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Sample records for underlying cerebral amyloidoses

  1. Amyloidoses as seen by the Rheumatologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Ch Gerster

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is due to extracellular deposition in various organs and tissues of amorphous materials made of protein fibrils, whose thickness is 10 nm. Seventeen different amyloid fibrils are known (1. Amyloidosis can be localised or systemic. There are 4 systemic amyloidoses (2: Familial amyloidosis with mutated transthyretin. Primary, paraprotein associated, amyloidosis AL. Secondary AA amyloidosis in long- standing inflammation. β2-microglobulin...

  2. MRI in cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis; MRT bei kardialer Sarkoidose und Amyloidose

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    Bauner, K.U. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Wintersperger, B. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Sarcoidosis and amyloidosis are both multisystem disorders, which may involve the heart; however, isolated cardiac disease is rare. Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis is crucial because the patient prognosis is dependent on cardiac involvement and early treatment. Echocardiography is the first line imaging modality in the diagnostic work-up of both diseases, possibly giving hints towards the correct diagnosis. Besides myocardial biopsy and radionuclide studies cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely performed in patients suspect of having infiltrative cardiomyopathy. The T1 mapping procedure is currently being evaluated as a new technique for detection and quantification of global myocardial enhancement, as seen in cardiac amyloidosis. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis can be significantly improved by MRI, especially with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. In cardiac sarcoidosis the use of LGE is outcome-related while in amyloidosis analysis of T1-mapping may be of prognostic value. If cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis or amyloidosis is suspected cardiac MRI including LGE should be performed for establishing the diagnosis. (orig.) [German] Die Sarkoidose und Amyloidose sind Multisystemerkrankungen, in deren Verlauf es zu einer kardialen Beteiligung kommen kann. Bildgebend wird als primaeres Verfahren die Echokardiographie eingesetzt. Zur weiteren Diagnostik wird neben der Biopsie und nuklearmedizinischen Verfahren v. a. die MRT herangezogen. Als neuere Technik zur Darstellung globaler diffuser Kontrastmittelanreicherungen, wie sie im Rahmen der Amyloidose vorkommen, wird z. Z. das T1-Mapping evaluiert. Durch den Einsatz der MRT, insbesondere des Late-Gadolinium-Enhancements (LGE), koennen die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet in der Diagnostik der kardialen Sarkoidose und Amyloidose entscheidend verbessert werden. Bei der Sarkoidose stellt das Vorhandensein eines LGE einen

  3. CT analyses of cerebral tumors under steroid therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.; Kretzschmar, K.; Schicketanz, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine, by CT density and volume measurements, the influence of steroid therapy on cerebral tumors, on their perifocal edema and on the uninvolved cerebral tissue, CT follow-up studies of 37 patients were analysed. In general a decrease of tumor density is to be seen within the first 10 days of therapy. Under continuous steroid application absorption coefficients then increase again, so that no cortisone effect on the tumor remains. The tumor size does not alter: in particular at no time is growth retardation detectable under cortisone therapy. Intensity and extension of the perifocal edema decrease in two stages. From this delayed course we conclude the cytotoxic component of the tumor edema to be more extensive than supposed. Deviations appear dependent on tumor histology, which sould lead to individualied steroid application. (orig.)

  4. MRI of cerebral blood flow under hyperbaric conditions in rats.

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    Cardenas, Damon P; Muir, Eric R; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-07-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has a number of clinical applications. However, the effects of acute HBO on basal cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neurovascular coupling are not well understood. This study explored the use of arterial spin labeling MRI to evaluate changes in baseline and forepaw stimulus-evoked CBF responses in rats (n = 8) during normobaric air (NB), normobaric oxygen (NBO) (100% O2 ), 3 atm absolute (ATA) hyperbaric air (HB) and 3 ATA HBO conditions. T1 was also measured, and the effects of changes in T1 caused by increasing oxygen on the CBF calculation were investigated. The major findings were as follows: (i) increased inhaled oxygen concentrations led to a reduced respiration rate; (ii) increased dissolved paramagnetic oxygen had significant effects on blood and tissue T1 , which affected the CBF calculation using the arterial spin labeling method; (iii) the differences in blood T1 had a larger effect than the differences in tissue T1 on CBF calculation; (iv) if oxygen-induced changes in blood and tissue T1 were not taken into account, CBF was underestimated by 33% at 3 ATA HBO, 10% at NBO and 0.05) and all were higher than CBF under NB by ~40% (p masks oxygen-induced vasoconstriction, although blood gas was not measured; and (vi) substantial stimulus-evoked CBF increases were detected under HBO, similar to NB, supporting the notion that activation-induced CBF regulation in the brain does not operate through an oxygen-sensing mechanism. CBF MRI provides valuable insights into the effects of oxygen on basal CBF and neurovascular coupling under hyperbaric conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy in Children (Under Five) in and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a non-progressive disorder of posture and movement due to brain damage/insult/lesion before birth, during delivery or in the perinatal period. It is a neurological disorder of childhood with significant medico-social implications. A retrospective hospital based cross sectional study was conducted to ...

  6. [Progress of researches on mechanism of acupuncture therapy underlying improvement of acute cerebral hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Wang, Hai-qiao; Dong, Gui-rong

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, the authors review the progress of researches on the mechanism of acupuncture therapy underlying improvement of acute cerebral hemorrhage from experimental studies and research methods. The effects of acupuncture intervention mainly involve (1) lessening inflammatory reactions, (2) reducing impairment of free radicals and excitatory amino acids on cerebral neurons, (3) balancing release of vascular bioactive substances to increase regional cerebral blood flow, and (4) promoting repair and regeneration of the neural tissue, etc. In regard to the research methods, many new biological techniques such as biological molecular approaches, neuro-cellular chemical methods, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or quantitative real time-PCR, situ hybridization, western blotting, electron microscope, etc., have been extensively applied to researches on the underlying mechanism of acupuncture therapy for cerebral infarction. In addition, the authors also pointed out that in spite of achieving some bigger progresses in experimental studies, most of the results basically reflect static, isolated and regional changes rather than dynamic and whole body changes. For this reason, more vivo research techniques and noninvasive research methods are highly recommended to be used in the future research on the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture therapy for acute cerebral ischemia.

  7. Frequency of cerebral infarction secondary to head injury and the underlying mechanisms: CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernande-Fresno, L.; Manzanares, R.; Caniego, J.L.; Velasco, M.; Parra, M.L.; Monasterio, F.

    1997-01-01

    To study the frequency of and possible mechanisms producing severe head injury (HI) by serial CT studies. We reviewed brain CT results in 154 HI patients examined over the past 31 months. All of them were hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) presenting coma with Glosgow Coma Scale scores of 9 or under. A first CT scan was performed when the patients arrived in the emergency room and at a least one more was carried out over the following 1 to 6 days. Sixteen of the 154 patients presented ischemic areas of low attenuation in a territory of defined vascular distribution that did not exist in the CT done at admission; the majority of them also had extensive extraaxial or intraaxial hematomas causing a considerable mass effect and cerebral displacement inducing different types of herniation. The vascular territories involved were anterior cerebral artery in five cases, middle cerebral artery in two, posterior cerebral artery in seven lenticulostriate arteries in six, anterior choroidal artery in five, perforating thalamus in six, recurrent artery in one case and superior cerebellar artery in another. In our series, there was a high prevalence (10.4%) of infarcts associated with severe HI; the most common etiopathogenic mechanisms are cerebral displacement accompanied by compression and vessel strain. (Author) 13 refs

  8. The baboon model under anaesthesia for in vivo cerebral blood flow studies using single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) techniques

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    Dormehl, I.; Redelinghuys, F.; Hugo, N. [Pretoria Univ. (South Africa); Oliver, D.; Pilloy, W. [Medical Univ. of Southern Africa (MEDUNSA), Pretoria (South Africa)

    1992-12-31

    Single photon computed tomography of the brain can be useful in animal experimentation directed towards cerebral conditions. A well established and understood baboon model, necessarily under anaesthesia, could especially be valuable in such investigations. Six normal baboons were studied under various anesthetic agents and their combinations: ketamine, thiopentone, pentobarbitone and halothane. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) studies were performed with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO. CBF effects from various anaesthesia were detected, requiring careful choice of the anaesthesia for cerebral investigations. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs.

  9. The baboon model under anaesthesia for in vivo cerebral blood flow studies using single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormehl, I.; Redelinghuys, F.; Hugo, N.; Oliver, D.; Pilloy, W.

    1992-01-01

    Single photon computed tomography of the brain can be useful in animal experimentation directed towards cerebral conditions. A well established and understood baboon model, necessarily under anaesthesia, could especially be valuable in such investigations. Six normal baboons were studied under various anesthetic agents and their combinations: ketamine, thiopentone, pentobarbitone and halothane. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) studies were performed with 99m Tc-HMPAO. CBF effects from various anaesthesia were detected, requiring careful choice of the anaesthesia for cerebral investigations. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Effect of thyroid hormone on myocardial and cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury in valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Qing-Bin Wei; Fei Xie; Shi-Li Wang; Gang Li

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of thyroid hormone (euthyrox) on myocardial and cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury in valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods: A total of 76 patients who received valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass in our hospital between January 2013 and December 2016 were collected and divided into control group (n=38) and observation group (n=38) according to random number table. Observation group took euthyrox orally 1 week before...

  11. MRI findings of cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter under various intracranial conditions

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    Yamamoto, Yoshisuke; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hidenori (Matsusaka Chuo Hospital, Mie (Japan))

    1993-12-01

    We have experienced 4 cases of cerebral parenchymas in which high intensity was sustained by MRI T[sub 2] WI, though a low density disappeared in CT, among the cases in which an expansion of the low density was observed in the cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter by a CT scan after ventricular drainage and a shunt operation designed to combat increased intracranial pressure due to meningitis and a brain tumor. The cases were classified on the basis of morbidity into 1 case of cryptococcus meningitis, 1 case complicated by cerebellar hemorrhage and meningitis, and two cases of acute increased intracranial pressue due to a thalamic tumor and cerebellar astrocytoma. If a ventricular catheter or drainage tube is inserted, cerebral fluid penetrates into the cerebral parenchyma to cause a change in the tissue which can be explained, on the basis of CT findings, as a reversible change. However, this histological change is not always reversible according to our present MRI finding; rather, it becomes strong if the results of an inflammation such as meningitis are added to the cerebral fluid; in such a case, the reversibility is considered to disappear completely. (author).

  12. MRI findings of cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter under various intracranial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshisuke; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hidenori

    1993-01-01

    We have experienced 4 cases of cerebral parenchymas in which high intensity was sustained by MRI T 2 WI, though a low density disappeared in CT, among the cases in which an expansion of the low density was observed in the cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter by a CT scan after ventricular drainage and a shunt operation designed to combat increased intracranial pressure due to meningitis and a brain tumor. The cases were classified on the basis of morbidity into 1 case of cryptococcus meningitis, 1 case complicated by cerebellar hemorrhage and meningitis, and two cases of acute increased intracranial pressue due to a thalamic tumor and cerebellar astrocytoma. If a ventricular catheter or drainage tube is inserted, cerebral fluid penetrates into the cerebral parenchyma to cause a change in the tissue which can be explained, on the basis of CT findings, as a reversible change. However, this histological change is not always reversible according to our present MRI finding; rather, it becomes strong if the results of an inflammation such as meningitis are added to the cerebral fluid; in such a case, the reversibility is considered to disappear completely. (author)

  13. Cesarean under general or epidural anesthesia: does it differ in terms of regional cerebral oxygenation?

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    Ozgen, Zehra Serpil Ustalar; Toraman, Fevzi; Erkek, Esin; Sungur, Tuba; Guclu, Pınar; Durmaz, Samime; Bilgili, Canan Okuyucu

    2014-12-01

    It is aimed to evaluate whether there is a difference in regional cerebral saturation of newborns measured by near infrared spectroscopy born either by general anesthesia or combined spinal epidural anesthesia during elective cesarean deliveries. After approval from the ethics committee of our hospital, and informed consents of the parturients were taken, 68 patients were included in the study. The regional cerebral oxygen saturations (RcSO2) of newborns were measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements at 1st, 5th min after birth. In group I (n=32), general anesthesia was performed for the cesarean operation and in group II (n=36), combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) was the anesthetic management. The age of the mother, gestation, the problems related to the pregnancy, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation (SpO2) of the mother had been recorded. The measurements of the newborn were; SpO2 of right hand, RcSO2 measured by NIRS, the delivery time (from incision to the cessation of circulation in the placental cord), Apgar score. Data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism 5.0 (GraphPad Software, La Jolla, California) and presented as mean +/- SD. Results obtained in different groups were compared using upaired t-test. Differences were statistically significant at p newborns were significantly higher in Group II. Regional cerebral oxygenation measured by NIRS were significantly higher in CSEA group. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia, besides other known advantages, had been shown to be superior to general anesthesia as a means of regional cerebral oxygenation of the newborns. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Effect of thyroid hormone on myocardial and cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury in valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Bin Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of thyroid hormone (euthyrox on myocardial and cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury in valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods: A total of 76 patients who received valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass in our hospital between January 2013 and December 2016 were collected and divided into control group (n=38 and observation group (n=38 according to random number table. Observation group took euthyrox orally 1 week before surgery, control group took vitamin C tablets orally at the same point in time, and both therapies lasted for 1 week. Before taking medicine and after cardiopulmonary bypass (before end of surgery, serum levels of myocardial enzyme spectrum indexes and nerve injury indexes were compared between the two groups of patients. Results: Before taking medicine, differences in the serum levels of myocardial enzyme spectrum indexes and nerve injury indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups of patients. After cardiopulmonary bypass, serum myocardial enzyme spectrum indexes cTnT, CK-MB, α-HBD and LDH levels in observation group were lower than those in control group; serum nerve injury indexes NSE, S100B and GFAP levels were lower than those in control group while bFGF level was higher than that in control group. Conclusion: Euthyrox intervention in valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass can effectively reduce the myocardial and cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury.

  15. Neuromorphometrical changes in cerebral cortex of Swiss albino mice during postnatal development under HTO exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A.L.; Sisodia, R.

    1988-01-01

    The present study is a neuromorphometrical evaluation of the effects of internal tritiated exposure (120.62 kBq/ml body water; or 9.1 mGy/day) on cerebral cortex during postnatal development. One day old Swiss albino mice along with mothers were maintained at the dose rate of 185 kBq/ml of tritiated drinking water thoughout the experimental period. Quantitative study on cerebral cortex on different 1 to 6 weeks of postnatal intervals showed a gradual decline in cortical depths in the visual area 17 which maximally reduced by 25.27 percent of control at 6 week. Frontal area 6, 8 and posterior cortical medial areas 29 C and 29 D however did not show any statistical significant change in their critical depths till 4 week p.p. Total cell density in layer VI of visual region area 17 remained unaffected, statistically in first three weeks which significantly declined at later intervals (p < 0.001). Increased number of glial cell and reduced neutron packing density has been noticed at all the intervals (p < 0.001). (author)

  16. Progression of vasogenic edema induced by activated microglia under permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Miki; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Shodo; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Vogel, Christoph F; Tsuji, Mayumi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Itoh, Kouichi

    2018-02-05

    Brain edema is a severe complication that accompanies ischemic stroke. Increasing evidence shows that inflammatory cytokines impair tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier, suggesting the involvement of microglia in brain edema. In this study, we examined the role of microglia in the progression of ischemic brain edema using mice with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. The intensity of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) in the cerebral cortex and the striatum was elevated 3 h after occlusion and spread to peripheral regions of the ischemic hemisphere. Merged images of 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining and T2WI revealed the exact vasogenic edema region, which spread from the ischemic core to outside the ischemic region. Microglia were strongly activated in the ischemic region 3 h after occlusion and, notably, activated microglia were observed in the non-ischemic region 24 h after occlusion. Pretreatment with minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation clearly suppressed not only vasogenic edema but also infarct formation. We demonstrated in this study that vasogenic edema spreads from the ischemic core to the peripheral region, which can be elicited, at least in part, by microglial activation induced by ischemia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutic time window and underlying therapeutic mechanism of breviscapine injection against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chao; Zhu, Yanrong; Weng, Yan; Wang, Shiquan; Guan, Yue; Wei, Guo; Yin, Ying; Xi, Miaomaio; Wen, Aidong

    2014-01-01

    Breviscapine injection is a Chinese herbal medicine standardized product extracted from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. It has been widely used for treating cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, the therapeutic time window and the action mechanism of breviscapine are still unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the therapeutic time window and underlying therapeutic mechanism of breviscapine injection against cerebral ischemic/reperfusion injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2h followed by 24h of reperfusion. Experiment part 1 was used to investigate the therapeutic time window of breviscapine. Rats were injected intravenously with 50mg/kg breviscapine at different time-points of reperfusion. After 24h of reperfusion, neurologic score, infarct volume, brain water content and serum level of neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured in a masked fashion. Part 2 was used to explore the therapeutic mechanism of breviscapine. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), 8-hydroxyl-2'- deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and the antioxidant capacity of ischemia cortex were measured by ELISA and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, respectively. Immunofluorescence and western blot analysis were used to analyze the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Part 1: breviscapine injection significantly ameliorated neurologic deficit, reduced infarct volume and water content, and suppressed the levels of NSE in a time-dependent manner. Part 2: breviscapine inhibited the increased levels of 4-HNE and 8-OHdG, and enhanced the antioxidant capacity of cortex tissue. Moreover, breviscapine obviously raised the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 proteins after 24h of reperfusion. The therapeutic time window of breviscapine injection for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury seemed to be within 5h after reperfusion. By up-regulating the expression of Nrf2/HO-1 pathway

  18. Clinical features and risk factors of cerebral infarction after mild head trauma under 18 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Liang, Hong-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Mild head trauma can cause cerebral infarction in children younger than 18 months of age, yet the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and risk factors are not fully understood. Data of 16 cases between August 2008 and September 2011, including clinical manifestations and imaging and laboratory findings were collected and analyzed. All patients had the history of mild head trauma. The median age of the cohort was 13.5 months (range 6 months to 18 months). All children developed neurologic symptoms and signs within 72 hours after trauma, 62.5% (10/16) within 30 minutes. The first symptoms included hemiparesis (9/16), facial paresis (4/16), and convulsion (6/16). Overall, 93.75% (15/16) of the lesions were in the basal ganglia region. Two risk factors were identified, basal ganglia calcification in 10 and cytomegalovirus infection in eight. After conservative therapy, the neurologic deficits recovered to some extent. Cerebral infarction after mild head trauma in children younger than 18 months of age may take place, especially under the circumstances of basal ganglia calcification or cytomegalovirus infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Forbidden word entropy of cerebral oximetric values predicts postoperative neurocognitive decline in patients undergoing aortic arch surgery under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dubovoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up to 53% of cardiac surgery patients experience postoperative neurocognitive decline. Cerebral oximetry is designed to detect changes in cerebral tissue saturation and therefore may be useful to predict which patients are at risk of developing neurocognitive decline. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of a prospective study originally designed to determine if treatment of cerebral oximetry desaturation is associated with improvement in postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients undergoing aortic reconstruction under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Cognitive function was measured, preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively, with 15 neuropsychologic tests administered by a psychologist; the individual test scores were summed and normalized. Bilateral cerebral oximetry data were stored and analyzed using measures of entropy. Cognitive decline was defined as any decrease in the summed normalized score from baseline to 3 months. Results: Seven of 17 (41% patients suffered cognitive decline. There was no association between baseline cerebral oximetry and postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Nor were changes in oximetry values associated with cognitive decline. However, cognitive decline was associated with loss of forbidden word entropy (FwEn (correlation: Rho ρ = 0.51, P = 0.037 for left cerebral oximetry FwEn and ρ = 0.54, P = 0.025 for right cerebral oximetry FwEn. Conclusion: Postoperative cognitive decline was associated with loss of complexity of the time series as shown by a decrease in FwEn from beginning to end of the case. This suggests that regulation of cerebral oximetry is different between those who do and those who do not develop cognitive decline.

  20. Blood -brain barrier disruption was less under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia via a PI3K/Akt pathway in early cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Oak Z; Mellender, Scott J; Kiss, Geza K; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2017-05-01

    One of the important factors altering the degree of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in cerebral ischemia is the anesthetic used. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway has been reported to be involved in modulating BBB permeability and in isoflurane induced neuroprotection. This study was performed to compare the degree of BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia under isoflurane vs pentobarbital anesthesia and to determine whether inhibition of PI3K/Akt would affect the disruption in the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia. Permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion was performed in rats under 1.4% isoflurane or pentobarbital (50mg/kg i.p.) anesthesia with controlled ventilation. In half of each group LY294002, which is a PI3K/Akt inhibitor, was applied on the ischemic cortex immediately after MCA occlusion. After one hour of MCA occlusion, the transfer coefficient (K i ) of 14 C-α-aminoisobutyric acid ( 14 C-AIB) was determined to quantify the degree of BBB disruption. MCA occlusion increased the K i both in the isoflurane and pentobarbital anesthetized rats. However, the value of K i was lower under isoflurane (11.5±6.0μL/g/min) than under pentobarbital (18.3±7.1μL/g/min) anesthesia. The K i of the contralateral cortex of the pentobarbital group was higher (+74%) than that of the isoflurane group. Application of LY294002 on the ischemic cortex increased the K i (+99%) only in the isoflurane group. The degree of BBB disruption by MCA occlusion was significantly lower under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Our data demonstrated the importance of choice of anesthetics and suggest that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway plays a significant role in altering BBB disruption in cerebral ischemia during isoflurane but not during pentobarbital anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. anterior cingulate cortex | arterial spin labeling | right prefrontal cortex

  2. Cellular processing of the amyloidogenic cystatin C variant of hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, Icelandic type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Merz, G S; Schwenk, V

    1999-01-01

    of an amyloidogenic mutation on the intracellular processing of its protein product. The protein, a mutant of the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C, is the amyloid precursor protein in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis--Icelandic type (HCHWA-I). The amyloid fibers are composed of mutant cystatin C......An important gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the amyloidoses is the identification of the cellular events that lead from synthesis of an amyloid precursor protein to its conversion to the amyloid fiber subunit. We address this question by characterizing the effects...... (L68Q) that lacks the first 10 amino acids. We have previously shown that processing of wild-type cystatin C entails formation of a transient intracellular dimer that dissociates prior to secretion, such that extracellular cystatin C is monomeric. We report here that the cystatin C mutation engenders...

  3. [Acute cerebral ischemia in patients under 45 years of age: a study in a series of 68 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, J C; Aladro-Benito, Y; Cubero-González, A

    1998-10-01

    To study acute cerebrovascular ischemia in young persons in our environment. A retrospective study was made of 68 patients, aged between 15 and 45, with transient ischemic accidents (TIA) or cerebral infarcts. Etiological factors, clinical features, diagnostic groups according to the TOAST classification and prognosis were analyzed. In our series there was a ratio of 1.26 in favor of the women. TIAs made up 29.4% of the cases. The most commonly affected territory was that of the carotid artery. In persons over the age of 30 there was greater prevalence of this pathology and of the risk factors diabetes, arterial hypertension and dyslipaemia. There was a significant association with migraine in those aged under 30. The biggest diagnostic group was that of infarct of unknown origin (39.7%), probably because of the specificity of the classification. The functional condition on follow-up was good: only 4.4% of the patients had a score greater than 3 on the Rankin scale. There were no deaths either during the acute phase or subsequently. Recurrences were seen in 10.2% of the patients. The results obtained in our series are similar to those published in the literature. In acute cerebrovascular ischaemia in young persons, full diagnostic investigations should be carried out in order to give suitable treatment.

  4. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes in oculopalatal myoclonus: implication for neural pathways, underlying the disorder

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    Cho, Sang Soo; Moon, So Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is characterized by rhythmic involuntary jerky movements of the soft palate of the throat. When associated with eye movements, it is called oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM). Ordinary PM is characterized by hypertrophic olivary degeneration, a trans-synaptic degeneration following loss of neuronal input to the inferior olivary nucleus due to an interruption of the Guillain-Mollaret triangle usually by a hemorrhage. However, the neural pathways underlying the disorder are uncertain. In an attempt to understand the pathologic neural pathways, we examined the metabolic correlates of this tremulous condition. Brain FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 patients with OPM (age, 49.9{+-}4.6 y: all males: 7 with pontine hemorrhage, 1 with diffuse brainstem infarction) and age-matched 50 healthy males (age, 50.7{+-} 9.0) and the regional glucose metabolism compared using SPM99. For group analysis, the hemispheres containing lesions were assigned to the right side of the brain. Patients with OPM had significant hypometabolism in the ipsilateral (to the lesion) brainstem and superior temporal and parahippocampal gyri (P < 0.05 corrected, k = 100). By contrast, there was significant hypermetabolism in the contralateral middle and inferior temporal gyri, thalamus, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus (P < 0.05 corrected, k=l00). Our data demonstrate the distinct metabolic changes between several ipsilateral and contralateral brain regions (hypometabolism vs. hypermetabolism) in patients with OPM. This may provide clues for understanding the neural pathways underlying the disorder.

  5. The deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamic nucleus modifies the cerebral metabolism in {sup 18}FDG-Tep of obsessive compulsive patients; La stimulation cerebrale profonde du noyau sous thalamique modifie le metabolisme cerebral en 18FDG-TEP des patients obsessionnels compulsifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Jeune, F.; Garin, E. [Service de medecine nucleaire, centre Eugene-Marquis, Rennes, (France); Verin, M.; Peron, J. [service de neurologie, CHU Pontchaillou, Rennes, (France); Mallet, L.; Yelnik, J. [Inserm, Avenir Team, Behavior, Emotion and Basal Ganglia, IFR 70, Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, (France); Kreps, M.O. [Inserm U796, service de psychiatrie, hopital Sainte-Anne, Paris, (France); Drapier, D.; Millet, B. [service de psychiatrie adulte, centre hospitalier Guillaume-Regnier, Rennes, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this work was to find again this orbito-frontal hyper metabolism among the resistant obsessive compulsive disorder patients that are going to benefit of a deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamus nucleus and to demonstrate that this new therapy approach leads a reduction of the metabolism in this area in correlation with the clinical improvement. It is about the first study realized in isotopic functional imaging on ten resistant compulsive disorder patients treated by bilateral deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamus nucleus. It shows that the treatment efficiency is in relation with a reduction of the glucide metabolism in the right orbito-frontal cortex. It suggests equally that the under thalamus nucleus would be functionally linked to the orbito-frontal cortex. (N.C.)

  6. Anatomy of the soul as reflected in the cerebral hemispheres: neural circuits underlying voluntary control of basic motivated behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Larry W

    2005-12-05

    Understanding the principles of cerebral hemisphere neural network organization is essential for understanding the biological foundations of cognition and affect-thinking and feeling. A tripartite model of cerebral structure-function organization is reviewed, with attention focused on a behavior control system differentiation that mediates voluntary influences on three fundamental classes of goal-oriented behavior common to all animals. The model postulates just three cerebral divisions, one cortical and two nuclear (lateral or striatal, and medial or pallidal), that together generate a triple descending projection to the brainstem/cord motor system. This minimal circuit element is topographically organized and regionally differentiated, with the map of cortical areas serving as a basic starting point. Virtually all of the cerebral hemisphere projects on the upper brainstem behavior control column, atop the motor system hierarchy. The latter's rostral segment helps control ingestive (eating and drinking), defensive (fight or flight), and reproductive (sexual and parental) motivated behaviors, whereas its caudal segment helps control foraging or exploratory behavior to obtain or avoid specific goal objects associated with all classes of motivated behavior. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  8. Cerebral histamine H1 receptor binding potential measured with PET under a test dose of olopatadine, an antihistamine, is reduced after repeated administration of olopatadine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Michio; Kubo, Nobuo; Adachi, Kazuhiko; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Keiichi; Shimizu, Keiji; Tominaga, Hideyuki

    2009-06-01

    Some antihistamine drugs that are used for rhinitis and pollinosis have a sedative effect as they enter the brain and block the H(1) receptor, potentially causing serious accidents. Receptor occupancy has been measured with PET under single-dose administration in humans to classify antihistamines as more sedating or as less sedating (or nonsedating). In this study, the effect of repeated administration of olopatadine, an antihistamine, on the cerebral H(1) receptor was measured with PET. A total of 17 young men with rhinitis underwent dynamic brain PET with (11)C-doxepin at baseline, under an initial single dose of 5 mg of olopatadine (acute scan), and under another 5-mg dose after repeated administration of olopatadine at 10 mg/d for 4 wk (chronic scan). The H(1) receptor binding potential was estimated using Logan graphical analysis with cerebellum as reference region input. The acute scan showed a slight decrease in H(1) receptor binding potential across the cerebral cortex (by 15% in the frontal cortex), but the chronic scan showed a marked decrease (by 45% from the acute scan in the frontal cortex). Behavioral data before and after the PET scans did not reveal any sedative effect. The results may be interpreted as either intracerebral accumulation of olopatadine or H(1) receptor downregulation due to repeated administration. The study shows feasibility and potential value for PET in evaluating the pharmacologic effect of a drug not only after a single dose but also after repeated administration.

  9. Cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenan, T.J.; Grossman, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews retrospectively MR, CT, and angiographic findings in patients with cerebral vasculitis in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities, as well as the spectrum of imaging abnormalities in this disease entity. Studies were retrospectively reviewed in 12 patients with cerebral vasculitis proved by means of angiography and/or brain biopsy

  10. Mechanism of aquaporin 4 (AQP 4) up-regulation in rat cerebral edema under hypobaric hypoxia and the preventative effect of puerarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi; Yan, Muyang; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Qi; He, Shang; Chen, Jingwen; Wang, Chengbin

    2018-01-15

    We aim to investigate the mechanism of aquaporin 4 (AQP 4) up-regulation during high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) in rats under hypobaric hypoxia and preventative effect of puerarin. Rats were exposed to a hypobaric chamber with or without the preventative treatment of puerarin or dexamethasone. Morriz water maze was used to evaluate the spatial memory injury. HE staining and W/D ratio were used to evaluate edema injury. Rat astrocytes and microglia were co-cultured under the condition of hypoxia with the administration of p38 inhibitor, NF-κB inhibitor or puerarin. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α) of cortex and culture supernatant were measured with ELISA. AQP4, phosphorylation of MAPKs, NF-κB pathway of cortex and astrocytes were measured by Western blot. Weakened spatial memory and cerebral edema were observed after hypobaric hypoxia exposure. AQP4, phosphorylation of NF-κB and MAPK signal pathway of cortex increased after hypoxia exposure and decreased with preventative treatment of puerarin. Hypoxia increased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in cortex and microglia and puerarin could prevent the increase of them. AQP4 of astrocytes increased after co-cultured with microglia when both were exposed to hypoxia. AQP4 showed a decrease after administered with p38 inhibitor, NF-κB inhibitor or puerarin. Hypoxia triggers inflammatory response, during which AQP4 of astrocytes can be up regulated through the release of TNF-α and IL-6 from microglia. Puerarin can exert a preventative effect on the increase of AQP4 through inhibiting the release of TNF-α and phosphorylation of NF-κB, MAPK pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the Cerebral State Index in Cats under Isoflurane Anaesthesia: Dose-Effect Relationship and Prediction of Clinical Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the cerebral state index (CSI in reflecting different levels of isoflurane anaesthesia was evaluated in ten cats subjected to four end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (EtIso, each maintained for 15 minutes (0.8%, 1.2%, 1.6%, or 2.0% EtIso. The CSI, hemodynamic data, ocular reflexes, and eye position were recorded for each EtIso concentration. Pharmacodynamic analysis of CSI with EtIso was performed, as well as prediction probability analysis with a clinical scale based on the eye reflexes. The CSI values showed great variability. Between all parameters, burst suppression ratio showed the better fitting with the sigmoidal concentration-effect model (R2=0.93 followed by CSI (R2=0.82 and electromyographic activity (R2=0.79. EtIso was the variable with better prediction of the clinical scale of anaesthesia (prediction probability value of 0.94. Although the CSI values decrease with increasing isoflurane concentrations, the huge variability in CSI values may be a strong limitation for its use in cats and it seems to be no better than EtIso as a predictor of clinical signs.

  12. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  13. Long-term fate of left atrial thrombi and incidence of cerebral embolism under continuous anticoagulation therapy; MR-tomographische Evaluation der Inzidenz zerebraler Embolien bei Patienten mit Vorhofflimmern und linksatrialen Thromben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strach, K.; Meyer, C.; Hackenbroch, M.; Schild, H.; Sommer, T. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Tiemann, K. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik II, Bonn (Germany); Haase, J. [Klinik Rotes Kreuz, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pizulli, L. [Petruskrankenhaus, Bonn (Germany); Omran, H. [St. Marien-Hospital, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: Patients (pts.) with atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial thrombi are known to have an increased risk for cerebral embolism. However, little is known about the clinical course of atrial thrombi and the incidence of cerebral embolism in those patients during anticoagulation therapy. The high sensitivity of MR imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) suggests that this technique could provide an improved estimate of cerebral embolism associated with the presence of left atrial thrombi. The aims of this prospective study were to evaluate (1) the prevalence of clinically silent and apparent cerebral embolism in pts. with newly diagnosed AF and atrial thrombi using MRI/DWI, (2) the long-term fate of atrial thrombi under continued anticoagulation therapy and (3) the incidence of cerebral embolism during a follow-up period of 12 months with continuous anticoagulation therapy. Materials and methods: The study group consisted of 32 pts. with (1) newly diagnosed AF and evidence of left atrial (LA) thrombi detected by TEE and (2) a new start of anticoagulation therapy [International Normalized Ratio (INR) 2.0-3.0]. 19 pts. with (1) newly diagnosed AF and no evidence of atrial thrombi and (2) an equivalent anticoagulation regimen served as the control group. In both groups (a) MRI/DWI studies of the brain (weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, 20, 28, 36, 44, and 52), (b) transesophageal echocardiographic studies (TEE) for assessment of LA-Thrombi (weeks 0 and 52) and (c) clinical neurological assessments (weeks 0, 20 and 52) were performed. Results: In the study group (AF and LA-Thrombi) 11 out of 32 pts. (34%) displayed signs of acute (n=8) or chronic (n=3) cerebral embolism in the initial MRI studies. In 4 out of 32 pts.(13%), MRI/DWI depicted new or additional cerebral emboli (n=12) during the follow-up period despite continuous anticoagulation therapy. 2 (n=2/4; 50%) of these patients had clinically apparent neurological deficits. In the control group 1 out of 19 pts

  14. Classification of manual abilities in children with cerebral palsy under 5 years of age : how reliable is the Manual Ability Classification System?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, V. F. P.; Ketelaar, M.; Nijnuis, M. G.; Enkelaar, L.; Gorter, J. W.

    Objective: To assess the interobserver reliability of the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) in young children (age 1-5 years) with cerebral palsy. Design: Interobserver reliability study. Setting: A cross-sectional study of a hospital-based population of children with cerebral palsy.

  15. Histological Architecture Underlying Brain-Immune Cell-Cell Interactions and the Cerebral Response to Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2017-01-01

    Although the brain is now known to actively interact with the immune system under non-inflammatory conditions, the site of cell-cell interactions between brain parenchymal cells and immune cells has been an open question until recently. Studies by our and other groups have indicated that brain structures such as the leptomeninges, choroid plexus stroma and epithelium, attachments of choroid plexus, vascular endothelial cells, cells of the perivascular space, circumventricular organs, and astrocytic endfeet construct the histological architecture that provides a location for intercellular interactions between bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage cells and brain parenchymal cells under non-inflammatory conditions. This architecture also functions as the interface between the brain and the immune system, through which systemic inflammation-induced molecular events can be relayed to the brain parenchyma at early stages of systemic inflammation during which the blood-brain barrier is relatively preserved. Although brain microglia are well known to be activated by systemic inflammation, the mechanism by which systemic inflammatory challenge and microglial activation are connected has not been well documented. Perturbed brain-immune interaction underlies a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders including ischemic brain injury, status epilepticus, repeated social defeat, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Proinflammatory status associated with cytokine imbalance is involved in autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and depression. In this article, we propose a mechanism connecting systemic inflammation, brain-immune interface cells, and brain parenchymal cells and discuss the relevance of basic studies of the mechanism to neurological disorders with a special emphasis on sepsis-associated encephalopathy and preterm brain injury.

  16. Time course of changes in cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation in patients with diabetes mellitus or previous stroke under sevoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinohara, Hiroshi; Kadoi, Yuji; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Chikara; Mizutani, Akio

    2011-06-01

    We observed an increase in mean middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (V(mca)) after tourniquet deflation during orthopedic surgery under sevoflurane anesthesia in patients with diabetes mellitus or previous stroke. Eight controls, seven insulin-treated diabetic patients, and eight previous stroke patients were studied. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, V(mca), arterial blood gases, and plasma lactate levels were measured every minute for 10 min after tourniquet release in all patients. V(mca) was measured using a transcranial Doppler probe. V(mca) in all three groups increased after tourniquet deflation, the increase lasting for 4 or 5 min. However, the degree of increase in V(mca) in the diabetic patients was smaller than that in the other two groups after tourniquet deflation (at 2 min after tourniquet deflation: control 58.5 ± 3.3, previous stroke 58.4 ± 4.6, diabetes 51.7 ± 2.3; P < 0.05 compared with the other two groups). In conclusion, the degree of increase in V (mca) in diabetic patients is smaller than that in controls and patients with previous stroke.

  17. Cerebral Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... off. When hypoxia lasts for longer periods of time, it can cause coma, seizures, and even brain death. In brain death, there is no measurable activity in the brain, although cardiovascular function is preserved. Life support is required for respiration. × Definition Cerebral hypoxia ...

  18. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru

    1992-01-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.)

  19. Changes of Cerebral and/or Peripheral Adenosine A1 Receptor and IGF-I Concentrations under Extended Sleep Duration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Chennaoui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Extended sleep improves sustained attention and reduces sleep pressure in humans. Downregulation of adenosine A1 receptor (A1R and modulation of the neurotrophic factor insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-I in brain structures controlling attentional capacities could be involved. In the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats, we measured adenosine A1R and IGF-I protein concentrations after photoperiod-induced sleep extension. Two groups of twelve rats were adapted over 14 days to a habitual (CON 12:12 light–dark (LD schedule and an extended (EXT 16:8 LD schedule. IGF-I content was also measured in plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle. In EXT, compared to CON rats, A1R content in the frontal cortex was significantly lower (p < 0.05, while IGF-I content was higher (p < 0.001, and no significant change was observed in the hippocampus. IGF-I content in plasma and muscle was higher (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, while it was lower in liver (p < 0.001. The absolute weight and weight gain were higher in EXT rats (p < 0.01. These data suggest that 14 days under a 16:8 LD photoperiod respectively down- and upregulated cortical A1R and IGF-I levels. This photoperiod induced an anabolic profile with increased weight gain and circulating and muscular IGF-I levels. An extension of sleep duration might favor cerebral and peripheral anabolism, which may help attentional and physical capacities.

  20. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  1. Cerebral Vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khorvash

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vasculitis is an inflammation systems may be involved of blood vessels due to various origins. Vessels of the peripheral and/or central nervous. Vasculitis of the CNS is rare and occurs in the context of systemic diseases or as primary angiitis of the CNS. Epidemiology: The overall incidence of primary vasculitis is about 40/1,000,000 persons [excluding giant cell (temporal arteritis, GCA]. Its incidence increases with age. The incidence of GCA is much higher (around 200/1,000,000 persons in the age group[50 years. Clinical Presentation: Clinical and pathological presentation in CNS vasculitis represents a wide spectrum. Among others, headache, cranial nerve affections, encephalopathy, seizures, psychosis, myelitis, stroke, intracranial haemorrhage and aseptic meningoencephalitis are described. Primary and secondary vasculitides leading more frequently to CNS manifestations are discussed. Primary and secondary Vasculitides: Including Giant Cell (Temporal Arteritis , Takayasu arteritis, Polyarteritis nodosa, Primary angiitis of the CNS, Wegener’s granulomatosis, and Connective tissue diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, mixed connective disease and Sjögren syndrome, are systemic immune-mediated diseases that lead to multiple organ affections. Cerebral Vasculitis: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis: Vasculitides represent a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases that affect blood vessel walls of varying calibers (inflammatory vasculopathy. Since the devastating symptoms of CNS vasculitis are at least partially reversible, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important. In order to establish a differential diagnosis clinical features, disease progression, age of onset, blood results, as well as CSF examinations have to be taken into consideration. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and DSA, play a central role in the diagnosis and disease monitoring .The diagnostic

  2. Cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy affects movement and posture causing activity limitation; it is a lifelong condition, with foreseeable complications. There are evidence-based interventions that will prevent participation restriction. Childhood interventions are generally delivered within multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. Sadly young adults are often not transferred to an appropriate multidisciplinary adult neurodisability service. An unexplained neurological deterioration should warrant further investigation. Pain is an important underreported symptom and musculoskeletal complaints are prevalent. Disabled adults have less participation socially, in employment, marriage, and independent living related to health problems, discrimination, or lack of access to information, support, and equipment. Evidence-based interventions include a variety of modalities at all International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health levels to include support and adaptations. Rehabilitation interventions that have been shown to be effective include surgery in childhood, ankle-foot orthoses, strength training, and electrical stimulation. Management of spasticity is beneficial and has an evidence base. Orthotics and casting are also used. Systematic reviews of upper limb therapies also show the benefit of physical therapy exercise, strengthening, fitness training, and constraint therapy. Occupational therapy has a weaker evidence base than in other disabling conditions but many modalities are transferable. Speech therapy is effective although no specific intervention is better. Psychological wellbeing interventions, including improving self-efficacy, health knowledge, and coping skills, are beneficial. Management of continence, nutrition, and fatigue promote wellbeing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Non operative management of cerebral abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batubara, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    Cerebral abscess is a focal intracerebral infection that begins as a localized area of cerebritis and develops into a collection of pus surrounded by a well-vascularized capsule. Patients typically present with varying combinations of aheadache, progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, and evidence of infection. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imagingare the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosing cerebral abscess. The treatment of cerebral abscess has been a challenge. Small cerebralabscesses (managed by the use of intravenous mannitol (or hypertonic saline) and dexamethasone. Acute seizures should be terminated with the administration of intravenous benzodiazepines or by intravenous fosphenytoin. Anticonvulsants prophylaxis must be initiated immediately and continued at least one year due to high risk in the cerebral abscesses. Easier detection of underlying conditions, monitoring of the therapeutic progress, and recognition of complications have probably contributed to the improved prognosis.

  4. Time patterns in multiple acute cerebral infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Vojtech; Khanevski, Andrej N; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2017-12-01

    Background Multiple acute cerebral infarcts in different arterial territories may be caused by several emboli concurrently or successively. Aim and/or hypothesis We hypothesized that the time from stroke onset to magnetic resonance imaging may shed light on underlying mechanisms of multiple acute cerebral infarcts. Methods This is a prospective observational cohort study involving 2697 ischemic stroke patients conducted at Haukeland University Hospital between February 2006 and October 2013. Only patients with diffusion-weighted imaging lesions in more than one arterial territory (left or right anterior circulation or posterior circulation) were included. The time from stroke onset to magnetic resonance imaging was registered and correlated with the etiology of multiple acute cerebral infarcts in each patient. Results We reviewed 2697 consecutive patients and 2220 (82%) underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Among these 2125 (96%) had diffusion-weighted imaging lesions. We found 187 multiple acute cerebral infarct patients who were then included in the study. There was positive correlation (0.20; p time to magnetic resonance imaging and frequency of multiple acute cerebral infarcts caused by internal carotid stenosis. There was no correlation (-.02) between time to magnetic resonance imaging and frequency of multiple acute cerebral infarcts caused by cardiogenic embolism. Conclusions Multiple acute cerebral infarcts associated with cardiogenic embolism seem to happen concurrently as a shower of emboli whereas multiple acute cerebral infarcts associated with internal carotid artery stenosis seem to occur successively separated by hours or days.

  5. Influence of aquatic physical therapy on gross motor skills in children under 5 years of age with cerebral palsy: Systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Latorre-García

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aquatic environment has been used and is used to perform physiotherapy treatments in different pathologies including cerebral palsy. No method has been proven more effective than the others. Aim: The objective of this article is to carry out a systematic review of the scientific literature on how physical exercise in water affects the gross motor skills and neurodevelopment of children with cerebral palsy. Methods: A systematic search was carried out using the PRISMA model. The search for articles in this review was done in the databases through Scopus and PubMed, as well as in the Web of Science (WOS platform and in official websites of international organizations, such as the World Health Organization (WHO. The review was carried out between the months of June and December of the year 2016. Results: Of the 8 studies that met the inclusion criteria, only two used randomized control trial design and the results were mixed. Most of the studies used quasi-experimental designs and reported improvements in gross motor skills, for group analyzes, after the aquatic programs were maintained from two to three sessions a week and lasted from 6 to 16 weeks. Participants were evaluated and classified according to the different development scales, and were less than 5 years old. Conclusions: Although the different studies have not demonstrated a greater efficacy of aquatic physiotherapy compared to other treatment concepts, neither has been less, so that the exercise in water increases the therapeutic possibilities to which the chronic nature of the Pathology must access the patient throughout his life. Aquatic exercise is feasible and adverse effects are minimal; but the dosage parameters are not clear. However, in order to promote the prescription by physicians of this type of therapy, it is necessary to carry out research studies that demonstrate in a quantitative way the efficacy of the method, with longer and longer samples.

  6. Validation of a Cerebral Palsy Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Monica; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Uldall, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse completeness and validity of data in the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982. METHODS: Completeness has been assessed by comparing data from The Danish National Patient Register (DNPR) with the cases included in the Cerebral Palsy Register (CPR). Agreement between......, but gestational age was subject to a systematic error, and urinary infections in pregnancy (kappa = 0.43) and placental abruption (kappa = 0.52) were seriously under-reported in the CPR. CONCLUSIONS: Completeness of the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982, has been assessed to maximal 85%, emphasizing...

  7. Postural Dysfunction During Standing and Walking in Children With Cerebral Palsy: What are the Underlying Problems and What New Therapies Might Improve Balance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Hines Woollacott

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we explore studies related to constraints on balance and walking in children with cerebral palsy (CP and the efficacy of training reactive balance (recovering from a slip induced by a platform displacement in children with both spastic hemiplegic and diplegic CP. Children with CP show (a crouched posture, contributing to decreased ability to recover balance (longer time/increased sway; (b delayed responses in ankle muscles; (c inappropriate muscle response sequencing; (d increased coactivation of agonists/antagonists. Constraints on gait include (a crouched gait; (b increased co-activation of agonists/antagonists; (c decreased muscle activation; (d spasticity. The efficiency of balance recovery can be improved in children with CP, indicated by both a reduction in the total center of pressure path used during balance recovery and in the time to restabilize balance after training. Changes in muscle response characteristics contributing to improved recovery include reductions in time of contraction onset, improved muscle response organization, and reduced co-contraction of agonists/antagonists. Clinical implications include the suggestion that improvement in the ability to recover balance is possible in school age children with CP.

  8. Hereditary protein S deficiency presenting with cerebral sinus thrombosis in an adolescent girl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelman, J. H.; Bakker, C. M.; Plandsoen, W. C.; Peeters, F. L.; Barth, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl, on oral contraceptives for 3 months, presented with cerebral sinus thrombosis. Investigation revealed underlying hereditary protein S deficiency. This uncommon cause of cerebral sinus thrombosis and the possible association with oral contraceptives are discussed

  9. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  10. Cellular processing of the amyloidogenic cystatin C variant of hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, Icelandic type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Merz, G S; Schwenk, V

    1999-01-01

    An important gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the amyloidoses is the identification of the cellular events that lead from synthesis of an amyloid precursor protein to its conversion to the amyloid fiber subunit. We address this question by characterizing the effects of an amyloidog......An important gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the amyloidoses is the identification of the cellular events that lead from synthesis of an amyloid precursor protein to its conversion to the amyloid fiber subunit. We address this question by characterizing the effects...

  11. How does the interaction of presumed timing, location and extent of the underlying brain lesion relate to upper limb function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailleux, Lisa; Klingels, Katrijn; Fiori, Simona; Simon-Martinez, Cristina; Demaerel, Philippe; Locus, Marlies; Fosseprez, Eva; Boyd, Roslyn N; Guzzetta, Andrea; Ortibus, Els; Feys, Hilde

    2017-09-01

    Upper limb (UL) function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) vary largely depending on presumed timing, location and extent of brain lesions. These factors might exhibit a complex interaction and the combined prognostic value warrants further investigation. This study aimed to map lesion location and extent and assessed whether these differ according to presumed lesion timing and to determine the impact of structural brain damage on UL function within different lesion timing groups. Seventy-three children with unilateral CP (mean age 10 years 2 months) were classified according to lesion timing: malformations (N = 2), periventricular white matter (PWM, N = 42) and cortical and deep grey matter (CDGM, N = 29) lesions. Neuroanatomical damage was scored using a semi-quantitative MRI scale. UL function was assessed at body function and activity level. CDGM lesions were more pronounced compared to PWM lesions (p = 0.0003). Neuroanatomical scores were correlated with a higher degree to UL function in the CDGM group (r s  = -0.39 to r s  = -0.84) compared to the PWM group (r rb  = -0.42 to r s  = -0.61). Regression analysis found lesion location and extent to explain 75% and 65% (p < 0.02) respectively, of the variance in AHA performance in the CDGM group, but only 24% and 12% (p < 0.03) in the PWM group. In the CDGM group, lesion location and extent seems to impact more on UL function compared to the PWM group. In children with PWM lesions, other factors like corticospinal tract (re)organization and structural connectivity may play an additional role. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluctuations in Cerebral Hemodynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Latka, Miroslaw

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that the scaling properties of intracranial pressure (ICP) fluctuations and fluctuations of blood flow velocity in middle cerebral arteries are characterized by two scaling exponents...

  13. Cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Names AVM - cerebral; Arteriovenous hemangioma; Stroke - AVM; Hemorrhagic stroke - AVM Patient Instructions Brain surgery - discharge Headache - what to ask your doctor Stereotactic ...

  14. Progesterone is neuroprotective by inhibiting cerebral edema after ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-zheng Zhao; Min Zhang; Heng-fang Liu; Jian-ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic edema can alter the structure and permeability of the blood-brain barrier. Recent studies have reported that progesterone reduces cerebral edema after cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, progesterone effectively reduced Evans blue extravasation in the ischemic penumbra, but not in the ischemic core, 48 hours after cerebral ischemia in rats. Progesterone also inhibited the down-regulation of gene and pr...

  15. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this article? What Is ...

  16. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Kids / Cerebral Palsy What's in this article? What's CP? ...

  17. Is fasting necessary for elective cerebral angiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O-K; Oh, C W; Park, H; Bang, J S; Bae, H-J; Han, M K; Park, S-H; Han, M H; Kang, H-S; Park, S-K; Whang, G; Kim, B-C; Jin, S-C

    2011-05-01

    In order to prevent unexpected events such as aspiration pneumonia, cerebral angiography has been performed under fasting in most cases. We investigated prospectively the necessity of fasting before elective cerebral angiography. The study is an open-labeled clinical trial without random allocation. In total, 2554 patients who underwent elective cerebral angiography were evaluated on development of nausea, vomiting, and pulmonary aspiration during and after angiography. Potential risks and benefits associated with fasting were provided in written documents and through personal counseling to patients before the procedure. The patients chose their fasting or nonfasting option. No restriction in diet was given after angiography. The patients were observed for 24 hours. Nausea and vomiting during and within 1 hour after angiography was considered as a positive event associated with cerebral angiography. The overall incidence of nausea and vomiting during and within 1 hour after angiography was 1.05% (27/2554 patients). There was no patient with pulmonary aspiration. No statistical difference in nausea and vomiting development between the fasting and the diet groups was found. The incidence of nausea and vomiting associated with cerebral angiography is low and not affected by diet or fasting. Pulmonary aspiration had no difference between the diet and the fasting group. Our study suggests that fasting may not be necessary for patients who undergo elective cerebral angiography.

  18. Cerebral microcirculation during experimental normovolaemic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eBellapart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is accepted amongst critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anaemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anaemia. Experimental studies suggest that anaemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion amongst critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anaemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anaesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anaemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anaemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anaemia does not result in short term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain.

  19. Inadequate cerebral oxygen delivery and central fatigue during strenuous exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Rasmussen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Under resting conditions, the brain is protected against hypoxia because cerebral blood flow increases when the arterial oxygen tension becomes low. However, during strenuous exercise, hyperventilation lowers the arterial carbon dioxide tension and blunts the increase in cerebral blood flow, which...... can lead to an inadequate oxygen delivery to the brain and contribute to the development of fatigue....

  20. Transcranial Doppler estimation of cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular conductance during modified rebreathing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Zhang, R.; Fu, Q.; Witkowski, S.; Levine, B.D.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical transcranial Doppler assessment of cerebral vasomotor reactivity (CVMR) uses linear regression of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) vs. end-tidal CO(2) (Pet(CO(2))) under steady-state conditions. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF)-Pet(CO(2)) relationship is nonlinear, even for

  1. Male-female differences in upregulation of vasoconstrictor responses in human cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnstedt, Hilda; Cao, Lei; Krause, Diana N

    2013-01-01

    Male-female differences may significantly impact stroke prevention and treatment in men and women, however underlying mechanisms for sexual dimorphism in stroke are not understood. We previously found in males that cerebral ischemia upregulates contractile receptors in cerebral arteries, which...... is associated with lower blood flow. The present study investigates if cerebral arteries from men and women differ in cerebrovascular receptor upregulation....

  2. Cerebral haematocrit measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loutfi, Issa.

    1987-01-01

    Regional cerebral haematocrit was measured in a group of sixteen subjects by the single-photon emission computerized tomography method. This group included three normal subjects as controls and thirteen patients affected with ischaemic cerebral disease presenting clinically with transient ischaemic attacks-six patients - or recent cerebral stroke - seven patients. Two intravenous radioactive tracers - technetium-99m labelled autologous red blood cells and Tc-99m human serum albumin were used. Cerebral tomographic imaging was performed using a rotating scintillation camera. The values of cerebral haematocrit obtained, taken as a ratio to venous haematocrit, range between 0.65-0.88 in the subjects studied. As a general finding in normal subjects and in patients with transient ischaemic attacks, no significant difference between right and left hemispheric haematocrit value was noted. However, in the group of patients affected with stroke, a significant difference in the right versus left hemispheric Hct was observed in 3 patients, the higher Hct value corresponding to the affected side. The clinical implication is on the emphasis of cerebral Hct measurement when the measurement of cerebral blood flow or volume is sought. Also the variation in regional Hct value observed in patients with stroke, above mentioned, points to a regulation mechanism of the blood composition for optimal oxygen delivery to the brain that is impaired in these patients. 14 refs. (Author)

  3. Aspirin plus dipyridamole has the highest surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) values in terms of mortality, intracranial hemorrhage, and adverse event rate among 7 drug therapies in the treatment of cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Jun; Liu, Xin

    2018-03-01

    The standardization for the clinical use of drug therapy for cerebral infarction (CI) has not yet determined in some aspects. In this paper, we discussed the efficacies of different drug therapies (aspirin, aspirin plus dipyridamole, aspirin plus clopidogrel, aspirin plus warfarin, cilostazol, warfarin, and ticlopidine) for CI. We searched databases of PubMed and Cochrane Library from the inception to April, 2017, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in this study. The network meta-analysis integrated evidences of direct and indirect comparisons to assess odd ratios (OR) and surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value. Thirteen eligible RCTs including 7 drug therapies were included into this network meta-analysis. The network meta-analysis results showed that CI patients who received aspirin plus dipyridamole presented lower mortality when compared with those received aspirin plus clopidogrel (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.18-0.99), indicating aspirin plus dipyridamole therapy had better efficacy for CI. As for intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), stroke recurrence, and adverse event (AE) rate, there were no significant differences of efficacy among 7 drug therapies. Besides, SUCRA values demonstrated that in the 7 drug therapies, aspirin plus dipyridamole therapy was more effective than others (mortality: 80.67%; ICH: 76.6%; AE rate: 90.2%). Our findings revealed that aspirin plus dipyridamole therapy might be the optimum one for patients with CI, which could help to improve the survival of CI patients.

  4. Neonatal Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The presentation, treatment, and outcome of neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (SVT were studied in 42 children, using neurology clinic records (1986-2005 at Indiana University School of Medicine.

  5. Cerebral Manifestations of Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Brussé (Ingrid)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis intends to describe and explain the course of clinical neurophysiological and neuropsychological parameters in patients with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. We aimed to improve knowledge on cerebral pathophysiological mechanisms of preeclampsia related to signs and

  6. Demonstration of cerebral vessels by multiplane computed cerebral angiotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Sakurai, Masaru; Yamamoto, Yuji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko.

    1981-01-01

    1. Cerebral arteries and veins were demonstrated by multiplane computed cerebral angiotomography [combination of axial, modified coronal, half axial (Towne), and semisagittal planes]. The vessels which were demonstrated by various planes were as follows: Axial plane: Willis ring, middle cerebral arteries (horizontal and insular portions), anterior cerebral arteries (Horizontal and ascending portions), posterior cerebral arteries, basal vein of Rosenthal, internal cerebral veins (and the subependymal veins which join the ICV), and vein of Galen. Coronal plane: intermal carotid arteries (supraclinoid portion), anterior cerebral arteries (horizontal portion), middle cerebral arteries (horizontal and insular portions), lenticulostriate arteries, basal vein of Rosenthal (and the subependymal veins which join this vessel), internal cerebral veins, and vein of Galen. Half axial plane (Towne projection): basilar artery, vertebral arteries, posterior cerebral arteries, superior cerebellar arteries, middle cerebral arteries (horizontal portion), and anterior cerebral arteries (horizontal and ascending portions). Semisagittal plane: internal carotid artery (supraclinoid portion), posterior communicating artery, posterior carebral artery, superior cerebellar artery, internal cerebral vein, basal vein of Rosenthal, vein of Galen, and straight shinus. 2. A detailed knowledge of normal cerebrovascular structures acquired by computed tomography (CT) is essential in detecting and more precisely localizing lesions such as cerebrovascular disease, neoplasm or abscess, in differentiating these lesions from the normal contrast-enhanced structures, and in understanding the spatial relationship between the mass lesion and the neighboring vessels. In addition, it will be possible to discover such asymptomatic cerebrovascular diseases as non-ruptured aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and Moyamoya disease by means of computed cerebral angiotomography. (author)

  7. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  8. Recovery of cerebral blood flow in unilateral chronic subdural hematoma. The correlation with cerebral re-expansion in elders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Akio [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-01-01

    CT and SPECT were used to investigate the relationship between cerebral re-expansion and changes in cerebral blood flow underneath hematoma in elderly patients after surgery for chronic unilateral subdural hematoma. I studied 22 patients with mild hematoma, aged 43 to 82 years (mean 67 years). The patients were placed in either Group A (under 70 years) or Group B (70 years or over) to observe postoperative changes. CT and SPECT examinations were conducted before surgery and 1, 7 and 30 days after surgery, 4 times in total. Cerebral re-expansion was represented by the re-expansion rate (PER) comparing the pre- and postoperative thickness of the maximal hematoma in CT images. The rate of cerebral re-expansion was slowed in Group B (p<0.01). Cerebral re-expansion was characterized by biphasic, rapid or gradual re-expansion on postoperative day 1 with a significant difference between groups (p<0.01). Before surgery, cerebral blood flow on the affected side correlated with age (p<0.01), thougn blood flow was diminished in both groups. After surgery, cerebral blood flow on the affected side exceeded that on the unaffected side in Group A and transiently increased on postoperative day 1. Cerebral blood flow improved after surgery in both groups, with a significant difference in those changes over time (p<0.01). In both groups, cerebral re-expansion on postoperative days 7 and 30 correlated with cerebral blood flow on the affected side (p<0.05). The present results suggest that improvement in cerebral blood flow on the affected side is delayed in elderly patients, due to slower postoperative cerebral re-expansion. (author)

  9. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  10. Influence of intravenously administered lidocaine on cerebral blood flow in a baboon model standardized under controlled general anaesthesia using single-photon emission tomography and technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormehl, I.C. (AEC Inst. for Life Sciences, Pretoria Univ. (South Africa)); Lipp, M.D.W. (Klinik fuer Anaesthesiologie, Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)); Hugo, N. (AEC Inst. for Life Sciences, Pretoria Univ. (South Africa)); Daublaender, M. (Stadtkrankenhaus Landau, Abt. fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie (Germany)); Picard, J.A. (H.A. Grove Research Centre, Pretoria (South Africa))

    1993-11-01

    The baboon under general anaesthesia as a model to assess druginduced cerebral blood flow changes ([Delta] CBF) using single-photon emission tomography (SPET) offers great in vivo possibilities but has to comply with demands on control of anaestesia-related influencing factors, such as P[sub a]CO[sub 2] changes. The model sought in this study and described here allows control of P[sub a]CO[sub 2], in the baboon under thiopentone anaesthesia by ventilation, and was evaluated for the functioal dependence of [Delta] CBF vs [Delta] P[sub a]CO[sub 2], using SPET technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) and the split-dose method together with controlled ventilation. During the experiment the model was validated for normal reactivity to P[sub a]CO[sub 2] changes, and subsequently applied to investigate the mechanisms (still uncertain) of CBF increase known to follow administration of the local anaesthetic lidocaine. Six baboons received 6 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously. CBF was measured between two consecutive SPET acquisitions (split-dose method) respectively relating to HMPAO distributions in the brain before and after the injection of lidocaine. Meanwhile the animals were maintained at constant respiratory rate and volume. The results indicate that the correlation between D CBF and the ensuing fall in P[sub a]CO[sub 2] deviated from the baseline pattern from the model and confirmed a cerebrovascular contribution to the lidocaine-induced CBF increase. This agreed well with mean and systolic blood pressure changes and heart rate. (orig.)

  11. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  12. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral haemod...

  13. Evaluation of ocular acupuncture on cerebral infarction with cerebral blood flow perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuge; Gao Qinyi; Wang Shuang; Zhao Yong

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the immediate effect of ocular acupuncture on patients, an method of SPECT image of cerebral blood flow daily stress test was established. 10 patients diagnosed as cerebral infarction by CT or MRI were tested. They all received 99 Tc m -ECD SPECT imaging at twice before and after ocular acupuncture. By means of image subtraction technique and semi-quantitative method of regional interesting area, the change of regional cerebral blood flow was observed between the two images. Under restful state perfusion of cerebral blood flow in 18 foci was low at the frontal lobe, the cerebellum, the basal ganglia and temporal lobe. After ocular acupuncture, the perfusions were obviously increased in 16 foci among them and the reactivity of the frontal lobe and the cerebellum to ocular acupuncture was higher, the average improvement rate of which was 55.15% and 53.06% respectively, lower in the basal ganglia and temporal lobe, the average improvement rate was 31.79% and 36.67% respectively. 99 Tc m -ECD SPECT cerebral perfusion image has some significant clinic value for evaluating the effect of ocular acupuncture to treating cerebral infarction. (authors)

  14. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ichord

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare but serious cerebrovascular disorder affecting children from the newborn period through childhood and adolescence. The incidence is estimated at 0.6/100,000/year, with 30–50% occurring in newborns. Causes are diverse and are highly age dependent. Acute systemic illness is the dominant risk factor among newborns. In childhood CSVT, acute infections of the head and neck such as mastoiditis are most common, followed by chronic underlying diseases such as nephrotic syndrome, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Signs and symptoms are also age related. Seizures and altered mental status are the commonest manifestations in newborns. Headache, vomiting, and lethargy, sometimes with 6th nerve palsy, are the most common symptoms in children and adolescents. Recent multicenter cohort studies from North America and Europe have provided updated information on risk factors, clinical presentations, treatment practices, and outcomes. While systemic anticoagulation is the most common specific treatment used, there are wide variations and many uncertainties even among experts concerning best practice. The treatment dilemma is especially pronounced for neonatal CSVT. This is due in part to the higher prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage among newborns on the one hand, and the clear evidence that newborns suffer greater long-term neurologic morbidity on the other hand. With the advent of widespread availability and acceptance of acute endovascular therapy for arterial ischemic stroke, there is renewed interest in this therapy for children with CSVT. Limited published evidence exists regarding the benefits and risks of these invasive therapies. Therefore, the authors of current guidelines advise reserving this therapy for children with progressive and severe disease who have failed optimal medical management. As research focused on childhood cerebrovascular disease continues to grow rapidly, the future prospects

  15. Quantification of extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations during physical exercise using time-domain near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Héloïse; Bherer, Louis; Boucher, Étienne; Hoge, Richard; Lesage, Frédéric; Dehaes, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    Fitness is known to have beneficial effects on brain anatomy and function. However, the understanding of mechanisms underlying immediate and long-term neurophysiological changes due to exercise is currently incomplete due to the lack of tools to investigate brain function during physical activity. In this study, we used time-domain near infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) to quantify and discriminate extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation ( SO 2 ) in young adults at rest and during incremental intensity exercise. In extra-cerebral tissue, an increase in deoxy-hemoglobin ( HbR ) and a decrease in SO 2 were observed while only cerebral HbR increased at high intensity exercise. Results in extra-cerebral tissue are consistent with thermoregulatory mechanisms to dissipate excess heat through skin blood flow, while cerebral changes are in agreement with cerebral blood flow ( CBF ) redistribution mechanisms to meet oxygen demand in activated regions during exercise. No significant difference was observed in oxy- ( HbO 2 ) and total hemoglobin ( HbT ). In addition HbO 2 , HbR and HbT increased with subject's peak power output (equivalent to the maximum oxygen volume consumption; VO 2 peak) supporting previous observations of increased total mass of red blood cells in trained individuals. Our results also revealed known gender differences with higher hemoglobin in men. Our approach in quantifying both extra-cerebral and cerebral absolute hemoglobin during exercise may help to better interpret past and future continuous-wave NIRS studies that are prone to extra-cerebral contamination and allow a better understanding of acute cerebral changes due to physical exercise.

  16. Clinical correlations in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciu, Ioana

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of persistent (but not necessarily unchanged), movement, posture, muscle tone and motor skills disorders non-progressive, with early onset, due to non-progressive impairments, occurring on an immature brain or a brain under development (prenatal, perinatal, postnatal during the first 3-4 years of life). It is associated to a variable extent with: cognitive disorders, epilepsy, sensory deficits, behaviour disorders. The study of the correlations between the clinical forms/subtypes of CP, comorbidities, and severity of functional impairment. It is a retrospective trial aimed only at patients with the diagnosis of cerebral palsy admitted at Paediatric Neurology Clinic of the "Alexandru Obregia" Clinical Hospital in 2010.Results, discussions and conclusions: Patients with cerebral palsy corresponding with the criteria for inclusion: 379. The spastic CP type has prevailed. Comorbidities like mental retardation, epilepsy, and ophthalmic disorders were found with greater frequency than in the studies in the literature.The unilateral spastic form was statistically correlated with slight functional impairment (GMFCS I), with the absence of comorbidities or mild mental retardation, or with focal epilepsy when there is epilepsy. The bilateral spastic, tetraparetic and dyskinetic forms were correlated significantly with severe functional impairment (GMFCS IV, V), with profound or severe retardation, microcephaly, swallowing disorders, statural, ponderal hypotrophy, blindness and epilepsy. The bilateral spastic paraparetic form, which in the literature is mentioned as having fewer associated disorders (for example strabismus, slight retardation), when there is severe functional impairment, it may have the same comorbidities as the tetraparetic form (similar to the cases studied in the hospital). Comorbidities are the main admission cause and it correlates with the severity and prognosis.

  17. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  18. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  19. Diaschisis with cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, R.; Reivich, M.; Goldberg, H.; Banka, R.; Greenberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients admitted to Philadelphia General Hospital with acute strokes had repeated measurements of cerebral blood flow measured by the /sup 133/X inhalation method. A progressive decline in cerebral blood flow in both hemispheres was observed during the first week after infarction in twelve of these patients. This decline could be partially explained by loss of autoregulation, but could not be correlated with level of consciousness, clinical status of PCO2. This progressive decline in flow in the non-ischemic hemisphere indicates a process more complex than a simple destruction of axonal afferants to neurons as implied by the term diaschisis. The flow changes in the non-ischemic hemisphere are likely caused by a combination of the immediate effects of decreased neuronal stimulation modified by loss of autoregulation, release of vasoactive substances, cerebral edema, and other factors.

  20. Neuroimaging of cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wengenroth, M.; Saam, T.; Haehnel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis can have a variety of origins. Furthermore, there are no vasculitis-specific symptoms or imaging signs and vasculitis of the CNS can mimic many other neurological diseases, which require different treatment approaches. Thus, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis is challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) should be the radiological imaging methods of choice to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes. If the results are unclear digital subtraction angiography (DSA) should be pursued in order to also detect changes in medium sized vessels. Vasculitis of small vessels cannot be detected by vascular imaging and requires brain or leptomeningeal biopsy. In this review we present the current diagnostic approach and a variety of imaging findings in cerebral vasculitis and discuss the main radiological differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  1. Cerebral fat embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Sawada, Yusuke; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Nishide, Kazuyuki; Yoshioka, Toshiharu

    1982-01-01

    A case of cerebral fat embolism is reported. A 18-year-old patient with multiple bone fractures was in semiconma immediately after an injury. Brain CT showed no brain swelling or intracranial hematoma. Hypoxemia and alcoholemia were noted on admission, which returned to normal without improvement of consciousness level. In addition, respiratory symptoms with positive radiographic changes, tachycardia, pyrexia, sudden drop in hemoglobin level, and sudden thrombocytopenia developed. These symptoms were compatible with Gurd's criteria of systemic fat embolism. Eight days after injury, multiple low density areas appeared on CT and disappeared within the subsequent two weeks, and subdural effusion with cerebral atrophy developed. These CT findings were not considered due to cerebral trauma. Diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism was made. The subdural effusion was drained. Neurologic and pulmonary recoveries took place slowly and one month following the injury the patient became alert and exhibited fully coordinated limb movement. The CT scans of the present case well corresponded with hitherto reported pathological findings. Petechiae in the white matter must have developed on the day of injury, which could not be detected by CT examination. It is suggested that some petechial regions fused to purpuras and then gradually resolved when they were detected as multiple low density areas on CT. CT in the purpuras phase would have shown these lesions as high density areas. These lesions must have healed with formation of tiny scars and blood pigment which were demonstrated as the disappearance of multiple low density areas by CT examination. Cerebral atrophy and subsequent subdural effusion developed as a result of demyelination. The patient took the typical clinical course of cerebral fat embolism and serial CT scans served for its assessment. (author)

  2. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  3. Is cerebral hemorrhage approaching?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Yukiko; Yoneyama, Takumi; Hamasuna, Ryouichi; Fujime, Kenichi; Goya, Tomokazu [Junwakai Memorial Hospital, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    In Junwakai Memorial Hospital, from May, 2000 to April, 2001, 1042 patients underwent MRI examination to detect intracerebral microbleed (MB). This series included 481 hypertensive cases and 109 intra-cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage patients. MB was identified by MRI GRASS image that detects hemosiderin with high sensitivity. The occurrence of MB is high in men and increased with the age. The hypertensive patients showed increased frequency of MB in proportion to the duration of hypertension. Almost all of the symptomatic cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage cases showed multiple MBs except for massive hemorrhagic lesions. Therefore, MB can be an antecedant feature of the inpending symptomatic intracerebral and cerebellar hemorrhages. (author)

  4. Cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following various cerebral diseases, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Patients having cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following hypoglycemia, cerebral contusion, or cerebral hypoxia including cerebrovascular disorders were reported. Description was made as to cerebral changes visualized on CT images and clinical courses of a patient who revived 10 minutes after heart stoppage during neurosurgery, a newborn with asphyxia, a patient with hypoglycemia, a patient who suffered from asphyxia by an accident 10 years before, a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning at an acute stage, a patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning 10 years before, a patient with diffuse cerebral ischemic changes, a patient with cerebral edema around metastatic tumor, a patient with respiration brain, a patient with neurological sequelae after cerebral contusion, a patient who had an operation to excise right parietal lobe artery malformation, and a patient who was shooted by a machine gun and had a lead in the brain for 34 years. (Tsunoda, M.)

  5. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvis, Suzanne M.; de Sousa, Diana Aguiar; Ferro, José M.; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an important cause of stroke in young adults. Data from large international registries published in the past two decades have greatly improved our knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and prognosis of CVT. The presentation of symptoms is

  6. Cardiopulmonary-cerebral resuscitation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The brain is the organ most sensitive to hypoxia. The brain cannot store oxygen and has a very limited capacity for anaerobic metabolism. Permanent brain damage will thus result after three to four minutes of total hypoxia at normal temperatures. Should cerebral blood flow be restored after such an incident, the patient may ...

  7. CASE REPORT Cerebral schistosomiasis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0b013e3182704d1e]. 5. Sanelli PC, Lev MH, Gonzalez RG, Schaefer PW. Unique linear and nodular MR enhancement pattern in schistosomiasis of the central nervous system: Report of three patients. AJR 2001;177(6):1471-1474. Cerebral schistosomiasis.

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed cerebral vasospasm is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. While the cellular mechanisms underlying vasospasm remain unclear, it is believed that inflammation may play a critical role in vasospasm. Matrix metalloproteinasees (MMPs are a family of extracellular and membrane-bound proteases capable of degrading the blood-rain barrier (BBB. As such, MMP upregulation following SAH may result in a proinflammatory extravascular environment capable of inciting delayed cerebral vasospasm. This paper presents an overview of MMPs and describes existing data pertinent to delayed cerebral vasospasm.

  9. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El término parálisis cerebral (PC engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia mental, trastornos del lenguaje, audición, visión, déficit de la atención que mejoran el pronóstico de manera significativa. El pronóstico también depende de la gravedad del padecimiento y de las manifestaciones asociadas.The term cerebral palsy (CP, is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the nonevolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  10. Postradiation regional cerebral blood flow in primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockerham, L.G.; Cerveny, T.J.; Hampton, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Early transient incapacitation (ETI) is the complete cessation of performance during the first 30 min after radiation exposure and performance decrement (PD) is a reduction in performance at the same time. Supralethal doses of radiation have been shown to produce a marked decrease in regional cerebral blood flow in primates concurrent with hypotension and a dramatic release of mast cell histamine. In an attempt to elucidate mechanisms underlying the radiation-induced ETI/PD phenomenon and the postradiation decrease in cerebral blood flow, primates were exposed to 100 Gy (1 Gy = 100 rads), whole-body, gamma radiation. Pontine and cortical blood flows were measured by hydrogen clearance, before and after radiation exposure. Systemic blood pressures were determined simultaneously. Systemic arterial histamine levels were determined preradiation and postradiation. Data obtained indicated that radiated animals showed a decrease in blood flow of 63% in the motor cortex and 51% in the pons by 10 min postradiation. Regional cerebral blood flow of radiated animals showed a slight recovery 20 min postradiation, followed by a fall to the 10 min nadir by 60 min postradiation. Immediately, postradiation systemic blood pressure fell 67% and remained at that level for the remainder of the experiment. Histamine levels in the radiated animals increased a hundredfold 2 min postradiation. This study indicates that regional cerebral blood flow decreases postradiation with the development of hypotension and may be associated temporally with the postradiation release of histamine

  11. 12 hours after cerebral ischemia is the optimal time for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mojtaba Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy using stem cell transplantation against cerebral ischemia has been reported. However, it remains controversial regarding the optimal time for cell transplantation and the transplantation route. Rat models of cerebral ischemia were established by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. At 1, 12 hours, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after cerebral ischemia, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were injected via the tail vein. At 28 days after cerebral ischemia, rat neurological function was evaluated using a 6-point grading scale and the pathological change of ischemic cerebral tissue was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Under the fluorescence microscope, the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was examined by PKH labeling. Caspase-3 activity was measured using spectrophotometry. The optimal neurological function recovery, lowest degree of ischemic cerebral damage, greatest number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrating to peri-ischemic area, and lowest caspase-3 activity in the ischemic cerebral tissue were observed in rats that underwent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation at 12 hours after cerebral ischemia. These findings suggest that 12 hours after cerebral ischemia is the optimal time for tail vein injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation against cerebral ischemia, and the strongest neuroprotective effect of this cell therapy appears at this time.

  12. Quantification of extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations during physical exercise using time-domain near infrared spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Auger, Héloïse; Bherer, Louis; Boucher, Étienne; Hoge, Richard; Lesage, Frédéric; Dehaes, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Fitness is known to have beneficial effects on brain anatomy and function. However, the understanding of mechanisms underlying immediate and long-term neurophysiological changes due to exercise is currently incomplete due to the lack of tools to investigate brain function during physical activity. In this study, we used time-domain near infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS) to quantify and discriminate extra-cerebral and cerebral hemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation (SO2) in young adults...

  13. Global cerebral edema and brain metabolism after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbok, Raimund; Ko, Sang-Bae; Schmidt, J Michael; Kurtz, Pedro; Fernandez, Luis; Choi, H Alex; Connolly, E Sander; Lee, Kiwon; Badjatia, Neeraj; Mayer, Stephan A; Claassen, Jan

    2011-06-01

    Global cerebral edema is common among patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with poor outcome. Currently no targeted therapy exists largely due to an incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. This is a prospective observational study including 39 consecutive patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage with multimodal neuromonitoring. Levels of microdialysate lactate-pyruvate ratio, episodes of cerebral metabolic crisis (lactate-pyruvate ratio >40 and brain glucose cerebral perfusion pressure, and transcranial Doppler sonography flow velocities were analyzed. Median age was 54 years (range, 45 to 61 years) and 62% were female. Patients with global cerebral edema on admission (n=24 [62%]) had a higher incidence of metabolic crisis in the first 12 hours of monitoring (n=15 [15% versus 2%], Pcerebral edema. There was no difference in brain tissue oxygen tension or cerebral perfusion pressure between the groups; however, in patients with global cerebral edema, a higher cerebral perfusion pressure was associated with lower lactate-pyruvate ratio (Pcerebral edema is associated with early brain metabolic distress.

  14. Genetics of Cerebral Vasospasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis R. Ladner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm (CV is a major source of morbidity and mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. It is thought that an inflammatory cascade initiated by extravasated blood products precipitates CV, disrupting vascular smooth muscle cell function of major cerebral arteries, leading to vasoconstriction. Mechanisms of CV and modes of therapy are an active area of research. Understanding the genetic basis of CV holds promise for the recognition and treatment for this devastating neurovascular event. In our review, we summarize the most recent research involving key areas within the genetics and vasospasm discussion: (1 Prognostic role of genetics—risk stratification based on gene sequencing, biomarkers, and polymorphisms; (2 Signaling pathways—pinpointing key inflammatory molecules responsible for downstream cellular signaling and altering these mediators to provide therapeutic benefit; and (3 Gene therapy and gene delivery—using viral vectors or novel protein delivery methods to overexpress protective genes in the vasospasm cascade.

  15. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  16. Cerebral palsy and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through ad...

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for cerebral studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    For obtain good brain scintillation images in nuclear medicine must be used several radiopharmaceuticals. Cerebral studies give a tumors visual image as well as brain anomalities detection and are helpful in the diagnostic diseases . Are described in this work: a cerebrum radiopharmaceuticals classification,labelled compounds proceeding and Tc 99m good properties in for your fast caption, post administration and blood purification for renal way

  18. Plasticidad cerebral y lenguaje

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Torres Sánchez, Ignacio; Berthier-Torres, Marcelo Luis

    2012-01-01

    Hace pocos años se daba por sentado que la recuperación del lenguaje tras una lesión cerebral era imposible, al igual que adquirir la lengua materna más allá de los tres primeros años de vida. Sin embargo, las últimas indagaciones muestran que nuestra capacidad de aprender es mucho mayor.

  19. Utility of the cerebral SPECT in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuguerot, C.H.; Lopez-Lerena, J.J.; Quagliata, A.; Hermida, J.C.; Oliveira, M.C.; Anastasia, H.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare cortical and subcortical cerebral perfusion in schizophrenics patients with normal controls, and analyze the relation to clinical patterns and neuroleptic treatment. Method: 18 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia under neuroleptic treatment (except 3 cases), evaluated with clinical scales (BPRS and PANSS). The control group included 5 subjects in good health. All subjects were studied with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99 etilencisteinato (99mTc-ECD) as a tracer. Region of interest (ROI) were defined in cerebral cortex and thalamus-basal ganglia areas. The cortical cerebral blood flow was measured with a quantitative analysis, expressed as a ratio of regional tracer uptake to occipital cortex uptake. In basal ganglia and thalamus, regional blood flow was evaluated with a semiquantitative methodology, defining categories. Results: Schizophrenics patients showed a significant reduction of perfusion on a left anterior frontal cortex ('hipofrontality') and global decrease of perfusion on left hemisphere. The interhemispheric (left/right) ratio of perfusion was incremented respect control group. In thalamic-basal ganglia complex, a significant hypoperfusion was found in neuroleptic-free patients and control group. On the other hand, neuroleptic-treated patients revealed normal or increased regional blood flow in thalamus and basal ganglia. Only the clinical item 'thought disorder' had significant high correlation with perfusion on left structures (left anterior frontal, left lateral frontal, left temporo-parietal); the other items correlated with right structures. Conclusions: The findings suggest a pattern o left cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with an incremented interhemispheric ratio of cerebral blood flow. The pivotal role of thalamic and basal ganglia areas in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and neuroleptic action was reaffirmed; apparently, perfusion in thalamic-basal ganglia

  20. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Nadine J. [Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  1. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Nadine J.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  2. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...

  3. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Nov ... About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis and Symptoms Damage Treatments What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a ...

  5. Cerebral Autoregulation in Normal Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Teelkien R.; Panerai, Ronney B.; Haeri, Sina; Griffioen, Annemiek C.; Zeeman, Gerda; Belfort, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that preeclampsia is associated with impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. METHODS: In a prospective cohort analysis, cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (determined by transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (determined by noninvasive

  6. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysham, D.G.; Brotherton, A.F.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine

  7. Cerebral oxygenation after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessel, Trine W; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare absolute values of regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (cStO2 ) during haemodynamic transition after birth and repeatability during steady state for two commercial near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) devices. METHODS: In a prospective observational study, the INVOS 5100C and FORE......: The INVOS and FORE-SIGHT cStO2 estimates showed oxygenation-level-dependent difference during birth transition. The better repeatability of FORE-SIGHT could be due to the lower response to change in saturation....

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A; Bousser, M G

    1992-02-01

    Neuroimagining facilities allow early recognition of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), which now appears far more common than previously assumed. The diagnosis remains difficult because of a wide spectrum of clinical presentation and a highly variable mode of onset. Numerous conditions (presently mostly noninfectious) can cause or predispose to CVT, which therefore requires an extensive etiologic work-up. The functional and vital prognosis is much better than classically thought with, in noninfectious CVT, a fatality rate of less than 10% and a complete recovery in over 70%. Although spontaneous recovery is possible, the efficacy of heparin is now well established.

  9. Cerebral aneurysms – an audit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Abstract. We performed an audit to determine the profile of cerebral aneurysms at the Universitas Hospital Bloem- fontein, the only government hospital with a vascular suite in the Free State and Northern Cape area. Two hun- dred and twenty-three government patients, diagnosed with cerebral aneurysms during the period.

  10. Syncope, cerebral perfusion, and oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Wieling, Wouter; Karemaker, John M.; Secher, Niels H.

    2003-01-01

    During standing, both the position of the cerebral circulation and the reductions in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac output challenge cerebral autoregulatory (CA) mechanisms. Syncope is most often associated with the upright position and can be provoked by any condition that jeopardizes

  11. Cerebral Edema in Traumatic Brain Injury: Pathophysiology and Prospective Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Minter, Daniel; Yue, John K; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a heterogeneous disorder resulting from an external force applied to the head. The development of cerebral edema plays a central role in the evolution of injury following brain trauma and is closely associated with neurologic outcomes. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular and cellular pathways contributing to the posttraumatic development of cerebral edema have led to the identification of multiple prospective therapeutic targets. The authors summarize the pathogenic mechanisms underlying cerebral edema and highlight the molecular pathways that may be therapeutically targeted to mitigate cerebral edema and associated sequelae following traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide intervention in focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-juan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide against neuronal damage caused by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. We established the middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats via the suture method. Ten minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the animals were intraperitoneally injected with hydrogen sulfide donor compound sodium hydrosulfide. Immunofluorescence revealed that the immunoreactivity of P2X 7 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury decreased with hydrogen sulfide treatment. Furthermore, treatment of these rats with hydrogen sulfide significantly lowered mortality, the Longa neurological deficit scores, and infarct volume. These results indicate that hydrogen sulfide may be protective in rats with local cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by down-regulating the expression of P2X 7 receptors.

  14. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  15. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics

  16. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I. [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  17. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Nak Kwan; Nam, Kyung Jin; Park, Churl Min; Eun, Chung Kie; Lee, Sun Wha

    1983-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is widely distributed in Far East and Southeast Asia, particularly in Korea. The central nervous system is the most frequent location for paragonimiasis outside the lungs. We analyzed the computed tomographic findings of 17 cases which were diagnosed pathologically and clinically as cerebral paragonimiasis. The results were as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female was 10 : 7 and about 88% of cases were under the age of 40 years. 2. The common locations of cerebral paragonimiasis were the occipital (12 cases) and temporal (11 cases) lobes. 3. Precontrast CT findings of cerebral paragonimiasis were low density with calcifications in 6 cases, low and isodensities in 4 cases, mixed densities in 3 cases, only low density in 2 cases and only calcification in 2 cases. Hydrocephalus (7 cases), mass effect (6 cases), atrophic change (6 cases) and cyst formation (3 cases) were associated. 4. The shape of calcifications in CT scan were soap-bubble or ring in 6 cases, nodular or oval in 6 cases, stipple in 4 cases and amorphous conglomerated in 2 cases. 5. The contrast -enhanced 8 cases were 5 ring or rim like, 2 nodular and 1 irregular enhancements, while 9 cases were not enhanced

  19. Cerebral metastases from malignant melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, G. (Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Sydney Melanoma Unit); Firth, I. (Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Department of Medical Oncology); Coates, A. (Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Sydney Melanoma Unit)

    1993-03-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken of factors affecting survival in 129 patients with cerebral metastases from malignant melanoma referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology from June '82-January '90. Their ages ranged from 19-83 years and the time interval form diagnosis of the primary tumour to development of cerebral metastases ranged from 1 month-17 years. Cerebral metastases were apparently solitary in 59 (46%) and multiple in 70 (54%) patients. Craniotomy with resection of tumour was performed in 49 patients, of whom 24 had a solitary cerebral metastasis as the only evidence of disease Most patients (94%) received radiotherapy-course. Median survival of the whole group after detection of cerebral metastases was 5 months (range <1-87+). Univariate analysis indicated that a solitary cerebral metastasis, absence of extracranial disease and tumour resection predicted improved survival, but only surgical intervention was of independent prognostic significance in a multivariate analysis. The effect of cranial irradiation on survival could not be assessed, but the dose of radiation did not influence survival. Of the 10 patients who survived for more than 2 years, 8 had total resection of a solitary cerebral metastasis. (author). 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. [Cerebral infarctions in vertebrobasilar artery atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufriev, P L; Evdokimenko, A N; Gulevskaya, T S

    2018-01-01

    to obtain more specific information on the morphology and pathogenesis of cerebral infarctions occurring in vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) atherosclerosis. Macro- and microscopic investigations of the brain, its arterial system, and heart were conducted in 69 autopsy cases with infarctions located in the vertebrobasilar system (VBS) in atherosclerosis. 69 cases were found to have 206 VBA infarctions of various extent and locations. The detected infarctions were single and multiple in 27 and 42 cases, respectively. The detected infarctions included extensive (n=7), large (n=9), medium (n=63), small deep (lacunar) (n=97), and small superficial (n=30). The brain stem showed lacunar infarctions most frequently (76% of the infarctions at this site). Medium and small infarctions were identified at the same frequency in the cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. The occurrence of 94% of the extensive and large infarctions was ascertained to be pathogenetically associated with atherothrombotic occlusion of the intracranial arteries in the VBS. 76% of the small infarctions occurred through the mechanism of cerebral vascular insufficiency in tandem atherostenosis of VBAs in conjunction with an additional decrease in cerebral blood flow under the influence of an extracerebral factor (coronary heart disease). Medium infarctions were approximately equifrequently due to the two aforementioned causes and, in some cases, to cardiogenic thromboembolism of VBAs. Infarctions were multiple in most cases; while recent large atherothrombotic infarctions were frequently concurrent with small organized infarctions resulting from tandem atherostenosis of VBAs. This investigation could establish the relationship between the site, extent, and pathogenetic factors of infarctions in the VBA bed in atherosclerosis, as well as the prognostic value of small infarctions as predictors for severe ischemic stroke.

  1. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    in decompensated disease. In contrast, their biological effects on the cerebral hemodynamics are poorly understood. In this mini-review, we summarize the hemodynamic effects of the natriuretic peptides with a focus on the cerebral hemodynamics. In addition, we will discuss its potential implications in diseases...... where alteration of the cerebral hemodynamics plays a role such as migraine and acute brain injury including stroke. We conclude that a possible role of the peptides is feasible as evaluated from animal and in vitro studies, but more research is needed in humans to determine the precise response...

  2. Cerebral Vasculitis Complicating Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khedher

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral vasculitis is an uncommon life-threatening complication of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. Patient and methods: We report the case of a 64-year-old woman with pneumococcal meningitis who developed parainfectious vasculitis causing ischaemic brain damage. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical and radiological recovery after delayed addition of corticosteroid was achieved. Discussion: This report shows that the onset of neurological deficits following pneumococcal meningitis can be caused by cerebral vasculitis. Underdosing with antibiotics and delayed adjunctive dexamethasone seem to favour this complication. There are no guidelines for treatment but high doses of steroids led to resolution in this case.

  3. Cerebral white matter hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, R.B.; Shields, W.D.; Sankar, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the MR imaging findings in children with cerebral white matter hypoplasia (CWMH). The MR studies of four children, aged 3-7 y (mean age, 2.3 y) with a diagnosis of CWMH were reviewed. In all cases multiplanar T1-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained. All children had similar histories of severe developmental delay and nonprogressive neurologic deficits despite normal gestational and birth histories. In two cases there was a history of maternal cocaine abuse. Autopsy correlation was available in one child. The MR images of all four children demonstrated diffuse lack of white matter and enlarged ventricles but normal-appearing gray matter. The corpus callosum, although completely formed, was severely thinned. There was no evidence of gliosis or porencephaly, and the distribution of myelin deposition was normal for age in all cases. Autopsy finding in one child correlated exactly with the MR finding

  4. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, F.; Steudel, H.; Klotz, D.; Bonn Univ.; Bonn Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1982 (Hauser and co-workers), literature has reported focal cerebral tissue charges in AIDS patients whose diagnosis was unclear at first but which could be identified finally as florid toxoplasmosis encephalitis by biopsy and autopsy. It was found that the value of otherwise reliable serological tests (KBR, Sabin-Feldmann tests, etc.) is questionable in patients with severely impaired or incompetent immune systems, and, in particular, that a negative or uncharacteristic test result may not preclude any opportunistic infection process. Furthermore, isolation of Toxoplasma gondii or specific antibodies from the cerebrospinal fluid will be successful in exceptional cases only. In patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy syndrome, the differential diagnosis will have to include - first and foremost - reactivated toxoplasma infection (not newly acquired, as a rule) if central neurological symptoms occur. (orig.) [de

  5. Racial, Ethnic, and Socioeconomic Disparities in the Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guibo; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Danielson, Beate; Smith, Lloyd H.; Gilbert, William M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Racial and ethnic disparities in cerebral palsy have been documented, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We determined whether low birth weight accounts for ethnic disparities in the prevalence of cerebral palsy and whether socioeconomic factors impact cerebral palsy within racial and ethnic groups. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort of 6.2 million births in California between 1991 and 2001, we compared maternal and infant characteristics among 8397 infants with cerebral palsy who qualified for services from the California Department of Health Services and unaffected infants. RESULTS: Overall, black infants were 29% more likely to have cerebral palsy than white infants (relative risk: 1.29 [95% confidence interval: 1.19–1.39]). However, black infants who were very low or moderately low birth weight were 21% to 29% less likely to have cerebral palsy than white infants of comparable birth weight. After we adjusted for birth weight, there was no difference in the risk of cerebral palsy between black and white infants. In multivariate analyses, women of all ethnicities who did not receive any prenatal care were twice as likely to have infants with cerebral palsy relative to women with an early onset of prenatal care. Maternal education was associated with cerebral palsy in a dose-response fashion among white and Hispanic women. Hispanic adolescent mothers (aged cerebral palsy. CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk of cerebral palsy among black infants is primarily related to their higher risk of low birth weight. Understanding how educational attainment and use of prenatal care impact the risk of cerebral palsy may inform new prevention strategies. PMID:21339278

  6. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  7. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003428.htm Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection is a test to look at the fluid ...

  8. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: SMALL • LARGE Cerebral Cavernous Angioma and Hemorrhage By Jack Hoch; Reviewed by Dr. Issam Awad ... for years, the mechanism by which these lesions hemorrhage remains poorly understood. Hemorrhage Types Since cavernous angiomas ...

  9. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B.; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and

  10. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-01-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.)

  11. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  12. Parálisis cerebral :

    OpenAIRE

    Giral Lamenca, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Se aborda el tema de la parálisis cerebral definiendo qué es, clasificando los tipos de parálisis dependiendo de la afectación y las características principales. Se explican algunos de sus tratamientos, se dan sistemas alternativos y/o aumentativos de comunicación para un alumno con PC (parálisis cerebral).

  13. Implementation of cerebral microdialysis at a community-based hospital: A 5-year retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeff W; Rogers, Shana L; Gombart, Zoe J; Adler, David E; Cecil, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral microdialysis (MD) provides valuable information about brain metabolism under normal and pathologic conditions. The CMA 600 microdialysis analyzer received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for clinical use in the United States in 2005. Since then, cerebral MD has been increasingly utilized nationally in the multimodal monitoring of traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and brain tumors. We describe a 5-year, single-institutional experience using cerebral MD at a community-based hospital, Legacy Emanuel Medical Center (LEMC). Implications for the adoption and utility of MD in medical centers with limited resources are discussed. This is a retrospective chart review and data analysis of 174 consecutive patients who had cerebral MD as part of multimodal brain monitoring. All cerebral MD catheters were placed by board-certified, attending neurosurgeons at LEMC. Clinical severity in the TBI patients was reported using initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS); radiologic severity was graded with the Marshall CT grading scale. Measures of the risks of MD placement included post-placement hemorrhage, cerebral infection, and dislodgement. Between July 2005 and July 2010, 248 cerebral MD catheters were placed in 174 patients undergoing multimodal brain monitoring. One hundred and eighty-five catheters were placed at the time of open craniotomy. None were associated with cranial infection. Patients ranged in age from 5 months to 90 years, with a mean of 49 years. The male to female ratio was 1.4:1. The underlying pathologies were: TBI (126), cerebral vascular accident (24), aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (17), and tumor (7). Cerebral MD was readily implemented in a community-based hospital. No cerebral hemorrhages or infections were attributed to cerebral MD. Examples of how MD may be a useful adjunct in the clinical decision making of patients with brain injuries are presented.

  14. Some economic and socio-cultural factors associated with cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Risk factors associated with the occurrence of cerebral malaria in under fives are well documented. Outside these acknowledged factors of age, location, and nutrition, other socioeconomic/cultural factors could contribute to the maze of factors determining the occurrence of the morbidity. Methods: To unravel ...

  15. Therapeutic implications of melatonin in cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral edema/brain edema refers to the accumulation of fluid in the brain and is one of the fatal conditions that require immediate medical attention. Cerebral edema develops as a consequence of cerebral trauma, cerebral infarction, hemorrhages, abscess, tumor, hypoxia, and other toxic or metabolic factors. Based on the causative factors cerebral edema is differentiated into cytotoxic cerebral edema, vasogenic cerebral edema, osmotic and interstitial cerebral edema. Treatment of cerebral edema depends on timely diagnosis and medical assistance. Pragmatic treatment strategies such as antihypertensive medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, steroids, glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and trometamol are used in clinical practice. Although the above mentioned treatment approaches are being used, owing to the complexity of the mechanisms involved in cerebral edema, a single therapeutic strategy which could ameliorate cerebral edema is yet to be identified. However, recent experimental studies have suggested that melatonin, a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland, could be an effective alternative for treating cerebral edema. In animal models of stroke, melatonin was not only shown to reduce cerebral edema but also preserved the blood brain barrier. Melatonin's beneficial effects were attributed to its properties, such as being a potent anti-oxidant, and its ability to cross the blood brain barrier within minutes after its administration. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of melatonin when used for treating cerebral edema.

  16. Cerebral lactate production and blood flow in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Gideon, P; Sperling, B

    1992-01-01

    Eight stroke patients were examined serially in the acute phase and 1 week and 2-4 weeks after stroke with water-suppressed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The time courses of lactate level and regional cerebral blood flow were studied. A high lactate level was found in the acute phase....... The lactate content decreased to barely detectable levels during the following 3 weeks, while regional blood flow increased during this period. The inverse relationship between lactate level and cerebral blood flow suggests that lactate plays no substantial role in the vasodilatation underlying the hyperemia...

  17. Cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic changes in fulminant hepatic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mendes Paschoal Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intracranial hypertension and brain swelling are a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients suffering from fulminant hepatic failure (FHF. The pathogenesis of these complications has been investigated in man, in experimental models and in isolated cell systems. Currently, the mechanism underlying cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension in the presence of FHF is multi-factorial in etiology and only partially understood. The aim of this paper is to review the pathophysiology of cerebral hemodynamic and metabolism changes in FHF in order to improve understanding of intracranial dynamics complication in FHF.

  18. Cerebral trypanosomiasis and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Apio Claudio Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36 year-old black female, complaining of headache of one month's duration presented with nausea, vomiting, somnolence, short memory problems, loss of weight, and no fever history. Smoker, intravenous drugs abuser, promiscuous lifestyle. Physical examination: left homonimous hemianopsia, left hemiparesis, no papilledema, diffuse hyperreflexia, slowness of movements. Brain CT scan: tumor-like lesion in the splenium of the corpus calosum, measuring 3.5 x 1.4 cm, with heterogeneous enhancing pattern, sugesting a primary CNS tumor. Due to the possibility of CNS infection, a lumbar puncture disclosed an opening pressure of 380 mmH(20; 11 white cells (lymphocytes; glucose 18 mg/dl (serum glucose 73 mg/dl; proteins 139 mg/dl; presence of Trypanosoma parasites. Serum Elisa-HIV tests turned out to be positive. Treatment with benznidazole dramatically improved clinical and radiographic picture, but the patient died 6 weeks later because of respiratory failure. T. cruzi infection of the CNS is a rare disease, but we have an increasing number of cases in HIV immunecompromised patients. Diagnosis by direct observation of CSF is uncommon, and most of the cases are diagnosed by pathological examination. It is a highly lethal disease, even when properly diagnosed and treated. This article intends to include cerebral trypanosomiasis in the differential diagnosis of intracranial space-occupying lesions, especially in immunecompromised patients from endemic regions.

  19. Cerebral vasculitis and its simulators. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Hideki; Nakajima, Kazuaki; Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Sakamoto, Ayami; Sakugawa, Takayuki; Morikawa, Minoru; Inuzuka, Michiko; Kimura, Seigo

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis, although rare in general, is an important cause of cerebral ischemia, because the treatment strategy is different from that of usual cerebral infarction. On the other hand, a variety of common and uncommon nonvasculitic disorders may mimic vasculitis angiographically or clinically. It is also important to distinguish these vasculitis simulators from true vasculitis in order to avoid the unnecessary and harmful side effects of corticosteroid and immunosuppressant, the mainstay of drug therapy for vasculitis. The diagnosis is often difficult. Angiography is expected to demonstrate the underlying vascular pathology; however, many vasculitides affect small arteries beyond the spatial resolution of conventional angiography. The most important role of the diagnostic imaging is the identification of brain lesions consistent with cerebral vasculitis. Multiple lesions in more than one vascular territory should raise this suspicion, although no specific pattern for this entity exists. In large and medium-sized vessel vasculitis, MRI can directly demonstrate mural thickening and enhancement, which is considered to specific for active inflammation. We propose here a classification for cerebral vasculitis and simulators according to the size of the affected brain vessels, which would help us to make a differential diagnosis. We also review the endovascular techniques for this entity, and its indications. (author)

  20. Cerebral Vasospasm with Ischemia following a Spontaneous Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia F. Shakur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known consequence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH triggered by blood breakdown products. Here, we present the first case of cerebral vasospasm with ischemia following a spontaneous spinal SAH. A 67-year-old woman, who was on Coumadin for atrial fibrillation, presented with chest pain radiating to the back accompanied by headache and leg paresthesias. The international normalized ratio (INR was 4.5. Ten hours after presentation, she developed loss of movement in both legs and lack of sensation below the umbilicus. Spine MRI showed intradural hemorrhage. Her coagulopathy was reversed, and she underwent T2 to T12 laminectomies. A large subarachnoid hematoma was evacuated. Given her complaint of headache preoperatively and the intraoperative finding of spinal SAH, a head CT was done postoperatively that displayed SAH in peripheral sulci. On postoperative day 5, she became obtunded. Brain MRI demonstrated focal restricted diffusion in the left frontoparietal area. Formal angiography revealed vasospasm in anterior cerebral arteries bilaterally and right middle cerebral artery. Vasospasm was treated, and she returned to baseline within 48 hours. Spontaneous spinal SAH can result in the same sequelae typically associated with aneurysmal SAH, and the clinician must have a degree of suspicion in such patients. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cerebral vasospasm may explain this unique case.

  1. Monitoring Cerebral Oxygenation in Neonates: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Laura Marie Louise; van Bel, Frank; Lemmers, Petra Maria Anna

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral oxygenation is not always reflected by systemic arterial oxygenation. Therefore, regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) monitoring with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is of added value in neonatal intensive care. rScO2 represents oxygen supply to the brain, while cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction, which is the ratio between rScO2 and systemic arterial oxygen saturation, reflects cerebral oxygen utilization. The balance between oxygen supply and utilization provides insight in neonatal cerebral (patho-)physiology. This review highlights the potential and limitations of cerebral oxygenation monitoring with NIRS in the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:28352624

  2. Hippocampal neurogenesis in the new model of global cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisel, A. A.; Chernysheva, G. A.; Smol'yakova, V. I.; Savchenko, R. R.; Plotnikov, M. B.; Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the changes of hippocampal neurogenesis in a new model of global transient cerebral ischemia which was performed by the occlusion of the three main vessels (tr. brachiocephalicus, a. subclavia sinistra, and a. carotis communis sinistra) branching from the aortic arch and supplying the brain. Global transitory cerebral ischemia was modeled on male rats (weight = 250-300 g) under chloral hydrate with artificial lung ventilation. Animals after the same surgical operation without vessel occlusion served as sham-operated controls. The number of DCX-positive (doublecortin, the marker of immature neurons) cells in dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1-CA3 fields of hippocampus was counted at the 31st day after ischemia modeling. It was revealed that global cerebral ischemia decreased neurogenesis in dentate gyrus in comparison with the sham-operated group (Pneurogenesis in CA1-CA3 fields was increased as compared to the control (P<0.05).

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β40 Is Decreased in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Marcel M.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; van Domburg, Peter H. M. F.; Skehan, Maureen E.; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is caused by deposition of the amyloid β protein in the cerebral vasculature. In analogy to previous observations in Alzheimer disease, we hypothesized that analysis of amyloid β40 and β42 proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid might serve as a molecular biomarker. We observed strongly decreased cerebrospinal fluid amyloid β40 (p < 0.01 vs controls or Alzheimer disease) and amyloid β42 concentrations (p < 0.001 vs controls and p < 0.05 vs Alzheimer disease) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients. The combination of amyloid β42 and total tau discriminated cerebral amyloid angiopathy from controls, with an area under the receiver operator curve of 0.98. Our data are consistent with neuropathological evidence that amyloid β40 as well as amyloid β42 protein are selectively trapped in the cerebral vasculature from interstitial fluid drainage pathways that otherwise transport amyloid β proteins toward the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:19743453

  4. Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: mechanisms of brain tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-qiang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Buyanghuanwu decoction has been shown to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, rats were intragastrically given Buyanghuanwu decoction, 15 mL/kg, for 3 days. A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In rats administered Buyanghuanwu decoction, infarct volume was reduced, serum vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin αvβ3 levels were increased, and brain tissue vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression levels were increased compared with untreated animals. These effects of Buyanghuanwu decoction were partially suppressed by an angiogenesis inhibitor (administered through the lateral ventricle for 7 consecutive days. These data suggest that Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis, improves cerebral circulation, and enhances brain tissue repair after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  5. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in ...

  6. Positron emission tomography and cerebral metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comar, D.; Maziere, M.; Zarifian, E.; Naquet, R.

    1979-01-01

    The association of new methods of labelling with short lived radioisotopes and of visualisation 'in vivo' of these labelled molecules by emission tomography, provide the possibility of studying brain metabolism at different levels. Two examples will illustrate the possibilities of this methodology. Cerebral metabolism of methionine- 11 C in phenylketonutic patients: The cerebral uptake of methionine was measured in 24 PKU children aged 1 to 40 months on a low protein diet. Ten of them were examined twice at intervals of several months. Stopping the diet for one week leads to an increase in blood phenylalanine and to a significant important decrease in brain uptake of labelled methionine. Futhermore, for children under treatment having a low phenylalanine blood concentration, brain uptake of methionine decreases with age between 1 and 40 months. These results suggest that the treatment of this disease should be started as soon as possible after birth. Cerebral metabolism of psychoactive drugs: The study of the brain distribution and kinetics of psychoactive drugs may help in understanding their mode of action. Chlorpromazine- 11 C was administered i.v. to schyzophrenic patients not previously treated with neuroleptics. In all patients the brain uptake of the drug was high and rapid, and was localized mainly in the grey matter, probably in proportion to the blood flow. Non-specific binding of this drug to brain proteins prevented visualization of specific binding to dopaminergic or αnor-adrenergic receptors. Specific receptor binding of benzodiazepines was however visualized in the brain of baboons after injection of 11 C-flunitrazepam (specific activity = 600 Ci/μmole) and subsequent displacement of this radioactive ligand by a pharmacological dose of Lorazepam

  7. Cerebral perfusion imaging in HIV positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundley, Kshama; Chowdhury, D.; Lele, V.R.; Lele, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Twelve human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients were studied by SPECT cerebral perfusion imaging 1 hour post injection of 15 mCi of 99m Tc-ECD under ideal conditions with a triple head gamma camera (Prism 3000 X P LEUHR), fanbeam collimators followed by Folstein Mini Mental Status Examination (FMMSE) and AIDS dementia complex (ADC) staging on the same day. All 12 patients were male, in the age range of 23-45 y (mean 31 y). The infected status was diagnosed by ELISA (10 patients) or Western blot (5 patients). The interval between diagnosis and imaging ranged from 1 month - 35 months (mean 15.3 months). Two patients were alcoholic and 2 were smokers. None of them had CNS disorder clinically. ADC staging and FMMSE could be performed in 4 patients. Two patients were normal (stage 0) and 2 were subclinical (stage 0.5) on ADC staging. FMMSE revealed normal or near normal status (mean score 35; maximum score 36). Cerebral perfusion images were interpreted simultaneously by 3 observers blind towards history and examination using semi-quantitative and quantitative methods by consensus. It revealed multiple areas of hypoperfusion, viz. temporal (11 patients (91 %), parietal 10 patients (83%), frontal 9 patients (75%, pre and post central gyrus 7 patients (58%), occipital 6 patients (50%) cingulate gyrus and cerebellum 5 patients (41%) and thalamic in 2 patients (16%). Hyper perfusion in caudate nuclei was noted in 10 patients (83%). The study reveals presence of multiple perfusion abnormalities on cerebral perfusion imaging in HIV positive patients who have normal/near normal mental status suggesting precedence of perfusion abnormality over clinically apparent mental deficit

  8. NEYROPSYCHOLOGICAL CONSECUENCES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA NAVARRO MELENDRO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy is defined as a movement alteration result of a non progressive damage witch is permanent in anencephalon that has not acquired its final maturation. Patients that suffer cerebral palsy present learning disabilities,that varies between being completely normal to severe as a consequence of memory, gnosis, praxis, perceptive andlanguage impairments. Nevertheless the consequences of this disease are not always predictable. This paper pretendsto make a description of the cognitive and behavioral deficits that overcomes along with the manifestation of thecerebral palsy and its possible treatment. We used a complete neuropsychological battery to evaluate a 7 years oldpatient who was diagnosed of cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia finding some cognitive impairment in fields such asmnesic, gnosic and attention processes.

  9. Deep Cerebral Vein Thrombosis: A Clinical Masquerader

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Prabhat; Sasmal, Gargi; Mahto, Subodh Kumar; Gupta, Shreya; Gupta, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke. Thrombosis can occur in superficial veins, deep venous system or cortical veins of brain. The term Deep Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (DCVT) is used for thrombosis of internal cerebral vein, vein of Galen and basal vein of Rosenthal. Only 10% cases of CVT are because of thrombosis of deep cerebral vein. The diagnosis of DCVT is often missed because of its heterogenous presentation. Herein, we present a case of DCVT which was initially ...

  10. Effects of Hyperglycemia and Effects of Ketosis on Cerebral Perfusion, Cerebral Water Distribution, and Cerebral Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O’Donnell, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury. PMID:22498698

  11. Recent Experiences with Severe and Cerebral Malaria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-29

    Jun 29, 1974 ... Malaria admissions. Cerebral malaria ... Cerebral signs. Haemoglobin below 10 g/100 ml (not all tested). Enlarged tender liver or jaundice, or both ... articl~ by H. Smitskamp and F. H. Wolthuis entitled 'New concepts in treatment of malaria with malignant tertian cerebral involvement' which appeared in the ...

  12. Cerebral Syphilitic Gumma in Immunocompetent Man, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Sato, Hidenori; Osa, Morichika; Fujikura, Yuji; Kawana, Akihiko

    2018-02-01

    Although cerebral syphilitic gummas are generally considered to be rare manifestations of tertiary syphilis, many reports exist of early cerebral syphilitic gumma. Our finding of cerebral syphilitic gumma in an HIV-negative man within 5 months after syphilis infection suggests that this condition should be considered in syphilis patients who have neurologic symptoms.

  13. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-01-01

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis

  14. Cerebral toksoplasmose primaert diagnosticeret som tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, M E; Skøt, J; Skriver, E B

    1992-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis as the presenting manifestation of AIDS are reported. The initial diagnoses were brain tumors because of the cerebral mass lesions which resembled glioblastoma. In the light of the increasing occurrence of AIDS, attention is drawn to cerebral toxoplasmosis...

  15. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  16. Cerebral MR imaging in vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.; Geissler, A.; Peter, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for the detection of cerebral involvement in vasculitis. Seventy-six patient with proved systematic vasculitis and two with isolated cerebral vasculitis were examined. Half of them had central nervous system symptoms. T2-weighted sequences were performed at 2 T in most cases. All but two symptomatic and one-third of the asymptomatic patients showed pathologic changes in the white matter. The distribution and shape of lesions depend on the caliber of the involved vessel. In small-vessel vasculitis, the distribution was mostly subcortical, the average size was 0.5--10 mm, and lesions were predominantly round

  17. Features to validate cerebral toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina da Cunha Correia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neurotoxoplasmosis (NT sometimes manifests unusual characteristics. Methods We analyzed 85 patients with NT and AIDS according to clinical, cerebrospinal fluid, cranial magnetic resonance, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR characteristics. Results In 8.5%, focal neurological deficits were absent and 16.4% had single cerebral lesions. Increased sensitivity of PCR for Toxoplasma gondii DNA in the central nervous system was associated with pleocytosis and presence of >4 encephalic lesions. Conclusions Patients with NT may present without focal neurological deficit and NT may occur with presence of a single cerebral lesion. Greater numbers of lesions and greater cellularity in cerebrospinal fluid improve the sensitivity of PCR to T gondii.

  18. Practical techniques for reducing radiation exposure during cerebral angiography procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Monica S; Torok, Collin; Wang, Jiangxia; Wyse, Emily; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Gailloud, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    DSA remains the gold standard imaging method for the evaluation of many cerebrovascular disorders, in particular cerebral aneurysms and vascular malformations. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effect of modifying DSA frame rate, fluoroscopic and roadmap pulse rates, and flat panel detector (FPD) position on the radiation dose delivered during routine views for a cerebral angiogram in a phantom model. Adult skull and abdomen/pelvis anthropomorphic phantoms were used to compare the radiation dose metrics Ka,r (in mGy), PKA (in μGym(2)), and fluoroscopy time (in minutes) after modification of fluoroscopic pulses per second (p/s), DSA frames per second (f/s), and FPD position and collimation in three components of a cerebral angiogram: (1) femoral artery access, (2) roadmap guidance, and (3) biplane cerebral DSA. For femoral artery access, DSA protocols resulted in significantly higher doses than those utilizing fluoroscopy alone (p=0.007). Roadmaps using 3 p/s or 4 p/s delivered significantly less dose than higher pulse rates (p=0.008). The ranges of delivered doses for biplane cerebral DSA were 347.3-1188.5 mGy and 3914.54-9518.78 μGym(2). The lowest radiation doses were generated by the variable frame rate DSA protocols. Replacing femoral arterial access evaluations by DSA with fluoroscopy, utilizing lower pulse rates during fluoroscopy and roadmap guidance, and choosing variable frame rates for DSA are simple techniques that may be considered by operators in their clinical practices to lower radiation dose during cerebral angiography procedures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. T2 Relaxometry MRI Predicts Cerebral Palsy in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L-W; Wang, S-T; Huang, C-C; Tu, Y-F; Tsai, Y-S

    2018-01-18

    T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging enables objective measurement of brain maturation based on the water-macromolecule ratio in white matter, but the outcome correlation is not established in preterm infants. Our study aimed to predict neurodevelopment with T2-relaxation values of brain MR imaging among preterm infants. From January 1, 2012, to May 31, 2015, preterm infants who underwent both T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging and neurodevelopmental follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. T2-relaxation values were measured over the periventricular white matter, including sections through the frontal horns, midbody of the lateral ventricles, and centrum semiovale. Periventricular T2 relaxometry in relation to corrected age was analyzed with restricted cubic spline regression. Prediction of cerebral palsy was examined with the receiver operating characteristic curve. Thirty-eight preterm infants were enrolled for analysis. Twenty patients (52.6%) had neurodevelopmental abnormalities, including 8 (21%) with developmental delay without cerebral palsy and 12 (31.6%) with cerebral palsy. The periventricular T2-relaxation values in relation to age were curvilinear in preterm infants with normal development, linear in those with developmental delay without cerebral palsy, and flat in those with cerebral palsy. When MR imaging was performed at >1 month corrected age, cerebral palsy could be predicted with T2 relaxometry of the periventricular white matter on sections through the midbody of the lateral ventricles (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.738; cutoff value of >217.4 with 63.6% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity). T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging could provide prognostic prediction of neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants. Age-dependent and area-selective interpretation in preterm brains should be emphasized. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. Effect of Cardiorespiratory Training on Aerobic Fitness and Carryover to Activity In Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jane M.; Scianni, Aline; Ada, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The question under consideration was does cardiorespiratory training improve aerobic fitness in children with cerebral palsy and is there any carryover into activity? The study design consisted of a systematic review of randomized trials using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Participants were children of school age with cerebral palsy.…

  1. What is cerebral small vessel disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    An accumulating amount of evidence suggests that the white matter hyperintensities on T 2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging predict an increased risk of dementia and gait disturbance. This state has been proposed as cerebral small vessel disease, including leukoaraiosis, Binswanger's disease, lacunar stroke and cerebral microbleeds. However, the concept of cerebral small vessel disease is still obscure. To understand the cerebral small vessel disease, the precise structure and function of cerebral small vessels must be clarified. Cerebral small vessels include several different arteries which have different anatomical structures and functions. Important functions of the cerebral small vessels are blood-brain barrier and perivasucular drainage of interstitial fluid from the brain parenchyma. Cerebral capillaries and glial endfeet, take an important role for these functions. However, the previous pathological investigations on cerebral small vessels have focused on larger arteries than capillaries. Therefore little is known about the pathology of capillaries in small vessel disease. The recent discoveries of genes which cause the cerebral small vessel disease indicate that the cerebral small vessel diseases are caused by a distinct molecular mechanism. One of the pathological findings in hereditary cerebral small vessel disease is the loss of smooth muscle cells, which is an also well-recognized finding in sporadic cerebral small vessel disease. Since pericytes have similar character with the smooth muscle cells, the pericytes should be investigated in these disorders. In addition, the loss of smooth muscle cells may result in dysfunction of drainage of interstitial fluid from capillaries. The precise correlation between the loss of smooth muscle cells and white matter disease is still unknown. However, the function that is specific to cerebral small vessel may be associated with the pathogenesis of cerebral small vessel disease. (author)

  2. Cerebral microhemorrhages: mechanisms, consequences, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Zoltan; Tarantini, Stefano; Kirkpatrick, Angelia C; Csiszar, Anna; Prodan, Calin I

    2017-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of multifocal cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs, also known as "cerebral microbleeds") is a significant, newly recognized problem in the aging population of the Western world. CMHs are associated with rupture of small intracerebral vessels and are thought to progressively impair neuronal function, potentially contributing to cognitive decline, geriatric psychiatric syndromes, and gait disorders. Clinical studies show that aging and hypertension significantly increase prevalence of CMHs. CMHs are also now recognized by the National Institutes of Health as a major factor in Alzheimer's disease pathology. Moreover, the presence of CMHs is an independent risk factor for subsequent larger intracerebral hemorrhages. In this article, we review the epidemiology, detection, risk factors, clinical significance, and pathogenesis of CMHs. The potential age-related cellular mechanisms underlying the development of CMHs are discussed, with a focus on the structural determinants of microvascular fragility, age-related alterations in cerebrovascular adaptation to hypertension, the role of oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinase activation, and the deleterious effects of arterial stiffening, increased pulse pressure, and impaired myogenic autoregulatory protection on the brain microvasculature. Finally, we examine potential treatments for the prevention of CMHs based on the proposed model of aging- and hypertension-dependent activation of the reactive oxygen species-matrix metalloproteinases axis, and we discuss critical questions to be addressed by future studies.

  3. The mechanism of cerebral aneurysmal formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, Toshihiro; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a disease of poor prognosis and MR- and CT-angiographies are used for its diagnosis and in the preventive therapy of its rupture. Here discussed are formation and growth leading to rupture of the lesion for its advanced diagnosis and prevention of rupturing. Beginning from findings in animal experimentation in mice, rats and monkeys, discussed are pathology of the aneurysm, genes related with its formation, molecular biological approaches concerning apoptosis and NF-kB/TNF-α related inflammatory reactions, participation of sex hormone, clinical hemodynamic analyses based on 3D data from CT and MRI findings, and clinical studies. Authors consider that local hemodynamic stress loading is possibly related to cerebral aneurysm formation as it is yielded at the loading part of the vessel in human and in animal models. The aneurysm is possibly a result of remodeling disturbance by the load and subsequent excessive involution of the artery. In the process, probably included are the inflammation, apoptosis, degradation of extracellular matrix and functional impairment of endotherial cells. Future elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the aneurismal growth and rupture will bring about the improved treatment to prevent the disease by stabilizing the aneurismal wall. (T.T.)

  4. Cerebral cuterebrosis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartin, E A; Hendrix, C M; Dillehay, D L; Nicholls, B

    1986-11-15

    A second instar Cuterebra larva was found in the thickened meninges of a 6-week-old female Doberman Pinscher at necropsy. The dog appeared blind and had chewing fits before death. Cerebral cuterebrosis in the dog is uncommon. This report briefly discusses the pathogenesis of the condition.

  5. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  6. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki [Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide [and others

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  7. Cerebral imaging revealing Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral imaging is the only non-invasive means of examining the brain and is essential in studying Alzheimer's disease. As a tool for early diagnosis, evaluation and treatment monitoring, this technology is at the heart of the research being done to further improve its reliability and sensitivity. (authors)

  8. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  9. Cerebral blood-flow tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Henriksen, L; Holm, S

    1983-01-01

    Tomographic maps of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) were obtained with xenon-133 and with isopropyl-amphetamine-iodine-123 (IMP) in 11 subjects: one normal, two tumor cases, and eight cerebrovascular cases. A highly sensitive four-face, rapidly rotating, single-photon emission tomograph was used....

  10. Cerebral edema in drug addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daruši Dragana J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The effect of drugs leaves permanent consequences on the brain, organic in type, followed by numerous manifestations, and it significantly affects the development of mental dysfunctions. The clinicians are often given a task to estimate a patient’s personality during treatment or during experts estimate of a drug addict. The aim of this research was to determine the differences, if any, in characteristics of addicts experience and personality traits in drug addicts with or without cerebral edema. Methods. The research was conducted on a sample of 252 male drug addicts, the average age of 23.3 (SD = 4.3 years. Cerebral edema was confirmed on magnetic resonance (MR images of the brain performed during the treatment of the addicts. The participants were tested by the psychologists using Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-201 test, and the data were processed using canonical discriminate analysis within the SPSS program. The dependent variable in the study was cerebral edema. A block of independent variables, designed for the requirements of this study, consisted of two subgroups. The first one consisted of 12 variables describing the relevant characteristics of drug abuse. The second subgroup consisted of 8 psychopathological tendencies in the personality defined by the mentioned test. Results. Cerebral edema was confirmed in 52 (20.63% of the drug addicts. The differences between the groups of drug addicts with and without cerebral edema were determined in the following: the time span of taking drugs (0.301, use of alcohol parallel with drugs (0.466, and treatment for addiction (0.603. In the drug addicts with a cerebral edema, MMPI-201 confirmed the increase in the scales for hypochondria, psychopathic deviations and psychastenia, and the decrease in the scales for schizophrenia and depression. Conclusion. Our study confirmed a possible connection between cerebral edema and personality traits in a number of the

  11. Contraceptives and cerebral thrombosis: a five-year national case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Kreiner, Svend

    2002-01-01

    Oral contraceptives; Cerebral thrombosis; Thrombotic stroke; Transitory cerebral ischemic attack; Thrombosis......Oral contraceptives; Cerebral thrombosis; Thrombotic stroke; Transitory cerebral ischemic attack; Thrombosis...

  12. [Advances in genetic research of cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Luo, Rong; Qu, Yi; Mu, De-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy is a group of syndromes caused by non-progressive brain injury in the fetus or infant and can cause disabilities in childhood. Etiology of cerebral palsy has always been a hot topic for clinical scientists. More and more studies have shown that genetic factors are closely associated with the development of cerebral palsy. With the development and application of various molecular and biological techniques such as chromosome microarray analysis, genome-wide association study, and whole exome sequencing, new achievements have been made in the genetic research of cerebral palsy. Chromosome abnormalities, copy number variations, susceptibility genes, and single gene mutation associated with the development of cerebral palsy have been identified, which provides new opportunities for the research on the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy. This article reviews the advances in the genetic research on cerebral palsy in recent years.

  13. Anestesia e paralisia cerebral Anestesia y parálisis cerebral Anesthesia and cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Március Vinícius M Maranhão

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A paralisia cerebral (PC é uma doença não progressiva decorrente de lesão no sistema nervoso central, levando a um comprometimento motor do paciente. O portador de PC freqüentemente é submetido a procedimentos cirúrgicos devido a doenças usuais e situações particulares decorrentes da paralisia cerebral. Foi objetivo deste artigo revisar aspectos da paralisia cerebral de interesse para o anestesiologista, permitindo um adequado manuseio pré, intra e pós-operatório neste tipo de paciente. CONTEÚDO: O artigo aborda aspectos da paralisia cerebral como etiologia, classificação, fatores de risco, fisiopatologia, quadro clínico, diagnóstico, terapêuticas utilizadas bem como avaliação pré-operatória, medicação pré-anestésica, manuseio intra e pós-operatório, analgesia pós-operatória e dor crônica. CONCLUSÕES: O anestesiologista desempenha um papel importante na diminuição da morbidade e mortalidade anestésico-cirúrgica em pacientes portadores de paralisia cerebral. O conhecimento da fisiopatologia dos diferentes tipos de paralisia cerebral bem como das doenças associadas e suas terapêuticas é imprescindível, pois permite ao anestesiologista antecipar e prevenir complicações intra e pós-operatórias neste tipo de paciente.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La parálisis cerebral (PC es una enfermedad no progresiva consecuente de una lesión en el sistema nervioso central, llevando a un comprometimiento motor del paciente. El portador de PC, frecuentemente es sometido a procedimientos quirúrgicos debido a enfermedades usuales y situaciones particulares consecuentes de la parálisis cerebral. El objetivo de este artículo, fue revisar aspectos de la parálisis cerebral de interés para el anestesista, permitiendo un adecuado manoseo pre, intra y posoperatorio en este tipo de paciente. CONTENIDO: El artículo aborda aspectos de la parálisis cerebral como etiología, clasificación, factores de

  14. Therapeutic effects of different durations of acupuncture on rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is regarded as an effective therapy for cerebral ischemia. Different acupuncture manipulations and durations may result in different therapeutic effects. In the present study, the Neiguan (PC6 acupoint of rats with occluded middle cerebral arteries was needled at a fixed frequency (3 Hz with different durations, i.e., 5, 60 and 180 seconds under a twisting-rotating acupuncture method. Results showed that different durations of acupuncture had different therapeutic effects, with 60 seconds yielding a better therapeutic effect than the other two groups. This duration of treatment demonstrated rapid cerebral blood flow, encouraging recovery of neurological function, and small cerebral infarct volume. Experimental findings indicated that under 3 Hz frequency, the treatment of needling Neiguan for 60 seconds is effective for ischemic stroke

  15. Implementation of cerebral microdialysis at a community-based hospital: A 5-year retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jeff W.; Rogers, Shana L.; Gombart, Zoe J.; Adler, David E.; Cecil, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cerebral microdialysis (MD) provides valuable information about brain metabolism under normal and pathologic conditions. The CMA 600 microdialysis analyzer received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for clinical use in the United States in 2005. Since then, cerebral MD has been increasingly utilized nationally in the multimodal monitoring of traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and brain tumors. We describe a 5-year, single-institu...

  16. Clinical application of iopamidol (pamiray 300) for cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Ho; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Dong Joon; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Dong Ik

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of Pamiray 300 (Iopamidol; Dongkook Pharm, Seoul, Korea) as a nonionic contrast medium for cerebral angiography. One hundred patients undergoing cerebral angiography were randomly assigned to receive Pamiray 300 after written consent had been obtained. Patients with adverse reactions were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients with minor adverse events such as heat sensation and pain, and the other group consisted of patients with major adverse events such as dyspnea, laryngeal edema and shock. The qualities of the radiographic images were stratified into five grades by three independent radiologists. No abnormality induced by Pamiray 300 was seen by a physical and neurological examination, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiogram, respiration rate measurement and partial fraction of arterial oxygen recording. No major and severe adverse events occurred throughout the study. Patient sex, age, disease category, underlying disease and administered contrast dosage showed no statistical significance with regards to the occurrence of adverse events. The opacification of blood vessels in all patients was 'good' or 'excellent'. Based on the results of this study, Pamiray 300 is a safe, efficacious and well-tolerated contrast medium for use in cerebral angiography. Thus, Pamiray 300 can be used as a competitive medium in cerebral angiography

  17. Clinical application of iopamidol (pamiray 300) for cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Ho; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Dong Joon; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of Pamiray 300 (Iopamidol; Dongkook Pharm, Seoul, Korea) as a nonionic contrast medium for cerebral angiography. One hundred patients undergoing cerebral angiography were randomly assigned to receive Pamiray 300 after written consent had been obtained. Patients with adverse reactions were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients with minor adverse events such as heat sensation and pain, and the other group consisted of patients with major adverse events such as dyspnea, laryngeal edema and shock. The qualities of the radiographic images were stratified into five grades by three independent radiologists. No abnormality induced by Pamiray 300 was seen by a physical and neurological examination, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiogram, respiration rate measurement and partial fraction of arterial oxygen recording. No major and severe adverse events occurred throughout the study. Patient sex, age, disease category, underlying disease and administered contrast dosage showed no statistical significance with regards to the occurrence of adverse events. The opacification of blood vessels in all patients was 'good' or 'excellent'. Based on the results of this study, Pamiray 300 is a safe, efficacious and well-tolerated contrast medium for use in cerebral angiography. Thus, Pamiray 300 can be used as a competitive medium in cerebral angiography.

  18. Cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism in thalamic hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Ken

    1987-12-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO/sub 2/), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were studied in 20 cases of thalamic hemorrhage using positron CT and /sup 15/O labeled gas steady-state inhalation method. CBF reduction was limited around the thalamus in the small sized hematoma. CBF were significantly diminished in the mean cortical, parietal, temporal, basal ganglia and thalamic area ipsilateral and cerebellar cortex contralateral to the medium sized hematoma. There was bilateral and diffuse CBF reduction in the large sized hematoma which was caused by increased intracranial pressure. CMRO/sub 2/ value were similary changed as CBF. OEF change showed within normal limit. Diffuse CBV reduction was observed in the large sized hematoma. This reduction was the result of decreased vascular bed caused by mass effect of the hematoma and hydrocephalus. Effect of surgical treatment such as ventricular drainage and hematoma evacuation were also discussed in correlation to CBF in some case using positron and single photon ECT.

  19. Clinical application of cerebral dynamic perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLand, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    Radionuclide cerebral perfusion studies are assuming a far greater importance in the detection and differential diagnosis of cerebral lesions. Perfusion studies not only contribute to the differential diagnosis of lesions but in certain cases are the preferred methods by which more accurate clinical interpretations can be made. The characteristic blood flow of arterio-venous malformations readily differentiates this lesion from neoplasms. The decreased perfusion or absent perfusion observed in cerebral infarctions is diagnostic without concurrent evidence from static images. Changes in rates and direction of blood flow contribute fundamental information to the status of stenosis and vascular occlusion and, in addition, offer valuable information on the competency and routes of collateral circulation. The degree of cerebral perfusion after cerebral vascular accidents appears to be directly related to patient recovery, particularly muscular function. Cerebral perfusion adds a new parameter in the diagnosis of subdural haematomas and concussion and in the differentiation of obscuring radioactivity from superficial trauma. Although pictorial displays of perfusion blood flow will offer information in most cerebral vascular problems, the addition of computer analysis better defines temporal relationships of regional blood flow, quantitative changes in flow and the detection of the more subtle increases or decreases in cerebral blood flow. The status of radionuclide cerebral perfusion studies has taken on an importance making it the primary modality for the diagnosis of cerebral lesions. (author)

  20. Cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten

    2001-01-01

    Ph.d. afhandlingen omhandler sammenhængen mellem hjernens blodtilførsel (CBF) og middelarterietrykket (MAP) hos patienter med akut bakteriel meningitis. Hos raske er CBF uafhængig af MAP, hvilket kaldes CBF autoregulation. Svækket autoregulation antages at øge risikoen for cerebral hypoperfusion og...... iskæmi under episoder med lavt MAP, og for cerebral hyperperfusion og vasogent ødem ved højt MAP. CBF autoregulationen undersøgtes hos tyve voksne patienter med akut bakteriel meningitis i den tidlige sygdomsfase (... meningitis, men retableres ved klinisk restitution. Autoregulationen kan endvidere delvis retableres ved akut hyperventilation. Fundene har potentiel betydning for valg af supportiv terapi hos patienter med meningitis....

  1. Risk Factors for Malnutrition Among Children With Cerebral Palsy in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Allison; Gambrah-Sampaney, Claudia; Khurana, Esha; Baier, James; Baranov, Esther; Monokwane, Baphaleng; Bearden, David R

    2017-05-01

    Children with cerebral palsy in low-resource settings are at high risk of malnutrition, which further increases their risk of poor health outcomes. However, there are few available data on specific risk factors for malnutrition among children with cerebral palsy in the developing world. We performed a case-control study among children with cerebral palsy receiving care at a tertiary care hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. Children with cerebral palsy and malnutrition were identified according to World Health Organization growth curves and compared with subjects with cerebral palsy without malnutrition. Risk factors for malnutrition were identified using multivariable logistic regression models. These risk factors were then used to generate a Malnutrition Risk Score, and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to identify optimal cutoffs to identify subjects at high risk of malnutrition. We identified 61 children with cerebral palsy, 26 of whom (43%) met criteria for malnutrition. Nonambulatory status (odds ratio 13.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.8-50.1, P malnutrition. A Malnutrition Risk Score was constructed based on these risk factors, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated excellent performance characteristics of this score (area under the curve 0.92, 95% CI 0.89-0.94). Malnutrition is common among children with cerebral palsy in Botswana, and a simple risk score may help identify children with the highest risk. Further studies are needed to validate this screening tool and to determine optimal nutritional interventions in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical experience of cerebral protection with balloon occlusion during carotid artery stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, H.J.; Mathias, K.D.; Drescher, R.; Bockisch, G.; Hauth, E.; Demirel, E.; Gissler, H.M.; Witten/Herdecke Univ.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To asses the technical feasibility and the results of cerebral protection with the GuardWire Plus Temporary Occlusion and Aspiration System during carotid artery stenting for high-grade stenosis. Patients and Methods: In 20 patients 20 carotid artery stenoses were treated with stent placement under cerebral protection. A contralateral carotid occlusion was an exclusion criteria for the use of the protection device. In all cases only aspiration, but no flushing was used before deflation of the occlusion balloon. In 17 of 20 patients diffusion-weighted (DW-)MRT imaging of the brain was performed before and 24 hours after the procedure. Results: The stent implantation was successfully performed in all patients. In 3 patients neurologic symptoms occurred during the occlusion time. In these 3 patients the symptoms immediately disappeared after deflation of the balloon. In one case there was dilatation of the internal carotid artery at the site of the balloon inflation. In 3 of the 17 DW-MR images new ipsilateral cerebral lesions, in one case a new contralateral lesion occurred after the procedure. Conclusions: The cerebral protection procedure is technically feasible. The occlusion of the internal carotid artery was not tolerated by all patients. The DW-MR imaging demonstrated cerebral lesions indicating the occurrence of cerebral microemboli during the procedure. Further investigations are necessary to determine if the use of the cerebral protection device will improve the results of the carotid artery stenting for high-grade stenoses. (orig.) [de

  3. Daily rhythm of cerebral blood flow velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spielman Arthur J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CBFV (cerebral blood flow velocity is lower in the morning than in the afternoon and evening. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the time of day changes in CBFV: 1 CBFV changes are due to sleep-associated processes or 2 time of day changes in CBFV are due to an endogenous circadian rhythm independent of sleep. The aim of this study was to examine CBFV over 30 hours of sustained wakefulness to determine whether CBFV exhibits fluctuations associated with time of day. Methods Eleven subjects underwent a modified constant routine protocol. CBFV from the middle cerebral artery was monitored by chronic recording of Transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasonography. Other variables included core body temperature (CBT, end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2, blood pressure, and heart rate. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO served as a measure of endogenous circadian phase position. Results A non-linear multiple regression, cosine fit analysis revealed that both the CBT and CBFV rhythm fit a 24 hour rhythm (R2 = 0.62 and R2 = 0.68, respectively. Circadian phase position of CBT occurred at 6:05 am while CBFV occurred at 12:02 pm, revealing a six hour, or 90 degree difference between these two rhythms (t = 4.9, df = 10, p Conclusion In conclusion, time of day variations in CBFV have an approximately 24 hour rhythm under constant conditions, suggesting regulation by a circadian oscillator. The 90 degree-phase angle difference between the CBT and CBFV rhythms may help explain previous findings of lower CBFV values in the morning. The phase difference occurs at a time period during which cognitive performance decrements have been observed and when both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events occur more frequently. The mechanisms underlying this phase angle difference require further exploration.

  4. CEREBRAL PALSY. PRENTICE-HALL FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANCE, BURTON, JR.; MCDONALD, EUGENE T.

    THIS INTRODUCTORY TEXT ON CEREBRAL PALSY IS DIVIDED INTO TWO SECTIONS. THE FIRST SECTION OF THE BOOK CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING OF CEREBRAL PALSY, PROGRAMS FOR THOSE WITH CEREBRAL PALSY, THE NEUROLOGICAL BASES, ETIOLOGY, AND DIAGNOSIS, AND THE CLASSIFICATION OF CEREBRAL PALSY. PROBLEMS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH CEREBRAL PALSY…

  5. Cerebral haemorrhage as the presenting feature of myeloproliferative disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kondlapudi, Jyothi; O’Connor, Rory J; Mawer, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders predispose individuals to bleeding and thrombosis, often with devastating consequences. We report a 41-year-old man who presented with headache, amnesia and dysphagia due to cerebral haemorrhage. Extensive investigation revealed the cause of the neurological syndrome as an underlying essential thrombocytosis. The patient made a full recovery following extensive inpatient and community rehabilitation, returning to work after 6 months. We discuss the diagnosis and m...

  6. Cerebral visual impairment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, G N; Jacobson, L K

    2001-12-01

    Much of the brain is devoted to vision. Damage causes visual problems ranging from profound impairment, to cognitive visual problems only. A child with cerebral blindness may have intact perception of movement. The principal cognitive visual pathways comprise the dorsal and the ventral streams. The dorsal stream runs between the occipital lobes (which process incoming visual data), the posterior parietal lobes (which process the whole visual scene and give attention to component parts), the motor cortex (which facilitates movement through the visual scene) and the frontal cortex (which directs attention to chosen parts of the visual scene). The ventral stream runs between the occipital lobes and the temporal lobes (which enable recognition of people and objects, facilitate route finding and serve visual memory). Damage to these pathways disrupts these functions in a variety of combinations. This paper reviews cerebral visual impairment in children, the differential diagnosis and the management. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Apraxia in deep cerebral lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Agostoni, E; Coletti, A; Orlando, G; Tredici, G

    1983-01-01

    In a series of 50 patients with cerebrovascular lesions (demonstrated with CT scan), seven patients had lesions located in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. All these seven patients were apractic. Ideomotor apraxia was present in all patients; five also had constructional apraxia, and one had bucco-facial apraxia. None of the patients had utilisation apraxia. These observations indicated that apraxia is not only a "high cerebral (cortical) function", but may depend also on the integrity of s...

  8. Cerebral hyperperfusion following carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Sørensen, O

    1987-01-01

    , occurred in the low pressure ratio group, while the hemispheric asymmetry on average was unchanged in the high pressure ratio group. This relative hyperemia was most pronounced 2 to 4 days following reconstruction. The marked hyperemia, absolute as well as relative, in patients with a low ICA/CCA pressure...... ratio suggests a temporary impairment of autoregulation. Special care should be taken to avoid postoperative hypertension in such patients, who typically have preoperative hypoperfusion, to avoid the occurrence of cerebral edema or hemorrhage....

  9. Methodological appraisal of SPECT measurements of cerebral blood volume and cerebral tissue hematocrit. Chapter 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Fumihiko

    1988-01-01

    In this communication a critical appraisal is given of the method for measuring cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral hematocrit employing single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). 2 refs

  10. Behcet's disease with cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardamaglia, L.; Desmond, P.M.; Gonzales, M.F.; Bendrups, A.; Brodtmann, A.

    2001-01-01

    The case presented illustrates the diagnostic dilemma off neurological involvement in Behcet's disease and other inflammatory diseases. 'Psychiatric' symptoms were present for 2 years without abnormalities on SPECT or MRI and without CSF pleocytosis. Even at the time of fitting, no CSF abnormalities were observed. The preceding psychiatric presentations may have been due to cerebral vasculitis that was exacerbated by withdrawal of steroids. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the most sensitive imaging modality. Lesions are usually in the brainstem, cerebellum, basal ganglia region or periventricular white matter, and the pons and the mesencephalon are commonly affected. In our patient there was no diencephalic or brainstem involvement. The inflammatory process can appear as a very large lesion, with gadolinium enhancement and significant mass effect, as in our patient. Brain magnetic resonance imaging. Postgadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, axial image shows two large lesions in the right frontal lobe, with the larger, posterior lesion demonstrating vivid ring enhancement. A central nodule is isodense, with the cerebral white matter within the larger lesion. Surrounding low T 1 signal involves the hemispheric white matter without cortical extension and is consistent with vasogenic oedema. Minor mass effect is demonstrated with bowing of the anterior falx cerebri to the left. Biopsy shows prominent fibrinoid necrosis in small calibre postcapillary venules and cerebral white matter. There are surrounding acute and chronic inflammatory cells and nuclear debris, consistent with vasculitis

  11. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis; With special reference to the neuroradiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-10-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.).

  12. Cerebral Edema and Cerebral Hemorrhages in Interleukin-10-Deficient Mice Infected with Plasmodium chabaudi

    OpenAIRE

    Sanni, Latifu A.; Jarra, William; Li, Ching; Langhorne, Jean

    2004-01-01

    During a Plasmodium chabaudi infection in interleukin-10 (IL-10) knockout mice, there is greater parasite sequestration, more severe cerebral edema, and a high frequency of cerebral hemorrhage compared with infection of C57BL/6 mice. Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha treatment ameliorated both cerebral edema and hemorrhages, suggesting that proinflammatory responses contributed to cerebral complications in infected IL-10−/− mice.

  13. Pharmacokinetic Study of Piracetam in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Pankaj; Dash, Debabrata; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2018-04-01

    Cerebral ischemia affects hepatic enzymes and brain permeability extensively. Piracetam was investigated up to phase III of clinical trials and there is lack of data on brain penetration in cerebral ischemic condition. Thus, knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of piracetam during ischemic condition would aid to improve pharmacotherapeutics in ischemic stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h in male Wistar rats followed by reperfusion. After 24 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion or 22 h of reperfusion, piracetam was administered for pharmacokinetic, brain penetration, and pharmacological experiments. In pharmacokinetic study, blood samples were collected at different time points after 200-mg/kg (oral) and 75-mg/kg (intravenous) administration of piracetam through right external jugular vein cannulation. In brain penetration study, the cerebrospinal fluid, systemic blood, portal blood, and brain samples were collected at pre-designated time points after 200-mg/kg oral administration of piracetam. In a separate experiment, the pharmacological effect of the single oral dose of piracetam in middle cerebral artery occlusion was assessed at a dose of 200 mg/kg. All the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam including area under curve (AUC 0-24 ), maximum plasma concentration (C max ), time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (t max ), elimination half-life (t 1/2 ), volume of distribution (V z ), total body clearance, mean residence time, and bioavailability were found to be similar in ischemic stroke condition except for brain penetration. Piracetam exposure (AUC 0-2 ) in brain and CSF were found to be 2.4- and 3.1-fold higher, respectively, in ischemic stroke compared to control rats. Piracetam significantly reduced infarct volume by 35.77% caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no change in the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam in the ischemic stroke model except for

  14. Dental characteristics of children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Stevanović Radoje; Jovičić Olivera

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is one of the commonest children's physical handicaps with frequency of 1.5-3/1000. Beside many other disturbances, these children may have serious disorders caused by dental diseases. Concerning this fact, the objective of our study was to examine children with cerebral palsy in our country and determine condition of dental health and suggest adequate protective measures. A total of 116 children, 3-18 years old, with cerebral palsy were examined and the results were compared t...

  15. Epigenetics and cerebral organoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Sheena Louise; Ilieva, Mirolyuba; Maria Michel, Tanja

    2018-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect 1 in 68 children in the US according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is characterized by impairments in social interactions and communication, restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors, and interests. Owing to disease...... also play a role. Some studies indicate a set of candidate genes with different DNA methylation profiles in ASD compared to healthy individuals. Thus epigenetic alterations could help bridging the gene-environment gap in deciphering the underlying neurobiology of autism. However, epigenome...... of the art concerning knowledge on epigenetic changes in autism and how new, cutting edge expertise based on three-dimensional (3D) stem cell technology models (brain organoids) can contribute in elucidating the multiple aspects of disease mechanisms....

  16. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  17. A study on the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria and cerebral babesiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Aikawa

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral complications are important, but poorly understood pathological features of infections caused by some species of Plasmodium and Babesia. Patients dying from P. falciparum were classified as cerebral or non-cerebral cases according to the cerebral malaria coma scale. Light microscopy revealed that cerebral microvessels of cerebral malaria patients were field with a mixture of parazited and unparazited erythrocytes, with 94% of the vessels showing parasitized red blood cell (PRBC sequestration. Some degree of PRBC sequestration was also found in non-cerebral malaria patients, but the percentage of microvessls with sequestered PRBC was only 13% Electron microscopy demonstrated knobs on the membrane of PRBC that formed focal junctions with the capillary endothelium. A number of host cell molecules such as CD36, thrombospondim (TSP and intracellular adhesion molecule I (ICAM-1 may function as endothelial cell surfacereports for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Affinity labeling of CD36 and TSP to the PRBC surface showed these molecules specifically bind to the knobs. Babesia bovis infected erythrocytes procedure projections of the erythrocyte membrane that are similar to knobs. When brain tissue from B. bovis-infected cattle was examined, cerebral capillaries were packed with PRBC. Infected erythrocytes formed focal attachments with cerebral endothelial cells at the site of these knob-like projections. These findings indicate that cerebral pathology caused by B. bovis is similar to human cerebral malaria. A search for cytoadherence proteins in the endothelial cells may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenisis of cerebral babesiosis.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide infusion enhances dynamic cerebral autoregulation without affecting cerebral oxygen vasoreactivity in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Mg; Plovsing, Ronni R; Evans, Kevin A

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis may be associated with disturbances in cerebral oxygen transport and cerebral haemodynamic function, thus rendering the brain particularly susceptible to hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of isocapnic hypoxia and hyperoxia on dynamic cerebral autoregulation in a h...

  19. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    . They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  20. Anxiety and cerebral blood flow during behavioral challenge. Dissociation of central from peripheral and subjective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohar, J.; Insel, T.R.; Berman, K.F.; Foa, E.B.; Hill, J.L.; Weinberger, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between anxiety and regional cerebral blood flow, we administered behavioral challenges to 10 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder while measuring regional cerebral blood flow with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Each patient was studied under three conditions: relaxation, imaginal flooding, and in vivo (actual) exposure to the phobic stimulus. Subjective anxiety, obsessive-compulsive ratings, and autonomic measures (heart rate, blood pressure) increased significantly, but respiratory rate and PCO 2 did not change across the three conditions. Regional cerebral blood flow increased slightly (in the temporal region) during imaginal flooding, but decreased markedly in several cortical regions during in vivo exposure, when anxiety was highest by subjective and peripheral autonomic measures. These results demonstrate that intense anxiety can be associated with decreased rather than increased cortical perfusion and that ostensibly related states of anxiety (eg, anticipatory and obsessional anxiety) may be associated with opposite effects on regional cerebral blood flow

  1. Anxiety and cerebral blood flow during behavioral challenge. Dissociation of central from peripheral and subjective measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohar, J.; Insel, T.R.; Berman, K.F.; Foa, E.B.; Hill, J.L.; Weinberger, D.R.

    1989-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between anxiety and regional cerebral blood flow, we administered behavioral challenges to 10 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder while measuring regional cerebral blood flow with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Each patient was studied under three conditions: relaxation, imaginal flooding, and in vivo (actual) exposure to the phobic stimulus. Subjective anxiety, obsessive-compulsive ratings, and autonomic measures (heart rate, blood pressure) increased significantly, but respiratory rate and PCO/sub 2/ did not change across the three conditions. Regional cerebral blood flow increased slightly (in the temporal region) during imaginal flooding, but decreased markedly in several cortical regions during in vivo exposure, when anxiety was highest by subjective and peripheral autonomic measures. These results demonstrate that intense anxiety can be associated with decreased rather than increased cortical perfusion and that ostensibly related states of anxiety (eg, anticipatory and obsessional anxiety) may be associated with opposite effects on regional cerebral blood flow.

  2. Acute cerebral vascular accident associated with hyperperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soin, J.S.; Burdine, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Cerebral radionuclide angiography can demonstrate decreased or normal radioactivity in the affected region during the arterial phase in patients who have sustained a cerebral vascular accident and thus enhances the diagnostic specificity of the static brain image. In an occasional patient, however, a seemingly paradoxical pattern of regional hyperperfusion with a return to normal or subnormal perfusion following the acute phase has been observed. This phenomenon, called luxury perfusion, has been defined using intra-arterial 133 Xe for semiquantitative cerebral blood flow measurements and should be kept in mind as a potentially misleading cerebral imaging pattern

  3. Deep Cerebral Vein Thrombosis: A Clinical Masquerader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prabhat; Sasmal, Gargi; Mahto, Subodh Kumar; Gupta, Shreya; Gupta, Harish

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke. Thrombosis can occur in superficial veins, deep venous system or cortical veins of brain. The term Deep Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (DCVT) is used for thrombosis of internal cerebral vein, vein of Galen and basal vein of Rosenthal. Only 10% cases of CVT are because of thrombosis of deep cerebral vein. The diagnosis of DCVT is often missed because of its heterogenous presentation. Herein, we present a case of DCVT which was initially treated as meningoencephalitis. A timely advised brain imaging helped in making the diagnosis and patient recovered completely after institution of anticoagulation.

  4. Stimulation-induced cerebral glycolytic glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, R.F.; Lear, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a method to estimate the relative amounts of cerebral oxidative and glycolytic glucose metabolism with sequentially administered radiolabeled fluorode-oxyglucose (FDG) and 6-glucose (GLU). Cerebral FDG metabolite concentration was found to reflect total glucose metabolism. Cerebral GLU metabolite concentration, however, was found to reflect mainly oxidative metabolism, because of significant fraction of the radiolabel was lost through lactate production and diffusion from the brain with glycolysis. The authors applied the method to normal rats, to seizing rats, and to optically stimulated rats. Normal cerebral glucose metabolism was primarily oxidative, but stimulation caused profound increases in glycolysis in activated brain regions

  5. Brainstem involvement as a cause of central sleep apnea: pattern of microstructural cerebral damage in patients with cerebral microangiopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Duning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exact underlying pathomechanism of central sleep apnea with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSA-CSR is still unclear. Recent studies have demonstrated an association between cerebral white matter changes and CSA. A dysfunction of central respiratory control centers in the brainstem was suggested by some authors. Novel MR-imaging analysis tools now allow far more subtle assessment of microstructural cerebral changes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and what severity of subtle structural cerebral changes could lead to CSA-CSR, and whether there is a specific pattern of neurodegenerative changes that cause CSR. Therefore, we examined patients with Fabry disease (FD, an inherited, lysosomal storage disease. White matter lesions are early and frequent findings in FD. Thus, FD can serve as a "model disease" of cerebral microangiopathy to study in more detail the impact of cerebral lesions on central sleep apnea. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Genetically proven FD patients (n = 23 and age-matched healthy controls (n = 44 underwent a cardio-respiratory polysomnography and brain MRI at 3.0 Tesla. We applied different MR-imaging techniques, ranging from semiquantitative measurement of white matter lesion (WML volumes and automated calculation of brain tissue volumes to VBM of gray matter and voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI analysis. RESULTS: In 5 of 23 Fabry patients (22% CSA-CSR was detected. Voxel-based DTI analysis revealed widespread structural changes in FD patients when compared to the healthy controls. When calculated as a separate group, DTI changes of CSA-CSR patients were most prominent in the brainstem. Voxel-based regression analysis revealed a significant association between CSR severity and microstructural DTI changes within the brainstem. CONCLUSION: Subtle microstructural changes in the brainstem might be a neuroanatomical correlate of CSA-CSR in patients at risk of WML. DTI is more sensitive and specific than

  6. [Effect of electroacupuncture and moxibustion pretreatment on expression of cerebral micro- RNAs and Aquaporin protein-4 in cerebral infarction rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shi-Ping; Han, Wei; Chu, Hao-Ran; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Ling; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Cui, Qian-Qian

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed at observing the effect of moxibustion pretreatment on the expression of cerebral microRNAs and Aquaporin protein-4 (AQP 4) in rats with cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (CI/R), so as to reveal its mechanism underlying improvement of cerebral infarction. A total of 130 Wistar rats were randomly divided into blank control (n = 10), CI/R model (n = 30), electroacupuncture (EA, n = 30), moxibustion (n = 30), Aspirin groups (n = 30). Before modeling, EA (2 Hz/5 Hz, 1-2 mA) or moxibustion was applied to "Baihui" (GV 20), "Fengfu" (GV 16) and "Dazhui" (GV 14) for 20 min, once daily for 7 days. The rats of the Asprin group were treated by intragastric administration of Aspirin (10 mg/kg, 1 mg/mL) , once daily for 7 days before modeling. The CI/R model was established by occlusion of the bilateral carotid arteries. The expression levels of cerebral miRNAs and AQP 4 were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Compared with the blank control group, the expression levels of cerebral miRNA 290 and miRNA 494 were significantly reduced, while that of AQP 4 was obviously up-regulated in the model group (P < 0.01). After pretreatment with EA and moxibustion, the relative expression levels of miRNA 290 and miRNA 494 were significantly higher in the EA, moxibustion and Aspirin pretreatment groups than in the model group (P < 0.01), while cortical AQP 4 expression levels were significantly lower in the EA, moxibustion and Aspirin pretreatment groups than in the model group (P < 0. 01, P < 0.05). The effects of both EA and moxibustion groups were significantly superior to those of Aspirin pretreatment group in up-regulating expression of miRNA 290 and miRNA 494 and down-regulating expression of AQP 4 (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). In addition, the EA pretreatment was markedly superior to moxibustion pretreatment in the aforementioned effects (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION EA pretreatment of GV 14, GV 16 and GV 20 can effectively up-regulate cerebral cortical

  7. Unexpected reductions in regional cerebral perfusion during prolonged hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Justin S; Macdonald, Jamie H; Oliver, Samuel J; Mullins, Paul G

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive performance is impaired by hypoxia despite global cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism being maintained. Using arterial spin labelled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, this is the first study to show regional reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in response to decreased oxygen supply (hypoxia) at 2 h that increased in area and became more pronounced at 10 h. Reductions in CBF were seen in brain regions typically associated with the 'default mode' or 'task negative' network. Regional reductions in CBF, and associated vasoconstriction, within the default mode network in hypoxia is supported by increased vasodilatation in these regions to a subsequent hypercapnic (5% CO 2 ) challenge. These results suggest an anatomical mechanism through which hypoxia may cause previously reported deficits in cognitive performance. Hypoxia causes an increase in global cerebral blood flow, which maintains global cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism. However, neurological deficits are abundant under hypoxic conditions. We investigated regional cerebral microvascular responses to acute (2 h) and prolonged (10 h) poikilocapnic normobaric hypoxia. We found that 2 h of hypoxia caused an expected increase in frontal cortical grey matter perfusion but unexpected perfusion decreases in regions of the brain normally associated with the 'default mode' or 'task negative' network. After 10 h in hypoxia, decreased blood flow to the major nodes of the default mode network became more pronounced and widespread. The use of a hypercapnic challenge (5% CO 2 ) confirmed that these reductions in cerebral blood flow from hypoxia were related to vasoconstriction. Our findings demonstrate steady-state deactivation of the default network under acute hypoxia, which become more pronounced over time. Moreover, these data provide a unique insight into the nuanced localized cerebrovascular response to hypoxia that is not attainable through traditional methods. The observation of reduced

  8. Imaging of cerebral ischemic edema and neuronal death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kummer, Ruediger von [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Dresden (Germany); Dzialowski, Imanuel [Elblandklinikum Meissen, Neurologische Rehabilitationsklinik Grossenhain, Meissen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    In acute cerebral ischemia, the assessment of irreversible injury is crucial for treatment decisions and the patient's prognosis. There is still uncertainty how imaging can safely differentiate reversible from irreversible ischemic brain tissue in the acute phase of stroke. We have searched PubMed and Google Scholar for experimental and clinical papers describing the pathology and pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia under controlled conditions. Within the first 6 h of stroke onset, ischemic cell injury is subtle and hard to recognize under the microscope. Functional impairment is obvious, but can be induced by ischemic blood flow allowing recovery with flow restoration. The critical cerebral blood flow (CBF) threshold for irreversible injury is ∝15 ml/100 g x min. Below this threshold, ischemic brain tissue takes up water in case of any residual capillary flow (ionic edema). Because tissue water content is linearly related to X-ray attenuation, computed tomography (CT) can detect and measure ionic edema and, thus, determine ischemic brain infarction. In contrast, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) detects cytotoxic edema that develops at higher thresholds of ischemic CBF and is thus highly sensitive for milder levels of brain ischemia, but not specific for irreversible brain tissue injury. CT and MRI are complimentary in the detection of ischemic stroke pathology and are valuable for treatment decisions. (orig.)

  9. Imaging of cerebral ischemic edema and neuronal death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummer, Ruediger von; Dzialowski, Imanuel

    2017-01-01

    In acute cerebral ischemia, the assessment of irreversible injury is crucial for treatment decisions and the patient's prognosis. There is still uncertainty how imaging can safely differentiate reversible from irreversible ischemic brain tissue in the acute phase of stroke. We have searched PubMed and Google Scholar for experimental and clinical papers describing the pathology and pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia under controlled conditions. Within the first 6 h of stroke onset, ischemic cell injury is subtle and hard to recognize under the microscope. Functional impairment is obvious, but can be induced by ischemic blood flow allowing recovery with flow restoration. The critical cerebral blood flow (CBF) threshold for irreversible injury is ∝15 ml/100 g x min. Below this threshold, ischemic brain tissue takes up water in case of any residual capillary flow (ionic edema). Because tissue water content is linearly related to X-ray attenuation, computed tomography (CT) can detect and measure ionic edema and, thus, determine ischemic brain infarction. In contrast, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) detects cytotoxic edema that develops at higher thresholds of ischemic CBF and is thus highly sensitive for milder levels of brain ischemia, but not specific for irreversible brain tissue injury. CT and MRI are complimentary in the detection of ischemic stroke pathology and are valuable for treatment decisions. (orig.)

  10. Percutaneous Adductor Release in Nonambulant Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramji Lal Sahu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adductor spasticity at hips is the main barrier in functional activities and rehabilitation of spastic cerebral palsy patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of percutaneous adductor release under general anesthesia. Methods: From July 2005 to July 2010, 64 hips in 32 patients (19 males and 13 females were recruited from outpatient department having adductor contracture at hips in cerebral palsy children. All children were operated under general anesthesia. All children were followed for twenty-four months. The clinical results were evaluated radiologically, including measurement of CE- angle, AC-index and femoral head coverage and in terms of activity level of children. Results: Of the thirty-two children, twenty-eight showed marked and immediate improvement. None of our children was functionally worse at follow-up. The CE-angle and femoral head coverage did not change significantly. The AC-index improved significantly (p = 0.01.The results were excellent in 12.5% children, good in 50%, fair in 25% and poor in 12.5%. Conclusions: Bilateral mini-invasive adductor release can be an effective treatment for children suffering from adductor contracture refractory to nonoperative management and early adductor release can prevent subluxation and possibly the need for future bony procedure on the proximal femur and pelvis. Keywords: Adductor contracture, Percutaneous, Cerebral palsy, Minimal invasive procedure.

  11. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during light sleep (stage 2) in 8 young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness and light sleep as verified by standard....... They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  12. Escin attenuates cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Han, Bing; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Tongshen; Fu, Fenghua; Zhao, Delu

    2011-06-01

    Organophosphorus exposure affects different organs such as skeletal muscles, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung, and brain. The present experiment aimed to evaluate the effect of escin on cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered subcutaneously with omethoate at a single dose of 60 mg/kg followed by escin treatment. The results showed that escin reduced the brain water content and the amount of Evans blue in omethoate-poisoned animals. Treatment with escin decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) in the brain. Escin also alleviated the histopathological change induced by acute omethoate poisoning. The findings demonstrated that escin can attenuate cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning, and the underlying mechanism was associated with ameliorating the permeability of the blood-brain barrier.

  13. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  14. Isolated human and rat cerebral arteries constrict to increases in flow: role of 20-HETE and TP receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Rozsa, Bernadett; Springo, Zsolt; Doczi, Tamas; Koller, Akos

    2011-01-01

    Elevation of intraluminal pressure increases vasomotor tone, which thought to have a substantial role in regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Interestingly, responses of cerebral vessels to increases in flow varied and have not been studied in human cerebral arteries. We hypothesized that increases in flow elicit constrictions of isolated human and rat cerebral arteries and aimed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Human cerebral arteries and rat middle cerebral arteries constricted to increases in flow (P<0.05). Simultaneous increase in intraluminal flow+pressure further reduced the diameter compared with pressure-induced changes (P<0.05), leading to constant estimated CBF. Flow-induced constrictions were abolished by HET0016 (inhibitor of synthesis of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) or inhibition of COXs or blocking TP (thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2, receptors and attenuated by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flow-enhanced ROS formation was significantly reduced by HET0016. In conclusion, in human and rat cerebral arteries (1) increases in flow elicit constrictions, (2) signaling mechanism of flow-induced constriction of cerebral arteries involves enhanced production of ROS, COX activity, and mediated by 20-HETE via TP receptors, and (3) we propose that simultaneous operation of pressure- and flow-induced constrictions is necessary to provide an effective autoregulation of CBF. PMID:21610722

  15. Multiple cerebral aneurysms of middle cerebral artery. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Nica1, Tatiana Rosca1, A. Dinca2, M. Stroi3, Mirela Renta4, A.V. Ciurea5

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cerebral aneurysms present awide variation in incidence with averages of13% at angiographic studies and 22.7% atautopsy.High blood pressue, cigarette smoking,stress and possible also age and female sexseem to be risk factors for multipleintracranial aneurysms (MIAn in patientsof working age who have suffered asubarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH.Aneurysms were situated on the same sidein one-third of the patients with twoaneurysms and the most common site wasthe middle cerebral artery (MCA. Tomanage these challenging lesionsneurosurgeons must use all availableinnovations and advances, includingdiagnostic, technical and perioperativeadjuncts. The author presents a case ofmiddle age female, with two saccularaneurysms situated on the same side (rightMCA, who was operated in our clinic, 20days after first SAH episode, I grade onHunt/Hess scale. The angio MRI wasperformed before, and control DSangiography after operation. After pterionalapproach, the author used themagnification, microsurgical technics,temporal clip, and two permanent Yasargilcurved clips. A postoperative good recoveryenable the patient go to work and drive onemonth later.

  16. Flow structures in cerebral aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Gambaruto, Alberto M; João, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of blood flow are commonly correlated to a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. In this work means to describe and characterise the flow field in the free-slip and no-slip domains are discussed in the context of cerebral aneurysms, reconstructed from in-vivo medical imaging. The approaches rely on a Taylor series expansion of the velocity field to first order terms that leads to a system of ODEs, the solution to which locally describes the motion of the flow. On perfor...

  17. Schizencephaly/congenital cerebral clefts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.; Naidich, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Schizencephaly (from the Greek meaning ''split brain''), is a term developed in the 1940s to explain symmetric clefts in the brain seen at autopsy in children with histories of severe neurologic defects. Use of the term has been expanded to include a variety of cerebral clefts. A review of the experience at Children's Memorial Hospital as well as case materials made available to the authors are presented, including CT, MR imaging, and US findings. Theories of etiology and pathogenesis of these congenital clefts, associated anomalies, and the spectrum of appearance of these clefts are discussed

  18. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvis, Suzanne M.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often

  19. Venous Thromboembolic Events After Cerebral Vein Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda, Bruno; Ferro, José M.; Canhão, Patrícia; Stam, Jan; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando; Scoditti, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-After cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVT), there is an increased risk of further venous thromboembolic events (VTEs). Time to a second cerebral or systemic venous thrombotic event and risk factors for recurrence have not been investigated in large prospective

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Endovascular treatment of cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms - a cost analysis. David Le Feuvre, Allan Taylor. Objectives. To determine if endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms is cost effective when compared with conventional surgical treatment. Design. A retrospective study. Subjects. Seventeen patients ...

  1. Spontaneous peripheral gangrene following severe cerebral malaria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... phalanges of the right index and middle fingers and the distal phalanges of the great, second and middle toes of the right foot following cerebral malaria. Until now, there has been only five such cases of peripheral gangrene associated with 'cerebral' malaria reported in literature and all these were all from Southeast Asia.

  2. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Y.; Nakajima, Y.; Ohsuga, H.; Yamamoto, M.

    1991-01-01

    In a period of nearly three years, 2757 patients have undergone magnetic resonance scans of the brain. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence and the cause of asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among the patients who had been diagnosed as having apparent cerebral hemorrhage. (author). 2 refs.; 1 tab

  3. Fatal cerebral oedema in adult diabetic ketoacidosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haringhuizen, A.; Tjan, D.H.; Grool, A.; Vugt, R. van; Zante, A.R. van

    2010-01-01

    In this report, a case of adult onset fatal cerebral oedema as a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is described and confirmed at post-mortem pathological examination. The pathogenesis of cerebral oedema due to DKA is still unknown. Potential mechanisms include the administration of

  4. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  5. MRI of sickle cell cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Johnson, M.; Grossman, R.I.; Hecht-Leavitt, C.; Gill, F.

    1987-05-01

    Eleven patients with sickle cell disease and neurological symptoms underwent MRI examination. Cerebral infarcts of two types were found, those in the vascular distribution of the middle cerebral artery and those in the deep white matter. In the patient whose hydration and whose oxygenation of erythrocytes has been treated, MRI offers diagnostic advantages over arteriography and CT.

  6. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance im...

  7. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  8. MRI of sickle cell cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Johnson, M.; Grossman, R.I.; Hecht-Leavitt, C.; Gill, F.; Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    Eleven patients with sickle cell disease and neurological symptoms underwent MRI examination. Cerebral infarcts of two types were found, those in the vascular distribution of the middle cerebral artery and those in the deep white matter. In the patient whose hydration and whose oxygenation of erythrocytes has been treated, MRI offers diagnostic advantages over arteriography and CT. (orig.)

  9. MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    The neurological lesion causing cerebral palsy (CP) is static, but the clinical con- dition changes ... Is it cerebral palsy? There must be evidence of an upper motor neuron (UMN) lesion, with brisk reflexes and possibly clonus; there should also be increased tone or persist- ent primitive ..... are at high risk for hip dislocation.

  10. Animal models of cerebral arterial gas embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Robert P.; Hollmann, Markus W.; van Hulst, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism is a dreaded complication of diving and invasive medical procedures. Many different animal models have been used in research on cerebral arterial gas embolism. This review provides an overview of the most important characteristics of these animal models. The properties

  11. Prevalence of cerebral palsy in Uganda: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Andrews, Carin; Peterson, Stefan; Wabwire Mangen, Fred; Eliasson, Ann Christin; Forssberg, Hans

    2017-12-01

    probable cause of cerebral palsy in 24 (25%) of 97 children. Cerebral palsy prevalence was higher in rural Uganda than in high-income countries (HICs), where prevalence is about 1·8-2·3 cases per 1000 children. Children younger than 8 years were more likely to have severe cerebral palsy than older children. Fewer older children than younger children with cerebral palsy suggested a high mortality in severely affected children. The small number of preterm-born children probably resulted from low preterm survival. About five times more children with post-neonatal cerebral palsy in Uganda than in HICs suggested that cerebral malaria and seizures were prevalent risk factors in this population. Swedish Research Council, Promobilia. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. CT findings in patients with cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, K. (Akita Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Clinical findings and CT findings in 73 cases of cerebral palsy were studied. The causes of cerebral palsy were presumed to be as follows: abnormal cerebral development (36%), asphyxial delivery (34%), and immature delivery (19%), etc. CT findings were abnormal in 58% of the 73 cases, 83% of the spastic tetraplegia patients and all of the spastic hemiplegia patients showed abnormal CT findings. All the patients with spastic monoplegia presented normal CT findings. In 75% of the spastic hemiplegia cases, the CT abnormalities were due to cerebral parenchymal abnormality such as porencephaly and regional low absorption. In cases of spastic tetraplegia, cerebral parenchymal abnormality was found only in 10%. Cortical atrophy was found only in 15 of the 73 cases, whereas central atrophy was found in 36 cases.

  13. Cerebral hemodynamics: concepts of clinical importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Bor-Seng-Shu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism are frequently impaired in a wide range of neurological diseases, including traumatic brain injury and stroke, with several pathophysiological mechanisms of injury. The resultant uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism can trigger secondary brain lesions, particularly in early phases, consequently worsening the patient's outcome. Cerebral blood flow regulation is influenced by blood gas content, blood viscosity, body temperature, cardiac output, altitude, cerebrovascular autoregulation, and neurovascular coupling, mediated by chemical agents such as nitric oxide (NO, carbon monoxide (CO, eicosanoid products, oxygen-derived free radicals, endothelins, K+, H+, and adenosine. A better understanding of these factors is valuable for the management of neurocritical care patients. The assessment of both cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in the acute phase of neurocritical care conditions may contribute to a more effective planning of therapeutic strategies for reducing secondary brain lesions. In this review, the authors have discussed concepts of cerebral hemodynamics, considering aspects of clinical importance.

  14. The adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy: mechanisms and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy is unique from other vascular beds. Most notably, the growth and vasodilatory response to high levels of circulating growth factors and cytokines that promote substantial hemodynamic changes in other vascular beds is limited in the cerebral circulation. This is accomplished through several mechanisms, including downregulation of key receptors and transcription factors, and production of circulating factors that counteract the vasodilatory effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor. Pregnancy both prevents and reverses hypertensive inward remodeling of cerebral arteries, possibly through downregulation of the angiotensin type 1 receptor. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) importantly adapts to pregnancy by preventing the passage of seizure provoking serum into the brain and limiting the permeability effects of VEGF that is more highly expressed in cerebral vasculature during pregnancy. While the adaptation of the cerebral circulation to pregnancy provides for relatively normal cerebral blood flow and BBB properties in the face of substantial cardiovascular changes and high levels of circulating factors, under pathologic conditions, these adaptations appear to promote greater brain injury, including edema formation during acute hypertension, and greater sensitivity to bacterial endotoxin. PMID:23321787

  15. Evaluation of cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolism and cerebral function by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro; Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Ueda, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) method has the unique potentiality of detecting cerebral metabolites, cerebral blood flow and brain functions in a noninvasive fashion. We have developed several MR techniques to detect these cerebral parameters with the use of clinical MRI scanners. By modifying the MR spectroscopy (MRS) technique, both 31 P- and 1 H-MRS data can be obtained from multiple, localized regions (multi-voxel method) of the brain, and the distribution of each metabolite in the brain can be readily visualized by metabolite mapping. The use of diffusion weighted images (DWI) permits visualization of the anisotropy of water diffusion in white matter, and based on the difference of diffusion coefficiency, the differential diagnosis between epidermoid tumor and arachnoid cyst can be made. By employing dynamic-MRI (Dyn-MRI) with Gd-DTPA administration, it is possible to examine the difference in blood circulation between brain tumor tissue and normal tissue, as well as among different types of brain tumors. By using magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging, it has become possible to detect brain tumors, and with a small dose of Gd-DTPA, to visualize the vascular system. Functional MRI (fMRI) visualizes the activated brain by using conventional gradient echo technique on conventional MRI scanners. This method has the unique characteristic of detecting a brain function with high spatial and temporal resolution by using the intrinsic substance. Moreover, the localization of motor and sensory areas was detected by noninvasive means within few minutes. The fMRI procedure will be used in the future to analyze the higher and complex brain functions. In conclusion, multi-modality MR is a powerful technique that is useful for investigating the pathogenesis of many diseases, and provides a noninvasive analytic modality for studying brain function. (author)

  16. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI of acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Osamu; Sato, Shuji; Suzuki, Takashi; Endo, Shunro; Takaku, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    Sequential changes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sixteen patients with acute cerebral infarction are studied in comparison with the findings of computed tomography (CT). The sixteen patients were examined within 36 hours from the onset of syptoms on resistive type MRI (0.15T) using T1 weighted image (IR2000/500) and T2 weighted image (SE2000/80), and on CT. In general, large infarcted lesions of the cortexsubcortex seemed to be visualized earlier than small lesions of the basal ganglia and brainstem. In 8 patients, the infarcted lesions were detected on MRI earlier than on CT. For example, early detecting time within 12 hours were 2, 6, 7, and 10 hours after onset. In two patients of this group, lesions were detected on T2 weighted image earlier than on T1-weighted image. In two cases, small lesions of the brainstem were detected only on MRI. The size of abnormal findings gradually developed and reached a maximum on days 5 to 7 sequentially. The difference between infarction and perifocal edema was not clear even on MRI. The changes gradually subsided and assumed a stable size after about 2 months. Contrast enhancement effect was observed in four patients. In two of these cases, the signal intensity of T2-weighted imaging was decreased just at the region which was enhanced with contrast medium. MRI is useful for early diagnosis of ischemic cerebral infarction, and may eludidate some aspects of the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke.

  18. Radiotherapy in primary cerebral lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legros, L.; Benezery, K.; Lagrange, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Primary cerebral lymphoma is a rare disease with an unfavorable prognosis. Whole brain radiotherapy has been the standard treatment, but neither the optimal radiation fields nor optimal dose level of the regimen are as yet firmly establisheD. From this review of the literature, it seems that the whole brain must be treated, and a boost to the area of the primary site must be discussed. With regard to dose, the radiation dose-response relationship is not clearly proven. Yet, a minimum dose of 40 Gy is necessary, and the maximum dose is set at 50 Gy because of late neurological sequelae. Because of the poor prognosis of this disease and the risk of late sequelae, other avenues have been explored. Chemotherapy has been studied, seem to have a survival advantage and combinations of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, especially with high-dose methotrexate. Because primary cerebral lymphoma is an uncommon disease, randomized clinical trials that compare radiotherapy alone to chemotherapy plus radiotherapy may not be feasible. Finally, even if chemotherapy seems to have a survival advantage, the regimen of chemotherapy is still a matter of debate. (authors)

  19. Neuroimaging patterns of cerebral hyperperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S.; Portnov, Yu; Semenov, A.; Korotkevich, A.; Kokov, A.

    2017-08-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) after revascularization is a rare phenomenon associated with post-ischemic (reactive) hyperemia and acute pathological hyperperfusion. First described on perfusion CT as a very often moderate CBF increase, MTT/TTP decrease within 30% like a temporary effect, according to a short-time deterioration of neurological symptoms (vestibular ataxia - 58%, vegetative dysfunction - 100%, asthenic syndrome - 100%) in early postoperative period in patients with cardiac ischemia who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. The acute pathological hyperperfusion carotid revascularization is a casuistic phenomenon with two- or three-fold CBV and MTT/TTP increase and high hemorrhage risk. Besides, we detected similar exchanges via perfusion CT called benign hyperemia, which marks extension of MTT/TTP and an increase of CBV from 27% to 48% (average 30%), but with normal CBF-parameters, indicating that venous stasis in acute venous ischemic stroke due cerebral venous sinus-trombosis (68%), only 6% in cardioembolic stroke and appears never in arterial stroke. Territorial coincidence registered for perifocal of necrosis zones of benign hyperemia and vasogenic edema accompanied on MRI (DWI, ADC). Secondary hemorrhagic transformation registered for primary non-hemorrhagic venous stroke in 27%, only in 9% for arterial stroke and in 60% for cardioembolic stroke. Probably, congestion is an increasingly predisposing factor secondary hemorrhaging than necrosis.

  20. The mitochondrial function of the cerebral vasculature in insulin-resistant Zucker obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdzo, Ivan; Rutkai, Ibolya; Tokes, Tunde; Sure, Venkata N L R; Katakam, Prasad V G; Busija, David W

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about mitochondrial functioning in the cerebral vasculature during insulin resistance (IR). We examined mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries of male Zucker obese (ZO) rats and phenotypically normal Zucker lean (ZL) rats using the Seahorse XFe24 analyzer. We investigated mitochondrial morphology in cerebral blood vessels as well as mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial protein expression levels in cerebral arteries and microvessels. We also measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cerebral microvessels. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial respiration components (nonmitochondrial respiration, basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, and spare respiratory capacity) showed similar levels among the ZL and ZO groups with the exception of maximal respiration, which was higher in the ZO group. We examined the role of nitric oxide by measuring mitochondrial respiration following inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and mitochondrial activation after administration of diazoxide (DZ). Both ZL and ZO groups showed similar responses to these stimuli with minor variations.l-NAME significantly increased the proton leak, and DZ decreased nonmitochondrial respiration in the ZL group. Other components were not affected. Mitochondrial morphology and distribution within vascular smooth muscle and endothelium as well as mitochondrial protein levels were similar in the arteries and microvessels of both groups. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and ROS levels were increased in cerebral microvessels of the ZO. Our study suggests that mitochondrial function is not significantly altered in the cerebral vasculature of young ZO rats, but increased ROS production might be due to increased eNOS in the cerebral microcirculation during IR. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Subject-specific modelling of lower limb muscles in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, K; Stott, N S; Mithraratne, K; Anderson, I A

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the architecture of spastic muscles in children with cerebral palsy is considerably altered; however, only little is known about the structural changes that occur other than in the gastrocnemius muscle. In the present study, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and subject-specific modelling techniques were used to compare the lengths and volumes of six lower limb muscles between children with cerebral palsy and typically developing children. MRI scans of the lower limbs of two children with spastic hemiplegia cerebral palsy, four children with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy (mean age 9.6 years) and a group of typically developing children (mean age 10.2 years) were acquired. Subject-specific models of six lower limb muscles were developed from the MRI data using a technique called Face Fitting. Muscle volumes and muscle lengths were derived from the models and normalised to body mass and segmental lengths, respectively. Normalised muscle volumes in the children with cerebral palsy were smaller than in the control group with the difference being 22% in the calf muscles, 26% in the hamstrings and 22% in the quadriceps, respectively. Only the differences in the hamstrings and the quadriceps were statistically significant (P=0.036, P=0.038). Normalised muscle lengths in the children with cerebral palsy were significantly shorter (Pmuscle in either group. The present results show that lower limb muscles in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy are significantly altered, suggesting an overall mechanical deficit due to predominant muscle atrophy. Further investigations of the underlying causes of the muscle atrophy are required to better define management and treatment strategies for children with cerebral palsy.

  2. Detection of Cerebral Hemorrhage in Rabbits by Time-Difference Magnetic Inductive Phase Shift Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wencai; Yan, Qingguang; Qin, Mingxin; Jin, Gui; Sun, Jian; Ning, Xu; Zhuang, Wei; Peng, Bin; Li, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage, a difficult issue in clinical practice, is often detected and studied with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). However, these expensive devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions, and hence are unable to provide bedside and emergency on-site monitoring. The magnetic inductive phase shift (MIPS) is an emerging technology that may become a new tool to detect cerebral hemorrhage and to serve as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. In order to study a wider band of cerebral hemorrhage MIPS and to provide more useful information for measuring cerebral hemorrhage, we established a cerebral hemorrhage magnetic induction phase shift spectroscopy (MIPSS) detection system. Thirteen rabbits with five cerebral hemorrhage states were studied using a single coil-coil within a 1 MHz-200 MHz frequency range in linear sweep. A feature band (FB) with the highest detection sensitivity and the greatest stability was selected for further analysis and processing. In addition, a maximum conductivity cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI was performed to verify and interpret the MIPSS result. The average phase shift change induced by a 3 ml injection of autologous blood under FB was -7.7503° ± 1.4204°, which was considerably larger than our previous work. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Friedman M test showed that in the FB, MIPSS could distinguish the five states of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits, with a statistical significance of phemorrhage severity from a single set of measurements. The results illustrate that the MIPSS detection method is able to provide a new possibility for real-time monitoring and diagnosis of the severity of cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26001112

  3. Reporting standards for endovascular repair of saccular intracranial cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Philip M; Schumacher, H Christian; Higashida, Randall T; Derdeyn, Colin P; Nesbit, Gary M; Sacks, David; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Bederson, Joshua B; Lavine, Sean D; Rasmussen, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this article is to provide consensus recommendations for reporting standards, terminology, and written definitions when reporting on the radiological evaluation and endovascular treatment of intracranial, cerebral aneurysms. These criteria can be used to design clinical trials, to provide uniformity of definitions for appropriate selection and stratification of patients, and to allow analysis and meta-analysis of reported data. This article was written under the auspices of the Joint Writing Group of the Technology Assessment Committee, Society of Neurolnterventional Surgery, Society of Interventional Radiology; Joint Section on Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons; and Section of Stroke and Interventional Neurology of the American Academy of Neurology. A computerized search of the National Library of Medicine database of literature (PubMed) from January 1991 to December 2007 was conducted with the goal to identify published endovascular cerebrovascular interventional data about the assessment and endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms useful as benchmarks for quality assessment. We sought to identify those risk adjustment variables that affect the likelihood of success and complications. This article offers the rationale for different clinical and technical considerations that may be important during the design of clinical trials for endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Included in this guidance article are suggestions for uniform reporting standards for such trials. These definitions and standards are primarily intended for research purposes; however, they should also be helpful in clinical practice and applicable to all publications. The evaluation and treatment of brain aneurysms often involve multiple medical specialties. Recent reviews by the American Heart Association have surveyed the medical literature to develop guidelines for the clinical

  4. Impact of Cardiac Contractility during Cerebral Blood Flow in Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silver, Brian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In cerebral regions affected by ischemia, intrinsic vascular autoregulation is often lost. Blood flow delivery depends upon cardiac function and may be influenced by neuro-endocrine mediated myocardial suppression. Our objective is to evaluate the relation between ejection fraction (EF and transcranial doppler (TCD peak systolic velocities (PSV in patients with cerebral ischemic events.Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study from an existing TCD registry. We evaluated patients admitted within 24 hours of onset of a focal neurological deficit who had an echocardiogram and TCD performed within 72 hours of admission.Results: We identified 58 patients from March to October 2003. Eighty-one percent (n=47 had a hospital discharge diagnosis of ischemic stroke and 18.9% (n=11 had a diagnosis of transient ischemic attack. Fourteen patients had systolic dysfunction (EF50% compared to those with systolic dysfunction (EF<50% was as follows: middle cerebral artery 62.0 + 28.6 cm/s vs. 51.0 + 23.3 cm/s, p=0.11; anterior cerebral artery 52.1 + 21.6 cm/s vs. 45.9 + 22.7 cm/s, p=0.28; internal carotid artery 56.5 + 20.1 cm/s vs. 46.4 + 18.4 cm/s, p=0.04; ophthalmic artery 18.6 + 7.2 cm/s vs. 15.3 + 5.2 cm/s, p=0.11; vertebral artery 34.0 + 13.9 cm/s vs. 31.6 + 15.0 cm/s, p=0.44.Conclusion: Cerebral blood flow in the internal carotid artery territory appears to be higher in cerebral ischemia patients with preserved left ventricular contractility. Our study was unable to differentiate pre-existing cardiac dysfunction from neuro-endocrine mediated myocardial stunning. Future research is necessary to better understand heart-brain interactions in this setting and to further explore the underlying mechanisms and consequences of neuro-endocrine mediated cardiac dysfunction. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(2:227-232.

  5. Hyperglycemia decreases preoxiredoxin-2 expression in a middle cerebral artery occlusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Phil-Ok

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and is also associated with worsened outcomes following a stroke. Peroxiredoxin-2 exerts potent neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress. In the present study, we identified altered peroxiredoxin-2 expression in an ischemic stroke model under hyperglycemic conditions. Adult male rats were administrated streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection to induce diabetes. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was induced surgically 4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 hours after MCAO. Peroxiredoxin-2 expression was evaluated in the cerebral cortex of MCAO-operated animals using a proteomics approach, and was found to be decreased. In addition, the reduction in peroxiredoxin-2 levels was more severe in cerebral ischemia with diabetes compared to animals without diabetes. Reverse-transcriptase PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed the significantly reduced peroxiredoxin-2 expression in MCAO-operated animals under hyperglycemic conditions. It is an accepted fact that peroxiredoxin-2 has antioxidative activity against ischemic injury. Thus, the findings of this study suggest that a more severe reduction in peroxiredoxin-2 under hyperglycemic conditions leads to worsened brain damage during cerebral ischemia with diabetes.

  6. Plantar flexor muscle weakness and fatigue in spastic cerebral palsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyroud, Daria; Armand, Stéphane; De Coulon, Geraldo; Sarah R Dias Da Silva; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy develop an important muscle weakness which might affect the aetiology and extent of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. This study evaluated the aetiology and extent of plantar flexor neuromuscular fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy. Ten patients with cerebral palsy and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals (∼20 years old, 6 females) performed four 30-s maximal isometric plantar flexions interspaced by a resting period of 2-3s to elicit a resting twitch. Maximal voluntary contraction force, voluntary activation level and peak twitch were quantified before and immediately after the fatiguing task. Before fatigue, patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than healthy individuals (341±134N vs. 858±151N, pfatiguing task (-10±23%, p>0.05), whereas it decreased by 30±12% (pmuscles of patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than their healthy peers but showed greater fatigue resistance. Cerebral palsy is a widely defined pathology that is known to result in muscle weakness. The extent and origin of muscle weakness were the topic of several previous investigations; however some discrepant results were reported in the literature regarding how it might affect the development of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. Importantly, most of the studies interested in the assessment of fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy did so with general questionnaires and reported increased levels of fatigue. Yet, exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue was quantified in just a few studies and it was found that young patients with cerebral palsy might be more fatigue resistant that their peers. Thus, it appears that (i) conflicting results exist regarding objectively-evaluated fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy and (ii) the mechanisms underlying this muscle fatigue - in comparison to those of healthy peers - remain poorly understood. The present study adds important knowledge to the field as it shows that when young adults with

  7. Safety of adenosine in stress cerebral perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Pengcheng; Gu Yushen; Liu Wenguan; Xiu Yan; Zhu Weimin; Chen Shuguang; Shi Hongcheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety of adenosine as pharmacological stress agents in stress cerebral perfusion imaging. Methods: Eighty patients under investigation for suspected cerebral vessel disease were recruited. Each had a resting scan and a stress scan on different days. The adenosine stress protocol was as same as the protocol used in adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging. Subjective and objective side-effects were investigated during pharmacological stress procedure. Results: All patients completed the 6 min infusion protocol without premature termination on safety criteria or due to intolerable symptoms. 46 patients had mild side effects. 20 patients (25%) had dizziness, 12 patients (15%) had palpitation, 1 patient (1%) was hypotensive, 7 patients (9%) had dyspnoea, 4 patients (5%) felt hot, 3 patients (4%) had sweat, 4 patients (5%) had nausea, 6 patients (8%) had flushing, 19 patients (24%) had chest pain, 6 patients (8%) had abdomen pain, 3 patients (4%) had abnormal taste and 1 patient (1%) were thirsty. Transient ST change occurred in only 1 patient. Conclusion: Adenosine stress cerebral perfusion imaging is a safe diagnostic method with mild side effects. (authors)

  8. Cerebral autoregulation and symptoms of orthostatic hypotension in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente Mora, Cristina; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy

    2017-07-01

    Familial dysautonomia is an inherited autonomic disorder with afferent baroreflex failure. We questioned why despite low blood pressure standing, surprisingly few familial dysautonomia patients complain of symptomatic hypotension or have syncope. Using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography of the middle cerebral artery, we measured flow velocity (mean, peak systolic, and diastolic), area under the curve, pulsatility index, and height of the dictrotic notch in 25 patients with familial dysautonomia and 15 controls. In patients, changing from sitting to a standing position, decreased BP from 124 ± 4/64 ± 3 to 82 ± 3/37 ± 2 mmHg (p < 0.0001, for both). Despite low BP, all patients denied orthostatic symptoms. Middle cerebral artery velocity fell minimally, and the magnitude of the reductions were similar to those observed in healthy controls, in whom BP upright did not fall. While standing, patients had a greater fall in cerebrovascular resistance (p < 0.0001), an increase in pulsatility (p < 0.0001), and a deepening of the dicrotic notch (p = 0.0010), findings all consistent with low cerebrovascular resistance. No significant changes occurred in controls. Patients born with baroreflex deafferentation retain the ability to buffer wide fluctuations in BP and auto-regulate cerebral blood flow. This explains how they can tolerate extremely low BPs standing that would otherwise induce syncope.

  9. Wingspan stent for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xinbin; Zhang Jianning; Li Xudong; Huang Ying; Fan Yimu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of Wingspan stent for patients with symptomatic M1 stenosis of middle cerebral artery (MCA). Methods: Thirty-two cases with recurrent symptomatic MCA stenosis resistant to medical therapy treated by self-expanding stent were reviewed retrospectively [average (49 ± 19) years old, 13 women]. All patients underwent angioplasty and stenting with the Gateway balloon-Wingspan stent system. After 6 months, all patients were followed up by telephone or clinic, and advised followed up with DSA or TCD. Results: Thirty-two patients were successfully stented during the first treatment session. The mean degree of stenosis reduced from (76.5 ± 15.4)% to (19.3 ± 9.2)%. The number of complicating subarachnoid hemorrhage was one, and occlusion occurred on one patients related to balloon angioplasty. During a follow-up of 6 months, there was no recurrence of transient ischemic attack or stroke in 32 available patients. Cerebral hemodynamics using transcranial Doppler monitoring were normal in 19 follow-up patients. Six-month angiographic follow-up was obtained in 5 patients, demonstrating good patency in 5 stenting vessels. The other patients refused to perform TCD or DSA. Conclusions: Wingspan stent for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery appears to be a safe and feasible under strict control of periperformeral project. However further study is needed to evaluate the long-term effect. (authors)

  10. Effect of corilagin on cerebral ischaemia/reperfusioninduced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the neuroprotective effects of corilagin in cerebral ischaemia-induced cerebral injury in a rat model. Methods: Cerebral ischaemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The animals were separated into five groups, including a control group that underwent surgery without inserting a ...

  11. Hemodynamic characteristics of hyperplastic remodeling lesions in cerebral aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Furukawa

    Full Text Available Hyperplastic remodeling (HR lesions are sometimes found on cerebral aneurysm walls. Atherosclerosis is the results of HR, which may cause an adverse effect on surgical treatment for cerebral aneurysms. Previous studies have demonstrated that atherosclerotic changes had a correlation with certain hemodynamic characteristics. Therefore, we investigated local hemodynamic characteristics of HR lesions of cerebral aneurysms using computational fluid dynamics (CFD.Twenty-four cerebral aneurysms were investigated using CFD and intraoperative video recordings. HR lesions and red walls were confirmed on the intraoperative images, and the qualification points were determined on the center of the HR lesions and the red walls. The qualification points were set on the virtual operative images for evaluation of wall shear stress (WSS, normalized WSS (NWSS, oscillatory shear index (OSI, relative residence time (RRT, and aneurysm formation indicator (AFI. These hemodynamic parameters at the qualification points were compared between HR lesions and red walls.HR lesions had lower NWSS, lower AFI, higher OSI and prolonged RRT compared with red walls. From analysis of the receiver-operating characteristic curve for hemodynamic parameters, OSI was the most optimal hemodynamic parameter to predict HR lesions (area under the curve, 0.745; 95% confidence interval, 0.603-0.887; cutoff value, 0.00917; sensitivity, 0.643; specificity, 0.893; P<0.01. With multivariate logistic regression analyses using stepwise method, NWSS was significantly associated with the HR lesions.Although low NWSS was independently associated with HR lesions, OSI is the most valuable hemodynamic parameter to distinguish HR lesions from red walls.

  12. Evidence for developmental programming of cerebral laterality in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jones

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Adverse fetal environments are associated with depression, reduced cognitive ability and increased stress responsiveness in later life, but underlying mechanisms are unknown. Environmental pressures on the fetus, resulting from variations in placental function and maternal nutrition, health and stress might alter neurodevelopment, promoting the development of some brain regions over others. As asymmetry of cerebral activity, with greater right hemisphere activity, has been associated with psychopathology, we hypothesized that regional specialization during fetal life might be reflected persistently in the relative activity of the cerebral hemispheres. We tested this hypothesis in 140 healthy 8-9 year-old children, using tympanic membrane temperature to assess relative blood flow to the cerebral hemispheres at rest and following psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test for Children. Their birth weight and placental weight had already been measured when their mothers took part in a previous study of pregnancy outcomes. We found that children who had a smaller weight at birth had evidence of greater blood flow to the right hemisphere than to the left hemisphere (r = -.09, P = .29 at rest; r = -.18, P = .04 following stress. This finding was strengthened if the children had a relatively low birth weight for their placental weight (r = -.17, P = .05 at rest; r = -.31, P = .0005 following stress. Our findings suggest that lateralization of cerebral activity is influenced persistently by early developmental experiences, with possible consequences for long-term neurocognitive function.

  13. Effects of nitrous oxide on cerebral haemodynamics and metabolism during isoflurane anaesthesia in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algotsson, L.; Messeter, K.; Rosen, I.; Holmin. T.

    1992-01-01

    Seven normoventilated and five hyperventilated healthy adults undergoing cholecystectomy and anaesthetized with methohexitone, fentanyl and pancuronium were studied with measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cereal metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRo 2 ), and quantified electroencephalography (EEG) under two sets of conditions: 1) 1.7% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in air/oxygen: 2) 0.85% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in nitrous oxide (N 2 O)/oxygen. The object was to study the effects of N 2 O during isoflurane anaesthesia on cerebral circulation, metabolism and neuroelectric activity. N 2 O in the anaesthetic gas mixture caused a 43% (P 2 was not significantly altered by N 2 O. EEG demonstrated an activated pattern with decreased low frequency activity and increased high frequency activity. The results confirm that N 2 O is a potent cerebral vasodilator in man, although the mechanisms underlying the effects on CBF are still unclear. (au)

  14. Regional cerebral blood perfusion SPECT imaging in brain ischemic injury due to cerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunyin; Chen Yue; Li Zuoxiao; Tan Hua; Li Xiaohong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of SPECT perfusion imaging in brain ischemic injury due to cerebral hemorrhage before and after treatment. Methods: Sixty cases of cerebral hemorrhage were randomly divided into nimodipine treated group and routine treated group. The volume of primary ischemic focus, changes of regional cerebral blood perfusion around hematoma and other cerebral areas were observed by SPECT imaging. Results: Volume of the primary focus was reduced apparently in both groups, but much more in nimodipine treated group (P<0.01). Also the regional cerebral blood flow in ischemic focus and remote areas increased much more in nimodipine treated group than routine treated group (P< 0.01). Conclusions: Brain SPECT imaging can sensitively reflect the regional cerebral blood flow before and after treatment. Thereby, it is useful for therapeutic monitoring. (authors)

  15. Serum cystatin C and cerebral microbleeds in patients with acute cerebral stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Biao; Jü, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hai-Rong; Li, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that kidney dysfunction is associated with cerebral microbleeds (CMB). Cystatin C is a more useful measurement than creatinine-based estimating equations for evaluating kidney function. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between cystatin C levels and CMB in patients with acute cerebral stroke. This cross-sectional study included a total of 485 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 129 patients with cerebral hemorrhage. The serum levels of cystatin C were significantly higher in acute cerebral stroke patients with CMB than in those without (pstroke. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) in patients with acute cerebral infarction and cerebral hemorrhage were 2.92 (1.81-6.93) and 2.98 (1.76-6.97), respectively. The present study suggests that elevated levels of cystatin C are associated with the presence of CMB in acute stroke patients, independent of conventional risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Orthopedic management of spasticity in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacheck, Tom F; Gage, James R

    2007-09-01

    This article summarizes our experience with cerebral palsy. The primary and secondary deformities that occur with cerebral palsy are described, followed by a brief overview of the nature and role of gait analysis in the treatment of gait problems in cerebral palsy. The concept of lever-arm dysfunction is introduced. Our current treatment program is then presented and subsequently illustrated by two case examples. Finally, an outcomes analysis of a group of patients with spastic diplegia treated with selective dorsal rhizotomy is presented to illustrate our current method of evaluating treatment outcomes and the need for team management in the treatment of this complex condition.

  17. The serpentine mitral valve and cerebral embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ker James

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Valvular strands, well-delineated filiform masses, attached to cardiac valve edges are associated with cerebral embolism and stroke. Strokes, caused by emboli from valvular strands, tend to occur among younger persons. In this case report a valvular strand, giving a peculiar serpentine appearance to the mitral valve is described. This mitral valvular strand was the only explanation for an episode of cerebral embolism, presenting with a transient right sided hemiparesis. It is proposed that a randomized study involving combined treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel is warranted in young patients with valvular strands, presenting with a first episode of cerebral embolism.

  18. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs...... in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about euro860 000 for men and about euro800 000 for women. The largest component was social care costs......, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high...

  19. Embodying Investigations of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke

    to understand what it means for persons to live with CP and then figure out how we should help them . Based on his method of open - minded cognitive science, Martiny presents data on neuro - physiological, psychological and social aspects of living with CP. From this theoretical work, Martiny develops......The main question of Kristian Martiny’s dissertation is: how do we help persons living with the brain damage, cerebral palsy (CP)? This question is as complex and difficult to answer as any healthcare question. Martiny argues that we need to ‘open up’ how we do ( cognitive ) science in order...... an embodied - based model of intervention for CP, focusing on the experience of self control as a way to help people with CP. In addition, a theatre performance, Humane Liquidation , and a documentary film, Natural Disorder, are developed so as to both communicate what it means to live with CP and empower...

  20. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Standardisation of cerebral MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assheuer, J.; Lanta, L.; Longerich, U.J.J.; Sievert, T.; Mai, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    The complex three-dimensional organisation of the human brain, as well as the numerous variables involved in modern imaging techniques, make it necessary to introduce guidelines for the interpretation of the topographical localisation and allocation of normal cerebral structures and pathological processes. In a historical overview of the methods used for precise localisation we introduce some models that can be used as diagnostic aids. As supporting means in the MRI we suggest the standardisation of the imaging by application of this model. The methodological procedures of its use in the MRI are shown in detail. Finally the advantages and disadvantages of this model are discussed with regard to its possible applications in imaging systems such as MR. The image standardisations for intra-, interindividual and intermethodical comparison in routine investigations are emphasised in particular. (orig.) [de

  2. A case of cerebral cryptococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Nomura, Takayoshi; Imagawa, Kenji; Asai, Akira; Kawasaki, Michiro

    1984-01-01

    A 66-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with chief complaint of vertigo, gait disturbance and dysarthria. These symptoms started about one year before admission and worsened. Vomiting and urinary incontinence appeared. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria. In plain CT (computerized tomography) irregular ill-defined low density area was noted in the cerebellar vermis and bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. And slight ventricular dilatation was found. Irregular shape of ring-like enhancement corresponding to capsule and patchy or mottled enhancement inside the tumor were seen. Suboccipital craniectomy was performed and yellowish necrotic tumor with hard capsule was removed. Histological diagnosis was not neoplasm or tuberculoma. Postoperatively liver function progressively worsened. She died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Autopsy revealed typical liver cirrhosis without malignant change. 3.0 x 2.5 cm sized, slightly hard, yellowish lesion was found on upper part of cerebellar hemispheres. This had extremely necrotic tissue and a great number of cryptococcus neoformans were found. And other intracranial lesion was not confirmed. Finding of pulmonary cryptococcosis was not gained. Our case is very rare because of solitary cerebellar abscess and absence of meningitic episode or pulmonary cryptococcosis. There are three types of inflammation in cerebral cryptococcosis. The commonest manifestation is the meningitic type, the second mode is granulomatous lesion and the third and the least presentation is intracranial abscess formatior. CT reveals various finidngs according to clinical stage. CT findings are those of meningitis, meningoencephalitis, granuloma and abscess. Cryptococcal granuloma or abscess often simulates brain abscess, glioma and metastatic brain tumor. We discussed CT findings of cerebral cryptococcosis and examined the CT number of our case. (J.P.N.)

  3. Cerebral palsy in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeši-Drljan Čila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the leading causes of neurological impairment in childhood. Preterm birth is a significant risk factor in the occurrence of CP. Clinical outcomes may include impairment of gross motor function and intellectual abilities, visual impairment and epilepsy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among gestational age, type of CP, functional ability and associated conditions. Methods. The sample size was 206 children with CP. The data were obtained from medical records and included gestational age at birth, clinical characteristics of CP and associated conditions. Clinical CP type was determined according to Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE and topographically. Gross motor function abilities were evaluated according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Results. More than half of the children with CP were born prematurely (54.4%. Statistically significant difference was noted with respect to the distribution of various clinical types of CP in relation to gestational age (p < 0.001. In the group with spastic bilateral CP type, there is a greater proportion of children born preterm. Statistically significant difference was noted in the functional classification based on GMFCS in terms of gestational age (p = 0.049, children born at earlier gestational age are classified at a higher GMFCS level of functional limitation. The greatest percentage of children (70.0% affected by two or more associated conditions was found in the group that had extremely preterm birth, and that number declined with increasing maturity at birth. Epilepsy was more prevalent in children born at greater gestational age, and this difference in distribution was statistically significant (p = 0.032. Conclusion. The application of antenatal and postnatal protection of preterm children should be a significant component of the CP prevention strategy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  4. Role of Aquaporin-4 in Cerebral Edema and Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Zador, Zsolt; Stiver, Shirley; Wang, Vincent; Manley, Geoffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral edema plays a central role in the pathophysiology of many diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) including ischemia, trauma, tumors, inflammation, and metabolic disturbances. The formation of cerebral edema results in an increase in tissue water content and brain swelling which, if unchecked, can lead to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), reduced cerebral blood flow, and ultimately cerebral herniation and death. Despite the clinical significance of cerebral edema, the mechan...

  5. The Ultradense Middle Cerebral Artery: A specific sign of Cerebral Lipiodol Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Mougnyan; Hurst, Robert; Vossough, Arastoo

    2018-02-03

    Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a rare but known complication of lymphatic embolization for plastic bronchitis. The classic imaging finding on a noncontrast head CT is multiple small areas of hyperdensity within the cerebral hemispheres, which represent lipiodol deposition in the brain. We report a case of lipiodol deposition in the middle cerebral artery following lymphatic embolization, producing an 'ultradense' vessel sign on noncontrast CT. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Clinical experience with L-lysine escinate for acute and chronic cerebral circulatory disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pizova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases (CVD are major causes of disability and death in Russia. Stroke is the third significant cause of higher death rates after cardiovascular disease and cancer. The prevalence of circulatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, is on the rise. Therapy for CVD must be aimed at the underlying disease in which vascular catastrophe (atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart disease, etc. develops, at the regression of neurological and psychopathological syndromes, and at the improvement of cerebral blood flow and metabolic processes. Neuroprotective agents, whose efficacy has been established in uncontrolled and small placebo-controlled trials, are widely used in our country. The prescription of these medications is substantiated by the important role of the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying cerebral ischemia. This paper gives data on the clinical use of L-lysine escinate for ischemic stroke (IS, hypertensive crisis, and chronic cerebral circulatory disorders and discusses the mechanism of this drug's action and the pathogenetic mechanisms of cerebrovascular lesions. A number of investigations have shown it expedient to incorporate L-lysine escinate in the combined neuroprotective therapy of patients with IS, cerebral hypertensive crisis, and hypertensive encephalopathy, which is associated with its antiedematous effect, particularly in preventing vasogenic brain edema, in enhancing the tone of cerebral veins, and in improving venous outflow. It is stated that there is a need for an individualized approach to treating CVD, by taking into consideration the existing risk factors and somatic and neurological diseases. 

  7. Clinical significance of determination of plasma NPY levels and serum lipid profile in patients with cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fujuan; Shen Airong; Yang Yongqing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of plasma NPY levels and serum lipid profile in patients with cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction. Methods: Plasma NPY levels (with RIA) and serum lipid profile (with biochemistry) were determined in (1) 48 patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage (2) 46 patients with acute cerebral infarction and (3) controls.Results Plasma NPY levels in both patients with cerebral hemorrhage and patients with cerebral infarction were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: NPY played important roles in the development and pathogenesis of cerebral vascular accidents. Lipid profile changes was the basic etiological factor. (authors)

  8. Neurological function following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion is improved by the Ruyi Zhenbao pill in a rats

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, TIAN; DUAN, SIJIN; WANG, HAIPING; SUN, SHAN; HAN, BING; FU, FENGHUA

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of the Ruyi Zhenbao pill on neurological function following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion following reperfusion. The rats received intragastrically either sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (control and model groups) or Ruyi Zhenbao pill at doses of 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8 g/kg. Neurological function was assessed by cylinder, adhesive and beam-walking te...

  9. Cerebral blood volume alterations during fractional pneumoencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, K.; Greitz, T.

    1976-01-01

    Simultaneous and continuous measurements of the cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood pressure were carried out in six patients during fractional pneumoencephalography in order to examine intracranial volumetric interactions. Three patients (Group A) showed normal encephalographic findings, and in three patients (Group B) communicating hydrocephalus with convexity block was found encephalographically. In all patients the injection of air was followed by an immediate increase of CSF pressure and blood pressure and a concomitant decrease of CBV. The initial CSF pressure was invariably re-established within 3 to 3.5 min. During this time interval the CBV of the patients of Group B decreased significantly and 30 percent more than that of Group A. Furthermore, after restoration of the original CSF pressure, CBV returned to its initial level in all patients of Group A, whereas it remained unchanged or showed a further decrease in the patients of Group B. Removal of an amount of CSF corresponding to half of the amount of injected air was followed by a significant reactive hyperemic response in two normal patients. The intracranial volumetric alterations during fractional pneumoencephalography are discussed in detail with respect to the underlying physiologic mechanisms and are suggested as a model for acute and low pressure hydrocephalus

  10. CT classification and clinical prognosis of cerebral infarction in the area of middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Jyoji

    1983-01-01

    Computerized tomographies (CT) were repeatedly scanned on 70 patients with cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery. Low density area (LDA) was measured with HounFsfield's Unit (HU) and studied on the progressive changes. Classification of LDA was attempted and studied on correlation with mass effect, contrast enhancement, angiographical findings, clinical symptoms and prognosis. It was considered that important points of diagnosis of cerebral infarction were timing of examination of CT and determination of LDA with HUF. It was also thought that CT classification of LDA was usefull to estimate prognosis of the patients with cerebral infarction. (author)

  11. Comparison of Cerebral Oxygen Saturation and Cerebral Perfusion Computed Tomography in Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Alexey O; Kalentiev, George; Voennov, Oleg; Grigoryeva, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between cerebral tissue oxygen saturation and cerebral blood volume in patients with traumatic brain injury. Perfusion computed tomography of the brain was performed in 25 patients with traumatic brain injury together with simultaneous SctO2 level measurement using cerebral near-infrared oxymetry. The mean age of the injured persons was 34.5±15.6 years (range 15-65); 14 men, 11 women. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) values were 44.4±9.7 (range 25-81). The Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) mean value before the study was 10.6±2.1 (range 5-13). SctO2 ranged from 51 to 89%, mean 62±8.2%. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) values were 2.1±0.67 ml/100 g (min 1.1; max 4.3 ml/100 g). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was 31.99±13.6 ml/100 g×min. Mean transit time (MTT) values were 5.7±4.5 s (min 2.8; max 34.3 s). The time to peak (TTP) was 22.2±3.1 s. A statistically significant correlation was found between SctO2 level and cerebral blood volume (CBV) level (R=0.9; pbrain tissue oxygenation and other parameters of brain perfusion.

  12. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA......) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  13. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation

  14. Cerebral ganglioglioma and neurofibromatosis type I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizel, P.M.; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J.; Vyve, M. van

    1991-01-01

    We report the occurrence of a left frontal lobe ganglioglioma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type I (von Recklinghausen's disease) and conclude that the occurrence of a cerebral ganglioglioma in a patient with neurofibromatosis must probably be considered coincidental. (orig.)

  15. Somatosensory discrimination deficits following pediatric cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, A T; Spellacy, F J; Dugbartey, M T

    1998-09-01

    Pathologic studies of central nervous system damage in human falciparum malaria indicate primary localization in the cerebral white matter. We report a sensory-perceptual investigation of 20 Ghanaian children with a recent history of cerebral malaria who were age-, gender-, and education-matched with 20 healthy control subjects. Somatosensory examinations failed to show any evidence of hemianesthesia, pseudohemianesthesia, or extinction to double simultaneous tactile stimulation. While unilateral upper limb testing revealed intact unimanual tactile roughness discrimination, bimanual tactile discrimination, however, was significantly impaired in the cerebral malaria group. A strong negative correlation (r = -0.72) between coma duration and the bimanual tactile roughness discrimination test was also found. An inefficiency in the integrity of callosal fibers appear to account for our findings, although alternative subcortical mechanisms known to be involved in information transfer across the cerebral hemispheres may be compromised as well.

  16. Cerebral oxygen desaturation during beach chair position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, Annelies T.; de Hert, Stefan G.; Jacobs, Tom F.; de Wilde, Lieven F.; Wouters, Patrick F.

    2012-01-01

    Cases of ischaemic brain damage have been reported in relatively healthy patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Unrecognised cerebral hypoperfusion may have contributed to these catastrophic events, indicating that routine anaesthesia monitoring may not suffice.

  17. Cerebral cysticercosis in a cat : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Schwan

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode of Taenia solium, Cysticercus cellulosae, was recovered from the brain of a cat showing central nervous clinical signs ante mortem. This is the first record of cerebral cysticercosis in a cat in South Africa.

  18. Gluconeogenesis and fasting in cerebral malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thien, H.; Ackermans, M. T.; Weverling, G. J.; Dang Vinh, T.; Endert, E.; Kager, P. A.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In healthy subjects after an overnight fast, glucose production is for approximately 50% derived from glycogenolysis. If the fast is prolonged, glucose production decreases due to a decline in glycogenolysis, while gluconeogenesis remains stable. In cerebral malaria, glucose production

  19. [Application of noninvasive cerebral electrical impedance measurement on brain edema in patient with cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lan-Ying; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Bei; Dong, Wei-Wei; Luo, Yong

    2010-11-23

    to investigate the change of brain edema in patients with cerebral infarction (CI) by the measurement of noninvasive cerebral electrical impedance (CEI). an invariable secure current at a frequency 50 kHz and an intensity of 0.1 mA was applied into a person's brain. The CEI of values for both hemispheres of 200 healthy volunteers and 107 CI patients was measured. The results were compared with the volume of edema on CT. (1) in healthy volunteers, the CEI values in the left and right hemisphere were 8.0 ± 1.0 and 8.0 ± 0.7 respectively. And there was no significant difference between either side (P > 0.05). Age, sex and different measuring time points did not obviously affect the CEI values (P > 0.05). (2) In CI patients, the CEI was more sensitive in the volumes of lesion which was more than 20 ml (80.0%), the CEI was75.9% and 83.3% in the volumes of lesion which was 20 - 50 ml and more than 50 ml respectively. The CEI was low when the volume fell under 20 ml; (3) The CEI of the ipsilateral side was higher than contralateral side in the patients at Day 3 after onset. It increased obviously at Days 3 - 5 after onset. The difference of two sides was the most significant. CEI of two sides was 9.2 ± 2.1 and 8.8 ± 1.8 (n = 91, P 0.05); (4) There was a positive correlation between the ispilateral CEI and the volume of infarction detected within 24 hours (n = 31, r = 0.682, P brain edema in CI patients. The higher the CEI, the more severe edema resulted. The sensitivity of CEI is higher when the volume of infarction exceeds 20 ml. CEI is a new technique for judging the patient condition of brain edema noninvasively.

  20. Toxoplasma encephalitis: an HIV/AIDS patient with cerebral mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seza Ayse inal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmic encephalitis is an opportunistic infection, which develops as a result of reactivation of the latent tissue cysts of Toxoplasma gondii in patients with reduced CD4+ T lymphocytes. Amongst patients with human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, toxoplasmic encephalitis is one of the leading causes of the intracerebral involvement. In this report, we present a toxoplasmic encephalitis case, who has admitted with neurological symptoms and fever. The patient was identified human immunodeficiency virus positive while he was under investigation for cerebral mass lesion, The patient has fully recovered by antiprotozoal and antiretroviral therapy. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 184-188

  1. Applications of cerebral MRI in neonatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) has become the most important method in the workup of infantile cerebral complications after primary sonography. Cerebral MR examination and image interpretation during the infantile period require extensive knowledge of morphological manifestations, their pathophysiological background, and frequency. The choice of imaging parameters and image interpretation is demonstrated in infarctions and hemorrhages of the mature and immature brain. A review of the main differential diagnoses is also given. The relevance of MR spectroscopy and fetal MRI is discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Treatment of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Gül Mete Civelek; Ayçe Atalay

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral palsy diagnosis is a clinical one and it includes motor development delay, abnormal muscle tone and hyperreflexia. Muscle weakness, spasticity, loss of coordination, the continuation of the primitive reflexes and non-developed normal motor control are often seen in children with cerebral palsy. Spasticity is the velocity dependent increase in the resistance against passive muscle stretching. Spasticity treatment program should be established after detailed evaluation of degree an...

  3. Chronic cerebral ischemia, neuroplasticity, possibilities of therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Chukanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents current views on the pathogenetic mechanisms of cerebral ischemia. It discusses the role of neurotrophins in the processes of neuroplasticity. Experimental and clinical studies of the neuropeptide drug Cerebrolysin are reviewed. The authors describe in detail the results of the clinical trial and a health economic analysis of the effects of Cerebrolysin on the time course of clinical changes, progression, and risk of exacerbations in patients with chronic cerebral ischemia. 

  4. Hyperdense lesions in CT of cerebral toxoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinones Tapia, D.; Ramos Amador, A.; Monereo Alonso, A.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with stage IV C 1 AIDS who presented hyperdense CT images 13 days after beginning antitoxoplasma treatment. These lesions could be caused by calcifications or blood. The attenuation values lead us to believe that they are calcium. Intracranial calcification in adult cerebral toxoplasmosis is an uncommon finding. Its presence in AIDS patients should not suggest any etiology other than toxoplasmosis. (Author) 16 refs

  5. CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    The CT findings of the acute cerebral infarction are well known. However the CT findings of early stroke within 24 hours of the onset have not been sufficiently reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate early acute cerebral infarction on CT within 24 hours after ictus. The early and accurate CT diagnosis could lead to the appropriate therapy and improved outcome of the patients. Authors retrospectively analyzed 16 patients with early acute cerebral infarction. Acute cerebral infarction was confirmed by follow-up CT in 11 patients, SPECT in 4 patients, and MRI in 1 patient. The CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction include effacement of cortical sulci or cistern (n = 16, 100%), hyperattenuation of MCA (n = 3), obscuration of lentiform nucleus (n = 6), loss of insular ribbon (n = 6) and subtle low density in hemisphere (n = 5). The most frequent finding was effacement of cortical sulci in our study, and it was thought to be the most important sign of early acute cerebral infarction.

  6. Purine Metabolism in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Oreshnikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of purine metabolism in clinically significant acute cerebral ischemia. Subjects and materials. Three hundred and fifty patients with the acutest cerebral ischemic stroke were examined. The parameters of gas and electrolyte composition, acid-base balance, the levels of malonic dialdehyde, adenine, guanine, hypox-anthine, xanthine, and uric acid, and the activity of xanthine oxidase were determined in arterial and venous bloods and spinal fluid. Results. In ischemic stroke, hyperuricemia reflects the severity of cerebral metabolic disturbances, hemodynamic instability, hypercoagulation susceptiility, and the extent of neurological deficit. In ischemic stroke, hyperuri-corachia is accompanied by the higher spinal fluid levels of adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine and it is an indirect indicator of respiratory disorders of central genesis, systemic acidosis, hypercoagulation susceptibility, free radical oxidation activation, the intensity of a stressor response to cerebral ischemia, cerebral metabolic disturbances, the depth of reduced consciousness, and the severity of neurological deficit. Conclusion. The high venous blood activity of xanthine oxidase in ischemic stroke is associated with the better neurological parameters in all follow-up periods, the better early functional outcome, and lower mortality rates. Key words: hyperuricemia, stroke, xanthine oxidase, uric acid, cerebral ischemia.

  7. Intravascular perfusion of carbon black ink allows reliable visualization of cerebral vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad R; Herz, Josephine; Hermann, Dirk M; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2013-01-04

    The anatomical structure of cerebral vessels is a key determinant for brain hemodynamics as well as the severity of injury following ischemic insults. The cerebral vasculature dynamically responds to various pathophysiological states and it exhibits considerable differences between strains and under conditions of genetic manipulations. Essentially, a reliable technique for intracranial vessel staining is essential in order to study the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Until recently, a set of different techniques has been employed to visualize the cerebral vasculature including injection of low viscosity resin, araldite F, gelatin mixed with various dyes (i.e. carmine red, India ink) or latex with or without carbon black. Perfusion of white latex compound through the ascending aorta has been first reported by Coyle and Jokelainen. Maeda et al. have modified the protocol by adding carbon black ink to the latex compound for improved contrast visualization of the vessels after saline perfusion of the brain. However, inefficient perfusion and inadequate filling of the vessels are frequently experienced due to high viscosity of the latex compound. Therefore, we have described a simple and cost-effective technique using a mixture of two commercially available carbon black inks (CB1 and CB2) to visualize the cerebral vasculature in a reproducible manner. We have shown that perfusion with CB1+CB2 in mice results in staining of significantly smaller cerebral vessels at a higher density in comparison to latex perfusion. Here, we describe our protocol to identify the anastomotic points between the anterior (ACA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA) to study vessel variations in mice with different genetic backgrounds. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of our technique in a transient focal cerebral ischemia model in mice by combining CB1+CB2-mediated vessel staining with TTC staining in various degrees of ischemic injuries.

  8. The effect of ventricular assist devices on cerebral blood flow and blood pressure fractality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellapart, Judith; Fraser, John F; Chan, Gregory S H; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Ainslie, Philip N; Dunster, Kimble R; Barnett, Adrian G; Boots, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Biological signals often exhibit self-similar or fractal scaling characteristics which may reflect intrinsic adaptability to their underlying physiological system. This study analysed fractal dynamics of cerebral blood flow in patients supported with ventricular assist devices (VAD) to ascertain if sustained modifications of blood pressure waveform affect cerebral blood flow fractality. Simultaneous recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity using transcranial Doppler were obtained from five cardiogenic shock patients supported by VAD, five matched control patients and five healthy subjects. Computation of a fractal scaling exponent (α) at the low-frequency time scale by detrended fluctuation analysis showed that cerebral blood flow velocity exhibited 1/f fractal scaling in both patient groups (α = 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.97 ± 0.12, respectively) as well as in the healthy subjects (α = 0.86 ± 0.07). In contrast, fluctuation in blood pressure was similar to non-fractal white noise in both patient groups (α = 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.52 ± 0.09, respectively) but exhibited 1/f scaling in the healthy subjects (α = 0.87 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 compared with the patient groups). The preservation of fractality in cerebral blood flow of VAD patients suggests that normal cardiac pulsation and central perfusion pressure changes are not the integral sources of cerebral blood flow fractality and that intrinsic vascular properties such as cerebral autoregulation may be involved. However, there is a clear difference in the fractal scaling properties of arterial blood pressure between the cardiogenic shock patients and the healthy subjects

  9. Headway Duo microcatheter for cerebral arteriovenous malformation embolization with n-BCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Jeremy J; Faisal, Abigail G S; Telischak, Nicholas A; Choudhri, Omar; Do, Huy M

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are uncommon vascular lesions, and hemorrhage secondary to AVM rupture results in significant morbidity and mortality. AVMs may be treated by endovascular embolization, and technical advances in microcatheter design are likely to improve the success and safety of endovascular embolization of cerebral AVMs. To describe our early experience with the Headway Duo microcatheter for embolization of cerebral AVMs with n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (n-BCA). Consecutive patients treated by endovascular embolization of a cerebral AVM with n-BCA delivered intra-arterially through the Headway Duo microcatheter (167 cm length) were identified. Patient demographic information, procedural details, and patient outcome were determined from electronic medical records. Ten consecutive patients undergoing cerebral AVM embolization using n-BCA injected through the Headway Duo microcatheter were identified. Presenting symptoms included headache, hemorrhage, seizures, and weakness. Spetzler Martin grades ranged from 1 to 5, and AVMs were located in the basal ganglia (2 patients), parietal lobe (4 patients), frontal lobe (1 patient), temporal lobe (1 patient), an entire hemisphere (1 patient), and posterior fossa (1 patient). 50 arterial pedicles were embolized, and all procedures were technically successful. There was one post-procedural hemorrhage that was well tolerated by the patient, and no other complications occurred. Additional AVM treatment was performed by surgery and radiation therapy. The Headway Duo microcatheter is safe and effective for embolization of cerebral AVMs using n-BCA. The trackability and high burst pressure of the Headway Duo make it an important and useful tool for the neurointerventionalist during cerebral AVM embolization. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. The effects of indomethacin on intracranial pressure and cerebral haemodynamics in patients undergoing craniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads; Tankisi, A; Cold, G E

    2004-01-01

    We compared the effects of indomethacin (bolus of 0.2 mg.kg-1 followed by an infusion of 0.2 mg.kg-1.h-1) and placebo on intracranial pressure and cerebral haemodynamics in 30 patients undergoing craniotomy for supratentorial brain tumours under propofol and fentanyl anaesthesia. Indomethacin...

  11. Cerebral white matter blood flow and energy metabolism in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, Christel; D'haeseleer, Miguel; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Fierens, Yves; Cambron, Melissa; Mostert, Jop P.; Heersema, Dorothea J.; Koch, Marcus W.; Keyser, de Jacques

    Background: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is reduced in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Objective: The objective of this article is to assess the relationship between reduced NAWM CBF and both axonal mitochondrial

  12. Characterization of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: Dependence of Catch Angle on Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Ren, Yupeng; Goldsmith, Ashlee; Gaebler, Deborah; Liu, Shu Q.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate spasticity under controlled velocities and torques in children with cerebral palsy (CP) using a manual spasticity evaluator. Method: The study involved 10 children with spastic CP (six males, four females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 2y 9mo, range 7-16y; one with quadriplegia, six with right hemiplegia, three with left hemiplegia; Gross…

  13. The brain in acute liver failure. A tortuous path from hyperammonemia to cerebral edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Eefsen, Martin; Hansen, Bent Adel

    2008-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a condition with an unfavourable prognosis. Multiorgan failure and circulatory collapse are frequent causes of death, but cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension (ICH) are also common complications with a high risk of fatal outcome. The underlying pathogenesis has...

  14. Under Under Under / Merit Kask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kask, Merit

    2006-01-01

    20. nov. esietendub Kumu auditooriumis MTÜ Ühenduse R.A.A.A.M teatriprojekt "Under" poetess Marie Underist. Lavastajad Merle Karusoo ja Raimo Pass, kunstnik Jaagup Roomet, helilooja Urmas Lattikas, peaosas Katrin Saukas

  15. Cerebral tuberculoma as a manifestation of paradoxical reaction in patients with pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Das

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of cerebral tuberculomas or their new appearance as a manifestation of paradoxical reaction in patients under antituberculous chemotherapy is well documented. Distinguishing paradoxical reaction from disease progression or treatment failure is an important issue in tuberculosis management. Five cases of cerebral tuberculomas are reported here as manifestations of paradoxical reaction in patients with pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis on antituberculous treatment. Case 1 and 2 had tuberculous meningitis, Case 3 had miliary tuberculosis, Case 4 had miliary tuberculosis and destructive vertebral lesions, and Case 5 had pulmonary tuberculosis. Continuation of antituberculous drugs and addition of steroids led to full recovery of all patients.

  16. Pharmacologicalmodification of thegabaergicsystem as a potentialvariant of cerebral protection in acute cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Володимирович Тихоновський

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to study the possible impact of some derivatives of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, piracetam, picamilon and Krebs cycle intermediates - succinate (as sodium salt on the pathobiochemical changes in the central nervous system, that occur under experimental playing of acute ischemic tissue damage of the cerebrum.Research methods: The study was conducted in 96 rats Wistar, who were on a standardized vivarium diet. Cerebral ischemia was caused by bond of the unilateral common carotid artery. All drugs were administered intraperitoneally once daily for 4 days after modeling of an acute cerebral ischemia after which animals were withdrawn from experiment. In the brain tissues concentrations of pyruvic, izocitric, dairy and apple acids were determined. The activity of antioxidant enzymes: catalase and superoxide dysmutaza. In addition, the brain tissues the contents of lipid peroxidation products were evaluated – diene conjugates and malonic dialdehyde. Level of brain energy production was judged by the content of the adenylic nucleotide and also phosphocreatine . The degree of destruction of the brain cells was assessed by activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase in the blood and brain fraction of the creatine phosphokinase.Research results: As a result of studies, on the 4th day of ischemia a significant carbohydrate metabolism is detected, which is reflected in the sharp strengthening of anaerobic glycolysis and reduced activity of the Krebs cycle reactions, as evidenced by a significant increase in quantity of lactate and decrease in quantity of malate, isocitrate and pyruvate.A sharp strengthening of anaerobic glycolysis results in the accumulation of oxidized products and intermediates especially the latter product – lactic acid. Metabolic acidosis develops against the background of energy failure, which leads to activation of lipid peroxidation reactions. Courses appointment of the cyclic derivatives of GABA piracetam

  17. Cerebral oxygen extraction, oxygen consumption, and regional cerebral blood flow during the aura phase of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olesen, Jes; Lassen, N A

    1994-01-01

    The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism.......The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism....

  18. The early markers for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy are different from those for spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einspieler, C; Cioni, G; Paolicelli, PB; Bos, AF; Dressler, A; Ferrari, F; Roversi, MF; Prechtl, HFR

    Qualitative abnormalities of spontaneous motor activity in new-borns and young infants are early predictive markers for later spastic cerebral palsy. Aim of this research was to identify which motor patterns may be specific for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In a large, prospectively performed

  19. Cerebral air embolism after ERCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabanco, Sonia; Pardo, Sara; Williams, Mónica; Diaz, Javier; Ruiz, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Digestive endoscopic procedures have become increasingly common diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in hospitals. Generally they are safe procedures and complications, though infrequent, can occur and are potentially lethal. As the number of procedures performed increases, the complications arising are likely to become more frequent, so it is advisable to bear this in mind when establishing early diagnosis and treatment. Cerebral air embolism is a rare complication after a digestive endoscopic procedure, although in the case of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), may be as high as 10%. In such cases there are usually local circumstances exist favoring the entry of air into the bloodstream, and in some cases it is the presence of a patent foramen ovale that favors the passage of air into the arterial system. The clinical signs and symptoms will depend on the speed and volume of the air infused and on the territory affected, and in some cases the consequences may be fatal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerebral oxygenation in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Karinna L; Yiallourou, Stephanie R; Wong, Flora Y; Odoi, Alexsandria; Walker, Adrian M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2014-09-01

    Prone sleeping is a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and preterm infants are at significantly increased risk. In term infants, prone sleeping is associated with reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cerebral tissue oxygenation index (TOI). However, little is known about the effects of sleeping position on TOI and MAP in preterm infants. We aimed to examine TOI and MAP in preterm infants after term-equivalent age, during the period of greatest SIDS risk. Thirty-five preterm and 17 term infants underwent daytime polysomnography, including measurement of TOI (NIRO-200 spectrophotometer, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Japan) and MAP (Finapress Medical Systems, Amsterdam, Netherlands) at 2 to 4 weeks, 2 to 3 months, and 5 to 6 months postterm age. Infants slept prone and supine in active and quiet sleep. The effects of sleep state and position were determined by using 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance and of preterm birth by using 2-way analysis of variance. In preterm infants, TOI was significantly lower when prone compared with supine in both sleep states at all ages (P preterm compared with term infants at 2 to 4 weeks, in both positions (P preterm infants in the prone position at 2 to 3 months (P position in preterm infants and is lower compared with age-matched term infants, predominantly in the prone position when MAP is also reduced. This may contribute to their increased SIDS risk. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Cerebral sino-venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayama, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Tsunesaburo; Nakajima, Kenji

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral sino-venous thrombosis were reported. Repeated CT findings were studied and discussed on account of the treatments for those pathologic conditions. Those of studied cases are; a 22-year-old postpartum woman, a 42-year-old woman with irregular vaginal bleeding, and a 26-year-old man with severe reactive emesis after drinking alcohol. They were treated conservatively. Case 1 died in its acute stage. In the remaining ones, each had an uneventful recovery. CT scan findings of them manifested their exact clinical conditions. These findings were devided into two categories, one was direct signs expressed sino-venous occlusion, the other was indirect signs which appeared as a result of these occlusion. Direct signs cannot always get in every cases with sino-venous occlusion, but as for indirect signs, we can get various changes corresponding to the time taken CT photoes, and they are useful to decide appropriate treatments at that time. Considering suitable treatments for this disease, it is necessary to select most suitable ones according to their pathologic conditions, which may be precisely drawn with CT scans. (J.P.N.)

  2. Cerebral CT of ischaemic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulich, A.

    1981-01-01

    The diagnosis of stroke must first be established by clinical examination. CT has proved useful for confirmation of the diagnosis and provides a global intracranial picture of morphological changes in cerebral vascular diseases. A hemorrhage can be recognized with certainty at the first CT examination as the cause of the stroke, but in the detection of a lesion due to ischemia an important role is played by the correct choice of the time of examination, and in some cases also of the check-up with contrast medium. The differential diagnosis between infarct in the acute stage and encephalitis or gliomas of low-grade malignity can be difficult. A decision can often only be made after a series of examinations. Postmalacial conditions are often difficult to differentiate from defects due to other causes, such as hemorrhage, head injury, postoperative states and after encephalitis. A knowledge of the anamnesis and the clinical findings is indispensable for CT evaluation. In assessing the prognosis before vascular surgery on the extracranial brain-supplying vessels the performance of a CT examination should be advised. A warning is given against the use of CT as a screening method. (orig.) [de

  3. Hemorrhagic stroke and cerebral paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Ju, Yan; Chen, Jing; You, Chao

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and imaging characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment outcomes of 10 patients with hemorrhagic cerebral paragonimiasis (CP), and we evaluated the influence of Paragonimus infection on cerebrovascular damage. Ten patients (7 male and 3 female; median age 15.7 years, range 4-46 years) with hemorrhagic CP were diagnosed between April 2009 and January 2013. All patients underwent the head computed tomography scans and 9 patients underwent MRI examinations. Four patients underwent computed tomographic angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and digital subtraction angiography. Liquid-based cytological examination of cerebrospinal fluid was performed in 7 patients. Follow-up examinations were performed for 9 cases for a period of 12 to 62 months. Hemorrhagic CP accounted for 37% of CP cases (10/27). No patients were initially diagnosed with CP. The major symptoms of hemorrhagic CP included acute headache, vomiting, hemiparalysis, epilepsy, blurred vision, sensory impairment, and tinnitus. Four cases were surgically treated. Most symptoms markedly improved, but fine motor dysfunction and mental dysfunction remained in 3 surgical patients. Hemorrhagic stroke typically occurred during the acute stage and in the early stages of further Paragonimus migration. Delay of treatment increased the risk of initial and recurrent stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. A comparative study of middle cerebral pressure in dogs and macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symon, Lindsay

    1967-01-01

    1. A comparison has been made of the pressures recorded from pial branches of the middle cerebral artery in dogs and macaques. This pressure has been shown to be between 88 and 95% of femoral arterial pressure in dogs under chloralose anaesthesia, and between 80 and 90% of femoral arterial pressure in macaques similarly anaesthetized. 2. The effect of occlusion of the main vessels in the neck is shown to differ considerably in the two species. Blood pressure within the forebrain of the dog is shown to be largely dependent upon the integrity of the external carotid artery, whereas in the monkey the external carotid artery is without effect in the maintenance of forebrain blood pressure. Occlusion of the four major arteries in the neck is shown to produce a greater effect in the macaque and to be accompanied by signs of medullary ischaemia in this species. 3. After occlusion of the main middle cerebral artery, arterial pressure measured distal to the occlusion depends upon the integrity of collateral vessels from the other cerebral arteries. When only a branch of the middle cerebral artery is occluded, the greater part of the residual blood pressure depends upon anastomoses from other branches of the middle cerebral artery itself. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4963869

  5. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during light sleep (stage 2) in 8 young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness and light sleep as verified by standard...... polysomnography. Unlike our previous study in man showing a highly significant 25% decrease in CMRO2 during deep sleep (stage 3-4) we found a modest but statistically significant decrease of 5% in CMRO2 during stage 2 sleep. Deep and light sleep are both characterized by an almost complete lack of mental activity....... They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  6. Control modeling and Chinese acupuncture treatment on cerebral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Sui, Jinxue; Shi, Hongzhi

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral hemodynamic parameters are related to the occurrence and development of the cerebral vascular diseases. This paper proposes a new possible method for control treatment on cerebral circulation network diseases. Cerebral circulation is taken as a kind of fluid network that should be controlled. The acupuncture treatment in traditional Chinese medicine is used as an actuator, whose design principle is changing the artery pressure and resistance of the cerebral circulation to increase the blood flow, so as to achieve the purpose of treating cerebral circulation diseases. Clinical data of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment has also preliminarily proved the correctness of this method.

  7. Neonatal intensive care: an obvious, yet difficult area for cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov, Lotte; Brun, Nikolai C.; Greisen, Gorm

    1997-01-01

    The first clinical application of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) 11 years go was on the head of newborn infants under intensive care. Since then much credible and some important data have been accumulated in this area of research. The best data have been obtained using manipulation of arterial oxygen saturation to obtain single or repeated estimates of cerebral blood flow or cerebral blood volume, or interference with cerebral venous return to obtain measures of venous oxygen saturation. It has been more difficult to take advantage of the continuous and noninvasive nature of NIRS. In particular, the value of the cytochrome signal can still be doubted. A role has not yet developed for NIRS in clinical neonatology.

  8. Fabrication of cerebral aneurysm simulator with a desktop 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Gao, Qing; Du, Song; Chen, ZiChen; Fu, JianZhong; Chen, Bing; Liu, ZhenJie; He, Yong

    2017-05-17

    Now, more and more patients are suffering cerebral aneurysm. However, long training time limits the rapid growth of cerebrovascular neurosurgeons. Here we developed a novel cerebral aneurysm simulator which can be better represented the dynamic bulging process of cerebral aneurysm The proposed simulator features the integration of a hollow elastic vascular model, a skull model and a brain model, which can be affordably fabricated at the clinic (Fab@Clinic), under $25.00 each with the help of a low-cost desktop 3D printer. Moreover, the clinical blood flow and pulsation pressure similar to the human can be well simulated, which can be used to train the neurosurgical residents how to clip aneurysms more effectively.

  9. Gait training facilitates central drive to ankle dorsiflexors in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Farmer, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    Foot drop and toe walking are frequent concerns in children with cerebral palsy. The main underlying cause of these problems is early damage and lack of maturation of the corticospinal tract. In the present study we investigated whether 4 weeks of daily treadmill training with an incline may...... facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve the control of the ankle joint in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Classification System I:6, II:6, III:4) aged 5-14 years old, were recruited for the study. Evaluation of gait ability and intramuscular coherence...... significantly when compared to coherence before training. The largest changes in coherence with training were observed for children

  10. A study of the acute effect of smoking on cerebral blood flow using 99mTc-ECD SPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Monden, Toshihide; Satoh, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is known to be associated with atherosclerosis, is an important risk factor for stroke and has other serious effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute effect of cigarette smoking on cerebral blood flow using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Ten healthy volunteers with a smoking habit were studied using technetium-99m-labelled ethylcysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomography (SPET). We evaluated the regional cerebral blood flow under the smoking and resting states. The regional cerebral blood flow on smoking-activated SPET was significantly decreased in the whole brain as compared with that on resting SPET. Our findings therefore suggest that one of the acute effects of cigarette smoking is to induce a diffuse decrease in cerebral blood flow. (orig.)

  11. The Pattern of Brain Microhemorrhages After Severe Lung Failure Resembles the One Seen in High-Altitude Cerebral Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riech, Sebastian; Kallenberg, Kai; Moerer, Onnen; Hellen, Peter; Bärtsch, Peter; Quintel, Michael; Knauth, Michael

    2015-09-01

    After suffering from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, several patients show generalized brain alterations and atrophy. A distinctive morphologic pattern of cerebral injury, however, has not been found so far. We present the history of three patients who survived severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. In these patients, MRI of the brain showed multiple microhemorrhages predominantly in the splenium of the corpus callosum. An identical pattern of microhemorrhages has previously been described in mountaineers who suffered from high-altitude cerebral edema. This report demonstrates that patients after treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome and high-altitude cerebral edema show congruent cerebral injuries. Further investigation into the similarities of the causative conditions and neurologic consequences might reveal underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms and clinical implications of this observation.

  12. Endotoxemia reduces cerebral perfusion but enhances dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation at reduced arterial carbon dioxide tension*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Kim, Yu-Sok; van Lieshout, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The administration of endotoxin to healthy humans reduces cerebral blood flow but its influence on dynamic cerebral autoregulation remains unknown. We considered that a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension would attenuate cerebral perfusion and improve dynamic cerebral autoreg...

  13. Association of Lead Levels and Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Bansal MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is a common motor disability in childhood. Raised lead levels affect cognition. Children with cerebral palsy may have raised lead levels, further impairing their residual cognitive motor and behavioral abilities. Environmental exposure and abnormal eating habits may lead to increased lead levels. Aims and Objectives: To measure blood lead levels in children with cerebral palsy and compare them with healthy neurologically normal children. To correlate blood lead levels with environmental factors. Material and Methods: Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Tertiary care hospital. Participants: Cases comprised 34 children with cerebral palsy, and controls comprised 34 neurologically normal, age- and sex-matched children. Methods: Clinical and demographic details were recorded as per proforma. Detailed environmental history was recorded to know the source of exposure to lead. These children were investigated and treated as per protocol. Venous blood was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid vials for analysis of blood lead levels. Lead levels were estimated by Schimadzu Flame AA-6800 (atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. P < .05 was taken as significant. Results: Mean blood lead levels were 9.20 ± 8.31 µg/dL in cerebral palsy cases and 2.89 ± 3.04 µg/dL in their controls (P < .001. Among children with cerebral palsy, 19 (55.88% children had blood lead levels ≥5 µg/dL. Lead levels in children with pica were 12.33 ± 10.02 µg/dL in comparison to children with no history of pica, 6.70 ± 4.60 µg/dL (P = .029. No correlation was found between hemoglobin and blood lead levels in cases and controls. Conclusion: In our study, blood lead levels are raised in children with cerebral palsy. However, further studies are required to show effects of raised levels in these children.

  14. PRETERM BIRTH ASSOCIATION WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy ( CP is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Preterm birth is the birth of baby before 37 completed weeks, a full term birth is birth at 37 to 42 weeks of gestation . AIM: To show the extent of association of preterm deliveries as a risk factor in development of cerebral palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This r etrospective cohort study was conducted by eliciting history from the mothers of 99 cerebral palsy children who w ere treated in Rani Chandra Mani Devi Hospital, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India. De tailed history was taken from the mothers of 99 cerebral palsy children who were treated in this hospital. History regarding the period of gestation at which the child was born (preterm or full term, any previous history of pre - term delivery or abortions, was obtained from the mothers and the data analyzed . RESULTS: From this study it was observed the proportional association of pre - term births to cerebral palsy is 33 out 99 i.e., about 33.33%, Of these 33 cerebral palsy children highest association being with birth at 28 wks gestation (51 %. This study also shows th at the mothers with a previous history of preterm delivery have 14.4 times higher risk of subsequent pre term delivery; those with previous history of abortions have 5.7 times risk of pre - term delivery than mothers without such history. CONCLUSION: From th is study it was concluded that the pre - term birth plays a major role as a risk factor in the development of cerebral palsy with mothers having previous pre term delivery and previous abortions adding further to this risk.

  15. Unconstrained parameter estimation for assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacón, M; Nuñez, N; Henríquez, C; Panerai, R B

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA), the transient response of cerebral blood flow (CBF) to changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP), has been performed with an index of autoregulation (ARI), related to the parameters of a second-order differential equation model, namely gain (K), damping factor (D) and time constant (T). Limitations of the ARI were addressed by increasing its numerical resolution and generalizing the parameter space. In 16 healthy subjects, recordings of ABP (Finapres) and CBF velocity (ultrasound Doppler) were performed at rest, before, during and after 5% CO 2 breathing, and for six repeated thigh cuff maneuvers. The unconstrained model produced lower predictive error (p < 0.001) than the original model. Unconstrained parameters (K'–D'–T') were significantly different from K–D–T but were still sensitive to different measurement conditions, such as the under-regulation induced by hypercapnia. The intra-subject variability of K' was significantly lower than that of the ARI and this parameter did not show the unexpected occurrences of zero values as observed with the ARI and the classical value of K. These results suggest that K' could be considered as a more stable and reliable index of dynamic autoregulation than ARI. Further studies are needed to validate this new index under different clinical conditions

  16. Mechanisms of Astrocyte-Mediated Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema formation stems from disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and occurs after injury to the CNS. Due to the restrictive skull, relatively small increases in brain volume can translate into impaired tissue perfusion and brain herniation. In excess, cerebral edema can be gravely harmful. Astrocytes are key participants in cerebral edema by virtue of their relationship with the cerebral vasculature, their unique compliment of solute and water transport proteins, and their general role in brain volume homeostasis. Following the discovery of aquaporins, passive conduits of water flow, aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was identified as the predominant astrocyte water channel. Normally, AQP4 is highly enriched at perivascular endfeet, the outermost layer of the BBB, whereas after injury, AQP4 expression disseminates to the entire astrocytic plasmalemma, a phenomenon termed dysregulation. Arguably, the most important role of AQP4 is to rapidly neutralize osmotic gradients generated by ionic transporters. In pathological conditions, AQP4 is believed to be intimately involved in the formation and clearance of cerebral edema. In this review, we discuss aquaporin function and localization in the BBB during health and injury, and we examine post-injury ionic events that modulate AQP4- dependent edema formation. PMID:24996934

  17. Cerebral cortical registration of subliminal visceral stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Mark K; Shaker, Reza

    2002-02-01

    Although brain registration of subliminal somatic stimulations such as masked visual stimuli and their influence on electrical and hemodynamic measures of cerebral activity have been reported previously, there have been no reports on cerebral cortical registration of subliminal visceral stimulation. Because studies evaluating the consequences of subliminal somatic stimulation have shown that subliminal stimulation can effect behavior, it is conceivable that such subliminal messages from the intestine could potentially influence intestinal sensory/motor function or effect the perception/interpretation of sensory signals originating from the gut. We studied the cerebral cortical functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to subliminal, liminal, and supraliminal rectal distention in healthy volunteers. Study findings indicate that subliminal afferent signals originating from the gut are registered in the cerebral cortex without reaching the level of awareness. Locations of cortical activity caused by intestinal subliminal stimulation are similar to those of liminal and supraliminal stimulation but their intensity and volume are significantly lower (P Subliminal afferent signals originating from the gut are registered in the cerebral cortex and induce changes in measures of brain activity, such as hemodynamic changes detectable by fMRI.

  18. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyttel-Sørensen, Simon; Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. DESIGN: Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. SETTING: Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care unit...

  19. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyttel-Sørensen, Simon; Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. DESIGN: Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. SETTING: Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care units...

  20. Gastrostomy tube feeding of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlseng, Magnus O; Andersen, Guro L; DA Graca Andrada, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries.......To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries....

  1. Effects of viscosity on cerebral blood flow after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, L.L.A.; Pop, G.A.M.; Teerenstra, S.; Struijk, P.C.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine blood viscosity in adult comatose patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and to assess the relation between blood viscosity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral oxygen extraction. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Tertiary care university

  2. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Nonhemorrhagic Lesions: Clinical Correlates and Prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferro, José M.; Canhão, Patrícia; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Stam, Jan; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando; Stolz, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Brain imaging of patients with acute cerebral venous thrombosis often shows parenchymal hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic lesions. The clinical relevance of nonhemorrhagic lesions is poorly known. Method: In the International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis

  3. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.

    2008-01-01

    cerebral palsy, as well as to IQ level, active epilepsy, and severe visual and hearing impairment. Severe cerebral palsy, defined as both the inability to walk and an IQ of ... disability load Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  4. Association between type of cerebral palsy and the cognitive levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Dewi Kusumaningrum

    2009-07-01

    Conclusion Our data showed that most patients with cerebral palsy had mental retardation of several cognitive level but there was no significant association between each type of cerebral palsy with cognitive levels.

  5. The Role of Right- Cerebral and Left- Cerebral in Persistence and Creation of Cultures and Civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nourimotlagh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that, some live creatures have more civilizational and cultural complex structure comparing to human beings, but humans are inclined toward mixed perfection of right -cerebral, left-cerebral ( with strength and weakness in different societies, and their balanced growth and development. Therefore, human beings from the first step of creation have used their genetic power in any environment and society. The growth of that compilation depends on cultural feature and formed by culture according to right cerebral. The growth of compilation ends on established civilization and is created as a result of being left cerebral. In this sense, we can study, calculate, predict and plan the cultural and civilizational processes of different societies depended on right or left cerebrality. The question of this article is that, what kind of relationship is there between the right- cerebral left cerebral, civilization and culture?This paper is descriptive and data collection is based on library and documentary method with the index card and chart instrument.

  6. Prediction of Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome with Velocity Blood Pressure Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Chao Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is an important complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA. An >100% increase in middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAV after CEA is used to predict the cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS development, but the accuracy is limited. The increase in blood pressure (BP after surgery is a risk factor of CHS, but no study uses it to predict CHS. This study was to create a more precise parameter for prediction of CHS by combined the increase of MCAV and BP after CEA. Methods: Systolic MCAV measured by transcranial Doppler and systematic BP were recorded preoperatively; 30 min postoperatively. The new parameter velocity BP index (VBI was calculated from the postoperative increase ratios of MCAV and BP. The prediction powers of VBI and the increase ratio of MCAV (velocity ratio [VR] were compared for predicting CHS occurrence. Results: Totally, 6/185 cases suffered CHS. The best-fit cut-off point of 2.0 for VBI was identified, which had 83.3% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity, 62.5% positive predictive value and 99.4% negative predictive value for CHS development. This result is significantly better than VR (33.3%, 97.2%, 28.6% and 97.8%. The area under the curve (AUC of receiver operating characteristic: AUC VBI = 0.981, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.949-0.995; AUC VR = 0.935, 95% CI 0.890-0.966, P = 0.02. Conclusions: The new parameter VBI can more accurately predict patients at risk of CHS after CEA. This observation needs to be validated by larger studies.

  7. Neurociências, neurocultura e autoajuda cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ortega

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo pretende analisar o fenômeno denominado de neuroascese, ou autoajuda cerebral no contexto do crescente impacto das neurociências e do surgimento da neurocultura e do sujeito cerebral. Para tanto, é importante compreender o âmbito sóciocultural mais amplo no qual a neuroascese se insere e que corresponde ao que vem se chamando de 'cultura somática' ou, mais especificamente, de biossociabilidade. O objetivo do artigo é explorar como uma forma de subjetividade reducionista, o sujeito cerebral, dá lugar à aparição de práticas de si cerebrais, isto é, práticas de como agir sobre o cérebro para maximizar a sua performance, que levam a formação de novas formas de sociabilidade.

  8. Neurociências, neurocultura e autoajuda cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ortega

    Full Text Available Este artigo pretende analisar o fenômeno denominado de neuroascese, ou autoajuda cerebral no contexto do crescente impacto das neurociências e do surgimento da neurocultura e do sujeito cerebral. Para tanto, é importante compreender o âmbito sóciocultural mais amplo no qual a neuroascese se insere e que corresponde ao que vem se chamando de 'cultura somática' ou, mais especificamente, de biossociabilidade. O objetivo do artigo é explorar como uma forma de subjetividade reducionista, o sujeito cerebral, dá lugar à aparição de práticas de si cerebrais, isto é, práticas de como agir sobre o cérebro para maximizar a sua performance, que levam a formação de novas formas de sociabilidade.

  9. Training model for cerebral aneurysm clipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tenjin, M.D., Ph.D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clipping of cerebral aneurysms is still an important skill in neurosurgery. We have made a training model for the clipping of cerebral aneurysms. The concepts for the model were 1: training model for beginners, 2: three dimensional manipulation using an operating microscope, 3: the aneurysm model is to be perfused by simulated blood causing premature rupture. The correct relationship between each tissue, and softness of the brain and vessels were characteristics of the model. The skull, brain, arteries, and veins were made using a 3D printer with data from DICOM. The brain and vessels were made from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. One training course was held and this model was useful for training of cerebral aneurysm surgery for young neurosurgeons.

  10. Contrast MR imaging of acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogame, Saeko; Syakudo, Miyuki; Inoue, Yuichi (Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-04-01

    Thirty patients with acute and subacute cerebral infarction (13 and 17 deep cerebral infarction) were studied with 0.5 T MR unit before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA. Thirteen patients were studied within 7 days after neurological ictus, 17 patients were studied between 7 and 14 days. Two types of abnormal enhancement, cortical arterial and parenchymal enhancement, were noted. The former was seen in 3 of 4 cases of very acute cortical infarction within 4 days after clinical ictus. The latter was detected in all 7 cases of cortical infarction after the 6th day of the ictus, and one patient with deep cerebral infarction at the 12th day of the ictus. Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging seems to detect gyral enhancement earlier compared with contrast CT, and depict intra-arterial sluggish flow which was not expected to see on contrast CT scans. (author).

  11. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  12. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery

  13. Computerized tomographic evaluation of cerebral cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Young; Lee, Mi Sook; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Precbyterian Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-08-15

    Cerebral cysticercosis, unfortunately frequent in Korea, is a parastic disease in which man serve as the intermediate host of taenia solium. The larvae have a predilection for the central nervous system and can cause a variety of neurologic symptoms. The authors reviewed 19 cases of surgically proven cerebral cysticercosis and following results were obtained. 1. The most frequent age distribution was 5th and 6th decade and male to female ratio was 14:5. 2. The most frevalent involving site was cerebral parenchyme and following by ventricles. 3. Clinical manifestations were symtom and sign of increased ICP, seizure and focal neurological dificit. 4. It was assumed that computerized tomography was the procedure of choice for the diagnosis of these parasitic brain disease.

  14. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. (Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  15. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijen, P.C. van.

    1991-01-01

    In-vivo proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect changes in cerebral metabolism during ischemia and other types of metabolic stress. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in an animal model to observe morphological alterations during focal cerebral ischemia. Spectroscopy was performed in animal models with global ischemia, in volunteers during hyperventilation and pharmaco-logically altered cerebral perfusion, and in patients with acute and prolonged focal cerebral ischemia. (author). 396 refs.; 44 figs.; 14 tabs

  16. Bedside Monitoring of Cerebral Energy State During Cardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mölström, Simon; Nielsen, Troels H; Andersen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether the lactate-to-pyruvate (LP) ratio obtained by microdialysis (MD) of the cerebral venous outflow reflected a derangement of global cerebral energy state during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). DESIGN: Interventional, prospective, randomized study. SETTING...... in either group during CPB. In each group, 50% of the patients showed significant cognitive decline (mini-mental state examination, 3 points) 2 days after surgery. CONCLUSION: The LP ratio of cerebral venous blood increased significantly during CPB, indicating compromised cerebral oxidative metabolism...

  17. Cerebral vascular effects of hypovolemia and dopamine infusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst Hahn, Gitte; Heiring, Christian; Pryds, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread use, effects of volume boluses and dopamine in hypotensive newborn infants remain controversial. We aimed to elucidate if hypovolemia alone impairs cerebral autoregulation (CA) and if dopamine affects cerebral vasculature.......Despite widespread use, effects of volume boluses and dopamine in hypotensive newborn infants remain controversial. We aimed to elucidate if hypovolemia alone impairs cerebral autoregulation (CA) and if dopamine affects cerebral vasculature....

  18. Normal cerebral FDG uptake during childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, Kevin; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of cerebral FDG uptake during childhood originates from a small number of studies in patients with neurological abnormalities. Our aim was to describe cerebral FDG uptake in a dataset of FDG PET scans in children more likely to represent a normal population. We reviewed cerebral FDG PET scans in children up to 16 years of age with suspected/proven extracranial malignancies and the following exclusions: central nervous system metastases, previous malignancies, previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, development of cerebral metastases during therapy, neurological conditions, taking antiepileptic medication or medications likely to interfere with cerebral metabolism, and general anaesthesia within 24 h. White matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and the cerebellar cortex were analysed using regional SUV max , and the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum were analysed using a regional relative uptake analysis in comparison to maximal cortical uptake. Scans from 30 patients (age range 11 months to 16 years, mean age 10 years 5 months) were included. All regions showed increasing SUV max with age. The parietal, occipital, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobes showed lower rates of increasing FDG uptake causing changing patterns of regional FDG uptake during childhood. The cortical regions showing the most intense uptake in early childhood were the parietal and occipital lobes. At approximately 7 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the frontal lobes and at approximately 10 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the thalamus. Relative FDG uptake in the brain has not reached an adult pattern by 1 year of age, but continues to change up to 16 years of age. The changing pattern is due to different regional rates of increasing cortical FDG uptake, which is less rapid in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes than in the frontal lobes. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral microbleeds in a neonatal rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Carusillo Theriault

    Full Text Available In adult humans, cerebral microbleeds play important roles in neurodegenerative diseases but in neonates, the consequences of cerebral microbleeds are unknown. In rats, a single pro-angiogenic stimulus in utero predisposes to cerebral microbleeds after birth at term, a time when late oligodendrocyte progenitors (pre-oligodendrocytes dominate in the rat brain. We hypothesized that two independent pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero would be associated with a high likelihood of perinatal microbleeds that would be severely damaging to white matter.Pregnant Wistar rats were subjected to intrauterine ischemia (IUI and low-dose maternal lipopolysaccharide (mLPS at embryonic day (E 19. Pups were born vaginally or abdominally at E21-22. Brains were evaluated for angiogenic markers, microhemorrhages, myelination and axonal development. Neurological function was assessed out to 6 weeks.mRNA (Vegf, Cd31, Mmp2, Mmp9, Timp1, Timp2 and protein (CD31, MMP2, MMP9 for angiogenic markers, in situ proteolytic activity, and collagen IV immunoreactivity were altered, consistent with an angiogenic response. Vaginally delivered pups exposed to prenatal IUI+mLPS had spontaneous cerebral microbleeds, abnormal neurological function, and dysmorphic, hypomyelinated white matter and axonopathy. Pups exposed to the same pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero but delivered abdominally had minimal cerebral microbleeds, preserved myelination and axonal development, and neurological function similar to naïve controls.In rats, pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero can predispose to vascular fragility and lead to cerebral microbleeds. The study of microbleeds in the neonatal rat brain at full gestation may give insights into the consequences of microbleeds in human preterm infants during critical periods of white matter development.

  20. Normal cerebral FDG uptake during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, Kevin [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Disciplines of Imaging and Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Current understanding of cerebral FDG uptake during childhood originates from a small number of studies in patients with neurological abnormalities. Our aim was to describe cerebral FDG uptake in a dataset of FDG PET scans in children more likely to represent a normal population. We reviewed cerebral FDG PET scans in children up to 16 years of age with suspected/proven extracranial malignancies and the following exclusions: central nervous system metastases, previous malignancies, previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, development of cerebral metastases during therapy, neurological conditions, taking antiepileptic medication or medications likely to interfere with cerebral metabolism, and general anaesthesia within 24 h. White matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and the cerebellar cortex were analysed using regional SUV{sub max}, and the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum were analysed using a regional relative uptake analysis in comparison to maximal cortical uptake. Scans from 30 patients (age range 11 months to 16 years, mean age 10 years 5 months) were included. All regions showed increasing SUV{sub max} with age. The parietal, occipital, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobes showed lower rates of increasing FDG uptake causing changing patterns of regional FDG uptake during childhood. The cortical regions showing the most intense uptake in early childhood were the parietal and occipital lobes. At approximately 7 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the frontal lobes and at approximately 10 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the thalamus. Relative FDG uptake in the brain has not reached an adult pattern by 1 year of age, but continues to change up to 16 years of age. The changing pattern is due to different regional rates of increasing cortical FDG uptake, which is less rapid in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes than in the frontal lobes. (orig.)

  1. Modulation of cerebral blood flow with transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) in patients with cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Stewart, Roy; Staal, Michiel J; Elting, Jan-Willem J.

    ObjectivesTranscutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) and spinal cord stimulation have been shown to increase peripheral and cerebral blood flow. We postulate that certain pathological conditions attenuate cerebral autoregulation, which may result in a relative increase of the importance of

  2. Modulation of cerebral blood flow with transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) in patients with cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, M. ter; Dijk, J.M. van; Stewart, R.; Staal, M.J.; Elting, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) and spinal cord stimulation have been shown to increase peripheral and cerebral blood flow. We postulate that certain pathological conditions attenuate cerebral autoregulation, which may result in a relative increase of the importance of

  3. MRI findings and differential diagnosis in children with cerebral paragonimiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zeng

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The clinical manifestations of cerebral paragonimiasis are nonspecific in children while the MRI findings of cerebral paragonimiasis are characteristic, including irregular hemorrhage, ring-like enhancement and disproportionately large areas of surrounding edema. Brain MRI plays an important role in the diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis in children.

  4. Radiologic manifestations of focal cerebral hyperemia in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Skriver, E B; Herning, M

    1991-01-01

    In 16 acute stroke patients with focal cerebral hyperemia angiography and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were studied 1 to 4 days post stroke. CT was performed twice with and without contrast enhancement 3 +/- 1 days and 16 +/- 4 days post stroke. Angiographic evidence of focal cerebral hype...

  5. Cephalea, Horner's syndrome and cerebral ischemia: pathognomonic triad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Pomero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissection of cerebral vessels represents an important cause of stroke in young patients without cardiovascular risk factors. Clinical feature of this pathology is quite peculiar and is described as combination of cephalea, Horner’s syndrome and cerebral ischemia. Clinical suspicion and fast access to ecocolordoppler are the only ways to save vessels’ patency and to restore cerebral blood flow.

  6. Recirculation usually precedes malignant edema in middle cerebral artery infarcts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Ståhl, N; Schalén, W

    2012-01-01

    In patients with large middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarcts, maximum brain swelling leading to cerebral herniation and death usually occurs 2-5 days after onset of stroke. The study aimed at exploring the pattern of compounds related to cerebral energy metabolism in infarcted brain tissue....

  7. Profile of children diagnosed with cerebral palsy at Universitas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy is a term used for a group of non-progressive but often changing motor deficits, which are a result of a lesion of the brain occurring at an early developmental stage. Cerebral palsy may be classified physiologically or topographically. Physiologically, there are five types of cerebral palsy1: spastic, dyskinetic, ...

  8. [Musical relaxation therapy on the cerebral arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X; Yang, F; Zhuang, H

    1997-01-01

    The transcranial Doppler and psychological measurement methods were used to evaluate the effect of musical relaxation therapy on the cerebral arteriosclerosis. The results showed that the musical relaxation therapy could improve the cerebral blood flow (physiological), offset the Type A behavior and eliminate the emotional disturbance (psychological), and that its effect was better than that of the control patients. The mechanism of the effect may be related to the 1/f sound wave (physical), abdominal respiration with long expiration and involuntary inspiration (physiological) and the hinting effects of the inducing phrases (psychological).

  9. Experimental thrombolysis of middle cerebral artery thromboemboli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschberg, M.; Wiesmann, W.; Korves, M.; Koc, I.; Hofferberth, B.; Muenster Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Since the majority of ischaemic cerebral infarcts is caused by thromboemboli, we determined the benefit of firbrinolytic therapy in acute stroke. Thromboemboli were induced in the middle cerebral artery of 21 dogs. Urokinase was started at different time intervals after infarction (1, 3 and 5 hours) at a rate of 1000 IU/kg/min. Angiographically controlled thrombolysis was achieved in all 15 treated cases, whereas in the control group (n=6) no case of recanalisation was observed. Systemic fibrinolysis occurred in all cases. Postmortem examinations of the brains showed no intracerebral haemorrhages. Our findings indicate the urokinase treatment may be of value in acute ischaemic stroke. (orig.) [de

  10. Cerebral angiographic findings in thromboangiitis obliterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Young J.; Lee, Eun M.; Kim, Jong S.; Lee, Deok H.

    2005-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or ischemic stroke may complicate thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO). However, there has been debate regarding the mechanism of ischemic stroke in TAO. We report the case of a patient with TAO who developed repeated TIAs. An angiogram showed multiple alternative areas of arterial occlusions in the distal segments of both middle cerebral arteries. Extensive collateral vessels around the occluded segment were also observed, which resembled the ''tree root'' or ''corkscrew'' vessels described in the peripheral arteries in TAO. Our patient illustrates that cerebral manifestations of TAO may occur with vascular changes that are identical with those encountered in the limb arteries in TAO. (orig.)

  11. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Reversible cerebral vasconstriction syndrome: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Sub; Park, Ji Kang; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Jeong, Sun Young

    2013-01-01

    We report a 46-year-old woman patient with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). She presented with severe headache, multiple cerebral infarction, and multifocal severe stenosis in the intracranial arteries on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). One month after the episode, a small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was incidentally detected during the evaluation of severe anemia and GIST was removed. Follow-up MRA was performed 3 months and 1 year after an initial attack of headache, and multifocal severe intracranial arterial stenotic lesions were completely resolved, she did not experience any episode of RCVS during the 2 years.

  13. Cerebral blood flow changes in cluster headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.W.; Hachinski, V.C.; Cooper, P.W.

    1976-01-01

    Serial cerebral blood flod studies performed by the intra-carotid 133 Xenon method were fortuitously determined during the course of a cluster headache in a 32 year old man. The initial study was performed about 10 min after the headache began and showed values at the upper limit of normal. Twenty min after the headache started a second procedure showed that the autoregulatory response on hyperventilation was normal. Ergotamine tartrate was given intra-muscularly 23 min after the headache began and there was partial relief. A third cerebral blood flow estimation showed abnormally high values. The probable reasons for this are discussed. (author)

  14. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented...... by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling...

  15. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T

    2005-01-01

    Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...... participants with CP born between 1965 and 1978 (471 males; mean age 28y 10 mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y) in the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry were compared with 4406 controls without CP born between 1965 and 1978 (2546 males; mean age 28y 10 mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y). Diagnostic subtypes of the 819...

  16. Maternal Infections during Pregnancy and Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Jessica; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Streja, Elani

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common motor disability in childhood. We examined the association between maternal infections during pregnancy and the risk of congenital CP in the child. METHODS: Liveborn singletons in Denmark between 1997 and 2003 were identified from the Danish National...... the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Of the 440 564 singletons with follow-up data, 840 were diagnosed with congenital CP. Maternal genito-urinary tract infections (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4, 3...

  17. Epidemiology of cerebral palsy in Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Dunkhase-Heinl, Ulrike; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence, subtypes, severity and neuroimaging findings of cerebral palsy (CP) in a cohort of children born in Southern Denmark. Risk factors were analysed and aetiology considered. METHODS: A population-based cohort study covering 17...... prevention of CP is possible if the numbers of preterm births and multiple pregnancies can be reduced. FUNDING: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Programme is supported by the foundation "Ludvig og Sara Elsass Fond". TRIAL REGISTRATION: 2008-58-0034....

  18. Reversible cerebral vasconstriction syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Sub; Park, Ji Kang; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Jeong, Sun Young [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    We report a 46-year-old woman patient with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). She presented with severe headache, multiple cerebral infarction, and multifocal severe stenosis in the intracranial arteries on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). One month after the episode, a small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was incidentally detected during the evaluation of severe anemia and GIST was removed. Follow-up MRA was performed 3 months and 1 year after an initial attack of headache, and multifocal severe intracranial arterial stenotic lesions were completely resolved, she did not experience any episode of RCVS during the 2 years.

  19. Sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leonardo Scofano Dias

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The most effective treatment that addresses the cause of sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy is training of sensory awareness and oral motor skills, performed by a speech therapist. Botulinum toxin injection and the use of anticholinergics have a transient effect and are adjuvant to speech therapy; they should be considered in cases of moderate to severe sialorrhea or respiratory complications. Atropine sulfate is inexpensive and appears to have good clinical response combined with good safety profile. The use of trihexyphenidyl for the treatment of sialorrhea can be considered in dyskinetic forms of cerebral palsy or in selected cases.

  20. CYTOPROTECTIVE AND NEUROTROPHIC THERAPY FOR CEREBRAL STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Martynov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data of Russian and foreign studies on the pathophysiological mechanisms of brain injury in ischemic and hemorrhagicstroke, the specific features of brain plasticity and its activation after cerebral stroke, and main directions for basic and differentiation therapy for acute cerebrovascular pathology. Particular emphasis is placed on the issues of cytoprotective and neurotrophic therapy for cerebral stroke. Analysis of the data available in the literature shows that cytoprotective and neurotrophic therapies are important components of combination treatment in patients with stroke and favorably affect the functional outcome of the disease.

  1. Chinese herbal formula Tongluo Jiunao injection protects against cerebral ischemia by activating neurotrophin 3/tropomyosin-related kinase C pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Alesheikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese herbal formula Tongluo Jiunao, containing the active components Panax notoginseng and Gardenia jasminoides, has recently been patented and is in use clinically. It is known to be neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia, but the underlying pathway remains poorly understood. In the present study, we established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and administered Tongluo Jiunao, a positive control (Xuesai Tong, containing Panax notoginseng or saline intraperitoneally to investigate the pathway involved in the action of Tongluo Jiunao injection. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining showed that the cerebral infarct area was significantly smaller in model rats that received Tongluo Jiunao than in those that received saline. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed significantly greater expression of neurotrophin 3 and growth-associated protein 43 in ischemic cerebral tissue, and serum levels of neurotrophin 3, in the Tongluo Jiunao group than in the saline group. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining showed that after treatment with Tongluo Jiunao or Xuesai Tong, tropomyosin-related kinase C gene expression and immunoreactivity were significantly elevated compared with saline, with the greatest expression observed after Tongluo Jiunao treatment. These findings suggest that Tongluo Jiunao injection exerts a neuroprotective effect in rats with cerebral ischemia by activating the neurotrophin 3/tropomyosin-related kinase C pathway.

  2. Implementation of Early Diagnosis and Intervention Guidelines for Cerebral Palsy in a High-Risk Infant Follow-Up Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Rachel; Noritz, Garey; Maitre, Nathalie L

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common physical disability in childhood, and is mostly diagnosed after age 2 years. Delays in diagnosis can have negative long-term consequences for children and parents. New guidelines for early cerebral palsy diagnosis and intervention were recently published, after systematic review of the evidence by international multidisciplinary experts aiming to decrease age at diagnosis. The current study tested the feasibility of implementing these guidelines in an American clinical setting. We designed a stepwise implementation process in a neonatal intensive care follow-up clinic. Efficacy was tested by comparing 10-month pre- and post-implementation periods. Clinic visit types, cerebral palsy diagnosis, provider competencies and perspectives, and balancing measures were analyzed. Changes to infrastructure, assessments, scheduling algorithms, documentation and supports in diagnosis or counseling were successfully implemented. Number of three- to four-month screening visits increased (255 to 499, P cerebral palsy care guidelines for infants under age 2 years. We demonstrated for the first time in a US clinical setting the feasibility of implementation of international early diagnosis and treatment guidelines for cerebral palsy. This process is adaptable to other settings and underscores the necessity of future research on cerebral palsy treatments in infancy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing cerebral perfusion with external counterpulsation after ischaemic stroke: how long does it last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li; Lin, Wenhua; Han, Jinghao; Chen, Xiangyan; Leung, Thomas; Soo, Yannie; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-05-01

    External counterpulsation (ECP) is a non-invasive method used to augment cerebral perfusion in ischaemic stroke. We aimed to investigate time-course effects on blood pressure elevation and cerebral blood flow augmentation induced by ECP in ischaemic stroke. Patients with acute unilateral ischaemic stroke and large artery occlusive disease were recruited to receive 35 daily 1 h ECP treatment sessions. Serial transcranial Doppler monitoring of bilateral middle cerebral arteries was performed on days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 and 35 after stroke onset. Flow velocity changes before, during and after ECP and continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure data were recorded. The cerebral augmentation index (CAI) is the increase in the percentage of the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity during ECP compared with baseline. The CAI in patients with stroke was significantly higher on the ipsilateral side and on the contralateral side on day 3 (ipsilateral CAI, 9.3%; contralateral CAI, 7.2%), day 5 (7.0%; 6.7%), day 7 (6.8%; 6.0%), day 10 (6.0%; 5.1%), day 14 (4.7%; 2.6%) and day 21 (4.1%; 2.2%) after stroke onset than that in controls (-2.0%) (all pstroke. Differences in the percentage increase in the mean blood pressure did not change significantly over time in patients with stroke. Blood pressure elevation persists throughout ECP treatment, which consists of 35 sessions. However, cerebral blood flow augmentation may last at least 3 weeks and then appears to return to baseline 1 month after acute stroke onset. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Male-female differences in upregulation of vasoconstrictor responses in human cerebral arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Ahnstedt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Male-female differences may significantly impact stroke prevention and treatment in men and women, however underlying mechanisms for sexual dimorphism in stroke are not understood. We previously found in males that cerebral ischemia upregulates contractile receptors in cerebral arteries, which is associated with lower blood flow. The present study investigates if cerebral arteries from men and women differ in cerebrovascular receptor upregulation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Freshly obtained human cerebral arteries were placed in organ culture, an established model for studying receptor upregulation. 5-hydroxtryptamine type 1B (5-HT1B, angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 and endothelin-1 type A and B (ETA and ETB receptors were evaluated using wire myograph for contractile responses, real-time PCR for mRNA and immunohistochemistry for receptor expression. KEY RESULTS: Vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II and endothelin-1 was markedly lower in cultured cerebral arteries from women as compared to men. ETB receptor-mediated contraction occurred in male but not female arteries. Interestingly, there were similar upregulation in mRNA and expression of 5-HT1B, AT1, and ETB receptors and in local expression of Ang II after organ culture. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: In spite of receptor upregulation after organ culture in both sexes, cerebral arteries from women were significantly less responsive to vasoconstrictors angiotensin II and endothelin-1 as compared to arteries from men. This suggests receptor coupling and/or signal transduction mechanisms involved in cerebrovascular contractility may be suppressed in females. This is the first study to demonstrate sex differences in the vascular function of human brain arteries.

  5. Local O2 Balance in Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Improved during Pentobarbital Compared with Isoflurane Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Oak Z; Barsoum, Sylviana; Rah, Kang H; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2015-06-01

    Most anesthetics affect cerebral blood flow and metabolism. We compared microregional O2 balance in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion during pentobarbital and isoflurane anesthesia. After 1 hour of middle cerebral artery occlusion and a 2-hour reperfusion under isoflurane (1.4%, n = 14) or pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, n = 14) anesthesia in rats, regional cerebral blood flow using (14)C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography, microregional arterial and venous O2 saturation (20-60 μm in diameter) using cryomicrospectrophotometry, and the size of cortical infarct were determined. Ischemia-reperfusion decreased the average cortical venous O2 saturation in both pentobarbital and isoflurane groups (P pentobarbital despite a similar average regional cerebral blood flow and O2 consumption. The heterogeneity of venous O2 saturation reported as a coefficient of variation (100 × standard deviation/mean) was smaller (P pentobarbital than that with isoflurane (7.5 versus 16.1). The number of veins with low venous O2 saturation (pentobarbital (5 of 80 versus 24 of 80). The percentage of cortical infarct in total cortex was smaller with pentobarbital (5.2 ± 2.5% versus 12.3 ± 2.6%, P pentobarbital than isoflurane anesthesia. This improvement in microregional O2 balance with pentobarbital was accompanied by the reduced cortical infarct. Our data suggest that the neurologic outcome could vary during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion depending on the anesthetics used. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Acute mild hypoxia impairment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation assessed by spectral analysis and thigh-cuff deflation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsukawa, Hajime; Ogawa, Yojiro; Aoki, Ken; Yanagida, Ryo; Iwasaki, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Acute hypoxia may impair dynamic cerebral autoregulation. However, previous studies have been controversial. The difference in methods of estimation of dynamic cerebral autoregulation is reported to be responsible for conflicting reports. We, therefore, conducted this study using two representative methods of estimation of dynamic cerebral autoregulation to test our hypothesis that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired during acute exposure to mild hypoxia. Eleven healthy men were exposed to 15% oxygen concentration for two hours. They were examined under normoxia (21% O(2)) and hypoxia (15% O(2)). The mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the radial artery was measured by tonometry, and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) in the middle cerebral artery was measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was assessed by spectral and transfer function analyses of beat-by-beat changes in MAP and CBFv. Moreover, the dynamic rate of regulation and percentage restoration of CBFv were estimated when a temporal decrease in arterial pressure was induced by thigh-cuff deflation. Arterial oxygen saturation decreased significantly during hypoxia (97±0% to 88±1%), whereas respiratory rate was unchanged, as was steady-state CBFv. With 15% O(2), the very-low-frequency power of CBFv variability increased significantly. Transfer function coherence (0.40±0.02 to 0.53±0.05) and gain (0.51±0.07 cm/s/mmHg to 0.79±0.11 cm/s/mmHg) in the very-low-frequency range increased significantly. Moreover, the percentage restoration of CBF velocity determined by thigh-cuff deflation decreased significantly during hypoxia (125±25% to 65±8%). Taken together, these results obtained using two representative methods consistently indicate that mild hypoxia impairs dynamic cerebral autoregulation.

  7. In vivo proton MRS to quantify anesthetic effects of pentobarbital on cerebral metabolism and brain activity in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fei; Zhang, Yi; Iltis, Isabelle; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Chen, Wei

    2009-12-01

    To quantitatively investigate the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia on brain activity, brain metabolite concentrations and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose, in vivo proton MR spectra, and electroencephalography were measured in the rat brain with various doses of pentobarbital. The results show that (1) the resonances attributed to propylene glycol, a solvent in pentobarbital injection solution, can be robustly detected and quantified in the brain; (2) the concentration of most brain metabolites remained constant under the isoelectric state (silent electroencephalography) with a high dose of pentobarbital compared to mild isoflurane anesthesia condition, except for a reduction of 61% in the brain glucose level, which was associated with a 37% decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose, suggesting a significant amount of "housekeeping" energy for maintaining brain cellular integrity under the isoelectric state; and (3) electroencephalography and cerebral metabolic activities were tightly coupled to the pentobarbital anesthesia depth and they can be indirectly quantified by the propylene glycol resonance signal at 1.13 ppm. This study indicates that in vivo proton MR spectroscopy can be used to measure changes in cerebral metabolite concentrations and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose under varied pentobarbital anesthesia states; moreover, the propylene glycol signal provides a sensitive biomarker for quantitatively monitoring these changes and anesthesia depth noninvasively. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. MEK1/2 Inhibitor U0126 but Not Endothelin Receptor Antagonist Clazosentan Reduces Upregulation of Cerebrovascular Contractile Receptors and Delayed Cerebral Ischemia, and Improves Outcome after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro K; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm and late cerebral ischemia (LCI) remain leading causes of mortality in patients experiencing a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This occurs typically 3 to 4 days after the initial bleeding and peaks at 5 to 7 days. The underlying pathophysiology is still poorly understood. Becaus...

  9. Detection of cerebral arterial gas embolism using regional cerebral oxygen saturation, quantitative electroencephalography, and brain oxygen tension in the swine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, R. P.; Hollmann, M. W.; Stevens, M. F.; Kager, J.; van Gulik, T. M.; van Hulst, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral air emboli occur as a complication of invasive medical procedures. The sensitivity of cerebral monitoring methods for the detection of air emboli is not known. This study investigates the utility of electroencephalography and non-invasively measured cerebral oxygen saturation in the

  10. [Cerebral hydatic cyst and psychiatric disorders. Two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, F; Tazi, I; Maaroufi, K; El Moudden, A; Ghannane, H; Ait Benali, S

    2007-01-01

    unconscious of his disorders. The patient has first been put under classical neuroleptic 9 mg/day of Haloperidol and 200 mg/day of chlorpromazine. The diagnosis of schizophrenia has been kept according to criteria of DSM IV. The PANSS (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) was to 137 (score on a positive scale was to 34, score on a negative scale was to 35 and the general psychopathologie scale was to 58). One week after his hospitalization, he developed headache with subconfusion, a cerebral scanning has been made in emergency and showed a voluminous cyst in oval foramen compressing the mesencephalon strongly. The cyst was well limited, hypodense, not taking the contrast, and without intracerebral oedema, the diagnosis of cerebral hydatic cyst has been made. The complementary exploration didn't show any other localizations, and biologic exam results didn't show any particular anomalies. The patient has been operated in neurosurgery. The immediate evolution was favorable with disappearance of confusion and absence of complications. The patient was lost of view. Six months after, the patient has been readmitted to the psychiatric emergency. He dropped his neuroleptic treatment. He was aggressive, raving, hallucinated and depersonalized. The global score to the PANSS was 63. He has been put back under neuroleptics. Three weeks after improvement and passage of the PANSS to 30, the patient went out. We couldn't have a cerebral scanner of control because the patient had no medical assurance and no money for cerebral scanner. Case 2 - Patient aged of 53 years, father of four children, uneducated, native and resident of Marrakech, confectioner as profession. He is in contact with dogs since 12 years. He has been brought to the psychiatric emergencies by his family after an agitation. The history of his illness seemed to go back at eight months ago, by the progressive apparition of an instability, sleep disorders, hostility, associated with an emotional lability. To the interview he

  11. The Coupling of Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Glucose and Cerebral Blood Flow In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Steen; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    The energy supplied to the brain by metabolic substrate is largely utilized for maintaining synaptic transmission. In this regulation cerebral blood flow and glucose consumption is tightly coupled as well in the resting condition as during activation. Quantification of cerebral blood flow...... and metabolism was originally performed using the Kety-Schmidt method and this method still represent the gold standard by which subsequent methods have been evaluated. However, in its classical setting, the method overestimates cerebral blood flow. Studies of metabolic changes during activation must take...... difficulties due to limitation in resolution and partial volume effects. In contrast to the tight coupling between regional glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow, there is an uncoupling between flow and oxygen consumption as the latter only increases to a limited extend. The excess glucose uptake is thus...

  12. Regulatory mechanism of endothelin receptor B in the cerebral arteries after focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Anne-Sofie; Thigarajah, Rushani; Edvinsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    drug targets to restore normal cerebral artery contractile function as part of successful neuroprotective therapy. METHODS: We have employed in vitro methods on human and rat cerebral arteries to study the regulatory mechanisms and the efficacy of target selective inhibitor, Mithramycin A (MitA...... arteries. RESULTS: Increased expression of specificity protein (Sp1) was observed in human and rat cerebral arteries after organ culture, strongly correlating with the ETBR upregulation. Similar observations were made in MCAO rats. Treatment with MitA, a Sp1 specific inhibitor, significantly downregulated...... vasoconstriction in focal cerebral ischemia via MEK-ERK signaling, which is also conserved in humans. The results show that MitA can effectively be used to block ETBR mediated vasoconstriction as a supplement to an existing ischemic stroke therapy....

  13. Cell-mediated allergy to cerebral aneurysm clip causing extensive cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Terence; Tee, Jin W; Han, Tiew F

    2014-10-01

    The authors report the first case of vasogenic cerebral edema due to a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to a nickel-containing aneurysm clip. The patient initially presented for elective clipping of a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm, and on long-term follow-up she demonstrated relapsing-remitting cerebral edema. Four years post-aneurysm clipping, she underwent an exploratory craniotomy given unsuccessful conservative management of her headaches and imaging evidence of cerebral edema with mass effect. During surgery, gross parenchymal edema and inflammatory nodules were observed. Histopathology was consistent with a cell-mediated (Type IV) hypersensitivity reaction. Concerns regarding nickel allergy are often reported in the cardiac literature. This case highlights the possibility of nickel hypersensitivity when using nickel-containing aneurysm clips, especially in patients with known nickel allergies.

  14. Alterations in the Cerebral Microvascular Proteome Expression Profile After Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spray, Stine; Johansson, Sara E; Edwards, Alistair V G

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at obtaining an in-depth mapping of expressional changes of the cerebral microvasculature after transient global cerebral ischemia (GCI) and the impact on these GCI-induced expressional changes of post-GCI treatment with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1/2) inhibitor....... The proteomic profile of the isolated cerebral microvasculature 72 h after GCI (compared to sham) indicated that the main expressional changes could be divided into nine categories: (1) cellular respiration, (2) remodelling of the extracellular matrix, (3) decreased contractile phenotype, (4) clathrin...... categories. Flow cytometry confirmed key findings from the proteome such as upregulation of the extracellular proteins lamininβ2 and nidogen2 (p expressional changes in the cerebral microvasculature after GCI...

  15. Cerebral versus Ocular Visual Impairment: The Impact on Developmental Neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Maria B. C.; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Martín-Hernández, Juan; López-Miguel, Alberto; Maldonado, Miguel; Baladrón, Carlos; Bauer, Corinna M.; Merabet, Lotfi B.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical/cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is clinically defined as significant visual dysfunction caused by injury to visual pathways and structures occurring during early perinatal development. Depending on the location and extent of damage, children with CVI often present with a myriad of visual deficits including decreased visual acuity and impaired visual field function. Most striking, however, are impairments in visual processing and attention which have a significant impact on learning, development, and independence. Within the educational arena, current evidence suggests that strategies designed for individuals with ocular visual impairment are not effective in the case of CVI. We propose that this variance may be related to differences in compensatory neuroplasticity related to the type of visual impairment, as well as underlying alterations in brain structural connectivity. We discuss the etiology and nature of visual impairments related to CVI, and how advanced neuroimaging techniques (i.e., diffusion-based imaging) may help uncover differences between ocular and cerebral causes of visual dysfunction. Revealing these differences may help in developing future strategies for the education and rehabilitation of individuals living with visual impairment. PMID:28082927

  16. Cerebral versus Ocular Visual Impairment: The Impact on Developmental Neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Maria B C; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Martín-Hernández, Juan; López-Miguel, Alberto; Maldonado, Miguel; Baladrón, Carlos; Bauer, Corinna M; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2016-01-01

    Cortical/cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is clinically defined as significant visual dysfunction caused by injury to visual pathways and structures occurring during early perinatal development. Depending on the location and extent of damage, children with CVI often present with a myriad of visual deficits including decreased visual acuity and impaired visual field function. Most striking, however, are impairments in visual processing and attention which have a significant impact on learning, development, and independence. Within the educational arena, current evidence suggests that strategies designed for individuals with ocular visual impairment are not effective in the case of CVI. We propose that this variance may be related to differences in compensatory neuroplasticity related to the type of visual impairment, as well as underlying alterations in brain structural connectivity. We discuss the etiology and nature of visual impairments related to CVI, and how advanced neuroimaging techniques (i.e., diffusion-based imaging) may help uncover differences between ocular and cerebral causes of visual dysfunction. Revealing these differences may help in developing future strategies for the education and rehabilitation of individuals living with visual impairment.

  17. People With Cerebral Palsy: Effects of and Perspectives for Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayston, Margaret J.

    2001-01-01

    The movement disorder of cerebral palsy (CP) is expressed in a variety of ways and to varying degrees in each individual. The condition has become more complex over the last 20 years with the increasing survival of children born at less than 28 to 30 weeks gestationai age. Impairments present in children with CP as a direct result of the brain injury or occurring indirectly to compensate for underlying problems include abnormal muscle tone; weakness and lack of fitness; limited variety of muscle synergies; contracture and altered biomechanics, the net result being limited functional ability. Other contributors to the motor disorder include sensory, cognitive and perceptual impairments. In recent years understanding of the motor problem has increased, but less is known about effects of therapy. Evidence suggests that therapy can improve functional possibilities for children with cerebral palsy but is inconclusive as to which approach might be most beneficial. The therapist requires an understanding of the interaction of all systems, cognitive/perceptual, motor, musculoskeletal, sensory and behavioral, in the context of the development and plasticity of the CNS. It is necessary to understand the limitations of the damaged immature nervous system, but important to optimize the child's functional possibilities. PMID:11530888

  18. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Faraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient′s history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control.

  19. The effect of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and total circulatory arrest on cerebral metabolism in neonates, infants, and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, W J; Kern, F H; Ungerleider, R M; Boyd, J L; Quill, T; Smith, L R; Baldwin, B; Reves, J G

    1991-05-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass management in neonates, infants, and children often requires the use of deep hypothermia at 18 degrees C with occasional periods of circulatory arrest and represents marked physiologic extremes of temperature and perfusion. The safety of these techniques is largely dependent on the reduction of metabolism, particularly cerebral metabolism. We studied the effect of hypothermia on cerebral metabolism during cardiac surgery and quantified the changes. Cerebral metabolism was measured before, during, and after hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in 46 pediatric patients, aged 1 day to 14 years. Patients were grouped on the basis of the different bypass techniques commonly used in children: group A--moderate hypothermic bypass at 28 degrees C; group B--deep hypothermic bypass at 18 degrees to 20 degrees C with maintenance of continuous flow; and group C--deep hypothermic circulatory arrest at 18 degrees C. Cerebral metabolism significantly decreased under hypothermic conditions in all groups compared with control levels at normothermia, the data demonstrating an exponential relationship between temperature and cerebral metabolism and an average temperature coefficient of 3.65. There was no significant difference in the rate of metabolism reduction (temperature coefficient) in patients cooled to 28 degrees and 18 degrees C. From these data we were able to derive an equation that numerically expresses a hypothermic metabolic index, which quantitates duration of brain protection provided by reduction of cerebral metabolism owing to hypothermic bypass over any temperature range. Based on this index, patients cooled to 28 degrees C have a predicted ischemic tolerance of 11 to 19 minutes. The predicted duration that the brain can tolerate ischemia ("safe" period of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest) in patients cooled to 18 degrees C, based on our metabolic index, is 39 to 65 minutes, similar to the safe period of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

  20. Decreased light attenuation in cerebral cortex during cerebral edema detected using optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Carissa L. R.; Szu, Jenny I.; Eberle, Melissa M.; Wang, Yan; Hsu, Mike S.; Binder, Devin K.; Park, B. Hyle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cerebral edema develops in response to a variety of conditions, including traumatic brain injury and stroke, and contributes to the poor prognosis associated with these injuries. This study examines the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detecting cerebral edema in vivo. Three-dimensional imaging of an in vivo water intoxication model in mice was performed using a spectral-domain OCT system centered at 1300 nm. The change in attenuation coefficient was calculated and cere...

  1. Hemorrhagic transformation and cerebral edema in acute ischemic stroke: Link to cerebral autoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Pedro; Azevedo, Elsa; Serrador, Jorge; Rocha, Isabel; Sorond, Farzaneh

    2017-01-15

    Hemorrhagic transformation and cerebral edema are feared complications of acute ischemic stroke but mechanisms are poorly understood and reliable early markers are lacking. Early assessment of cerebrovascular hemodynamics may advance our knowledge in both areas. We examined the relationship between dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) in the early hours post ischemia, and the risk of developing hemorrhagic transformation and cerebral edema at 24h post stroke METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 46 patients from our center with acute ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory. Cerebrovascular resistance index was calculated. Dynamic CA was assessed by transfer function analysis (coherence, phase and gain) of the spontaneous blood flow velocity and blood pressure oscillations. Infarct volume, hemorrhagic transformation, cerebral edema, and white matter changes were collected from computed tomography performed at presentation and 24h. At admission, phase was lower (worse CA) in patients with hemorrhagic transformation [6.6±30 versus 45±38°; adjusted odds ratio 0.95 (95% confidence internal 0.94-0.98), p=0.023] and with cerebral edema [6.6±30 versus 45±38°, adjusted odds ratio 0.96 (0.92-0.999), p=0.044]. Progression to edema was associated with lower cerebrovascular resistance (1.4±0.2 versus 2.3±1.5mmHg/cm/s, p=0.033) and increased cerebral blood flow velocity (51±25 versus 42±17cm/s, p=0.033) at presentation. All hemodynamic differences resolved at 3months CONCLUSIONS: Less effective CA in the early hour post ischemic stroke is associated with increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation and cerebral edema, possibly reflecting breakthrough hyperperfusion and microvascular injury. Early assessment of dynamic CA could be useful in identifying individuals at risk for these complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Studies of cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Shin

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of 25 patients with Parkinson's disease were studied. The rCBF was measured with the intra-arterial Xe-133 injection method. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Sixty four % of Parkinson's disease patients showed ventricular dilation, and 76% of Parkinson's disease patients showed cortical atrophy on the CT scan, but we had to allow for the effects of the natural aging process on these results. 2) No correlation was recognized either between cerebral atrophy and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between cerebral atrophy and the duration of Parkinson's disease. 3) In Parkinson's disease patients, the mean rCBF was lower than that of normal control subjects. The difference was even more remarkable in older patients. Only 40% of Parkinson's disease patients showed hyperfrontal pattern. 4) There was no correlation either between the mean rCBF and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between the mean rCBF and the duration of Parkinson's disease. There was no significant difference between the mean rCBF of Parkinson's disease patients receiving levodopa and that of untreated patients. 5) The mean rCBF decreased in patients with cerebral atrophy on the CT scan. 6) Parkinson's disease patients with intellectual impairment showed cerebral atrophy and a remarkable decrease of the mean rCBF. 7) The effect of aging on cerebral atrophy on the CT scan had to be allowed for, but judging from the decrease of the mean rCBF, the cerebral cortex is evidently involved in Parkinson's disease. 8) The rCBF decline in Parkinson's disease patients may be related with the diminished cortical metabolic rate due to a remote effect of striatal dysfunction and a disturbance of mesocortical dopaminergic pathways. (J.P.N.)

  3. A quantitative study of the physiological cerebral atrophy with aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, K.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of discriminating pathological cerebral atrophy from physiological atrophy during aging is reported. The authors advocate a pixel counting method using a minicomputer for the quantitative measurement of cerebral atrophy. Five hundred cases were studied with this quantitative method and the normal range of the physiological atrophy was determined statistically. In order to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy easily, the conventional linear measurement methods were compared with the pixel counting method using multivariant analysis, and a simple formula for the calculation of the degree of cerebral atrophy is proposed. Using this formula and the normal range, pathological cerebral atrophy is easily detectable. (orig.)

  4. Short communication: Cerebral Malaria Complicated by Blindness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral malaria is a severe manifestation of a parasitic infection caused by Plasmodium falciparum. The sequelae of this disease such as blindness, deafness, loss of motor function could be emotionally traumatic and physically disabling. We, therefore, present this case of an 8‑year‑old boy who presented with high‑grade ...

  5. Small juxtacortical hemorrhages in cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutinho, Jonathan M.; van den Berg, René; Zuurbier, Susanna M.; VanBavel, Ed; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B.; Stam, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) are common in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). We examined whether small juxtacortical hemorrhages (JCHs) are characteristic for CVT and studied their radiological and pathological properties. We identified all patients with CVT and an ICH at baseline

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow in aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, K; Larsen, B; Skinhøj, E

    1978-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in 13 aphasic patients with left hemisphere lesions, using the intracarotid xenon 133 injection method and a 254-detector gamma camera system. The rCBF was measured during rest and during various function tests, including a simple speech test...

  7. Excessive oral intake caffeine altered cerebral cortex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caffeine is commonly consumed in an effort to enhance speed in performance and wakefulness. However, little is known about the deleterious effects it can produce on the brain, this study aimed at determining the extents of effects and damage that can be caused by excessive consumption of caffeine on the cerebral cortex ...

  8. Early identification and intervention in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anna; Greisen, Gorm; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Infants with possible cerebral palsy (CP) are commonly assumed to benefit from early diagnosis and early intervention, but substantial evidence for this is lacking. There is no consensus in the literature on a definition of 'early', but this review focuses on interventions initiated within...

  9. Cerebral blood flow in acute mountain sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Wright, Anne; Lassen, N A

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured using the radioactive xenon technique and were related to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). In 12 subjects, ascending from 150 to 3,475 m, CBF was 24% increased at 24 h [45.1 to 55.9 initial slope index (ISI) units] and 4% increased...

  10. Cerebral Malaria Complicated by Blindness, Deafness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A diagnosis of cerebral malaria was made, and the patient was commenced on intravenous quinine and parenteral paracetamol. He was transfused while on admission in the emergency room. The patient regained consciousness after 12 days of treatment but was found to have blindness and deafness following reviews by.

  11. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  12. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observ...

  13. Spontaneous peripheral gangrene following severe cerebral malaria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    developed arrythmia / ventricular fibrillation after quinine therapy. QJM 1998 ; 91 : 246. 4 Jain D, Srivastavo S, Singhai S S. A rare presentation of falciparum malaria JAPI 1995; 45582. 5 Chittichai P, Chierakul N, Davis T M. Peripheral gangrene in non-fatal paediatric cerebral malaria: a report of two cases in Southeast Asia.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genes associated with hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy APP CST3 ITM2B Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation ... a disorder seems to run in my family? What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about ... APP-related Genetic Testing Registry: Dementia familial British Genetic ...

  15. Magnetic resonance angiography in suspected cerebral vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe; De Ruyter, Nele; Wilms, Guido [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Department of Medical Imaging Computing, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Velghe, Beatrijs [Department of Radiology, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Schiepse Bos 6, 3600, Genk (Belgium)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the technical capacity and diagnostic accuracy of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in suspected cerebral vasculitis in a retrospective analysis of MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 14 young patients with clinical and/or radiological suspicion of cerebral vasculitis. A total of nine arteries were evaluated in each patient. Consensus review of DSA by three observers was the reference standard. The sensitivity for detecting a stenosis varied from 62 to 79% for MRA and from 76 to 94% for DSA, depending on the observer. The specificity for detecting a stenosis varied from 83 to 87% for MRA and from 83 to 97% for DSA. Using the criterion ''more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions'' to consider the examination as being true positive, the false-positive rates for MRA and DSA were comparable. MRA plays a role as the first angiographical examination in the diagnostic work-up of suspected cerebral vasculitis. When more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions are depicted on MRA, DSA is not expected to add a significant diagnostic contribution in a patient with suspected cerebral vasculitis. DSA remains necessary when MRA is normal or when less than three stenoses are seen. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography in suspected cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, Philippe; De Ruyter, Nele; Wilms, Guido; Maes, Frederik; Velghe, Beatrijs

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the technical capacity and diagnostic accuracy of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in suspected cerebral vasculitis in a retrospective analysis of MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 14 young patients with clinical and/or radiological suspicion of cerebral vasculitis. A total of nine arteries were evaluated in each patient. Consensus review of DSA by three observers was the reference standard. The sensitivity for detecting a stenosis varied from 62 to 79% for MRA and from 76 to 94% for DSA, depending on the observer. The specificity for detecting a stenosis varied from 83 to 87% for MRA and from 83 to 97% for DSA. Using the criterion ''more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions'' to consider the examination as being true positive, the false-positive rates for MRA and DSA were comparable. MRA plays a role as the first angiographical examination in the diagnostic work-up of suspected cerebral vasculitis. When more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions are depicted on MRA, DSA is not expected to add a significant diagnostic contribution in a patient with suspected cerebral vasculitis. DSA remains necessary when MRA is normal or when less than three stenoses are seen. (orig.)

  17. Cerebral hemodynamics and functional prognosis in hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Osamu; Nishikawa, Michio; Watanabe, Shu; Yamakawa, Hiroyasu; Kinoshita, Yoshimasa; Uno, Akira; Handa, Hajime

    1989-01-01

    The functional outcome of cerebral hemodynamics in the chronic stage of juvenile hydrocephalus was determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Five patients including three with aqueductal stenosis, one with post-meningitic hydrocephalus, and one case with hydrocephalus having developed after repair of a huge occipital encephalocele. Early images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were obtained 25 minutes after intravenous injection of 123-I-iodoamphetamine (IMP), and late images were scanned 3 hours later. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) was also measured using 99m Tc in three patients. Twenty cases with adult communicating hydrocephalus were also investigated from the point of view of shunt effectiveness. Although there was no remarkable change in the cerebrovascular bed in the juvenile cases, CBF of the remnant brain parenchyma was good irrespective of the degree of ventricular dilatation. There was a periventricular-related IMP uptake in each case; however, it somehow matched the ventricular span. Functional outcome one to 23 years after the initial shunt operation was good in every case, despite multiple shunt revisions. Redistribution on late images had no bearing on clinical states. In adult cases, 8 patients with effective shunting demonstrated a relatively localized periventricular low perfusion, with preoperative increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. On the contrary, 12 patients with no improvement with or without ventricular-reduced IMP uptake, despite low CSF pressure. The present study indicates that periventricular hemodynamics may play an important role in cerebral function compromised by hydrocephalus. (J.P.N.)

  18. Cerebral hemodynamics and functional prognosis in hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Osamu; Nishikawa, Michio; Watanabe, Shu; Yamakawa, Hiroyasu; Kinoshita, Yoshimasa; Uno, Akira; Handa, Hajime (Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    The functional outcome of cerebral hemodynamics in the chronic stage of juvenile hydrocephalus was determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Five patients including three with aqueductal stenosis, one with post-meningitic hydrocephalus, and one case with hydrocephalus having developed after repair of a huge occipital encephalocele. Early images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were obtained 25 minutes after intravenous injection of 123-I-iodoamphetamine (IMP), and late images were scanned 3 hours later. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) was also measured using {sup 99m}Tc in three patients. Twenty cases with adult communicating hydrocephalus were also investigated from the point of view of shunt effectiveness. Although there was no remarkable change in the cerebrovascular bed in the juvenile cases, CBF of the remnant brain parenchyma was good irrespective of the degree of ventricular dilatation. There was a periventricular-related IMP uptake in each case; however, it somehow matched the ventricular span. Functional outcome one to 23 years after the initial shunt operation was good in every case, despite multiple shunt revisions. Redistribution on late images had no bearing on clinical states. In adult cases, 8 patients with effective shunting demonstrated a relatively localized periventricular low perfusion, with preoperative increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. On the contrary, 12 patients with no improvement with or without ventricular-reduced IMP uptake, despite low CSF pressure. The present study indicates that periventricular hemodynamics may play an important role in cerebral function compromised by hydrocephalus. (J.P.N.).

  19. CEREBRAL CORTEX DAMAGE INDUCED BY ACUTE ORAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... Keywords: Brain, cerebral cortex, alcohol, Wistar rats, oxidative stress. INTRODUCTION. The prefrontal cortex is ... damage, memory loss, sleep disorders and psychosis, with or without ..... and emotional consequences of binge drinking: Role of amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Philos Trans R Soc Lond Biol ...

  20. Progress in Drug Treatment of Cerebral Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y Y; Shen, F C; Xie, D; Han, Q P; Fang, M; Chen, C B; Zeng, H K

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema causes intracranial hypertension (ICH) which leads to severe outcome of patients in the clinical setting. Effective anti-edema therapy may significantly decrease the mortality in a variety of neurological conditions. At present drug treatment is a cornerstone in the management of cerebral edema. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy. Mannitol and hypertonic saline (HS) are the most commonly used osmotic agents. The relative safety and efficacy of HS and mannitol in the treatment of cerebral edema and reduction of enhanced ICP have been demonstrated in the past decades. Apart from its osmotic force, HS exerts anti-edema effects partly through inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) Cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in astrocytes. Melatonin may also reduce brain edema and exert neuroprotective effect on several central nervous system diseases through inhibition of inflammatory response. The inhibitors of Na/H exchanger, NKCC and AQP4 may attenuate brain edema formation through inhibition of excessive transportation of ion and water from blood into the cerebral tissue. In this review we survey some of the most recent findings in the drug treatment of brain edema focusing on the use of osmotherapy, melatonin and inhibitors of ion cotransporters and water channels. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these agents would help to improve in the clinical management of patients with brain edema.

  1. THE PATHOGENESIS OF CEREBRAL GLIOMATOUS CYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOHLE, PNM; VERHAGEN, ITHJ; TEELKEN, AW; BLAAUW, EH; GO, KG

    In this study, the authors have examined the mechanism of the formation of tumor cysts. Cyst fluid samples were obtained during surgery and by percutaneous aspiration from 22 patients with cystic cerebral gliomas. The concentration of protein was measured in the cyst fluid and blood plasma. Analysis

  2. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito

    1991-01-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy in the cerebral metastatic malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Albuquerque, L.F.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Peres, O.; Bandeira, D.C.; Calvis, L.A.; Santos, I.D.A.O.; Belfort, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 21 patients with cerebral metastasis from malignant melanoma was done. Two groups of patients were defined: patients receiving cranial radiation therapy with total dose higher than 20 Gy with or without other Kinds of therapy and patients not irradiated. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. Cerebrovascular endothelin receptor upregulation in cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a serious neurological disease and the third leading cause of death in the western world. In roughly 15 % of the cases, the cause is due to an intracranial haemorrhage, and the remaining 85 % represent ischemic strokes. Ischemic stroke is caused by the occlusion of a cerebral artery...

  5. Epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruck Isac

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence and characteristics of epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy in a tertiary center. METHODS: a total of 100 consecutive patients with cerebral palsy were retrospectively studied. Criteria for inclusion were follow-up period for at least 2 years. Types and incidence of epilepsy were correlated with the different forms of cerebral palsy. Other factors associated with epilepsy such as age of first seizure, neonatal seizures and family history of epilepsy were also analysed. RESULTS: follow-up ranged between 24 and 151 months (mean 57 months. The overall prevalence of epilepsy was 62%. Incidence of epilepsy was predominant in patients with hemiplegic and tetraplegic palsies: 70.6% and 66.1%, respectively. First seizure occurred during the first year of life in 74.2% of patients with epilepsy. Generalized and partial were the predominant types of epilepsy (61.3% and 27.4%, respectively. Thirty-three (53.2% of 62 patients were seizure free for at least 1 year. Neonatal seizures and family history of epilepsy were associated with a higher incidence of epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS: epilepsy in cerebral palsy can be predicted if seizures occur in the first year of life, in neonatal period and if there is family history of epilepsy.

  6. Cerebral Palsy. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral palsy--also known as CP--is a condition caused by injury to the parts of the brain that control the body's ability to use muscles effectively. Often the injury happens before birth, sometimes during delivery or soon after birth. The symptoms will differ from person to person and change as children and their nervous systems mature. This…

  7. Parental infertility and cerebral palsy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Basso, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have been reported to have a higher risk of cerebral palsy (CP), perhaps due to the higher frequency of preterm birth, multiple births or vanishing embryo in the pregnancies. However, it has been suggested...

  8. Educational Solutions for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Lynn; Omichinski, Donna Riccio; Miller, Nicole; Sandella, Danielle; Warschausky, Seth

    2010-01-01

    This paper characterizes educational strengths and needs of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and connects research findings from the University of Michigan's Adapted Cognitive Assessment Lab (ACAL) to current special educational requirements. It acknowledges the uniqueness of educating a child with significant motor and communication disabilities…

  9. Obstruction of cerebral arteries in childhood stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velkey, I.; Lombay, B.; Panczel, G.

    1992-01-01

    Middle cerebral artery obstruction in children is reviewed by our two cases. Ischemic childhood stroke was caused by moyamoya disease in the first, and by fibromuscular dysplasia in the second patient. In both cases transcranial Doppler sonography and cranial CT were performed, but the final diagnosis was made by angiography. The importance of angiography in childhood stroke is emphasized. (orig.)

  10. Cerebral and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations CASE REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography (CT) examination of the brain with intrave- nous contrast revealed multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), predominantly involving the left cerebral hemisphere and thalamic region (Fig. 2). On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) multiple tightly packed masses of flow voids were found (Figs 3 ...

  11. Pretend Play of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pacciulio, Amanda Mota; dos Santos, Camila Abrao; dos Santos, Jair Licio; Stagnitti, Karen Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Evaluate self-initiated pretend play of children with cerebral palsy. Method: Twenty preschool children participated in the study. Pretend play ability was measured by using the child-initiated pretend play assessment culturally adapted to Brazil. Results: There were significant negative correlations between the children's…

  12. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptak, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

  13. SPECT analysis of recent cerebral infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raynaud, C; Rancurel, G; Tzourio, N

    1989-01-01

    We measured regional cerebral blood flow and [123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) uptake in 16 patients with unilateral brain infarcts during the subacute period (Day 3 to Day 50) and again after 3 months. Our results show that the central and peripheral areas described earlier in the chronic period were ...

  14. Clinical and pathological study on 10 cases of cerebral lobe hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qi LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical data and pathological features of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA diagnosed pathologically, thereby to improve the knowledge and diagnosis of the disease. Methods The clinical data of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA, collected in the General Hospital of Shenyang Command from 1983 up to now, were retrospectively analyzed, and the clinical and neuropathological features of these cases were summarized. Results Of the 10 patients, 2 suffered from single lobar hemorrhage and 8 multiple lobar hemorrhage, all of them were confirmed pathologically to have ruptured into the subarachnoid space. Pathological examination revealed microaneurysm in 2 cases, "double barrel" change in 4 cases, multiple arteriolar clusters in 5 cases, obliterative onion-liked intima change in 4 cases, and fibrinoid necrosis of vessel wall in 7 cases. In addition, neurofibrillary tangles were found in 8 cases, and senile plaque was observed in 5 cases. Conclusions Cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA is mainly located in the parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, readily breaking into the subarachnoid space, and it is often multiple and recurrent. The CAA associated microvasculopathy was found frequently in the autopsy sample of CAA related cerebral lobar hemorrhage, and it may contribute to the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.04

  15. Prediction of cerebral ischemia due to cerebral vasospasm in SAH using SPECT and 123I-IMP with acetazolamide test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawara, Jyoji; Wada, Keiji; Takeda, Rihei; Usami, Takashi; Hashimoto, Ikuo; Shimazaki, Mitsuteru; Tanaka, Chiharu; Nakamura, Jun-ichi; Suematsu, Katsumi.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of predicting cerebral ischemia due to cerebral vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), serial evaluation of the cerebral vasodilatory capacity by the acetazolamide test was conducted, using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and N-isopropyl 123 I-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP), in 17 patients with cerebral vasospasm following early surgery for ruptured aneurysms. The degree of vasospasm measured on the angiograms was classified into the following three types; mild degree (25%>stenosis), moderate degree (25∼50% stenosis), and severe degree(50%cerebral vasodilatory capacity was preserved at the normal level during the period of vasospasm. In eight patients with asymptomatic vasospasm (moderate degree), a transient limitation of cerebral vasodiratory capacity was observed between the 6th and 16th day after a rupture of the cerebral aneurysm. In five patients with symptomatic vasospasm resulting in reversible ischemia, a marked limitation of cerebral vasodilatory capacity was noted between the 7th and 15th day, and a delayed recovery of cerebral vasodilatory capacity was observed. This reversibility of cerebral vasodilatory capacity in patients with cerebral vasospasm suggests that a local decrease of purfusion pressure due to cerebral vasospasm causes compensatory vasodilation of intraparenchymal arteries and the vasodilatory reaction to acetazolamide was limited until the release of the cerebral vasospasm. Therefore, assessment of cerebral vasodilatory capacity in SAH by the acetazolamide test might predict the appearance and continuation of potential ischemia of the brain caused by the reduction of perfusion pressure due to cerebral vasospasm. (J.P.N.)

  16. Perivascular expression and potent vasoconstrictor effect of dynorphin A in cerebral arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Ruisanchez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous literary data indicate that dynorphin A (DYN-A has a significant impact on cerebral circulation, especially under pathophysiological conditions, but its potential direct influence on the tone of cerebral vessels is obscure. The aim of the present study was threefold: 1 to clarify if DYN-A is present in cerebral vessels, 2 to determine if it exerts any direct effect on cerebrovascular tone, and if so, 3 to analyze the role of κ-opiate receptors in mediating the effect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of DYN-A in perivascular nerves of rat pial arteries as well as in both rat and human intraparenchymal vessels of the cerebral cortex. In isolated rat basilar and middle cerebral arteries (BAs and MCAs DYN-A (1-13 and DYN-A (1-17 but not DYN-A (1-8 or dynorphin B (DYN-B induced strong vasoconstriction in micromolar concentrations. The maximal effects, compared to a reference contraction induced by 124 mM K(+, were 115±6% and 104±10% in BAs and 113±3% and 125±9% in MCAs for 10 µM of DYN-A (1-13 and DYN-A (1-17, respectively. The vasoconstrictor effects of DYN-A (1-13 could be inhibited but not abolished by both the κ-opiate receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (NORBI and blockade of G(i/o-protein mediated signaling by pertussis toxin. Finally, des-Tyr(1 DYN-A (2-13, which reportedly fails to activate κ-opiate receptors, induced vasoconstriction of 45±11% in BAs and 50±5% in MCAs at 10 µM, which effects were resistant to NORBI. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: DYN-A is present in rat and human cerebral perivascular nerves and induces sustained contraction of rat cerebral arteries. This vasoconstrictor effect is only partly mediated by κ-opiate receptors and heterotrimeric G(i/o-proteins. To our knowledge our present findings are the first to indicate that DYN-A has a direct cerebral vasoconstrictor effect and that a dynorphin-induced vascular action may be

  17. Glycopyrrolate prevents extreme bradycardia and cerebral deoxygenation during electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Andersson, John-Erik; Koch, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The stimulation phase of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces bradycardia. We evaluated the effect of this bradycardia on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by administration of the anticholinergic drug glycopyrrolate (Glp). Cerebral perfusion was estimated by transcranial ultrasound in the mi......The stimulation phase of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces bradycardia. We evaluated the effect of this bradycardia on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by administration of the anticholinergic drug glycopyrrolate (Glp). Cerebral perfusion was estimated by transcranial ultrasound...... in the middle cerebral artery reporting the mean flow velocity (middle cerebral artery [MCA] V(mean)), and cerebral oxygenation was determined by near-infrared spectroscopy of the frontal lobe. Before ECT, heart rate (HR) was 84 beats min(-1) (66-113; median and range) and decreased to 17 (7-85) beats min(-1......) during the stimulation phase of ECT (P

  18. Cerebral hemometabolism: from isolated measurements to monitoring and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cruz

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview is presented on historical and multivariate aspects of cerebral hemometabolism. This involves a full multivariate approach, from blood pressure to cerebral metabolism. From isolated measurements, to monitoring and management, a comprehensive overview of cerebral hemometabolism is addressed, from its inception to current days, up to a new concept, the cerebral hemodynamic reserve. A multivariate functional diagram is proposed, to summarize the multivariate interrelationships of cerebral hemometabolism. A generic proposition is mode for studies of truly normal cerebral hemometabolism in children, for subsequent clinical applications. Another proposition is made for multivariate cerebral hemometabolic monitoring, in a broad variety of circumstances of predominantly global changes in intracranial dynamics, both in animal and clinical research.

  19. Evaluation of radiation risk and work practices during cerebral interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Raghuram, L; Korah, Ipeson P; Raj, D Victor [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632004 (India)

    2003-09-01

    This study was intended to evaluate radiation risk to patients during cerebral interventions and the contribution to this risk from work practices. Thirty nine patients undergoing cerebral interventions in a digital subtraction angiography suite were included in this study. Patients who underwent cerebral interventions were categorised into two groups according to the number of cerebral interventions performed on them, and their effective doses were calculated. The effective dose for patients undergoing a single cerebral intervention (group A) varied from 1.55 to 15.9 mSv and for multiple cerebral interventions (group B) varied from 16.52 to 43.52 mSv. Two patients who underwent multiple cerebral interventions (group B) had alopecia of the irradiated scalp.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, P.; Sharma, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, U. (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis and Dept. of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India))

    2008-06-15

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  1. Transbrachial artery approach for selective cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Morisako, Toshitaka; Numazawa, Shinichi; Yamada, Keisuke; Nagai, Shigeki; Shibamoto, Kenji (Osaka Neurological Inst., Toyonaka (Japan))

    1990-02-01

    Transaxillary or transbrachial approaches to the cerebral vessels have been reported, but selective angiography of all four vessels has not been possible through one route. In this report, a new technique for selective cerebral angiography with transbrachial approach is described. One hundred and twenty three patients with cerebral infarction, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, intracerebral hemorrhage, epilepsy, or cerebral tumor were examined. Those patients consisted of 85 outpatients and 38 inpatients whose age ranged from 15 years old to 82 years old. The patients were examined via the transbrachial approach (97 cases via the right brachial, 29 cases via the left). Materials included a DSA system (Digital Fluorikon 5000, General Electric Co.), a 4 French tight J-curved Simmons 80-cm catheter, a 19-gauge extra-thin-wall Seldinger needle, and a J/Straight floppy 125-cm guide-wire. Generally, the volume of the contrast agent (300 mgI/ml iopamidol) used in the common carotid artery angiogram was 6 ml, while that used in the vertebral artery angiogram was 4 ml. If catheterization of the vertebral artery or right common carotid artery was unsuccessful, about 8 ml of the contrast agent was injected into the subclavian or branchiocephalic artery. Definitive diagnosis and a decision on proper treatment of the patients can be easily obtained, and the results were clinically satisfactory. Moreover, no complications were encountered in this study. This new technique making a transbrachial approach to the cerebral vessels using the DSA system is introduced here. Neurosurgeons can use this technique easily, and they will find that it provides them with all the information they need about the patient. (author).

  2. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, P.; Sharma, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, U.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 , and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  3. Trunk movements during gait in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Michael; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Lempereur, Mathieu; Lascombes, Pierre; De Coulon, Geraldo; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Lower limb deficits have been widely studied during gait in cerebral palsy, deficits in upper body have received little attention. The purpose of this research was to describe the characteristics of trunk movement of cerebral palsy children in terms of type of deficits (diplegia/hemiplegia) and gross motor function classification system (1, 2 or 3). Data from 92 cerebral palsy children, which corresponds to 141 clinical gait analysis, were retrospectively selected. Kinematic parameters of trunk were extracted from thorax and spine angles in the sagittal, transverse and coronal planes. The range of motion and the mean positions over the gait cycle were analysed. Intra-group differences between the children with diplegia or hemiplegia, gross motor function classification systems 1 to 3 and typically developing participants were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc tests. Pearson correlation coefficients between the gait profile score normalised walking speed and kinematic parameters of the thorax were assessed. The results revealed: 1) the range of motion of the thorax and spine exhibited more significant differences between groups than the mean positions; 2) greater levels of impairment were associated with higher thorax range of motion, and 3) the children with diplegia and gross motor function classification system 3 exhibited a greater range of motion for all planes with the exception of spine rotation. This study confirmed that greater levels of impairment in cerebral palsy are associated with greater thorax range of motion during gait. The thorax plays an important role during gait in cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-modal assessment of neurovascular coupling during cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion using remote middle cerebral artery occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Fordsmann, Jonas C; Martin, Chris

    2017-01-01

    . Male Wistar rats were subjected to remote middle cerebral artery occlusion, where a long filament was advanced intraluminally through a guide cannula in the common carotid artery. Transcallosal stimulation evoked increases in blood flow, tissue oxygenation and neuronal activity, which were diminished......Hyperacute changes in cerebral blood flow during cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion are important determinants of injury. Cerebral blood flow is regulated by neurovascular coupling, and disruption of neurovascular coupling contributes to brain plasticity and repair problems. However, it is unknown...... by middle cerebral artery occlusion and partially restored during reperfusion. These evoked responses were not affected by administration of the thrombolytic alteplase at clinically used doses. Evoked cerebral blood flow responses were fully restored at 24 h post-middle cerebral artery occlusion indicating...

  5. Thrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion produced by topical FeCl3 application: a novel model suitable for intravital microscopy and thrombolysis studies

    OpenAIRE

    Karatas, Hulya; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin; Gurer, Gunfer; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Dunn, Andrew K; Dalkara, Turgay

    2011-01-01

    Intravital or multiphoton microscopy and laser-speckle imaging have become popular because they allow live monitoring of several processes during cerebral ischemia. Available rodent models have limitations for these experiments; e.g., filament occlusion of the proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) is difficult to perform under a microscope, whereas distal occlusion methods may damage the MCA and the peri-arterial cortex. We found that placement of a 10% FeCl3-soaked filter paper strip (0.3 × ...

  6. Case-control study of six genes asymmetrically expressed in the two cerebral hemispheres: association of BAIAP2 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribasés, Marta; Bosch, Rosa; Hervás, Amaia

    2009-01-01

    -related cognitive processes, including sustained attention, working memory, response inhibition and planning. Although mechanisms underlying cerebral lateralization are unknown, left-right cortical asymmetry has been associated with transcriptional asymmetry at embryonic stages and several genes differentially...... results support the participation of BAIAP2 in the continuity of ADHD across life span, at least in some of the populations analyzed, and suggest that genetic factors potentially influencing abnormal cerebral lateralization may be involved in this disorder....

  7. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Christine L.; Ances, Beau M.; Perthen, Joanna E.; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T.; Hopkins, Susan R.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO2 coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological c...

  8. Relation of measured brain glucose utilisation and cerebral atrophy in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, N L; Horwitz, B; Creasey, H; Carson, R; Duara, R; Berg, G W; Rapoport, S I

    1987-06-01

    The effect of cerebral atrophy on measured cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (CMRglc), as determined with positron emission tomography (PET), was examined in 49 healthy males aged 21-83 years. Global CMRglc and regional CMRglc for 34 grey matter regions parallel to and from 30 to 80 mm above the inferior orbital meatal (IOM) line were measured under resting conditions, using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose and an ECAT II positron emission tomograph. Using a GE 8800 CT/T scanner, slices parallel to and from 30 to 80 mm above the IOM line were analysed for CSF volume. Cerebral atrophy, indicated by increased CSF volume, was correlated significantly with global CMRglc, but accounted for no more than 13% of the variance in the CMRglc measurements. Methods for correcting for inter-subject variation in CSF volume were proposed. Global values for CMRglc, uncorrected or corrected for CSF volume, were found to be age invariant. These findings indicate that (a) cerebral atrophy has a small, but statistically significant effect on CMRglc as measured with PET; (b) CMRglc is age invariant in healthy males.

  9. Elevated Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Edema following Permanent MCA Occlusion in an Ovine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Adam J.; Vink, Robert; Helps, Stephen C.; Knox, Steven J.; Blumbergs, Peter C.; Turner, Renée J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke has a disproportionately high mortality due to the rapid development of refractory space-occupying cerebral edema. Animal models are essential in developing successful anti-edema therapies; however to date poor clinical translation has been associated with the predominately used rodent models. As such, large animal gyrencephalic models of stroke are urgently needed. The aim of the study was to characterize the intracranial pressure (ICP) response to MCA occlusion in our recently developed ovine stroke model. Materials and Methods 30 adult female Merino sheep (n = 8–12/gp) were randomized to sham surgery, temporary or permanent proximal MCA occlusion. ICP and brain tissue oxygen were monitored for 24 hours under general anesthesia. MRI, infarct volume with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and histology were performed. Results No increase in ICP, radiological evidence of ischemia within the MCA territory but without space-occupying edema, and TTC infarct volumes of 7.9+/-5.1% were seen with temporary MCAO. Permanent MCAO resulted in significantly elevated ICP, accompanied by 30% mortality, radiological evidence of space-occupying cerebral edema and TTC infarct volumes of 27.4+/-6.4%. Conclusions Permanent proximal MCAO in the sheep results in space-occupying cerebral edema, raised ICP and mortality similar to human malignant MCA stroke. This animal model may prove useful for pre-clinical testing of anti-edema therapies that have shown promise in rodent studies. PMID:26121036

  10. Construction of a Cerebral Hemorrhage Test System Operated in Real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gen; Sun, Jian; Ma, Ke; Yan, Qingguang; Zheng, Xiaolin; Qin, Mingxin; Jin, Gui; Ning, Xu; Zhuang, Wei; Feng, Hua; Huang, Shiyuwei

    2017-02-01

    The real-time monitoring and evaluation of the severity and progression of cerebral hemorrhage is essential to its intensive care and its successful emergency treatment. Based on magnetic induction phase shift technology combined with a PCI data acquisition system and LabVIEW software, this study established a real-time monitoring system for cerebral hemorrhage. To test and evaluate the performance of the system, the authors performed resolution conductivity experiments, salted water simulation experiments and cerebral hemorrhage experiments in rabbits and found that when the conductivity difference was 0.73 S/m, the phase difference was 13.196°. The phase difference change value was positively proportional to the volume of saline water, and the conductivity value was positively related to the phase difference of liquid under the same volume conditions. After injecting 3 mL blood into six rabbits, the average change in the blood phase difference was -2.03783 ± 0.22505°, and it was positively proportional to the volume of blood, which was consistent with the theoretical results. The results show that the system can monitor the progressive development of cerebral hemorrhage in real-time and has the advantages of low cost, small size, high phase accuracy, and good clinical application potentiality.

  11. Study of regional cerebral blood flow in obsessive compulsive disorder patients with SPM and ROI method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peiyong; Jiang Xufeng; Zhang Liying; Guo Wanhua; Zhu Chengmo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the alternations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) patients using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Methods: rCBF measurements using 99 Tc m -ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT was performed on 14 OCD patients and 23 age-matched healthy volunteers. The rCBF distribution was compared between these two groups with SPM under the conditions of increased and decreased perfusion, and with regions of interest (ROIs) using cerebral template. P value was set at 0.01 level. Results: SPM analysis showed that rCBF decreased in cerebral areas including bilateral putamen, superior temporal gyrus and precuneus, and right orbital gyrus, superior and middle frontal gyrus, and left temporo-occipital lobule and superior parietal gyrus, and vermis. rCBF was also increased in left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior cingulate gyrus. With ROIs method, rCBF was decreased in right anterior frontal, temporo-parietal lobule and left temporo-occipital lobule. Conclusions: The study supports the viewpoint that rCBF abnormality of fronto-striatal circuits is involved in OCD patients. SPM method is a forceful tool in analyzing cerebral regional characters

  12. Elevated Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Edema following Permanent MCA Occlusion in an Ovine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Adam J; Vink, Robert; Helps, Stephen C; Knox, Steven J; Blumbergs, Peter C; Turner, Renée J

    2015-01-01

    Malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke has a disproportionately high mortality due to the rapid development of refractory space-occupying cerebral edema. Animal models are essential in developing successful anti-edema therapies; however to date poor clinical translation has been associated with the predominately used rodent models. As such, large animal gyrencephalic models of stroke are urgently needed. The aim of the study was to characterize the intracranial pressure (ICP) response to MCA occlusion in our recently developed ovine stroke model. 30 adult female Merino sheep (n = 8-12/gp) were randomized to sham surgery, temporary or permanent proximal MCA occlusion. ICP and brain tissue oxygen were monitored for 24 hours under general anesthesia. MRI, infarct volume with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and histology were performed. No increase in ICP, radiological evidence of ischemia within the MCA territory but without space-occupying edema, and TTC infarct volumes of 7.9+/-5.1% were seen with temporary MCAO. Permanent MCAO resulted in significantly elevated ICP, accompanied by 30% mortality, radiological evidence of space-occupying cerebral edema and TTC infarct volumes of 27.4+/-6.4%. Permanent proximal MCAO in the sheep results in space-occupying cerebral edema, raised ICP and mortality similar to human malignant MCA stroke. This animal model may prove useful for pre-clinical testing of anti-edema therapies that have shown promise in rodent studies.

  13. Chronic photoperiod disruption does not increase vulnerability to focal cerebral ischemia in young normotensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku Mohd Noor, Ku Mastura; Wyse, Cathy; Roy, Lisa A; Biello, Stephany M; McCabe, Christopher; Dewar, Deborah

    2017-11-01

    Photoperiod disruption, which occurs during shift work, is associated with changes in metabolism or physiology (e.g. hypertension and hyperglycaemia) that have the potential to adversely affect stroke outcome. We sought to investigate if photoperiod disruption affects vulnerability to stroke by determining the impact of photoperiod disruption on infarct size following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Adult male Wistar rats (210-290 g) were housed singly under two different light/dark cycle conditions ( n = 12 each). Controls were maintained on a standard 12:12 light/dark cycle for nine weeks. For rats exposed to photoperiod disruption, every three days for nine weeks, the lights were switched on 6 h earlier than in the previous photoperiod. T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 48 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Disruption of photoperiod in young healthy rats for nine weeks did not alter key physiological variables that can impact on ischaemic damage, e.g. blood pressure and blood glucose immediately prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no effect of photoperiod disruption on infarct size after middle cerebral artery occlusion. We conclude that any potentially adverse effect of photoperiod disruption on stroke outcome may require additional factors such as high fat/high sugar diet or pre-existing co-morbidities.

  14. A comparative study of cerebral atrophy in various alcoholic groups, based on CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Tomoyuki

    1983-01-01

    The alcoholics were diagnosed and classified based on the criteria, offered at the Alcoholism Diagnostic Conference (1977) which was held under the auspices of the Ministry of Welfare, Japan. Grade of cerebral atrophy was estimated. Measurement items on the Computed Tomography (CT Scan) which contributed to discrimination among these groups were investigated simultaneously. The study consisted of seventy-five alcoholic patients and control group of ninety-four who were devoid of any evidence for alcoholism. Influential factors which were involved in cerebral atrophy of the alcoholic groups were investigated and factorial analysis was completed. There was a definite increase in cerebral atrophy during the aging process in patients with long term durations of drinking alcohol. There was a close correlation between age and duration of drinking alcohol. After the results of canonical discriminant analysis against 9 CT items, the Ventricle index definitely contributed both in the discrimination between the alcoholics and the controls and in the discrimination between alcoholic dementia and other alcoholic psychoses. Furthermore, the horizontal diameter of the third ventricle contributed to the latter discrimination, while the Evans' index contributed to the former discrimination. Therefore, the Ventricle index and the Evans' index turn out as the most valuable diagnostic criteria, as well as the CT index against cerebral atrophy in the alcoholics; however, the horizontal diameter of the third ventricle is useful in comparing among alcoholic psychoses. (J.P.N.)

  15. Dissecting human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex using single-cell RNAseq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treutlein, Barbara

    Cerebral organoids - three-dimensional cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells - have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and novel interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages, and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue in order to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures.

  16. Quantification of modulated blood oxygenation levels in single cerebral veins by investigating their MR signal decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacik, Jan [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States). Div. of Translational Imaging Research; University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Rauscher, Alexander [University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). MRI Research Centre; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [University Clinics Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group

    2009-07-01

    The transverse magnetization of a single vein and its surrounding tissue is subject to spin dephasing caused by the local magnetic field inhomogeneity which is induced by the very same vessel. This phenomenon can be approximated and simulated by applying the model of an infinitely long and homogeneously magnetized cylinder embedded in a homogeneous tissue background. It is then possible to estimate the oxygenation level of the venous blood by fitting the simulated magnetization-time-course to the measured signal decay. In this work we demonstrate the ability of this approach to quantify the blood oxygenation level (Y) of small cerebral veins in vivo, not only under normal physiologic conditions (Y{sub native}=0.5-0.55) but also during induced changes of physiologic conditions which affect the cerebral venous blood oxygenation level. Changes of blood's oxygenation level induced by carbogen (5% CO{sub 2}, 95% O{sub 2}) and caffeine were observed and quantified, resulting in values of Y{sub carbogen}=0.7 and Y{sub caffeine}=0.42, respectively. The proposed technique may ultimately help to better understand local changes in cerebral physiology during neuronal activation by quantifying blood oxygenation in veins draining active brain areas. It may also be beneficial in clinical applications where it may improve diagnosis of cerebral pathologies as well as monitoring of responses to therapy. (orig.)

  17. Proteção cerebral no tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas do arco aórtico: estudo experimental em cães Cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysms resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Murad

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores realizaram estudo experimental comparativo entre dois métodos de proteção cerebral utilizados na abordagem cirúrgica dos aneurismas do arco aórtico, avaliando a sua eficácia. Os métodos comparados foram a hipotermia sistêmica profunda isolada (menor que 20ºC com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico e a hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada à perfusão carotídea seletiva. Dois grupos de 15 cães cada foram submetidos, respectivamente, a hipotermia sistêmica profunda com pinçamento arterial braquiocefálico (GRUPO I e a hipotermia sistêmica profunda associada a perfusão seletiva da carótida direita (GRUPO II. Foram colhidas amostras seriadas de sangue para análise das alterações metabólicas de pH e PaCO2 que ocorreram no retorno venoso cerebral, aferidas na veia jugular interna, bem como as alterações histopatológicas encontradas com 45 min, 90 min e 135 min de cada procedimento. Os resultados demonstraram que, apesar de ambos os métodos de proteção cerebral serem eficazes por um período de 45 minutos, o método utilizado no GRUPO II mostrou ser superior em períodos de até 90 minutos. Em períodos de 135 minutos os métodos tiveram resultados semelhantes, não oferecendo proteção cerebral adequada.The authors proposition is to make an experimental study of two methods of cerebral protection to be used during aortic arch aneurysm resection. The methods to be evaluated were profound systemic hypothermia (under 20oC with great vessels occlusion and profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion. Two groups of 15 dogs each were submitted either to profound systemic hypothermia with great vessels occlusion (GROUP I or to profound systemic hypothermia with selective right carotid artery perfusion (GROUP II. Serial jugular vein samples for pH and PaC02 were analyzed to evaluate ischemic cerebral metabolic derangements. Hystopathological studies were also made at 45, 90 and 135

  18. Rural cerebral CT. It's role in the investigation of headaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burking, A.

    1997-01-01

    The most common request for cerebral CT is for the investigation of headaches. These requests should not be taken lightly. In many cases CT is extremely valuable in detecting underlying pathology. More so in the rural clinical setting. In 1994, the lower great southern region of W.A. had it's first CT scanning facility installed. A high incidence of pathology was evident in our first 3,000 patients, particularly those presenting with headaches. This paper documents our rural experience. Interesting case studies are provided. These illustrate the fact that old CT technology can still do an admirable job. The facility has helped save lives and raise the level of regional health care. (author)

  19. Septic Cerebral Venosinus Thrombosis Secondary to an Odontogenic Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hongvan; Prejean, Shane; Heck, Madeleine

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral venosinus thrombosis (CVT); is an uncommon, potentially fatal disease that is more common in young adults and children. Thrombophilia, elevated estrogenic states, and infections are the most common risk factors in patients who develop CVT. A 69-year-old man with a right-sided odontogenic infection presented with fever, headache, opthalmoplegia, and periorbital swelling. Imaging revealed evidence of meningitis and thrombosis of bilateral ophthalmic veins, the cavernous sinus, right internal jugular vein, and sigmoid sinus. The patient was treated with empiric antibiotic therapy and unfractionated heparin. He recovered with only mild impairment in right eye abduction. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of CVT is vital in reducing the associated morbidity and mortality. Unfractionated or low molecular weight heparin may be safely used in CVT patients. Thrombolytic therapy is an option in clinically severe cases. Treatment also includes addressing the underlying cause and management of early complications.

  20. Exercise interventions for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennifer M; Cassidy, Elizabeth E; Noorduyn, Stephen G; O'Connell, Neil E

    2017-06-11

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder resulting from an injury to the developing brain. It is the most common form of childhood disability with prevalence rates of between 1.5 and 3.8 per 1000 births reported worldwide. The primary impairments associated with CP include reduced muscle strength and reduced cardiorespiratory fitness, resulting in difficulties performing activities such as dressing, walking and negotiating stairs.Exercise is defined as a planned, structured and repetitive activity that aims to improve fitness, and it is a commonly used intervention for people with CP. Aerobic and resistance training may improve activity (i.e. the ability to execute a task) and participation (i.e. involvement in a life situation) through their impact on the primary impairments of CP. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive review of exercise interventions for people with CP. To assess the effects of exercise interventions in people with CP, primarily in terms of activity, participation and quality of life. Secondary outcomes assessed body functions and body structures. Comparators of interest were no treatment, usual care or an alternative type of exercise intervention. In June 2016 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, nine other databases and four trials registers. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs of children, adolescents and adults with CP. We included studies of aerobic exercise, resistance training, and 'mixed training' (a combination of at least two of aerobic exercise, resistance training and anaerobic training). Two review authors independently screened titles, abstracts and potentially relevant full-text reports for eligibility; extracted all relevant data and conducted 'Risk of bias' and GRADE assessments. We included 29 trials (926 participants); 27 included children and adolescents up to the age of 19 years, three included adolescents and young adults (10 to 22 years), and one included adults over 20

  1. Radiologically Isolated Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Dimitri; Wacongne, Anne; Thouvenot, Eric

    2017-11-01

    In amyloid β-related angiitis of the central nervous system (also called cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation), cerebral amyloid angiopathy occurs in association with primary vasculitis of small- and medium-sized leptomeningeal and cortical arteries. To avoid brain biopsy, clinicoradiological criteria (including clinical features due to inflammation-related uni/multifocal white matter hyperintensities) for the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation have been validated recently. We report 3 cases with acute symptoms directly related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the presence of asymptomatic cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation hyperintensities on initial magnetic resonance imaging. Recognizing radiological features of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy is important because radiological isolated cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation may become symptomatic and immunosuppressive treatment is often effective in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation, although optimal treatment regimen is yet unknown. In contrast, apart from hypertension treatment, few therapeutic options exist in cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detrended fluctuation analysis of cerebral venous dynamics in newborn mice with intracranial hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Bibikova, O. A.; Pavlova, O. N.; Mohammad, Y. K.; Huang, Q.; Zhu, D.; Li, P.; Tuchin, V. V.; Luo, Q.

    2015-03-01

    We study pathological changes in cerebral venous dynamics in newborn mice using the laser speckle contrast imaging and the detrended fluctuation analysis with a special attention to the latent stage of the development of the intracranial hemorrhage. We show that this stage is characterized by a high responsiveness of the sagittal sinus to pharmacological stimulations of adrenorelated dilation. We conclude that this effect can be considered as an important mechanism underlying the development of ICH in newborns.

  3. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only...... most distant from the capillaries, whereas other studies point to a shift toward a higher degree of non-oxidative glucose consumption during activation. In this review, we argue that the key mechanism responsible for the regional CBF (rCBF) increase during functional activation is a tight coupling...... between rCBF and glucose metabolism. We assert that uncoupling of rCBF and oxidative metabolism is a consequence of a less pronounced increase in oxygen consumption. On the basis of earlier studies, we take into consideration the functional recruitment of capillaries and attempt to accommodate...

  4. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Lund; Vorstrup, S

    1991-01-01

    A review of the current literature regarding sleep-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) is presented. Early investigations have led to the notion that dreamless sleep was characterized by global values of CBF and CMR practically at the level of wakefulness......, while rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (dream sleep) was a state characterized by a dramatically increased level of CBF and possibly also of CMR. However, recent investigations firmly contradict this notion. Investigations on CBF and CMR performed during non-REM sleep, taking the effect of different...... levels of sleep into consideration, show that light sleep (stage II) is characterized by global levels of CBF and CMR only slightly reduced by 3-10% below the level associated with wakefulness, whereas CBF and CMR during deep sleep (stage III-IV) is dramatically reduced by 25-44%. Furthermore, recent...

  5. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index

  6. Cerebral palsy characterization by estimating ocular motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jully; Atehortúa, Angélica; Moncayo, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a large group of motion and posture disorders caused during the fetal or infant brain development. Sensorial impairment is commonly found in children with CP, i.e., between 40-75 percent presents some form of vision problems or disabilities. An automatic characterization of the cerebral palsy is herein presented by estimating the ocular motion during a gaze pursuing task. Specifically, After automatically detecting the eye location, an optical flow algorithm tracks the eye motion following a pre-established visual assignment. Subsequently, the optical flow trajectories are characterized in the velocity-acceleration phase plane. Differences are quantified in a small set of patients between four to ten years.

  7. CT features in metastatic cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Saburo; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Moriyasu, Nobuo

    1980-01-01

    The incidence of metastatic cerebral tumors is reportedly from 4% to 15% of total cerebral tumors. It has been on the increase with the advance of the diagnostic techniques, and seems to increase especially with CT scanning. The features of the CT findings in 19 cases are reviewed. (1) In the cancer of lungs, low to iso density was exhibited. The surrounding edema was generally salient. In enhancement, variety of patterns were shown. (2) In the fibroadenoma in the cancer of breasts, the multiple metastatic lesions all exhibited same iso density. In enhancement, the similar patterns were shown, with nodules. (3) In adenocarcinoma, variety of densities were shown by simple CT. The edema was generally salient. In enhancement, almost all were with nodules. (4) In the adenocarcinoma in the cancer of colons, low density areas were shown by simple CT. (J.P.N.)

  8. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, Z.; Surlan, M.; Zvan, B.; Zaletel, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy is an uncommon but well-defined entity. There are only few reports of ''hyperperfusion injury'' following carotid angioplasty. Case report. We report an unstable arterial hypertension and high-grade carotid stenosis in a 58-year-old, right-handed woman. After a stroke in the territory of middle cerebral artery carotid angioplasty was performed in the patient. Among risk factors, the long lasting arterial hypertension was the most pronounced. Immediately after the procedure, the patient was stable without any additional neurologic deficit. The second day, the patient had an epileptic seizure and CT revealed a small haemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Conclusions. The combination of a high-grade carotid stenosis and unstable arterial pressure is probably an important prognostic factor in the pathogenesis of hyperperfusion syndrome. (author)

  9. Neural perspectives of cerebral correlates of giftedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A C; Buckley, K C

    1988-07-01

    Giftedness is defined as some special endowment or propensity for creativity, skill, and eminent achievement, found in relatively few individuals among the population. A high order of mental power (IQ), creativity, and motivation (task commitment) appear to be the most universally recognized attributes of the gifted. This report summarizes current knowledge of the cerebral correlates of intelligence and creativity, including physiological measures of EEG, cortical power spectrum, brain evoked potentials, and positron emission tomography. Controversy, debates, contentions, formal hypotheses, and research issues are considered. We are especially interested in the formulation of the deterministic function of EEG-brain dynamics. A CHAOS modeling on hierarchy of cognitive organization and cerebral processing in the gifted is suggested.

  10. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral arterial ectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Ko, Young Ho; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1987-01-01

    The computed tomographic findings of cerebral arterial ectasia in 8 patients, of which 5 cases were angiographically documented, are reported. The ecstatic arteries, located predominantly in the suprasellar and interpeduncular cisterns, appeared as serpignous, tubular structures on the unenhanced scan. The enhanced CT scan demonstrated dense, sharply defined, homogeneous intraluminal enhancement. Until recently, the diagnosis of cerebral arterial ectasia was usually established by angiography. With introduction of CT it has become possible to noninvasively identify and characterize this vascular disorder and its associated intracranial complications. The vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia may be diagnosed by CT as an extra-axial lesion in the cerebellopontine angle. It enhances in a tubular fashion after intravenous injection of contrast.

  11. Locations of cerebral infarctions in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, F.Y.; Chia, L.G. (Section of Neurology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan)); Shen, W.C. (Section of Neuroradiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan))

    1992-06-01

    The locations of cerebral infarctions were studied in 14 patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and 173 patients with noninflammatory ischemic stroke (IS). In patients with TBM, 75% of infarctions occurred in the 'TB zone' supplied by medial striate and thalamoperforating arteries; only 11% occurred in the 'IS zone' supplied by lateral striate, anterior choroidal and thalamogeniculate arteries. In patients with IS, 29% of infarctions occurred in the IS zone, 29% in the subcortical white matter, and 24% in (or involving) the cerebral cortex. Only 11% occurred in the TB zone. Bilaterally symmetrical infarctions of the TB zone were common with TBM (71%) but rare with IS (5%). (orig.).

  12. Cerebral blood flow in asymptomatic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Iiji, Osamu; Ashida, Keiichi; Imaizumi, Masatoshi

    1993-01-01

    We studied the relationship between cortical grey matter flow (CBF) and age, cerebrovascular risk factors and the severity of subcortical hypersignals (HS, hyperintensity score in MRI) in 47 asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors. Multiple regression analysis revealed that HS was most strongly related to CBF, and that hematocrit, age and evidence of ischemic change detected in the electrocardiogram also appeared to be independent determinants of CBF. Both the severity and location of hypersignals were correlated with CBF. The most significant negative correlation observed was that between CBF and HS in the basal ganglia-thalamic region, where the degree of signal abnormality was modest. Decreased CBF in asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors may be related to microcirculatory disturbance associated with elevated hematocrit and an increase in the number of risk factors, and functional suppression of cerebral cortex due to the neuronal disconnection associated with subcortical lesions. In addition, impaired cerebral circulation may be related to MRI signal abnormalities. (author)

  13. Cerebral oxygenation in the beach chair position before and during general anesthesia in patients with and without cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yukiko; Yamada, Masana; Akahori, Takahiko; Hatakeyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate changes in cerebral tissue oxygen index (TOI) values under the beach chair position before and during general anesthesia in surgical patients with or without cardiovascular risk factors. Prospective study. Operating room in the university hospital. Ninety-one patients undergoing surgery, including healthy patients (n = 28), patients with 1 cardiovascular risk factor (n = 33), and those with more than 1 risk factor (n = 30). Cerebral TOI the day before and during general anesthesia was evaluated using a near-infrared spectroscopy NIRO-200 (Hamamatsu Photonics, Hamamatsu, Japan) for each patient. The initial TOI measurement in the supine position after a 10-minute rest or 10 minute after the endotracheal intubation was followed by measurements in 30° and subsequent 60° upright position for 5 minutes. Phenylephrine 0.1 mg and/or ephedrine 4 mg was administered intravenously to maintain mean blood pressure above 60 mm Hg accordingly. The beach chair position decreased mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate under general anesthesia, although patients with more than 1 cardiovascular risk factor needed significantly more phenylephrine doses to maintain mean blood pressure above 60 mm Hg. Values of TOI were within the normal range of about 70% before and during anesthesia in all groups. The beach chair position under general anesthesia did not alter cerebral oxygenation in patients with or without cardiovascular risk factors showing normal preoperative cerebral TOI values when the mean blood pressure was maintained above 60 mm Hg. The careful management using the cerebral oxygenation monitoring appears to maintain cerebral perfusion in the beach chair position during general anesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Monitorization of the effects of spinal anaesthesia on cerebral oxygen saturation in elder patients using near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Kusku

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Central blockage provided by spinal anaesthesia enables realization of many surgical procedures, whereas hemodynamic and respiratory changes influence systemic oxygen delivery leading to the potential development of series of problems such as cerebral ischemia, myocardial infarction and acute renal failure. This study was intended to detect potentially adverse effects of hemodynamic and respiratory changes on systemic oxygen delivery using cerebral oxymetric methods in patients who underwent spinal anaesthesia. METHODS: Twenty-five ASA I-II Group patients aged 65-80 years scheduled for unilateral inguinal hernia repair under spinal anaesthesia were included in the study. Following standard monitorization baseline cerebral oxygen levels were measured using cerebral oximetric methods. Standardized Mini Mental Test (SMMT was applied before and after the operation so as to determine the level of cognitive functioning of the cases. Using a standard technique and equal amounts of a local anaesthetic drug (15 mg bupivacaine 5% intratechal blockade was performed. Mean blood pressure (MBP, maximum heart rate (MHR, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 and cerebral oxygen levels (rSO2 were preoperatively monitored for 60 min. Pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels were measured. The variations in data obtained and their correlations with the cerebral oxygen levels were investigated. RESULTS: Significant changes in pre- and postoperative measurements of haemoglobin levels and SMMT scores and intraoperative SpO2 levels were not observed. However, significant variations were observed in intraoperative MBP, MHR and rSO2 levels. Besides, a correlation between variations in rSO2, MBP and MHR was determined. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of the data obtained in the study demonstrated that post-spinal decline in blood pressure and also heart rate decreases systemic oxygen delivery and adversely effects cerebral oxygen levels. However, this downward change did

  15. Quantification of structural cerebral abnormalities on MRI 18 months after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients who received endovascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresser, Jeroen de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Luitse, Merel J.A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Biessels, Geert Jan [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Viergever, Max A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-03-01

    Volume measurements performed on brain MRI after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) may provide insight into the structural abnormalities that underlie the commonly occurring and persistent long-term functional deficits after aSAH. We examined the pattern of long-term cerebral structural changes on MRI in relation to known risk factors for poor functional outcome. We studied MRI scans from 38 patients who received endovascular treatment and were not dependent for activities of daily life at 18 months after aSAH. Risk factors for poor functional outcome (clinical condition, Hijdra score, and bicaudate index on admission; occurrence of hydrocephalus or delayed cerebral infarction during hospitalization) were related to supratentorial cerebral parenchymal and lateral ventricular volumes on MRI with linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, and intracranial volume. Clinical condition, Hijdra score, and bicaudate index on admission were not related to cerebral parenchymal volume at 18 months. A higher bicaudate index on admission was related to lateral ventricular enlargement at 18 months after aSAH (Beta; 95%CI: 0.51; 0.14<->0.88). Delayed cerebral infarction was related to smaller cerebral parenchymal volumes (-0.14; -0.25<->-0.04) and to lateral ventricular enlargement (0.49; 0.16<->0.83) at 18 months. Volume measurements of the brain are able to quantify patterns of long-term cerebral damage in relation to different risk factors after aSAH. Application of volumetric techniques may provide more insight into the heterogeneous underlying pathophysiological processes. After confirmation of these results in larger studies, volumetric measures might even be used as outcome measures in future treatment studies. (orig.)

  16. Monitorization of the effects of spinal anaesthesia on cerebral oxygen saturation in elder patients using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusku, Aysegul; Demir, Guray; Cukurova, Zafer; Eren, Gulay; Hergunsel, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Central blockage provided by spinal anaesthesia enables realization of many surgical procedures, whereas hemodynamic and respiratory changes influence systemic oxygen delivery leading to the potential development of series of problems such as cerebral ischemia, myocardial infarction and acute renal failure. This study was intended to detect potentially adverse effects of hemodynamic and respiratory changes on systemic oxygen delivery using cerebral oxymetric methods in patients who underwent spinal anaesthesia. Twenty-five ASA I-II Group patients aged 65-80 years scheduled for unilateral inguinal hernia repair under spinal anaesthesia were included in the study. Following standard monitorization baseline cerebral oxygen levels were measured using cerebral oximetric methods. Standardized Mini Mental Test (SMMT) was applied before and after the operation so as to determine the level of cognitive functioning of the cases. Using a standard technique and equal amounts of a local anaesthetic drug (15mg bupivacaine 5%) intratechal blockade was performed. Mean blood pressure (MBP), maximum heart rate (MHR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and cerebral oxygen levels (rSO2) were preoperatively monitored for 60min. Pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels were measured. The variations in data obtained and their correlations with the cerebral oxygen levels were investigated. Significant changes in pre- and postoperative measurements of haemoglobin levels and SMMT scores and intraoperative SpO2 levels were not observed. However, significant variations were observed in intraoperative MBP, MHR and rSO2 levels. Besides, a correlation between variations in rSO2, MBP and MHR was determined. Evaluation of the data obtained in the study demonstrated that post-spinal decline in blood pressure and also heart rate decreases systemic oxygen delivery and adversely effects cerebral oxygen levels. However, this downward change did not result in deterioration of cognitive functioning

  17. [Monitorization of the effects of spinal anaesthesia on cerebral oxygen saturation in elder patients using near-infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusku, Aysegul; Demir, Guray; Cukurova, Zafer; Eren, Gulay; Hergunsel, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Central blockage provided by spinal anaesthesia enables realization of many surgical procedures, whereas hemodynamic and respiratory changes influence systemic oxygen delivery leading to the potential development of series of problems such as cerebral ischemia, myocardial infarction and acute renal failure. This study was intended to detect potentially adverse effects of hemodynamic and respiratory changes on systemic oxygen delivery using cerebral oxymetric methods in patients who underwent spinal anaesthesia. Twenty-five ASA I-II Group patients aged 65-80 years scheduled for unilateral inguinal hernia repair under spinal anaesthesia were included in the study. Following standard monitorization baseline cerebral oxygen levels were measured using cerebral oximetric methods. Standardized Mini Mental Test (SMMT) was applied before and after the operation so as to determine the level of cognitive functioning of the cases. Using a standard technique and equal amounts of a local anaesthetic drug (15mg bupivacaine 5%) intratechal blockade was performed. Mean blood pressure (MBP), maximum heart rate (MHR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and cerebral oxygen levels (rSO2) were preoperatively monitored for 60min. Pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels were measured. The variations in data obtained and their correlations with the cerebral oxygen levels were investigated. Significant changes in pre- and postoperative measurements of haemoglobin levels and SMMT scores and intraoperative SpO2 levels were not observed. However, significant variations were observed in intraoperative MBP, MHR and rSO2 levels. Besides, a correlation between variations in rSO2, MBP and MHR was determined. Evaluation of the data obtained in the study demonstrated that post-spinal decline in blood pressure and also heart rate decreases systemic oxygen delivery and adversely effects cerebral oxygen levels. However, this downward change did not result in deterioration of cognitive functioning

  18. Dynamic FDG PET for assessing early effects of cerebral hypoxia and resuscitation in new-born pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Charlotte de; Malinen, Eirik; Qu, Hong; Johnsrud, Kjersti; Skretting, Arne; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Munkeby, Berit H.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in cerebral glucose metabolism may be an early prognostic indicator of perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury. In this study dynamic 18 F-FDG PET was used to evaluate cerebral glucose metabolism in piglets after global perinatal hypoxia and the impact of the resuscitation strategy using room air or hyperoxia. New-born piglets (n = 16) underwent 60 min of global hypoxia followed by 30 min of resuscitation with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ) of 0.21 or 1.0. Dynamic FDG PET, using a microPET system, was performed at baseline and repeated at the end of resuscitation under stabilized haemodynamic conditions. MRI at 3 T was performed for anatomic correlation. Global and regional cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMR gl ) were assessed by Patlak analysis for the two time-points and resuscitation groups. Global hypoxia was found to cause an immediate decrease in cerebral glucose metabolism from a baseline level (mean ± SD) of 21.2 ± 7.9 to 12.6 ± 4.7 μmol/min/100 g (p gl but no significant differences in global or regional CMR gl between the resuscitation groups were found. Dynamic FDG PET detected decreased cerebral glucose metabolism early after perinatal hypoxia in piglets. The decrease in CMR gl may indicate early changes of mild cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia. No significant effect of hyperoxic resuscitation on the degree of hypometabolism was found in this early phase after hypoxia. Cerebral FDG PET can provide new insights into mechanisms of perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury where early detection plays an important role in instituting therapy. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral arteriovenous shunts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Ganesan, Vijeya; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous shunts (AVSs) in children can be divided into pial arteriovenous malformations, vein of Galen malformations, and arteriovenous fistulae (AVF). Dural AVF and dural sinus malformations are rare entities within this group. The relative immaturity of the anatomy and physiology of the neonatal and infant brain results in the inability of the hydrovenous system to compensate in the face of such disorders. Thus, the clinical presentation reflects this difference in the underlying anatomy, physiology, and disorder between children and adults. In this article, we briefly review the presentation, natural history and management of these entities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (Pfailed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (Pindices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by linear regressions, and the slope was not different between control subjects and patients with OI. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in OI during orthostasis, which is primarily due to hyperventilation, causing significant hypocapnia. Hypocapnia and symptoms of orthostatic hypertension are reversible by CO2 rebreathing.

  1. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Prendiville, Julie S.

    2005-01-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  2. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  3. Increased Cerebral Water Content in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Reetz, Kathrin; Abbas, Zaheer; Eitner, Frank; Gross, Theresa; Schulz, Jörg Bernhard; Floege, Jürgen; Shah, N. J.; Costa, Ana Sofia; Gras, Vincent; Tiffin-Richards, Frances; Mirzazade, Shahram; Holschbach, Bernhard; Frank, Rolf Dario; Vassiliadou, Athina; Krüger, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available on the impact of hemodialysis on cerebral water homeostasis and its distribution in chronic kidney disease. We used a neuropsychological test battery, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a novel technique for quantitative measurement of localized water content using 3T MRI to investigate ten hemodialysis patients (HD) on a dialysis-free day and after hemodialysis (2.4±2.2 hours), and a matched healthy control group with the same time interval. Neuro...

  4. Regional cerebral blood flow in Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guecueyener, K. (Dept. of Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Goekcora, N. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Ilgin, N. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Buyan, N. (Dept. of Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Sayli, A. (Dept. of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1993-07-01

    A patient with typical features of Angelman syndrome - a genetically inherited disorder involving developmental delay, ataxia, episodes of paroxysmal laughter and brachiocephaly - was studied with single-photon emission tomography. Hyperfusion found in the left frontal and left temporoparietal regions can provide insights into the functional cerebral pathology, which may be due to a disturbance of the developmental process related to a chromosomal abnormality. (orig.)

  5. Rhino Cerebral Mucormycosis - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Eswar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhino cerebral Mucormycosis is an opportunistic infection caused by a saprophytic fungus which is found in soil, decaying fruits and vegetables. Usually predisposing factors for this infection are poorly controlled diabetes, ketoacidosis, leukemia, immunodeficiency states, prolonged steroid therapy etc. The fungus once entering the susceptible host do cause highly invasive and fulminant infection usually with fatal outcome. Early recognition of this condition is highly essential to initiate immediate life saving measures.

  6. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in the Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Fakeeh Khalid

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old boy with idiopathic steroid responsive nephritic syndrome developed bilateral sixth-nerve palsy and lethargy secondary to cerebral sinus thrombosis. Treatment with heparin, fresh frozen plasma as source of antithrombin III and vitamin K inhibitors may have prevented further sequels. However, anti-coagulation, as assessed by partial thromboplastin and prothrombin time, was difficult to achieve. Despite these problems the child made a complete neurological recovery.

  7. Hemorragia cerebral secundaria a trombocitopenia por varicela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Lizarazo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un hombre de 44 años, previamente sano, con varicela, trombocitopenia grave, manifestaciones hemorrágicas en mucosas y una extensa hemorragia cerebral en el hemisferio derecho. Su tratamiento incluyó la transfusión de plaquetas y altas dosis de esteroides. El paciente mejoró, aunque persistieron la hemianopsia homónima izquierda y la epilepsia, tratada con medicación.

  8. Cerebral sex dimorphism and sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzouri, Amirhossein; Savic, Ivanka

    2018-03-01

    The neurobiology of sexual orientation is frequently discussed in terms of cerebral sex dimorphism (defining both functional and structural sex differences). Yet, the information about possible cerebral differences between sex-matched homo and heterosexual persons is limited, particularly among women. In this multimodal MRI study, we addressed these issues by investigating possible cerebral differences between homo and heterosexual persons, and by asking whether there is any sex difference in this aspect. Measurements of cortical thickness (Cth), subcortical volumes, and functional and structural resting-state connections among 40 heterosexual males (HeM) and 40 heterosexual females (HeF) were compared with those of 30 homosexual males (HoM) and 30 homosexual females (HoF). Congruent with previous reports, sex differences were detected in heterosexual controls with regard to fractional anisotropy (FA), Cth, and several subcortical volumes. Homosexual groups did not display any sex differences in FA values. Furthermore, their functional connectivity was significantly less pronounced in the mesial prefrontal and precuneus regions. In these two particular regions, HoM also displayed thicker cerebral cortex than other groups, whereas HoF did not differ from HeF. In addition, in HoM the parietal Cth showed "sex-reversed" values, not observed in HoF. Homosexual orientation seems associated with a less pronounced sexual differentiation of white matter tracts and a less pronounced functional connectivity of the self-referential networks compared to heterosexual orientation. Analyses of Cth suggest that male and female homosexuality are not simple analogues of each other and that differences from heterosexual controls are more pronounced in HoM. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cerebral activation pattern in primary writing tremor

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, D; Preibisch, C; Hofmann, E; Naumann, M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the cerebral activation pattern during writing of patients with writing tremor with healthy controls using functional MRI
METHODS—Three patients with writing tremor and 10 healthy controls were examined using a 1.5 Tesla scanner. All subjects performed a paradigm of alternating 30 second periods of rest or writing. For functional imaging 60 EPI multislice data sets were acquired. All images were analyzed using SPM96 software. Data were analyzed for the grou...

  10. Regional cerebral perfusion in cardiovascular reflex syncope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toeyry, J.P.; Kuikka, J.T.; Laensimies, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the regional cerebral perfusion in subjects with presyncope or syncope, and the impact that autonomic nervous dysfunction has on it. Seven subjects with cardiovascular vasodepressor reflex syncope were studied. A baseline test was performed with the patients standing in the 70 upright position, while the passive head-up tilt table test with and without isoprenaline infusion was employed for provocation. Regional cerebral perfusion was assessed by means of single-photon emission tomography with technetium-99m labelled V-oxo-1,2-N,N 1 -ethylenedylbis-l-cysteine diethylester (baseline, and during blood pressure decline in the provocation test) and the autonomic nervous function by means of spectral analysis of heart rate variability (baseline, and before blood pressure decline in the provocation test). Every subject showed an abrupt decline in blood pressure in the provocation test (five with presyncope and two with syncope). The systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly (P<0.001) between the baseline and the provocation study time points (radiopharmaceutical injection and lowest systolic blood pressure). Mean cerebral perfusion as average count densities decreased upon provocation as compared with baseline (190±63 vs 307±90 counts/voxel, respectively, P=0.013). Hypoperfusion was most pronounced in the frontal lobe. These results suggest that cerebral perfusion decreases markedly during presyncope or syncope with systemic blood pressure decline in subjects with cardiovascular vasodepressor syncope. Furthermore, the autonomic nervous function remains unchanged before the systemic blood pressure decline. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Dynamic CT scan in cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Oka, Nobuo; Mitsuhashi, Hiromitsu

    1984-01-01

    Forty-two dynamic CT studies were performed on 27 patients with cerebral infarction (11 to 75 years of age), and perfusion patterns of low density areas on plain CT were evaluated. The initial studies were performed 1.5 hours to 60 days after acute onset. The following results were obtained. 1) The perfusion pattern in the low density area on plain CT varies among patients at any periods after onset, ranging from absent perfusion pattern to hyperfusion pattern. No consisitent perfusion pattern was obtained at any given time after onset. 2) Repeat dynamic CT revealed that the perfusion pattern in the low density area changed with time variously. 3) The perfusion pattern or change of perfusion pattern did not correlate with outcome of the patient. 4) At an acute stage, when no abnormal findings were obtained on plain CT, dynamic CT revealed abnormal perfusion pattern, enabling early diagnosis of cerebral infarction and estimation of blood perfusion in the infarcted area. In determining the treatment for the cerebral infarction at an acute stage, it is important to know the condition of the blood perfusion in the infarcted area. For the patients in whom recanalization has already taken place, mannitol or steroid might be effective, providing protection against severe brain edema and hemorrhagic infarction. On the other hand, if recanalization has not taken place, revascularization therapy might be worth trying within 6 hours since the onset. It has been said that ischemic brain damage may not be reversed by the revascularization after 6 hours. Dynamic CT is safe, less invasive, convenient and very useful for early diagnosis of the cerebral infarction and determination of the treatment at the acute stage. (J.P.N.)

  12. Cerebral hypoxia and ischemia in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ravarino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premature birth is a major public health issue internationally affecting 13 million babies worldwide. Hypoxia and ischemia is probably the commonest type of acquired brain damage in preterm infants. The clinical manifestations of hypoxic-ischemic injury in survivors of premature birth include a spectrum of cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities. Until recently, the extensive brain abnormalities in preterm neonates appeared to be related mostly to destructive processes that lead to substantial deletion of neurons, axons, and glia from necrotic lesions in the developing brain. Advances in neonatal care coincide with a growing body of evidence that the preterm gray and white matter frequently sustain less severe insults, where tissue destruction is the minor component. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL is the major form of white matter injury and consists classically of focal necrotic lesions, with subsequent cyst formation, and a less severe but more diffuse injury to cerebral white mater, with prominent astrogliosis and microgliosis but without overt necrosis. With PVL a concomitant injury occurs to subplate neurons, located in the subcortical white matter. Severe hypoxic-ischemic insults that trigger significant white matter necrosis are accompanied by neuronal degeneration in cerebral gray and white matter. This review aims to illustrate signs of cerebral embryology of the second half of fetal life and correlate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the premature infant. This should help us better understand the symptoms early and late and facilitate new therapeutic strategies. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  13. Bayesian Modeling of Cerebral Information Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Labatut, Vincent; Pastor, Josette

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Modeling explicitly the links between cognitive functions and networks of cerebral areas is necessitated both by the understanding of the clinical outcomes of brain lesions and by the interpretation of activation data provided by functional neuroimaging techniques. At this global level of representation, the human brain can be best modeled by a probabilistic functional causal network. Our modeling approach is based on the anatomical connection pattern, the information ...

  14. Invos Cerebral Oximeter compared with the transcranial Doppler for monitoring adequacy of cerebral perfusion in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiadis, N; Zayed, H; Rashid, H; Green, D W

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the correlation between signals obtained during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) under local (LA) or general anesthesia from the Somanetics Invos cerebral oximeter (CO) and transcranial Doppler (TCD). Forty patients were enrolled in the study. The percentages fall in TCD mean flow velocity (FVm) and CO regional oxygen saturation (rSO2) on the ipsilateral side following clamping were recorded and the correlation coefficient and Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation were calculated. Fourteen patients were not included in the statistical analysis because either no TCD window or reliable TCD signal was obtained. The remaining 26 patients had a fall in either FVm, rSO2 or both during carotid clamping. There was a highly statistically significant correlation between the percentage fall in FVm and rSO2 with a correlation coefficient of 0.73, P<0.0001, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for r=0.48 to 0.87; Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation (rho) =0.67, P=0.0008, with a 95% CI for rho=0.384 to 0.84. A significant decline in both TCD and rSO2 was noted in 3 patients under LA out of which 2 required shunts for alteration in conscious level. In 2 LA patients there was a significant decline in TCD but not in rSO2 and the endarterectomy was completed without a shunt. Regional oxygen saturation correlates well with FVm during carotid clamping. However, the inability to obtain reliable TCD FVm readings in 35% of patients is a serious disadvantage for this monitor. It appears that CO is a satisfactory and possibly superior device for monitoring adequacy of cerebral perfusion and oxygenation during CEA in comparison with the TCD.

  15. A Neuropsychological Instrument Measuring Age-Related Cerebral Decline in Older Drivers : Development, Reliability, and Validity of MedDrive.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaucher, Paul; cardoso, isabel; Veldstra, Janet; Herzig, Daniela; Mangin, Patrice; Herzog, Micheal; Favrat, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    When facing age-related cerebral decline, older adults are unequally affected by cognitive impairment without us knowing why. To explore underlying mechanisms and find possible solutions to maintain life-space mobility, there is a need for a standardized behavioral test that relates to behaviors in

  16. Mechanical Properties of the Plantarflexor Musculotendinous Unit during Passive Dorsiflexion in Children with Cerebral Palsy Compared with Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusaini, Adel A. A.; Crosbie, Jack; Shepherd, Roberta B.; Dean, Catherine M.; Scheinberg, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine the passive length-tension relations in the myotendinous components of the plantarflexor muscles of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) under conditions excluding reflex muscle contraction. Method: A cross-sectional, non-interventional study was conducted in a hospital outpatient clinic. Passive torque-angle…

  17. Aphasia following anterior cerebral artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimosaka, Shinichi; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi; Shimizu, Takeo; Morikawa, Atsunori

    1982-01-01

    We have report two cases of aphasia that had infarcts in the distribution of the left or right anterior cerebral artery, as confirmed by computed tomography. Case 1 is a right-handed, 65-year-old man in whom computerized tomographic scanning revealed an infarction of the territory of the left anterior cerebral artery after the clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The standard language test of aphasia (SLTA) revealed non-fluent aphasia with dysarthria, good comprehension, almost normal repetition with good articulation, and a defectiveness in writing. This syndrome was considered an instance of transcortical motor aphasia. Although three years had passed from the onset, his aphasia did not show any improvement. Case 2 is a 37-year-old man who is right-handed but who can use his left hand as well. He was admitted because of subarachnoid hemorrhage from an anterior communicating aneurysm. Because of postoperative spasm, an infarction in the distribution of the right anterior cerebral artery developed. He was totally unable to express himself vocally, but he could use written language quite well to express his ideas and had a good comprehension of spoken language. This clinical picture was considered that of an aphemia. After several weeks, his vocalization returned, but the initial output was still hypophonic. (J.P.N.)

  18. Hemicorea asociada a toxoplasmosis cerebral y SIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. garretto

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Se observan complicaciones neurológicas en 40% de enfermos con SIDA. De estos, en 10% puede ser la manifestation inicial de la enfermedad. En otro 11% pueden aparecer trastornos del movimiento. Comunicamos el primer caso de hemicorea asociada a toxoplasmosis cerebral y SIDA en nuestro pais. Hombre de 26 anos, con diagnostico de SIDA y toxoplasmosis cerebral. Habia comenzado con crisis motoras simples de hemicuerpo izquierdo, con generalization secundaria y luego perdida de fuerza progresiva en dicho hemicuerpo. La RMN de cérebro mostro una lesion frontal derecha y otra temporo-occipital izquierda, con gran edema perilesional y efecto de masa. Las serologias para HIV y toxoplasmosis fueron positivas. Comenzo tratamiento con sulfadiazina y pirimetamina. Al duodecimo dia aparecieron movimientos involuntários dei pie izquierdo, coreicos, que se extendieron mas tarde a todo ese miembro inferior y luego al hemicuerpo. Nueva RMN de cérebro mostro disminucion dei edema y efecto de masa de las lesiones. Sin embargo, se observo una nueva lesion a nivel peduncular derecho. Movimientos involuntarios en pacientes con toxoplasmosis cerebral comenzaron a describirse recientemente solo en pacientes con SIDA. El presente seria el decimotercer caso de la literatura mundial y el primero en nuestro pais de hemicorea asociada a toxoplasmosis y SIDA.

  19. MR findings of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Myung Kwan; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Choi, Choong Gom

    1994-01-01

    To describe MR findings of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. We reviewed 11 MR images of six patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The MR images were retrospectively analyzed in terms of location and signal intensity of the thrombi, parenchymal lesions such as hemorrhage and edema, and changes in follow up study obtained in 4 patients. The thrombus in venous sinus was visualized on MRI in all six patients. The most frequently involved sites were superior sagittal sinus(n=4) and left transverse sinus(n=4). Signal intensity of the thrombus was isointense or hyperintense on both T1- and T2-weighted images with loss of normal signal void of the sinus on all sequences in all patients. Parenchymal lesion was patients in five of six cases, manifested as local hemorrhage in three and edema in three cases(one case overlapped). Local edema seen in three patients was completely resolved on follow up study of seven to 29 days intervals. It is concluded that iso- or high signal intensity with loss of signal void in venous sinus is virtually diagnostic of venous sinus thrombosis. If there are local parenchymal lesions such as hemorrhage and/or edema of unknown causes, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis should be included in differential diagnosis

  20. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS - computerized tomography evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Regina Coeli Fonseca; Narchiori, Edson

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a disease that affects many AIDS's patients. FOr this paper 46 patients with confirmed cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis who did a CT scan between March, 1994 and September, 1997 were examined. Single lesions were found in 28.3% of the patients. The lesions were more frequently detected in the basal ganglia and the frontal lobes. No lesion was larger than 4 cm. As regards the contrast enhancing of the lesions on a CT scan we observed that 54.5% of the lesions had a ring-like contrast enhancing, 36.4% had a nodular contrast enhancing and 6% had a heterogeneous form. After the 21st day of treatment we noticed an improvement in the aspect of the patients'lesions. The improvement of the lesions could be seen through a reduction of the edematous halo, a reduction of the lesion size and a modification in the contrast enhancing on the CT scan. The CT scan was an important method to demonstrate the lesions compatibility enhancing on the CT scan. The CT scan was an important method to demonstrate the lesions compatibility with cerebral toxoplasmosis, as well as to monitor these patients during treatment. (author)

  1. Opiates and cerebral functional activity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trusk, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral activity was measured using the free-fatty acid (1-/sup 14/C) octanoate as a fast functional tracer in conscious, unrestrained rats 5 minutes after intravenous injection of heroin, cocaine or saline vehicle. Regional changes of octanoate labeling density in the autoradiograms relative to saline-injected animals were used to determine the functional activity effects of each drug. Heroin and cocaine each produced a distinctive pattern of activity increases and suppression throughout the rat brain. Similar regional changes induced by both drugs were found in limbic brain regions implicated in drug reinforcement. Labeled octanoate autoradiography was used to measure the cerebral functional response to a tone that had previously been paired to heroin injections. Rats were trained in groups of three consisting of one heroin self-administration animal, and two animals receiving yoked infusion of heroin or saline. A tone was paired with each infusion during training. Behavioral experiments in similarly trained rats demonstrated that these training conditions impart secondary reinforcing properties to the tone in animals previously self-administering heroin, while the tone remains behaviorally neutral in yoked-infusion rats. Cerebral functional activity was measured during presentation of the tone without drug infusion. Octanoate labeling density changed in fifteen brain areas in response to the tone previously paired to heroin without response contingency. Labeling density was significantly modified in sixteen regions as a result of previously pairing the tone to response-contingent heroin infusions.

  2. Traumatic Anterior Cerebral Artery Pseudoaneurysmal Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing Lin; Xue, Hao; Qi, Chang Jing; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Dong Hai; Li, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is a rare but emergent condition. We report a case of traumatic anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis and review the published literature. A 49-year-old man sustained severe head trauma. He was diagnosed with multiple skull bone fractures, left subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pneumocephalus, and right frontal hematoma. Subdural hematoma evacuation was done at a local hospital. In the following months, he experienced repeated epistaxis that required nasal packing to stop the bleeding. Digital subtraction angiography showed an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm protruding into the posterior ethmoid sinus. Embolization of the aneurysm was performed with microcoils, and the parent artery was occluded by thrombosis. The patient presented 1 month later with another epistaxis episode. Digital subtraction angiography showed recanalization of the parent artery and recurrence of the aneurysm. The parent artery was occluded for the second time with coils and Onyx embolic agent. Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is rare, and this is the first report of an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm that manifested with epistaxis. Endovascular intervention has become the first choice of treatment for this disease. The high recurrence rate is the main disadvantage of endovascular intervention. Aneurysm trapping with bypass surgery is another treatment option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A postural `stressed` cerebral HMPAO case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.C.; Jost, G.M.; Bolitho, L.; Grantham, M. [Wangaratta District Hospital, VIC (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: This case study represents an example of the utility of postural hypoperfusion stressed HMPAO SPECT. An elderly woman of 78 with a long history of giddiness was referred to our laboratory for examination of possible cerebral ischaemia. She had recurrent dizzy episodes, sometimes posture related, over the past few years and had suffered several falls. Cerebral DSA revealed minimal disease. CT scans were reported as normal. Carotid duplex Doppler studies revealed bilateral plaque disease in the carotid bulbs extending to the origins of the ICAs which were not significant stenoses. Postural symptoms were induced by standing the patient up rapidly and HMPAO was administered at the same time. A SPECT scan of the brain was performed. Quantitative analysis showed a left to right decrease of 10.8% in the temporo-occipital area, 5.6% in the temporo-parietal area and 2.5% in the cerebellar and parietal areas. Images revealed moderately reduced tracer concentration in the left half of the cerebellum and the left occipital region extending as far forward as the temporo-parietal region A repeat HMPAO SPECT scan without stress was normal. This would appear to indicate reversible ischaemia in the left posterior region, and is consistent with the reported symptoms. This case illustrates the usefulness of HMPAO in the diagnosis of reversible cerebral ischaemia.

  4. Aphasia following anterior cerebral artery occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimosaka, Shinichi; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi; Shimizu, Takeo; Morikawa, Atsunori (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    We have report two cases of aphasia that had infarcts in the distribution of the left or right anterior cerebral artery, as confirmed by computed tomography. Case 1 is a right-handed, 65-year-old man in whom computerized tomographic scanning revealed an infarction of the territory of the left anterior cerebral artery after the clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The standard language test of aphasia (SLTA) revealed non-fluent aphasia with dysarthria, good comprehension, almost normal repetition with good articulation, and a defectiveness in writing. This syndrome was considered an instance of transcortical motor aphasia. Although three years had passed from the onset, his aphasia did not show any improvement. Case 2 is a 37-year-old man who is right-handed but who can use his left hand as well. He was admitted because of subarachnoid hemorrhage from an anterior communicating aneurysm. Because of postoperative spasm, an infarction in the distribution of the right anterior cerebral artery developed. He was totally unable to express himself vocally, but he could use written language quite well to express his ideas and had a good comprehension of spoken language. This clinical picture was considered that of an aphemia. After several weeks, his vocalization returned, but the initial output was still hypophonic.

  5. The relation of breech presentation at term to cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, L; Topp, M; Langhoff-Roos, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between breech delivery and cerebral palsy, considering the influence of intrauterine growth, low Apgar score at birth, and mode of delivery. DESIGN: Register-based, case-control study. POPULATION: A cohort of infants with cerebral palsy born between 1979 and 1986...... in East Denmark, identified by linkage of the cerebral palsy register with the national birth register. Discharge letters from births of breech infants with cerebral palsy were reviewed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presentation, mode of delivery, gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score, type of cerebral...... palsy, severity of handicap. RESULTS: Breech presentation at term was associated with a borderline significantly higher risk of cerebral palsy than vertex presentation (OR 1.56; 95% CI 0.9-2.4). Breech presentation infants more often had a lower Apgar score (

  6. Glycopyrrolate prevents extreme bradycardia and cerebral deoxygenation during electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Andersson, John-Erik; Koch, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The stimulation phase of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces bradycardia. We evaluated the effect of this bradycardia on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by administration of the anticholinergic drug glycopyrrolate (Glp). Cerebral perfusion was estimated by transcranial ultrasound...... in the middle cerebral artery reporting the mean flow velocity (middle cerebral artery [MCA] V(mean)), and cerebral oxygenation was determined by near-infrared spectroscopy of the frontal lobe. Before ECT, heart rate (HR) was 84 beats min(-1) (66-113; median and range) and decreased to 17 (7-85) beats min(-1...... and oxygenation normalized over approximately 3 minutes, whereas the electroencephalogram was unaffected by Glp. The results demonstrate that ECT is associated with hemodynamic effects severe enough to affect cerebral oxygenation and perfusion, and that these effects can be attenuated by Glp treatment....

  7. Symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Features and surgical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Development of less invasive imaging studies, such as magnetic resonance angiography, has increased the chances that unruptured cerebral aneurysms are found. The rupture risk of 'symptomatic' aneurysms is higher than for 'asymptomatic' aneurysms; so 'symptomatic' aneurysms are more often surgically treated. Many reviews examine 'asymptomatic' unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but few evaluate 'symptomatic' aneurysms. The author has treated many patients with symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms and found that improved cranial nerve signs can be expected if the surgical treatment is performed before the symptoms become irreversible; the critical period is approximately 3 months. It is important to suppress the pulsation of the aneurysms compressing the cranial nerves; both a clipping procedure and endovascular coiling are effective. Cranial nerve signs are more commonly the symptoms of unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but large to giant aneurysms can also be the causes of hemiparesis, hydrocephalus, epilepsy, or even cerebral infarction. This review summarizes the features and surgical outcome of symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (author)

  8. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.

    2008-01-01

    : The collaboration Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe provides a powerful means of monitoring trends in cerebral palsy and its functional consequences. The proportion of nonwalking in children with cerebral palsy seems to be rather stable over years and across centers despite the changes that have occurred......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to describe walking ability in children with cerebral palsy from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe common database through 21 years and to examine the association between walking ability and predicting factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Anonymous data...... on 10042 children with cerebral palsy born between 1976 and 1996 were gathered from 14 European centers; 9012 patients were eligible for the analyses. RESULTS: Unaided walking as the primary way of walking at 5 years of age was reported for 54%, walking with assistive devices was reported for 16...

  9. Glioblastoma mimicking a cerebral contusion: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    LI, XINWEI; WANG, KUN; ZHANG, ANLING; SONG, ZHENGFEI; YANG, SHUXU; QIAN, CONG; WANG, YIRONG

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old male presented with a rare case of glioblastoma mimicking a cerebral contusion subsequent to collapsing. The patient had been medicated for hypertension for seven years and diabetes for eight years prior to hospitalization. Brain computed tomography (CT) revealed a cerebral contusion and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the left temporal region. The patient was initially administered intravenous drugs to reduce the intracranial pressure following the diagnosis of a cerebral con...

  10. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  11. Optic atrophy and cerebral infarcts caused by methanol intoxication: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, H.H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen, C.Y. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen, F.H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lee, C.C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chou, T.Y. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Zimmerman, R.A. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-03-01

    We present the MRI findings of cerebral and optic pathway damage in the acute and subacute stages of methanol intoxication. In the acute stage, CT and MRI showed bilateral haemorrhagic necrosis of the corpus striatum and infarcts in the anterior and middle cerebral arterial territories. MRI in the subacute stage demonstrated atrophy of the optic chiasm and prechiasmatic optic nerves in addition to the cerebral infarcts. The patient survived, with total blindness. (orig.)

  12. Hypereosinophilia with Multiple Thromboembolic Cerebral Infarcts and Focal Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ju; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Hyun Young [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    We report a case of hypereosinophilia causing multiple areas of cerebral infarcts. A 52-year-old Korean man presented with dysarthria and weakness in both arms. A brain MRI revealed multiple acute infarcts in the distal border zone with focal intracerebral hemorrhage, whereas a cerebral angiogram was not remarkable. The eosinophil count was 5,500/{mu}L and was accompanied by elevated cardiac enzyme levels. The pattern of cerebral infarcts and laboratory results suggest a thromboembolic infarction associated with hypereosinophilia.

  13. Blood pressure gradients in cerebral arteries: a clue to pathogenesis of cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Pablo J; Müller, Lucas O; Spence, J David

    2017-09-01

    The role of hypertension in cerebral small vessel disease is poorly understood. At the base of the brain (the 'vascular centrencephalon'), short straight arteries transmit blood pressure directly to small resistance vessels; the cerebral convexity is supplied by long arteries with many branches, resulting in a drop in blood pressure. Hypertensive small vessel disease (lipohyalinosis) causes the classically described lacunar infarctions at the base of the brain; however, periventricular white matter intensities (WMIs) seen on MRI and WMI in subcortical areas over the convexity, which are often also called 'lacunes', probably have different aetiologies. We studied pressure gradients from proximal to distal regions of the cerebral vasculature by mathematical modelling. Blood flow/pressure equations were solved in an Anatomically Detailed Arterial Network (ADAN) model, considering a normotensive and a hypertensive case. Model parameters were suitably modified to account for structural changes in arterial vessels in the hypertensive scenario. Computations predict a marked drop in blood pressure from large and medium-sized cerebral vessels to cerebral peripheral beds. When blood pressure in the brachial artery is 192/113 mm Hg, the pressure in the small arterioles of the posterior parietal artery bed would be only 117/68 mm Hg. In the normotensive case, with blood pressure in the brachial artery of 117/75 mm Hg, the pressure in small parietal arterioles would be only 59/38 mm Hg. These findings have important implications for understanding small vessel disease. The marked pressure gradient across cerebral arteries should be taken into account when evaluating the pathogenesis of small WMIs on MRI. Hypertensive small vessel disease, affecting the arterioles at the base of the brain should be distinguished from small vessel disease in subcortical regions of the convexity and venous disease in the periventricular white matter.

  14. [Importance of the study of cerebral blood flow and regional oxygen consumption in cerebral ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanet, M

    1987-06-18

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two threshold lies a "penumbra zone". This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO2), oxygen extraction (EO2) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO2 and often a decrease in CMRO2, whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO2, EO2 and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis. Arteriopathic dementia probably does not result from chronic ischaemia of the cerebral parenchyma.

  15. Study of cerebral vascular diseases with radioisotopes in cerebral atherosclerotical subjects and/for subjects with sequelae of cerebral stroke, before and after use of the association piracetam-dihydroergotoxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, P.F.; Ferreira, A.; Paulillo, L.F.; Cukierman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Twently subjects with cerebral sclerosis and/or sequelas of cerebral stroke were studied, before and after use of piracetam-dihydroergotoxine. We performed the complete hemispheric cerebral blood flow and cerebral scintigraphy, beyond clinical and neurological examination. Scintigraphies were unchanged. Cerebral circulation times, or both hemispheres, diminished. This occurred, probably, in relation with metabolic effects of both pharmaceutical drugs. The alpha sympatolytic and modulatory effects of dihydroergotoxine should be considered. (author) [pt

  16. Increased risk for complications following diagnostic cerebral angiography in older patients: Trends from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1999-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhri, Omar; Schoen, Matthew; Mantha, Aditya; Feroze, Abdullah; Ali, Rohaid; Lawton, Michael T; Do, Huy M

    2016-10-01

    The full utility of diagnostic cerebral angiography, an invasive cerebrovascular imaging technique, is currently debated. Our goal was to determine trends in diagnostic cerebral angiography utilization and associated complications from 1999 through 2009. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) was used to identify patients who received primary cerebral angiography from 1999-2009 in the United States. We observed trends in discharge volume, total mean charge, and post-procedural complications for this population. Data was based on sample projections and analyzed using univariate and multivariate regression. There were a total of 424,105 discharges indicating primary cerebral angiography nationwide from 1999-2009. The majority of these cases (65%) were in patients older than 55years. Embolic stroke was the most frequent complication, particularly in the oldest age bracket, occurring in 16,304 patients. The risk for complications increased with age (p<0.0001) and with other underlying health conditions. Pulmonary, deep vein thrombosis, and renal associated comorbidities resulted in the greatest risk for developing post-procedural complications. Throughout the study period case volume for cerebral angiography remained constant while total charge per patient increased from $17,365 in 1999 to $45,339 in 2009 (p<0.001). While the overall complication rate for this invasive procedure is relatively low, the potential risk for embolic stroke in older patients is significant. It is worth considering less invasive diagnostic techniques for an older and at risk patient population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Brain region-selective mechanisms contribute to the progression of cerebral alterations in acute liver failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Omar; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Rodrigo, Regina; Agusti, Ana; Boix, Jordi; Nieto-Charques, Laura; Cerdán, Sebastián; Felipo, Vicente

    2011-02-01

    Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) often die of intracranial pressure (IP) and cerebral herniation. Main contributors to increased IP are ammonia, glutamine, edema, and blood flow. The sequence of events and underlying mechanisms, as well as the temporal pattern, regional distribution, and contribution of each parameter to the progression of neurologic deterioration and IP, are unclear. We studied rats with ALF to follow the progression of changes in ammonia, glutamine, grade and type (vasogenic or cytotoxic) of edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, cerebral blood flow, and IP. We assessed whether the changes in these parameters were similar between frontal cortex and cerebellum and evaluated the presence, type, and progression of edema in 12 brain areas. ALF was induced by injection of galactosamine. The grade and type of edema was assessed by measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient by magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral blood flow was measured by magnetic resonance and blood-brain barrier permeability by Evans blue-albumin extravasation. Increased IP arises from an early increase of blood-brain barrier permeability in certain areas (including cerebellum but not frontal cortex) followed by vasogenic edema. Ammonia and glutamine then increase progressively, leading to cytotoxic edema in many areas. Alterations in lactate and cerebral blood flow are later events that further increase IP. Different mechanisms in specific regions of the brain contribute, with different temporal patterns, to the progression of cerebral alterations and IP in ALF. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of lavender oil (Lavandula angustifolia) on cerebral edema and its possible mechanisms in an experimental model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Abedin; Sharifat, Shaghayegh; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza

    2014-02-22

    Lavender belongs to the family Labiatae and has a variety of cosmetic uses as well as therapeutic purposes in herbal medicine. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of lavender oil against brain edema and its possible mechanisms in an experimental model of stroke. Under Laser-Doppler Flowmetry, focal cerebral ischemia was induced by the transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 1h in rats. Lavender oil (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg ip (and/or vehicle was injected at the onset of ischemia. Infarct size, cerebral edema, functional outcome, and oxidative stress biomarkers were evaluated using standard methods. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expression of VEGF, Bax, and Bcl-2. Treatment with lavender oil at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly diminished infarct size, brain edema, and improved functional outcome after cerebral ischemia (P0.05). The results indicated that lavender oil has neuroprotective activity against cerebral ischemia and alleviated neurological function in rats, and the mechanism may be related to augmentation in endogenous antioxidant defense, inhibiting oxidative stress, and increasing VEGF expression in the rat brain. However, lavender oil could not suppress the apoptosis pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Improvement in regional CBF by L-serine contributes to its neuroprotective effect in rats after focal cerebral ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Jie Ren

    Full Text Available To investigate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-serine, permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery while monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF. Rats were divided into control and L-serine-treated groups after middle cerebral artery occlusion. The neurological deficit score and brain infarct volume were assessed. Nissl staining was used to quantify the cortical injury. L-serine and D-serine levels in the ischemic cortex were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography. We found that L-serine treatment: 1 reduced the neurological deficit score, infarct volume and cortical neuron loss in a dose-dependent manner; 2 improved CBF in the cortex, and this effect was inhibited in the presence of apamin plus charybdotoxin while the alleviation of both neurological deficit score and infarct volume was blocked; and 3 increased the amount of L-serine and D-serine in the cortex, and inhibition of the conversion of L-serine into D-serine by aminooxyacetic acid did not affect the reduction of neurological deficit score and infarct volume by L-serine. In conclusion, improvement in regional CBF by L-serine may contribute to its neuroprotective effect on the ischemic brain, potentially through vasodilation which is mediated by the small- and intermediate-conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels on the cerebral blood vessel endothelium.

  20. Do we know enough to find an adjunctive therapy for cerebral malaria in African children? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany A. Riggle

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is the deadliest complication of malaria, a febrile infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasite. Any of the five human Plasmodium species can cause disease, but, for unknown reasons, in approximately 2 million cases each year P. falciparum progresses to severe disease, ultimately resulting in half a million deaths. The majority of these deaths are in children under the age of five. Currently, there is no way to predict which child will progress to severe disease and there are no adjunctive therapies to halt the symptoms after onset. Herein, we discuss what is known about the disease mechanism of one form of severe malaria, cerebral malaria, and how we might exploit this understanding to rescue children in the throes of cerebral disease.