternative RNA splicing in humans. In addition, the deletion of genes encoding the U2 snRNP subunits, Lea1 or Msl1, in combination with an htb-K123R mutation, leads to synthetic lethality. Conclusion These data suggest that H2BK123ub1 facilitates cross talk between chromatin and pre-mRNA splicing by modulating the distribution of intronic and exonic histone modifications.

  11. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  12. Concrete structures under projectile impact

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Qin

    2017-01-01

    In this book, the authors present their theoretical, experimental and numerical investigations into concrete structures subjected to projectile and aircraft impacts in recent years. Innovative approaches to analyze the rigid, mass abrasive and eroding projectile penetration and perforation are proposed. Damage and failure analyses of nuclear power plant containments impacted by large commercial aircrafts are numerically and experimentally analyzed. Ultra-high performance concrete materials and structures against the projectile impact are developed and their capacities of resisting projectile impact are evaluated. This book is written for the researchers, engineers and graduate students in the fields of protective structures and terminal ballistics.

  13. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Längst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development.

  14. The physics of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Schiessel, Helmut

    2003-01-01

    Recent progress has been made in the understanding of the physical properties of chromatin -- the dense complex of DNA and histone proteins that occupies the nuclei of plant and animal cells. Here I will focus on the two lowest levels of the hierarchy of DNA folding into the chromatin complex: (i) the nucleosome, the chromatin repeating unit consisting of a globular aggregate of eight histone proteins with the DNA wrapped around: its overcharging, the DNA unwrapping transition, the ''sliding'...

  15. SUMO and Chromatin Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotton, David; Pemberton, Lucy F; Merrill-Schools, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Many of the known SUMO substrates are nuclear proteins, which regulate gene expression and chromatin dynamics. Sumoylation, in general, appears to correlate with decreased transcriptional activity, and in many cases modulation of the chromatin template is implicated. Sumoylation of the core histones is associated with transcriptional silencing, and transcription factor sumoylation can decrease gene expression by promoting recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes. Additionally, sumoylation of transcriptional corepressors and chromatin remodeling enzymes can influence interactions with other transcriptional regulators, and alter their enzymatic activity. In some cases, proteins that are components of transcriptional corepressor complexes have been shown to be SUMO E3 ligases, further emphasizing the integration of sumoylation with the regulation of chromatin remodeling. Despite the evidence suggesting that sumoylation is primarily repressive for access to chromatin, recent analyses suggest that protein sumoylation on the chromatin template may play important roles at highly expressed genes. Elucidating the dynamic interplay of sumoylation with other post-translational modifications of histones and chromatin associated proteins will be key to fully understanding the regulation of access to the chromatin template.

  16. Epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodeling in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Somi; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2017-01-13

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of memory formation and maintenance has been a major goal in the field of neuroscience. Memory formation and maintenance are tightly controlled complex processes. Among the various processes occurring at different levels, gene expression regulation is especially crucial for proper memory processing, as some genes need to be activated while some genes must be suppressed. Epigenetic regulation of the genome involves processes such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational modifications. These processes edit genomic properties or the interactions between the genome and histone cores. They then induce structural changes in the chromatin and lead to transcriptional changes of different genes. Recent studies have focused on the concept of chromatin remodeling, which consists of 3D structural changes in chromatin in relation to gene regulation, and is an important process in learning and memory. In this review, we will introduce three major epigenetic processes involved in memory regulation: DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation. We will also discuss general mechanisms of long-term memory storage and relate the epigenetic control of learning and memory to chromatin remodeling. Finally, we will discuss how epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to the pathologies of neurological disorders and cause memory-related symptoms.

  17. Primary structure of histone H2A from nucleated erythrocyte of the marine worm Sipunculus nudus. Presence of two forms of H2A in the sipunculid chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmiecik, D; Couppez, M; Belaiche, D; Sautiere, P

    1983-09-01

    The complete amino acid sequence (123 residues) of histone H2A from erythrocytes of the marine worm Sipunculus nudus, has been established from data provided by automated sequence analysis of large fragments generated by V8 staphylococcal protease digestion of histone H2A and by limited hydrolysis of the protein with alpha-chymotrypsin and from structural studies of tryptic peptides of the protein. By comparison with calf homologous histone, the sipunculid histone H2A shows 6 deletions and 13 substitutions. Six of the substitutions are non-conservative. Most of the evolutionary changes are mainly observed in the basic amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal regions of the molecule, which are the primary DNA-binding sites. Few conservative point changes are observed in the central region (residues 18-118) which interacts strongly with histone H2B to form the dimer H2A-H2B. 60% of the H2A molecules were found phosphorylated on the amino-terminal residue, N-acetyl-serine. The high content of phosphorylated histone H2A in the sipunculid erythrocyte chromatin could probably be related to smaller repeat length (177 +/- 5 base pairs) of nucleosomal DNA and to nuclear inactivation and chromatin condensation.

  18. Extracellular Matrix, Nuclear and Chromatin Structure and GeneExpression in Normal Tissues and Malignant Tumors: A Work inProgress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Virginia A.; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-08-01

    Almost three decades ago, we presented a model where theextracellular matrix (ECM) was postulated to influence gene expressionand tissue-specificity through the action of ECM receptors and thecytoskeleton. This hypothesis implied that ECM molecules could signal tothe nucleus and that the unit of function in higher organisms was not thecell alone, but the cell plus its microenvironment. We now know that ECMinvokes changes in tissue and organ architecture and that tissue, cell,nuclear, and chromatin structure are changed profoundly as a result ofand during malignant progression. Whereas some evidence has beengenerated for a link between ECM-induced alterations in tissuearchitecture and changes in both nuclear and chromatin organization, themanner by which these changes actively induce or repress gene expressionin normal and malignant cells is a topic in need of further attention.Here, we will discuss some key findings that may provide insights intomechanisms through which ECM could influence gene transcription and howtumor cells acquire the ability to overcome these levels ofcontrol.

  19. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure; Etude des cassures de l'ADN et des mecanismes de reparation dans les sequences telomeriques interstitielles: Influence de la structure chromatinienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-15

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  20. The interplay among chromatin dynamics, cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms modulates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Federico; Giannattasio, Michele; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Plevani, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    Cells are continuously under the assault of endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress that challenges the integrity of DNA. To cope with such a formidable task cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms, known as checkpoints, and a variety of DNA repair systems responding to different types of DNA lesions. These lesions occur in the context of the chromatin structure and, as expected for all DNA transactions, the cellular response to DNA damage is going to be influenced by the chromatin enviroment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies implicating chromatin remodelling factors and histone modifications in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and in checkpoint activation in response to UV lesions.

  1. Chromatin dynamics coupled to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Dori; Sendra, Ramon; Muñoz, Purificación

    2009-01-01

    In order to protect and preserve the integrity of the genome, eukaryotic cells have developed accurate DNA repair pathways involving a coordinated network of DNA repair and epigenetic factors. The DNA damage response has to proceed in the context of chromatin, a packaged and compact structure that is flexible enough to regulate the accession of the DNA repair machinery to DNA-damaged sites. Chromatin modifications and ATP-remodeling activities are both necessary to ensure efficient DNA repair. Here we review the current progress of research into the importance of chromatin modifications and the ATP-remodeling complex to the DNA damage response, with respect to the sensing and signaling of DNA lesions, DNA repair and the processes that restore chromatin structure.

  2. The Multifaceted Contributions of Chromatin to HIV-1 Integration, Transcription, and Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crignis, E; Mahmoudi, T

    2017-01-01

    The capacity of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) to establish latent infections constitutes a major barrier to the development of a cure for HIV-1. In latent infection, replication competent HIV-1 provirus is integrated within the host genome but remains silent, masking the infected cells from the activity of the host immune response. Despite the progress in elucidating the molecular players that regulate HIV-1 gene expression, the mechanisms driving the establishment and maintenance of latency are still not fully understood. Transcription from the HIV-1 genome occurs in the context of chromatin and is subjected to the same regulatory mechanisms that drive cellular gene expression. Much like in eukaryotic genes, the nucleosomal landscape of the HIV-1 promoter and its position within genomic chromatin are determinants of its transcriptional activity. Understanding the multilayered chromatin-mediated mechanisms that underpin HIV-1 integration and expression is of utmost importance for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the pool of latently infected cells. In this review, we discuss the impact of chromatin structure on viral integration, transcriptional regulation and latency, and the host factors that influence HIV-1 replication by regulating chromatin organization. Finally, we describe therapeutic strategies under development to target the chromatin-HIV-1 interplay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  4. Activation of the alpha-globin gene expression correlates with dramatic upregulation of nearby non-globin genes and changes in local and large-scale chromatin spatial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Galitsyna, Aleksandra A; Flyamer, Ilya M; Golov, Arkadiy K; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Imakaev, Maxim V; Abdennur, Nezar A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2017-07-11

    In homeotherms, the alpha-globin gene clusters are located within permanently open genome regions enriched in housekeeping genes. Terminal erythroid differentiation results in dramatic upregulation of alpha-globin genes making their expression comparable to the rRNA transcriptional output. Little is known about the influence of the erythroid-specific alpha-globin gene transcription outburst on adjacent, widely expressed genes and large-scale chromatin organization. Here, we have analyzed the total transcription output, the overall chromatin contact profile, and CTCF binding within the 2.7 Mb segment of chicken chromosome 14 harboring the alpha-globin gene cluster in cultured lymphoid cells and cultured erythroid cells before and after induction of terminal erythroid differentiation. We found that, similarly to mammalian genome, the chicken genomes is organized in TADs and compartments. Full activation of the alpha-globin gene transcription in differentiated erythroid cells is correlated with upregulation of several adjacent housekeeping genes and the emergence of abundant intergenic transcription. An extended chromosome region encompassing the alpha-globin cluster becomes significantly decompacted in differentiated erythroid cells, and depleted in CTCF binding and CTCF-anchored chromatin loops, while the sub-TAD harboring alpha-globin gene cluster and the upstream major regulatory element (MRE) becomes highly enriched with chromatin interactions as compared to lymphoid and proliferating erythroid cells. The alpha-globin gene domain and the neighboring loci reside within the A-like chromatin compartment in both lymphoid and erythroid cells and become further segregated from the upstream gene desert upon terminal erythroid differentiation. Our findings demonstrate that the effects of tissue-specific transcription activation are not restricted to the host genomic locus but affect the overall chromatin structure and transcriptional output of the encompassing

  5. Formaldehyde Crosslinking: A Tool for the Study of Chromatin Complexes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A.; Frey, Brian L.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Auble, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde has been used for decades to probe macromolecular structure and function and to trap complexes, cells, and tissues for further analysis. Formaldehyde crosslinking is routinely employed for detection and quantification of protein-DNA interactions, interactions between chromatin proteins, and interactions between distal segments of the chromatin fiber. Despite widespread use and a rich biochemical literature, important aspects of formaldehyde behavior in cells have not been well described. Here, we highlight features of formaldehyde chemistry relevant to its use in analyses of chromatin complexes, focusing on how its properties may influence studies of chromatin structure and function. PMID:26354429

  6. Formaldehyde crosslinking: a tool for the study of chromatin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A; Frey, Brian L; Smith, Lloyd M; Auble, David T

    2015-10-30

    Formaldehyde has been used for decades to probe macromolecular structure and function and to trap complexes, cells, and tissues for further analysis. Formaldehyde crosslinking is routinely employed for detection and quantification of protein-DNA interactions, interactions between chromatin proteins, and interactions between distal segments of the chromatin fiber. Despite widespread use and a rich biochemical literature, important aspects of formaldehyde behavior in cells have not been well described. Here, we highlight features of formaldehyde chemistry relevant to its use in analyses of chromatin complexes, focusing on how its properties may influence studies of chromatin structure and function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Role of Chromatin-Associated Proteins in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Minucci, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    The organization of the chromatin structure is essential for maintaining cell-type-specific gene expression and therefore for cell identity. This structure is highly dynamic and is regulated by a large number of chromatin-associated proteins that are required for normal development...... and differentiation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been found with high frequency in genes coding for chromatin-associated proteins in cancer, and several of these are required for cancer maintenance. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the role of chromatin-associated proteins...

  8. Cell- and stage-specific chromatin structure across the Complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) promoter coincide with CBF1 and C/EBP-beta binding in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Mark N; Fenwick, Emily; Karimi, Mahdad; Abraham, Lawrence J; Ulgiati, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Stringent developmental transcription requires multiple transcription factor (TF) binding sites, cell-specific expression of signaling molecules, TFs and co-regulators and appropriate chromatin structure. During B-lymphopoiesis, human Complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) is detected on immature and mature B cells but not on B cell precursors and plasma cells. We examined cell- and stage-specific human CR2 gene regulation using cell lines modeling B-lymphopoiesis. Chromatin accessibility assays revealed a region between -409 and -262 with enhanced accessibility in mature B cells and pre-B cells, compared to either non-lymphoid or plasma cell-types, however, accessibility near the transcription start site (TSS) was elevated only in CR2-expressing B cells. A correlation between histone acetylation and CR2 expression was observed, while histone H3K4 dimethylation was enriched near the TSS in both CR2-expressing B cells and non-expressing pre-B cells. Candidate sites within the CR2 promoter were identified which could regulate chromatin, including a matrix attachment region associated with CDP, SATB1/BRIGHT and CEBP-beta sites as well as two CBF1 sites. ChIP assays verified that both CBF1 and C/EBP-beta bind the CR2 promoter in B cells raising the possibility that these factors facilitate or respond to alterations in chromatin structure to control the timing and/or level of CR2 transcription.

  9. Single and combinatorial chromatin coupling events underlies the function of transcript factor krüppel-like factor 11 in the regulation of gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) are a group of master regulators of gene expression conserved from flies to human. However, scant information is available on either the mechanisms or functional impact of the coupling of KLF proteins to chromatin remodeling machines, a deterministic step in transcriptional regulation. Results and discussion In the current study, we use genome-wide analyses of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-on-Chip) and Affymetrix-based expression profiling to gain insight into how KLF11, a human transcription factor involved in tumor suppression and metabolic diseases, works by coupling to three co-factor groups: the Sin3-histone deacetylase system, WD40-domain containing proteins, and the HP1-histone methyltransferase system. Our results reveal that KLF11 regulates distinct gene networks involved in metabolism and growth by using single or combinatorial coupling events. Conclusion This study, the first of its type for any KLF protein, reveals that interactions with multiple chromatin systems are required for the full gene regulatory function of these proteins. PMID:24885560

  10. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  11. Colloidal Aggregate Structure under Shear by USANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; van Dyk, Antony K.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.; Nakatani, Alan I.

    2015-03-01

    Paints are complex formulations of polymeric binders, inorganic pigments, dispersants, surfactants, colorants, rheology modifiers, and other additives. A commercially successful paint exhibits a desired viscosity profile over a wide shear rate range from 10-5 s-1 for settling to >104 s-1 for rolling, and spray applications. Understanding paint formulation structure is critical as it governs the paint viscosity profile. However, probing paint formulation structure under shear is a challenging task due to the formulation complexity containing structures with different hierarchical length scales and their alterations under the influence of an external flow field. In this work mesoscale structures of paint formulations under shear are investigated using Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (rheo-USANS). Contrast match conditions were utilized to independently probe the structure of latex binder particle aggregates and the TiO2 pigment particle aggregates. Rheo-USANS data revealed that the aggregates are fractal in nature and their self-similarity dimensions and correlations lengths depend on the chemistry of the binder particles, the type of rheology modifier present and the shear stress imposed upon the formulation. These results can be explained in the framework of diffusion and reaction limited transient aggregates structure evolution under simple shear.

  12. Chromatin organization regulated by EZH2-mediated H3K27me3 is required for OPN-induced migration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Ju, Yang; Morita, Yasuyuki; Song, Guanbin

    2018-03-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a chemokine-like extracellular matrix-associated protein involved in the migration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). An increasing number of studies have found that chromatin organization may affect cellular migration. However, whether OPN regulates chromatin organization is not understood, nor are the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the link between chromatin organization and BMSC migration and demonstrated that OPN-mediated BMSC migration leads to elevated levels of heterochromatin marker histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) through the methyltransferase EZH2. The expression of EZH2 reorganizes the chromatin structure of BMSCs. Pharmacological inhibition or depletion of EZH2 blocks BMSC migration. Moreover, using an atomic force microscope (AFM), we found that chromatin decondensation alters the mechanical properties of the nucleus. In addition, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signals represses OPN-promoted chromatin condensation and cell migration. Thus, our results identify a mechanism by which ERK1/2 signalling drives specific chromatin modifications in BMSCs, which alters chromatin organization and thereby enables OPN-mediated BMSC migration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chromatin proteins: key responders to stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen T Smith

    Full Text Available Environments can be ever-changing and stresses are commonplace. In order for organisms to survive, they need to be able to respond to change and adapt to new conditions. Fortunately, many organisms have systems in place that enable dynamic adaptation to immediate stresses and changes within the environment. Much of this cellular response is coordinated by modulating the structure and accessibility of the genome. In eukaryotic cells, the genome is packaged and rolled up by histone proteins to create a series of DNA/histone core structures known as nucleosomes; these are further condensed into chromatin. The degree and nature of the condensation can in turn determine which genes are transcribed. Histones can be modified chemically by a large number of proteins that are thereby responsible for dynamic changes in gene expression. In this Primer we discuss findings from a study published in this issue of PLoS Biology by Weiner et al. that highlight how chromatin structure and chromatin binding proteins alter transcription in response to environmental changes and stresses. Their study reveals the importance of chromatin in mediating the speed and amplitude of stress responses in cells and suggests that chromatin is a critically important component of the cellular response to stress.

  14. Water Demand Under Alternative Price Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sheila Olmstead; W. Michael Hanemann; Robert N. Stavins

    2007-01-01

    We estimate the price elasticity of water demand with household-level data, structurally modeling the piecewise-linear budget constraints imposed by increasing-block pricing. We develop a mathematical expression for the unconditional price elasticity of demand under increasing-block prices and compare conditional and unconditional elasticities analytically and empirically. We test the hypothesis that price elasticity may depend on price structure, beyond technical differences in elasticity co...

  15. Efficient Bayesian inference under the structured coalescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Timothy G; Kühnert, Denise; Popinga, Alex; Welch, David; Drummond, Alexei J

    2014-08-15

    Population structure significantly affects evolutionary dynamics. Such structure may be due to spatial segregation, but may also reflect any other gene-flow-limiting aspect of a model. In combination with the structured coalescent, this fact can be used to inform phylogenetic tree reconstruction, as well as to infer parameters such as migration rates and subpopulation sizes from annotated sequence data. However, conducting Bayesian inference under the structured coalescent is impeded by the difficulty of constructing Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling algorithms (samplers) capable of efficiently exploring the state space. In this article, we present a new MCMC sampler capable of sampling from posterior distributions over structured trees: timed phylogenetic trees in which lineages are associated with the distinct subpopulation in which they lie. The sampler includes a set of MCMC proposal functions that offer significant mixing improvements over a previously published method. Furthermore, its implementation as a BEAST 2 package ensures maximum flexibility with respect to model and prior specification. We demonstrate the usefulness of this new sampler by using it to infer migration rates and effective population sizes of H3N2 influenza between New Zealand, New York and Hong Kong from publicly available hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences under the structured coalescent. The sampler has been implemented as a publicly available BEAST 2 package that is distributed under version 3 of the GNU General Public License at http://compevol.github.io/MultiTypeTree. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Chromatin dynamics during DSB repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Gabrielová, Barbora; Ondřej, Vladan; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1773, č. 10 (2007), s. 1534-1545 ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P349; GA ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1065203; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05OC084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chromatin structure * double- strand breaks (DSB) * DNA repair Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.374, year: 2007

  17. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  18. Chromatin replication and histone dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    organization into chromatin. We reveal how specialized replication-coupled mechanisms rapidly assemble newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, while the complete restoration of chromatin organization including histone marks is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. Because failure...

  19. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering study of the structure organization of the chromatin in biological cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iashina, E.G.; Bouwman, W.G.; Duif, C.P.; Filatov, M.V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    Spin-echo small-angle scattering (SESANS) technique is a method to measure the structure of materials from nano- to micrmeter length scales. This method could be important for studying the packaging of DNA in the eukaryotic cell. We measured the SESANS function from chicken erythrocyte nuclei

  20. Neutron-scattering studies of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.; Baldwin, J.P.; Carpenter, B.G.; Hjelm, R.P.; Hancock, R.; Ibel, K.

    1976-01-01

    It is clear that a knowledge of the basic molecular structure of chromatin is a prerequisite for any progress toward an understanding of chromosome organization. With a two-component system, protein and nucleic acid, neutrons have a particularly powerful application to studies of the spatial arrangements of these components because of the ability, by contrast matching with H 2 O-D 2 O mixtures, to obtain neutron-scattering data on the individual components. With this approach it has been shown that the neutron diffraction of chromatin is consistent with a ''beads on a string'' model in which the bead consists of a protein core with DNA coiled on the outside. However, because chromatin is a gel and gives limited structural data, confirmation of such a model requires extension of the neutron studies by deuteration of specific chromatin components and the isolation of chromatin subunits. Although these studies are not complete, the neutron results so far obtained support the subunit model described above

  1. Analysis of Chromatin Organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: chromatin, nucleases, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, melting point, gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide, autoradiography, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Sanger sequencing, restriction endonucleases, exonucleases, linker DNA, chloroform extraction, nucleosomes,…

  2. Where splicing joins chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2011), s. 182-188 ISSN 1949-1034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0424; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromatin * exon * alternative splicing * transcription * snRNP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering study of the structure organization of the chromatin in biological cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iashina, E G; Grigoriev, S V; Bouwman, W G; Duif, C P; Filatov, M V

    2017-01-01

    Spin-echo small-angle scattering (SESANS) technique is a method to measure the structure of materials from nano- to micrometer length scales. This method could be important for studying the packaging of DNA in the eukaryotic cell. We measured the SESANS function from chicken erythrocyte nuclei which is well fitted by the exponential function G ( z ) = exp(− z / ξ ), where ξ is the correlation length of a nucleus (in experimental data ξ = 3, 3 μ m). The exponential decay of G ( z ) corresponds to the logarithmic pair correlation function γ ( r ) = ln( ξ / r ). As the sensitivity of the SESANS signal depends on the neutron wavelength, we propose the SESANS setup with the changeable wavelength in the range from 2 to 12 Å. Such option allows one to study in great detail the internal structure of the biological cell in the length scale from 10 −2 μ m to 10 μ m. (paper)

  4. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering study of the structure organization of the chromatin in biological cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iashina, E. G.; Bouwman, W. G.; Duif, C. P.; Filatov, M. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    Spin-echo small-angle scattering (SESANS) technique is a method to measure the structure of materials from nano- to micrmeter length scales. This method could be important for studying the packaging of DNA in the eukaryotic cell. We measured the SESANS function from chicken erythrocyte nuclei which is well fitted by the exponential function G(z) = exp(-z/ξ), where ξ is the correlation length of a nucleus (in experimental data ξ = 3, 3 μm). The exponential decay of G(z) corresponds to the logarithmic pair correlation function γ(r) = ln(ξ/r). As the sensitivity of the SESANS signal depends on the neutron wavelength, we propose the SESANS setup with the changeable wavelength in the range from 2 to 12 Å. Such option allows one to study in great detail the internal structure of the biological cell in the length scale from 10-2 μm to 10 μm.

  5. Nucleosome fragility reveals novel functional states of chromatin and poises genes for activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yuanxin; Yao, Jianhui; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; He, Xiangwei

    2011-05-01

    The structural complexity of nucleosomes underlies their functional versatility. Here we report a new type of complexity-nucleosome fragility, manifested as high sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease, in contrast to the common presumption that nucleosomes are similar in resistance to MNase digestion. Using differential MNase digestion of chromatin and high-throughput sequencing, we have identified a special group of nucleosomes termed "fragile nucleosomes" throughout the yeast genome, nearly 1000 of which were at previously determined "nucleosome-free" loci. Nucleosome fragility is broadly implicated in multiple chromatin processes, including transcription, translocation, and replication, in correspondence to specific physiological states of cells. In the environmental-stress-response genes, the presence of fragile nucleosomes prior to the occurrence of environmental changes suggests that nucleosome fragility poises genes for swift up-regulation in response to the environmental changes. We propose that nucleosome fragility underscores distinct functional statuses of the chromatin and provides a new dimension for portraying the landscape of genome organization.

  6. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  7. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of In Vitro Assembled Chromatin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Fedisch, Andreas; Schilcher, Pierre; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The structure of chromatin is critical for many aspects of cellular physiology and is considered to be the primary medium to store epigenetic information. It is defined by the histone molecules that constitute the nucleosome, the positioning of the nucleosomes along the DNA and the non-histone proteins that associate with it. These factors help to establish and maintain a largely DNA sequence-independent but surprisingly stable structure. Chromatin is extensively disassembled and reassembled during DNA replication, repair, recombination or transcription in order to allow the necessary factors to gain access to their substrate. Despite such constant interference with chromatin structure, the epigenetic information is generally well maintained. Surprisingly, the mechanisms that coordinate chromatin assembly and ensure proper assembly are not particularly well understood. Here, we use label free quantitative mass spectrometry to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The use of a data independent acquisition method for proteome wide quantitation allows a time resolved comparison of in vitro chromatin assembly. A comparison of our in vitro data with proteomic studies of replicative chromatin assembly in vivo reveals an extensive overlap showing that the in vitro system can be used for investigating the kinetics of chromatin assembly in a proteome-wide manner. PMID:26811354

  8. Analysis of Chromatin Dynamics during Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Craig J.; Ward, James M.; Crusselle-Davis, Valerie J.; Kissling, Grace E.; Phadke, Dhiral; Shah, Ruchir R.

    2012-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors initiate a genetic program tightly regulated by the chromatin environment of the responsive regions. Using the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a model factor for transcriptional initiation, we classified chromatin structure through formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE). We looked at dynamic changes in FAIRE signals during GR activation specifically at regions of receptor interaction. We found a distribution of GR-responsive regions with diverse responses to activation and chromatin modulation. The majority of GR binding regions demonstrate increases in FAIRE signal in response to ligand. However, the majority GR-responsive regions shared a similar FAIRE signal in the basal chromatin state, suggesting a common chromatin structure for GR recruitment. Supporting this notion, global FAIRE sequencing (seq) data indicated an enrichment of signal surrounding the GR binding site prior to activation. Brg-1 knockdown showed response element-specific effects of ATPase-dependent chromatin remodeling. FAIRE induction was universally decreased by Brg-1 depletion, but to varying degrees in a target specific manner. Taken together, these data suggest classes of nuclear receptor response regions that react to activation through different chromatin regulatory events and identify a chromatin structure that classifies the majority of response elements tested. PMID:22451486

  9. The dynamics of chromatin remodeling at promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Jane

    2005-07-22

    The nucleosome, the structural unit of chromatin, is known to play a central role in regulating gene transcription from promoters. The last seven years have spawned a vast amount of data on the enzymes that remodel and modify nucleosomes and the rules governing how transcription factors interact with the epigenetic code on histones. Yet despite this effort, there has yet to emerge a unifying mechanism by which nucleosomes are remodeled during gene regulation. Recent advances have allowed nucleosome dynamics on promoters to be studied in real time, dramatically changing how we think about gene regulation on chromatin templates.

  10. Autism genes keep turning up chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalle, Janine M

    2013-06-19

    Autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex genetic disorders collectively characterized by impaired social interactions and language as well as repetitive and restrictive behaviors. Of the hundreds of genes implicated in ASD, those encoding proteins acting at neuronal synapses have been most characterized by candidate gene studies. However, recent unbiased genome-wide analyses have turned up a multitude of novel candidate genes encoding nuclear factors implicated in chromatin remodeling, histone demethylation, histone variants, and the recognition of DNA methylation. Furthermore, the chromatin landscape of the human genome has been shown to influence the location of de novo mutations observed in ASD as well as the landscape of DNA methylation underlying neurodevelopmental and synaptic processes. Understanding the interactions of nuclear chromatin proteins and DNA with signal transduction pathways and environmental influences in the developing brain will be critical to understanding the relevance of these ASD candidate genes and continued uncovering of the "roots" of autism etiology.

  11. Thermomechanics of composite structures under high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrienko, Yu I

    2016-01-01

    This pioneering book presents new models for the thermomechanical behavior of composite materials and structures taking into account internal physico-chemical transformations such as thermodecomposition, sublimation and melting at high temperatures (up to 3000 K). It is of great importance for the design of new thermostable materials and for the investigation of reliability and fire safety of composite structures. It also supports the investigation of interaction of composites with laser irradiation and the design of heat-shield systems. Structural methods are presented for calculating the effective mechanical and thermal properties of matrices, fibres and unidirectional, reinforced by dispersed particles and textile composites, in terms of properties of their constituent phases. Useful calculation methods are developed for characteristics such as the rate of thermomechanical erosion of composites under high-speed flow and the heat deformation of composites with account of chemical shrinkage. The author expan...

  12. Fatigue in Steel Structures under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning

    1999-01-01

    test results. Both the fracture mechanics analysis and the fatigue test results indicate that Miner's rule, which is normally used in the design against fatigue in steel structures, may give results, which are unconservative, and that the validity of the results obtained from Miner's rule will depend......Fatigue damage accumulation in steel structures under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series have been carried through on various...... types of welded plate test specimens and full-scale offshore tubular joints. The materials that have been used are either conventional structural steel with a yield stress of ~ 360-410 MPa or high-strength steel with a yield stress of ~ 810-1010 MPa. The fatigue tests and the fracture mechanics analyses...

  13. A model of photon cell killing based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA damage in higher order chromatin structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Herr

    Full Text Available We present a new approach to model dose rate effects on cell killing after photon radiation based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs within higher order chromatin structures of approximately 1-2 Mbp size, so called giant loops. The main concept of this approach consists of a distinction of two classes of lesions, isolated and clustered DSBs, characterized by the number of double strand breaks induced in a giant loop. We assume a low lethality and fast component of repair for isolated DSBs and a high lethality and slow component of repair for clustered DSBs. With appropriate rates, the temporal transition between the different lesion classes is expressed in terms of five differential equations. These allow formulating the dynamics involved in the competition of damage induction and repair for arbitrary dose rates and fractionation schemes. Final cell survival probabilities are computable with a cell line specific set of three parameters: The lethality for isolated DSBs, the lethality for clustered DSBs and the half-life time of isolated DSBs. By comparison with larger sets of published experimental data it is demonstrated that the model describes the cell line dependent response to treatments using either continuous irradiation at a constant dose rate or to split dose irradiation well. Furthermore, an analytic investigation of the formulation concerning single fraction treatments with constant dose rates in the limiting cases of extremely high or low dose rates is presented. The approach is consistent with the Linear-Quadratic model extended by the Lea-Catcheside factor up to the second moment in dose. Finally, it is shown that the model correctly predicts empirical findings about the dose rate dependence of incidence probabilities for deterministic radiation effects like pneumonitis and the bone marrow syndrome. These findings further support the general concepts on which the approach is based.

  14. Integrative modeling reveals the principles of multi-scale chromatin boundary formation in human nuclear organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Benjamin L; Aitken, Stuart; Semple, Colin A

    2015-05-27

    Interphase chromosomes adopt a hierarchical structure, and recent data have characterized their chromatin organization at very different scales, from sub-genic regions associated with DNA-binding proteins at the order of tens or hundreds of bases, through larger regions with active or repressed chromatin states, up to multi-megabase-scale domains associated with nuclear positioning, replication timing and other qualities. However, we have lacked detailed, quantitative models to understand the interactions between these different strata. Here we collate large collections of matched locus-level chromatin features and Hi-C interaction data, representing higher-order organization, across three human cell types. We use quantitative modeling approaches to assess whether locus-level features are sufficient to explain higher-order structure, and identify the most influential underlying features. We identify structurally variable domains between cell types and examine the underlying features to discover a general association with cell-type-specific enhancer activity. We also identify the most prominent features marking the boundaries of two types of higher-order domains at different scales: topologically associating domains and nuclear compartments. We find parallel enrichments of particular chromatin features for both types, including features associated with active promoters and the architectural proteins CTCF and YY1. We show that integrative modeling of large chromatin dataset collections using random forests can generate useful insights into chromosome structure. The models produced recapitulate known biological features of the cell types involved, allow exploration of the antecedents of higher-order structures and generate testable hypotheses for further experimental studies.

  15. STABILITY OF UNDERWATER STRUCTURE UNDER WAVE ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paotonan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Geotube is, among others, a type of coastal structure that is increasingly accepted for coastal protection especially underwater breakwater. Besides its relatively low cost, it has other advantages such as flexibility, ease of construction and the fact that it can be filled with local sand material. Similar to all other coastal structures, it should also be stable under wave attack. A simple theoretical approach based on linear wave was adopted to estimate the stability of such structure. The theoretical solution was then compared with an experimental study. The experimental study was conducted at the Hydraulics and Hydrology Laboratory of Universitas Gadjah Mada. However, instead of a real geotube, PVC pipe was used where the weight of the PVC was varied by adjusting the volume of sand in the pipe. The result indicated that the agreement between the theoretical solution and the experiment was encouraging. The analytical solution may be utilized to predict underwater pipe stability under wave attack with certain degree of accuracy.

  16. Dietary polyphenols and chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Gian Luigi; Vastolo, Viviana; Ciccarelli, Marco; Albano, Luigi; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Ungaro, Paola

    2017-08-13

    Polyphenols are the most abundant phytochemicals in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages. Recent findings suggest that polyphenols display the ability to reverse adverse epigenetic regulation involved in pathological conditions, such as obesity, metabolic disorder, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and various forms of cancer. Epigenetics, defined as heritable changes to the transcriptome, independent from those occurring in the genome, includes DNA methylation, histone modifications, and posttranscriptional gene regulation by noncoding RNAs. Sinergistically and cooperatively, these processes regulate gene expression by changing chromatin organization and DNA accessibility. Such induced epigenetic changes can be inherited during cell division, resulting in permanent maintenance of the acquired phenotype, but they may also occur throughout an individual life-course and may ultimately influence phenotypic outcomes (health and disease risk). In the last decade, a number of studies have shown that nutrients can affect metabolic traits by altering the structure of chromatin and directly regulate both transcription and translational processes. In this context, dietary polyphenol-targeted epigenetics becomes an attractive approach for disease prevention and intervention. Here, we will review how polyphenols, including flavonoids, curcuminoids, and stilbenes, modulate the establishment and maintenance of key epigenetic marks, thereby influencing gene expression and, hence, disease risk and health.

  17. Multiple modes of chromatin remodeling by Forkhead box proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalmansingh, Avin S; Karmakar, Sudipan; Jin, Yetao; Nagaich, Akhilesh K

    2012-07-01

    Forkhead box (FOX) proteins represent a large family of transcriptional regulators unified by their DNA binding domain (DBD) known as a 'forkhead' or 'winged helix' domain. Over 40 FOX genes have been identified in the mammalian genome. FOX proteins share significant sequence similarities in the DBD which allow them to bind to a consensus DNA response element. However, their modes of action are quite diverse as they regulate gene expression by acting as pioneer factors, transcription factors, or both. This review focuses on the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling with an emphasis on three sub-classes-FOXA, FOXO, and FOXP members. FOXA proteins serve as pioneer factors to open up local chromatin structure and thereby increase accessibility of chromatin to factors regulating transcription. FOXP proteins, in contrast, function as classic transcription factors to recruit a variety of chromatin modifying enzymes to regulate gene expression. FOXO proteins represent a hybrid subclass having dual roles as pioneering factors and transcription factors. A subset of FOX proteins interacts with condensed mitotic chromatin and may function as 'bookmarking' agents to maintain transcriptional competence at specific genomic sites. The overall diversity in chromatin remodeling function by FOX proteins is related to unique structural motifs present within the DBD flanking regions that govern selective interactions with core histones and/or chromatin coregulatory proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Strength of concrete structures under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpyak, O. G.; Galyautdinov, Z. R.; Kokorin, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    The use of elastic supports is one the efficient methods of decreasing the dynamic loading. The paper describes the influence of elastic supports on the stress-strain state of steel concrete structures exposed to one-time dynamic loading resulting in failure. Oblique bending beams on elastic supports and their elastic, elastoplastic, and elastoplastic consolidation behavior are considered in this paper. For numerical calculations the developed computer program is used based on the finite element method. Research findings prove high efficiency of elastic supports under dynamic loading conditions. The most effective behavior of elastic supports is demonstrated at the elastoplastic stage. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical and experimental results.

  19. Deciphering Noncoding RNA and Chromatin Interactions: Multiplex Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag Sequencing (mChIA-PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Jocelyn; Fullwood, Melissa J

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is dynamically associated with protein factors and folded to form chromatin fibers. The 3-dimensional (3D) configuration of the chromatin will enable the distal genetic elements to come into close proximity, allowing transcriptional regulation. Noncoding RNA can mediate the 3D structure of chromatin. Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag Sequencing (ChIA-PET) is a valuable and powerful technique in molecular biology which allows the study of unbiased, genome-wide de novo chromatin interactions with paired-end tags. Here, we describe the standard version of ChIA-PET and a Multiplex ChIA-PET version.

  20. Concrete structures under impact and impulsive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plauk, G.

    1982-05-01

    This book contains papers contributed to the RILEM/CEB/IABSE/IASS-Interassociation Symposium on 'Concrete Structures under Impact and Impulsive Loading'. The essential aim of this symposium is to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on existing and current research relating to impact problems as well as to identify areas to which further research activities should be directed. The subject of the symposium is far ranging. Fifty five papers were proposed and arranged in six technical sessions, a task which sometimes posed difficulties for the Organization Committee and the Advisory Group, because some of the papers touched several topics and were difficult to integrate. However, we are confident that these minor difficulties were solved to the satisfaction of everyone involved. Each session of the symposium is devoted to a major subject area and introduced by a distinguished Introductory Reporter. The large international attendance, some 21 countries are represented, and the large number of excellent papers will certainly produce a lively discussion after each session and thus help to further close the gaps in our knowledge about the behaviour of structures and materials under impact and impulsive loading. (orig./RW)

  1. Chromatin Dynamics during Nucleotide Excision Repair: Histones on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E.

    2012-01-01

    It has been a long-standing question how DNA damage repair proceeds in a nuclear environment where DNA is packaged into chromatin. Several decades of analysis combining in vitro and in vivo studies in various model organisms ranging from yeast to human have markedly increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chromatin disorganization upon damage detection and re-assembly after repair. Here, we review the methods that have been developed over the years to delineate chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage by focusing on the well-characterized Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) pathway. We also highlight how these methods have provided key mechanistic insight into histone dynamics coupled to repair in mammals, raising new issues about the maintenance of chromatin integrity. In particular, we discuss how NER factors and central players in chromatin dynamics such as histone modifiers, nucleosome remodeling factors, and histone chaperones function to mobilize histones during repair. PMID:23109890

  2. A Method to Study the Epigenetic Chromatin States of Rare Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells; MiniChIP–Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishaupt Holger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic chromatin structure is a fundamental property of gene transcriptional regulation, and has emerged as a critical modulator of physiological processes during cellular differentiation and development. Analysis of chromatin structure using molecular biology and biochemical assays in rare somatic stem and progenitor cells is key for understanding these processes but poses a great challenge because of their reliance on millions of cells. Through the development of a miniaturized genome-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation method (miniChIP–chip, we have documented the genome-wide chromatin states of low abundant populations that comprise hematopoietic stem cells and immediate progeny residing in murine bone marrow. In this report, we describe the miniChIP methodology that can be used for increasing an understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function. Application of this method will reveal the contribution of dynamic chromatin structure in regulating the function of other somatic stem cell populations, and how this process becomes perturbed in pathological conditions. Additional file 1 Click here for file

  3. Comprehensive analysis of the chromatin landscape in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Peter V; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Schwartz, Yuri B; Minoda, Aki; Riddle, Nicole C; Ernst, Jason; Sabo, Peter J; Larschan, Erica; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Gu, Tingting; Linder-Basso, Daniela; Plachetka, Annette; Shanower, Gregory; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Luquette, Lovelace J; Xi, Ruibin; Jung, Youngsook L; Park, Richard W; Bishop, Eric P; Canfield, Theresa K; Sandstrom, Richard; Thurman, Robert E; MacAlpine, David M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Kellis, Manolis; Elgin, Sarah C R; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Karpen, Gary H; Park, Peter J

    2011-03-24

    Chromatin is composed of DNA and a variety of modified histones and non-histone proteins, which have an impact on cell differentiation, gene regulation and other key cellular processes. Here we present a genome-wide chromatin landscape for Drosophila melanogaster based on eighteen histone modifications, summarized by nine prevalent combinatorial patterns. Integrative analysis with other data (non-histone chromatin proteins, DNase I hypersensitivity, GRO-Seq reads produced by engaged polymerase, short/long RNA products) reveals discrete characteristics of chromosomes, genes, regulatory elements and other functional domains. We find that active genes display distinct chromatin signatures that are correlated with disparate gene lengths, exon patterns, regulatory functions and genomic contexts. We also demonstrate a diversity of signatures among Polycomb targets that include a subset with paused polymerase. This systematic profiling and integrative analysis of chromatin signatures provides insights into how genomic elements are regulated, and will serve as a resource for future experimental investigations of genome structure and function.

  4. Genome maintenance in the context of 4D chromatin condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sonia; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packaged in the three-dimensional nuclear space by forming loops, domains and compartments in a hierarchical manner. However, when duplicated genomes prepare for segregation, mitotic cells eliminate topologically associating domains and abandon the compartmentalized structure. Alongside chromatin architecture reorganization during the transition from interphase to mitosis, cells halt most DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. The intrinsically condensed chromatin serves as a sophisticated signaling module subjected to selective relaxation for programmed genomic activities. To understand the elaborate genome-epigenome interplay during cell cycle progression, the steady three-dimensional genome requires a time scale to form a dynamic four-dimensional and a more comprehensive portrait. In this review, we will dissect the functions of critical chromatin architectural components in constructing and maintaining an orderly packaged chromatin environment. We will also highlight the importance of the spatially-and-temporally-conscious orchestration of chromatin remodeling to ensure high-fidelity genetic transmission. PMID:27098512

  5. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  6. The chromatin regulatory code: Beyond a histone code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, A.

    2006-03-01

    In this commentary on the contribution by Arndt Benecke in this issue, I discuss why the notion of “chromatin code” introduced and elaborated in this paper is to be preferred to that of “histone code”. Speaking of a code as regards nucleosome conformation and histone tail post-translational modifications only makes sense within the chromatin fiber, where their physico-chemical features can be translated into regulatory programs at the genome level, by means of a complex, multi-level interplay with the fiber architecture and dynamics settled in the course of Evolution. In particular, this chromatin code presumably exploits allosteric transitions of the chromatin fiber. The chromatin structure dependence of its translation suggests two alternative modes of transcription initiation regulation, also proposed in the paper by A. Benecke in this issue for interpreting strikingly bimodal micro-array data.

  7. Bridging the dynamics and organization of chromatin domains by mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Soya; Nozaki, Tadasu; Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Togashi, Yuichi

    2017-07-04

    The genome is 3-dimensionally organized in the cell, and the mammalian genome DNA is partitioned into submegabase-sized chromatin domains. Genome functions are regulated within and across the domains according to their organization, whereas the chromatin itself is highly dynamic. However, the details of such dynamic organization of chromatin domains in living cells remain unclear. To unify chromatin dynamics and organization, we recently demonstrated that structural information of chromatin domains in living human cells can be extracted from analyses of the subdiffusive nucleosome movement using mathematical modeling. Our mathematical analysis suggested that as the chromatin domain becomes smaller and more compact, nucleosome movement becomes increasingly restricted. Here, we show the implication of these results for bridging the gap between chromatin dynamics and organization, and provide physical insight into chromatin domains as efficient units to conduct genome functions in the thermal noisy environment of the cell.

  8. Structural behavior of supercritical fluids under confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kanka; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    The existence of the Frenkel line in the supercritical regime of a Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid shown through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations initially and later corroborated by experiments on argon opens up possibilities of understanding the structure and dynamics of supercritical fluids in general and of the Frenkel line in particular. The location of the Frenkel line, which demarcates two distinct physical states, liquidlike and gaslike within the supercritical regime, has been established through MD simulations of the velocity autocorrelation (VACF) and radial distribution function (RDF). We, in this article, explore the changes in the structural features of supercritical LJ fluid under partial confinement using atomistic walls. The study is carried out across the Frenkel line through a series of MD simulations considering a set of thermodynamics states in the supercritical regime (P =5000 bar, 240 K ≤T ≤1500 K ) of argon well above the critical point. Confinement is partial, with atomistic walls located normal to z and extending to "infinity" along the x and y directions. In the "liquidlike" regime of the supercritical phase, particles are found to be distributed in distinct layers along the z axis with layer spacing less than one atomic diameter and the lateral RDF showing amorphous-like structure for specific spacings (packing frustration) and non-amorphous-like structure for other spacings. Increasing the rigidity of the atomistic walls is found to lead to stronger layering and increased structural order. For confinement with reflective walls, layers are found to form with one atomic diameter spacing and the lateral RDF showing close-packed structure for the smaller confinements. Translational order parameter and excess entropy assessment confirms the ordering taking place for atomistic wall and reflective wall confinements. In the "gaslike" regime of the supercritical phase, particle distribution along the spacing and the lateral RDF exhibit features

  9. Aberrant Chromatin Modification as a Mechanism of Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Hongwu

    2004-01-01

    .... However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that aberrant chromatin modification plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression...

  10. Unbiased chromatin accessibility profiling by RED-seq uncovers unique features of nucleosome variants in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Poshen B; Zhu, Lihua J; Hainer, Sarah J; McCannell, Kurtis N; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2014-12-15

    Differential accessibility of DNA to nuclear proteins underlies the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Although DNA accessibility is primarily determined by the presence or absence of nucleosomes, differences in nucleosome composition or dynamics may also regulate accessibility. Methods for mapping nucleosome positions and occupancies genome-wide (MNase-seq) have uncovered the nucleosome landscapes of many different cell types and organisms. Conversely, methods specialized for the detection of large nucleosome-free regions of chromatin (DNase-seq, FAIRE-seq) have uncovered numerous gene regulatory elements. However, these methods are less successful in measuring the accessibility of DNA sequences within nucelosome arrays. Here we probe the genome-wide accessibility of multiple cell types in an unbiased manner using restriction endonuclease digestion of chromatin coupled to deep sequencing (RED-seq). Using this method, we identified differences in chromatin accessibility between populations of cells, not only in nucleosome-depleted regions of the genome (e.g., enhancers and promoters), but also within the majority of the genome that is packaged into nucleosome arrays. Furthermore, we identified both large differences in chromatin accessibility in distinct cell lineages and subtle but significant changes during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Most significantly, using RED-seq, we identified differences in accessibility among nucleosomes harboring well-studied histone variants, and show that these differences depend on factors required for their deposition. Using an unbiased method to probe chromatin accessibility genome-wide, we uncover unique features of chromatin structure that are not observed using more widely-utilized methods. We demonstrate that different types of nucleosomes within mammalian cells exhibit different degrees of accessibility. These findings provide significant insight into the regulation of DNA accessibility.

  11. Chromatin Flavors: Chromatin composition and domain organization in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. van Bemmel (Joke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractChromatin was originally identified by W. Flemming in 1882 as not much more than the stainable substance of the cell nucleus. Flemming named this substance according to the Greek word “chroma”, meaning color. In 1911 chromatin was characterized as proteins, named histones, that

  12. Structural modifications of spinels under radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quentin, A.

    2010-12-01

    This work is devoted to the study of spinel structure materials under radiation. For that purpose, samples of polycrystalline ZnAl 2 O 4 and monocrystalline MgAl 2 O 4 were irradiated by different heavy ions with different energies. Samples of ZnAl 2 O 4 were studied par electron transmission microscopy, and by grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis. Samples of MgAl 2 O 4 were studied by optical spectroscopy. Most of the results concern amorphization and crystalline structure modification of ZnAl 2 O 4 especially the inversion. We were able to determine a stopping power threshold for amorphization, between 11 keV/nm and 12 keV/nm, and also the amorphization process, which is a multiple impacts process. We studied the evolution of the amorphous phase by TEM and showed a nano-patterning phenomenon. Concerning the inversion, we determined that it did happen by a single impact process, and the saturation value did not reach the random cation distribution value. Inversion and amorphization have different, but close, stopping power threshold. However, amorphization seems to be conditioned by a pre-damage of the material which consists in inversion. (author)

  13. Fibronectin: a chromatin-associated protein?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardi, L; Siri, A; Carnemolla, B; Santi, L; Gardner, W D; Hoch, S O

    1979-11-01

    We have previously reported that chromatin preparations from human cultured fibroblasts contain a single homologous serum protein. In this paper we present evidence, based on immunological identity and physicochemical properties, that this serum protein is fibronectin. Furthermore, using a radioimmunoassay system, we have estimated that fibronectin represents about 0.7% of the total protein in both chromatin preparations and whole fibroblasts. Using a nitrocellulose filter assay system, we also show that fibronectin is a DNA-binding protein having an equilibrium constant of 4.6 x 10(-6) M. Equilibrium competition experiments have demonstrated that fibronectin has the ability to differentiate among nucleotides, indicating that fibronectin-DNA interaction is at least partially specific, and that a minimum polymer length of 12-18 nucleotides is required for effective binding to occur. Fibronectin has been isolated readily from plasma using DNA-affinity chromatography. We do not have direct evidence that fibronectin is an actual nonhistone chromosomal protein, but fibronectin is a DNA-binding protein (at least under in vitro assay conditions) and appears to be a normal constituent of chromatin as chromatin is currently isolated from cell nuclei.

  14. Chromatin remodeling effects on enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Estela; Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Arzate-Mejía, Rodrigo; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2016-08-01

    During organism development, a diversity of cell types emerges with disparate, yet stable profiles of gene expression with distinctive cellular functions. In addition to gene promoters, the genome contains enhancer regulatory sequences, which are implicated in cellular specialization by facilitating cell-type and tissue-specific gene expression. Enhancers are DNA binding elements characterized by highly sophisticated and various mechanisms of action allowing for the specific interaction of general and tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs). However, eukaryotic organisms package their genetic material into chromatin, generating a physical barrier for TFs to interact with their cognate sequences. The ability of TFs to bind DNA regulatory elements is also modulated by changes in the chromatin structure, including histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, and the methylation status of DNA. Furthermore, it has recently been revealed that enhancer sequences are also transcribed into a set of enhancer RNAs with regulatory potential. These interdependent processes act in the context of a complex network of chromatin interactions, which together contributes to a renewed vision of how gene activation is coordinated in a cell-type-dependent manner. In this review, we describe the interplay between genetic and epigenetic aspects associated with enhancers and discuss their possible roles on enhancer function.

  15. The Latest Twists in Chromatin Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossey, Ralf; Schiessel, Helmut

    2018-01-05

    In its most restrictive interpretation, the notion of chromatin remodeling refers to the action of chromatin-remodeling enzymes on nucleosomes with the aim of displacing and removing them from the chromatin fiber (the effective polymer formed by a DNA molecule and proteins). This local modification of the fiber structure can have consequences for the initiation and repression of the transcription process, and when the remodeling process spreads along the fiber, it also results in long-range effects essential for fiber condensation. There are three regulatory levels of relevance that can be distinguished for this process: the intrinsic sequence preference of the histone octamer, which rules the positioning of the nucleosome along the DNA, notably in relation to the genetic information coded in DNA; the recognition or selection of nucleosomal substrates by remodeling complexes; and, finally, the motor action on the nucleosome exerted by the chromatin remodeler. Recent work has been able to provide crucial insights at each of these three levels that add new twists to this exciting and unfinished story, which we highlight in this perspective. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characteristics of thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Kano, Y.

    1983-01-01

    We investigated thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) chromatin in the cell-free reconstruction system. The normal-cell extract performed specific dimer excision from native chromatin and DNA isolated from 100 J/m 2 -irradiated cells. Such an excision in vitro was rapid and required high concentrations of extract. The extracts of XP group A, C and G cells were unable to excise from their own native-chromatin, but capable of excising from chromatin deprived of loosely bound nonhistone proteins with 0.35 M NaCl, as were from purified DNA. Thus, group A, C and G cells are most likely to be defective in the specific XP factors facilitating the excising activity under multicomponent regulation at the chromatin level. Further, either of group A, C and G extracts successfully complemented the native chromatin of the alternative groups. Uniquely, the XP group D extract excised dimers from native chromatin in the normal fashion under the condition. These results suggest that XP group A, C, D and G cells examined may not be defective in the dimer specific endonuclease and exonuclease per se. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  17. Histone redistribution and conformational effect on chromatin induced by formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacow, I; Cabasso, L; Li, H J

    1976-10-19

    Histone redistributions between endogenous DNA in calf thymus chromatin and exogenous DNA from Clostridium perfringens (69% A + T) or from Micrococcus luteus (30% A + T) induced by 0.6 M NaCl or by 2% formaldehyde were studied by thermal denaturation. The observed redistribution occurred on histone Hl when the exogenous DNA was (A + T)-richer than the DNA in chromatin, and when the mixture was exposed to 0.6 M NaCl or formaldehyde. When a (G + C)-richer DNA was added as the acceptor for histones, no substantial transfer of histones from chromatin DNA to exogenous DNA was found. Thus the activation energy of histone dissociation from chromatin DNA seems to be substantially lowered by 0.6 M NaCl or formaldehyde such that histones (mostly histone Hl) can be dissociated and bind the (A + T)-richer DNA and form a more stable complex. It is suggested that the formaldehyde effect on histones may be due to the loss of positive charges on lysine and arginin residues (probably more on lysine than on arginine) in histones after their rapid reaction with formaldehyde. Formaldehyde treatment of chromatin also distorts the DNA conformation, as revealed by circular dichroism (CD) studies. This structural effect occurs mainly on those base pairs bound by histones other than Hl, or within the chromatin subunit. Histone redistribution is treated as a thermodynamic phenomenon of histone binding to DNA. The validity of using formaldehyde to study chromatin structure is discussed.

  18. Nucleosome fragility reveals novel functional states of chromatin and poises genes for activation

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Yuanxin; Yao, Jianhui; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; He, Xiangwei

    2011-01-01

    The structural complexity of nucleosomes underlies their functional versatility. Here we report a new type of complexity—nucleosome fragility, manifested as high sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease, in contrast to the common presumption that nucleosomes are similar in resistance to MNase digestion. Using differential MNase digestion of chromatin and high-throughput sequencing, we have identified a special group of nucleosomes termed “fragile nucleosomes” throughout the yeast genome, nearly 10...

  19. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  20. Systems proteomics of cardiac chromatin identifies nucleolin as a regulator of growth and cellular plasticity in cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Monte, Emma; Mouillesseaux, Kevin; Chen, Haodong; Kimball, Todd; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Chen, Jau-Nian; Vondriska, Thomas M.; Franklin, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Myocyte hypertrophy antecedent to heart failure involves changes in global gene expression, although the preceding mechanisms to coordinate DNA accessibility on a genomic scale are unknown. Chromatin-associated proteins alter chromatin structure by changing their association with DNA, thereby altering the gene expression profile. Little is known about the global changes in chromatin subproteomes that accompany heart failure, and the mechanisms by which these proteins alter chromatin structure...

  1. Influence of oncogenic transcription factors on chromatin conformation and implications in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang YA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeqing Angela Yang,1 Jung Kim,1 Jindan Yu1,21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: In recent years, facilitated by rapid technological advances, we are becoming more adept at probing the molecular processes, which take place in the nucleus, that are crucial for the hierarchical regulation and organization of chromatin architecture. With an unprecedented level of resolution, a detailed atlas of chromosomal structures (histone displacement, variants, modifications, chromosome territories, and DNA looping and mechanisms underlying their establishment, provides invaluable insight into physiological as well as pathological phenomena. In this review, we will focus on prostate cancer, a prevalent malignancy in men worldwide, and for which a curative treatment strategy is yet to be attained. We aim to catalog the most frequently observed oncogenic alterations associated with chromatin conformation, while emphasizing the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, which is found in more than one-half of prostate cancer patients and its functions in compromising the chromatin landscape in prostate cancer.Keywords: chromatin conformation, ERG, prostate cancer

  2. Characterizing the molecular architectures of chromatin-modifying complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiaputra, Dheva T; Yip, Calvin K

    2017-11-01

    Eukaryotic cells package their genome in the form of a DNA-protein complex known as chromatin. This organization not only condenses the genome to fit within the confines of the nucleus, but also provides a platform for a cell to regulate accessibility to different gene sequences. The basic packaging element of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped around histone proteins. One major means that a cell regulates chromatin structure is by depositing post-translational modifications on nucleosomal histone proteins, and thereby altering internucleosomal interactions and/or binding to different chromatin associated factors. These chromatin modifications are often catalyzed by multi-subunit enzyme complexes, whose large size, sophisticated composition, and inherent conformational flexibility pose significant technical challenges to their biochemical and structural characterization. Multiple structural approaches including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, single-particle electron microscopy, and crosslinking coupled to mass spectrometry are often used synergistically to probe the overall architecture, subunit organization, and catalytic mechanisms of these macromolecular assemblies. In this review, we highlight several recent chromatin-modifying complexes studies that embodies this multipronged structural approach, and explore common themes amongst them. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  4. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uppal, Timsy; Jha, Hem C.; Verma, Subhash C.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle

  5. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, Timsy [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Jha, Hem C. [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Robertson, Erle S., E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  6. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  7. Magnetic structures of erbium under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawano, S.; Lebech, B.; Achiwa, N.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of the magnetic structures of erbium metal at 4.5 K and 11.5 kbar hydrostatic pressure have revealed that the transition to a conical structure at low temperatures is suppressed and that the cycloidal structure, with modulation vector Q congruent-to (2/7 2pi/c)c persists...

  8. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  9. Higher order chromatin organization in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Karen L.; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of our increased understanding of how genomes are dysregulated in cancer and a plethora of molecular diagnostic tools, the front line and ‘gold standard’ detection of cancer remains the pathologist’s detection of gross changes in cellular and tissue structure, most strikingly nuclear dis-organization. In fact, for over 140 years it has been noted that nuclear morphology is often disrupted in cancer. Even today, nuclear morphology measures include nuclear size, shape, DNA content (ploidy) and ‘chromatin organization’. Given the importance of nuclear shape to diagnoses of cancer phenotypes, it is surprising and frustrating that we currently lack a detailed understanding to explain these changes and how they might arise and relate to molecular events in the cell. It is an implicit hypothesis that perturbation of chromatin and epigenetic signatures may lead to alterations in nuclear structure (or vice versa) and that these perturbations lie at the heart of cancer genesis. In this review, we attempt to synthesize research leading to our current understanding on how chromatin interactions at the nuclear lamina, epigenetic modulation and gene regulation may intersect in cancer and offer a perspective on critical experiments that would help clarify how nuclear architecture may contribute to the cancerous phenotype. We also discuss the historical understanding of nuclear structure in normal cells and as a diagnostic in cancer. PMID:23266653

  10. Chromatin in 3D: progress and prospects for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Weigel, Detlef

    2015-08-21

    Methods that use high-throughput sequencing have begun to reveal features of the three-dimensional structure of genomes at a resolution that goes far beyond that of traditional microscopy. Integration of these methods with other molecular tools has advanced our knowledge of both global and local chromatin packing in plants, and has revealed how patterns of chromatin packing correlate with the genomic and epigenomic landscapes. This update reports recent progress made in this area in plants, and suggests new research directions.

  11. Increased chromatin plasticity supports enhanced metastatic potential of mouse melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizels, Yael; Elbaz, Adi; Hernandez-Vicens, Rosari; Sandrusy, Oshrat; Rosenberg, Anna; Gerlitz, Gabi

    2017-08-15

    Metastasis formation is strongly dependent on the migration capabilities of tumor cells. Recently it has become apparent that nuclear structure and morphology affect the cellular ability to migrate. Previously we found that migration of melanoma cells is both associated with and dependent on global chromatin condensation. Therefore, we anticipated that tumor progression would be associated with increased chromatin condensation. Interestingly, the opposite has been reported for melanoma. In trying to resolve this contradiction, we show that during growth conditions, tumor progression is associated with global chromatin de-condensation that is beneficial for faster proliferation. However, upon induction of migration, in both low- and high-metastatic mouse melanoma cells chromatin undergoes condensation to support cell migration. Our results reveal that throughout tumor progression induction of chromatin condensation by migration signals is maintained, whereas the organization of chromatin during growth conditions is altered. Thus, tumor progression is associated with an increase in chromatin dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dense chromatin plates in metaphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gállego, Isaac; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Caño, Silvia; Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2009-04-01

    In a previous work we observed multilayered plate-like structures surrounding partially denatured HeLa chromosomes at metaphase ionic conditions. This unexpected finding has led us to carry out an extensive investigation of these structures. Our results show that plates can also be found in metaphase chromosomes from chicken lymphocytes. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image and investigate the mechanical properties of plates in aqueous solution. Plates are thin (approximately 6.5 nm each layer) but compact and resistant to penetration by the AFM tip: their Young's modulus is approximately 0.2 GPa and the stress required for surface penetration is approximately 0.03 GPa in the presence of Mg(2+) (5-20 mM). Low-ionic strength conditions produce emanation of chromatin fibers from the edges of uncrosslinked plates. These observations and AFM results obtained applying high forces indicate that the chromatin filament is tightly tethered inside the plates. Images of metal-shadowed plates and cryo-electron microscopy images of frozen-hydrated plates suggest that nucleosomes are tilted with respect to the plate surface to allow an interdigitation between the successive layers and a thickness reduction compatible with the observed plate height. The similarities between denatured plates from chicken chromosomes and aggregates of purified chromatin from chicken erythrocytes suggest that chromatin has intrinsic structural properties leading to plate formation. Scanning electron micrographs and images obtained with the 200-kV transmission microscope show that plates are the dominant component of compact chromatids. We propose that metaphase chromosomes are formed by many stacked plates perpendicular to the chromatid axis.

  13. Response of masonry structure under impact load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makovicka, D.

    1993-01-01

    The paper deals with interaction of a short gaseous impact wave with a plate structure. Analyses of dynamic bending, depending on the parameters of the structure and the impact wave (i.e. the stress and displacement field produced by the resulting incident and reflected wave) have been made by FEM. The calculated data was based on the real material properties of this structure. Pressures greater than computed limit pressures result in the failure of the structure. The calculated and experimental data are compared. (author)

  14. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  15. Nascent Connections: R-Loops and Chromatin Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chédin, Frédéric

    2016-12-01

    RNA molecules, such as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), have critical roles in regulating gene expression, chromosome architecture, and the modification states of chromatin. Recent developments suggest that RNA also influences gene expression and chromatin patterns through the interaction of nascent transcripts with their DNA template via the formation of co-transcriptional R-loop structures. R-loop formation over specific, conserved, hotspots occurs at thousands of genes in mammalian genomes and represents an important and dynamic feature of mammalian chromatin. Here, focusing primarily on mammalian systems, I describe the accumulating connections and possible mechanisms linking R-loop formation and chromatin patterning. The possible contribution of aberrant R-loops to pathological conditions is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chromatin SUMOylation in heat stress: To protect, pause and organise?: SUMO stress response on chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Einari A; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2017-06-01

    Post-translational modifications, e.g. SUMO modifications (SUMOylation), provide a mechanism for swiftly changing a protein's activity. Various stress conditions trigger a SUMO stress response (SSR) - a stress-induced rapid change in the conjugation of SUMO to multiple proteins, which predominantly targets nuclear proteins. The SSR has been postulated to protect stressed cells by preserving the functionality of crucial proteins. However, it is unclear how it exerts its protective functions. Interestingly, heat stress (HS) increases SUMOylation of proteins at active promoters and enhancers. In promoters, HS-induced SUMOylation correlates with gene transcription and stress-induced RNA polymerase II (Pol2) pausing. Conversely, a disappearance of SUMOylation in HS occurs at chromatin anchor points that maintain chromatin-looping structures and the spatial organisation of chromatin. In reviewing the literature, we hypothesise that the SSR regulates Pol2 pausing by modulating the interactions of pausing-regulating proteins, whereas deSUMOylation alters the function of chromatin anchors. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Structure of polymer chains under confinement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cluded volume interactions (so-called regime of “semi-dilute cigars”). For confined charged polymers, a peak is observed whose intensity increases with molecular weight and the asymptotic 1/q scattering region is extended compared to the bulk. We infer that the chains are sufficiently extended, under the influence of ...

  18. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs.

  19. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs. (paper)

  20. MRN1 implicates chromatin remodeling complexes and architectural factors in mRNA maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düring, Louis; Thorsen, Michael; Petersen, Darima

    2012-01-01

    A functional relationship between chromatin structure and mRNA processing events has been suggested, however, so far only a few involved factors have been characterized. Here we show that rsc nhp6¿¿ mutants, deficient for the function of the chromatin remodeling factor RSC and the chromatin....... Genetic interactions are observed between 2 µm-MRN1 and the splicing deficient mutants snt309¿, prp3, prp4, and prp22, and additional genetic analyses link MRN1, SNT309, NHP6A/B, SWI/SNF, and RSC supporting the notion of a role of chromatin structure in mRNA processing....

  1. DNA repair goes hip-hop: SMARCA and CHD chromatin remodellers join the break dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Magdalena B; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-10-05

    Proper signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical to prevent genome instability and diseases such as cancer. The packaging of DNA into chromatin, however, has evolved as a mere obstacle to these DSB responses. Posttranslational modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling help to overcome this barrier by modulating nucleosome structures and allow signalling and repair machineries access to DSBs in chromatin. Here we recap our current knowledge on how ATP-dependent SMARCA- and CHD-type chromatin remodellers alter chromatin structure during the signalling and repair of DSBs and discuss how their dysfunction impacts genome stability and human disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Concurrent Structural Fatigue Damage Prognosis Under Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    same experiment is carried on AISI 4340 steel. AISI 4340 steel is a heat treatable, low alloy steel containing nickel, chromium and molybdenum. The...but after the unstable crack growth after the overload, it is 82 83 hard to measure the crack growth per cycle which is smaller than 20...structural and macro materials level. The extension to include material microstructure effect for the fatigue prognosis needs further investigations

  3. Robustness Assessment of Building Structures under Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Waggoner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, much research has focused on the behaviour of structures following the failure of a key structural component. Particular attention has been given to sudden column loss, though questions remain as to whether this event-independent scenario is relevant to actual extreme events such as explosion. Few studies have been conducted to assess the performance of floor slabs above a failed column, and the computational tools used have not been validated against experimental results. The research program presented in this paper investigates the adequacy of sudden column loss as an idealisation of local damage caused by realistic explosion events, and extends prior work by combining the development of accurate computational models with large-scale testing of a typical floor system in a prototypical steel-framed structure. The floor system consists of corrugated decking topped by a lightly reinforced concrete slab that is connected to the floor beams through shear studs. The design is consistent with typical building practices in the US. The first test has been completed, and subsequent tests are currently being planned. This paper addresses the importance of robustness design for localized damage and includes a detailed description regarding how the research program advances the current state of knowledge for assessing robustness of compositely constructed steel-framed buildings.

  4. Materials and structures under shock and impact

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    In risk studies, engineers often have to consider the consequences of an accident leading to a shock on a construction. This can concern the impact of a ground vehicle or aircraft, or the effects of an explosion on an industrial site.This book presents a didactic approach starting with the theoretical elements of the mechanics of materials and structures, in order to develop their applications in the cases of shocks and impacts. The latter are studied on a local scale at first. They lead to stresses and strains in the form of waves propagating through the material, this movement then extending

  5. Factor structure underlying components of allostatic load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M McCaffery

    Full Text Available Allostatic load is a commonly used metric of health risk based on the hypothesis that recurrent exposure to environmental demands (e.g., stress engenders a progressive dysregulation of multiple physiological systems. Prominent indicators of response to environmental challenges, such as stress-related hormones, sympatho-vagal balance, or inflammatory cytokines, comprise primary allostatic mediators. Secondary mediators reflect ensuing biological alterations that accumulate over time and confer risk for clinical disease but overlap substantially with a second metric of health risk, the metabolic syndrome. Whether allostatic load mediators covary and thus warrant treatment as a unitary construct remains to be established and, in particular, the relation of allostatic load parameters to the metabolic syndrome requires elucidation. Here, we employ confirmatory factor analysis to test: 1 whether a single common factor underlies variation in physiological systems associated with allostatic load; and 2 whether allostatic load parameters continue to load on a single common factor if a second factor representing the metabolic syndrome is also modeled. Participants were 645 adults from Allegheny County, PA (30-54 years old, 82% non-Hispanic white, 52% female who were free of confounding medications. Model fitting supported a single, second-order factor underlying variance in the allostatic load components available in this study (metabolic, inflammatory and vagal measures. Further, this common factor reflecting covariation among allostatic load components persisted when a latent factor representing metabolic syndrome facets was conjointly modeled. Overall, this study provides novel evidence that the modeled allostatic load components do share common variance as hypothesized. Moreover, the common variance suggests the existence of statistical coherence above and beyond that attributable to the metabolic syndrome.

  6. The telomere binding protein TRF2 induces chromatin compaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa M Baker

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that require the telomere binding protein, TRF2, for maintaining chromosome stability. In addition to its ability to modulate DNA repair activities, TRF2 also has direct effects on DNA structure and topology. Given that mammalian telomeric chromatin includes nucleosomes, we investigated the effect of this protein on chromatin structure. TRF2 bound to reconstituted telomeric nucleosomal fibers through both its basic N-terminus and its C-terminal DNA binding domain. Analytical agarose gel electrophoresis (AAGE studies showed that TRF2 promoted the folding of nucleosomal arrays into more compact structures by neutralizing negative surface charge. A construct containing the N-terminal and TRFH domains together altered the charge and radius of nucleosomal arrays similarly to full-length TRF2 suggesting that TRF2-driven changes in global chromatin structure were largely due to these regions. However, the most compact chromatin structures were induced by the isolated basic N-terminal region, as judged by both AAGE and atomic force microscopy. Although the N-terminal region condensed nucleosomal array fibers, the TRFH domain, known to alter DNA topology, was required for stimulation of a strand invasion-like reaction with nucleosomal arrays. Optimal strand invasion also required the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Furthermore, the reaction was not stimulated on linear histone-free DNA. Our data suggest that nucleosomal chromatin has the ability to facilitate this activity of TRF2 which is thought to be involved in stabilizing looped telomere structures.

  7. Chromatin remodeling in mammalian embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Birgit; Cabot, Ryan A

    2018-03-01

    The mammalian embryo undergoes a dramatic amount of epigenetic remodeling during the first week of development. In this review, we discuss several epigenetic changes that happen over the course of cleavage development, focusing on covalent marks (e.g., histone methylation and acetylation) and non-covalent remodeling (chromatin remodeling via remodeling complexes; e.g., SWI/SNF-mediated chromatin remodeling). Comparisons are also drawn between remodeling events that occur in embryos from a variety of mammalian species. © 2018 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  8. Chromatin Architecture Defines the Glucocorticoid Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Craig J.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2013-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) functions to regulate a wide group of physiological processes through hormone inducible interaction with genomic loci and subsequent manipulation of the transcriptional output of target genes. Despite expression in a wide variety of tissues, the GR has diverse roles that are regulated tightly in a cell type specific manner. With the advent of whole genome approaches, the details of that diversity and the mechanisms regulating them are beginning to be elucidated. This review aims describe the recent advances detailing the role chromatin structure plays in dictating GR specificity. PMID:23545159

  9. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availability...... and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  10. Chromatin Dynamics in Genome Stability: Roles in Suppressing Endogenous DNA Damage and Facilitating DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage. PMID:28698521

  11. ADP-ribose-specific chromatin-affinity purification for investigating genome-wide or locus-specific chromatin ADP-ribosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisceglie, Lavinia; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O

    2017-09-01

    Protein ADP-ribosylation is a structurally heterogeneous post-translational modification (PTM) that influences the physicochemical and biological properties of the modified protein. ADP-ribosylation of chromatin changes its structural properties, thereby regulating important nuclear functions. A lack of suitable antibodies for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) has so far prevented a comprehensive analysis of DNA-associated protein ADP-ribosylation. To analyze chromatin ADP-ribosylation, we recently developed a novel ADP-ribose-specific chromatin-affinity purification (ADPr-ChAP) methodology that uses the recently identified ADP-ribose-binding domains RNF146 WWE and Af1521. In this protocol, we describe how to use this robust and versatile method for genome-wide and loci-specific localization of chromatin ADP-ribosylation. ADPr-ChAP enables bioinformatic comparisons of ADP-ribosylation with other chromatin modifications and is useful for understanding how ADP-ribosylation regulates biologically important cellular processes. ADPr-ChAP takes 1 week and requires standard skills in molecular biology and biochemistry. Although not covered in detail here, this technique can also be combined with conventional ChIP or DNA analysis to define the histone marks specifically associated with the ADP-ribosylated chromatin fractions and dissect the molecular mechanism and functional role of chromatin ADP-ribosylation.

  12. Empirical Analysis of Farm Credit Risk under the Structure Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan

    2009-01-01

    The study measures farm credit risk by using farm records collected by Farm Business Farm Management (FBFM) during the period 1995-2004. The study addresses the following questions: (1) whether farm's financial position is fully described by the structure model, (2) what are the determinants of farm capital structure under the structure model, (3)…

  13. A Long-Distance Chromatin Affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, Annette; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor binding sequences result in correlated changes in chromatin composition locally and at sites hundreds of kilobases away. New studies demonstrate that this concordance is mediated via spatial chromatin interactions that constitute regulatory modules of the human

  14. Guarding against Collateral Damage during Chromatin Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Signal amplifications are vital for chromatin function, yet they also bear the risk of transforming into unrestrained, self-escalating, and potentially harmful responses. Examples of inbuilt limitations are emerging, revealing how chromatin transactions are confined within physiological boundaries....

  15. SMC complexes orchestrate the mitotic chromatin interaction landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakui, Yasutaka; Uhlmann, Frank

    2017-09-21

    Chromatin is a very long DNA-protein complex that controls the expression and inheritance of the genetic information. Chromatin is stored within the nucleus in interphase and further compacted into chromosomes during mitosis. This process, known as chromosome condensation, is essential for faithful segregation of genomic DNA into daughter cells. Condensin and cohesin, members of the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family, are fundamental for chromosome architecture, both for establishment of chromatin structure in the interphase nucleus and for the formation of condensed chromosomes in mitosis. These ring-shaped SMC complexes are thought to regulate the interactions between DNA strands by topologically entrapping DNA. How this activity shapes chromosomes is not yet understood. Recent high throughput chromosome conformation capture studies revealed how chromatin is reorganized during the cell cycle and have started to explore the role of SMC complexes in mitotic chromatin architecture. Here, we summarize these findings and discuss the conserved nature of chromosome condensation in eukaryotes. We highlight the unexpected finding that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal interactions in mitosis increase within a distinctive distance range that is characteristic for an organism, while longer and shorter-range interactions are suppressed. This reveals important molecular insight into chromosome architecture.

  16. Chromatin Configuration Determines Cell Responses to Hormone Stimuli | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ever since selective gene expression was established as the central driver of cell behavior, researchers have been working to understand the forces that control gene transcription. Aberrant gene expression can cause or promote many diseases, including cancer, and alterations in gene expression are the goal of many therapeutic agents. Recent work has focused on the potential role of chromatin structure as a contributor to gene regulation. Chromatin can exist in a tightly packed/inaccessible or loose/accessible configuration depending on the interactions between DNA and its associated proteins. Patterns of chromatin structure can differ between cell types and can also change within cells in response to certain signals. Cancer researchers are particularly interested in the role of chromatin in gene regulation because many of the genomic regions found to be associated with cancer risk are in open chromatin structures.

  17. Thermal behavior of spatial structures under solar irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbo; Liao, Xiangwei; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The temperature, particularly the non-uniform temperature under solar irradiation, is the main load for large-span steel structures. Due the shortage of in-site temperature test in previous studies, an in-site test was conducted on the large-span steel structures under solar irradiation, which was covered by glass roof and light roof, to gain insight into the temperature distribution of steel members under glass roof or light roof. A numerical method also was presented and verified to forecast the temperature of steel member under glass roof or light roof. Based on the on-site measurement and numerical analyses conducted, the following conclusions were obtained: 1) a remarkable temperature difference exists between the steel member under glass roof and that under light roof, 2) solar irradiation has a significant effect on the temperature distribution and thermal behavior of large-span spatial structures, 3) negative thermal load is the controlling factor for member stress, and the positive thermal load is the controlling factor for nodal displacement. - Highlights: • Temperature was measured for a steel structures under glass roof and light roof. • Temperature simulation method was presented and verified. • The thermal behavior of steel structures under glass or light roof was presented

  18. Chromatin states modify network motifs contributing to cell-specific functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Pang, Lin; Yu, Fulong; Fan, Huihui; Ping, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modification can affect many important biological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. It can alter chromatin conformation and contribute to gene regulation. To investigate how chromatin states associated with network motifs, we assembled chromatin state-modified regulatory networks by combining 269 ChIP-seq data and chromatin states in four cell types. We found that many chromatin states were significantly associated with network motifs, especially for feedforward loops (FFLs). These distinct chromatin state compositions contribute to different expression levels and translational control of targets in FFLs. Strikingly, the chromatin state-modified FFLs were highly cell-specific and, to a large extent, determined cell-selective functions, such as the embryonic stem cell-specific bivalent modification-related FFL with an important role in poising developmentally important genes for expression. Besides, comparisons of chromatin state-modified FFLs between cancerous/stem and primary cell lines revealed specific type of chromatin state alterations that may act together with motif structural changes cooperatively contribute to cell-to-cell functional differences. Combination of these alterations could be helpful in prioritizing candidate genes. Together, this work highlights that a dynamic epigenetic dimension can help network motifs to control cell-specific functions. PMID:26169043

  19. Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Weitz, David A; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2013-09-24

    Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood, especially at large length scales. We developed an approach, displacement correlation spectroscopy based on time-resolved image correlation analysis, to map chromatin dynamics simultaneously across the whole nucleus in cultured human cells. This method revealed that chromatin movement was coherent across large regions (4-5 µm) for several seconds. Regions of coherent motion extended beyond the boundaries of single-chromosome territories, suggesting elastic coupling of motion over length scales much larger than those of genes. These large-scale, coupled motions were ATP dependent and unidirectional for several seconds, perhaps accounting for ATP-dependent directed movement of single genes. Perturbation of major nuclear ATPases such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase II, and topoisomerase II eliminated micron-scale coherence, while causing rapid, local movement to increase; i.e., local motions accelerated but became uncoupled from their neighbors. We observe similar trends in chromatin dynamics upon inducing a direct DNA damage; thus we hypothesize that this may be due to DNA damage responses that physically relax chromatin and block long-distance communication of forces.

  20. Plant programmed cell death from a chromatin point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrasse, D; Benhamed, M; Bergounioux, C; Raynaud, C; Delarue, M

    2016-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting of the activation of finely controlled signalling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. PCD can be part of a developmental programme (dPCD) or be triggered by environmental conditions (ePCD). In plant cells, as in animal cells, extensive chromatin condensation and degradation of the nuclear DNA are among the most conspicuous features of cells undergoing PCD. Changes in chromatin condensation could either reflect the structural changes required for internucleosomal fragmentation of nuclear DNA or relate to large-scale chromatin rearrangements associated with a major transcriptional switch occurring during cell death. The aim of this review is to give an update on plant PCD processes from a chromatin point of view. The first part will be dedicated to chromatin conformational changes associated with cell death observed in various developmental and physiological conditions, whereas the second part will be devoted to histone dynamics and DNA modifications associated with critical changes in genome expression during the cell death process. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Inferring the physical properties of yeast chromatin through Bayesian analysis of whole nucleus simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbona, Jean-Michel; Herbert, Sébastien; Fabre, Emmanuelle; Zimmer, Christophe

    2017-05-03

    The structure and mechanical properties of chromatin impact DNA functions and nuclear architecture but remain poorly understood. In budding yeast, a simple polymer model with minimal sequence-specific constraints and a small number of structural parameters can explain diverse experimental data on nuclear architecture. However, how assumed chromatin properties affect model predictions was not previously systematically investigated. We used hundreds of dynamic chromosome simulations and Bayesian inference to determine chromatin properties consistent with an extensive dataset that includes hundreds of measurements from imaging in fixed and live cells and two Hi-C studies. We place new constraints on average chromatin fiber properties, narrowing down the chromatin compaction to ~53-65 bp/nm and persistence length to ~52-85 nm. These constraints argue against a 20-30 nm fiber as the exclusive chromatin structure in the genome. Our best model provides a much better match to experimental measurements of nuclear architecture and also recapitulates chromatin dynamics measured on multiple loci over long timescales. This work substantially improves our understanding of yeast chromatin mechanics and chromosome architecture and provides a new analytic framework to infer chromosome properties in other organisms.

  2. Defining B Cell Chromatin: Lessons from EBF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, Sören; Li, Rui; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2018-04-01

    Hematopoiesis is regulated by signals from the microenvironment, transcription factor networks, and changes of the epigenetic landscape. Transcription factors interact with and shape chromatin to allow for lineage- and cell type-specific changes in gene expression. During B lymphopoiesis, epigenetic regulation is observed in multilineage progenitors in which a specific chromatin context is established, at the onset of the B cell differentiation when early B cell factor 1 (EBF1) induces lineage-specific changes in chromatin, during V(D)J recombination and after antigen-driven activation of B cells and terminal differentiation. In this review, we discuss the epigenetic changes underlying B cell differentiation, focusing on the role of transcription factor EBF1 in B cell lineage priming. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  4. Pharmacologic Targeting of Chromatin Modulators As Therapeutics of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML, a common hematological cancer of myeloid lineage cells, generally exhibits poor prognosis in the clinic and demands new treatment options. Recently, direct sequencing of samples from human AMLs and pre-leukemic diseases has unveiled their mutational landscapes and significantly advanced the molecular understanding of AML pathogenesis. The newly identified recurrent mutations frequently “hit” genes encoding epigenetic modulators, a wide range of chromatin-modifying enzymes and regulatory factors involved in gene expression regulation, supporting aberration of chromatin structure and epigenetic modification as a main oncogenic mechanism and cancer-initiating event. Increasing body of evidence demonstrates that chromatin modification aberrations underlying the formation of blood cancer can be reversed by pharmacological targeting of the responsible epigenetic modulators, thus providing new mechanism-based treatment strategies. Here, we summarize recent advances in development of small-molecule inhibitors specific to chromatin factors and their potential applications in the treatment of genetically defined AMLs. These compounds selectively inhibit various subclasses of “epigenetic writers” (such as histone methyltransferases MLL/KMT2A, G9A/KMT1C, EZH2/KMT6A, DOT1L/KMT4, and PRMT1, “epigenetic readers” (such as BRD4 and plant homeodomain finger proteins, and “epigenetic erasers” (such as histone demethylases LSD1/KDM1A and JMJD2C/KDM4C. We also discuss about the molecular mechanisms underpinning therapeutic effect of these epigenetic compounds in AML and favor their potential usage for combinational therapy and treatment of pre-leukemia diseases.

  5. Open chromatin in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Yufeng; Jiang, Jiming

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity to DNase I digestion is an indicator of the accessibility and configuration of chromatin in eukaryotic genomes. Open chromatin exhibits high sensitivity to DNase I cleavage. DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in eukaryotic genomes can be identified through DNase I treatment followed by sequencing (DNase-seq). DHSs are most frequently associated with various cis-regulatory DNA elements, including promoters, enhancers, and silencers in both animal and plant genomes. Genome-wide identification of DHSs provides an efficient method to interpret previously un-annotated regulatory DNA sequences. In this review, we provide an overview of the historical perspective of DHS research in eukaryotes. We summarize the main achievements of DHS research in model animal species and review the recent progress of DHS research in plants. We finally discuss possible future directions of using DHS as a tool in plant genomics research. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Nuclear phosphoinositide regulation of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Bree L; Blind, Raymond D

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipid signaling has clear connections to a wide array of cellular processes, particularly in gene expression and in controlling the chromatin biology of cells. However, most of the work elucidating how phospholipid signaling pathways contribute to cellular physiology have studied cytoplasmic membranes, while relatively little attention has been paid to the role of phospholipid signaling in the nucleus. Recent work from several labs has shown that nuclear phospholipid signaling can have important roles that are specific to this cellular compartment. This review focuses on the nuclear phospholipid functions and the activities of phospholipid signaling enzymes that regulate metazoan chromatin and gene expression. In particular, we highlight the roles that nuclear phosphoinositides play in several nuclear-driven physiological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and gene expression. Taken together, the recent discovery of several specifically nuclear phospholipid functions could have dramatic impact on our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that enable tight control of cellular physiology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. DNA Methylation Landscape Reflects the Spatial Organization of Chromatin in Different Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Xie, Wen Jun; Liu, Sirui; Meng, Luming; Gu, Chan; Gao, Yi Qin

    2017-10-03

    The relationship between DNA methylation and chromatin structure is still largely unknown. By analyzing a large set of published sequencing data, we observed a long-range power law correlation of DNA methylation with cell class-specific scaling exponents in the range of tens of kilobases. We showed that such cell class-specific scaling exponents are caused by different patchiness of DNA methylation in different cells. By modeling the chromatin structure using high-resolution chromosome conformation capture data and mapping the methylation level onto the modeled structure, we demonstrated that the patchiness of DNA methylation is related to chromatin structure. The scaling exponents of the power law correlation are thus a display of the spatial organization of chromatin. Besides the long-range correlation, we also showed that the local correlation of DNA methylation is associated with nucleosome positioning. The local correlation of partially methylated domains is different from that of nonpartially methylated domains, suggesting that their chromatin structures differ at the scale of several hundred base pairs (covering a few nucleosomes). Our study provides a novel, to our knowledge, view of the spatial organization of chromatin structure from a perspective of DNA methylation, in which both long-range and local correlations of DNA methylation along the genome reflect the spatial organization of chromatin. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mapping chromatin interactions with 5C technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraiuolo, Maria A.; Sanyal, Amartya; Naumova, Natalia; Dekker, Job; Dostie, Josée

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genome organization can be observed on many levels and at different scales. This organization is important not only to reduce chromosome length but also for the proper execution of various biological processes. High-resolution mapping of spatial chromatin structure was made possible by the development of the chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique. 3C uses chemical cross-linking followed by proximity-based ligation of fragmented DNA to capture frequently interacting chromatin segments in cell populations. Several 3C-related methods capable of higher chromosome conformation mapping throughput were reported afterwards. These techniques include the 3C-carbon copy (5C) approach, which offers the advantage of being highly quantitative and reproducible. We provide here a reference protocol for the production of 5C libraries analyzed by next-generation sequencing or onto microarrays. A procedure used to verify that 3C library templates bear the high quality required to produce superior 5C libraries is also described. We believe that this comprehensive detailed protocol will help guide researchers in probing spatial genome organization and its role in various biological processes. PMID:23137922

  9. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  10. Physical and chemical properties of chromatin and its fragments formed in the rat thymus during postirradiation autolysis and under the influence of DNA-ase and protease on DNP preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolaeva, N.V.; Vodolazskaya, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    It has been shown that the thymus chromatin degradation 2-8 hr after irradiation is followed by its cross-splitting and accumulation of several types of fragments differing in the degree of DNA association with the protein. Participation of proteases in the formation of fragments is hardly probable. Acid DNAase is involved in the autolysis perhaps in his maximum later 6 hr after irradiation

  11. Factors limiting the operation of structures under high gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    Factors limiting the operation of rf structures under high-gradient conditions are described. Included are recent rf measurements at laboratories in Europe, Asia, and North America and how these measurements relate to earlier data as exemplified by the use of the Kilpatrick criterion (Kp). Operation limitations will cover mechanical, geometry, thermal, and surface constraints and the associated impact on structure design, fabrication, and material selection. Generally, structures operating continuous wave (100% duty factor) appear to be limited to peak surface fields at about twice the Kilpatrick limit, whereas pulsed structures operating with pulse lengths less than a millisecond can attain peak surface fields five times the Kilpatrick limit

  12. Numerical Analysis of Vibrations of Structures under Moving Inertial Load

    CERN Document Server

    Bajer, Czeslaw I

    2012-01-01

    Moving inertial loads are applied to structures in civil engineering, robotics, and mechanical engineering. Some fundamental books exist, as well as thousands of research papers. Well known is the book by L. Frýba, Vibrations of Solids and Structures Under Moving Loads, which describes almost all problems concerning non-inertial loads. This book presents broad description of numerical tools successfully applied to structural dynamic analysis. Physically we deal with non-conservative systems. The discrete approach formulated with the use of the classical finite element method results in elemental matrices, which can be directly added to global structure matrices. A more general approach is carried out with the space-time finite element method. In such a case, a trajectory of the moving concentrated parameter in space and time can be simply defined. We consider structures described by pure hyperbolic differential equations such as strings and structures described by hyperbolic-parabolic differential equations ...

  13. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone H1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure. H1 has multiple isoforms; the subtypes differ in timing of expression, extent of phosphorylation and turnover rate. In vertebrates, the amino acid substitution rates differ among subtypes by almost one order of magnitude, suggesting that each subtype might have acquired a unique function. We have devised a competitive assay to estimate the relative binding affinities of histone H1 mammalian somatic subtypes H1a-e and H1° for long chromatin fragments (30–35 nucleosomes in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl at constant stoichiometry. Results The H1 complement of native chromatin was perturbed by adding an additional amount of one of the subtypes. A certain amount of SAR (scaffold-associated region DNA was present in the mixture to avoid precipitation of chromatin by excess H1. SAR DNA also provided a set of reference relative affinities, which were needed to estimate the relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin from the distribution of the subtypes between the SAR and the chromatin. The amounts of chromatin, SAR and additional H1 were adjusted so as to keep the stoichiometry of perturbed chromatin similar to that of native chromatin. H1 molecules freely exchanged between the chromatin and SAR binding sites. In conditions of free exchange, H1a was the subtype of lowest affinity, H1b and H1c had intermediate affinities and H1d, H1e and H1° the highest affinities. Subtype affinities for chromatin differed by up to 19-fold. The relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin were equivalent to those estimated for a SAR DNA fragment and a pUC19 fragment of similar length. Avian H5 had an affinity ~12-fold higher than H1e for both DNA and chromatin. Conclusion H1 subtypes freely exchange in vitro between chromatin binding sites in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl. The large differences in relative affinity of the H1 subtypes for

  14. Prospects and implications of using chromatin insulators in gene therapy and transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recillas-Targa, Félix; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Farrell, Catherine M

    2004-07-01

    Gene therapy has emerged from the idea of inserting a wild-type copy of a gene in order to restore the proper expression and function of a damaged gene. Initial efforts have focused on finding the proper vector and delivery method to introduce a corrected gene to the affected tissue or cell type. Even though these first attempts are clearly promising, several problems remain unsolved. A major problem is the influence of chromatin structure on transgene expression. To overcome chromatin-dependent repressive transgenic states, researchers have begun to use chromatin regulatory elements to drive transgene expression. Insulators or chromatin boundaries are able to protect a transgene against chromatin position effects at their genomic integration sites, and they are able to maintain transgene expression for long periods of time. Therefore, these elements may be very useful tools in gene therapy applications for ensuring high-level and stable expression of transgenes. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Single-molecule FRET reveals multiscale chromatin dynamics modulated by HP1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Sinan; Felekyan, Suren; Doroshenko, Olga; Boichenko, Iuliia; Dimura, Mykola; Vardanyan, Hayk; Bryan, Louise C; Arya, Gaurav; Seidel, Claus A M; Fierz, Beat

    2018-01-16

    The dynamic architecture of chromatin fibers, a key determinant of genome regulation, is poorly understood. Here, we employ multimodal single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer studies to reveal structural states and their interconversion kinetics in chromatin fibers. We show that nucleosomes engage in short-lived (micro- to milliseconds) stacking interactions with one of their neighbors. This results in discrete tetranucleosome units with distinct interaction registers that interconvert within hundreds of milliseconds. Additionally, we find that dynamic chromatin architecture is modulated by the multivalent architectural protein heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which engages methylated histone tails and thereby transiently stabilizes stacked nucleosomes. This compacted state nevertheless remains dynamic, exhibiting fluctuations on the timescale of HP1α residence times. Overall, this study reveals that exposure of internal DNA sites and nucleosome surfaces in chromatin fibers is governed by an intrinsic dynamic hierarchy from micro- to milliseconds, allowing the gene regulation machinery to access compact chromatin.

  16. Condensin-mediated remodeling of the mitotic chromatin landscape in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakui, Yasutaka; Rabinowitz, Adam; Barry, David J; Uhlmann, Frank

    2017-10-01

    The eukaryotic genome consists of DNA molecules far longer than the cells that contain them. They reach their greatest compaction during chromosome condensation in mitosis. This process is aided by condensin, a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family member. The spatial organization of mitotic chromosomes and how condensin shapes chromatin architecture are not yet fully understood. Here we use chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) to study mitotic chromosome condensation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This showed that the interphase landscape characterized by small chromatin domains is replaced by fewer but larger domains in mitosis. Condensin achieves this by setting up longer-range, intrachromosomal DNA interactions, which compact and individualize chromosomes. At the same time, local chromatin contacts are constrained by condensin, with profound implications for local chromatin function during mitosis. Our results highlight condensin as a major determinant that changes the chromatin landscape as cells prepare their genomes for cell division.

  17. Gene activation and cell fate control in plants: a chromatin perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhorn, Julia; Blanvillain, Robert; Carles, Cristel C

    2014-08-01

    In plants, environment-adaptable organogenesis extends throughout the lifespan, and iterative development requires repetitive rounds of activation and repression of several sets of genes. Eukaryotic genome compaction into chromatin forms a physical barrier for transcription; therefore, induction of gene expression requires alteration in chromatin structure. One of the present great challenges in molecular and developmental biology is to understand how chromatin is brought from a repressive to permissive state on specific loci and in a very specific cluster of cells, as well as how this state is further maintained and propagated through time and cell division in a cell lineage. In this review, we report recent discoveries implementing our knowledge on chromatin dynamics that modulate developmental gene expression. We also discuss how new data sets highlight plant specificities, likely reflecting requirement for a highly dynamic chromatin.

  18. Proteomics of a fuzzy organelle: interphase chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustatscher, Georg; Hégarat, Nadia; Wills, Karen L H; Furlan, Cristina; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Hochegger, Helfrid; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin proteins mediate replication, regulate expression, and ensure integrity of the genome. So far, a comprehensive inventory of interphase chromatin has not been determined. This is largely due to its heterogeneous and dynamic composition, which makes conclusive biochemical purification difficult, if not impossible. As a fuzzy organelle, it defies classical organellar proteomics and cannot be described by a single and ultimate list of protein components. Instead, we propose a new approach that provides a quantitative assessment of a protein's probability to function in chromatin. We integrate chromatin composition over a range of different biochemical and biological conditions. This resulted in interphase chromatin probabilities for 7635 human proteins, including 1840 previously uncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate the power of our large-scale data-driven annotation during the analysis of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulation in chromatin. Quantitative protein ontologies may provide a general alternative to list-based investigations of organelles and complement Gene Ontology. PMID:24534090

  19. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile M. Doyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin.

  20. Gold-nanoparticle-assisted laser perturbation of chromatin assembly reveals unusual aspects of nuclear architecture within living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Aprotim; Shivashankar, G V

    2007-09-15

    Chromatin organization within the nucleus is a vital regulator of genome function, yet its mechanical coupling to the nuclear architecture has remained elusive. To directly investigate this coupling, we locally modulated chromatin structure in living cells using nanoparticle-based laser perturbation. Unusual differences in the response of the cell nucleus were observed depending on the nuclear region that was perturbed--the heterochromatin, the euchromatin, and the nuclear envelope. This response varied under different conditions of cellular perturbations such as ATP depletion, apoptosis, and inhibition of histone deacetylases. Our studies implicate heterochromatin organization in imparting mechanical stability to the cell nucleus and suggest that nuclear size and shape are the result of interplay between nuclear and cytoplasmic anchors.

  1. Chromatin status and transcription factor binding to gonadotropin promoters in gonadotrope cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin; Hoffmann, Hanne M; Iyer, Anita K; Brayman, Melissa J; Ngo, Cindy; Sunshine, Mary Jean; Mellon, Pamela L

    2017-10-24

    Proper expression of key reproductive hormones from gonadotrope cells of the pituitary is required for pubertal onset and reproduction. To further our understanding of the molecular events taking place during embryonic development, leading to expression of the glycoproteins luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), we characterized chromatin structure changes, imparted mainly by histone modifications, in model gonadotrope cell lines. We evaluated chromatin status and gene expression profiles by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, DNase sensitivity assay, and RNA sequencing in three developmentally staged gonadotrope cell lines, αT1-1 (progenitor, expressing Cga), αT3-1 (immature, expressing Cga and Gnrhr), and LβT2 (mature, expressing Cga, Gnrhr, Lhb, and Fshb), to assess changes in chromatin status and transcription factor access of gonadotrope-specific genes. We found the common mRNA α-subunit of LH and FSH, called Cga, to have an open chromatin conformation in all three cell lines. In contrast, chromatin status of Gnrhr is open only in αT3-1 and LβT2 cells. Lhb begins to open in LβT2 cells and was further opened by activin treatment. Histone H3 modifications associated with active chromatin were high on Gnrhr in αT3-1 and LβT2, and Lhb in LβT2 cells, while H3 modifications associated with repressed chromatin were low on Gnrhr, Lhb, and Fshb in LβT2 cells. Finally, chromatin status correlates with the progressive access of LHX3 to Cga and Gnrhr, followed by PITX1 binding to the Lhb promoter. Our data show the gonadotrope-specific genes Cga, Gnrhr, Lhb, and Fshb are not only controlled by developmental transcription factors, but also by epigenetic mechanisms that include the modulation of chromatin structure, and histone modifications.

  2. Characterizing Thematized Derivative Schema by the Underlying Emergent Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mercedes; Llinares, Salvador; Sanchez-Matamoros, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on different underlying structures of the derivative schema of three undergraduate students that were considered to be at the trans level of development of the derivative schema (action-process-object-schema). The derivative schema is characterized in terms of the students' ability to explicitly transfer the relationship between…

  3. Colloidal hard dumbbells under gravity: structure and crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marechal, M.A.T.; Dijkstra, M.

    2011-01-01

    We study the structure and phase behavior of hard dumbbells under gravity. The fluid shows layering near the wall, where subsequent layers of dumbbells align alternatingly parallel or perpendicular to the wall. We observe coexistence of a fluid with a plastic crystal (PC) and an aligned crystal

  4. The Fatigue Behavior of Steel Structures under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning

    2009-01-01

    Fatigue damage accumulation in steel structures under random loading has been studied in a number of investigations at the Technical University of Denmark. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part...

  5. The Fatigue Behavior of Steel Structures under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue damage accumulation in steel structures under random loading has been studied in a number of investigations at the Technical University of Denmark. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part...

  6. Structural composite panel performance under long-term load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore L. Laufenberg

    1988-01-01

    Information on the performance of wood-based structural composite panels under long-term load is currently needed to permit their use in engineered assemblies and systems. A broad assessment of the time-dependent properties of panels is critical for creating databases and models of the creep-rupture phenomenon that lead to reliability-based design procedures. This...

  7. Chromatin conformation in living cells: support for a zig-zag model of the 30 nm chromatin fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, B.; Holley, W. R.; Mian, I. S.; Chatterjee, A.

    1998-01-01

    A new method was used to probe the conformation of chromatin in living mammalian cells. The method employs ionizing radiation and is based on the concept that such radiation induces correlated breaks in DNA strands that are in spatial proximity. Human dermal fibroblasts in G0 phase of the cell cycle and Chinese hamster ovary cells in mitosis were irradiated by X-rays or accelerated ions. Following lysis of the cells, DNA fragments induced by correlated breaks were end-labeled and separated according to size on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. A characteristic peak was obtained for a fragment size of 78 bases, which is the size that corresponds to one turn of DNA around the nucleosome. Additional peaks between 175 and 450 bases reflect the relative position of nearest-neighbor nucleosomes. Theoretical calculations that simulate the indirect and direct effect of radiation on DNA demonstrate that the fragment size distributions are closely related to the chromatin structure model used. Comparison of the experimental data with theoretical results support a zig-zag model of the chromatin fiber rather than a simple helical model. Thus, radiation-induced damage analysis can provide information on chromatin structure in the living cell. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  8. Design of mild steel structures under unequal cyclic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a method is proposed to investigate the behavior and life of structural components under unequal cyclic loading conditions. Appropriate cyclic moment-curvature relations and life information, in the form of life versus extreme fiber strain, are developed from tests on beams under pure bending conditions. Theoretical predictions of behavior are based on structural geometry and the cyclic moment-curvature relations used in association with the simple curvature-area method. Structural life is also predicted using the life information developed and the theoretical strain history at the critical section in conjunction with a linear damage summation criterion. Theoretical predictions of behavior and life compare reasonably well with the experiments. Based on this study, a design procedure is proposed for mild steel components subjected to unequal cyclic loading conditions. The loads on the tested components were such that they failed due to low cyclic fatigue (i.e., at less than 10 5 cycles)

  9. The architects of crenarchaeal chromatin : A biophysical characterization of chromatin proteins from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Rosalie Paula Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of chromatin organization and compaction in Archaea is currently limited. The genome of several megabasepairs long is folded by a set of small chromatin proteins to fit into the micron-sized cell. A first step in understanding archaeal chromatin organization is to study the action of

  10. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po

    2014-01-01

    replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3,995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors...

  11. Modulation of endothelial glycocalyx structure under inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolářová, Hana; Ambrůzová, Barbora; Svihálková Šindlerová, Lenka; Klinke, Anna; Kubala, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The glycocalyx of the endothelium is an intravascular compartment that creates a barrier between circulating blood and the vessel wall. The glycocalyx is suggested to play an important role in numerous physiological processes including the regulation of vascular permeability, the prevention of the margination of blood cells to the vessel wall, and the transmission of shear stress. Various theoretical models and experimental approaches provide data about changes to the structure and functions of the glycocalyx under various types of inflammatory conditions. These alterations are suggested to promote inflammatory processes in vessels and contribute to the pathogenesis of number of diseases. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the modulation of the glycocalyx under inflammatory conditions and the consequences for the course of inflammation in vessels. The structure and functions of endothelial glycocalyx are briefly discussed in the context of methodological approaches regarding the determination of endothelial glycocalyx and the uncertainty and challenges involved in glycocalyx structure determination. In addition, the modulation of glycocalyx structure under inflammatory conditions and the possible consequences for pathogenesis of selected diseases and medical conditions (in particular, diabetes, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, and sepsis) are summarized. Finally, therapeutic strategies to ameliorate glycocalyx dysfunction suggested by various authors are discussed.

  12. Modulation of Endothelial Glycocalyx Structure under Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kolářová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycocalyx of the endothelium is an intravascular compartment that creates a barrier between circulating blood and the vessel wall. The glycocalyx is suggested to play an important role in numerous physiological processes including the regulation of vascular permeability, the prevention of the margination of blood cells to the vessel wall, and the transmission of shear stress. Various theoretical models and experimental approaches provide data about changes to the structure and functions of the glycocalyx under various types of inflammatory conditions. These alterations are suggested to promote inflammatory processes in vessels and contribute to the pathogenesis of number of diseases. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the modulation of the glycocalyx under inflammatory conditions and the consequences for the course of inflammation in vessels. The structure and functions of endothelial glycocalyx are briefly discussed in the context of methodological approaches regarding the determination of endothelial glycocalyx and the uncertainty and challenges involved in glycocalyx structure determination. In addition, the modulation of glycocalyx structure under inflammatory conditions and the possible consequences for pathogenesis of selected diseases and medical conditions (in particular, diabetes, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, and sepsis are summarized. Finally, therapeutic strategies to ameliorate glycocalyx dysfunction suggested by various authors are discussed.

  13. Non-farnesylated B-type lamin can tether chromatin inside the nucleus and its chromatin interaction requires the Ig-fold region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Ryo; Sugiyama, Shin; Katagiri, Motoi; Chuman, Yoshiro; Furukawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Lamins are thought to direct heterochromatin to the nuclear lamina (NL); however, this function of lamin has not been clearly demonstrated in vivo. To address this, we analyzed polytene chromosome morphology when artificial lamin variants were expressed in Drosophila endoreplicating cells. We found that the CaaX-motif-deleted B-type lamin Dm 0 , but not A-type lamin C, was able to form a nuclear envelope-independent layer that was closely associated with chromatin. Other nuclear envelope proteins were not detected in this "ectopic lamina," and the associated chromatin showed a repressive histone modification maker but not a permissive histone modification marker nor RNA polymerase II proteins. Furthermore, deletion of the C-terminal lamin-Ig-fold domain prevents chromatin association with this ectopic lamina. Thus, non-farnesylated B-type lamin Dm 0 can form an ectopic lamina and induce changes to chromatin structure and status inside the interphase nucleus.

  14. Safety margins of containment structures under impulsive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.H.

    1978-01-01

    Containment structures for nuclear power plants are designed to a large extent to satisfy the various stress limits specified by ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. For short-duration impulsive loads, the common practice of meeting the Code stress limits based on a quasi-static approach is a poor measure of the reserve load-carrying capacity of a structure and always results in a conservative design with a greater than desired margin of safety. There are situations, however, where one might wish to quantify this additional conservatism to avoid excessive or unnecessary field modification. Typical examples were found in re-evaluation studies of MARK I Boiling Water Reactor containment structures under the hydrodynamic loads expected during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The paper is based on the results of a plane strain, large displacement, elastic-plastic, finite-element analysis of a thin cylindrical shell subjected to external pressure pulses. An analytical procedure is presented for estimating the ultimate load capacity of the thin shell structure and, subsequently, for quantifying the design margins of safety for the type of loads under consideration. For defining failure of structures, a finite strain failure criterion is derived that accounts for multiaxiality effects

  15. Effect of support conditions on structural response under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, T.; Memon, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    In design practice, dynamic structural analysis is carried out with base of structure considered as fixed; this means that foundation is placed on rock like soil material. While conducting this type of analyses the role of foundation and soil behaviour is totally neglected. The actions in members and loads transferred at foundation level obtained in this manner do not depict the true structural behaviour. FEM (Finite Element Methods) analysis where both superstructure and foundation soil are coupled together is quite complicated and expensive for design environments. A simplified model is required to depict dynamic response of structures with foundations based on flexible soils. The primary purpose of this research is to compare the superstructure dynamic responses of structural systems with fixed base to that of simple soil model base. The selected simple soil model is to be suitable for use in a design environment to give more realistic results. For this purpose building models are idealized with various heights and structural systems in both 2D (Two Dimensional) and 3D (Three Dimensional) space. These models are then provided with visco-elastic supports representing three soil bearing capacities and the analysis results are compared to that of fixed supports models. The results indicate that fixed support system underestimates natural time period of the structures. Dynamic behavior and force response of visco-elastic support is different from fixed support model. Fixed support models result in over designed base columns and under designed beams. (author)

  16. Generalized Minimum Variance Control for MDOF Structures under Earthquake Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhdar Guenfaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of a multi-degree-of-freedom structural system under earthquake excitation is investigated in this paper. The control approach based on the Generalized Minimum Variance (GMV algorithm is developed and presented. Our approach is a generalization to multivariable systems of the GMV strategy designed initially for single-input-single-output (SISO systems. Kanai-Tajimi and Clough-Penzien models are used to generate the seismic excitations. Those models are calculated using the specific soil parameters. Simulation tests using a 3DOF structure are performed and show the effectiveness of the control method.

  17. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  18. A microscopic analysis of Arabidopsis chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic information of eukaryotic organisms is stored as DNA in the nuclei of their cells. Nuclear DNA is associated with several proteins, which together form chromatin. The most abundant chromatin proteins arehistones,they arrange the initial packaging step of the DNA. DNA

  19. Single-molecule kinetic analysis of HP1-chromatin binding reveals a dynamic network of histone modification and DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Louise C; Weilandt, Daniel R; Bachmann, Andreas L; Kilic, Sinan; Lechner, Carolin C; Odermatt, Pascal D; Fantner, Georg E; Georgeon, Sandrine; Hantschel, Oliver; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Fierz, Beat

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin recruitment of effector proteins involved in gene regulation depends on multivalent interaction with histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) and structural features of the chromatin fiber. Due to the complex interactions involved, it is currently not understood how effectors dynamically sample the chromatin landscape. Here, we dissect the dynamic chromatin interactions of a family of multivalent effectors, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) proteins, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging and computational modeling. We show that the three human HP1 isoforms are recruited and retained on chromatin by a dynamic exchange between histone PTM and DNA bound states. These interactions depend on local chromatin structure, the HP1 isoforms as well as on PTMs on HP1 itself. Of the HP1 isoforms, HP1α exhibits the longest residence times and fastest binding rates due to DNA interactions in addition to PTM binding. HP1α phosphorylation further increases chromatin retention through strengthening of multivalency while reducing DNA binding. As DNA binding in combination with specific PTM recognition is found in many chromatin effectors, we propose a general dynamic capture mechanism for effector recruitment. Multiple weak protein and DNA interactions result in a multivalent interaction network that targets effectors to a specific chromatin modification state, where their activity is required. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Structural Evaluation on HIC Transport Packaging under Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Sung Hwan; Kim, Duck Hoi; Jung, Jin Se; Yang, Ke Hyung; Lee, Heung Young

    2005-01-01

    HIC transport packaging to transport a high integrity container(HIC) containing dry spent resin generated from nuclear power plants is to comply with the regulatory requirements of Korea and IAEA for Type B packaging due to the high radioactivity of the content, and to maintain the structural integrity under normal and accident conditions. It must withstand 9 m free drop impact onto an unyielding surface and 1 m drop impact onto a mild steel bar in a position causing maximum damage. For the conceptual design of a cylindrical HIC transport package, three dimensional dynamic structural analysis to ensure that the integrity of the package is maintained under all credible loads for 9 m free drop and 1 m puncture conditions were carried out using ABAQUS code.

  1. High-Frequency Promoter Firing Links THO Complex Function to Heavy Chromatin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouaikel, John; Causse, Sébastien Z; Rougemaille, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    The THO complex is involved in transcription, genome stability, and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) formation, but its precise molecular function remains enigmatic. Under heat shock conditions, THO mutants accumulate large protein-DNA complexes that alter the chromatin density of target genes......-molecule fluorescence insitu hybridization measurements show that heavy chromatin formation correlates with an unusually high firing pace of the promoter with more than 20 transcription events per minute. Heavy chromatin formation closely follows the modulation of promoter firing and strongly correlates with polymerase...

  2. Human Genome Replication Proceeds through Four Chromatin States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julienne, Hanna; Zoufir, Azedine; Audit, Benjamin; Arneodo, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genomic studies have led to significant progress in understanding the epigenetically controlled interplay between chromatin structure and nuclear functions. Epigenetic modifications were shown to play a key role in transcription regulation and genome activity during development and differentiation or in response to the environment. Paradoxically, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the spatio-temporal replication program in higher eukaryotes, and in particular their links to epigenetic modifications, still remain elusive. By integrative analysis of the genome-wide distributions of thirteen epigenetic marks in the human cell line K562, at the 100 kb resolution of corresponding mean replication timing (MRT) data, we identify four major groups of chromatin marks with shared features. These states have different MRT, namely from early to late replicating, replication proceeds though a transcriptionally active euchromatin state (C1), a repressive type of chromatin (C2) associated with polycomb complexes, a silent state (C3) not enriched in any available marks, and a gene poor HP1-associated heterochromatin state (C4). When mapping these chromatin states inside the megabase-sized U-domains (U-shaped MRT profile) covering about 50% of the human genome, we reveal that the associated replication fork polarity gradient corresponds to a directional path across the four chromatin states, from C1 at U-domains borders followed by C2, C3 and C4 at centers. Analysis of the other genome half is consistent with early and late replication loci occurring in separate compartments, the former correspond to gene-rich, high-GC domains of intermingled chromatin states C1 and C2, whereas the latter correspond to gene-poor, low-GC domains of alternating chromatin states C3 and C4 or long C4 domains. This new segmentation sheds a new light on the epigenetic regulation of the spatio-temporal replication program in human and provides a

  3. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  4. Portfolio optimization with structured products under return constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baweja Meena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for optimizing risk in a portfolio of financial instruments involving structured products is presented. This paper deals with a portfolio selection model which uses optimization methodology to minimize conditional Value-at-Risk (CVaR under return constraint. It focuses on minimizing CVaR rather than on minimizing value-at-Risk VaR, as portfolios with low CVaR necessarily have low VaR as well. We consider a simple investment problem where besides stocks and bonds, the investor can also include structured products into the investment portfolio. Due to possible intermediate payments from structured product, we have to deal with a re-investment problem modeled as a linear optimization problem.

  5. Structural pounding of concrete frame structure with masonry infill wall under seismic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Rozaina; Hasnan, Mohd Hafizudin; Shamsudin, Nurhanis

    2017-10-01

    Structural pounding is additional problem than the other harmful damage that may occurs due to the earthquake vibrations. A lot of study has been made by past researcher but most of them did not include the walls. The infill masonry walls are rarely involved analysis of structural systems but it does contribute to earthquake response of the structures. In this research, a comparison between adjacent building of 10-storey and 7-storey concrete frame structure without of masonry infill walls and the same dynamic properties of buildings. The diagonal strut approach is adopted for modeling masonry infill walls. This research also focused on finding critical building separation in order to prevent the adjacent structures from pounding. LUSAS FEA v14.03 software has been used for modeling analyzing the behavior of structures due to seismic loading and the displacement each floor of the building has been taken in order to determine the critical separation distance between the buildings. From the analysis that has been done, it is found that masonry infill walls do affect the structures behavior under seismic load. Structures without masonry infill walls needs more distance between the structures to prevent structural pounding due to higher displacement of the buildings when it sways under seismic load compared to structures with masonry infill walls. This shows that contribution of masonry infill walls to the analysis of structures cannot be neglected.

  6. Optimal Tuned Mass Damper for Nonlinear Structure under Different Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shakeri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since there is no closed-form formula for designing TMD (Tuned Mass Damper for nonlinear structures, some researchers have proposed numerical optimization procedures such as a genetic algorithm to obtain the optimal values of TMD parameters for nonlinear structures. These methods are based on determining the optimal values of TMD parameters to minimize the maximum response (e.g. inter story drift of the controlled structure subjected to a specific earthquake record. Therefore, the performance of TMD that has been designed using a specific record strongly depends on the characteristics of the earthquake record. By changing the characteristics of the input earthquake record, the efficiency of TMD is changed and in some cases, it is possible that the response of the controlled structure is increased. To overcome the shortcomings of the previous researches, in this paper, an efficient method for designing optimal TMD on nonlinear structures is proposed, in which the effect of different ground motion records is considered in the design procedure. In the proposed method, the optimal value of the TMD parameters are determined so that the average maximum response (e.g. inter story drift resulting from different records in the controlled structure is minimized. To illustrate the procedure of the propose method, the method is used to design optimal TMD for a sample structure. The results of numerical simulations show that the average maximum response of controlled structure resulting from different records is reduced significantly. Hence, it can be concluded that the proposed method for designing optimal TMD under different earthquakes is effective.

  7. Crystalline structures of poly(L-lactide) formed under pressure and structure transitions with heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shaoyong; Li, Hongfei; Yu, Donghong

    2013-01-01

    The isothermally crystallized poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) samples were obtained at 135 °C under pressures (Pc) ranging from 1 bar to 2.5 kbar. The crystalline structures, the structure transition, and thermal properties of the prepared samples were investigated by wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD...

  8. Bisulfite sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA (BisChIP-seq) directly informs methylation status of histone-modified DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Statham, A.L.; Robinson, M.D.; Song, J.Z.; Coolen, M.W.; Stirzaker, C.; Clark, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    The complex relationship between DNA methylation, chromatin modification, and underlying DNA sequence is often difficult to unravel with existing technologies. Here, we describe a novel technique based on high-throughput sequencing of bisulfite-treated chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA (BisChIP-seq),

  9. Controlled DNA compaction within chromatin: the tail-bridging effect

    OpenAIRE

    Muehlbacher, Frank; Holm, Christian; Schiessel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    We study the mechanism underlying the attraction between nucleosomes, the fundamental packaging units of DNA inside the chromatin complex. We introduce a simple model of the nucleosome, the eight-tail colloid, consisting of a charged sphere with eight oppositely charged, flexible, grafted chains that represent the terminal histone tails. We demonstrate that our complexes are attracted via the formation of chain bridges and that this attraction can be tuned by changing the fraction of charged ...

  10. Circular chromatin complexes in human lymphocytes high-resolution autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becak, M.L.; Fukuda-Pizzocaro, K.; Santos, R. de C.S. dos; Brunner, O.

    1985-01-01

    Transcriptionally active chromatin fibers were observed in chromosomes presenting the loops/scaffold configuration. The active fibers showed altered nucleosomes and presented multiforked aspects which led to the formation of ring complexes. The ribonucleoprotein transcripts (RNP) appeared as networks of 0.1 μm or multiples tandemly disposed along the fiber. It is suggested that the ring complexes belong to the human genome. The possibility that these circular structures come from a prokaryote is also considered. (author) [pt

  11. Impact of chromatin structure on PR signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    techniques suggest that steroid receptors preferentially sequester within distinct nuclear hubs. We will integrate dynamic studies from single cells and genomic studies from cell populations, and discuss how genomic approaches have reshaped our current understanding of mechanisms that control steroid...

  12. Role of chromatin structure in telomere maintenance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kunická, Zuzana; Muselíková Polanská, Eva; Dvořáčková, Martina; Štros, Michal; Fajkus, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 28, 5C (2008), s. 193 ISSN 0250-7005. [Eighth International Conference of Anticancer Research. 17.10.2008-22.10.2008, Kos] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/1530 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : telomeres * epigenetics * heterochromatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Fatigue life prediction of mechanical structures under stochastic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner Bohuš

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems of fatigue life prediction of materials and structures are discussed in the paper. Service loading is assumed as a continuous loading process with possible discontinuous events, which are caused by various operating conditions. The damage in a material is due to a cumulative degradation process. The damaging process is then represented either by rain-flow matrices or by a fatigue damage function which is derived using some hypothesis of a fatigue failure criterion. Presented theoretical procedure enables a very effective estimation of a service life and/or reliable evaluation of residual life of any structures under various types of loading and environmental conditions. This approach creates a good basis for powerful expert systems in structural and mechanical engineering. The aim of the paper is to present briefly some results of analysis of load-bearing steel structure loads of special railway crane PKP 25/20i which was utilized in some specific ad relatively hard operating conditions. Virtual models of the structure were being used in an analysis of acting working dynamics loads influence to be able to forecast fatigue life of load-bearing of the crane jib.

  14. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.

    2013-10-17

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  15. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin-modifying proteins mold the genome into areas that are accessible for transcriptional activity and areas that are transcriptionally silent. This epigenetic gene regulation allows for different transcriptional programs to be conducted in different cell types at different timepoints......-despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  16. CARIBBEAN OFFSHORE CORPORATE STRUCTURES UNDER A SWOT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria GEAMÃNU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tax havens have long been under the attention of numerous Governments and International Organizations which triggered the concern of an uneven playing field in the taxation area. As a result numerous amendments have been made to both their commercial and tax legislations in order to be in line with the internationally agreed tax standards. The aim of this article is to conduct a SWOT analysis on the offshore corporate structures found in the Caribbean landscape. Based on a selection process of the most commonly recognized tax havens in the Caribbean region and an analysis of their offshore companies at the level of incorporation, administration, activities conducted and costs, a set of frequently met characteristics have been identified which stand at the basis of the SWOT analysis. The results stand to present a comprehensive four dimension framework of the offshore corporate structures in regards to their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

  17. Capital Structure Arbitrage under a Risk-Neutral Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Zeitsch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By reinterpreting the calibration of structural models, a reassessment of the importance of the input variables is undertaken. The analysis shows that volatility is the key parameter to any calibration exercise, by several orders of magnitude. To maximize the sensitivity to volatility, a simple formulation of Merton’s model is proposed that employs deep out-of-the-money option implied volatilities. The methodology also eliminates the use of historic data to specify the default barrier, thereby leading to a full risk-neutral calibration. Subsequently, a new technique for identifying and hedging capital structure arbitrage opportunities is illustrated. The approach seeks to hedge the volatility risk, or vega, as opposed to the exposure from the underlying equity itself, or delta. The results question the efficacy of the common arbitrage strategy of only executing the delta hedge.

  18. Structural characterization of lipidic systems under nonequilibrium conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yaghmur, Anan; Rappolt, Michael

    2012-01-01

    manipulation techniques including, for instance, stop-flow mixing or rapid temperature-jump perturbation is given. Second, our recent synchrotron SAXS findings on the dynamic structural response of gold nanoparticle-loaded vesicles upon exposure to an ultraviolet light source, the impact of rapidly mixing...... and the possible formation of intermediate states in the millisecond to second range. The need for investigating self-assembled systems, mainly stimuli-responsive drug nanocarriers, under nonequilibrium conditions is discussed. For pharmaceutically relevant applications, it is essential to combine...

  19. Structural Behavior of SC and RC Panels under Impact Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyuk-Kee; Kim, Seung-Eock [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    NPP structures have been generally constructed using reinforced concrete (RC) structures. In recent studies, however, it has been confirmed that a steel-plate concrete (SC) structures has a much better impact resistance than an RC structure. In this paper, the impact resistance of SC and RC panels is evaluated using the commercial software LS-DYNA. To verify finite element (FE) models, the analysis results for SC and half steel-plate concrete panels under impact loading are compared with the test results conducted in other research. The impact analysis according to the different steel ratios with four different concrete thicknesses is performed in order to compare the impact resistance of SC and RC panels. To compare the impact resistance of SC and RC panels, the impact analysis was performed according to the different steel ratios with four different concrete thicknesses. Based on this study, the following conclusions have been obtained: (1) The rear face steel plate of SC panel plays more important role than the rear rebar of RC panel in preventing perforation. (2) When the perforation failure occurs, RC panel is more effective than SC panel to reduce the velocity of the missile.

  20. On structural design optimization under uncertainty and risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teofilo Beck, Andre; Santana Gomes, Wellison Jose de

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of uncertainty and risk on structural design optimization are investigated, by comparing results of Deterministic Design Optimization (DDO), Reliability-based Design Optimization (RBDO) and Reliability-based Risk Optimization (RBRO). DDO yields a structural topology (or shape) which is optimum in terms of mechanics, but does not explicitly address parameter uncertainties and their effects on structural safety. RBDO properly models safety-under-uncertainty, allowing the optimum structure to maintain an acceptable level of safety. Results, however, are dependent on the failure probability used as constraint. Risk optimization (RBRO) increases the scope of the problem, by addressing the compromising goals of economy and safety. This is accomplished by quantifying the costs associated to construction, operation and maintenance, as well as the monetary consequences of failure. RBRO yields the optimum topology and the optimum point of balance between economy and safety. Results are compared for some example problems. The broader RBRO solution is found first, and optimum results are used as constraints in DDO and RBDO. Results show that even when the optimum safety coefficients are used as constraint in DDO, the formulation leads to optimum configurations which respect these design constraints, reduce manufacturing costs but increase total expected costs (including expected cost of failure). If the (optimum) system failure probability is used as constraint in RBDO, the optimum solution reduces manufacturing costs, but by increasing total expected costs. This happens when the costs associated to different failure modes are distinct.

  1. Topological spin-singlet superconductors with underlying sublattice structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutreix, C.

    2017-07-01

    Majorana boundary quasiparticles may naturally emerge in a spin-singlet superconductor with Rashba spin-orbit interactions when a Zeeman magnetic field breaks time-reversal symmetry. Their existence and robustness against adiabatic changes is deeply related, via a bulk-edge correspondence, to topological properties of the band structure. The present paper shows that the spin-orbit may be responsible for topological transitions when the superconducting system has an underlying sublattice structure, as it appears in a dimerized Peierls chain, graphene, and phosphorene. These systems, which belong to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes class D, are found to have an extra symmetry that plays the role of the parity. It enables the characterization of the topology of the particle-hole symmetric band structure in terms of band inversions. The topological phase diagrams this leads to are then obtained analytically and exactly. They reveal that, because of the underlying sublattice structure, the existence of topological superconducting phases requires a minimum doping fixed by the strength of the Rashba spin orbit. Majorana boundary quasiparticles are finally predicted to emerge when the Fermi level lies in the vicinity of the bottom (top) of the conduction (valence) band in semiconductors such as the dimerized Peierls chain and phosphorene. In a two-dimensional topological superconductor based on (stretched) graphene, which is semimetallic, Majorana quasiparticles cannot emerge at zero and low doping, that is, when the Fermi level is close to the Dirac points. Nevertheless, they are likely to appear in the vicinity of the van Hove singularities.

  2. Stability assessment of structures under earthquake hazard through GRID technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto Castrillo, F.; Boton Fernandez, M.

    2009-04-01

    This work presents a GRID framework to estimate the vulnerability of structures under earthquake hazard. The tool has been designed to cover the needs of a typical earthquake engineering stability analysis; preparation of input data (pre-processing), response computation and stability analysis (post-processing). In order to validate the application over GRID, a simplified model of structure under artificially generated earthquake records has been implemented. To achieve this goal, the proposed scheme exploits the GRID technology and its main advantages (parallel intensive computing, huge storage capacity and collaboration analysis among institutions) through intensive interaction among the GRID elements (Computing Element, Storage Element, LHC File Catalogue, federated database etc.) The dynamical model is described by a set of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) and by a set of parameters. Both elements, along with the integration engine, are encapsulated into Java classes. With this high level design, subsequent improvements/changes of the model can be addressed with little effort. In the procedure, an earthquake record database is prepared and stored (pre-processing) in the GRID Storage Element (SE). The Metadata of these records is also stored in the GRID federated database. This Metadata contains both relevant information about the earthquake (as it is usual in a seismic repository) and also the Logical File Name (LFN) of the record for its later retrieval. Then, from the available set of accelerograms in the SE, the user can specify a range of earthquake parameters to carry out a dynamic analysis. This way, a GRID job is created for each selected accelerogram in the database. At the GRID Computing Element (CE), displacements are then obtained by numerical integration of the ODE's over time. The resulting response for that configuration is stored in the GRID Storage Element (SE) and the maximum structure displacement is computed. Then, the corresponding

  3. Antisense transcription-dependent chromatin signature modulates sense transcript dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas; Howe, Françoise S; Murray, Struan C; Wouters, Meredith; Lorenz, Philipp; Seward, Emily; Rata, Scott; Angel, Andrew; Mellor, Jane

    2018-02-12

    Antisense transcription is widespread in genomes. Despite large differences in gene size and architecture, we find that yeast and human genes share a unique, antisense transcription-associated chromatin signature. We asked whether this signature is related to a biological function for antisense transcription. Using quantitative RNA-FISH, we observed changes in sense transcript distributions in nuclei and cytoplasm as antisense transcript levels were altered. To determine the mechanistic differences underlying these distributions, we developed a mathematical framework describing transcription from initiation to transcript degradation. At GAL1 , high levels of antisense transcription alter sense transcription dynamics, reducing rates of transcript production and processing, while increasing transcript stability. This relationship with transcript stability is also observed as a genome-wide association. Establishing the antisense transcription-associated chromatin signature through disruption of the Set3C histone deacetylase activity is sufficient to similarly change these rates even in the absence of antisense transcription. Thus, antisense transcription alters sense transcription dynamics in a chromatin-dependent manner. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  4. Chromatin Conformation Capture-Based Analysis of Nuclear Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Stefan; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear organization and higher-order chromosome structure in interphase nuclei are thought to have important effects on fundamental biological processes, including chromosome condensation, replication, and transcription. Until recently, however, nuclear organization could only be analyzed microscopically. The development of chromatin conformation capture (3C)-based techniques now allows a detailed look at chromosomal architecture from the level of individual loci to the entire genome. Here we provide a robust Hi-C protocol, allowing the analysis of nuclear organization in nuclei from different wild-type and mutant plant tissues. This method is quantitative and provides a highly efficient and comprehensive way to study chromatin organization during plant development, in response to different environmental stimuli, and in mutants disrupting a variety of processes, including epigenetic pathways regulating gene expression.

  5. Structural Health Monitoring under Nonlinear Environmental or Operational Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Kullaa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration-based structural health monitoring is based on detecting changes in the dynamic characteristics of the structure. It is well known that environmental or operational variations can also have an influence on the vibration properties. If these effects are not taken into account, they can result in false indications of damage. If the environmental or operational variations cause nonlinear effects, they can be compensated using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM without the measurement of the underlying variables. The number of Gaussian components can also be estimated. For the local linear components, minimum mean square error (MMSE estimation is applied to eliminate the environmental or operational influences. Damage is detected from the residuals after applying principal component analysis (PCA. Control charts are used for novelty detection. The proposed approach is validated using simulated data and the identified lowest natural frequencies of the Z24 Bridge under temperature variation. Nonlinear models are most effective if the data dimensionality is low. On the other hand, linear models often outperform nonlinear models for high-dimensional data.

  6. Genome-wide chromatin mapping with size resolution reveals a dynamic sub-nucleosomal landscape in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Daniel Antony; Sornay, Emily; Marchbank, Angela; Crawford, Margaret R; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kent, Nicholas A; Murray, James A H

    2017-09-01

    All eukaryotic genomes are packaged as chromatin, with DNA interlaced with both regularly patterned nucleosomes and sub-nucleosomal-sized protein structures such as mobile and labile transcription factors (TF) and initiation complexes, together forming a dynamic chromatin landscape. Whilst details of nucleosome position in Arabidopsis have been previously analysed, there is less understanding of their relationship to more dynamic sub-nucleosomal particles (subNSPs) defined as protected regions shorter than the ~150bp typical of nucleosomes. The genome-wide profile of these subNSPs has not been previously analysed in plants and this study investigates the relationship of dynamic bound particles with transcriptional control. Here we combine differential micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion and a modified paired-end sequencing protocol to reveal the chromatin structure landscape of Arabidopsis cells across a wide particle size range. Linking this data to RNAseq expression analysis provides detailed insight into the relationship of identified DNA-bound particles with transcriptional activity. The use of differential digestion reveals sensitive positions, including a labile -1 nucleosome positioned upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) of active genes. We investigated the response of the chromatin landscape to changes in environmental conditions using light and dark growth, given the large transcriptional changes resulting from this simple alteration. The resulting shifts in the suites of expressed and repressed genes show little correspondence to changes in nucleosome positioning, but led to significant alterations in the profile of subNSPs upstream of TSS both globally and locally. We examined previously mapped positions for the TFs PIF3, PIF4 and CCA1, which regulate light responses, and found that changes in subNSPs co-localized with these binding sites. This small particle structure is detected only under low levels of MNase digestion and is lost on more

  7. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain...... with the ATPase module mediates auto-inhibition. PARP1 activation suppresses this inhibitory interaction. Crucially, release from auto-inhibition requires a poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) binding macrodomain. We identify tri-ADP-ribose as a potent PAR-mimic and synthetic allosteric effector that abrogates ATPase......-macrodomain interactions, promotes an ungated conformation, and activates the remodeler's ATPase. ALC1 fragments lacking the regulatory macrodomain relax chromatin in vivo without requiring PARP1 activation. Further, the ATPase restricts the macrodomain's interaction with PARP1 under non-DNA damage conditions. Somatic...

  8. Chromatin Pioneers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taking advantage of their ability to explore provocative ideas, NCI investigators pioneered the study of chromatin to demonstrate its functional importance and lay the groundwork for understanding its role in cancer and other diseases.

  9. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin -- a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins -- is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  10. Large-scale chromatin morpho-functional changes during mammalian oocyte growth and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, A M; Lodde, V; Franciosi, F; Tessaro, I; Corbani, D; Modina, S

    2012-08-10

    Mammalian oocyte development is characterized by impressive changes in chromatin structure and function within the germinal vesicle (GV). These changes are crucial to confer the oocyte with meiotic and developmental competencies. In cow, oocytes collected from early and middle antral follicles present four patterns of chromatin configuration, from GV0 to GV3, and its progressive condensation has been related to the achievement of developmental potential. During oogenesis, follicular cells are essential for the acquisition of meiotic and developmental competencies and communicate with the oocyte by paracrine and gap junction mediated mechanisms. We recently analyzed the role of gap junction communications (GJC) on chromatin remodeling process during the specific phase of folliculogenesis that coincides with the transcriptional silencing and sequential acquisition of meiotic and developmental capabilities. Our studies demonstrated that GJC between germinal and somatic compartments plays a fundamental role in the regulation of chromatin remodeling and transcription activities during the final oocyte differentiation, throughout cAMP dependent mechanism(s).

  11. Probabilistic modelling of chromatin code landscape reveals functional diversity of enhancer-like chromatin states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting the functional state of chromatin from the combinatorial binding patterns of chromatin factors, that is, the chromatin codes, is crucial for decoding the epigenetic state of the cell. Here we present a systematic map of Drosophila chromatin states derived from data-driven probabilistic modelling of dependencies between chromatin factors. Our model not only recapitulates enhancer-like chromatin states as indicated by widely used enhancer marks but also divides these states into three functionally distinct groups, of which only one specific group possesses active enhancer activity. Moreover, we discover a strong association between one specific enhancer state and RNA Polymerase II pausing, linking transcription regulatory potential and chromatin organization. We also observe that with the exception of long-intron genes, chromatin state transition positions in transcriptionally active genes align with an absolute distance to their corresponding transcription start site, regardless of gene length. Using our method, we provide a resource that helps elucidate the functional and spatial organization of the chromatin code landscape. PMID:26841971

  12. Anatomical position of the asterion and its underlying structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripairojkul, B; Adultrakoon, A

    2000-09-01

    Surface anatomy is important for surgical planning. The asterion has been believed and used for locating the underlying posterior fossa dura. To prove whether this landmark is reliable or not, forty-three fixed heads of cadaver were dissected. A burr hole was made on the asterion and its underlying structure was examined. Seventy-four point four per cent (74.4%) of the asterion on the right side were adjacent to the transverse-sigmoid sinus complex when compared to 58.1 per cent on the left. Twenty-three point three per cent (23.3%) of the asterion on the right side were found over the infratentorial dura while that on the left side were 32.6 per cent. Two point three per cent (2.3%) of the asterion were located over the supratentorial dura on the right and 9.3 per cent on the left side. It is concluded, therefore, that the asterion is not an appropriate landmark to locate the underlying posterior fossa dura.

  13. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koski, Kristie Jo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-31

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  14. Chromatin organization changes during the establishment and maintenance of the postmitotic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yiqin; Buttitta, Laura

    2017-11-10

    Genome organization changes during development as cells differentiate. Chromatin motion becomes increasingly constrained and heterochromatin clusters as cells become restricted in their developmental potential. These changes coincide with slowing of the cell cycle, which can also influence chromatin organization and dynamics. Terminal differentiation is often coupled with permanent exit from the cell cycle, and existing data suggest a close relationship between a repressive chromatin structure and silencing of the cell cycle in postmitotic cells. Heterochromatin clustering could also contribute to stable gene repression to maintain terminal differentiation or cell cycle exit, but whether clustering is initiated by differentiation, cell cycle changes, or both is unclear. Here we examine the relationship between chromatin organization, terminal differentiation and cell cycle exit. We focused our studies on the Drosophila wing, where epithelial cells transition from active proliferation to a postmitotic state in a temporally controlled manner. We find there are two stages of G 0 in this tissue, a flexible G 0 period where cells can be induced to reenter the cell cycle under specific genetic manipulations and a state we call "robust," where cells become strongly refractory to cell cycle reentry. Compromising the flexible G 0 by driving ectopic expression of cell cycle activators causes a global disruption of the clustering of heterochromatin-associated histone modifications such as H3K27 trimethylation and H3K9 trimethylation, as well as their associated repressors, Polycomb and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). However, this disruption is reversible. When cells enter a robust G 0 state, even in the presence of ectopic cell cycle activity, clustering of heterochromatin-associated modifications is restored. If cell cycle exit is bypassed, cells in the wing continue to terminally differentiate, but heterochromatin clustering is severely disrupted. Heterochromatin

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of Chromatin States Reveals Distinct Mechanisms of Sex-Dependent Gene Regulation in Male and Female Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugathan, Aarathi

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin state maps were developed to elucidate sex differences in chromatin structure and their impact on sex-differential chromatin accessibility and sex-biased gene expression in mouse liver. Genes in active, inactive, and poised chromatin states exhibited differential responsiveness to ligand-activated nuclear receptors and distinct enrichments for functional gene categories. Sex-biased genes were clustered by chromatin environments and mapped to DNase-hypersensitive sites (DHS) classified by sex bias in chromatin accessibility and enhancer modifications. Results were integrated with genome-wide binding data for five transcription factors implicated in growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased liver gene expression, leading to the following findings. (i) Sex-biased DHS, but not sex-biased genes, are frequently characterized by sex-differential chromatin states, indicating distal regulation. (ii) Trimethylation of histone H3 at K27 (H3K27me3) is a major sex-biased repressive mark at highly female-biased but not at highly male-biased genes. (iii) FOXA factors are associated with sex-dependent chromatin opening at male-biased but not female-biased regulatory sites. (iv) Sex-biased STAT5 binding is enriched at sex-biased DHS marked as active enhancers and preferentially targets sex-biased genes with sex-differences in local chromatin marks. (v) The male-biased repressor BCL6 preferentially targets female-biased genes and regulatory sites in a sex-independent chromatin state. (vi) CUX2, a female-specific repressor of male-biased genes, also activates strongly female-biased genes, in association with loss of H3K27me3 marks. Chromatin states are thus a major determinant of sex-biased chromatin accessibility and gene expression, with FOXA pioneer factors proposed to confer sex-dependent chromatin opening and STAT5, but not BCL6, regulating sex-biased genes by binding to sites in a sex-biased chromatin state. PMID:23836885

  16. Instrumental variables estimation under a structural Cox model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Torben; Nørbo Sørensen, Ditte; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2017-01-01

    Instrumental variable (IV) analysis is an increasingly popular tool for inferring the effect of an exposure on an outcome, as witnessed by the growing number of IV applications in epidemiology, for instance. The majority of IV analyses of time-to-event endpoints are, however, dominated by heuristic...... and instruments. We propose a novel class of estimators and derive their asymptotic properties. The methodology is illustrated using two real data applications, and using simulated data....... approaches. More rigorous proposals have either sidestepped the Cox model, or considered it within a restrictive context with dichotomous exposure and instrument, amongst other limitations. The aim of this article is to reconsider IV estimation under a structural Cox model, allowing for arbitrary exposure...

  17. Graded Geometric Structures Underlying F-Theory Related Defect Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2013-08-01

    In the context of F-theory, we study the related eight-dimensional super-Yang-Mills theory and reveal the underlying supersymmetric quantum mechanics algebra that the fermionic fields localized on the corresponding defect theory are related to. Particularly, the localized fermionic fields constitute a graded vector space, and in turn this graded space enriches the geometric structures that can be built on the initial eight-dimensional space. We construct the implied composite fiber bundles, which include the graded affine vector space and demonstrate that the composite sections of this fiber bundle are in one-to-one correspondence to the sections of the square root of the canonical bundle corresponding to the submanifold on which the zero modes are localized.

  18. Chromatin Dynamics during Lytic Infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kristen L.; Schang, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Latent HSV-1 genomes are chromatinized with silencing marks. Since 2004, however, there has been an apparent inconsistency in the studies of the chromatinization of the HSV-1 genomes in lytically infected cells. Nuclease protection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggested that the genomes were not regularly chromatinized, having only low histone occupancy. However, the chromatin modifications associated with transcribed and non-transcribed HSV-1 genes were those associated with active or repressed transcription, respectively. Moreover, the three critical HSV-1 transcriptional activators all had the capability to induce chromatin remodelling, and interacted with critical chromatin modifying enzymes. Depletion or overexpression of some, but not all, chromatin modifying proteins affected HSV-1 transcription, but often in unexpected manners. Since 2010, it has become clear that both cellular and HSV-1 chromatins are highly dynamic in infected cells. These dynamics reconcile the weak interactions between HSV-1 genomes and chromatin proteins, detected by nuclease protection and chromatin immunoprecipitation, with the proposed regulation of HSV-1 gene expression by chromatin, supported by the marks in the chromatin in the viral genomes and the abilities of the HSV-1 transcription activators to modulate chromatin. It also explains the sometimes unexpected results of interventions to modulate chromatin remodelling activities in infected cells. PMID:23863878

  19. Behavior of grid-stiffened composite structures under transverse loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Changsheng

    The energy absorption characteristics and failure modes of grid-stiffened composite plates under transverse load were studied in detail. Several laboratory scale composite grid plates were fabricated by using co-mingled E-glass fiber/polypropylene matrix and carbon/nylon composites in a thermoplastic stamping process. Both experimental and finite element approaches were used to evaluate and understand the role of major failure modes on the performance of damaged grid-stiffened composite plates under transverse load. The load-deflection responses of grid-stiffened composite plates were determined and compared with those of sandwich composite plates of the same size. The failure modes of grid-stiffened composite plates under different load conditions were investigated and used as the basis for FEA models. The intrinsic strength properties of constituent composite materials were measured by using either three point bending or tensile test and were used as input data to the FEA models. Several FEA models including the major failure modes based on the experimental results were built to simulate the damage processes of grid-stiffened composite plates under transverse load. A FORTRAN subroutine was implemented within the ABAQUS code to incorporate the material failure models. Effects of damage on the modal frequencies and loss factors of grid-stiffened composite plates were also investigated experimentally. Experimental and simulation results showed that sandwich composite specimens failed catastrophically with the load dropping sharply at the displacement corresponding to initial and final failure. However, grid-stiffened composite specimens failed in a more gradual and forgiving way in a sequence of relatively small load drops. No catastrophic load drops were observed in the grid structures over the range of displacements investigated here. The SEA values of the grid composite specimens are typically higher than those of the sandwich specimens with the same boundary

  20. Transcription-dependent association of HDAC2 with active chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, Sanzida; Sun, Jian-Min; He, Shihua; Davie, James R

    2018-02-01

    Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) catalyzes deacetylation of histones at the promoter and coding regions of transcribed genes and regulates chromatin structure and transcription. To explore the role of HDAC2 and phosphorylated HDAC2 in gene regulation, we studied the location along transcribed genes, the mode of recruitment and the associated proteins with HDAC2 and HDAC2S394ph in chicken polychromatic erythrocytes. We show that HDAC2 and HDAC2S394ph are associated with transcriptionally active chromatin and located in the interchromatin channels. HDAC2S394ph was present primarly at the upstream promoter region of the transcribed CA2 and GAS41 genes, while total HDAC2 was also found within the coding region of the CA2 gene. Recruitment of HDAC2 to these genes was partially dependent upon on-going transcription. Unmodified HDAC2 was associated with RNA binding proteins and interacted with RNA bound to the initiating and elongating forms of RNA polymerase II. HDAC2S394ph was not associated with RNA polymerase II. These results highlight the differential properties of unmodified and phosphorylated HDAC2 and the organization of acetylated transcriptionally active chromatin in the chicken polychromatic erythrocyte. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Structural evolution of zirconium carbide under ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosset, D. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMA, F-91191 Gif/Yvette cedex (France)], E-mail: dominique.gosset@cea.fr; Dolle, M. [CEMES-CNRS (UPR 8011), BP 94347, F-31055 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Simeone, D. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMA, F-91191 Gif/Yvette cedex (France); Baldinozzi, G. [SPMS, Ecole Centrale Paris, F-92295 Chatenay-Malabry cedex (France); Thome, L. [CSNSM, bat. 108, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2008-02-15

    Zirconium carbide is one of the candidate materials to be used for some fuel components of the high temperature nuclear reactors planned in the frame of the Gen-IV project. Few data exist regarding its behaviour under irradiation. We have irradiated ZrC samples at room temperature with slow heavy ions (4 MeV Au, fluence from 10{sup 11} to 5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}) in order to simulate neutron irradiations. Grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis have been performed in order to study the microstructural evolution of the material versus ion fluence. A high sensitivity to oxidation is observed with the formation of zirconia precipitates during the ion irradiations. Three damage stages are observed. At low fluence (<10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}), low modifications are observed. At intermediate fluence, high micro-strains appear together with small faulted dislocation loops. At the highest fluence (>10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}), the micro-strains saturate and the loops coalesce to form a dense dislocation network. No other structural modification is observed. The material shows a moderate cell parameter increase, corresponding to a 0.6 vol.% swelling, which saturates around 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}, i.e., a few Zr dpa. As a result, in spite of a strong covalent bonding component, ZrC seems to have a behaviour under irradiation close to cubic metals.

  2. Analysis of Dynamic Properties of Piezoelectric Structure under Impact Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model of the dynamic properties is established for a piezoelectric structure under impact load, without considering noise and perturbations in this paper. Based on the general theory of piezo-elasticity and impact mechanics, the theoretical solutions of the mechanical and electrical fields of the smart structure are obtained with the standing and traveling wave methods, respectively. The comparisons between the two methods have shown that the standing wave method is better for studying long-time response after an impact load. In addition, good agreements are found between the theoretical and the numerical results. To simulate the impact load, both triangle and step pulse loads are used and comparisons are given. Furthermore, the influence of several parameters is discussed so as to provide some advices for practical use. It can be seen that the proposed analytical model would benefit, to some extent, the design and application (especially the airport runway of the related smart devices by taking into account their impact load performance.

  3. BACKSTEPPING ALGORITHM FOR LINEAR SISO PLANTS UNDER STRUCTURAL UNCERTAINTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Furtat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust algorithm is proposed for parametric and structurally uncertain linear plants under external bounded disturbances. The structural uncertainty is an unknown dynamic order of the model of plants. The developed algorithm provides plant output tracking for a smooth bounded reference signal with a required accuracy at a finite time. It is assumed that only scalar input and output of the plants are available for measurement, but not their derivatives. For the synthesis of the control algorithm we use a modified backstepping algorithm. The synthesis of control algorithm is separated into rsteps, where ris an upper bound of the relative degree of control plant model. At each step we synthesize auxiliary controls that stabilize each subsystem about a zero. At the last step we synthesize a basic control law, which provides output tracking for smooth reference signal. It is shown that for the implementation of the algorithm we need to use only one filter of the control signal and the simplified control laws obtained by application of the real derivative elements. It allows simplifying significantly the calculation and implementation of the control system. Numerical examples and results of computer simulation are given, illustrating the operation of the proposed scheme.

  4. On the underlying gauge group structure of D=11 supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandos, I.A.; Azcarraga, J.A. de; Izquierdo, J.M.; Picon, M.; Varela, O.

    2004-01-01

    The underlying gauge group structure of D=11 supergravity is revisited. It may be described by a one-parametric family of Lie supergroups Σ-bar (s)x-bar SO(1,10), s 0. The family of superalgebras E-bar (s) associated to Σ-bar (s) is given by a family of extensions of the M-algebra {Pa,Qα,Zab,Za1...a5} by an additional fermionic central charge Qα'. The Chevalley-Eilenberg four-cocycle ω4∼Πα-bar Πβ-bar Πa-bar ΠbΓabαβ on the standard D=11 supersymmetry algebra may be trivialized on E-bar (s), and this implies that the three-form field A3 of D=11 supergravity may be expressed as a composite of the Σ-bar (s) one-form gauge fields ea, ψα, Bab, Ba1...a5 and ηα. Two superalgebras of E-bar (s) recover the two earlier D'Auria and Fre decompositions of A3. Another member of E-bar (s) allows for a simpler composite structure for A3 that does not involve the Ba1...a5 field. Σ-bar (s) is a deformation of Σ-bar (0), which is singularized by having an enhanced Sp(32) (rather than just SO(1,10)) automorphism symmetry and by being an expansion of OSp(1 vertical bar 32)

  5. Wavelet transform analysis of chromatin texture changes during heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbomel, G; Grichine, A; Fertin, A; Delon, A; Vourc'h, C; Souchier, C; Usson, Y

    2016-06-01

    Texture analysis can be a useful tool to investigate the organization of chromatin. Approaches based on multiscale analysis and in particular the 'à trou' wavelet analysis has already been used for microscopy (Olivo Marin). In order to analyse texture changes, the statistical properties of the wavelet coefficient images were summarized by the first four statistical orders: mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis of the coefficient image histogram. The 'à trou' transform provided a representation of the wavelet coefficients and texture parameters with the same statistical robustness throughout the scale spaces. It was applied for quantifying chromatin texture and heat-induced chromatin changes in living cells. We investigated the changes by both laser scanning and spinning disk confocal microscopies and compared the texture parameters before and after increasing duration of heat shock exposure (15 min, 30 min and 1 h). Furthermore, as activation of the heat shock response also correlates with a rapid localization of HSF1 within a few nuclear structures termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs), we compared the dynamics of nSBs formation with that of textural changes during 1 h of continuous heat shock. Next, we studied the recovery phase following a 1-h heat shock. Significant differences were observed, particularly affecting the perinucleolar region, even for the shortest heat shock time affecting mostly the skewness and standard deviation. Furthermore, progressive changes could be observed according to the duration of heat shock, mostly affecting fine details (pixel-wise changes) as revealed by the parameters, obtained from the first- and second-order wavelet coefficients. 'A trou' wavelet texture analysis provided a sensitive and efficient tool to investigate minute changes of chromatin. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Developmentally Regulated Recruitment of Transcription Factors and Chromatin Modification Activities to Chicken Lysozyme cis-Regulatory Elements In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Pascal; Melnik, Svitlana; Wilson, Nicola; Riggs, Arthur D.; Bonifer, Constanze

    2003-01-01

    Expression of the chicken lysozyme gene is upregulated during macrophage differentiation and reaches its highest level in bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. This is accompanied by complex alterations in chromatin structure. We have previously shown that chromatin fine-structure alterations precede the onset of gene expression in macrophage precursor cells and mark the lysozyme chromatin domain for expression later in development. To further examine this phenomenon and to investigate the basis for the differentiation-dependent alterations of lysozyme chromatin, we studied the recruitment of transcription factors to the lysozyme locus in vivo at different stages of myeloid differentiation. Factor recruitment occurred in several steps. First, early-acting transcription factors such as NF1 and Fli-1 bound to a subset of enhancer elements and recruited CREB-binding protein. LPS stimulation led to an additional recruitment of C/EBPβ and a significant change in enhancer and promoter structure. Transcription factor recruitment was accompanied by specific changes in histone modification within the lysozyme chromatin domain. Interestingly, we present evidence for a transient interaction of transcription factors with lysozyme chromatin in lysozyme-nonexpressing macrophage precursors, which was accompanied by a partial demethylation of CpG sites. This indicates that a partially accessible chromatin structure of lineage-specific genes is a hallmark of hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:12773578

  7. Enhanced chromatin accessibility of the dosage compensated Drosophila male X-chromosome requires the CLAMP zinc finger protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jennifer; Kuzu, Guray; Bowman, Sarah; Scruggs, Benjamin; Henriques, Telmo; Kingston, Robert; Adelman, Karen; Tolstorukov, Michael; Larschan, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The essential process of dosage compensation is required to equalize gene expression of X-chromosome genes between males (XY) and females (XX). In Drosophila, the conserved Male-specific lethal (MSL) histone acetyltransferase complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcript levels from genes on the single male X-chromosome approximately two-fold. Consistent with its increased levels of transcription, the male X-chromosome has enhanced chromatin accessibility, distinguishing it from the autosomes. Here, we demonstrate that the non-sex-specific CLAMP (Chromatin-linked adaptor for MSL proteins) zinc finger protein that recognizes GA-rich sequences genome-wide promotes the specialized chromatin environment on the male X-chromosome and can act over long genomic distances (~14 kb). Although MSL complex is required for increasing transcript levels of X-linked genes, it is not required for enhancing global male X-chromosome chromatin accessibility, and instead works cooperatively with CLAMP to facilitate an accessible chromatin configuration at its sites of highest occupancy. Furthermore, CLAMP regulates chromatin structure at strong MSL complex binding sites through promoting recruitment of the Nucleosome Remodeling Factor (NURF) complex. In contrast to the X-chromosome, CLAMP regulates chromatin and gene expression on autosomes through a distinct mechanism that does not involve NURF recruitment. Overall, our results support a model where synergy between a non-sex-specific transcription factor (CLAMP) and a sex-specific cofactor (MSL) creates a specialized chromatin domain on the male X-chromosome.

  8. Self-assembled FUS binds active chromatin and regulates gene transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liuqing; Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Fused in sarcoma (FUS) is a DNA/RNA binding protein and mutations in FUS cause a subset of familial ALS. Most ALS mutations are clustered in the C-terminal nuclear localization sequence of FUS and consequently lead to the accumulation of protein inclusions in the cytoplasm. It remains debatable whether loss of FUS normal function in the nucleus or gain of toxic function in the cytoplasm plays a more critical role in the ALS etiology. Moreover, the physiological function of FUS in the nucleus remains to be fully understood. In this study, we found that a significant portion of nuclear FUS was bound to active chromatin and that the ALS mutations dramatically decreased FUS chromatin binding ability. Functionally, the chromatin binding is required for FUS transcription activation, but not for alternative splicing regulation. The N-terminal QGSY (glutamine-glycine-serine-tyrosine)-rich region (amino acids 1–164) mediates FUS self-assembly in the nucleus of mammalian cells and the self-assembly is essential for its chromatin binding and transcription activation. In addition, RNA binding is also required for FUS self-assembly and chromatin binding. Together, our results suggest a functional assembly of FUS in the nucleus under physiological conditions, which is different from the cytoplasmic inclusions. The ALS mutations can cause loss of function in the nucleus by disrupting this assembly and chromatin binding. PMID:25453086

  9. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R; Knobloch, Gunnar; Kistemaker, Hans A V; Hassler, Markus; Harrer, Nadine; Blessing, Charlotte; Eustermann, Sebastian; Kotthoff, Christiane; Huet, Sébastien; Mueller-Planitz, Felix; Filippov, Dmitri V; Timinszky, Gyula; Rand, Kasper D; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2017-12-07

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain with the ATPase module mediates auto-inhibition. PARP1 activation suppresses this inhibitory interaction. Crucially, release from auto-inhibition requires a poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) binding macrodomain. We identify tri-ADP-ribose as a potent PAR-mimic and synthetic allosteric effector that abrogates ATPase-macrodomain interactions, promotes an ungated conformation, and activates the remodeler's ATPase. ALC1 fragments lacking the regulatory macrodomain relax chromatin in vivo without requiring PARP1 activation. Further, the ATPase restricts the macrodomain's interaction with PARP1 under non-DNA damage conditions. Somatic cancer mutants disrupt ALC1's auto-inhibition and activate chromatin remodeling. Our data show that the NAD + -metabolite and nucleic acid PAR triggers ALC1 to drive chromatin relaxation. Modular allostery in this oncogene tightly controls its robust, DNA-damage-dependent activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 3D Chromatin Architecture of Large Plant Genomes Determined by Local A/B Compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pengfei; Tu, Xiaoyu; Chu, Po-Yu; Lü, Peitao; Zhu, Ning; Grierson, Donald; Du, Baijuan; Li, Pinghua; Zhong, Silin

    2017-12-04

    The spatial organization of the genome plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. However, the core structural features of animal genomes, such as topologically associated domains (TADs) and chromatin loops, are not prominent in the extremely compact Arabidopsis genome. In this study, we examine the chromatin architecture, as well as their DNA methylation, histone modifications, accessible chromatin, and gene expression, of maize, tomato, sorghum, foxtail millet, and rice with genome sizes ranging from 0.4 to 2.4 Gb. We found that these plant genomes can be divided into mammalian-like A/B compartments. At higher resolution, the chromosomes of these plants can be further partitioned to local A/B compartments that reflect their euchromatin, heterochromatin, and polycomb status. Chromatins in all these plants are organized into domains that are not conserved across species. They show similarity to the Drosophila compartment domains, and are clustered into active, polycomb, repressive, and intermediate types based on their transcriptional activities and epigenetic signatures, with domain border overlaps with the local A/B compartment junctions. In the large maize and tomato genomes, we observed extensive chromatin loops. However, unlike the mammalian chromatin loops that are enriched at the TAD border, plant chromatin loops are often formed between gene islands outside the repressive domains and are closely associated with active compartments. Our study indicates that plants have complex and unique 3D chromatin architectures, which require further study to elucidate their biological functions. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Ryuta; Inui, Masafumi; Hayashi, Yohei; Sedohara, Ayako [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Okabayashi, Koji [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kohnuma@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto, E-mail: asashi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Organ Development Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. {yields} Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  12. Chromatin remodeling of human subtelomeres and TERRA promoters upon cellular senescence: commonalities and differences between chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Peter E; Tobi, Elmar W; Balog, Judit; Schouten, Suzanne G; Kremer, Dennis; El Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Henneman, Peter; Putter, Hein; Eline Slagboom, P; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-05-01

    Subtelomeres are patchworks of evolutionary conserved sequence blocks and harbor the transcriptional start sites for telomere repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). Recent studies suggest that the interplay between telomeres and subtelomeric chromatin is required for maintaining telomere function. To further characterize chromatin remodeling of subtelomeres in relation to telomere shortening and cellular senescence, we systematically quantified histone modifications and DNA methylation at the subtelomeres of chromosomes 7q and 11q in primary human WI-38 fibroblasts. Upon senescence, both subtelomeres were characterized by a decrease in markers of constitutive heterochromatin, suggesting relative chromatin relaxation. However, we did not find increased levels of markers of euchromatin or derepression of the 7q VIPR2 gene. The repressed state of the subtelomeres was maintained upon senescence, which could be attributed to a rise in levels of facultative heterochromatin markers at both subtelomeres. While senescence-induced subtelomeric chromatin remodeling was similar for both chromosomes, chromatin remodeling at TERRA promoters displayed chromosome-specific patterns. At the 7q TERRA promoter, chromatin structure was co-regulated with the more proximal subtelomere. In contrast, the 11q TERRA promoter, which was previously shown to be bound by CCCTC-binding factor CTCF, displayed lower levels of markers of constitutive heterochromatin that did not change upon senescence, whereas levels of markers of facultative heterochromatin decreased upon senescence. In line with the chromatin state data, transcription of 11q TERRA but not 7q TERRA was detected. Our study provides a detailed description of human subtelomeric chromatin dynamics and shows distinct regulation of the TERRA promoters of 7q and 11q upon cellular senescence.

  13. Characteristic arrangement of nucleosomes is predictive of chromatin interactions at kilobase resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Feifei; Jia, Yan; Xu, Bingxiang; Zhang, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zhihua

    2017-12-15

    High-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technologies, such as Hi-C, have made it possible to survey 3D genome structure. However, obtaining 3D profiles at kilobase resolution at low cost remains a major challenge. Therefore, we herein present an algorithm for precise identification of chromatin interaction sites at kilobase resolution from MNase-seq data, termed chromatin interaction site detector (CISD), and a CISD-based chromatin loop predictor (CISD_loop) that predicts chromatin-chromatin interactions (CCIs) from low-resolution Hi-C data. We show that the predictions of CISD and CISD_loop overlap closely with chromatin interaction analysis by paired-end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) anchors and loops, respectively. The validity of CISD/CISD_loop was further supported by a 3C assay at about 5 kb resolution. Finally, we demonstrate that only modest amounts of MNase-seq and Hi-C data are sufficient to achieve ultrahigh resolution CCI maps. Our results suggest that CCIs may result in characteristic nucleosomes arrangement patterns flanking the interaction sites, and our algorithms may facilitate precise and systematic investigations of CCIs on a larger scale than hitherto have been possible. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. NuMA influences higher order chromatin organization in human mammary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Patricia C; Lewis, Jason; Mian, I Saira; Knowles, David W; Sturgis, Jennifer; Badve, Sunil; Xie, Jun; Lelièvre, Sophie A

    2007-02-01

    The coiled-coil protein NuMA is an important contributor to mitotic spindle formation and stabilization. A potential role for NuMA in nuclear organization or gene regulation is suggested by the observations that its pattern of nuclear distribution depends upon cell phenotype and that it interacts and/or colocalizes with transcription factors. To date, the precise contribution of NuMA to nuclear function remains unclear. Previously, we observed that antibody-induced alteration of NuMA distribution in growth-arrested and differentiated mammary epithelial structures (acini) in three-dimensional culture triggers the loss of acinar differentiation. Here, we show that in mammary epithelial cells, NuMA is present in both the nuclear matrix and chromatin compartments. Expression of a portion of the C terminus of NuMA that shares sequence similarity with the chromatin regulator HPC2 is sufficient to inhibit acinar differentiation and results in the redistribution of NuMA, chromatin markers acetyl-H4 and H4K20m, and regions of deoxyribonuclease I-sensitive chromatin compared with control cells. Short-term alteration of NuMA distribution with anti-NuMA C-terminus antibodies in live acinar cells indicates that changes in NuMA and chromatin organization precede loss of acinar differentiation. These findings suggest that NuMA has a role in mammary epithelial differentiation by influencing the organization of chromatin.

  15. Determining spatial chromatin organization of large genomic regions using 5C technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkum, Nynke L; Dekker, Job

    2009-01-01

    Spatial organization of chromatin plays an important role at multiple levels of genome regulation. On a global scale, its function is evident in processes like metaphase and chromosome segregation. On a detailed level, long-range interactions between regulatory elements and promoters are essential for proper gene regulation. Microscopic techniques like FISH can detect chromatin contacts, although the resolution is generally low making detection of enhancer-promoter interaction difficult. The 3C methodology allows for high-resolution analysis of chromatin interactions. 3C is now widely used and has revealed that long-range looping interactions between genomic elements are widespread. However, studying chromatin interactions in large genomic regions by 3C is very labor intensive. This limitation is overcome by the 5C technology. 5C is an adaptation of 3C, in which the concurrent use of thousands of primers permits the simultaneous detection of millions of chromatin contacts. The design of the 5C primers is critical because this will determine which and how many chromatin interactions will be examined in the assay. Starting material for 5C is a 3C template. To make a 3C template, chromatin interactions in living cells are cross-linked using formaldehyde. Next, chromatin is digested and subsequently ligated under conditions favoring ligation events between cross-linked fragments. This yields a genome-wide 3C library of ligation products representing all chromatin interactions in vivo. 5C then employs multiplex ligation-mediated amplification to detect, in a single assay, up to millions of unique ligation products present in the 3C library. The resulting 5C library can be analyzed by microarray analysis or deep sequencing. The observed abundance of a 5C product is a measure of the interaction frequency between the two corresponding chromatin fragments. The power of the 5C technique described in this chapter is the high-throughput, high-resolution, and quantitative way

  16. Dynamic chromatin accessibility modeled by Markov process of randomly-moving molecules in the 3D genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Fan, Caoqi; Zheng, Yuxuan; Li, Cheng

    2017-06-02

    Chromatin three-dimensional (3D) structure plays critical roles in gene expression regulation by influencing locus interactions and accessibility of chromatin regions. Here we propose a Markov process model to derive a chromosomal equilibrium distribution of randomly-moving molecules as a functional consequence of spatially organized genome 3D structures. The model calculates steady-state distributions (SSD) from Hi-C data as quantitative measures of each chromatin region's dynamic accessibility for transcription factors and histone modification enzymes. Different from other Hi-C derived features such as compartment A/B and interaction hubs, or traditional methods measuring chromatin accessibility such as DNase-seq and FAIRE-seq, SSD considers both chromatin-chromatin and protein-chromatin interactions. Through our model, we find that SSD could capture the chromosomal equilibrium distributions of activation histone modifications and transcription factors. Compared with compartment A/B, SSD has higher correlations with the binding of these histone modifications and transcription factors. In addition, we find that genes located in high SSD regions tend to be expressed at higher level. Furthermore, we track the change of genome organization during stem cell differentiation, and propose a two-stage model to explain the dynamic change of SSD and gene expression during differentiation, where chromatin organization genes first gain chromatin accessibility and are expressed before lineage-specific genes do. We conclude that SSD is a novel and better measure of dynamic chromatin activity and accessibility. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Quantitative analysis of chromatin accessibility in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Baowen; Yu, Juan; Chang, Luyuan; Lei, Jiafan; Wen, Zengqi; Liu, Cuifang; Mao, Guankun; Wang, Kehui; Shen, Jie; Xu, Xueqing

    2017-11-04

    Genomic DNA of eukaryotic cells is hierarchically packaged into chromatin by histones. The dynamic organization of chromatin fibers plays a critical role in the regulation of gene transcription and other DNA-associated biological processes. Recently, numerous approaches have been developed to map the chromatin organization by characterizing chromatin accessibilities in genome-wide. However, reliable methods to quantitatively map chromatin accessibility are not well-established, especially not on a genome-wide scale. Here, we developed a modified MNase-seq for mouse embryonic fibroblasts, wherein chromatin was partially digested at multiple digestion times using micrococcal nuclease (MNase), allowing quantitative analysis of local yet genome-wide chromatin compaction. Our results provide strong evidence that the chromatin accessibility at promoter regions are positively correlated with gene activity. In conclusion, our assay is an ideal tool for the quantitative study of gene regulation in the perspective of chromatin accessibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  19. Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation in Toxicology: A Step-by-Step Guide to Increasing Efficiency, Reducing Variability, and Expanding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histone modifications work in concert with DNA methylation to regulate cellular structure, function, and the response to environmental stimuli. More than 130 unique histone modifications have been described to date and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows for the explorat...

  20. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter A. A. de Steenhuijsen Piters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem—also called “microbiome”—is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1:e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting.

  1. The Network Structure Underlying the Earth Observation Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkin, S.; Doane, W. E. J.; Mary, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth Observations Assessment (EOA 2016) is a multiyear project designed to assess the effectiveness of civil earth observation data sources (instruments, sensors, models, etc.) on societal benefit areas (SBAs) for the United States. Subject matter experts (SMEs) provided input and scored how data sources inform products, product groups, key objectives, SBA sub-areas, and SBAs in an attempt to quantify the relationships between data sources and SBAs. The resulting data were processed by Integrated Applications Incorporated (IAI) using MITRE's PALMA software to create normalized relative impact scores for each of these relationships. However, PALMA processing obscures the natural network representation of the data. Any network analysis that might identify patterns of interaction among data sources, products, and SBAs is therefore impossible. Collaborating with IAI, we cleaned and recreated a network from the original dataset. Using R and Python we explore the underlying structure of the network and apply frequent itemset mining algorithms to identify groups of data sources and products that interact. We reveal interesting patterns and relationships in the EOA dataset that were not immediately observable from the EOA 2016 report and provide a basis for further exploration of the EOA network dataset.

  2. Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auletta, A.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

  3. Interevent relationships and judgment under uncertainty: structure determines strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfey, Alan G; Hastie, Reid

    2002-09-01

    A fundamental empirical question regarding judgments about events is whether experienced absolute frequencies or relative frequencies are relied on when the likelihood of a particular occurrence is judged. The present research explicates the conditions under which people rely on remembered raw absolute frequencies versus on inferred relative frequencies or proportions when making predictions. Participants saw opinion poll results for candidates prior to an election and, on the basis of these, made judgments concerning the likelihood of each candidate's winning this election. Certain candidates demonstrated a high absolute frequency of winning in the polls, whereas other candidates had high relative win frequencies. The results indicated that adults are cognitively flexible with regard to the inputs used in this judgment. Certain stimulus event configurations induced reasoning by way of absolute frequencies, whereas other configurations elicited judgments based on relative frequencies. More specifically, as the relational complexity of the event structure increased and more inferences were required to make predictions, the tendency to rely on absolute, as opposed to relative, frequencies also increased.

  4. Sub-fragmentation of structural reactive material casings under explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Gauthier, Maxime; Cojocaru, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    A concept of reactive hot spots intruded in a thick, structural reactive material casing was investigated to generate fine fragments for efficient energy release from casing material under explosive loading. This was achieved through distributing micro MoO3 particles into a granular Al casing, made by hot isostatic pressing, in a fuel-rich ratio of 10Al+MoO3. Reaction of Al and MoO3 during casing primary or secondary fragmentation creates heat and gas products to form micro-scale hot spots, whose expansion initiates local fractures leading to fine fragments of the rest of Al. Explosion experiments, using a 4.4 cm diameter cased charge with a casing-to-explosive mass ratio of 1.78 in a 2.1 m3 cylindrical chamber, demonstrated the presence of fine fragments and more efficient fragment combustion to augment air blast, as compared to a baseline pure Al-cased charge, thus indicating the feasibility of the concept.

  5. Dose-related Increased Binding of Nickel to Chromatin Proteins; and Changes to DNA Concentration in the Liver of Guinea Pigs Treated with Nigerian Light Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauretta Idabor

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The alteration in nuclear DNA concentration and the concomitant binding of xenobiotics (alkylating agents, heavy metals, etc. to chromatin constituents may adversely affect gene structure and/or function, and thus initiate carcinogenesis. Binding of nickel to chromatin DNA has been reported to cause DNA damage (cross-links, single-strand breaks, and although many soluble nickel compounds and complexes have been shown to bind to chromatin, porphyrin-complexed nickel (PCN in crude oils has not been studied. We have determined the doserelated increases in total and chromatin DNA concentrations, and the differential distribution (binding of PCN (crude oil nickel-CON to chromatin constituents in livers of adult male guinea pigs treated with 1.25, 2.50 and 5.0 ml/kg bw Nigerian Bonny light crude oil (BLCO by intraperitoneal injection. The results showed large BLCO-induced increases in total DNA concentrations of 424%, 632% and 436% at 1.25, 2.50 and 5.0 ml/kg bw BLCO respectively over the untreated controls; while it induced equally large increases in chromatin DNA concentrations of 585% and 200% at 2.50 and 5.0 ml/kg bw respectively. In both cases, maximum increases occurred at 2.50 ml/kg bw BLCO. The distribution of PCN in BLCO between chromatin DNA and chromatin proteins (histones and non-histones showed that at 2.50 and 5.0 ml/kg bw BLCO, nickel content in chromatin DNA reduced by 25% and 12.5% respectively over the controls; while its content in chromatin proteins also reduced by 26%; but increased by 166% at 2.50 and 5.0 ml/kg bw BLCO, respectively over the untreated controls. However, in intra-chromatin comparison, 38.8% more PCN bound to chromatin DNA than to chromatin proteins at 2.50 ml/kg bw; but at 5.0 ml/kg bw BLCO, 90.4% more PCN bound to chromatin proteins than to chromatin DNA. These results show a greater affinity of PCN in BLCO for chromatin proteins over chromatin DNA which may have played a role in the increased DNA concentrations

  6. Keeping it quiet: chromatin control of gammaherpesvirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Paul M

    2013-12-01

    The human gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establish long-term latent infections associated with diverse human cancers. Viral oncogenesis depends on the ability of the latent viral genome to persist in host nuclei as episomes that express a restricted yet dynamic pattern of viral genes. Multiple epigenetic events control viral episome generation and maintenance. This Review highlights some of the recent findings on the role of chromatin assembly, histone and DNA modifications, and higher-order chromosome structures that enable gammaherpesviruses to establish stable latent infections that mediate viral pathogenesis.

  7. Studies on Pounding Response Considering Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction under Seismic Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhen Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pounding phenomena considering structure–soil–structure interaction (SSSI under seismic loads are investigated in this paper. Based on a practical engineering project, this work presents a three-dimensional finite element numerical simulation method using ANSYS software. According to Chinese design code, the models of adjacent shear wall structures on Shanghai soft soil with the rigid foundation, box foundation and pile foundation are built respectively. In the simulation, the Davidenkov model of the soil skeleton curve is assumed for soil behavior, and the contact elements with Kelvin model are adopted to simulate pounding phenomena between adjacent structures. Finally, the dynamic responses of adjacent structures considering the pounding and SSSI effects are analyzed. The results show that pounding phenomena may occur, indicating that the seismic separation requirement for adjacent buildings of Chinese design code may not be enough to avoid pounding effect. Pounding and SSSI effects worsen the adjacent buildings’ conditions because their acceleration and shear responses are amplified after pounding considering SSSI. These results are significant for studying the effect of pounding and SSSI phenomena on seismic responses of structures and national sustainable development, especially in earthquake prevention and disaster reduction.

  8. Reconstruction of ancestral RNA sequences under multiple structural constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Tremblay-Savard, Olivier; Reinharz, Vladimir; Waldisp?hl, J?r?me

    2016-01-01

    Background Secondary structures form the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) families. An accurate reconstruction of ancestral ncRNAs must use this structural signal. However, the inference of ancestors of a single ncRNA family with a single consensus structure may bias the results towards sequences with high affinity to this structure, which are far from the true ancestors. Methods In this paper, we introduce achARNement, a maximum parsimony approach that, given...

  9. Proteome Characterization of a Chromatin Locus Using the Proteomics of Isolated Chromatin Segments Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Sophie L; Saksouk, Nehmé; Déjardin, Jérome

    2017-01-01

    The biological functions of given genomic regions are ruled by the local chromatin composition. The Proteomics of Isolated Chromatin segments approach (PICh) is a powerful and unbiased method to analyze the composition of chosen chromatin segments, provided they are abundant (repeated) or that the organism studied has a small genome. PICh can be used to identify novel and unexpected regulatory factors, or when combined with quantitative mass spectrometric approaches, to characterize the function of a defined factor at the chosen locus, by quantifying composition changes at the locus upon removal/addition of that factor.

  10. Interface stability of granular filter structures under currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, H.J.; Hoffmans, G.; Dorst, K.; Van de Sande, S.

    2012-01-01

    Granular filters are used for protection of structures against scour and erosion. For a proper functioning it is necessary that the interfaces between the filter structure, the subsoil and the water flowing above the filter structure are stable. Stability means that there is no transport of subsoil

  11. The possible role of chromatin conformation changes in adaptive responses to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhtiar, A.; Ammer, A.; Jbawi, A.; Othman, A.

    2012-05-01

    Organisms are affected by different DNA damaging agents naturally present in the environment or released as a result of human activity. Many defense mechanisms have evolved in organisms to minimize genotoxic damage. One of them is induced radioresistance or adaptive response. The adaptive response could be considered as a nonspecific phenomenon in which exposure to minimal stress could result in increased resistance to higher levels of the same or to other types of stress some hours later. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the adaptive response may lead to an improvement of cancer treatment, risk assessment and risk management strategies, radiation protection. The aim of current study was to study the possible role of chromatin conformation changes induced by ionizing radiation on the adaptive responses in human lymphocyte. For this aim the chromatin conformation have been studied in human lymphocytes from three non-smoking and three smoking healthy volunteers prior, and after espouser to gamma radiation (adaptive dose 0.1 Gy, challenge dose 1.5 Gy and adaptive + dose challenge). Chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus have been used as end point to study radio cytotoxicity and adaptive response. Our results indicated individual differences in radio adaptive response and the level of this response was dependent of chromatin de condensation induced by a adaptive small dose.The results showed that different dose of gamma rays induce a chromatin de condensation in human lymphocyte. The maximum chromatin relaxation were record when lymphocyte exposed to adaptive dose (0.1 Gy.). Results also showed that Adaptive dose have affected on the induction of challenge dose (1.5 Gy) of chromosome aberration and micronucleus . The comparison of results of chromatin de condensation induction as measured by flow cytometry and cytogenetic damages measured by chromosomal aberrations or micronucleus, was showed a proportionality of adaptive response with

  12. Recruitment of the NuA4 complex poises the PHO5 promoter for chromatin remodeling and activation

    OpenAIRE

    Nourani, Amine; Utley, Rhea T; Allard, Stéphane; Côté, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The remodeling of the promoter chromatin structure is a key event for the induction of the PHO5 gene. Two DNA-binding proteins Pho2 and Pho4 are critical for this step. We found that the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex is essential for PHO5 transcriptional induction without affecting Pho4 translocation upon phosphate starvation. Our data also indicate that NuA4 is critical for the chromatin remodeling event that occurs over the PHO5 promoter prior to activation. Using Chromatin IP anal...

  13. Classical and Nonclassical Estrogen Receptor Action on Chromatin Templates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nordeen, Steven

    2000-01-01

    .... Using newly-developed approaches, I investigated mechanisms of estrogen/estrogen receptor action on chromatin templates in vitro in order to better understand the role of chromatin in steroid-regulated gene expression...

  14. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...

  15. Classical and Nonclassical Estrogen Receptor Action on Chromatin Templaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nordeen, Steve

    2001-01-01

    .... Using newly-developed approaches, I investigated mechanisms of estrogen/estrogen receptor action on chromatin templates in vitro in order to better understand the role of chromatin in steroid-regulated gene expression...

  16. Chromatin as an expansive canvas for chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierz, Beat; Muir, Tom W

    2012-04-17

    Chromatin is extensively chemically modified and thereby acts as a dynamic signaling platform controlling gene function. Chromatin regulation is integral to cell differentiation, lineage commitment and organism development, whereas chromatin dysregulation can lead to age-related and neurodegenerative disorders as well as cancer. Investigating chromatin biology presents a unique challenge, as the issue spans many disciplines, including cell and systems biology, biochemistry and molecular biophysics. In recent years, the application of chemical biology methods for investigating chromatin processes has gained considerable traction. Indeed, chemical biologists now have at their disposal powerful chemical tools that allow chromatin biology to be scrutinized at the level of the cell all the way down to the single chromatin fiber. Here we present recent examples of how this rapidly expanding palette of chemical tools is being used to paint a detailed picture of chromatin function in organism development and disease.

  17. Evaluation of chromatin condensation in human spermatozoa: a flow cytometric assay using acridine orange staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, R; Shochat, L; Weissenberg, R; Soffer, Y; Marcus, Z; Oschry, Y; Lewin, L M

    1997-01-01

    The quality of sperm chromatin is an important factor in fertilization and is especially critical where one spermatozoon is artificially selected for fertilizing an egg (as in intracytoplasmic sperm injection). In this study, flow cytometry after staining of human spermatozoa with Acridine Orange was used to study chromatin structure. A method is described for estimating the percentage of cells in a human sperm sample that have completed epididymal maturation in regard to chromatin condensation. Of the 121 samples of the semen that were examined, nine contained a higher percentage of hypocondensed spermatozoa and six samples contained elevated amounts of hypercondensed spermatozoa. In addition to aberrancies in chromatin condensation other defects showed up as satellite populations of spermatozoa with higher than normal ratios of red/green fluorescence after Acridine Orange staining. Such defects were found in 15 semen samples. The use of swim-up and Percoll gradient centrifugation methods was shown to improve the percentage of spermatozoa with normal chromatin structure in some samples with poor initial quality.

  18. Influence of polynucleosome preparation methods on sedimentation velocity analysis of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujirai, Tomoya; Machida, Shinichi; Osakabe, Akihisa; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Chromatin dynamics and higher order structures play essential roles in genomic DNA functions. Histone variants and histone post-translational modifications are involved in the regulation of chromatin structure and dynamics, cooperatively with DNA methylation and chromatin binding proteins. Therefore, studies of higher-order chromatin conformations have become important to reveal how genomic DNA is regulated during DNA transcription, replication, recombination and repair. The sedimentation velocity analysis by analytical ultracentrifugation has been commonly used to evaluate the higher-order conformation of in vitro reconstituted polynucleosomes, as model chromatin. Three major preparation methods for the unpurified, purified, and partially purified polynucleosomes have been reported so far. It is important to clarify the effects of the different polynucleosome preparation methods on the sedimentation profiles. To accomplish this, in the present study, we prepared unpurified, purified and partially purified polynucleosomes, and compared their sedimentation velocity profiles by analytical ultracentrifugation. In addition, we tested how the histone occupancy affects the sedimentation velocities of polynucleosomes. Our results revealed how free histones and polynucleosome aggregates affect the sedimentation velocity profiles of the polynucleosomes, in the absence and presence of Mg2+ ions. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Variability in Chromatin Architecture and Associated DNA Repair at Genomic Positions Containing Somatic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byungho; Mun, Jihyeob; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Seon-Young

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic chromatin structures result in differential chemical reactivity to mutational processes throughout the genome. To identify chromatin features responsible for mutagenesis, we compared chromatin architecture around single-nucleotide variants (SNV), insertion/deletions (indels), and their context-matched, nonmutated positions. We found epigenetic differences between genomic regions containing missense SNVs and those containing frameshift indels across multiple cancer types. Levels of active histone marks were higher around frameshift indels than around missense SNV, whereas repressive histone marks exhibited the reverse trend. Accumulation of repressive histone marks and nucleosomes distinguished mutated positions (both SNV and indels) from the context-matched, nonmutated positions, whereas active marks were associated with substitution- and cancer type-specific mutagenesis. We also explained mutagenesis based on genome maintenance mechanisms, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), and DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE). Regional NER variation correlated strongly with chromatin features; NER machineries exhibited shifted or depleted binding around SNV, resulting in decreased NER at mutation positions, especially at sites of recurrent mutations. MMR-deficient tumors selectively acquired SNV in regions with high active histone marks, especially H3K36me3, whereas POLE-deficient tumors selectively acquired indels and SNV in regions with low active histone marks. These findings demonstrate the importance of fine-scaled chromatin structures and associated DNA repair mechanisms in mutagenesis. Cancer Res; 77(11); 2822-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Introducing enteral feeding induces intestinal subclinical inflammation and respective chromatin changes in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Rhea; Krych, Lukasz; Rybicki, Verena

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze how enteral food introduction affects intestinal gene regulation and chromatin structure in preterm pigs. MATERIALS & METHODS: Preterm pigs were fed parenteral nutrition plus/minus slowly increasing volumes of enteral nutrition. Intestinal gene-expression and chromatin structure...... were analyzed 5 days after birth. RESULTS: Enteral feeding led to differential upregulation of inflammatory and pattern recognition receptor genes, including IL8 (median: 5.8, 95% CI: 3.9-7.8 for formula; median: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.3 for colostrum) and TLR4 (median: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.6-4.8 for formula...... stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (median: 7.0; interquartile range: 5.63-8.85) compared with naive cells (median 4.2; interquartile range: 2.45-6.33; p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Enteral feeding, particular with formula, induces subclinical inflammation in the premature intestine and more open chromatin...

  1. Chromatin conformation capture strategies in molecular diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vree, Pauline J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis I have explored the clinical potential of the 4C-technology and worked on development of a novel chromatin conformation capture based technology, called TLA. In chapter 2 I describe how the 4C-technology can be applied as a targeted strategy to identify putative fusion-genes or

  2. Keystone Symposia on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjær, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Keystone Symposia kicked off the start of 2012 with two joint meetings on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics and a star-studded list of speakers. Held in Keystone, CO, January 17-22, and organized by Steven Jacobsen and Steven Henikoff and by Bradley Cairns and Geneviève Almouzni, respectively...

  3. EBV Latency Types Adopt Alternative Chromatin Conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempera, Italo; Klichinsky, Michael; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp) or type III (Cp) gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer. PMID:21829357

  4. EBV latency types adopt alternative chromatin conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Tempera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp or type III (Cp gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer.

  5. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    is a frequent event in disease, and the first epigenetic-based therapies for cancer treatment have been approved. A generation of new classes of potent and specific inhibitors for several chromatin-associated proteins have shown promise in preclinical trials. Although the biology of epigenetic regulation...

  6. Single Chromatin Fibre Assembly Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Martin L.; Pope, L.H.; Leuba, S.H.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Here we observe the formation of a single chromatin fibre using optical tweezers. A single -DNA molecule was suspended between two micron-sized beads, one held by a micropipette and the other in an optical trap. The constrained DNA molecule was incubated with Xenopus laevis egg extract in order to

  7. Optimization and anti-optimization of structures under uncertainty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elishakoff, Isaac; Ohsaki, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The volume presents a collaboration between internationally recognized experts on anti-optimization and structural optimization, and summarizes various novel ideas, methodologies and results studied over 20 years...

  8. The Chromatin Scaffold Protein SAFB1 Renders Chromatin Permissive for DNA Damage Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2013-01-01

    the chromatin-associated scaffold attachment factor SAFB1 as a component of the DNA damage response and show that SAFB1 cooperates with histone acetylation to allow for efficient γH2AX spreading and genotoxic stress signaling. SAFB1 undergoes a highly dynamic exchange at damaged chromatin in a poly......Although the general relevance of chromatin modifications for genotoxic stress signaling, cell-cycle checkpoint activation, and DNA repair is well established, how these modifications reach initial thresholds in order to trigger robust responses remains largely unexplored. Here, we identify...... barriers by making chromatin permissive for DNA damage signaling, whereas the ensuing exclusion of SAFB1 may help prevent excessive signaling....

  9. Genetic sequence-based prediction of long-range chromatin interactions suggests a potential role of short tandem repeat sequences in genome organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikumbh, Sarvesh; Pfeifer, Nico

    2017-04-18

    Knowing the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the chromatin is important for obtaining a complete picture of the regulatory landscape. Changes in the 3D structure have been implicated in diseases. While there exist approaches that attempt to predict the long-range chromatin interactions, they focus only on interactions between specific genomic regions - the promoters and enhancers, neglecting other possibilities, for instance, the so-called structural interactions involving intervening chromatin. We present a method that can be trained on 5C data using the genetic sequence of the candidate loci to predict potential genome-wide interaction partners of a particular locus of interest. We have built locus-specific support vector machine (SVM)-based predictors using the oligomer distance histograms (ODH) representation. The method shows good performance with a mean test AUC (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve) of 0.7 or higher for various regions across cell lines GM12878, K562 and HeLa-S3. In cases where any locus did not have sufficient candidate interaction partners for model training, we employed multitask learning to share knowledge between models of different loci. In this scenario, across the three cell lines, the method attained an average performance increase of 0.09 in the AUC. Performance evaluation of the models trained on 5C data regarding prediction on an independent high-resolution Hi-C dataset (which is a rather hard problem) shows 0.56 AUC, on average. Additionally, we have developed new, intuitive visualization methods that enable interpretation of sequence signals that contributed towards prediction of locus-specific interaction partners. The analysis of these sequence signals suggests a potential general role of short tandem repeat sequences in genome organization. We demonstrated how our approach can 1) provide insights into sequence features of locus-specific interaction partners, and 2) also identify their cell

  10. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  11. Peak earthquake response of structures under multi-component excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jianwei; Liang, Zach; Chu, Yi-Lun; Lee, George C.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate estimation of the peak seismic responses of structures is important in earthquake resistant design. The internal force distributions and the seismic responses of structures are quite complex, since ground motions are multi-directional. One key issue is the uncertainty of the incident angle between the directions of ground motion and the reference axes of the structure. Different assumed seismic incidences can result in different peak values within the scope of design spectrum analysis for a given structure and earthquake ground motion record combination. Using time history analysis to determine the maximum structural responses excited by a given earthquake record requires repetitive calculations to determine the critical incident angle. This paper presents a transformation approach for relatively accurate and rapid determination of the maximum peak responses of a linear structure subjected to three-dimensional excitations within all possible seismic incident angles. The responses can be deformations, internal forces, strains and so on. An irregular building structure model is established using SAP2000 program. Several typical earthquake records and an artificial white noise are applied to the structure model to illustrate the variation of the maximum structural responses for different incident angles. Numerical results show that for many structural parameters, the variation can be greater than 100%. This method can be directly applied to time history analysis of structures using existing computer software to determine the peak responses without carrying out the analyses for all possible incident angles. It can also be used to verify and/or modify aseismic designs by using response spectrum analysis.

  12. Spatially confined folding of chromatin in the interphase nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateos-Langerak, J.; Bohn, M.; de Leeuw, W.; Giromus, O.; Manders, E.M.M.; Verschure, P.J.; Indemans, M.H.G.; Gierman, H.J.; Heermann, D.W.; van Driel, R.; Goetze, S.

    2009-01-01

    Genome function in higher eukaryotes involves major changes in the spatial organization of the chromatin fiber. Nevertheless, our understanding of chromatin folding is remarkably limited. Polymer models have been used to describe chromatin folding. However, none of the proposed models gives a

  13. Structural convergence under reversible and irreversible monetary unification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beetsma, R.M.W.J.; Jensen, H.

    2003-01-01

    We explore endogenous monetary unification in the context of a model in which a country with serious structural distortions (and, hence, high inflation) is admitted into a monetary union once its economic structure has converged sufficiently towards that of the existing participants. If unification

  14. Structural convergence under reversible and irreversible monetary unification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beetsma, R.M.W.J.; Jensen, H.

    1999-01-01

    We explore endogenous monetary unification in the context of a model in which a country with serious structural distortions (and, hence, high inflation) is admitted into a monetary union once its economic structure has converged sufficiently towards that of the existing participants. If unification

  15. Analysis Of Masonry Infilled RC Frame Structures Under Lateral Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnaure Mircea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Partition walls are often made of masonry in Romania. Although they are usually considered non-structural elements in the case of reinforced concrete framed structures, the infill panels contribute significantly to the seismic behaviour of the building. Their impact is difficult to assess, mainly because the interaction between the bounding frame and the infill is an intricate issue. This paper analyses the structural behaviour of a masonry infilled reinforced concrete frame system subjected to in - plane loading. Three numerical models are proposed and their results are compared in terms of stiffness and strength of the structure. The role of the openings in the infill panel on the behaviour is analysed and discussed. The effect of gaps between the frame and the infill on the structural behaviour is also investigated. Comparisons are made with the in-force Romanian and European regulations provisions.

  16. Investigation of the association between the outcomes of sperm chromatin condensation and decondensation tests, and assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irez, T; Sahmay, S; Ocal, P; Goymen, A; Senol, H; Erol, N; Kaleli, S; Guralp, O

    2015-05-01

    The main purpose of this prospective study is to examine possible influences of abnormalities of sperm nuclear condensation and chromatin decondensation with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)-EDTA on outcomes of intrauterine insemination (IUI) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles. Semen samples from 122 IUI and 236 ICSI cycles were evaluated. Before semen preparation for IUI or ICSI, basic semen analysis was performed and a small portion from each sample was spared for fixation. The condensation of sperm nuclear chromatin was evaluated with acidic aniline blue, followed by sperm chromatin decondensation by SDS-EDTA and evaluation under light microscope. Ongoing pregnancy rate was 24% and 26.2% in the IUI and ICSI groups respectively. The chromatin condensation rate was significantly higher in the ongoing pregnancy-positive group compared to the negative group, both in IUI (P = 0.042) and ICSI groups (P = 0.027), and it was positively correlated with ongoing pregnancy rate in both IUI and ICSI groups (P = 0.015, r = 0.214 and P = 0.014, r = 0.312 respectively). Chromatin decondensation rates were not significantly different in neither of the groups. These results indicate that IUI and ICSI outcome is influenced by the rate of spermatozoa with abnormal chromatin condensation. Sperm chromatin condensation with aniline blue is useful for selecting assisted reproduction techniques (ART) patients. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. CAST-ChIP Maps Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States in the Drosophila Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Schauer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization and gene activity are responsive to developmental and environmental cues. Although many genes are transcribed throughout development and across cell types, much of gene regulation is highly cell-type specific. To readily track chromatin features at the resolution of cell types within complex tissues, we developed and validated chromatin affinity purification from specific cell types by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CAST-ChIP, a broadly applicable biochemical procedure. RNA polymerase II (Pol II CAST-ChIP identifies ∼1,500 neuronal and glia-specific genes in differentiated cells within the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, the histone H2A.Z is distributed similarly across cell types and throughout development, marking cell-type-invariant Pol II-bound regions. Our study identifies H2A.Z as an active chromatin signature that is refractory to changes across cell fates. Thus, CAST-ChIP powerfully identifies cell-type-specific as well as cell-type-invariant chromatin states, enabling the systematic dissection of chromatin structure and gene regulation within complex tissues such as the brain.

  18. The Yeast PHO Promoters as Paradigm for Transcriptional Regulation by Chromatin Remodelling: Current State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Barbarić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been widely acknowledged that modulation of chromatin structure at the promoter region influences the usage of factor binding sites and thus provides first, important level of transcriptional regulation. Chromatin-remodelling complexes utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to disassemble nucleosomes, and their functions are prominently correlated with promoter activation and also repression. Mechanistic details of individual steps and their orchestration in complex remodelling events, as well as regulatory mechanisms controlling remodeller activity, are subjects of current and future studies. The yeast PHO5 promoter was the first and still is one of the best characterized examples of a massive chromatin transition associated with transcriptional activation. Studies with this promoter provided several breakthrough findings and established basic principles of chromatin-remodelling process. Recent studies have revealed a network of five remodellers from all four remodeller subfamilies involved in this chromatin transition. Importantly, requirement for chromatin remodellers at the PHO8 as well as at PHO84 promoter, activated by the same transactivator as PHO5, are rather different. All these findings point out that chromatin remodelling process is in general even more complex than presumed, and it could be expected that further studies with the well-established PHO promoter system will be rather valuable for its further understanding.

  19. Ground Liquefaction and Deformation Analysis of Breakwater Structures Under Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground liquefaction and deformation is one of the important causes that damage engineering structures. Chinese current code for seismic design of breakwater is based on the single-level seismic design method as well as code for port and water-way engineering. However, this code can not exactly reflect the seismic performance of breakwater structures which experience different seismic intensities. In this paper, the author used a finite difference software, namely, FLAC3D, to analyze the state and compute seismic responses of breakwater structure. The breakwater foundation’s pore pressure ratio and displacement due to different earthquake have been studied. And the result show that: Smaller earthquakes have little influence on serviceability of the foundation, and severe earthquakes can liquefy some parts of the foundation; In the latter case , obvious changes of pores and foundation displaces can be found. Particularly, when seismic peak acceleration reachs 0.2g, Liquefaction appears in the foundation and mainly concentrated in the upper right side of the structure. In addition, the survey of ultra-hole pressure and displacement values of sand layers of the breakwater, manifests when the ultra pore pressure near 1.0, displacement and overturning structure is relatively large, resulting in varying degrees of damage to the structure. This paper’s research can provide theoretical and designable reference for similar engineering structures

  20. Optimal Design of Composite Structures Under Manufacturing Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marmaras, Konstantinos

    determination of the appropriate laminate thickness and the material choice in the structure. The optimal design problems that arise are stated as nonconvex mixed integer programming problems. We resort to different reformulation techniques to state the optimization problems as either linear or nonlinear convex....... The continuous relaxation of the mixed integer programming problems is being solved by an implementation of a primal–dual interior point method for nonlinear programming that updates the barrier parameter adaptively. The method is chosen for its excellent convergence properties and the ability of the method...... design phase results in structures with better structural performance reducing the need of manually post–processing the found designs....

  1. Chromatin dynamics in Pollen Mother Cells underpin a common scenario at the somatic-to-reproductive fate transition of both the male and female lineages in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing eShe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, where the germline is established early during embryogenesis, plants set aside their reproductive lineage late in development in dedicated floral organs. The specification of pollen mother cells (PMCs committed to meiosis takes place in the sporogenous tissue in anther locules and marks the somatic-to-reproductive cell fate transition towards the male reproductive lineage. Here we show that Arabidopsis PMCs differentiation is accompanied by large-scale changes in chromatin organization. This is characterized by significant increase in nuclear volume, chromatin decondensation, reduction in heterochromatin, eviction of linker histones and the H2AZ histone variant. These structural alterations are accompanied by dramatic, quantitative changes in histone modifications levels compared to that of surrounding somatic cells that do not share a sporogenic fate. All these changes are highly reminiscent of those we have formerly described in female megaspore mother cells (MMCs. This indicates that chromatin reprogramming is a common underlying scenario in the somatic-to-reproductive cell fate transition in both male and female lineages.

  2. Chromatin conformation of the H19 epigenetic mark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, A T; Tilghman, S M

    1998-11-01

    Genomic imprinting in mammals is an epigenetic process that results in differential expression of the two parental alleles. The tightly linked murine H19 and Igf2 genes are reciprocally imprinted: H19 is expressed from the maternal chromosome while Igf2 is expressed from the paternal chromosome. A single regulatory region in the 5' flank of the H19 gene has been implicated in silencing both genes. On the paternal chromosome, this region is heavily methylated at CpG residues, leading to repression of the H19 gene. The mechanism by which the same region in an unmethylated state on the maternal chromosome silences Igf2 is less well understood. We have probed the chromatin structure of the region by assessing its sensitivity to nuclease digestion. Two regions of nuclease hypersensitivity that are specific to the maternal chromosome were identified. These coincide with the region that is most heavily methylated on the paternal chromosome. As is the case with paternal methylation, hypersensitivity is present in all tissues surveyed, irrespective of H19 expression. We suggest that the chromatin structure of the maternal 5' flank of the H19 gene may represent an epigenetic mark involved in the silencing of Igf2.

  3. Harvesting Energy from Vibrations of the Underlying Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Bo; Vssilaras, S; Papadias, C.B.

    2013-01-01

    The use of wireless sensors for structural health monitoring offers several advantages such as small size, easy installation and minimal intervention on existing structures. However the most significant concern about such wireless sensors is the lifetime of the system, which depends heavily...... to the long-term structural health of a building or bridge, but at the same time they can be exploited as a power source to power the wireless sensors that are monitoring this structural health. This paper presents a new energy harvesting method based on a vibration driven electromagnetic harvester. By using...... on the type of power supply. No matter how energy efficient the operation of a battery operated sensor is, the energy of the battery will be exhausted at some point. In order to achieve a virtually unlimited lifetime, the sensor node should be able to recharge its battery in an easy way. Energy harvesting...

  4. Localized Damage Process in Metal Structures Under High Velocity Deformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vodenicharov, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    The ASB initiation and growth in high strength steel are investigated. An integrated energy theoretical approach is suggested for modeling ASB development and identifying post critical structure state in the bands...

  5. Determining wildlife use of wildlife crossing structures under different scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This research evaluated Utahs wildlife crossing structures to help UDOT and the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources assess crossing efficacy. In this study, remote motion-sensed cameras were used at 14 designated wildlife crossing culverts and bri...

  6. Performance based investigations of structural systems under fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentili, Filippo; Crosti, Chiara; Giuliani, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Prescriptive measures and procedures developed over the past here are mostly aimed at preventing structural failures of single elements for the time required for the evacuation. The response to fire and fire effects of the structural system as a whole remains often unknown and the survival of the...... structures are presented and discussed, with particular attention to methodological aspects. The effects of different assumptions in the modeling and in the definition of the collapse are highlighted, as critical aspects of a performance-based investigation....... these kinds of events, the mitigation of possible collapse induced by fire should be achieved. In this respect, a performance-based investigation of the structure aimed at highlight fire effects and fire-induced collapse mechanisms becomes of interest. In the paper collapse mechanisms of some simple...

  7. Structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures under monotonous and cyclic loadings: numerical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepretre, C.; Millard, A.; Nahas, G.

    1989-01-01

    The structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures is usually performed either by means of simplified methods of strength of materials type i.e. global methods, or by means of detailed methods of continuum mechanics type, i.e. local methods. For this second type, some constitutive models are available for concrete and rebars in a certain number of finite element systems. These models are often validated on simple homogeneous tests. Therefore, it is important to appraise the validity of the results when applying them to the analysis of a reinforced concrete structure, in order to be able to make correct predictions of the actual behaviour, under normal and faulty conditions. For this purpose, some tests have been performed at I.N.S.A. de Lyon on reinforced concrete beams, subjected to monotonous and cyclic loadings, in order to generate reference solutions to be compared with the numerical predictions given by two finite element systems: - CASTEM, developed by C.E.A./.D.E.M.T. - ELEFINI, developed by I.N.S.A. de Lyon

  8. Intranuclear and higher-order chromatin organization of the major histone gene cluster in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Andrew J; Ghule, Prachi N; Boyd, Joseph R; Tye, Coralee E; Page, Natalie A; Hong, Deli; Shirley, David J; Weinheimer, Adam S; Barutcu, Ahmet R; Gerrard, Diana L; Frietze, Seth; van Wijnen, Andre J; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Imbalzano, Anthony N; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2018-02-01

    Alterations in nuclear morphology are common in cancer progression. However, the degree to which gross morphological abnormalities translate into compromised higher-order chromatin organization is poorly understood. To explore the functional links between gene expression and chromatin structure in breast cancer, we performed RNA-seq gene expression analysis on the basal breast cancer progression model based on human MCF10A cells. Positional gene enrichment identified the major histone gene cluster at chromosome 6p22 as one of the most significantly upregulated (and not amplified) clusters of genes from the normal-like MCF10A to premalignant MCF10AT1 and metastatic MCF10CA1a cells. This cluster is subdivided into three sub-clusters of histone genes that are organized into hierarchical topologically associating domains (TADs). Interestingly, the sub-clusters of histone genes are located at TAD boundaries and interact more frequently with each other than the regions in-between them, suggesting that the histone sub-clusters form an active chromatin hub. The anchor sites of loops within this hub are occupied by CTCF, a known chromatin organizer. These histone genes are transcribed and processed at a specific sub-nuclear microenvironment termed the major histone locus body (HLB). While the overall chromatin structure of the major HLB is maintained across breast cancer progression, we detected alterations in its structure that may relate to gene expression. Importantly, breast tumor specimens also exhibit a coordinate pattern of upregulation across the major histone gene cluster. Our results provide a novel insight into the connection between the higher-order chromatin organization of the major HLB and its regulation during breast cancer progression. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Grid synchronization structure for wind converters under grid fault conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Jose Ignacio; Candela García, José Ignacio; Luna Alloza, Álvaro; Catalan, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a grid synchronization structure for three-phase electric power systems based on the use of a filtered quadrature signal generator (FQSG) and a phase-locked loop (PLL) structure, named Adaptive Vector Grid Synchronization system (AVGS). This system estimates the magnitude, frequency and phase of a signal, specially three-phase voltages and currents, and allows fast and accurate detection of the symmetrical components meet with the transient operating requirements imposed b...

  10. Behavior of auxetic structures under compression and impact forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chulho; Vora, Hitesh D.; Chang, Young

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, various auxetic material structures have been designed and fabricated for diverse applications that utilize normal materials that follow Hooke’s law but still show the properties of negative Poisson’s ratios (NPR). One potential application is body protection pads that are comfortable to wear and effective in protecting body parts by reducing impact force and preventing injuries in high-risk individuals such as elderly people, industrial workers, law enforcement and military personnel, and athletes. This paper reports an integrated theoretical, computational, and experimental investigation conducted for typical auxetic materials that exhibit NPR properties. Parametric 3D CAD models of auxetic structures such as re-entrant hexagonal cells and arrowheads were developed. Then, key structural characteristics of protection pads were evaluated through static analyses of FEA models. Finally, impact analyses were conducted through dynamic simulations of FEA models to validate the results obtained from the static analyses. Efforts were also made to relate the individual and/or combined effect of auxetic structures and materials to the overall stiffness and shock-absorption performance of the protection pads. An advanced additive manufacturing (3D printing) technique was used to build prototypes of the auxetic structures. Three different materials typically used for fused deposition modeling technology, namely polylactic acid (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane material (NinjaFlex® and SemiFlex®), were used for different stiffness and shock-absorption properties. The 3D printed prototypes were then tested and the results were compared to the computational predictions. The results showed that the auxetic material could be effective in reducing the shock forces. Each structure and material combination demonstrated unique structural properties such as stiffness, Poisson’s ratio, and efficiency in shock absorption. Auxetic structures showed better shock

  11. Oxide glass structure evolution under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, C.; Peuget, S.; Charpentier, T.; Moskura, M.; Caraballo, R.; Bouty, O.; Mir, A.H.; Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C.; Jegou, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Structure of SHI irradiated glass is similar to the one of a hyper quenched glass. • D2 Raman band associated to 3 members ring is only observed in irradiated glass. • Irradiated state seems slightly different to an equilibrated liquid quenched rapidly. - Abstract: The effects of ion tracks on the structure of oxide glasses were examined by irradiating a silica glass and two borosilicate glass specimens containing 3 and 6 oxides with krypton ions (74 MeV) and xenon ions (92 MeV). Structural changes in the glass were observed by Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a multinuclear approach ( 11 B, 23 Na, 27 Al and 29 Si). The structure of irradiated silica glass resembles a structure quenched at very high temperature. Both borosilicate glass specimens exhibited depolymerization of the borosilicate network, a lower boron coordination number, and a change in the role of a fraction of the sodium atoms after irradiation, suggesting that the final borosilicate glass structures were quenched from a high temperature state. In addition, a sharp increase in the concentration of three membered silica rings and the presence of large amounts of penta- and hexacoordinate aluminum in the irradiated 6-oxide glass suggest that the irradiated glass is different from a liquid quenched at equilibrium, but it is rather obtained from a nonequilibrium liquid that is partially relaxed by very rapid quenching within the ion tracks

  12. Reconstruction of ancestral RNA sequences under multiple structural constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Tremblay-Savard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary structures form the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of non-coding RNA (ncRNA families. An accurate reconstruction of ancestral ncRNAs must use this structural signal. However, the inference of ancestors of a single ncRNA family with a single consensus structure may bias the results towards sequences with high affinity to this structure, which are far from the true ancestors. Methods In this paper, we introduce achARNement, a maximum parsimony approach that, given two alignments of homologous ncRNA families with consensus secondary structures and a phylogenetic tree, simultaneously calculates ancestral RNA sequences for these two families. Results We test our methodology on simulated data sets, and show that achARNement outperforms classical maximum parsimony approaches in terms of accuracy, but also reduces by several orders of magnitude the number of candidate sequences. To conclude this study, we apply our algorithms on the Glm clan and the FinP-traJ clan from the Rfam database. Conclusions Our results show that our methods reconstruct small sets of high-quality candidate ancestors with better agreement to the two target structures than with classical approaches. Our program is freely available at: http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/acharnement .

  13. Structural integrity analysis of an INPP building under external loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dundulis, G.; Karalevicius, R.; Uspuras, E.; Kulak, R.F.; Marchertas, A.

    2005-01-01

    After the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington D. C. using civil airplanes, the evaluation of civil airplane crashes into civil and NPP structures has become very important. The interceptions of many terrorists' communications reveal that the use of commandeered commercial aircraft is still a major part of their plans for destruction. Aircraft crash or other flying objects in the territory of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) represents a concern to the plant. Aircraft traveling at high velocity have a destructive potential. The aircraft crash may damage the roof and walls of buildings, pipelines, electric motors, cases of power supplies, power cables of electricity transmission and other elements and systems, which are important for safety. Therefore, the evaluation of the structural response to an of aircraft crash is important and was selected for analysis. The structural integrity analysis due to the effects of an aircraft crash on an NPP building structure is the subject of this paper. The finite element method was used for the structural analysis of a typical Ignalina NPP building. The structural integrity analysis was performed for a portion of the ALS using the dynamic loading of an aircraft crash impact model. The computer code NEPTUNE was used for this analysis. The local effects caused by impact of the aircraft's engine on the building wall were evaluated independently by using an empirical formula. (authors)

  14. Training set optimization under population structure in genomic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidro, Julio; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Akdemir, Deniz; Poland, Jesse; Heslot, Nicolas; Sorrells, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Population structure must be evaluated before optimization of the training set population. Maximizing the phenotypic variance captured by the training set is important for optimal performance. The optimization of the training set (TRS) in genomic selection has received much interest in both animal and plant breeding, because it is critical to the accuracy of the prediction models. In this study, five different TRS sampling algorithms, stratified sampling, mean of the coefficient of determination (CDmean), mean of predictor error variance (PEVmean), stratified CDmean (StratCDmean) and random sampling, were evaluated for prediction accuracy in the presence of different levels of population structure. In the presence of population structure, the most phenotypic variation captured by a sampling method in the TRS is desirable. The wheat dataset showed mild population structure, and CDmean and stratified CDmean methods showed the highest accuracies for all the traits except for test weight and heading date. The rice dataset had strong population structure and the approach based on stratified sampling showed the highest accuracies for all traits. In general, CDmean minimized the relationship between genotypes in the TRS, maximizing the relationship between TRS and the test set. This makes it suitable as an optimization criterion for long-term selection. Our results indicated that the best selection criterion used to optimize the TRS seems to depend on the interaction of trait architecture and population structure.

  15. Reconstruction of ancestral RNA sequences under multiple structural constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Savard, Olivier; Reinharz, Vladimir; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2016-11-11

    Secondary structures form the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) families. An accurate reconstruction of ancestral ncRNAs must use this structural signal. However, the inference of ancestors of a single ncRNA family with a single consensus structure may bias the results towards sequences with high affinity to this structure, which are far from the true ancestors. In this paper, we introduce achARNement, a maximum parsimony approach that, given two alignments of homologous ncRNA families with consensus secondary structures and a phylogenetic tree, simultaneously calculates ancestral RNA sequences for these two families. We test our methodology on simulated data sets, and show that achARNement outperforms classical maximum parsimony approaches in terms of accuracy, but also reduces by several orders of magnitude the number of candidate sequences. To conclude this study, we apply our algorithms on the Glm clan and the FinP-traJ clan from the Rfam database. Our results show that our methods reconstruct small sets of high-quality candidate ancestors with better agreement to the two target structures than with classical approaches. Our program is freely available at: http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/acharnement .

  16. Fragmentation of chromatin DNA in mouse thymus cells after whole body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Kang; Liu Xueying; Zhu Xuefen

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of soluble chromatin in mouse thymus nuclei after whole body γ-irradiation were investigated by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After deproteinization and electrophoresis eight regular DNA bands were revealed. The molecular weights of these bands were estimated by comparing their migration rates with those of the standard fragments obtained from PBR 322 digested completely by restrictive endonuclease Hae III. The molecular weight of the first band was calculated to be 186 base pairs corresponding approximately to the size of DNA fragment from a single nucleosome, and those of other bands appeared to be its multiples. The results suggested that the disintegration of chromatin DNA after γ-irradiation might have occurred at the linkage regions of chromatin. The autolysis product of normal thymus chromatin under sterile condition were also analyzed and its electrophoretic pattern was found to be just the same as that of the postirradiation product. It seems, therefore, that the endonuclease existing in normal tissues might be responsible for the postirradiation chromatin degradation. The mechanism of this kind of enzymatic digestion remains to be elucidated in further investigation. (author)

  17. Analysis of topological organization of chromatin during spermatogenesis in mouse testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Gopeshwar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic chromatin is organized as radial DNA loops with periodical attachments to an underlying nucleoskeleton known as nuclear matrix. This higher order chromatin organization is revealed upon high salt extraction of cells. To understand the sequential change in the functional organization of chromatin during spermatogenesis, we have analysed the higher order organization of chromatin in different testicular cell types and the epididymal sperm of laboratory mouse. The expansion and contraction of the nucleoid DNA following 2 M NaCl extraction was measured in a fluorescence microscope using ethidium bromide (2.5-200 mg/mL as an intercalating dye to induce DNA positive supercoils. While the halo size varied among cell types (pachytene DNA most extended, round spermatid least, 5 mg/mL ethidium bromide (EtBr removed maximum negative supercoils in all the cell types. At higher EtBr concentrations, maximum positive supercoiling occured in pachytene DNA loops. Consistent with this, the pachytene looped domains were maximally sensitive to DNase I, while the elongated spermatids and sperms were highly resistant. Our data suggest that pachytene DNA is in the most open chromatin conformation of all testicular cell types, while round spermatids show the most compact conformation in terms of EtBr intercalation.

  18. The Impact of Chromatin Dynamics on Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daer, René M; Cutts, Josh P; Brafman, David A; Haynes, Karmella A

    2017-03-17

    In order to efficiently edit eukaryotic genomes, it is critical to test the impact of chromatin dynamics on CRISPR/Cas9 function and develop strategies to adapt the system to eukaryotic contexts. So far, research has extensively characterized the relationship between the CRISPR endonuclease Cas9 and the composition of the RNA-DNA duplex that mediates the system's precision. Evidence suggests that chromatin modifications and DNA packaging can block eukaryotic genome editing by custom-built DNA endonucleases like Cas9; however, the underlying mechanism of Cas9 inhibition is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that closed, gene-silencing-associated chromatin is a mechanism for the interference of Cas9-mediated DNA editing. Our assays use a transgenic cell line with a drug-inducible switch to control chromatin states (open and closed) at a single genomic locus. We show that closed chromatin inhibits binding and editing at specific target sites and that artificial reversal of the silenced state restores editing efficiency. These results provide new insights to improve Cas9-mediated editing in human and other mammalian cells.

  19. Not just gene expression: 3D implications of chromatin modifications during sexual plant reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Liu, Chang; Chen, Changbin

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications are epigenetic changes on a DNA molecule that alter the three-dimensional (3D) structure locally as well as globally, impacting chromatin looping and packaging on a larger scale. Epigenetic marks thus inform higher-order chromosome organization and placement in the nucleus. Conventional epigenetic marks are joined by chromatin modifiers like cohesins, condensins and membrane-anchoring complexes to support particularly 3D chromosome organization. The most popular consequences of epigenetic modifications are gene expression changes, but chromatin modifications have implications beyond this, particularly in actively dividing cells and during sexual reproduction. In this opinion paper, we will focus on epigenetic mechanisms and chromatin modifications during meiosis as part of plant sexual reproduction where 3D management of chromosomes and re-organization of chromatin are defining features and prime tasks in reproductive cells, not limited to modulating gene expression. Meiotic chromosome organization, pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes as well as distribution of meiotic double-strand breaks and resulting crossovers are presumably highly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Special mobile small RNAs have been described in anthers, where these so-called phasiRNAs seem to direct DNA methylation in meiotic cells. Intriguingly, many of the mentioned developmental processes make use of epigenetic changes and small RNAs in a manner other than gene expression changes. Widening our approaches and opening our mind to thinking three-dimensionally regarding epigenetics in plant development holds high promise for new discoveries and could give us a boost for further knowledge.

  20. Image preprocessing improves Fourier-based texture analysis of nuclear chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Randall L; Leite, Neucimar J; Metze, Konradin

    2008-06-01

    To investigate whether preprocessing of digitized images can improve the image analysis of chromatin of cytologic preparations using Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT). In a preprocessing step the nuclear borders of the segmented nuclei were smoothed, thus avoiding the Airy ring artifact. We tested this method, comparing the inertia values of digitalized cardiomyocyte nuclei of rats of different ages. Furthermore, we created in silicio nuclear images with chromatin alterations at or nearby the nuclear edge in order to investigate the robustness of our method. After preprocessing, the FFT-derived variable inertia discriminated significantly better the chromatin structure of the nuclei at different ages in every frequency range. The investigation on simulated nuclei revealed that within the frequency ranges from 1.8 microm to 0.72 microm smoothing of the borders does not interfere with the detection of chromatin changes at the nuclear border. Smoothing of borders in segmented images can improve the analysis of Fourier-derived variables of the chromatin texture.

  1. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on chromatin and its components from Yoshida ascites tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Patil, M.S.; Pradhan, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of U.V. irradiation on Yoshida ascites tumour chromatin and its non-DNA components. The extractability of total histones was increased from 6% to 17% with an increase in U.V. incident radiation dose from 500J/m 2 to 2000J/m 2 . The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis pattern of chromosomal proteins was examined after irradiation of the chromatin, and the effect of U.V. irradiation of chromatin on histones was also investigated. The results indicated that cross-linking of DNA with chromosomal proteins is an important category of U.V. radiation-induced lesions discerned in U.V. irradiated chromatin. Histones and several non-histone proteins seemed to undergo U.V. radiation-induced cross-linking with DNA, which was taken as indicative of their close association with DNA in the chromatin structure. It is suggested that the cross-link formation between DNA and non-histone proteins may be due to sequence-specific association of non-histone proteins with DNA. (U.K.)

  2. Fractal dimension of chromatin: potential molecular diagnostic applications for cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metze, Konradin

    2013-01-01

    Fractal characteristics of chromatin, revealed by light or electron microscopy, have been reported during the last 20 years. Fractal features can easily be estimated in digitalized microscopic images and are helpful for diagnosis and prognosis of neoplasias. During carcinogenesis and tumor progression, an increase of the fractal dimension (FD) of stained nuclei has been shown in intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix and the anus, oral squamous cell carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the pancreas. Furthermore, an increased FD of chromatin is an unfavorable prognostic factor in squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and the larynx, melanomas and multiple myelomas. High goodness-of-fit of the regression line of the FD is a favorable prognostic factor in acute leukemias and multiple myelomas. The nucleus has fractal and power-law organization in several different levels, which might in part be interrelated. Some possible relations between modifications of the chromatin organization during carcinogenesis and tumor progression and an increase of the FD of stained chromatin are suggested. Furthermore, increased complexity of the chromatin structure, loss of heterochromatin and a less-perfect self-organization of the nucleus in aggressive neoplasias are discussed. PMID:24063399

  3. Replication-Coupled Nucleosome Assembly and Positioning by ATP-Dependent Chromatin-Remodeling Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Yadav

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During DNA replication, chromatin must be disassembled and faithfully reassembled on newly synthesized genomes. The mechanisms that govern the assembly of chromatin structures following DNA replication are poorly understood. Here, we exploited Okazaki fragment synthesis and other assays to study how nucleosomes are deposited and become organized in S. cerevisiae. We observe that global nucleosome positioning is quickly established on newly synthesized DNA in vivo. Importantly, we find that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes, Isw1 and Chd1, collaborate with histone chaperones to remodel nucleosomes as they are loaded behind a replication fork. Using a whole-genome sequencing approach, we determine that the positioning of newly deposited nucleosomes in vivo is specified by the combined actions of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes and select DNA-binding proteins. Altogether, our data provide in vivo evidence for coordinated “loading and remodeling” of nucleosomes behind the replication fork, allowing for rapid organization of chromatin during S phase.

  4. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways. PMID:22289628

  5. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  6. DNA synthesis in chromatin preparations from human fibroblasts infected by cytomegalovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, T.

    1980-01-01

    Chromatin prepared from ( 14 C)-thymidine pulse labelled cytomegalovirus-infected human fibroblasts 72 hours postinfection exhibited under appropriate conditions endogenous activity of ( 3 H)-thymidine triphosphate incorporation which was relatively salt-resistant and phosphonoacetic acid-sensitive. Isopycnic centrifugation of the doubly labelled DNA in CsCl revealed that cell-free incorporation occurred into viral as well as into host cell DNA. Density labelling experiments with bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate suggested the incorporation into viral DNA to be due to replicative DNA synthesis. Chromatin from infected cells contained, in addition to cellular, viral DNA polymerase activity. (author)

  7. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines and Divalent Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwat Visvanathan

    Full Text Available The organisation of the large volume of mammalian genomic DNA within cell nuclei requires mechanisms to regulate chromatin compaction involving the reversible formation of higher order structures. The compaction state of chromatin varies between interphase and mitosis and is also subject to rapid and reversible change upon ATP depletion/repletion. In this study we have investigated mechanisms that may be involved in promoting the hyper-condensation of chromatin when ATP levels are depleted by treating cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose. Chromatin conformation was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and by electron spectroscopic imaging microscopy. We show that chromatin compaction following ATP depletion is not caused by loss of transcription activity and that it can occur at a similar level in both interphase and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation within nuclei is strongly influenced by the levels of divalent cations, including calcium and magnesium. While ATP depletion results in an increase in the level of unbound calcium, chromatin condensation still occurs even in the presence of a calcium chelator. Chromatin compaction is shown to be strongly affected by small changes in the levels of polyamines, including spermine and spermidine. The data are consistent with a model in which the increased intracellular pool of polyamines and divalent cations, resulting from depletion of ATP, bind to DNA and contribute to the large scale hyper-compaction of chromatin by a charge neutralisation mechanism.

  8. How does chromatin package DNA within nucleus and regulate gene expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazary, Ahmed E; Ju, Yi-Hsu; Abd-Rabboh, Hisham S M

    2017-08-01

    The human body is made up of 60 trillion cells, each cell containing 2 millions of genomic DNA in its nucleus. How is this genomic deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] organised into nuclei? Around 1880, W. Flemming discovered a nuclear substance that was clearly visible on staining under primitive light microscopes and named it 'chromatin'; this is now thought to be the basic unit of genomic DNA organization. Since long before DNA was known to carry genetic information, chromatin has fascinated biologists. DNA has a negatively charged phosphate backbone that produces electrostatic repulsion between adjacent DNA regions, making it difficult for DNA to fold upon itself. In this article, we will try to shed light on how does chromatin package DNA within nucleus and regulate gene expression? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chromatin changes in response to drought, salinity, heat, and cold stresses in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Myong eKim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is essential to regulate genes and genome activities. In plants, the alteration of histone modification and DNA methylation are coordinated with changes in the expression of stress-responsive genes to adapt to environmental changes. Several chromatin regulators have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stress-responsive gene networks under abiotic stress conditions. Specific histone modification sites and the histone modifiers that regulate key stress-responsive genes have been identified by genetic and biochemical approaches, revealing the importance of chromatin regulation in plant stress responses. Recent studies have also suggested that histone modification plays an important role in plant stress memory. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the regulation and alteration of histone modification (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, and SUMOylation in response to the abiotic stresses, drought, high-salinity, heat, and cold in plants.

  10. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 regulates ESC chromatin organization and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne M; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES...... cell chromatin structure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis, we identified >1,700 UTF1 target genes that significantly overlap with previously identified Nanog, Oct4, Klf-4, c-Myc, and Rex1 targets. Gene expression profiling showed that UTF1 knock down results in increased expression...... of a large set of genes, including a significant number of UTF1 targets. UTF1 knock down (KD) ES cells are, irrespective of the increased expression of several self-renewal genes, Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) dependent. However, UTF1 KD ES cells are perturbed in their differentiation in response...

  11. The viscoelastic properties of chromatin and the nucleoplasm revealed by scale-dependent protein mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdel, Fabian; Baum, Michael; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus harbours the DNA genome that is organized in a dynamic chromatin network and embedded in a viscous crowded fluid. This environment directly affects enzymatic reactions and target search processes that access the DNA sequence information. However, its physical properties as a reaction medium are poorly understood. Here, we exploit mobility measurements of differently sized inert green fluorescent tracer proteins to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the nuclear interior of a living human cell. We find that it resembles a viscous fluid on small and large scales but appears viscoelastic on intermediate scales that change with protein size. Our results are consistent with simulations of diffusion through polymers and suggest that chromatin forms a random obstacle network rather than a self-similar structure with fixed fractal dimensions. By calculating how long molecules remember their previous position in dependence on their size, we evaluate how the nuclear environment affects search processes of chromatin targets.

  12. Critical electrolyte concentration of spermatozoal chromatin containing histone H1 variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falco J.R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The critical electrolyte concentrations (CEC of sperm chromatin from animal species known or suspected to contain histone H1 variants were compared by examining the affinity of their DNA-protein complexes for toluidine blue in the presence of Mg2+. Bullfrog, sea urchin, bee and bumblebee spermatozoa were studied. The CEC for Rana catesbeiana and two sea urchin species were similar to that of histone H5-containing chromatin from chicken erythrocytes, thus confirming the biochemical and structural similarities of these DNA-protein complexes. The CEC for bees and the bumblebee, Bombus atratus, showed no particular phylogenetic relationship. We concluded that the CEC of histone H1-containing sperm cell chromatin is a useful indicator of variability in DNA-protein complexes but is of little phylogenetic value.

  13. Response of structural elements under non-uniformly distributed dynamic loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, T.A.T.; Huebner, M.; Ferretti, D.L.; Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van; Gebbeken, N.

    2016-01-01

    Determination of the structural response of a structural element under blast loading is of interest to vulnerability / lethality (V/L) studies of military operations in urban terrain. These studies require a quick and easy to use method to simulate the structural response of e.g. a wall under

  14. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  15. The cortical topography of tonal structures underlying Western music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, Petr; Birk, Jeffrey L; Van Horn, John D; Leman, Marc; Tillmann, Barbara; Bharucha, Jamshed J

    2002-12-13

    Western tonal music relies on a formal geometric structure that determines distance relationships within a harmonic or tonal space. In functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments, we identified an area in the rostromedial prefrontal cortex that tracks activation in tonal space. Different voxels in this area exhibited selectivity for different keys. Within the same set of consistently activated voxels, the topography of tonality selectivity rearranged itself across scanning sessions. The tonality structure was thus maintained as a dynamic topography in cortical areas known to be at a nexus of cognitive, affective, and mnemonic processing.

  16. Quantification of chromatin condensation level by image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianto, Jerome; Lee, David A; Knight, Martin M

    2014-03-01

    The level of chromatin condensation is related to the silencing/activation of chromosomal territories and therefore impacts on gene expression. Chromatin condensation changes during cell cycle, progression and differentiation, and is influenced by various physicochemical and epigenetic factors. This study describes a validated experimental technique to quantify chromatin condensation. A novel image processing procedure is developed using Sobel edge detection to quantify the level of chromatin condensation from nuclei images taken by confocal microscopy. The algorithm was developed in MATLAB and used to quantify different levels of chromatin condensation in chondrocyte nuclei achieved through alteration in osmotic pressure. The resulting chromatin condensation parameter (CCP) is in good agreement with independent multi-observer qualitative visual assessment. This image processing technique thereby provides a validated unbiased parameter for rapid and highly reproducible quantification of the level of chromatin condensation. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. RegulatING chromatin regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satpathy, Shankha; Nabbi, Arash; Riabowol, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The five human ING genes encode at least 15 splicing isoforms, most of which affect cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis through their ability to alter gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms. Since their discovery in 1996, ING proteins have been classified as type II tumour suppressors......-tuned in the physiological setting and how they add to the repertoire of activities affected by the INGs. In the present paper we review the different PTMs that have been reported to occur on INGs. We discuss the PTMs that modulate ING function under normal conditions and in response to a variety of stresses. We also...

  18. Interevent relationships and judgment under uncertainty: Structure determines strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanfey, A.G.; Hastie, R.

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental empirical question regarding judgments about events is whether experienced absolute frequencies or relative. frequencies are relied on when the likelihood of a particular occurrence is judged. The present research explicates the conditions under which people rely on remembered raw

  19. Influence of amendments on soil structure and soil loss under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macromolecule polymers are significant types of chemical amendments because of their special structure, useful functions and low cost. Macromolecule polymers as soil amendment provide new territory for studying China's agricultural practices and for soil and water conservation, because polymers have the ability to ...

  20. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, H.L.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1982-02-01

    This report contains the results of structural tests to determine the response of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters to simulated tornado conditions. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The type of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 m 3 /s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, faceguards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits

  1. Structure Formation of Thermoresponsive Microgels Suspensions Under Shear Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.; Lindner, P.; Richtering, W.

    2004-01-01

    Shear-induced structures of concentrated temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) microgel suspensions have been studied employing small angle neutron scattering (rheo-SANS). The interaction potential of swollen PNiPAM microgels could be varied from repulsive at temperatures below

  2. Sustainability assessment of concrete structure durability under reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    In the present paper a parametric study is conducted based on an existing finite element based model. The influence of cover layer, reinforcement diameter and water-to-cement ratio is compared to a possible scatter in the results due to insufficient knowledge about the distribution of the corrosi...... and predict the durability of a given structure....

  3. Optimization and anti-optimization of structures under uncertainty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elishakoff, Isaac; Ohsaki, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    ..., architecture, civil, mechanical or ocean engineering, invariably adopt the either/or style. Namely, they devote themselves either to linear or to nonlinear analysis of the structure they are dealing with, they are engaged in analyzing it either in the elastic or in the inelastic range; they deal either with its static or with its dynamic behavior. Al...

  4. Occupational structure in the Czech lands under the second serfdom

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klein, Alexander; Ogilvie, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 2 (2016), s. 493-521 ISSN 0013-0117 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13848S Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : occupational structure * Czech lands * Bohemia Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics, Econometrics Impact factor: 1.233, year: 2016

  5. Adjoint Techniques for Topology Optimization of Structures Under Damage Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation (Haftka and Gurdal, 1992) in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers (Akgun et al., 1998a and 1999). It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages (Haftka et al., 1983). A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization (Bendsoe, 1995) which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local

  6. The electronic structure of core states under extreme compressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, G.K.

    1992-01-01

    At normal density and for modest compressions, the electronic structure of a metal can be accurately described by treating the conduction electrons and their interactions with the usual methods of band theory. The core electrons remain essentially the same as for an isolated free atom and do not participate in the bonding forces responsible for creating a condensed phase. As the density increases, the core electrons begin to ''see'' one another as the overlap of the tails of wave functions can no longer be neglected. The electronic structure of the core electrons is responsible for an effective repulsive interaction that eventually becomes free-electron-like at very high compressions. The electronic structure of the interacting core electrons may be treated in a simple manner using the Atomic Surface Method (ASM). The ASM is a first-principles treatment of the electronic structure involving a rigorous integration of the Schroedinger equation within the atomic-sphere approximation. Solid phase wave functions are constructed from isolated atom wave functions and the band width W l and the center of gravity of the band C l are obtained from simple formulas. The ASM can also utilize analytic forms of the atomic wave functions and thus provide direct functional dependence of various aspects of the electronic structure. Of particular use in understanding the behavior of the core electrons, the ASM provides the ability to analytically determine the density dependence of the band widths and positions. The process whereby core states interact with one another is best viewed as the formation of narrow electron bands formed from atomic states. As the core-core overlap increases, the bands increase in width and mean energy. In Sec.3 this picture is further developed and from the ASM one obtains the analytic dependence on density of the relative motion of the different bands. Also in Sec. 3 is a discussion of the transition to free electron bands

  7. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms....

  8. HMGB proteins: Interactions with DNA and chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štros, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1799, 1-2 (2010), s. 101-113 ISSN 1874-9399 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/1530; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : HMG-box * DNA-protein interaction * chromatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.000, year: 2010

  9. Structural stability and theoretical strength of Cu crystal under equal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results indicate that, under sufficient tension, there exists a stress-free BCC phase which is unstable and slips spontaneously to a stress-free metastable BCT phase by consuming internal energy. The stable region ranges from −15.131 GPa to 2.803 GPa in the theoretical strength or from −5.801% to 4.972% in the strain ...

  10. Optimal Design of Composite Structures Under Manufacturing Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marmaras, Konstantinos

    sequence of well–posed optimization problems. They provide us with a discrete feasible solution or correctly determine problem infeasibility. Our aim is to solve the considered problems to proven global optimality. We propose a combination of the convergent Outer Approximation and Local Branching......This thesis considers discrete multi material and thickness optimization of laminated composite structures including local failure criteria and manufacturing constraints. Our models closely follow an immediate extension of the Discrete Material Optimization scheme, which allows simultaneous...... determination of the appropriate laminate thickness and the material choice in the structure. The optimal design problems that arise are stated as nonconvex mixed integer programming problems. We resort to different reformulation techniques to state the optimization problems as either linear or nonlinear convex...

  11. Analysis of ADU structure obtained under different precipitation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramella, Jose L.; Esteban, Adolfo; Mendez De Leo, Lucia P.; Sassone, Ariel; Novara, Oscar E.; Boero, Norma L.; Leyva, Ana G.

    1999-01-01

    ADU is the nominal name for ammonium poly uranate. It is a very complex compound of polymeric structure, which may have, according to precipitation conditions, different chemical composition and crystallographic structure. ADU is used as uranium oxide precursor in the manufacture of fuel elements. In former papers it was proved that if ultrasound is applied during precipitation and digestion the characteristics of the final product (U 3 O 8 UO 2 ) improve. By studying ADU thermal decomposition obtained by ultrasonic application, it was intended to obtain its composition. Therefore, differential thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analyses were performed. Samples were taken from special points and analyzed by X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy and scanning. An experiment was also designed to identify the products released during heating. Results and conclusions obtained are presented in this work. (author)

  12. Fiscal reaction under endogenous structural changes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei G. Simonassi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the importance of fiscal policy in smoothing the impact of shocks such as the international financial and economic crises, the paper analyzes the sustainability of the Brazilian fiscal policy by taking into consideration the possibility of multiple endogenous structural breaks on the coefficients of government reaction function. From monthly data in the period 1991–2008, tests on the reliable estimates dictate the occurrence of structural change in May 1994, and another in February 2003. There has been a situation of fiscal solvency in Brazil, but only from May 1994 the hitherto innocuous actions of government to formulate policies on public debt turn out to be significant, as it rose twofold after February 2003. This reinforces the existence of a more flexible alternative to implement strategic policy in Brazil, if an eventual alternative for increasing public spending is a way of hindering the effects of international financial crises without compromising the fiscal targets.

  13. Structural optimization under overhang constraints imposed by additive manufacturing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, G.; Dapogny, C.; Estevez, R.; Faure, A.; Michailidis, G.

    2017-12-01

    This article addresses one of the major constraints imposed by additive manufacturing processes on shape optimization problems - that of overhangs, i.e. large regions hanging over void without sufficient support from the lower structure. After revisiting the 'classical' geometric criteria used in the literature, based on the angle between the structural boundary and the build direction, we propose a new mechanical constraint functional, which mimics the layer by layer construction process featured by additive manufacturing technologies, and thereby appeals to the physical origin of the difficulties caused by overhangs. This constraint, as well as some variants, is precisely defined; their shape derivatives are computed in the sense of Hadamard's method, and numerical strategies are extensively discussed, in two and three space dimensions, to efficiently deal with the appearance of overhang features in the course of shape optimization processes.

  14. Structure and morphology of mythimna pupa under diffraction enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wanxia; Yuan Qingxi; Zhu Peiping; Wang Junyue; Liu Yijin; Chen Bo; Shu Hang; Hu Tiandou; Wu Ziyu; Ge Siqin

    2007-01-01

    As a technique of X-ray phase contrast imaging, the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) attracts much interest due to its high resolution and contrast. The top images of DEI were used to study the growth of a complete metamorphic mythimna in the period of pupa. Clear images about the pupa structure were obtained. The entire growth process of the pupa was observed, including the evolvement of part of organs and tissues from larva to imago. (authors)

  15. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, H. L.; Gregory, W. S.; Ricketts, C. I.; Smith, P. R.

    1982-02-01

    The response of high efficiency particulate air filters to simulated tornado conditions was determined. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The types of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 cu m/s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, face-guards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits.

  16. Disrupted white matter structure underlies cognitive deficit in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xin; Ma, Chao; Zhang, Junying; Chen, Yaojing; Zhang, Zhanjun; Sun, Xuan; Chen, Kewei

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is considered a risk factor of cognitive impairments and could result in white matter changes. Current studies on hypertension-related white matter (WM) changes focus only on regional changes, and the information about global changes in WM structure network is limited. We assessed the cognitive function in 39 hypertensive patients and 37 healthy controls with a battery of neuropsychological tests. The WM structural networks were constructed by utilizing diffusion tensor tractography and calculated topological properties of the networks using a graph theoretical method. The direct and indirect correlations among cognitive impairments, brain WM network disruptions and hypertension were analyzed with structural equation modelling (SEM). Hypertensive patients showed deficits in executive function, memory and attention compared with controls. An aberrant connectivity of WM networks was found in the hypertensive patients (P Eglob = 0.005, P Lp = 0.005), especially in the frontal and parietal regions. Importantly, SEM analysis showed that the decline of executive function resulted from aberrant WM networks in hypertensive patients (p = 0.3788, CFI = 0.99). These results suggest that the cognitive decline in hypertensive patients was due to frontal and parietal WM disconnections. Our findings highlight the importance of brain protection in hypertension patients. (orig.)

  17. The Response of Simple Polymer Structures Under Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, William; Ellison, Kay; Yapp, Su; Cole, Cloe; Galimberti, Stefano; Institute of Shock Physics Team

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic response of polymeric materials has been widely studied with the effects of degree of crystallinity, strain rate, temperature and sample size being commonly reported. This study uses a simple PMMA structure, a right cylindrical sample, with structural features such as holes. The features are added an varied in a systematic fashion. Samples were dynamically loaded using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar up to failure. The resulting stress-strain curves are presented showing the change in sample response. The strain to failure is shown to increase initially with the presence of holes, while failure stress is relatively unaffected. The fracture patterns seen in the failed samples change, with tensile cracks, Hertzian cones, shear effects being dominant for different holes sizes and geometries. The sample were prepared by laser cutting and checked for residual stress before experiment. The data is used to validate predictive model predictions where material, structure and damage are included.. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the support of Imperial College London and the Atomic Weapons Establishment.

  18. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION AND EMPLOYMENT UNDER STRUCTURAL BREAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut HALAÇ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For the economies which aim for the sustainable economic growth, one of the most important topic is industrialization. It is thought that it effects employability positively, by increasing the manufacturing. This study investigates the long-term relationship between industrial production and total employment, industrial employment and youth employment in Turkey using monthly data for the period from 2005:01 to 2017:06. Since the period involving structural changes, the stability of series was tested by standart Augmented Dickey Fuller unit root test and Zivot Andrews unit root test with structural breaks. Estimates of the cointegrating relation are obtained using Engle-Granger test procedure and Gregory Hansen test procedure taking structural breaks into account. The results of cointegration tests show that there is no long run relationship among the variables. The findings of the study indicate that the connections between industrial production and employment have been disappeared, during the time period examined for Turkey. This also suggests that the rise in the industrial production is still far from creating employability.

  19. Term Structure of Credit Spreads of A Firm When Its Underlying Assets are Discontinuous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhi Arta Surya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the previous works of Leland [12], Leland and Toft [11] andHilberink and Rogers [7] on optimal capital structure and show that thecredit spreads of short-maturity corporate bonds can have nonzero valueswhen the underlying of the firm’s assets value has downward jumps. We givean analytical treatment of this fact under a general Levy process and discusssome numerical examples under pure jump processes.Keywords: Optimal capital structure, credit risk, term structure of creditspread

  20. Sequence-specific packaging of DNA in human sperm chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatewood, J.M.; Cook, G.R.; Balhorn, R.; Bradbury, E.M.; Schmid, C.W.

    1987-05-22

    The DNA in human sperm chromatin is packaged into nucleoprotamine (approx.85%) and nucleohistone (approx.15%). Whether these two chromatin fractions are sequence-specific subsets of the spermatozoon genome is the question addressed in this report. Sequence-specific packaging would suggest distinct structural and functional roles for nucleohistone and nucleoprotamine in late spermatogenesis or early development or both. After removal of histones with 0.65 M NaCl, exposed DNA was cleaved with Bam HI restriction endonuclease and separated by centrifugation from insoluble nucleoprotamine. The DNA sequence distribution of nucleohistone DNA in the supernatant and nucleoprotamine DNA in the pellet was compared by cloning size-selected single-copy sequences and by using the derived clones as probes of nucleohistone DNA and nucleoprotamine DNA. Two clones derived from nucleohistone DNA preferentially hybridized to nucleohistone DNA, and two clones derived from nucleoprotamine DNA preferentially hybridized to nucleoprotamine DNA, which demonstrated the existence of sequence-specific nucleohistone and nucleoprotamine components within the human spermatozoon.

  1. New factors in mammalian DNA repair-the chromatin connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschellà, G; Melino, G; Malewicz, M

    2017-08-17

    In response to DNA damage mammalian cells activate a complex network of stress response pathways collectively termed DNA damage response (DDR). DDR involves a temporary arrest of the cell cycle to allow for the repair of the damage. DDR also attenuates gene expression by silencing global transcription and translation. Main function of DDR is, however, to prevent the fixation of debilitating changes to DNA by activation of various DNA repair pathways. Proper execution of DDR requires careful coordination between these interdependent cellular responses. Deregulation of some aspects of DDR orchestration is potentially pathological and could lead to various undesired outcomes such as DNA translocations, cellular transformation or acute cell death. It is thus critical to understand the regulation of DDR in cells especially in the light of a strong linkage between the DDR impairment and the occurrence of common human diseases such as cancer. In this review we focus on recent advances in understanding of mammalian DNA repair regulation and a on the function of PAXX/c9orf142 and ZNF281 proteins that recently had been discovered to play a role in that process. We focus on regulation of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair via the non-homologous end joining pathway, as unrepaired DSBs are the primary cause of pathological cellular states after DNA damage. Interestingly these new factors operate at the level of chromatin, which reinforces a notion of a central role of chromatin structure in the regulation of cellular DDR regulation.

  2. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  3. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégu, Teddy; Domenichini, Séverine; Blein, Thomas; Ariel, Federico; Christ, Aurélie; Kim, Soon-Kap; Crespi, Martin; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Mouille, Grégory; Bourge, Mickaël; Hirt, Heribert; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  4. Spatially Resolved Quantification of Chromatin Condensation through Differential Local Rheology in Cell Nuclei Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnol, Stephen T.; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-01-01

    The linear sequence of DNA encodes access to the complete set of proteins that carry out cellular functions. Yet, much of the functionality appropriate for each cell is nested within layers of dynamic regulation and organization, including a hierarchy of chromatin structural states and spatial arrangement within the nucleus. There remain limitations in our understanding of gene expression within the context of nuclear organization from an inability to characterize hierarchical chromatin organization in situ. Here we demonstrate the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to quantify and spatially resolve chromatin condensation state using cell-permeable, DNA-binding dyes (Hoechst 33342 and PicoGreen). Through in vitro and in situ experiments we demonstrate the sensitivity of fluorescence lifetime to condensation state through the mechanical effects that accompany the structural changes and are reflected through altered viscosity. The establishment of FLIM for resolving and quantifying chromatin condensation state opens the door for single-measurement mechanical studies of the nucleus and for characterizing the role of genome structure and organization in nuclear processes that accompany physiological and pathological changes. PMID:26765322

  5. Structural modification of aluminium oxynitride phases under stresses at high temperatures, high pressures and under irradiation by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, J.C.; Jeanne, A.; Roult, G.

    1990-01-01

    The structural modifications of the aluminium oxynitride phases under stresses are studied by the time of flight neutron diffraction method, at high temperatures (up to 1375degC), at high pressures (up to 2.4 GPa), and under irradiation by fast neutrons (up to 3.2 X 10 20 n/cm 2 ). In each case the evolutions of cell parameter, interatomic bond angles, bond lengths and atomic positions are given. (orig.)

  6. Structural behavior of human lumbar intervertebral disc under direct shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Häussler, Kim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Wolfram, Uwe

    2015-03-18

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is a complex, flexible joint between adjacent vertebral bodies that provides load transmission while permitting movements of the spinal column. Finite element models can be used to help clarify why and how IVDs fail or degenerate. To do so, it is of importance to validate those models against controllable experiments. Due to missing experimental data, shear properties are not used thus far in validating finite element models. This study aimed to investigate the structural shear properties of human lumbar IVDs in posteroanterior (PA) and laterolateral (LL) loading directions. Fourteen lumbar IVDs (median age: 49 years) underwent direct shear in PA and LL loading directions. A custom-build shear device was used in combination with a materials testing machine to load the specimens until failure. Shear stiffness, ultimate shear force and displacement, and work to failure were determined. Each specimen was tested until complete or partial disruption. Median stiffness in PA direction was 490 N/mm and in LL direction 568 N/mm. Median ultimate shear force in the PA direction was 2,877 N and in the LL direction 3,199 N. Work to failure was 12 Nm in the PA and 9 Nm in the LL direction. This study was an experiment to subject IVDs to direct shear. The results could help us to understand the structure and function of IVDs with regard to mechanical spinal stability, and they can be used to validate finite element models of the IVD.

  7. PTEN Interacts with Histone H1 and Controls Chromatin Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhu Hong; Zhu, Minglu; Yang, Jingyi; Liang, Hui; He, Jinxue; He, Shiming; Wang, Pan; Kang, Xi; McNutt, Michael A.; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromatin organization and dynamics are integral to global gene transcription. Histone modification influences chromatin status and gene expression. PTEN plays multiple roles in tumor suppression, development and metabolism. Here we report on the interplay of PTEN, histone H1 and chromatin. We show that loss of PTEN leads to dissociation of histone H1 from chromatin and decondensation of chromatin. PTEN deletion also results in elevation of histone H4 acetylation at lysine 16, an epigenetic marker for chromatin activation. We found that PTEN and histone H1 physically interact through their C-terminal domains. Disruption of the PTEN C-terminus promotes the chromatin association of MOF acetyltransferase and induces H4K16 acetylation. Hyperacetylation of H4K16 impairs the association of PTEN with histone H1, which constitutes regulatory feedback that may deteriorate chromatin stability. Our results demonstrate that PTEN controls chromatin condensation, thus influencing gene expression. We propose that PTEN regulates global gene transcription profiling through histones and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25199838

  8. Structural evaluation of electrosleeved tubes under severe accident transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.

    1999-01-01

    A flow stress model was developed for predicting failure of Electrosleeved PWR steam generator tubing under severe accident transients. The Electrosleeve, which is nanocrystalline pure nickel, loses its strength at temperatures greater than 400 C during severe accidents because of grain growth. A grain growth model and the Hall-Petch relationship were used to calculate the loss of flow stress as a function of time and temperature during the accident. Available tensile test data as well as high temperature failure tests on notched Electrosleeved tube specimens were used to derive the basic parameters of the failure model. The model was used to predict the failure temperatures of Electrosleeved tubes with axial cracks in the parent tube during postulated severe accident transients

  9. Nonequilibrium structure of colloidal dumbbells under oscillatory shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heptner, Nils; Chu, Fangfang; Lu, Yan; Lindner, Peter; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of dense, plastic-crystalline suspensions of mildly anisotropic colloidal hard dumbbells under the action of an oscillatory shear field by employing Brownian dynamics computer simulations. In particular, we extend previous investigations, where we uncovered nonequilibrium phase transitions, to other aspect ratios and to a larger nonequilibrium parameter space, that is, a wider range of strains and shear frequencies. We compare and discuss selected results in the context of scattering and rheological experiments. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate that the previously found transitions from the plastic crystal phase with increasing shear strain also occur at other aspect ratios. We explore the transition behavior in the strain-frequency phase and summarize it in a nonequilibrium phase diagram. Additionally, the experimental rheology results hint at a slowing down of the colloidal dynamics with higher aspect ratio.

  10. Finite element modeling of Balsa wood structures under severe loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toson, B.; Pesque, J.J.; Viot, P.

    2014-01-01

    In order to compute, in various situations, the requirements for transporting packages using Balsa wood as an energy absorber, a constitutive model is needed that takes into account all of the specific characteristics of the wood, such as its anisotropy, compressibility, softening, densification, and strain rate dependence. Such a model must also include the treatment of rupture of the wood when it is in traction. The complete description of wood behavior is not sufficient: robustness is also necessary because this model has to work in presence of large deformations and of many other external nonlinear phenomena in the surrounding structures. We propose such a constitutive model that we have developed using the commercial finite element package ABAQUS. The necessary data were acquired through an extensive compilation of the existing literature with the augmentation of personal measurements. Numerous validation tests are presented that represent different impact situations that a transportation cask might endure. (authors)

  11. Structural attributes of stand overstory and light under the canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Angelini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available  This paper reviews the literature relating to the relationship between light availability in the understory and the main qualitative and quantitative attributes of stand overstory usually considered in forest management and planning (species composition, density, tree sizes, etc. as well as their changes as consequences of harvesting. The paper is divided in two sections: the first one reviews studies which investigated the influence of species composition on understory light conditions; the second part examines research on the relationships among stand parameters determined from dendrometric field data and the radiation on understory layer. The objective was to highlight which are the most significant stand traits and management features to build more practical models for predicting light regimes in any forest stand and, in more general terms, to support forest managers in planning and designing silvicultural treatments that retain structure in different way in order to meet different objectives.

  12. Durability reliability analysis for corroding concrete structures under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a durability reliability analysis of reinforced concrete structures subject to the action of marine chloride. The focus is to provide insight into the role of epistemic uncertainties on durability reliability. The corrosion model involves a number of variables whose probabilistic characteristics cannot be fully determined due to the limited availability of supporting data. All sources of uncertainty, both aleatory and epistemic, should be included in the reliability analysis. Two methods are available to formulate the epistemic uncertainty: the imprecise probability-based method and the purely probabilistic method in which the epistemic uncertainties are modeled as random variables. The paper illustrates how the epistemic uncertainties are modeled and propagated in the two methods, and shows how epistemic uncertainties govern the durability reliability.

  13. Chemical Structures of Novel Maillard Reaction Products under Hyperglycemic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imahori, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kojima, Naoto; Hasei, Tomohiro; Sumii, Megumi; Sumida, Taishi; Yamashita, Masayuki; Watanabe, Tetsushi

    2018-01-01

    Two novel and two known compounds, 4-quinolylaldoxime and indole-3-aldehyde, were isolated from a reaction mixture consisting of D-glucose and L-tryptophan at physiological temperature and pH. The chemical structures of the two novel compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis such as X-ray crystallography. One of the novel compound and the indole-3-aldehyde showed mutagenicity toward Salmonella typhimurium YG1024 with S9 mix. Furthermore, 4-quinolylaldoxime was detected from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat plasma by LC-MS/MS analysis; however, the isolated compounds were not detected in rat diet extracts. To our knowledge, this is the first report in which 4-quinolylaldoxime was detected in rat plasma. These results suggest that amino-carbonyl reaction products may be formed in diabetic condition and induce genetic damage.

  14. Reliability prediction for structures under cyclic loads and recurring inspections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto W. S. Mello Jr

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a methodology for determining the reliability of fracture control plans for structures subjected to cyclic loads. It considers the variability of the parameters involved in the problem, such as initial flaw and crack growth curve. The probability of detection (POD curve of the field non-destructive inspection method and the condition/environment are used as important factors for structural confidence. According to classical damage tolerance analysis (DTA, inspection intervals are based on detectable crack size and crack growth rate. However, all variables have uncertainties, which makes the final result totally stochastic. The material properties, flight loads, engineering tools and even the reliability of inspection methods are subject to uncertainties which can affect significantly the final maintenance schedule. The present methodology incorporates all the uncertainties in a simulation process, such as Monte Carlo, and establishes a relationship between the reliability of the overall maintenance program and the proposed inspection interval, forming a “cascade” chart. Due to the scatter, it also defines the confidence level of the “acceptable” risk. As an example, the damage tolerance analysis (DTA results are presented for the upper cockpit longeron splice bolt of the BAF upgraded F-5EM. In this case, two possibilities of inspection intervals were found: one that can be characterized as remote risk, with a probability of failure (integrity nonsuccess of 1 in 10 million, per flight hour; and other as extremely improbable, with a probability of nonsuccess of 1 in 1 billion, per flight hour, according to aviation standards. These two results are compared with the classical military airplane damage tolerance requirements.

  15. Statistical structure of intrinsic climate variability under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuhua; Bye, John; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Climate variability is often studied in terms of fluctuations with respect to the mean state, whereas the dependence between the mean and variability is rarely discussed. We propose a new climate metric to measure the relationship between means and standard deviations of annual surface temperature computed over non-overlapping 100-year segments. This metric is analyzed based on equilibrium simulations of the Max Planck Institute-Earth System Model (MPI-ESM): the last millennium climate (800-1799), the future climate projection following the A1B scenario (2100-2199), and the 3100-year unforced control simulation. A linear relationship is globally observed in the control simulation and thus termed intrinsic climate variability, which is most pronounced in the tropical region with negative regression slopes over the Pacific warm pool and positive slopes in the eastern tropical Pacific. It relates to asymmetric changes in temperature extremes and associates fluctuating climate means with increase or decrease in intensity and occurrence of both El Niño and La Niña events. In the future scenario period, the linear regression slopes largely retain their spatial structure with appreciable changes in intensity and geographical locations. Since intrinsic climate variability describes the internal rhythm of the climate system, it may serve as guidance for interpreting climate variability and climate change signals in the past and the future.

  16. Structural changes in elastically stressed crystallites under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolnikov, K.P.; Korchuganov, A.V.; Kryzhevich, D.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Psakhie, S.G.

    2015-01-01

    The response of elastically stressed iron and vanadium crystallites to atomic displacement cascades was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Interatomic interaction in vanadium was described by a many-body potential calculated in the Finnis–Sinclair approximation of the embedded atom method. Interatomic interaction in iron was described by a many-body potential constructed in the approximation of valence-electron gas. The crystallite temperature in the calculations was varied from 100 to 600 K. The elastically stressed state in the crystallites was formed through uniaxial tension by 4–8% such that their volume remained unchanged. The energy of a primary knock-on atom was varied from 0.5 to 50 keV. It is shown that the lower the temperature and the higher the strain degree of an initial crystallite, the lower the threshold primary knock-on atom energy for plastic deformation generation in the crystallite. The structural rearrangements induced in the crystallites by an atomic displacement cascade are similar to those induced by mechanical loading. It is found that the rearrangements are realized through twinning

  17. Lifetime Reliability Prediction of Ceramic Structures Under Transient Thermomechanical Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Jadaan, Osama J.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical methodology is developed to predict the probability of survival (reliability) of ceramic components subjected to harsh thermomechanical loads that can vary with time (transient reliability analysis). This capability enables more accurate prediction of ceramic component integrity against fracture in situations such as turbine startup and shutdown, operational vibrations, atmospheric reentry, or other rapid heating or cooling situations (thermal shock). The transient reliability analysis methodology developed herein incorporates the following features: fast-fracture transient analysis (reliability analysis without slow crack growth, SCG); transient analysis with SCG (reliability analysis with time-dependent damage due to SCG); a computationally efficient algorithm to compute the reliability for components subjected to repeated transient loading (block loading); cyclic fatigue modeling using a combined SCG and Walker fatigue law; proof testing for transient loads; and Weibull and fatigue parameters that are allowed to vary with temperature or time. Component-to-component variation in strength (stochastic strength response) is accounted for with the Weibull distribution, and either the principle of independent action or the Batdorf theory is used to predict the effect of multiaxial stresses on reliability. The reliability analysis can be performed either as a function of the component surface (for surface-distributed flaws) or component volume (for volume-distributed flaws). The transient reliability analysis capability has been added to the NASA CARES/ Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code. CARES/Life was also updated to interface with commercially available finite element analysis software, such as ANSYS, when used to model the effects of transient load histories. Examples are provided to demonstrate the features of the methodology as implemented in the CARES/Life program.

  18. Prevalence of X-chromatin in Jordanian women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataineh, Ziad M.; Al-Azab, Mohammad A.

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the distribution of X-chromatin among Jordanian women at different age groups. Results will be compared with other studies for possible racial and environmental effects on X-chromatin distribution. Blood samples were drawn from all women subjected to this study by finger prick and stained with Wright's stain. X-chromatin positive polymorphonuclear cells were counted and corrected for percentage. Samples were taken during the late 2002 and early 2003 from healthy women attending routine checkup in health centers in Northern Jordan. The number of X-chromatin was highest in the 50 and above years age group. The number of X-chromatin was 14-18% in other age groups. These results were in accordance with other studies. It seems that racial and environmental factors are ineffective on distribution of X-chromatin in Jordanian women. These data could be used as as reference for further studies. (author)

  19. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  20. Capitalizing on disaster: Establishing chromatin specificity behind the replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Ahmad, Kami; Henikoff, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into nucleosomal chromatin, and genomic activity requires the precise localization of transcription factors, histone modifications and nucleosomes. Classic work described the progressive reassembly and maturation of bulk chromatin behind replication forks. More recent proteomics has detailed the molecular machines that accompany the replicative polymerase to promote rapid histone deposition onto the newly replicated DNA. However, localized chromatin features are transiently obliterated by DNA replication every S phase of the cell cycle. Genomic strategies now observe the rebuilding of locus-specific chromatin features, and reveal surprising delays in transcription factor binding behind replication forks. This implies that transient chromatin disorganization during replication is a central juncture for targeted transcription factor binding within genomes. We propose that transient occlusion of regulatory elements by disorganized nucleosomes during chromatin maturation enforces specificity of factor binding. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Is there a relationship between the chromatin status and DNA fragmentation of boar spermatozoa following freezing-thawing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, L; Strzezek, J

    2007-07-15

    In this study a radioisotope method, which is based on the quantitative measurements of tritiated-labeled actinomycin D ((3)H-AMD) incorporation into the sperm nuclei ((3)H-AMD incorporation assay), was used to assess the chromatin status of frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa. This study also tested the hypothesis that frozen-thawed spermatozoa with altered chromatin were susceptible to DNA fragmentation measured with the neutral comet assay (NCA). Boar semen was diluted in lactose-hen egg yolk-glycerol extender (L-HEY) or lactose ostrich egg yolk lipoprotein fractions-glycerol extender (L-LPFo), packaged into aluminum tubes or plastic straws and frozen in a controlled programmable freezer. In Experiment 1, the chromatin status and DNA fragmentation were measured in fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa from the same ejaculates. There was a significant increase in sperm chromatin destabilization and DNA fragmentation in frozen-thawed semen as compared with fresh semen. The proportions of spermatozoa labeled with (3)H-AMD were concurrent with elevated levels of sperm DNA fragmentation in K-3 extender, without cryoprotective substances, compared with L-HEY or L-LPFo extender. Regression analysis revealed that the results of the (3)H-AMD incorporation assay and NCA for frozen-thawed spermatozoa were correlated. Boars differed significantly in terms of post-thaw sperm DNA damage. In Experiment 2, the susceptibility of sperm chromatin to decondensation was assessed using a low concentration of heparin. Treatment of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with heparin revealed enhanced (3)H-AMD binding, suggesting nuclear chromatin decondensation. The deterioration in post-thaw sperm viability, such as motility, mitochondrial function and plasma membrane integrity, was concurrent with increased chromatin instability and DNA fragmentation. This is the first report to show that freezing-thawing procedure facilitated destabilization in the chromatin structure of boar spermatozoa, resulting in

  2. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Yasushi; Nishitani, Hideo

    2017-01-26

    During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC) complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity.

  3. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Shiomi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity.

  4. Reading the Epigenetic State of Chromatin Alters its Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Matthew D.

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into a structural polymer called chromatin. Ultimately, all access to genetic information is regulated by chromatin including access required for DNA replication, transcription, and repair. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome which is comprised of ˜147 bp of DNA tightly wrapped around a protein histone octamer core. The histone octamer is made up of eight proteins: two each of histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Many mechanisms exist to regulate access to DNA but one of pivotal importance is the creation of unique nucleosomes through i) integration of histone variants and ii) deposition of post translational modifications (PTMs). These modifications help comprise the epigenome of a cell. Classically, the two mechanisms by which they function have been through a direct regulation of nucleosome dynamics, or through third party proteins which are able to recognize the variants or PTMs and facilitate work. The library of potential PTMs therefore forms a sort of histone code which regulates access to DNA. This thesis investigates the intersection of these mechanisms to determine whether the act of recognizing epigenetic information alters DNA accessibility. The primary method used to determine changes in DNA accessibility is though observing the effective binding affinity of a transcription factor to its target site buried within a recombinantly prepared nucleosome which has been modified to carry a PTM and to report on its wrapping state. We find different regulation depending both on the PTM we investigate and the specific PTM-binding protein. We first investigate the H3K36me3-binding protein PHF1 and find that while the PTM it recognizes, H3K36me3, does not alter DNA accessibility, the binding of its recognition domain and N-terminal domain can illicit a change of DNA accessibility of 8 +/- 2-fold. This means that 8 times less DNA binding protein is required to occupy its target site if the nucleosome is bound by PHF

  5. Topography of the sex chromatin in vaginal histiocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, S; Urbiola, G; Dorantes, S; Márquez-Monter, H

    1975-01-01

    Routine vaginal smears with good numbers of histiocytes with kidney shaped morphology of their nuclei were selected for the study of sex chromatin topography. A variable distribution of the sex chromatin was found in 125 nuclei studied: polar in 57.4 percent, ventral in 21.9 percent and dorsal in 20.7 percent of the nuclei. No relationship was found between sex chromatin and cytoplasmic morphology and phagocytic activity.

  6. Histone acetylation: molecular mnemonics on the chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräff, Johannes; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2013-02-01

    Long-lasting memories require specific gene expression programmes that are, in part, orchestrated by epigenetic mechanisms. Of the epigenetic modifications identified in cognitive processes, histone acetylation has spurred considerable interest. Whereas increments in histone acetylation have consistently been shown to favour learning and memory, a lack thereof has been causally implicated in cognitive impairments in neurodevelopmental disorders, neurodegeneration and ageing. As histone acetylation and cognitive functions can be pharmacologically restored by histone deacetylase inhibitors, this epigenetic modification might constitute a molecular memory aid on the chromatin and, by extension, a new template for therapeutic interventions against cognitive frailty.

  7. Probing Chromatin Modifications in Response to ERK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksuz, Ozgur; Tee, Wee-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a technique used to determine the association of proteins or histone modifications with chromatin regions in living cells or tissues, and is used extensively in the chromatin biology field to study transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Increasing evidence points to an epigenetic coordination of signaling cascades, such as ERK, that regulate key processes in development and disease, revealing novel principles of gene regulation. Here we describe a detailed protocol for performing chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by qPCR (ChIP-qPCR) for probing histone modifications regulated by ERK signaling in mouse ESCs.

  8. Eigenvalue perturbation theory of structured matrices under generic structured rank one perturbations: Symplectic, orthogonal, and unitary matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ran, A.C.M.; Mehl, Chr.; Mehrmann, V.; Rodman, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study the perturbation theory of structured matrices under structured rank one perturbations, with emphasis on matrices that are unitary, orthogonal, or symplectic with respect to an indefinite inner product. The rank one perturbations are not necessarily of arbitrary small size (in the sense of

  9. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melters, Daniël P; Nye, Jonathan; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini

    2015-08-07

    Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  10. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  11. Genomic and chromatin signals underlying transcription start-site selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2011-01-01

    A central question in cellular biology is how the cell regulates transcription and discerns when and where to initiate it. Locating transcription start sites (TSSs), the signals that specify them, and ultimately elucidating the mechanisms of regulated initiation has therefore been a recurrent the...

  12. Cell identity bookmarking through heterogeneous chromatin landscape maintenance during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huaibing; Xi, Yanping; Li, Wei; Li, Jin; Li, Yan; Dong, Shihua; Peng, Lina; Liu, Yaping; Yu, Wenqiang

    2017-11-01

    Genetic and epigenetic information are faithfully duplicated and accurately transmitted to daughter cells to preserve cell identity during the cell cycle. However, how the chromatin-based epigenetic information beyond DNA sequence is stably transmitted along with the disruption and re-establishment of chromatin structure within a cell cycle remains largely unexplored. Through comprehensive analysis DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning patterns of HepG2 cells in G0/G1, early S, late S and G2/M phases, we found that DNA methylation may act as the prime element for epigenetic inheritance after replication, as DNA methylation was extremely stable in each cell cycle phase, while nucleosome occupancy showed notable phase dependent fluctuation. Nucleosome-Secured Regions (NSRs) occupied by polycomb-repressed chromatin played a role in repressing the irrelevant cell type-specific genes and were essential for preventing irrelevant transcription factors binding, while the well-defined Nucleosome-Depleted Regions (NDRs) marked the genes crucial for cell identity maintenance. Chromatin structure at NSRs and NDRs was well maintained throughout the cell cycle, which played crucial roles in steadily preserving the transcriptional identity of the cell to fulfill cell identity maintenance. Collectively, our results demonstrated that while chromatin architecture underwent dynamic changes during cell cycle progression, DNA methylation together with NSRs and NDRs were stable epigenetic elements that were required for faithful transmission to the daughter cell to accurately maintain cell identity during the cell cycle. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Chromatin-based epigenetics of adult subventricular zone neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eGonzales-Roybal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In specific regions of the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs generate new neurons throughout life. Emerging evidence indicate that chromatin-based transcriptional regulation is a key epigenetic mechanism for the life-long function of adult NSCs. In the adult mouse brain, NSCs in the subventricular zone (SVZ retain the ability to produce both neurons and glia for the life of the animal. In this review, we discuss the origin and function of SVZ NSCs as they relate to key epigenetic concepts of development and potential underlying mechanism of chromatin-based transcriptional regulation. A central point of discussion is how SVZ NSCs – which possess many characteristics of mature, non-neurogenic astrocytes – maintain a youthful ability to produce both neuronal and glial lineages. In addition to reviewing data regarding the function of chromatin-modifying factors in SVZ neurogenesis, we incorporate our growing understanding that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs serve as an important element to chromatin-based transcriptional regulation, including that of SVZ NSCs. Discoveries regarding the epigenetic mechanisms of adult SVZ NSCs may provide key insights into fundamental principles of adult stem cell biology as well as the more complex and dynamic developmental environment of the embryonic brain.

  14. Chromatin-dependent cooperativity between constitutive and inducible activation domains in CREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, H; Santoso, B; Guzman, E; Du, K; Cole, P A; Davidson, I; Montminy, M

    2001-12-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-responsive factor CREB induces target gene expression via constitutive (Q2) and inducible (KID, for kinase-inducible domain) activation domains that function synergistically in response to cellular signals. KID stimulates transcription via a phospho (Ser133)-dependent interaction with the coactivator paralogs CREB binding protein and p300, whereas Q2 recruits the TFIID complex via a direct association with hTAF(II)130. Here we investigate the mechanism underlying cooperativity between the Q2 domain and KID in CREB by in vitro transcription assay with naked DNA and chromatin templates containing the cAMP-responsive somatostatin promoter. The Q2 domain was highly active on a naked DNA template, and Ser133 phosphorylation had no additional effect on transcriptional initiation in crude extracts. Q2 activity was repressed on a chromatin template, however, and this repression was relieved by the phospho (Ser133) KID-dependent recruitment of p300 histone acetyltransferase activity to the promoter. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of NIH 3T3 cells, cAMP-dependent recruitment of p300 to the somatostatin promoter stimulated acetylation of histone H4. Correspondingly, overexpression of hTAFII130 potentiated CREB activity in cells exposed to cAMP, but had no effect on reporter gene expression in unstimulated cells. We propose that cooperativity between the KID and Q2 domains proceeds via a chromatin-dependent mechanism in which recruitment of p300 facilitates subsequent interaction of CREB with TFIID.

  15. Development of a novel flow cytometric approach to evaluate fish sperm chromatin using fixed samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of the paternal DNA is essential for the accurate transmission of genetic information, yet fertilization is not inhibited by chromatin breakage. Some methods are available for the sensitive detection of DNA damage and can be applied in studies of environmental toxicology, carcinogenesis, aging, and assisted reproduction techniques in both clinical and experimental settings. Because semen samples obtained from remote locations undergo chromatin damage prior to laboratory assessment, the present study was undertaken to evaluate treatments for effective chromatin staining in the development of a DNA fragmentation assay using fixed milt from yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Similar to the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), susceptibility of nuclear DNA to acid-induced denaturation was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Use of 10% buffered formalin for milt fixation allowed easier peak discrimination than 4% paraformaldehyde. The effects of time and temperature of incubation in 0.08 N HCl were evaluated in order to determine the ideal conditions for promoting DNA decondensation and making strand breaks more available for staining and detection by FCM. The best results were obtained with incubation at 37°C for 1 minute, followed by cold propidium iodide staining for 30 minutes.

  16. The Nuts and Bolts of Transcriptionally Silent Chromatin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartenberg, Marc R.; Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs at several genomic sites including the silent mating-type loci, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) tandem array. Epigenetic silencing at each of these domains is characterized by the absence of nearly all histone modifications, including most prominently the lack of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation. In all cases, silencing requires Sir2, a highly-conserved NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase. At locations other than the rDNA, silencing also requires additional Sir proteins, Sir1, Sir3, and Sir4 that together form a repressive heterochromatin-like structure termed silent chromatin. The mechanisms of silent chromatin establishment, maintenance, and inheritance have been investigated extensively over the last 25 years, and these studies have revealed numerous paradigms for transcriptional repression, chromatin organization, and epigenetic gene regulation. Studies of Sir2-dependent silencing at the rDNA have also contributed to understanding the mechanisms for maintaining the stability of repetitive DNA and regulating replicative cell aging. The goal of this comprehensive review is to distill a wide array of biochemical, molecular genetic, cell biological, and genomics studies down to the “nuts and bolts” of silent chromatin and the processes that yield transcriptional silencing. PMID:27516616

  17. Increased chromatin fragmentation and reduced acrosome integrity in spermatozoa of red deer from lead polluted sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Pilar; del Olmo, Enrique; Fernández-Santos, M Rocío; Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; Garde, J Julián; Mateo, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Vertebrates are constantly exposed to a diffuse pollution of heavy metals existing in the environment, but in some cases, the proximity to emission sources like mining activity increases the risk of developing adverse effects of these pollutants. Here we have studied lead (Pb) levels in spermatozoa and testis, and chromatin damage and levels of endogenous antioxidant activity in spermatozoa of red deer (Cervus elaphus) from a Pb mining area (n=37) and a control area (n=26). Deer from the Pb-polluted area showed higher Pb levels in testis parenchyma, epididymal cauda and spermatozoa, lower values of acrosome integrity, higher activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and higher values of DNA fragmentation (X-DFI) and stainability (HDS) in sperm than in the control area. These results indicate that mining pollution can produce damage on chromatin and membrane spermatozoa in wildlife. The study of chromatin fragmentation has not been studied before in spermatozoa of wildlife species, and the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) has been revealed as a successful tool for this purpose in species in which the amount of sperm that can be collected is very limited. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Recognition of chromatin by the plant alkaloid, ellipticine as a dual binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Majumder, Parijat [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Chakraborty, Payal [Bionivid Technology Pvt Ltd, Kasturi Nagar, Bangalore 560043 (India); Jana, Kuladip [Division of Molecular Medicine, Centre for Translational Animal Research, Bose Institute, P-1/12 C.I.T. Scheme VIIM, Kolkata 700054, West Bengal (India); Das, Chandrima, E-mail: chandrima.das@saha.ac.in [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Dasgupta, Dipak, E-mail: dipak.dasgupta@saha.ac.in [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India)

    2015-07-10

    Recognition of core histone components of chromatin along with chromosomal DNA by a class of small molecule modulators is worth examining to evaluate their intracellular mode of action. A plant alkaloid ellipticine (ELP) which is a putative anticancer agent has so far been reported to function via DNA intercalation, association with topoisomerase II and binding to telomere region. However, its effect upon the potential intracellular target, chromatin is hitherto unreported. Here we have characterized the biomolecular recognition between ELP and different hierarchical levels of chromatin. The significant result is that in addition to DNA, it binds to core histone(s) and can be categorized as a ‘dual binder’. As a sequel to binding with histone(s) and core octamer, it alters post-translational histone acetylation marks. We have further demonstrated that it has the potential to modulate gene expression thereby regulating several key biological processes such as nuclear organization, transcription, translation and histone modifications. - Highlights: • Ellipticine acts a dual binder binding to both DNA and core histone(s). • It induces structural perturbations in chromatin, chromatosome and histone octamer. • It alters histones acetylation and affects global gene expression.

  20. Recognition of chromatin by the plant alkaloid, ellipticine as a dual binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Majumder, Parijat; Chakraborty, Payal; Jana, Kuladip; Das, Chandrima; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of core histone components of chromatin along with chromosomal DNA by a class of small molecule modulators is worth examining to evaluate their intracellular mode of action. A plant alkaloid ellipticine (ELP) which is a putative anticancer agent has so far been reported to function via DNA intercalation, association with topoisomerase II and binding to telomere region. However, its effect upon the potential intracellular target, chromatin is hitherto unreported. Here we have characterized the biomolecular recognition between ELP and different hierarchical levels of chromatin. The significant result is that in addition to DNA, it binds to core histone(s) and can be categorized as a ‘dual binder’. As a sequel to binding with histone(s) and core octamer, it alters post-translational histone acetylation marks. We have further demonstrated that it has the potential to modulate gene expression thereby regulating several key biological processes such as nuclear organization, transcription, translation and histone modifications. - Highlights: • Ellipticine acts a dual binder binding to both DNA and core histone(s). • It induces structural perturbations in chromatin, chromatosome and histone octamer. • It alters histones acetylation and affects global gene expression