WorldWideScience

Sample records for underlying ceramic substrate

  1. Ceramic substrate including thin film multilayer surface conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joseph Ambrose; Peterson, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-09

    A ceramic substrate comprises a plurality of ceramic sheets, a plurality of inner conductive layers, a plurality of vias, and an upper conductive layer. The ceramic sheets are stacked one on top of another and include a top ceramic sheet. The inner conductive layers include electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of each ceramic sheet excluding the top ceramic sheet. The vias are formed in each of the ceramic sheets with each via being filled with electrically conductive material. The upper conductive layer includes electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of the top ceramic sheet. The upper conductive layer is constructed from a stack of four sublayers. A first sublayer is formed from titanium. A second sublayer is formed from copper. A third sublayer is formed from platinum. A fourth sublayer is formed from gold.

  2. Hot Films on Ceramic Substrates for Measuring Skin Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffz, Greg; Leiser, Daniel; Bartlett, Jim; Lavine, Adrienne

    2003-01-01

    Hot-film sensors, consisting of a metallic film on an electrically nonconductive substrate, have been used to measure skin friction as far back as 1931. A hot film is maintained at an elevated temperature relative to the local flow by passing an electrical current through it. The power required to maintain the specified temperature depends on the rate at which heat is transferred to the flow. The heat transfer rate correlates to the velocity gradient at the surface, and hence, with skin friction. The hot-film skin friction measurement method is most thoroughly developed for steady-state conditions, but additional issues arise under transient conditions. Fabricating hot-film substrates using low-thermal-conductivity ceramics can offer advantages over traditional quartz or polyester-film substrates. First, a low conductivity substrate increases the fraction of heat convected away by the fluid, thus increasing sensitivity to changes in flow conditions. Furthermore, the two-part, composite nature of the substrate allows the installation of thermocouple junctions just below the hot film, which can provide an estimate of the conduction heat loss.

  3. Mo-Si-B-Based Coatings for Ceramic Base Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepezko, John Harry (Inventor); Sakidja, Ridwan (Inventor); Ritt, Patrick (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Alumina-containing coatings based on molybdenum (Mo), silicon (Si), and boron (B) ("MoSiB coatings") that form protective, oxidation-resistant scales on ceramic substrate at high temperatures are provided. The protective scales comprise an aluminoborosilicate glass, and may additionally contain molybdenum. Two-stage deposition methods for forming the coatings are also provided.

  4. Supersonic laser spray of aluminium alloy on a ceramic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riveiro, A.; Lusquinos, F.; Comesana, R.; Quintero, F.; Pou, J.

    2007-01-01

    Applying a ceramic coating onto a metallic substrate to improve its wear resistance or corrosion resistance has attracted the interest of many researchers during decades. However, only few works explore the possibility to apply a metallic layer onto a ceramic material. This work presents a novel technique to coat ceramic materials with metals: the supersonic laser spraying. In this technique a laser beam is focused on the surface of the precursor metal in such a way that the metal is transformed to the liquid state in the beam-metal interaction zone. A supersonic jet expels the molten material and propels it to the surface of the ceramic substrate. In this study, we present the preliminary results obtained using the supersonic laser spray to coat a commercial cordierite ceramic plate with an Al-Cu alloy using a 3.5 kW CO 2 laser and a supersonic jet of Argon. Coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and interferometric profilometry

  5. Bonding strength of glass-ceramic trabecular-like coatings to ceramic substrates for prosthetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Baino, Francesco; Pugno, Nicola M; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2013-04-01

    A new approach based on the concepts of quantized fracture mechanics (QFM) is presented and discussed in this paper to estimate the bonding strength of trabecular-like coatings, i.e. glass-ceramic scaffolds mimicking the architecture of cancellous bone, to ceramic substrates. The innovative application of glass-derived scaffolds as trabecular-like coatings is proposed in order to enhance the osteointegration of prosthetic ceramic devices. The scaffolds, prepared by polymeric sponge replication, are joined to alumina substrates by a dense glass-ceramic coating (interlayer) and the so-obtained 3-layer constructs are investigated from micro-structural, morphological and mechanical viewpoints. In particular, the fracture strengths of three different crack propagation modes, i.e. glass-derived scaffold fracture, interface delamination or mixed fracture, are predicted in agreement with those of experimental mechanical tests. The approach proposed in this work could have interesting applications towards an ever more rational design of bone tissue engineering biomaterials and coatings, in view of the optimization of their mechanical properties for making them actually suitable for clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Removal of chromium from synthetic wastewater using MFI zeolite membrane supported on inexpensive tubular ceramic substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vinoth Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A mordenite framework inverted (MFI type zeolite membrane was produced on inexpensive tubular ceramic substrate through hydrothermal synthesis and applied for the removal of chromium from synthetic wastewater. The fabricated ceramic substrate and membrane was characterized by diverse standard techniques such as X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, porosity, water permeability and pore size measurements. The porosity of the ceramic substrate (53% was reduced by the deposition of MFI (51% zeolite layer. The pore size and water permeability of the membrane was evaluated as 0.272 μm and 4.43 × 10–7 m3/m2s.kPa, respectively, which are lower than that of the substrate pore size (0.309 μm and water permeability (5.93 × 10–7 m3/m2s.kPa values. To identify the effectiveness of the prepared membrane, the applied pressure of the filtration process and initial chromium concentration and cross flow rate were varied to study their influence on the permeate flux and percentage of removal. The maximum removal of chromium achieved was 78% under an applied pressure of 345 kPa and an initial feed concentration of 1,000 ppm. Finally, the efficiency of the membrane for chromium removal was assessed with other membranes reported in the literature.

  7. Design of pore size of macroporous ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szewald, O.; Kotsis, I.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for the design of macro-porous ceramic substrates. Based on geometrical and regression models detailed technology was worked out for producing these 100% open porous filters, which were made using quasi homo-disperse fractions of corundum of diameters of several tens and hundreds microns and glassy binding material. Axial pressing was used as a forming process. Pore networks with size distribution that can be defined by a curve having one maximum were provided applying the above technology. Based on geometrical considerations and measurements it was proved that these maximums are at characteristic pore sizes that depend only on characteristic size of the original grain fractions and on the extent of the axial forming pressure. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  8. Deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eryilmaz, O L; Johnson, J A; Ajayi, O O; Erdemir, A

    2006-01-01

    As an element, carbon is rather unique and offers a range of rare opportunities for the design and fabrication of zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanostructured novel materials and coatings such as fullerenes, nanotubes, thin films, and free-standing nano-to-macroscale structures. Among these, carbon-based two-dimensional thin films (such as diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC)) have attracted an overwhelming interest in recent years, mainly because of their exceptional physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and tribological properties. In particular, certain DLC films were found to provide extremely low friction and wear coefficients to sliding metallic and ceramic surfaces. Since the early 1990s, carbon has been used at Argonne National Laboratory to synthesize a class of novel DLC films that now provide friction and wear coefficients as low as 0.001 and 10 -11 -10 -10 mm 3 N -1 m -1 , respectively, when tested in inert or vacuum test environments. Over the years, we have optimized these films and applied them successfully to all kinds of metallic and ceramic substrates and evaluated their friction and wear properties under a wide range of sliding conditions. In this paper, we will provide details of our recent work on the deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates. We will also provide chemical and structural information about these films and describe the fundamental tribological mechanisms that control their unusual friction and wear behaviour

  9. Novel low-temperature sintering ceramic substrate based on indialite/cordierite glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Jobin; Vahera, Timo; Ohsato, Hitoshi; Iwata, Makoto; Jantunen, Heli

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a novel low-temperature sintering substrate for low temperature co-fired ceramic applications based on indialite/cordierite glass ceramics with Bi2O3 as a sintering aid showing low permittivity (εr) and ultralow dielectric loss (tan δ) is described. The fine powder of indialite was prepared by the crystallization of cordierite glass at 1000 °C/1 h. The optimized sintering temperature was 900 °C with 10 wt % Bi2O3 addition. The relative density achieved was 97%, and εr and tan δ were 6.10 and 0.0001 at 1 MHz, respectively. The composition also showed a moderately low temperature coefficient of relative permittivity of 118 ppm/°C at 1 MHz. The obtained linear coefficient of thermal expansion was 3.5 ppm/°C in the measured temperature range of 100 to 600 °C. The decreasing trend in dielectric loss, the low relative permittivity at 1 MHz, and the low thermal expansion of the newly developed composition make it an ideal choice for radio frequency applications.

  10. Microstructural and Wear Behavior Characterization of Porous Layers Produced by Pulsed Laser Irradiation in Glass-Ceramics Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Daniel; Conde, Ana; García, Iñaki; Gracia-Escosa, Elena; de Damborenea, Juan J; Peña, Jose I

    2013-09-09

    In this work, wear behavior and microstructural characterization of porous layers produced in glass-ceramic substrates by pulsed laser irradiation in the nanosecond range are studied under unidirectional sliding conditions against AISI316 and corundum counterbodies. Depending on the optical configuration of the laser beam and on the working parameters, the local temperature and pressure applied over the interaction zone can generate a porous glass-ceramic layer. Material transference from the ball to the porous glass-ceramic layer was observed in the wear tests carried out against the AISI316 ball counterface whereas, in the case of the corundum ball, the wear volume loss was concentrated in the porous layer. Wear rate and friction coefficient presented higher values than expected for dense glass-ceramics.

  11. Microstructural and Wear Behavior Characterization of Porous Layers Produced by Pulsed Laser Irradiation in Glass-Ceramics Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose I. Peña

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, wear behavior and microstructural characterization of porous layers produced in glass-ceramic substrates by pulsed laser irradiation in the nanosecond range are studied under unidirectional sliding conditions against AISI316 and corundum counterbodies. Depending on the optical configuration of the laser beam and on the working parameters, the local temperature and pressure applied over the interaction zone can generate a porous glass-ceramic layer. Material transference from the ball to the porous glass-ceramic layer was observed in the wear tests carried out against the AISI316 ball counterface whereas, in the case of the corundum ball, the wear volume loss was concentrated in the porous layer. Wear rate and friction coefficient presented higher values than expected for dense glass-ceramics.

  12. Thermal Effect of Ceramic Substrate on Heat Distribution in Thermoelectric Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolaei, Alireza Rezania; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    in the heat sink, a parallel microchannel heat sink is applied to a real TEG. The focus of this study is a discussion of the temperature difference variation between the cold/hot sides of the TEG legs versus the variation of the thermal conductivity of the ceramic substrate and the thickness of the substrate...... that the temperature difference is affected remarkably by the pressure drops in the heat sink, the thermal conductivity of the ceramic substrate, and the thickness of the substrate on the hot side....

  13. Transformation kinetics of mixed polymeric substrates under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bglucosidase and a-mannosidase were abundantly secreted in the growth medium. This research is the first report on mixed polymeric substrate biodegradation under sewer condition by A. niger, and could be considered as an open window on ...

  14. Essential Factors Influencing the Bonding Strength of Cold-Sprayed Aluminum Coatings on Ceramic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.; Wüstefeld, C.; Motylenko, M.; Rafaja, D.

    2018-02-01

    The present work summarizes the most important results of a research project dealing with the comprehensive investigation of the bonding mechanisms between cold-sprayed Al coatings and various poly- and monocrystalline ceramic substrates (Al2O3, AlN, Si3N4, SiC, MgF2). Due to their exceptional combination of properties, metallized ceramics are gaining more and more importance for a wide variety of applications, especially in electronic engineering. Cold spray provides a quick, flexible, and cost-effective one-step process to apply metallic coatings on ceramic surfaces. However, since most of the existing cold-spray-related publications focus on metallic substrates, only very little is known about the bonding mechanisms acting between cold-sprayed metals and ceramic substrates. In this paper, the essential factors influencing the bonding strength in such composites are identified. Besides mechanical tensile strength testing, a thorough analysis of the coatings and especially the metal/ceramic interfaces was conducted by means of HRTEM, FFT, STEM, EDX, EELS, GAXRD, and EBSD. The influence of substrate material, substrate temperature, and particle size is evaluated. The results suggest that, apart from mechanical interlocking, the adhesion of cold-sprayed metallic coatings on ceramics is based on a complex interplay of different mechanisms such as quasiadiabatic shearing, static recrystallization, and heteroepitaxial growth.

  15. Characterization of glassy phase at the surface of alumina ceramics substrate and its effect on laser cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Renli [School of Mechanical-Electronic and Materials Engineering, China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, JS (China); Dept. of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, CICECO, Univ. of Aveiro, Aveiro (Portugal); Li Yanbo [School of Mechanical-Electronic and Materials Engineering, China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, JS (China); Xu Xin; Ferreira, J.M.F. [Dept. of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, CICECO, Univ. of Aveiro, Aveiro (Portugal)

    2004-07-01

    Nowadays alumina ceramic substrates are widely used for high precision applications in electronic devices, such as hybrid integrated circuits (HIC). Usually, the alumina ceramic substrates are shaped through tape casting method and sintered in continuous slab kilns. The sintering aids used to enhance densification during sintering give rise to the formation of an alumino-silicate liquid phase, which is of crucial importance in pressureless and low-temperature sintering (<1600 C) of alumina ceramics. The preferential migration of liquid phase to the surface of alumina substrates under the capillary action and its transformation into glassy phase during cooling affects the subsequent processing steps of HIC. A smoothening effect on surface with its enrichment in glassy phase is accompanied by a decrease of the surface toughness. On the other hand, the accumulated glassy phase onto the surface has a great effect on laser cutting. The high temperatures developed during laser cutting turn the superficial glassy phase into liquid again, while rapid solidification will occur after removing laser beam. The fast cooling of the liquid phase causes formation of extensive network of cracks on the surface of alumina substrate. Apparently, the presence of such faults degrades mechanical strength and thermal shock resistance of alumina substrates. Meanwhile, the recast layers and spatter deposits at the periphery of the hole has been observed. (orig.)

  16. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass A, John Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick Jr.; Welsh R, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system

  17. Automatic quality control in the production of ceramic substrates by pulsed laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morace, Renate Erica; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) in the quality control of ceramic substrates produced by a CO2 pulsed laser. A procedure of automatic measurements on a CMM equipped with a CCD camera was developed. In particular, the number and the distribution...... of cavities on the cut face of thin ceramic substrates were investigated and different strategies to assess the depth and the pitch of cavities were compared. Then, the measurement uncertainty for these two critical parameters was evaluated using the method described in ISO/TS 15530-3....

  18. SERS substrates fabricated using ceramic filters for the detection of bacteria: Eliminating the citrate interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier-Boss, P. A.; Sorensen, K. C.; George, R. D.; Sims, P. C.; O'braztsova, A.

    2017-06-01

    It was found that spectra obtained for bacteria on SERS substrates fabricated by filtering citrate-generated Ag nanoparticles (NPs) onto rigid, ceramic filters exhibited peaks due to citrate as well as the bacteria. In many cases the citrate spectrum overwhelmed that of the bacteria. Given the simplicity of the method to prepare these substrates, means of eliminating this citrate interference were explored. It was found that allowing a mixture of bacteria suspension and citrate-generated Ag NPs to incubate prior to filtering onto the ceramic filter eliminated this interference.

  19. Substrate Effect on Carbon/Ceramic Mixed Matrix Membrane Prepared by a Vacuum-Assisted Method for Desalination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjun Song

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effect of various membrane substrates and coating conditions on the formation of carbon/ceramic mixed matrix membranes for desalination application. The substrates were impregnated with phenolic resin via a vacuum-assisted method followed by carbonization under an inert gas. Substrates with pore sizes of 100 nm required a single impregnation step only, where short vacuum times (<120 s resulted in low quality membranes with defects. For vacuum times of ≥120 s, high quality membranes with homogeneous impregnation were prepared leading to high salt rejection (>90% and high water fluxes (up to 25 L m−2 h−1. The increase in water flux as a function of the vacuum time confirms the vacuum etching effect resulting from the vacuum-assisted method. Substrates with pore sizes of 140 nm required two impregnation steps. These pores were too large for the ceramic inter-particle space to be filled with phenolic resin via a single step. In the second impregnation step, increasing the concentration of the phenolic resin resulted in membranes with lower water fluxes. These results indicate that thicker films were formed by increasing the phenolic resin concentration. In the case of substrates with pores of 600 nm, these pores were too large and inter-particle space filling with phenolic resin was not attained.

  20. CVD of solid oxides in porous substrates for ceramic membrane modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of yttria-doped zirconia has been experimented systematically in various types of porous ceramic substrates by a modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process operating in an opposing reactant geometry using water vapor and corresponding metal chloride vapors as reactants. The

  1. Effect of different surface treatments on adhesion of In-Ceram Zirconia to enamel and dentin substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Ibrahim, Fatma; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-08-01

    Resin bonding of In-Ceram Zirconia (ICZ) ceramics is still a challenge, especially for minimally invasive applications. This study evaluated the adhesion of ICZ to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments of the ceramic. ICZ ceramic specimens (diameter: 6 mm; thickness: 2 mm) (N = 100) were fabricated following the manufacturer's instructions and randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 20), according to the surface treatment methods applied. The groups were as follows: group C: no treatment; group SB: sandblasting; group SCS-S: CoJet+silane; group SCS-P: CoJet+Alloy Primer; group GE-S: glaze+ hydrofluoric acid etching (9.6%) for 60 s+silane. Each group was randomly divided into two subgroups to be bonded to either enamel or dentin (n = 10 per group) using MDP-based resin cement (Panavia F2.0). All the specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5000x, 5°C-55°C). The specimens were mounted in a universal testing machine and tensile force was applied to the ceramic/cement interface until failure occurred (1 mm/min). After evaluating all the debonded specimens under SEM, the failure types were defined as either "adhesive" with no cement left on the ceramic surface (score 0) or "mixed" with less than 1/2 of the cement left adhered to the surface with no cohesive failure of the substrate (score 1). The data were statistically evaluated using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The highest tensile bond strength for the enamel surfaces was obtained in group GE-S (18.1 ± 2 MPa) and the lowest in group SB (7.1 ± 1.4 MPa). Regarding dentin, group CSC-P showed the highest (12 ± 1.3 MPa) and SB the lowest tensile bond strength (5.7 ± 0.4 MPa). Groups SB, CSC-S, CSC-P, and GE-S did not show significant differences between the different surface treatments on either enamel or dentin surfaces (p enamel and dentin substrates (p enamel substrates, exclusively adhesive failures from ICZ (score 0) were found, on dentin exclusively mixed failures were observed (score

  2. Study of ceramics sintering under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunrath Neto, A.O.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study was made on high pressure sintering of ceramics in order to obtain materials with controlled microstructure, which are not accessible by conventional methods. Some aspects with particular interest were: to achieve very low porosity, with fine grains; to produce dispersed metastable and denser phases which can act as toughening agents; the study of new possibilities for toughening enhancement. (author)

  3. Effects of substrate pretreatments on diamond synthesis for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} based ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Y. [Prefectural Industrial Research Inst., Shizuoka (Japan); Takaya, M. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Tsudanuma 2-chome, Narashino-shi, 275 (Japan)

    1998-07-08

    Diamond synthesis for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics after various substrate pretreatments has been carried out by the microwave-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases. Four types of pretreatments for various substrates were performed as follows: scratching with diamond powder (I), applying O{sub 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 2} combustion flames (II), polishing with alumina (III), and platinum vapor deposition (IV). The products deposited on the substrate were examined with micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). It was found that the application of O{sub 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flames as a pretreatment of the substrate in diamond synthesis was suitable, because a higher density of diamond nucleation could be obtained, and a film-like diamond could be formed on the surface in a shorter time than without applying them. The diamond could be synthesized on the surface for all four types of substrate pretreatments performed in the present study. The effects of the substrate pretreatments on the surface morphology of grown diamond were that a film-like diamond for (I) or (II), a particle-like diamond for (III) and a particle and/or a film-like diamond for (IV) were formed on the surface. The surface morphology of grown diamond depended very much on the substrate temperature under deposition. (orig.) 18 refs.

  4. Glass-(nAg, nCu) Biocide Coatings on Ceramic Oxide Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Malpartida, Francisco; Díaz, Luis Antonio; Torrecillas, Ramón; Rojo, Fernando; Moya, José Serafín

    2012-01-01

    The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based) substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram-, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more th...

  5. SERS substrates fabricated using ceramic filters for the detection of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier-Boss, P. A.; Sorensen, K. C.; George, R. D.; Obraztsova, A.

    2016-01-01

    SERS substrates were fabricated by filtering either Ag or Au colloidal particles onto rigid, ceramic filters - onto which suspensions of bacteria were then filtered. SERS spectra of the bacteria were obtained using a Raman spectrometer that has an 'orbital raster scan' capability. It was shown that bacteria samples prepared in this manner were uniformly distributed onto the surface of the SERS substrate. The effect of common buffer systems on the SERS spectra was investigated and the utility of using the SERS technique for speciation of bacteria was explored.

  6. Crack Driving Forces in a Multilayered Coating System for Ceramic Matrix Composite Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the top coating thickness, modulus and shrinkage strains on the crack driving forces for a baseline multilayer Yttria-Stabilized-Zirconia/Mullite/Si thermal and environment barrier coating (TEBC) system for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite substrates are determined for gas turbine applications. The crack driving forces increase with increasing modulus, and a low modulus thermal barrier coating material (below 10 GPa) will have no cracking issues under the thermal gradient condition analyzed. Since top coating sintering increases the crack driving forces with time, highly sintering resistant coatings are desirable to maintain a low tensile modulus and maintain a low crack driving force with time. Finite element results demonstrated that an advanced TEBC system, such as ZrO2/HfO2, which possesses improved sintering resistance and high temperature stability, exhibited excellent durability. A multi-vertical cracked structure with fine columnar spacing is an ideal strain tolerant coating capable of reducing the crack driving forces to an acceptable level even with a high modulus of 50 GPa.

  7. Thin Single Crystal Silicon Solar Cells on Ceramic Substrates: November 2009 - November 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.; Ravi, K. V.

    2011-06-01

    In this program we have been developing a technology for fabricating thin (< 50 micrometres) single crystal silicon wafers on foreign substrates. We reverse the conventional approach of depositing or forming silicon on foreign substrates by depositing or forming thick (200 to 400 micrometres) ceramic materials on high quality single crystal silicon films ~ 50 micrometres thick. Our key innovation is the fabrication of thin, refractory, and self-adhering 'handling layers or substrates' on thin epitaxial silicon films in-situ, from powder precursors obtained from low cost raw materials. This 'handling layer' has sufficient strength for device and module processing and fabrication. Successful production of full sized (125 mm X 125 mm) silicon on ceramic wafers with 50 micrometre thick single crystal silicon has been achieved and device process flow developed for solar cell fabrication. Impurity transfer from the ceramic to the silicon during the elevated temperature consolidation process has resulted in very low minority carrier lifetimes and resulting low cell efficiencies. Detailed analysis of minority carrier lifetime, metals analysis and device characterization have been done. A full sized solar cell efficiency of 8% has been demonstrated.

  8. Finite element analysis of reticulated ceramics under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Angelo, Claudio; Ortona, Alberto; Colombo, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: This paper shows how finite element analysis can be used to study the effect of the morphological features of reticulated ceramics on their mechanical properties under compression. Quantitative morphological data, obtained by X-ray computed tomography (XCT) for a commercially available Si–SiC foam produced by the replica method, have been linked to a set of computer generated cells in which one morphological parameter was varied at a time. The findings indicate how the modification of some morphological features, which depend on the careful selection of appropriate and specific processing parameters, would enable the production of ceramic foams possessing higher strength for a given total porosity value.

  9. Modeling of thermal explosion under pressure in metal ceramic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, M.; Dudko, V.; Skachek, B.; Matvienko, A.; Gotman, I.; Gutmanas, E.Y.

    1998-01-01

    The process of reactive in situ synthesis of dense ceramic matrix composites in Ti-B-C, Ti-B-N, Ti-Si-N systems is modeled. These ceramics are fabricated on the basis of compacted blends of ceramic powders, namely Ti-B 4 C and/or Ti-BN. The objectives of the project are to identify and investigate the optimal thermal conditions preferable for production of fully dense ceramic matrix composites. Towards this goal heat transfer and combustion in dense and porous ceramic blends are investigated during monotonous heating at a constant rate. This process is modeled using a heat transfer-combustion model with kinetic parameters determined from the differential thermal analysis of the experimental data. The kinetic burning parameters and the model developed are further used to describe the thermal explosion synthesis in a restrained die under pressure. It is shown that heat removal from the reaction zone affects the combustion process and the final phase composition

  10. Ceramic-like open-celled geopolymer foam as a porous substrate for water treatment catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářík, T.; Křenek, T.; Pola, M.; Rieger, D.; Kadlec, J.; Franče, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents results from experimental study on microstructural and mechanical properties of geopolymer-based foam filters. The process for making porous ceramic-like geopolymer body was experimentally established, consists of (a) geopolymer paste synthesis, (b) ceramic filler incorporation, (c) coating of open-celled polyurethane foam with geopolymer mixture, (d) rapid setting procedure, (e) thermal treatment. Geopolymer paste was based on potassium silicate solution n(SiO2)/n(K2O)=1.6 and powder mixture of calcined kaolin and precipitated silica. Various types of ceramic granular filler (alumina, calcined schistous clay and cordierite) were tested in relation to aggregate gradation design and particle size distribution. The small amplitude oscillatory rheometry in strain controlled regime 0.01% with angular frequency 10 rad/s was applied for determination of rheology behavior of prepared mixtures. Thermal treatment conditions were applied in the temperature range 1100 - 1300 °C. The developed porous ceramic-like foam effectively served as a substrate for highly active nanoparticles of selected Fe+2 spinels. Such new-type of nanocomposite was tested as a heterogeneous catalyst for technological process of advanced oxidative degradation of resistive antibiotics occurring in waste waters.

  11. Surface modification of ceramic and metallic alloy substrates by laser raster-scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Grez, Jorge Andres

    This work describes the feasibility of continuous wave laser-raster scan-processing under controlled atmospheric conditions as employed in three distinct surface modification processes: (a) surface roughness reduction of indirect-Selective Laser Sintered 420 martensitic stainless steel-40 wt. % bronze infiltrated surfaces; (b) Si-Cr-Hf-C coating consolidation over 3D carbon-carbon composites cylinders; (c) dendritic solidification structures of Mar-M 247 confined powder precursor grown from polycrystalline Alloy 718 substrates. A heat transfer model was developed to illustrate that the aspect ratio of the laser scanned pattern and the density of scanning lines play a significant role in determining peak surface temperature, heating and cooling rates and melt resident times. Comprehensive characterization of the surface of the processed specimens was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), optical metallography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and, in certain cases, tactile profilometry. In Process (a), it was observed that a 24% to 37% roughness Ra reduction could be accomplished from the as-received value of 2.50+/-0.10 microns for laser energy densities ranging from 350 to 500 J/cm2. In Process (b), complete reactive wetting of carbon-carbon composite cylinders surface was achieved by laser melting a Si-Cr-Hf-C slurry. Coatings showed good thermal stability at 1000°C in argon, and, when tested in air, a percent weight reduction rate of -6.5 wt.%/hr was achieved. A soda-glass overcoat applied over the coated specimens by conventional means revealed a percent weight reduction rate between -1.4 to -2.2 wt.%/hr. Finally, in Process (c), microstructure of the Mar-M 247 single layer deposits, 1 mm in height, grown on Alloy 718 polycrystalline sheets, resulted in a sound metallurgical bond, low porosity, and uniform thickness. Polycrystalline dendrites grew preferentially along the [001] direction from the substrate up to 400

  12. Survival of resin infiltrated ceramics under influence of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Elsafi, Mohamed H

    2016-04-01

    to evaluate influence of cyclic fatigue on two resin infiltrated ceramics and three all-ceramic crowns manufactured using CAD/CAM technology. CAD/CAM anatomically shaped crowns were manufactured using two resin infiltrated ceramics (Lava Ultimate and Vita Enamic), two reinforced glass ceramic milling blocks ((IPS)Empress CAD and (IPS)e.max CAD) and a veneered zirconia core ((IPS)Zir CAD). (IPS)e.max CAD and (IPS)Zir CAD were milled into 0.5mm thick anatomically shaped core structure which received standardized press-on veneer ceramic. The manufactured crowns were cemented on standardized resin dies using a resin adhesive (Panavia F2.0). Initial fracture strength of half of the specimens was calculated using one cycle load to failure in a universal testing machine. The remaining crowns were subjected to 3.7 million chewing cycles (load range 50-200N at 3s interval) in a custom made pneumatic fatigue tester. Survival statistics were calculated and Weibull modulus was measured from fitted load-cycle-failure diagrams. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to fractographically analyze fractured surfaces. Data were analyzed using two way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc tests (α=0.05). Dynamic fatigue resulted in significant reduction (F=7.54, Pceramics and (IPS)Empress demonstrated the highest percent of fracture incidences under the influence of fatigue (35-45% splitting). None of the tested veneered zirconia restorations were fractured during testing, however, chipping of the veneer ceramics was observed in 6 crowns. The lowest percent of failure was observed for (IPS)e.max crowns manifested as 3 cases of minor chipping in addition to two complete fracture incidences. SEM images demonstrated the internal structure of the tested materials and detected location and size of the critical crack. The internal structure of the tested materials significantly influenced their fatigue behavior. Resin infiltrated ceramics were least influenced by fatigue while

  13. Self-supported ceramic substrates with directional porosity by mold freeze casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurauskis, Jonas; Graves, Christopher R.; Moreno, R.

    2016-01-01

    in a mold and applying directional freeze casting. Use of optimized suspension, cryoprotector additive and mold proved to deliver defect free ceramic films with high dimensional control. Microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of desirable aligned porosity at macro-structural scale and resulted...... to be highly dependent on colloidal behaviour and freeze casting conditions. Manufactured green films were joined by lamination at room temperature and sintered to obtain symmetrical cells consisting of two porous self-supported substrate electrodes (∼420 μm) and dense yttria stabilized zirconia electrolyte...

  14. Glass-(nAg, nCu) biocide coatings on ceramic oxide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Malpartida, Francisco; Díaz, Luis Antonio; Torrecillas, Ramón; Rojo, Fernando; Moya, José Serafín

    2012-01-01

    The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based) substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram-, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1-2 µg/cm(2) in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10-15 µg/cm(2) for the copper nanoparticles.

  15. Glass-(nAg, nCu biocide coatings on ceramic oxide substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Esteban-Tejeda

    Full Text Available The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram-, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1-2 µg/cm(2 in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10-15 µg/cm(2 for the copper nanoparticles.

  16. Predicting sintering deformation of ceramic film constrained by rigid substrate using anisotropic constitutive law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fan; Pan Jingzhe; Guillon, Olivier; Cocks, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Sintering of ceramic films on a solid substrate is an important technology for fabricating a range of products, including solid oxide fuel cells, micro-electronic PZT films and protective coatings. There is clear evidence that the constrained sintering process is anisotropic in nature. This paper presents a study of the constrained sintering deformation using an anisotropic constitutive law. The state of the material is described using the sintering strains rather than the relative density. In the limiting case of free sintering, the constitutive law reduces to a conventional isotropic constitutive law. The anisotropic constitutive law is used to calculate sintering deformation of a constrained film bonded to a rigid substrate and the compressive stress required in a sinter-forging experiment to achieve zero lateral shrinkage. The results are compared with experimental data in the literature. It is shown that the anisotropic constitutive law can capture the behaviour of the materials observed in the sintering experiments.

  17. Control of substrate oxidation in MOD ceramic coating on low-activation ferritic steel with reduced-pressure atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Teruya, E-mail: teru@nifs.ac.jp; Muroga, Takeo

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was produced on a ferritic steel substrate with a reduced-pressure. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer prevents further substrate oxidation in following coating process. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer has a function as a hydrogen permeation barrier. • A smooth MOD Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was successfully made on the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by dip coating. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer would enhance flexibility in MOD coating process and performances. - Abstract: An Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic coating fabricated using the metal–organic decomposition (MOD) method on a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-covered low-activation ferritic steel JLF-1 substrate was examined to improve hydrogen permeation barrier performance of the coating. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was obtained before coating by heat treating the substrate at 700 °C under reduced pressures of <5 × 10{sup −3} Pa and 5 Pa. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was significantly stable even with heat treatment at 700 °C in air. This layer prevented further production of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which has been considered to degrade coating performance. An MOD Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating with a smooth surface was successfully obtained on a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-covered JLF-1 substrate by dip coating followed by drying and baking. Preprocessing to obtain a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer would provide flexibility in the coating process for blanket components and ducts. Moreover, the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer suppressed hydrogen permeation through the JLF-1 substrate. While further optimization of the coating fabrication process is required, it would be possible to suppress hydrogen permeation significantly by multilayers of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MOD oxide ceramic.

  18. Development of Ceramic Coating on Metal Substrate using Industrial Waste and Ore Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, S. K.; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Mishra, S. C.

    2017-02-01

    The technological advancement in modern era has a boon for enlightening human life; but also is a bane to produce a huge amount of (industrial) wastes, which is of great concern for utilization and not to create environmental threats viz. polution etc. In the present piece of research work, attempts have been made to utilize fly ash (wastes of thermal power plants) and along with alumina bearing ore i.e. bauxite, for developing plasma spray ceramic coatings on metals. Fly ash and with 10 and 20% bauxite addition is used to deposit plasma spray coatings on a metal substrate. The surface morphology of the coatings deposited at different power levels of plasma spraying investigated through SEM and EDS analysis. The coating thickness is measured. The porosity levels of the coatings are evaluated. The coating hardness isalso measured. This piece of research work will be beneficial for future development and use of industrial waste and ore minerals for high-valued applications.

  19. Cold Gas-Sprayed Deposition of Metallic Coatings onto Ceramic Substrates Using Laser Surface Texturing Pre-treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, R.; Danlos, Y.; Costil, S.

    2018-04-01

    Cold spraying enables a variety of metals dense coatings onto metal surfaces. Supersonic gas jet accelerates particles which undergo with the substrate plastic deformation. Different bonding mechanisms can be created depending on the materials. The particle-substrate contact time, contact temperature and contact area upon impact are the parameters influencing physicochemical and mechanical bonds. The resultant bonding arose from plastic deformation of the particle and substrate and temperature increasing at the interface. The objective was to create specific topography to enable metallic particle adhesion onto ceramic substrates. Ceramic did not demonstrate deformation during the impact which minimized the intimate bonds. Laser surface texturing was hence used as prior surface treatment to create specific topography and to enable mechanical anchoring. Particle compressive states were necessary to build up coating. The coating deposition efficiency and adhesion strength were evaluated. Textured surface is required to obtain strong adhesion of metallic coatings onto ceramic substrates. Consequently, cold spray coating parameters depend on the target material and a methodology was established with particle parameters (diameters, velocities, temperatures) and particle/substrate properties to adapt the surface topography. Laser surface texturing is a promising tool to increase the cold spraying applications.

  20. Development of Bioactive Ceramic Coating on Titanium Alloy substrate for Biomedical Application Using Dip Coating Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmawi, R.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.; Amin, A. M.; Mustafa, N.; Noranai, Z.

    2017-08-01

    Bioactive apatite, such as hydroxyapatite ceramic (HA), [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] has been extensively investigated for biomedical applications due to its excellent biocompatibility and tissue bioactivity properties. Its bioactivity provides direct bonding to the bone tissue. Because of its similarity in chemical composition to the inorganic matrix of bone, HA is widely used as implant materials for bone. Unfortunately, because of its poor mechanical properties,. this bioactive material is not suitable for load bearing applications. In this study, by the assistance of dip-coating technique, HA coatings were deposited on titanium alloy substrates by employing hydrothermal derived HA powder. The produced coatings then were oven-dried at 130°C for 1 hour and calcined at various temperature over the range of 200-800°C for 1 hour. XRD measurement showed that HA was the only phase present in the coatings. However coatings calcined at 800°C comprised a mixture of HA and tri-calcium phosphate (TCP). FTIR measurement showed the existence of hydroxyl, phosphate, and carbonate bands. PO4 - band became sharper and narrower with the increased of calcination temperature. FESEM observation showed that the coating is polycrystalline with individual particles of nano to submicron size and has an average particle size of 35 nm. The thickness of the coating are direcly propotional with the viscosity of coating slurry. It was shown that the more viscous coating slurry would produce a thicker ceramic coating. Mechanical properties of the coating were measured in term of adhesion strength using a Micro Materials Nano Test microscratch testing machine. The result revealed that the coating had a good adhesion to the titanium alloy substrate.

  1. Influence of ceramic dental crown coating substrate thickness ratio on strain energy release rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnulhadi, K.; Daud, R.; Mat, F.; Noor, S. N. F. M.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Sulaiman, M. H.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the analysis of coating substrate thickness ratio effect on the crown coating fracture behaviour. The bi-layer material is examined under four point bending with pre-crack at the bottom of the core material by using finite element. Three different coating thickness of core/substrate was tested which is 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1. The fracture parameters are analysed based on bilayer and homogenous elastic interaction. The result shows that the ratio thickness of core/veneer provided a significant effect on energy release rate.

  2. Simulation of microdamage in ceramics deformed under high confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongmei; Feng Ruqiang

    2004-01-01

    A polycrystalline ceramic may display high strength under dynamic compression but fails catastrophically during load reversal to tension. One plausible mechanism is that heterogeneous plasticity in some of the crystals under compression induces microdamage during load reversal. To examine this possibility quantitatively, we developed a computational method, in which the polycrystalline microstructure is realistically simulated using Voronoi crystals having grain boundary layer. Both anisotropic elasticity and plastic slip in limited crystallographic planes are considered in crystal modeling. The grain boundary material is treated as an isotropic glassy solid, which has pressure-dependent shear strength under compression and fractures in Mode I when the threshold is reached. The structural and material models have been implemented into ABAQUS/Explicit code. Model simulations have been performed to analyze the intragranular microplasticity, intergranular microdamage, and their interactions in polycrystalline α-6H silicon carbide subjected to dynamic unaxial-strain compression and then load reversal to tension. It is found that microplasticity is more favorable than intergranular shear damage during compression. However, both the microplasticity-induced heterogeneity and the grain boundary damage affect strongly microcracking during load reversal, which leads to fragmentation or spallation depending on the level of compression. The significance of these findings is discussed

  3. Damage Characterization of EBC-SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Imposed Thermal Gradient Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high temperature capabilities, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components are being developed for use in hot-section aerospace engine applications. Harsh engine environments have led to the development of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for silicon-based CMCs to further increase thermal and environmental capabilities. This study aims at understanding the damage mechanisms associated with these materials under simulated operating conditions. A high heat-flux laser testing rig capable of imposing large through-thickness thermal gradients by means of controlled laser beam heating and back-side air cooling is used. Tests are performed on uncoated composites, as well as CMC substrates that have been coated with state-of-the-art ceramic EBC systems. Results show that the use of the EBCs may help increase temperature capability and creep resistance by reducing the effects of stressed oxidation and environmental degradation. Also, the ability of electrical resistance (ER) and acoustic emission (AE) measurements to monitor material condition and damage state during high temperature testing is shown; suggesting their usefulness as a valuable health monitoring technique. Micromechanics models are used to describe the localized stress state of the composite system, which is utilized along with ER modeling concepts to develop an electromechanical model capable of characterizing material behavior.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of 10%Gd doped ceria (GDC) deposited on NiO-GDC anode-grade-ceramic substrate as half cell for IT-SOFC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chourashiya, M. G.; Jadhav, L. D.

    2011-01-01

    In the present research work spray pyrolysis technique (SPT) is employed to synthesize GDC (10%Gd doped ceria) thin films on anode-grade-ceramic substrate (porous NiO-GDC). The film/substrate structure was characterized for their micro-structural and electrical properties along with their interfa......In the present research work spray pyrolysis technique (SPT) is employed to synthesize GDC (10%Gd doped ceria) thin films on anode-grade-ceramic substrate (porous NiO-GDC). The film/substrate structure was characterized for their micro-structural and electrical properties along...... with their interfacial-quality. By optimization of preparative parameters of SPT and modification of surface of anode-grade ceramic substrate, we were able to prepare the GDC films having thickness of the order of 13 μm on NiO-GDC substrate. Further to improve the interfacial quality and densification of film, annealing...

  5. Banana peel: A novel substrate for cellulase production under solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results indicated that banana peel provided necessary nutrients for cell growth and cellulase synthesis. It can be used as a potential substrate for cellulase production by T. viride GIM 3.0010 under solid-state fermentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on cellulase production using banana peel.

  6. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi; Farzaneh Aghajani; Javad Chalipa; Amir Hooman Sadrhaghighi

    2014-01-01

    Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting,...

  7. Synthesis and characterisation of novel low temperature ceramic and its implementation as substrate in dual segment CDRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Preeti; Tripathi, Pankaj; Sahu, Bhagirath; Singh, S. P.; Parkash, Om; Kumar, Devendra

    2018-02-01

    Li2O-(2-3x)MgO-(x)Al2O3-P2O5 (LMAP) (x = 0.00-0.08) ceramic system was prepared through solid state synthesis route at different sintering temperatures (800-925 °C). A small addition of Al2O3 (x = 0.02) in LMAP ceramics lowers the sintering temperature by more than 100 °C with good relative density of 94.13%. The sintered samples were characterized in terms of density, apparent porosity, water absorption, crystal structure, micro-structure and microwave dielectric properties. Silver compatibility test is also performed for its use as electrode material in low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) application. To check the performance of the prepared LTCC as substrate, a microstrip-fed aperture-coupled dual segment cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna (DS-CDRA) is designed using LMAP (x = 0.02) ceramic as substrate material and Barium Strontium Titanate with 10 wt% of PbO-BaO-B2O3-SiO2 glass (BSTG) and Teflon as the components of resonating material. The simulation study of the DS-CDRA is performed using the Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software. A conductive coating of silver is used on the substrate. The simulated and measured -10 dB reflection coefficient bandwidths of 910 MHz (9.07-9.98 GHz at resonant frequency of 9.49 GHz) and 1080 MHz (8.68-9.76 GHz at resonant frequency of 9.36 GHz), respectively are achieved. The measured results of the fabricated antenna are found in good agreement with the simulation results. The prepared material can find potential applications in radar and radio navigation as well as radio astronomy and military satellite communication.

  8. Microdamage in polycrystalline ceramics under dynamic compression and tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K.S.; Zhang, D.; Feng, R.; Wu, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In-grain microplasticity and intergranular microdamage in polycrystalline hexagonal-structure ceramics subjected to a sequence of dynamic compression and tension are studied computationally using the Voronoi polycrystal model, by which the topological heterogeneity and material anisotropy of the crystals are simulated explicitly. The constitutive modeling considers crystal plasticity by basal slip, intergranular shear damage during compression, and intergranular mode-I cracking during tension. The model parameters are calibrated with the available shock compression and spall strength data on polycrystalline α-6H silicon carbide. The numerical results show that microplasticity is a more plausible micromechanism for the inelastic response of the material under shock compression. On the other hand, the spallation behavior of the shocked material can be well predicted by intergranular mode-I microcracking during load reversal from dynamic compression to tension. The failure process and the resulting spall strength are, however, affected strongly by the intensity of local release heterogeneity induced by heterogeneous microplasticity, and by the grain-boundary shear damage during compression

  9. Bonding polycarbonate brackets to ceramic: : Effects of substrate treatment on bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Peltomäki, Timo; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Kalk, Warner

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 5 different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded to ceramic surfaces with resin based cement. Six disc-shaped ceramic specimens (feldspathic porcelain) with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were

  10. Synthesis and characterization of electrolyte-grade 10%Gd-doped ceria thin film/ceramic substrate structures for solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chourashiya, M. G.; Bharadwaj, S. R.; Jadhav, L. D.

    2010-01-01

    In the present research, spray pyrolysis technique is employed to synthesize 10%Gd-doped ceria (GDC) thin films on ceramic substrates with an intention to use the "film/substrate" structure in solid oxide fuel cells. GDC films deposited on GDC substrate showed enhanced crystallite formation....... In case of NiO-GDC composite substrate, the thickness of film was higher (∼ 13 μm) as compared to the film thickness on GDC substrate (∼ 2 μm). The relative density of the films deposited on both the substrates was of the order of 95%. The impedance measurements revealed that ionic conductivity of GDC...

  11. Microstructure and wear behavior of laser cladding VC–Cr7C3 ceramic coating on steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qianlin; Li, Wenge; Zhong, Ning; Gang, Wu; Haishan, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The VC–Cr 7 C 3 coating on steel substrate was in situ produced by laser cladding. ► The distribution of VC–Cr 7 C 3 phase decreased gradually from the top of the coating. ► The laser cladding achieved a high hardness of the order of 1000 HV. ► The wear resistance of the coating was 4 times that of the steel substrate. - Abstract: To enhance the wear resistance of mechanical components, laser cladding has been applied to deposit in situ VC–Cr 7 C 3 ceramic coating on steel substrate using a pre-placed powder consisting of vanadium, carbon and high-carbon ferrochrome. The laser cladding samples were subjected to various microstructure examinations, microhardness and wear tests. The results showed that defect-free coating with metallurgical joint to the steel substrate was obtained. The quantity of VC–Cr 7 C 3 particles gradually increased from the bottom to the top of the coating. The VC particles in nanometer were observed within the coating. Average hardness of the coating up to 1050 HV was significantly higher than that of the substrate 150 HV. Wear tests indicated the wear resistance of the clad coating was 4 times that of the steel substrate

  12. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive

  13. Radiance limits of ceramic phosphors under high excitation fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Zheng, Yi; Tchoul, Maxim

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic phosphors, excited by high radiance pump sources, offer considerable potential for high radiance conversion. Interestingly, thermodynamic arguments suggest that the radiance of the luminescent spot can even exceed that of the incoming light source. In practice, however, thermal quenching and (non-thermal) optical saturation limit the maximum attainable radiance of the luminescent source. We present experimental data for Ce:YAG and Ce:GdYAG ceramics in which these limits have been investigated. High excitation fluxes are achieved using laser pumping. Optical pumping intensities exceeding 100W/mm2 have been shown to produce only modest efficiency depreciation at low overall pump powers because of the short Ce3+ lifetime, although additional limitations exist. When pump powers are higher, heat-transfer bottlenecks within the ceramic and heat-sink interfaces limit maximum pump intensities. We find that surface temperatures of these laser-pumped ceramics can reach well over 150°C, causing thermal-quenching losses. We also find that in some cases, the loss of quantum efficiency with increasing temperature can cause a thermal run-away effect, resulting in a rapid loss in converted light, possibly over-heating the sample or surrounding structures. While one can still obtain radiances on the order of many W/mm2/sr, temperature quenching effects ultimately limit converted light radiance. Finally, we use the diffusion-approximation radiation transport models and rate equation models to simulate some of these nonlinear optical pumping and heating effects in high-scattering ceramics.

  14. Study on ceramic breeder and related materials by means of work function measurement under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, G.N.; Terai, T.; Yamawaki, M.; Yamaguchi, K.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic breeder materials, Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 and Li 4 SiO 4 , under irradiation have been studied using a Kelvin probe that measures work function changes of materials. Surface charging was observed to influence greatly the probe output, which can be explained qualitatively employing a model concerning induction electric field due to external field and free charges on ceramic surface. It is found that the insulating ceramics could not be studied properly with the Kelvin probe. A probable solution is to heat the ceramics, so as to raise their electric conductivities high enough to root out the surface charging. Also briefly discussed is the application of the probe to metals under ion irradiation. (orig.)

  15. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  16. Survival of heterotrophic bacteria in water environment under substrate deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, D.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between metabolic changes and survival of bacteria in the water environment under substrate deficiency was studied. The main factors supporting cell survival were cryptic growth, utilization of endogenous reserve substances and reorganization of metabolic activities. Based on the utilization of cell-free extract or lysates from dead bacteria, an Enterobacter aerogenes cell suspension yielded 50% more colonies. Metabolic processes of starved heterotrophic bacteria changed markedly and became stabilized at a lower level depending on species involved. The rate of utilization of endogenous reserve substances as indicated by endogenous respiration was related to the rate of cell mortality. Of the test bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens showed the lowest rates of endogenous respiration and mortality while in Enterobacter aerogenes these two rates were the highest. (author). 3 figs., 2 tabs.., 16 refs

  17. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  18. Fracture Mechanisms of Zirconium Diboride Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics under Pulse Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Bragov, Anatolii M.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.; Lomunov, Andrei K.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Vaganova, Irina K.

    2015-06-01

    Mechanisms of failure in ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTC) based on zirconium diboride under pulse loading were studied experimentally by the method of SHPB and theoretically using the multiscale simulation method. The obtained experimental and numerical data are evidence of the quasi-brittle fracture character of nanostructured zirconium diboride ceramics under compression and tension at high strain rates and the room temperatures. Damage of nanostructured porous zirconium diboride -based UHTC can be formed under stress pulse amplitude below the Hugoniot elastic limit. Fracture of nanostructured ultra-high temperature ceramics under pulse and shock-wave loadings is provided by fast processes of intercrystalline brittle fracture and relatively slow processes of quasi-brittle failure via growth and coalescence of microcracks. A decrease of the shear strength can be caused by nano-voids clusters in vicinity of triple junctions between ceramic matrix grains and ultrafine-grained ceramics. This research was supported by grants from ``The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program'' and also N. I. Lobachevski State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Grant of post graduate mobility).

  19. Ba2ErNbO6: A new perovskite ceramic substrate for Bi(2223 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    318 ... production of high quality superconducting films of these compounds for suitable electronic applications. Substrates ... for high temperature superconducting films is the chemi- ... pared by dip-coating technique and the structure of the dip.

  20. Evolution of transverse piezoelectric response of lead zirconate titanate ceramics under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Gao Junjie; Zhang, Chonghui; Yao Xi; Jin Li

    2009-01-01

    The piezoelectric properties of 31-mode resonators of lead zirconate titanate ceramics under hydrostatic pressure from 0.1 to 325 MPa were evaluated by a fitting method, in which mechanical loss was taken into account. Our results based on the fitting method showed a hydrostatic pressure independent tendency of the piezoelectric coefficient and the electromechanical coupling factor because the adopted PZT ceramic can be considered as a linear system in our experiment, while two misleading tendencies of piezoelectric coefficient were obtained based on the resonance method when ignoring the contribution of the mechanical loss. (fast track communication)

  1. In-situ ionic conductivity measurement of lithium ceramics under high energy heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Tetsuya; Noda, Kenji; Ishii, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Hideo; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Matsui, Hisayuki.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain fundamental information regarding the radiation damage in some lithium ceramics, e.g. Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 etc., candidate of breeder materials exposed to severe irradiation environment, an in-situ experiment technique for the ionic conductivity measurement, which allows the specimen temperature control and the beam current monitoring, have been developed. This paper describes the features of an apparatus to measure in situ the ionic conductivity under the irradiation environment and presents some results of ionic conductivity measured for typical ceramic breeders using this apparatus. (J.P.N.)

  2. Acclimatization and growth of ornamental pineapple seedlings under organic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Carlos Colombo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro propagation techniques are commonly used to produce ornamental pineapple seedlings in commercial scale, aiming to attend the growers with genetic and sanitary quality seedlings. However, the choice of the ideal substrate is essential for the acclimatization and growth stage of the seedlings propagated by this technique, since some substrates can increase the seedling mortality and/or limit the seedling growth due to its physical and chemical characteristics. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the acclimatization of ornamental pineapple [Ananas comosus (L. Merr. var. ananassoides (Baker Coppens & Leal] on different substrates. Seedlings with approximately seven centimeters, obtained from in vitro culture, were transplanted into styrofoam trays filled with the following substrates: sphagnum; semi-composed pine bark; carbonized rice husk; sphagnum + semicomposed pine bark; sphagnum + carbonized rice husk; and semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk. Each treatment was replicated five times using 10 plants. At 180 days, there were evaluated the following variables: survival percentage, plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, largest root length, and shoot and root dry matter. The substrate semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk presented the lowest mean (62% for survival percentage. The semi-composed pine bark and semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk treatments presented significant increments in some evaluated biometric characteristics. The semi-composed pine bark is the most favorable substrate for the A. comosus var. ananassoids acclimatization.

  3. Method for improving the performance of oxidizable ceramic materials in oxidizing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improved adhesion of thermal barrier coatings to nonmetallic substrates using a dense layer of ceramic on an underlying nonmetallic substrate that includes at least one oxidizable component. The improved adhesion occurs because the application of the dense ceramic layer forms a diffusion barrier for oxygen. This diffusion barrier prevents the oxidizable component of the substrate from decomposing. The present invention applies ceramic by a process that deposits a relatively thick and dense ceramic layer on the underlying substrate. The formation of the dense layer of ceramic avoids the problem of void formation associated with ceramic formation by most prior art thermal decomposition processes. The formation of voids has been associated with premature spalling of thermal barrier layers and other protective layers applied to substrates.

  4. Effect of core ceramic grinding on fracture behaviour of bilayered zirconia veneering ceramic systems under two loading schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yu-Tao; Tang, Tian-Yu; Swain, Michael V; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Ke

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of core ceramic grinding on the fracture behaviour of bilayered zirconia under two loading schemes. Interfacial surfaces of sandblasted zirconia disks (A) were ground with 80 (B), 120 (C) and 220 (D) grit diamond discs, respectively. Surface roughness and topographic analysis were performed using a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) and a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Relative monoclinic content was evaluated using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) then reevaluated after simulated veneer firing. Biaxial fracture strength (σ) and Weibull modulus (m) were calculated either with core in compression (subgroup Ac-Dc) or in tension (subgroup At-Dt). Facture surfaces were examined by SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Maximum tensile stress at fracture was estimated by finite element analysis. Statistical data analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and one-way ANOVA at a significance level of 0.05. As grit size of the diamond disc increased, zirconia surface roughness decreased (pgrinding. No difference in initial (p=0.519 for subgroups Ac-Dc) and final fracture strength (p=0.699 for subgroups Ac-Dc; p=0.328 for subgroups At-Dt) was found among the four groups for both loading schemes. While coarse grinding slightly increased final fracture strength reliability (m) for subgroups Ac-Dc. Two different modes of fracture were observed according to which material was on the bottom surface. Components of the liner porcelain remained on the zirconia surface after fracture for all groups. Technician grinding changed surface topography of zirconia ceramic material, but was not detrimental to the bilayered system strength after veneer application. Coarse grinding slightly improved the fracture strength reliability of the bilayered system tested with core in compression. It is recommended that veneering porcelain be applied directly after routine lab grinding of zirconia ceramic, and its

  5. The isothermal conductivity improvement in zirconia-based ceramics under 24 GHz microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Ayano, Keiko; Teranishi, Takashi; Hayashi, Hidetaka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Under 24-GHz millimetre-wave irradiation heating ionic conductivity of zirconia base ceramics was up to 20 times higher than that of a conventionally-heated sample at the same temperature of 400 °C. The degree of enhancement could be altered by changing the stabilising atom from Y to Yb. Enhancement of ionic conduction was prominent in the setup condition of larger self-heating ratio and larger MMW absorbing materials. The isothermal improvement of ionic conductivity under MMW irradiation would be ascribed to the non-thermal effect. - Highlights: • Under millimetre-wave irradiation heating ionic conductivity of zirconia ceramics was examined. • It was up to 20 times higher than that of a conventionally heating condition. • The activation process was examined in relation to the non-thermal effects. • The operation temperature could be lowered while maintaining the ionic conductivity

  6. Deposition of thin film of titanium on ceramic substrate using the discharge for hollow cathode for Al2O3/Al2O3 indirect brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Roberta Meira Marinho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of titanium were deposited onto Al2O3 substrate by hollow cathode discharge method for the formation of a ceramic-ceramic joint using indirect brazing method. An advantage of using this technique is that a relatively small amount of titanium is required for the metallization of the ceramic surface when compared with other conventional methods. Rapidly solidified brazing filler of Cu49Ag45Ce6 in the form of ribbons was used. The thickness of deposited titanium layer and the brazing temperature/time were varied. The quality of the brazed joint was evaluated through the three point bending flexural tests. The brazed joints presented high flexural resistance values up to 176 MPa showing the efficiency of the technique.

  7. Ceramic breeder pebble bed packing stability under cyclic loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chunbo, E-mail: chunbozhang@fusion.ucla.edu [Fusion Science and Technology Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Ying, Alice; Abdou, Mohamed A. [Fusion Science and Technology Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Park, Yi-Hyun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The feasibility of obtaining packing stability for pebble beds is studied. • The responses of pebble bed to cyclic loads have been presented and analyzed in details. • Pebble bed packing saturation and its applications are discussed. • A suggestion is made regarding the improvement of pebbles filling technique. - Abstract: Considering the optimization of blanket performance, it is desired that the bed morphology and packing state during reactor operation are stable and predictable. Both experimental and numerical work are performed to explore the stability of pebble beds, in particular under pulsed loading conditions. Uniaxial compaction tests have been performed for both KIT’s Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and NFRI’s Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble beds at elevated temperatures (up to 750 °C) under cyclic loads (up to 6 MPa). The obtained data shows the stress-strain loop initially moves towards the larger strain and nearly saturates after a certain number of cyclic loading cycles. The characterized FEM CAP material models for a Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebble bed with an edge-on configuration are used to simulate the thermomechanical behavior of pebble bed under ITER pulsed operations. Simulation results have shown the cyclic variation of temperature/stress/strain/gap and also the same saturation trend with experiments under cyclic loads. Therefore, it is feasible for pebble bed to maintain its packing stability during operation when disregarding pebbles’ breakage and irradiation.

  8. Long time relaxation of resistance in La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 ceramics and La0.65Ca0.35 MnO3 films on ferroelectric substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, Yu.V.; Mezin, N.I.; Nikolaenko, Yu.M.; Pigur, A.E.; Shishkova, N.V.; Ishchuk, V.M.; Chukanova, I.N.

    2004-01-01

    Galvanomagnetic properties of La 0.65 Ca 0.35 MnO 3 films with a thickness of 0.2 μm on Pb 2.9 Ba 0.05 Sr 0.05 (Zr 0.4 Ti 0.6 )O 3 ferroelectric ceramics substrates have been investigated. We have discovered the monotonic irreversible increase of the film resistance by 3-5 time of value during several hours after multiple inversion of substrate polarization. The long-time relaxation (LTR) of film resistance is explained by dielecrtrization of film intercrystallite boundaries as a result of oxygen redistribution under action of inhomogeneous mechanical stress. In addition, the LTR of resistance of La 0.8 Sr 0.2 MnO 3 and La 0.6 Sr 0.2 Mn 1.2 O 3 ceramic samples has been investigated under action of different kind of mechanical stress: stretch, compression and hydrostatic press. Time dependence of resistance is described by R 0 +ΔRexp(-t/τ). The magnitude of LTR is 5-10 time greater then fast variation of resistance under action of stress. The sign of ΔR is dependent on the kind of stress. The time constant (τ) has the value of 3-9 hours. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Wear Resistance of Nano Alumina Containing SiO2-B2O3-Na2O Glass-Ceramic on Steel Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    A. Faeghinia; A. Zamanian

    2016-01-01

    The experimental study has been carried out to investigate the tribological properties of nano Alumina reinforced glass-ceramic enamel. The mixtures of (5, 10, 15 wt.%) nano alumina and glass powders have been air sprayed on stainless steel substrate.. The thixotropy, wetting angle and surface tension of used slurry were increased inherently by 15-wt.% nano alumina. By heat treating at 870-640-525 ºC, the homogeneous crystalline sodium silicate phase beside nano alumina was obtained in glass ...

  10. Effects of varying oxygen partial pressure on molten silicon-ceramic substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, D. P.; Barsoum, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The silicon sessile drop contact angle was measured on hot pressed silicon nitride, silicon nitride coated on hot pressed silicon nitride, silicon carbon coated on graphite, and on Sialon to determine the degree to which silicon wets these substances. The post-sessile drop experiment samples were sectioned and photomicrographs were taken of the silicon-substrate interface to observe the degree of surface dissolution and degradation. Of these materials, silicon did not form a true sessile drop on the SiC on graphite due to infiltration of the silicon through the SiC coating, nor on the Sialon due to the formation of a more-or-less rigid coating on the liquid silicon. The most wetting was obtained on the coated Si3N4 with a value of 42 deg. The oxygen concentrations in a silicon ribbon furnace and in a sessile drop furnace were measured using the protable thoria-yttria solid solution electrolyte oxygen sensor. Oxygen partial pressures of 10 to the minus 7 power atm and 10 to the minus 8 power atm were obtained at the two facilities. These measurements are believed to represent nonequilibrium conditions.

  11. Creep of fissile ceramic materials under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucklacher, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical estimation of the irradiation-induced creep rate of U0 2 by a modification of the Nabarro-Herring model for diffusional creep resulted in a creep rate range between about 6 x 10 -6 to 8 x 10 -5 h -1 for a fission rate of 1 x 10 14 f/cm 3 s and a stress of 2 kgf/mm 2 . Accordingly, the creep rate is enhanced by irradiation at temperatures below 1000 0 to 1200 0 C. It is essentially due to the 'thermal rods' along the fission fragment tracks. Therefore, irradiation-induced creep rates should depend only slightly on temperature and must be markedly lower for carbide and nitride fuel. In-reactor creep experiments on UO 2 were performed at fuel temperatures between 250 0 to 850 0 C. At burnups between 0.3 to 3% the steady-state compressive creep rates are proportional to stress (0 to 4 kgf/mm 2 ) and to fission rate (1 x 10 13 to 2 x 10 14 f/cm 3 s), and are in the range estimated before. The increase in the creep rate with increasing temperature is low and corresponds to an apparent activation energy of only 5200 cal/mol. At burnups above 3 to 4% the stress exponent of the irradiation-induced creep rate increased from n = 1 to n = 1.5. Creep measurements on UO 2 to 15 wt-%Pu0 2 (mechanically mixed, sintered density 86% TD) showed the same temperature dependence as UO 2 below 700 0 C. However, the creep rates were higher by a factor of about 20 compared to fully dense UO 2 . This difference may be explained by assuming a high 'effective' porosity. In-pile creep tests on some UN samples resulted in creep rates that were lower by an order of magnitude than for UO 2 under comparable conditions. (author)

  12. Substrate Integrated Waveguide Based Phase Shifter and Phased Array in a Ferrite Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic Package

    KAUST Repository

    Nafe, Ahmed A.

    2014-03-01

    Phased array antennas, capable of controlling the direction of their radiated beam, are demanded by many conventional as well as modern systems. Applications such as automotive collision avoidance radar, inter-satellite communication links and future man-portable satellite communication on move services require reconfigurable beam systems with stress on mobility and cost effectiveness. Microwave phase shifters are key components of phased antenna arrays. A phase shifter is a device that controls the phase of the signal passing through it. Among the technologies used to realize this device, traditional ferrite waveguide phase shifters offer the best performance. However, they are bulky and difficult to integrate with other system components. Recently, ferrite material has been introduced in Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) multilayer packaging technology. This enables the integration of ferrite based components with other microwave circuitry in a compact, light-weight and mass producible package. Additionally, the recent concept of Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) allowed realization of synthesized rectangular waveguide-like structures in planar and multilayer substrates. These SIW structures have been shown to maintain the merits of conventional rectangular waveguides such as low loss and high power handling capabilities while being planar and easily integrable with other components. Implementing SIW structures inside a multilayer ferrite LTCC package enables monolithic integration of phase shifters and phased arrays representing a true System on Package (SoP) solution. It is the objective of this thesis to pursue realizing efficient integrated phase shifters and phased arrays combining the above mentioned technologies, namely Ferrite LTCC and SIW. In this work, a novel SIW phase shifter in ferrite LTCC package is designed, fabricated and tested. The device is able to operate reciprocally as well as non-reciprocally. Demonstrating a measured maximum

  13. Numerical analysis of an entire ceramic kiln under actual operating conditions for the energy efficiency improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Massimo; Montorsi, Luca; Stefani, Matteo; Saponelli, Roberto; Lizzano, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    The paper focuses on the analysis of an industrial ceramic kiln in order to improve the energy efficiency and thus the fuel consumption and the corresponding carbon dioxide emissions. A lumped and distributed parameter model of the entire system is constructed to simulate the performance of the kiln under actual operating conditions. The model is able to predict accurately the temperature distribution along the different modules of the kiln and the operation of the many natural gas burners employed to provide the required thermal power. Furthermore, the temperature of the tiles is also simulated so that the quality of the final product can be addressed by the modelling. Numerical results are validated against experimental measurements carried out on a real ceramic kiln during regular production operations. The developed numerical model demonstrates to be an efficient tool for the investigation of different design solutions for the kiln's components. In addition, a number of control strategies for the system working conditions can be simulated and compared in order to define the best trade off in terms of fuel consumption and product quality. In particular, the paper analyzes the effect of a new burner type characterized by internal heat recovery capability aimed at improving the energy efficiency of the ceramic kiln. The fuel saving and the relating reduction of carbon dioxide emissions resulted in the order of 10% when compared to the standard burner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conductive stability of graphene on PET and glass substrates under blue light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xueying; Liu, Xianming; Li, Xiangdi; Lei, Xiaohua; Chen, Weimin

    2018-01-01

    Electrical properties of graphene transparent conductive film under visible light irradiation are investigated. The CVD-grown graphene on Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) and glass substrates for flexible and rigid touch screen display application are chosen for research. The resistances of graphene with and without gold trichloride (AuCl3) doping are measured in vacuum and atmosphere environment under blue light irradiation. Results show that the conductivities of all samples change slowly under light irradiation. The change rate and degree are related to the substrate material, doping, environment and lighting power. Graphene on flexible PET substrate is more stable than that on rigid glass substrate. Doping can improve the electrical conductivity but induce instability under light irradiation. Finally, the main reason resulting in the graphene resistance slowly increasing under blue light irradiation is analyzed.

  15. Anisotropy of domain switching in prepoled lead titanate zirconate ceramics under multiaxial electrical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Ming; Li, Fa-Xin; Fang, Dai-Ning

    2007-01-01

    The authors report an observation of anisotropic domain switching process in prepoled lead titanate zirconate (PZT) ceramics under multiaxial electrical loading. Prepoled PZT blocks were obliquely cut to apply an electric field at discrete angles θ (0°-180°) to the initial poling direction. Both the coercive field and switchable polarization are found to decrease significantly when sinθ increases from zero to unity. The measured strain curves show that most domains that accomplished 180° domain switching actually experienced two successive 90° switching. The oriented domain texture after poling plus the induced nonuniform stress are used to explain the observed domain switching anisotropy.

  16. Enhancement of ionic conductivity in stabilized zirconia ceramics under millimeter-wave irradiation heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Ayano, Keiko; Hayashi, Hidetaka

    2011-01-01

    Ionic conductivity in yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics under millimeter-wave irradiation heating was compared with that obtained using conventional heating. The former was found to result in higher conductivity than the latter. Enhancement of the ionic conductivity and the reduction in activation energy seemed to depend on self-heating resulting from the millimeter-wave irradiation. Millimeter-wave irradiation heating restricted the degradation in conductivity accompanying over-substitution, suggesting the optimum structure that provided the maximum conductivity could be different between the two heating methods.

  17. Preparation of ceramic coating on Ti substrate by Plasma electrolytic oxidation in different electrolytes and evaluation of its corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhfar, M.; Dehghanian, C.; Baradaran, A.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic oxide coatings (titania) were produced on Ti by micro-arc oxidation in different aluminate and carbonate based electrolytes. This process was conducted under constant pulsed DC voltage condition. The effect of KOH and NaF in aluminate based solution was also studied. The surface morphology, growth and phase composition of coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behavior of the coatings was also examined by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the sparking initiation voltage (spark voltage) had a significant effect on the form and properties of coatings. Coatings obtained from potassium aluminate based solution had a lower spark voltage, higher surface homogeneity and a better corrosion resistance than the carbonate based solution. Addition of NaF instead of KOH had improper effects on the homogeneity and adhesion of coatings which in turn caused a poor corrosion protection behavior of the oxide layer. AC impedance curves showed two time constants which is an indication of the coatings with an outer porous layer and an inner compact layer.

  18. In-situ synthesized Ni–Zr intermetallic/ceramic reinforced composite coatings on zirconium substrate by high power diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kun; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan; Ma, Qunshuang

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • In-situ synthesized Ni–Zr intermetallics/ceramic reinforced composite coatings. • Si enrichment and Ni replacing site of Si both resulted in forming Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4.} • Microstructure and forming of ZrB{sub 2} depended on affinity of elements and Si/B ratio. - Abstract: Ni–Zr intermetallic/ceramic reinforced composite coatings were in-situ synthesized by laser cladding series of Ni–Cr–B–Si powders on zirconium substrate. Microstructure, phase constituents and microhardness of coatings were investigated by means of optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microsclemeter. Results indicated that coatings with metallurgical bonding to substrate consisted of cellular NiZr matrix and massive reinforcements including NiZr{sub 2}, Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4} and ZrB{sub 2}. Morphologies of reinforcements were mainly dominated by temperature gradient and cooling rate from surface to bottom of the coating produced by same powder. In different coatings, microstructure and forming of ZrB{sub 2} mainly depended on affinity of elements and Si/B ratio in different powders. In addition, the mean microhardness of coatings up to 1200–1300 HV{sub 0.2} is nearly 7 times higher than that of R60702 zirconium substrate.

  19. Ghrelin and food reward: the story of potential underlying substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibicka, Karolina P; Dickson, Suzanne L

    2011-11-01

    The incidence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and this worldwide epidemic represents a significant decrease in life span and quality of life of a large part of the affected population. Therefore an understanding of mechanisms underlying food overconsumption and obesity development is urgent and essential to find potential treatments. Research investigating mechanisms underlying obesity and the control of food intake has recently experienced a major shift in focus, from the brain's hypothalamus to additional important neural circuits controlling emotion, cognition and motivated behavior. Among them, the mesolimbic system, and the changes in reward and motivated behavior for food, emerge as new promising treatment targets. Furthermore, there is also growing appreciation of the impact of peripheral hormones that signal nutrition status to the mesolimbic areas, and especially the only known circulating orexigenic hormone, ghrelin. This review article provides a synthesis of recent evidence concerning the impact of manipulation of ghrelin and its receptor on models of food reward/food motivation behavior and the mesolimbic circuitry. Particular attention is given to the potential neurocircuitry and neurotransmitter systems downstream of ghrelin's effects on food reward. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Convergent synaptic and circuit substrates underlying autism genetic risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Aaron; Li, Guohui; Lu, Zhongming; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2014-02-01

    There has been a surge of diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) over the past decade. While large, high powered genome screening studies of children with ASD have identified numerous genetic risk factors, research efforts to understanding how each of these risk factors contributes to the development autism has met with limited success. Revealing the mechanisms by which these genetic risk factors affect brain development and predispose a child to autism requires mechanistic understanding of the neurobiological changes underlying this devastating group of developmental disorders at multifaceted molecular, cellular and system levels. It has been increasingly clear that the normal trajectory of neurodevelopment is compromised in autism, in multiple domains as much as aberrant neuronal production, growth, functional maturation, patterned connectivity, and balanced excitation and inhibition of brain networks. Many autism risk factors identified in humans have been now reconstituted in experimental mouse models to allow mechanistic interrogation of the biological role of the risk gene. Studies utilizing these mouse models have revealed that underlying the enormous heterogeneity of perturbed cellular events, mechanisms directing synaptic and circuit assembly may provide a unifying explanation for the pathophysiological changes and behavioral endophenotypes seen in autism, although synaptic perturbations are far from being the only alterations relevant for ASD. In this review, we discuss synaptic and circuit abnormalities obtained from several prevalent mouse models, particularly those reflecting syndromic forms of ASD that are caused by single gene perturbations. These compiled results reveal that ASD risk genes contribute to proper signaling of the developing gene networks that maintain synaptic and circuit homeostasis, which is fundamental to normal brain development.

  1. CFD analysis of a full-scale ceramic kiln module under actual operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Massimo; Montorsi, Luca; Stefani, Matteo; Venturelli, Matteo

    2017-11-01

    The paper focuses on the CFD analysis of a full-scale module of an industrial ceramic kiln under actual operating conditions. The multi-dimensional analysis includes the real geometry of a ceramic kiln module employed in the preheating and firing sections and investigates the heat transfer between the tiles and the burners' flame as well as the many components that comprise the module. Particular attention is devoted to the simulation of the convective flow field in the upper and lower chambers and to the effects of radiation on the different materials is addressed. The assessment of the radiation contribution to the tiles temperature is paramount to the improvement of the performance of the kiln in terms of energy efficiency and fuel consumption. The CFD analysis is combined to a lumped and distributed parameter model of the entire kiln in order to simulate the module behaviour at the boundaries under actual operating conditions. Finally, the CFD simulation is employed to address the effects of the module operating conditions on the tiles' temperature distribution in order to improve the temperature uniformity as well as to enhance the energy efficiency of the system and thus to reduce the fuel consumption.

  2. Testing of ceramic gas turbine components under service-like conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebmanns, W [Motoren- und Turbinen-Union G.m.b.H., Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-08-01

    If all gas turbine components which are in contact with hot gas are manufactured from special ceramics (silicon nitride, silicon carbide), cycle and component temperatures can be increased up to 1600/sup 0/K. MTU is developing various components, such as combustor and turbine wheel, step by step until they are ready for service. At present, combustors are surviving comprehensive service-like cyclic tests in hot gas at atmospheric pressure (1000 h, 1000 starts per component) without damage. Tests above atmospheric pressure (5 bar) are underway. At MTU, a rotor wheel variant consisting of a metallic hub with inserted single blades is being constructed. The step to aerodynamically contoured airfoils will follow, as soon as the stress problems encountered in connection with the blade root are fully under control. The program will be completed in 1980 with a test run of a prototype turbine made from ceramic components developed by various companies under the leadership of the DFVLR (Aerospace Research and Testing Institute).

  3. Noise origin of Co-Cr-Ta films on ultra-flat glass-ceramic and Si substrates for longitudinal recording disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Kohki; Kadokura, Sadao; Naoe, Masahiko

    2001-01-01

    Co 85 Cr 13 Ta 2 /Cr bilayered films for longitudinal recording disks were deposited by plasma-enhanced facing targets sputtering apparatus on 2.5 in and ultra-flat disk substrates of glass-ceramic and single-crystal silicon. Their noise and read/write characteristics were almost comparable with those of the high-performance disks using Co-Cr-Pt films, with coercivity H c of 2.4 kOe, as a reference disk, even though the Co-Cr-Ta films exhibited macroscopic H c of only 800 Oe. Co 85 Cr 13 Ta 2 films are known as low-noise media. This study addresses the problem of how to obtain low-noise media, using excellent sputtering apparatus and disk substrate materials, to allow practical applications in ultra-high-density recording systems, including 1 in microdrives for mobile applications

  4. Chemical deposition of La0.7Ca0.3MnO3±δ films on ceramic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Morilla-Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is reported the growth of La0.7Ca0.3MnO3±δ films using a chemical solution deposition method (CSD by the spin-coating technique. Such solution was prepared through a route based on modified polymeric precursor method. Spin-coating deposition on different ceramic substrates was performed and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The magnetic response of the prepared specimens was studied using a SQUID magnetometer. The obtained results indicated uniform deposition on SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 substrates with similar characteristics. Furthermore, significant differences were detected in the Mn3+/Mn4+ valence ratio and a corresponding diverse magnetic response was observed. The sample prepared on SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 presented a critical temperature around 270 K as expected.

  5. Growth and instability of charged dislocation loops under irradiation in ceramic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ryazanov, A I; Kinoshita, C; Klaptsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the physical mechanisms of the growth and stability of charged dislocation loops in ceramic materials with very strong different mass of atoms (stabilized cubic zirconia) under different energies and types of irradiation conditions: 100-1000 keV electrons, 100 keV He sup + and 300 keV O sup + ions. The anomalous formation of extended defect clusters (charged dislocation loops) has been observed by TEM under electron irradiation subsequent to ion irradiation. It is demonstrated that very strong strain field (contrast) near charged dislocation loops is formed. The dislocation loops grow up to a critical size and after then become unstable. The instability of the charged dislocation loop leads to the multiplication of dislocation loops and the formation of dislocation network near the charged dislocation loops. A theoretical model is suggested for the explanation of the growth and stability of the charged dislocation loop, taking the charge state of point defects. The calculated distribution...

  6. New substrate containing agroindustrial carnauba residue for production of papaya under foliar fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Albano, Francisca G.; Cavalcante, Ítalo H. L.; Machado, Jailson S.; Lacerda, Claudivan F. de; Silva, Esdras R. da; Sousa, Humberto G. de

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of organic waste in the composition of substrates for seedlings constitutes an alternative to the recycling of these materials. Thus, an experiment was conducted with the objective to evaluate the production of ‘Formosa’ papaya seedlings in substrate containing carnauba wax residue, under foliar fertilization. The experimental design was completely randomized with five replicates, with treatments distributed in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme, corresponding to five materials used as...

  7. New substrate containing agroindustrial carnauba residue for production of papaya under foliar fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Albano,Francisca G.; Cavalcante,Ítalo H. L.; Machado,Jailson S.; Lacerda,Claudivan F. de; Silva,Esdras R. da; Sousa,Humberto G. de

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of organic waste in the composition of substrates for seedlings constitutes an alternative to the recycling of these materials. Thus, an experiment was conducted with the objective to evaluate the production of ‘Formosa’ papaya seedlings in substrate containing carnauba wax residue, under foliar fertilization. The experimental design was completely randomized with five replicates, with treatments distributed in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme, corresponding to five mater...

  8. Numerical and experimental characterization of ceramic pebble beds under cycling mechanical loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pupeschi, S., E-mail: pupeschi.simone@hotmail.it [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Knitter, R.; Kamlah, M. [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Gan, Y. [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006 (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The effect of cyclic loading on the mechanical response of pebble beds was assessed. • Numerical simulations were performed with KIT-DEM code. • The numerical simulations were compared with the experimental outcomes. • A good qualitative agreement between experimental and simulation results was found. • The pebble size distribution affects the mechanical response of the assemblies. - Abstract: All solid breeder concepts considered to be tested in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), make use of lithium-based ceramics in the form of pebble-packed beds as tritium breeder. A thorough understanding of the thermal and mechanical properties of the ceramic pebble beds under fusion relevant conditions is essential for the design of the breeder blanket modules of future fusion reactors. In this study, the effect of cyclic loading on the mechanical behaviour of pebble bed assemblies was investigated using a Discrete Element Method (DEM) code. The numerical simulations were compared with the experimental outcomes. The results of numerical simulations show that the pebble size distribution affects noticeably the stress-strain behaviour of the assemblies. A good qualitative agreement between experimental and simulation results was found in terms of difference between residual strains of consecutive cycles. An increase of the oedometric modulus with the compressive load was observed for all investigated compositions in both experimental and DEM simulations. The numerical results show an increase of the oedometric modulus (E) with progressive compaction of the assemblies due to the cycling loading, while no significant influence of the pebbles size distribution was observed.

  9. Preparation and characterization of Grain-Oriented Barium Titanate Ceramics Using Electrophoresis Deposition Method under A High Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, T; Kondo, S; Takei, T; Kumada, N; Nakashima, K; Fujii, I; Wada, S [Material Science and Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medical and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-4-37 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8510 (Japan); Suzuki, T S; Uchikoshi, T; Sakka, Y [National Institute for materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Miwa, Y; Kawada, S; Kimura, M, E-mail: swada@yamanashi.ac.jp [Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 2288 Ooshinohara, Yasu, Shiga 520-2393 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) grain-oriented ceramics were prepared using electrophoresis deposition (EPD) method under high magnetic field of 12 T. First, BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles with high c/a ratio of 1.008 and size of 84 nm were prepared by two-step thermal decomposition method with barium titanyl oxalate nanoparticles. Using the BaTiO{sub 3} slurry, BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticle accumulations were prepared by EPD method under high magnetic field. After binder burnout, the accumulations were sintered and BaTiO{sub 3} grain-oriented ceramics were prepared. Moreover, dielectric properties of their ceramics were investigated

  10. Evaluating the Atrial Myopathy Underlying Atrial Fibrillation: Identifying the Arrhythmogenic and Thrombogenic Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J.; Arora, Rishi; Green, David; Greenland, Philip; Lee, Daniel C.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Markl, Michael; Ng, Jason; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial disease or myopathy forms the substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) and underlies the potential for atrial thrombus formation and subsequent stroke. Current diagnostic approaches in patients with AF focus on identifying clinical predictors with evaluation of left atrial size by echocardiography serving as the sole measure specifically evaluating the atrium. Although the atrial substrate underlying AF is likely developing for years prior to the onset of AF, there is no current evaluation to identify the pre-clinical atrial myopathy. Atrial fibrosis is one component of the atrial substrate that has garnered recent attention based on newer MRI techniques that have been applied to visualize atrial fibrosis in humans with prognostic implications regarding success of treatment. Advanced ECG signal processing, echocardiographic techniques, and MRI imaging of fibrosis and flow provide up-to-date approaches to evaluate the atrial myopathy underlying AF. While thromboembolic risk is currently defined by clinical scores, their predictive value is mediocre. Evaluation of stasis via imaging and biomarkers associated with thrombogenesis may provide enhanced approaches to assess risk for stroke in patients with AF. Better delineation of the atrial myopathy that serves as the substrate for AF and thromboembolic complications might improve treatment outcomes. Furthermore, better delineation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the atrial substrate for AF, particularly in its earlier stages, could help identify blood and imaging biomarkers that could be useful to assess risk for developing new onset AF and suggest specific pathways that could be targeted for prevention. PMID:26216085

  11. Crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings synthesized under hydrothermal conditions on modified titanium substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchanek, Katarzyna; Bartkowiak, Amanda; Gdowik, Agnieszka; Perzanowski, Marcin; Kąc, Sławomir; Szaraniec, Barbara; Suchanek, Mateusz; Marszałek, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were successfully produced on modified titanium substrates via hydrothermal synthesis in a Ca(EDTA) 2− and (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 solution. The morphology of modified titanium substrates as well as hydroxyapatite coatings was studied using scanning electron microcopy and phase identification by X-ray diffraction, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite needle-like crystals with hexagonal symmetry occurred only on titanium substrates both chemically and thermally treated. No hydroxyapatite phase was detected on only acid etched Ti metal. This finding demonstrates that only a particular titanium surface treatment can effectively induce the apatite nucleation under hydrothermal conditions. - Highlights: • Bioactivation of titanium substrate by chemical and heat treatments • Precipitation of hydroxyapatite on modified titanium plates • Hydrothermal crystallization of hydroxyapatite by chelate decomposition method

  12. Crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings synthesized under hydrothermal conditions on modified titanium substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchanek, Katarzyna, E-mail: Katarzyna.Suchanek@ifj.edu.pl [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Bartkowiak, Amanda [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Gdowik, Agnieszka [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Perzanowski, Marcin [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Kąc, Sławomir [Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewica 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Szaraniec, Barbara [Department of Biomaterials, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Suchanek, Mateusz [Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Mickiewicza 21, 31-120 Krakow (Poland); Marszałek, Marta [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were successfully produced on modified titanium substrates via hydrothermal synthesis in a Ca(EDTA){sup 2−} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solution. The morphology of modified titanium substrates as well as hydroxyapatite coatings was studied using scanning electron microcopy and phase identification by X-ray diffraction, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite needle-like crystals with hexagonal symmetry occurred only on titanium substrates both chemically and thermally treated. No hydroxyapatite phase was detected on only acid etched Ti metal. This finding demonstrates that only a particular titanium surface treatment can effectively induce the apatite nucleation under hydrothermal conditions. - Highlights: • Bioactivation of titanium substrate by chemical and heat treatments • Precipitation of hydroxyapatite on modified titanium plates • Hydrothermal crystallization of hydroxyapatite by chelate decomposition method.

  13. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Improves Substrate Hydraulic Conductivity in the Plant Available Moisture Range Under Root Growth Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterlich, Michael; Franken, Philipp; Graefe, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) proliferate in soils and are known to affect soil structure. Although their contribution to structure is extensively investigated, the consequences of those processes for soil water extractability and transport has, so far, gained surprisingly little attention. Therefore we asked, whether AMF can affect water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity under exclusion of root ingrowth, in order to minimize plant driven effects. We carried out experiments with tomato inoculated with Rhizoglomus irregulare in a soil substrate with sand and vermiculite that created variation in colonization by mixed pots with wild type (WT) plants and mycorrhiza resistant (RMC) mutants. Sampling cores were introduced and used to assess substrate moisture retention dynamics and modeling of substrate water retention and hydraulic conductivity. AMF reduced the saturated water content and total porosity, but maintained air filled porosity in soil spheres that excluded root ingrowth. The water content between field capacity and the permanent wilting point (6-1500 kPa) was only reduced in mycorrhizal substrates that contained at least one RMC mutant. Plant available water contents correlated positively with soil protein contents. Soil protein contents were highest in pots that possessed the strongest hyphal colonization, but not significantly affected. Substrate conductivity increased up to 50% in colonized substrates in the physiologically important water potential range between 6 and 10 kPa. The improvements in hydraulic conductivity are restricted to substrates where at least one WT plant was available for the fungus, indicating a necessity of a functional symbiosis for this effect. We conclude that functional mycorrhiza alleviates the resistance to water movement through the substrate in substrate areas outside of the root zone.

  14. Progress in development of a source term for sphene glass-ceramic dissolution under vault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, P.J.; Tait, J.C.; George, I.M.; Carmichael, A.A.; Ross, J.M.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the results of ongoing leaching experiments, involving aluminosilicate glass and sphene (CaTiSiO/sub 5/) ceramics, doped with /sup 22/Na or /sup 45/Ca, and leached in a simulated Ca-NA-Cl brine at 25 0 or 100 0 C. The experiments are designed to aid development of separate models for the dissolution of the glass and the ceramic phase in a sphene glass-ceramic, and to help evaluate a composite model for the dissolution of the glass-ceramic

  15. Influence of metformin and insulin on myocardial substrate oxidation under conditions encountered during cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Cyonna; Powell, LaShondra; Clarke, Nicholas S; Jessen, Michael E; Peltz, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    The influence of diabetic therapies on myocardial substrate selection during cardiac surgery is unknown but may be important to ensure optimal surgical outcomes. We hypothesized that metformin and insulin alter myocardial substrate selection during cardiac surgery and may affect reperfusion cardiac function. Rat hearts (n = 8 per group) were evaluated under 3 metabolic conditions: normokalemia, cardioplegia, or bypass. Groups were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer in the presence of no additives, metformin, insulin, or both insulin and metformin. Perfusion buffer containing physiologic concentrations of energetic substrates with different carbon-13 ( 13 C) labeling patterns were used to determine substrate oxidation preferences using 13 C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and glutamate isotopomer analysis. Rate pressure product and oxygen consumption were measured. Myocardial function was not different between groups. For normokalemia, ketone oxidation was reduced in the presence of insulin and the combination of metformin and insulin reduced fatty acid oxidation. Metformin reduced fatty acid and ketone oxidation during cardioplegia. Fatty acid oxidation was increased in the bypass group compared with all other conditions. Metformin and insulin affect substrate utilization and reduce fatty acid oxidation before reperfusion. These alterations in substrate oxidation did not affect myocardial function in otherwise normal hearts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pinus sylvestris switches respiration substrates under shading but not during drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Henrik; Fischer, Sarah; Hanf, Stefan; Frosch, Torsten; Poppp, Jürgen; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Reduced carbon assimilation during prolonged drought forces trees to rely on stored carbon to maintain vital processes like respiration. It has been shown, however, that the use of carbohydrates, a major carbon storage pool and main respiratory substrate in plants, strongly declines with deceasing plant hydration. Yet, no empirical evidence has been produced to what degree other carbon storage compounds like lipids and proteins may fuel respiration during drought. We exposed young scots pine trees to carbon limitation using either drought or shading and assessed respiratory substrate use by monitoring the respiratory quotient, δ13C of respired CO2and concentrations of the major storage compounds, i.e. carbohydrates (COH), lipids and amino acids. Generally, respiration was dominated by the most abundant substrate. Only shaded trees shifted from carbohydrate-dominated to lipid-dominated respiration and showed progressive carbohydrate depletion. In drought trees respiration was strongly reduced and fueled with carbohydrates from also strongly reduced carbon assimilation. Initial COH content was maintained during drought probably due to reduced COH mobilization and use and the maintained COH content may have prevented lipid catabolism via sugar signaling. Our results suggest that respiratory substrates other than carbohydrates are used under carbohydrate limitation but not during drought. Thus, respiratory substrate change cannot provide an efficient means to counterbalance carbon limitation under natural drought.

  17. Examination of the creep behaviour of ceramic fuel elements under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucklacher, D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper examines the creeping of UO 2 , UO 2 -PuO 2 and UN under neutron irradiation. It starts with the experimental results about the relation between the thermal creep rate and the load, the temperature, as well as characteristic material values, stoichiometry, grain size and porosity. These correlation are first qualitatively discussed and then compared with the statements of actual quantitative equations. From the models and theories on which these equations are based a modified Nabarro-Heering-equation results for the correlation between the creep rate of ceramic fuels, stress, temperature and the fission rate. In the experimental part of the examination, length-changes of creep samples of UO 2 , (U,Pu)O 2 and UN were measured in specially developed irradiation creep casings in different reactors. The measuring data were corrected and evaluated considering the thermal expansion effects, irregular temperature distribution and swelling effects in such a way that the dependences of the creep rate of UO 2 , UO 2 -PuO 2 and UN under irradiation on stress, temperature, fission rate, burn-up and porosity is obtained. It shows that creeping of fuels under irradiation at high temperatures is equivalent to thermally activated creeping, while at low temperature the creep rate induced by irradiation is much higher than the condition without irradiation. The increment of oxidic nuclear fuels is greater than in UN, the stress dependence on low burn-up is proportional in both cases, and the influence of temperature is quite small. (orig.) [de

  18. Luminescence evolution from alumina ceramic surface before flashover under direct and alternating current voltage in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yi-Bo; Song, Bai-Peng; Mu, Hai-Bao, E-mail: haibaomu@xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: gjzhang@xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Guan-Jun, E-mail: haibaomu@xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: gjzhang@xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Li, Feng; Wang, Meng [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2016-06-15

    The luminescence evolution phenomena from alumina ceramic surface in vacuum under high voltage of direct and alternating current are reported, with the voltage covering a large range from far below to close to the flashover voltage. Its time resolved and spatial distributed behaviors are examined by a photon counting system and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) together with a digital camera, respectively. The luminescence before flashover exhibits two stages as voltage increasing, i.e., under a relative low voltage (Stage A), the luminescence is ascribed to radiative recombination of hetero-charges injected into the sample surface layer by Schottky effect; under a higher voltage (Stage B), a stable secondary electron emission process, resulting from the Fowler-Nordheim emission at the cathode triple junction (CTJ), is responsible for the luminescence. Spectrum analysis implies that inner secondary electrons within the surface layer of alumina generated during the SSEE process also participate in the luminescence of Stage B. A comprehensive interpretation of the flashover process is formulated, which might promote a better understanding of flashover issue in vacuum.

  19. Wear Resistance of Nano Alumina Containing SiO2-B2O3-Na2O Glass-Ceramic on Steel Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Faeghinia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study has been carried out to investigate the tribological properties of nano Alumina reinforced glass-ceramic enamel. The mixtures of (5, 10, 15 wt.% nano alumina and glass powders have been air sprayed on stainless steel substrate.. The thixotropy, wetting angle and surface tension of used slurry were increased inherently by 15-wt.% nano alumina. By heat treating at 870-640-525 ºC, the homogeneous crystalline sodium silicate phase beside nano alumina was obtained in glass –ceramic coat. According to the EDAX results, the precipitated reduced Sb and Mo particles at the interface of enamel and steel caused to reasonable adherence of coat and steel. The dry sliding wear tests were carried out using pin on disk method. Results revealed the 0.01 mg wear rate by 30N load at 100 m for nano alumina bearing coats. The wear resistance increased by a factor of 10. According to SEM micrographs, the sliding load transfer by nano alumina particles occurred.

  20. Investigation of thin film deposition on stainless steel 304 substrates under different operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, M A; Nuruzzaman, D M

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, friction and wear in relation to the deposited carbon films on the steel substrates are important issues for industrial applications. In this research study, solid thin films were deposited on the stainless steel 304 (SS 304) substrates under different operating conditions. In the experiments, natural gas (97.14% methane) was used as a precursor gas in a hot filament thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. Deposition rates on SS 304 substrates were investigated under gas flow rates 0.5 - 3.0 l/min, pressure 20 - 50 torr, gap between activation heater and substrate 3.0 - 6.0 mm and deposition duration 30 - 120 minutes. The obtained results show that there are significant effects of these parameters on the deposition rates on SS 304 within the observed range. Friction coefficient of SS 304 sliding against SS 314 was also investigated under normal loads 5 - 10 N and sliding velocities 0.5 - m/s before and after deposition. The experimental results reveal that in general, frictional values are lower after deposition than that of before deposition. (paper)

  1. Crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings synthesized under hydrothermal conditions on modified titanium substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanek, Katarzyna; Bartkowiak, Amanda; Gdowik, Agnieszka; Perzanowski, Marcin; Kąc, Sławomir; Szaraniec, Barbara; Suchanek, Mateusz; Marszałek, Marta

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were successfully produced on modified titanium substrates via hydrothermal synthesis in a Ca(EDTA)(2-) and (NH4)2HPO4 solution. The morphology of modified titanium substrates as well as hydroxyapatite coatings was studied using scanning electron microcopy and phase identification by X-ray diffraction, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite needle-like crystals with hexagonal symmetry occurred only on titanium substrates both chemically and thermally treated. No hydroxyapatite phase was detected on only acid etched Ti metal. This finding demonstrates that only a particular titanium surface treatment can effectively induce the apatite nucleation under hydrothermal conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of deterioration mechanism of electrical ceramic insulating materials under high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Yoshinobu; Ito, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Tatsuki; Kumazawa, Ryoji; Aizawa, Rie; Moriyama, Hideshige

    2000-01-01

    It is thought that ceramic insulator can be applied to electric power equipments that are under high temperature not to be able use organic materials. Our research has suggested components of mica-alumina combined insulation. As the results of and carried out temperature accelerating test, combined insulation life is expected long term over 40 years at over 500-Celsius degrees. However to construct high reliable insulating system, it is clarified deterioration mechanism on combined insulation and evaluates life of that. Therefore we carried out metal behavior test and voltage aging test using mica-sheet and alumina-cloth that are components of combined insulation under high temperature in nitrogen gas atmosphere. It is cleared two metal behavior mechanisms: One is that the opening of insulator are filled up with copper that is oxidized, the other is the metal diffuses in alumina-cloth through surface. And distance of metal behavior is able to be estimated at modulate temperature and in modulate time. It is also cleared that alumina-cloth is deteriorated by metal behavior into alumina-cloth. These results indicate that combined insulation is deteriorated from electrode side by metal behavior and is finally broken down through alumina-cloth. (author)

  3. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  4. Numerical investigation on anti-penetration behavior of ceramic/metal target under ballistic impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, H; Wang, Y C; Liu, X; Cao, D F; Liu, L S

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we used the LS-DYNA FE code to simulate the bullet penetration against the target plate with different ceramic-steel ratio of thickness. The main stages of the bullet penetration and damage contours of the target were studied by analyzing the residual velocity-time curves. We also studied energy absorption of the ceramic/metal target. Considering curves of residual velocity-time, we reckon the process of penetration contains four stages. Ceramic performed good resistance before the formation of damage cone of ceramic. But after the damage cone formed, the anti-penetration behavior kept declining. When the bullet started to penetrate the layer of metal, the anti-penetration behavior of target rose slightly. Compared with thickness ratio of 0.4 and 0.6, ceramic with 0.2 absorbed more energy and works longer. Of several different thicknesses, layers of ceramic and steel were studied. Steel per cm absorbed more energy than ceramic per cm.

  5. Low frequency modelling of hysteresis behaviour and dielectric permittivity in ferroelectric ceramics under electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducharne, B; Guyomar, D; Sebald, G

    2007-01-01

    The properties of ferroelectric ceramics strongly depend on the electromechanical loading and their measurement conditions. In this paper, a nonlinear phenomenological one-dimensional model based on the dry friction concept is presented to describe the hysteretic polarization behaviour. Dielectric permittivities versus dc electric field (or capacitance C versus voltage V) loops are determined for the characterization of ferroelectric material. The ε 33 coefficient is used for the ceramic characterization because it is strongly correlated with the ceramic quality. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of reversal polarization behaviour close to physical realities, able to provide good performances on the simulation of dielectric permittivity loop ε 33 (E dc ). Simulated behaviours are finally compared with experimental results on a typically soft PZT ferroelectric ceramic

  6. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, Gilbert; Niepce, Jean-Claude; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Alary, J.A.; Allard, B.; Ayral, A.; Bassat, J.M.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Beauvy, M.; Bertrand, G.; Bignon, A.; Billieres, D.; Blanc, J.J.; Blumenfeld, P.; Bonnet, J.P.; Bougoin, M.; Bourgeon, M.; Boussuge, M.; Thorel, A.; Bruzek, C.E.; Cambier, F.; Carrerot, H.; Casabonne, J.M.; Chaix, J.M.; Chevalier, J.; Chopinet, M.H.; Couque, H.; Courtois, C.; Leriche, A.; Dhaler, D.; Denape, J.; Euzen, P.; Ganne, J.P.; Gauffinet, S.; Girard, A.; Gonon, M.; Guizard, C.; Hampshire, S.; Joulin, J.P.; Julbe, A.; Ferrato, M.; Fontaine, M.L.; Lebourgeois, R.; Lopez, J.; Maquet, M.; Marinel, S.; Marrony, M.; Martin, J.F.; Mougin, J.; Pailler, R.; Pate, M.; Petitpas, E.; Pijolat, C.; Pires-Franco, P.; Poirier, C.; Poirier, J.; Pourcel, F.; Potier, A.; Tulliani, J.M.; Viricelle, J.P.; Beauger, A.

    2013-01-01

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  7. New substrate containing agroindustrial carnauba residue for production of papaya under foliar fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca G. Albano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of organic waste in the composition of substrates for seedlings constitutes an alternative to the recycling of these materials. Thus, an experiment was conducted with the objective to evaluate the production of ‘Formosa’ papaya seedlings in substrate containing carnauba wax residue, under foliar fertilization. The experimental design was completely randomized with five replicates, with treatments distributed in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme, corresponding to five materials used as substrates, in the presence and absence of foliar fertilization. The materials used were: earthworm humus, carnauba residue + fresh rice husk; carnauba residue in powder; carnauba residue semi-decomposed and mixture of carnauba residues: carnauba residue + fresh rice husk + carnauba residue semi-decomposed + carnauba residue in powder, at the proportion 1:1:1. The agroindustrial residue of carnauba wax semi-decomposed can be used as substrates in the production of ‘Formosa’ papaya seedlings. The foliar fertilization increases the quality of papaya seedlings, leading to increment in leaf area, root volume and sulfur content in the leaves, thus becoming a necessary practice.

  8. Wear of tin coating and Al-Si alloy substrate against carburized steel under mixed lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Cheng, H. S.; Fine, M. E.

    1994-04-01

    Tin coatings on Al-Si alloys are widely used in the automotive industries. The soft tin coating and the harder substrate alloy form a tribological system with the advantages of low friction and reasonably high load-bearing capacity. Wear tests of tin coated Al-Si Z332 alloy in conformal contact against carburized 1016 steel have been carried out under mixed lubrications with SAE 10W30 oil to study the wear mechanisms. Two major wear mechanisms, uniform wear of the tin coating due to micro-plowing and spall pitting related to the substrate are found to contribute to the bearing material loss when the fluid lubrication film is relatively thick (Lambda about 1.6). Under conditions of thinner films (Lambda approximately = 0.8), some local coating debonding occurs. The pitting and local coating debounding are closely related to fracture in the substrate. The bonding between silicon and tin seems to be weaker than between aluminum and tin. During wear, oxidation occurs.

  9. Low cost silicon-on-ceramic photovoltaic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, B. G.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Sibold, J. D.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A technique has been developed for coating low-cost mullite-based refractory substrates with thin layers of solar cell quality silicon. The technique involves first carbonizing one surface of the ceramic and then contacting it with molten silicon. The silicon wets the carbonized surface and, under the proper thermal conditions, solidifies as a large-grained sheet. Solar cells produced from this composite silicon-on-ceramic material have exhibited total area conversion efficiencies of ten percent.

  10. Wear Characteristics of Ceramic Coating Materials by Plasma Spray under the Lubricative Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Ho

    2001-02-01

    This paper is to investigate the wear behaviors of two types of ceramics, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 , by coated plasma thermal spray method under the lubricative environment. The lubricative environments are grease fluids, a general hydraulic fluids, and bearing fluids. The wear testing machine used a pin on disk type. Wear characteristics, which were friction force, friction coefficient and the specific wear rate, according to the lubricative environments were obtained at the four kinds of load, and the sliding velocity is 0.2m/sec. After the wear experiments, the wear surfaces of the each test specimen were observed by a scanning electronic microscope. The obtained results are as follows. : 1. The friction coefficients of TiO 2 coating materials are 0.11 ∼ 0.16 range and those of Al 2 O 3 are 0.24 ∼ 0.39. The friction coefficient of two coating materials is relative to the hardness of these materials. 2. The friction coefficient of TiO 2 coating materials in three lubricative environments is almost same to each other in spite of changing of applied loads. 3. The friction coefficient of Al 2 O 3 coating materials is more large in low load than high load. And the friction coefficient in grease is more large than a general hydraulic and bearing fluids had almost same friction coefficient. 4. The specific wear rate in TiO 2 is greatly increasing according to change the applied loads, but that in Al 2 O 3 is slightly. And the wear in grease is the least among three lubricating environments. 5. On the wear mechanism by SEM image observation, the wear of Al 2 O 3 is adhesive wear and TiO 3 is abrasive wear

  11. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  12. Ultrafast dynamics of ligand and substrate interaction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase under Soret excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Chang; Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Chen, Pei-Feng; Liang, Keng S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of endothelial NOS oxygenase domain (eNOS-oxy) was performed to study dynamics of ligand or substrate interaction under Soret band excitation. Photo-excitation dissociates imidazole ligand in 4ps. The eNOS-oxy without additive is partially bound with water molecule, thus its photoexcited dynamics also shows ligand dissociation in <800fs. Then it followed by vibrational cooling coupled with charge transfer in 4.8ps, and recombination of ligand to distal side of heme in 12ps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sudden cardiac death: the pro-arrhythmic interaction of an acute loading with an underlying substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, George R

    2017-10-21

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a complex phenomenon, occurring either in apparently normal individuals or in those where there is a recognized underlying cardiac abnormality. In both groups, the lethal arrhythmia has frequently been related to the physiologic trigger of either exercise or stress. Prior research into SCD has focused mainly on a combination of identifying either vulnerable myocardial substrates; pharmacological approaches to altering electrical activation/repolarisation in substrates; or the suppression of induced lethal arrhythmias with implantable defibrillators. However, it has been suggested that in a significant number of cases, the interaction of a transient induced trigger with a pre-existing electrical or mechanical substrate is the basis for the induction of the sustained lethal arrhythmia. In this manuscript we will discuss the precise mechanisms whereby one of such potential physiologic trigger: an acute change in systolic blood pressure, can induce a sequence of alterations in global and local cardiac mechanics which in turn result in regional left ventricular post-systolic deformation which, mediated (through stretch-induced changes in local mechano-electrical coupling) provokes local electrical after-depolarisations which can spill over into complex runs of premature ventricular beats. These local acute pressure/stretch induced runs of ventricular ectopy originate in either basal or apical normal myocardium and, in combination with a co-existing distal pro-arrhymic substrate, can interact to induce a lethal arrhythmia. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. High-Performance Flexible Single-Crystalline Silicon Nanomembrane Thin-Film Transistors with High- k Nb2O5-Bi2O3-MgO Ceramics as Gate Dielectric on a Plastic Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guoxuan; Zhang, Yibo; Lan, Kuibo; Li, Lingxia; Ma, Jianguo; Yu, Shihui

    2018-04-18

    A novel method of fabricating flexible thin-film transistor based on single-crystalline Si nanomembrane (SiNM) with high- k Nb 2 O 5 -Bi 2 O 3 -MgO (BMN) ceramic gate dielectric on a plastic substrate is demonstrated in this paper. SiNMs are successfully transferred to a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate, which has been plated with indium-tin-oxide (ITO) conductive layer and high- k BMN ceramic gate dielectric layer by room-temperature magnetron sputtering. The BMN ceramic gate dielectric layer demonstrates as high as ∼109 dielectric constant, with only dozens of pA current leakage. The Si-BMN-ITO heterostructure has only ∼nA leakage current at the applied voltage of 3 V. The transistor is shown to work at a high current on/off ratio of above 10 4 , and the threshold voltage is ∼1.3 V, with over 200 cm 2 /(V s) effective channel electron mobility. Bending tests have been conducted and show that the flexible transistors have good tolerance on mechanical bending strains. These characteristics indicate that the flexible single-crystalline SiNM transistors with BMN ceramics as gate dielectric have great potential for applications in high-performance integrated flexible circuit.

  15. Adição de grafite na conformação de substratos cerâmicos porosos processados por rolos a frio Addition of graphite in the conformation of ceramic porous substrates processed by cold roll pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Koshimizu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento de substratos cerâmicos porosos de fina espessura (The development of porous ceramic substrates with thickness less than 1 mm presents a great technology interesting for electro-electronic or catalytic applications. Among all the techniques of ceramic conformation, the viscoplastic processing shows great advantages decreasing the amount of liquids and the particles agglomeration from an intensive shearing of the ceramic paste. This process allows the conformation of ceramic samples in a simple way and without toxic additives, the opposite of tape casting, which is the method often applied. The substrates were conformed by cold roll pressing in a thickness between 400 and 700 µm, and with the rotation of rollers of 15 rpm. Theses were dried before the firing at 1600 ºC for 1 h. As a pore-forming agent it was studied the graphite powder which was added to the alumina plastic paste in two different concentrations, 9 and 18 wt%, which results in an apparent porosity of 21 and 52%, respectively.

  16. The effect of the adsorbate layer on the work function reduction of gold substrates under external electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiang; Cheng, Feng; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2017-12-01

    The interface interaction between the dimethyl sulfide (DMS) molecule and the gold substrate under external electric fields is investigated by density functional theory method. The polarized DMS adsorbate reduces the work function of the gold substrate while the induced substrate dipole upon the adsorption slightly increases the work function. The DMS layer partially shields the Au(111) substrate from the electric fields and the vacuum level of DMS/Au(111) shifts less than of Au(111) in consequence. Under electric fields pointing outward from the Au(111) surface, both the reduction of work function and the adsorption of DMS molecule are enhanced on the surface. We also suggest the possible application of the field-effect transistor (FET) sensor with gold gate for detecting DMS molecule by utilizing the reduction of substrate work function upon adsorption. The effects of coverage and electric field on the theoretical sensitivity of the sensor are also discussed.

  17. Fabrication of lead-free piezoelectric Li2CO3-added (Ba,Ca)(Ti,Sn)O3 ceramics under controlled low oxygen partial pressure and their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noritake, Kouta; Sakamoto, Wataru; Yuitoo, Isamu; Takeuchi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Koichiro; Yogo, Toshinobu

    2018-02-01

    Reduction-resistant lead-free (Ba,Ca)(Ti,Sn)O3 piezoceramics with high piezoelectric constants were fabricated by optimizing the amount of Li2CO3 added. Oxygen partial pressure was controlled during the sintering of (Ba,Ca)(Ti,Sn)O3 ceramics in a reducing atmosphere using H2-CO2 gas. Enhanced grain growth and a high-polarization state after poling treatment were achieved by adding Li2CO3. Optimizing the amount of Li2CO3 added to (Ba0.95Ca0.05)(Ti0.95Sn0.05)O3 ceramics sintered under a low oxygen partial pressure resulted in improved piezoelectric properties while maintaining the high sintered density. The prepared Li2CO3-added ceramic samples had homogeneous microstructures with a uniform dispersion of each major constituent element. However, the residual Li content in the 3 mol % Li2CO3-added (Ba0.95Ca0.05)(Ti0.95Sn0.05)O3 ceramics after sintering was less than 0.3 mol %. Sintered bodies of this ceramic prepared in a CO2 (1.5%)-H2 (0.3%)/Ar reducing atmosphere (PO2 = 10-8 atm at 1350 °C), exhibited sufficient electrical resistivity and a piezoelectric constant (d 33) exceeding 500 pC/N. The piezoelectric properties of this nonreducible ceramic were comparable or superior to those of the same ceramic sintered in air.

  18. Sweet pepper greenhouse production under different depletion levels in substrate humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Quesada Roldán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 3 substrate humidity levels on the growth and yield of 2 sweet pepper hybrids, established under greenhouse conditions, was evaluated. The experiment was held in the industrial greenhouse of the Fabio Baudrit Moreno Experimental Research Station, in La Garita (Alajuela, and the materials evaluated were the hybrids Villaplants Americano (square yellow fruit, bell type and FBM-9 (triangular red fruit type, both national origin genotypes. The first treatment was to supply water at container capacity (CC to the plant, while the second and third ones were reducing 15 and 30%, respectively, of the plant original water supply. It was demonstrated that there is no effect due to the amount of water supply on the plant´s growth, although it was observed that hydric- stressed plants were the first to begin the flowering and fruiting phase. In both hybrids, a reduction in the amount of first and second one amount quality fruit and an increasing of fruit rejected as the watering was limited. Blossom-end rot was the main rejection cause due to the water loss, associated with low calcium availability. The highest commercial yield was obtained with the Villaplants Americano hibryd (31,8 ton.ha-1, although without statistical difference between substrates at CC and CC–15%, despite a fruit quality reduction with the later treatment. The same was observed with the FBM-9 hybrid. With the CC–30% treatment, both commercial yield and fruit quality were affected, in both hybrids.

  19. Droplet evaporation on a horizontal substrate under gravity field by mesoscopic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chiyu; Zhang, Jianying; Bertola, Volfango; Wang, Moran

    2016-02-01

    The evaporation of water drop deposited on a horizontal substrate is investigated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for multiphase flows with a large-density ratio. To account for the variation of evaporation flux distribution along the drop interface, a novel evaporation scheme is introduced into the LBM framework, and validated by comparison with experimental data. We aim at discovering the effect of gravity on the evaporating drop in detail, and various evaporation conditions are considered as well as different wetting properties of the substrates. An effective diameter is introduced as an indicator of the critical drop size under which gravity is negligible. Our results show that such critical diameter is much smaller than the capillary length, which has been widely accepted as the critical size in previous and current works. The critical diameter is found to be almost independent of the evaporation conditions and the surface wettability. A correlation between this critical diameter and the capillary length is also proposed for easy use in applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phase transformations on the surface of YAG composite ceramics under the action of directed laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasova, M., E-mail: vlasovamarina@inbox.ru; Márquez Aguilar, P.A.; Escobar Martinez, A.; Kakazey, M.; Guardian Tapia, R.; Trujillo Estrada, A.

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • During directed laser treatment of the surface of the composite ceramics consisting of predominantly Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the oriented crystallization of YAG and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} takes place. • As a result of high-temperature heating, in the surface layer of tracks, the partial dissociation of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}, Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, and Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9} and enrichment in YAlO{sub 3} occur. • The content of YAlO{sub 3}, the size of YAG crystallites, and their crystallographic texturing depend on the irradiation mode. • After laser treatment, the ceramic material transforms into a three-layer macrostructure consisting of the basic ceramic material, near-surface textured layer, and surface layer. - Abstract: The laser treatment of composite ceramics based on Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} with Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} additives is accompanied by the melting of the surface layer and formation of tracks. In the volume of tracks, the partial dissociation of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}, Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, and Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9}, and the formation of new phases such as YAlO{sub 3} of orthorhombic and hexagonal modifications along with the appearance of additional content of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are observed. The content of all these phases depends on the irradiation mode and the phase composition of the ceramics. With increase in the corundum content in ceramic specimens, in the tracks, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content increases, and the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} content decreases. In the volume of tracks, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystallites are textured. The size of YAG crystallites and their crystallographic texturing depend on the irradiation mode and Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase ratio. On the surface of tracks, a layer enriched in YAlO{sub 3} forms. Thus, as a result of laser

  1. Sensor Substrate Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Novel substrates, such as aerogels and porous, low density ceramics may increase the sensitivities of chemical reaction-based sensors for toxic vapors. These sensors...

  2. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  3. Dynamics of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates under fast thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the growth/decay rate of surface perturbations of an ultrathin metal film on an amorphous substrate (SiO 2 ). The formulation combines the approach of Mullins [W. W. Mullins, J. Appl. Phys. 30, 77 (1959)] for bulk surfaces, in which curvature-driven mass transport and surface deformation can occur by surface/volume diffusion and evaporation-condensation processes, with that of Spencer et al. [B. J. Spencer, P. W. Voorhees, and S. H. Davis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 26 (1991)] to describe solid-state transport in thin films under epitaxial strain. Modifications of the Mullins model to account for thin-film boundary conditions result in qualitatively different dispersion relationships especially in the limit as kh o o is the unperturbed film height. The model is applied to study the relative rate of solid-state mass transport as compared to that of liquid phase dewetting in a thin film subjected to a fast thermal pulse. Specifically, we have recently shown that multiple cycles of nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser melting and resolidification of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates can lead to the formation of various types of spatially ordered nanostructures [J. Trice, D. Thomas, C. Favazza, R. Sureshkumar, and R. Kalyanaraman, Phys. Rev. B 75, 235439 (2007)]. The pattern formation has been attributed to the dewetting of the thin film by a hydrodynamic instability. In such experiments the film is in the solid state during a substantial fraction of each thermal cycle. However, results of a linear stability analysis based on the aforementioned model suggest that solid-state mass transport has a negligible effect on morphological changes of the surface. Further, a qualitative analysis of the effect of thermoelastic stress, induced by the rapid temperature changes in the film-substrate bilayer, suggests that stress relaxation does not appreciably contribute to surface deformation. Hence, surface deformation caused by liquid

  4. Dynamics of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates under fast thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2007-11-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the growth/decay rate of surface perturbations of an ultrathin metal film on an amorphous substrate (SiO2). The formulation combines the approach of Mullins [W. W. Mullins, J. Appl. Phys. 30, 77 (1959)] for bulk surfaces, in which curvature-driven mass transport and surface deformation can occur by surface/volume diffusion and evaporation-condensation processes, with that of Spencer etal . [B. J. Spencer, P. W. Voorhees, and S. H. Davis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 26 (1991)] to describe solid-state transport in thin films under epitaxial strain. Modifications of the Mullins model to account for thin-film boundary conditions result in qualitatively different dispersion relationships especially in the limit as kho≪1, where k is the wavenumber of the perturbation and ho is the unperturbed film height. The model is applied to study the relative rate of solid-state mass transport as compared to that of liquid phase dewetting in a thin film subjected to a fast thermal pulse. Specifically, we have recently shown that multiple cycles of nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser melting and resolidification of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates can lead to the formation of various types of spatially ordered nanostructures [J. Trice, D. Thomas, C. Favazza, R. Sureshkumar, and R. Kalyanaraman, Phys. Rev. B 75, 235439 (2007)]. The pattern formation has been attributed to the dewetting of the thin film by a hydrodynamic instability. In such experiments the film is in the solid state during a substantial fraction of each thermal cycle. However, results of a linear stability analysis based on the aforementioned model suggest that solid-state mass transport has a negligible effect on morphological changes of the surface. Further, a qualitative analysis of the effect of thermoelastic stress, induced by the rapid temperature changes in the film-substrate bilayer, suggests that stress relaxation does not appreciably contribute to surface

  5. Luminescent properties of Eu{sup 3+}-doped glass ceramics containing BaCl{sub 2} nanocrystals under NUV excitation for White LED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Han; Mo, Zhaojun, E-mail: mzjmzj163@163.com; Zhang, Xiaosong; Yuan, Linlin; Yan, Ming; Li, Lan, E-mail: lilan@tjut.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Eu{sup 3+} doped fluorozirconate glass ceramics containing BaCl{sub 2} nanocrystals were successfully fabricated by melt quenching method, and their structural and luminous properties were investigated. The existence of BaCl{sub 2} nanocrystals in the glass ceramics plays an important role on the improvement of luminescent properties. The emission intensity in glass ceramics was remarkably enhanced, which attributes to the phonon energy decrease by Eu{sup 3+} ions into BaCl{sub 2} nanocrystals. Meanwhile, the extended average fluorescence decay lifetime from 4.60 ms to 5.42 ms and the decreased Red/Orange ratio and spark splitting of {sup 7}F{sub 1} energy level also confirmed this view. Additionally, the excitation spectra showed that glass ceramics could be effectively excited by NUV light. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of glass ceramics (GC320) were calculated as (0.611, 0.371), which was close to the NTSC standard values for red (0.67, 0.33). The results suggested that the glass ceramics may be used as potential red phosphors under UV light excitation for white light-emitting diodes.

  6. Neuronal Substrates Underlying Performance Variability in Well-Trained Skillful Motor Task in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Uehara, Shintaro; Hirose, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Naito, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Motor performance fluctuates trial by trial even in a well-trained motor skill. Here we show neural substrates underlying such behavioral fluctuation in humans. We first scanned brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging while healthy participants repeatedly performed a 10 s skillful sequential finger-tapping task. Before starting the experiment, the participants had completed intensive training. We evaluated task performance per trial (number of correct sequences in 10 s) and depicted brain regions where the activity changes in association with the fluctuation of the task performance across trials. We found that the activity in a broader range of frontoparietocerebellar network, including the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), anterior cingulate and anterior insular cortices, and left cerebellar hemisphere, was negatively correlated with the task performance. We further showed in another transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) experiment that task performance deteriorated, when we applied anodal tDCS to the right DLPFC. These results indicate that fluctuation of brain activity in the nonmotor frontoparietocerebellar network may underlie trial-by-trial performance variability even in a well-trained motor skill, and its neuromodulation with tDCS may affect the task performance.

  7. The insula: a critical neural substrate for craving and drug seeking under conflict and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Nasir H; Gaznick, Natassia; Tranel, Daniel; Bechara, Antoine

    2014-05-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by the inability to control drug use when it results in negative consequences or conflicts with more adaptive goals. Our previous work showed that damage to the insula disrupted addiction to cigarette smoking-the first time that the insula was shown to be a critical neural substrate for addiction. Here, we review those findings, as well as more recent studies that corroborate and extend them, demonstrating the role of the insula in (1) incentive motivational processes that drive addictive behavior, (2) control processes that moderate or inhibit addictive behavior, and (3) interoceptive processes that represent bodily states associated with drug use. We then describe a theoretical framework that attempts to integrate these seemingly disparate findings. In this framework, the insula functions in the recall of interoceptive drug effects during craving and drug seeking under specific conditions where drug taking is perceived as risky and/or where there is conflict between drug taking and more adaptive goals. We describe this framework in an evolutionary context and discuss its implications for understanding the mechanisms of behavior change in addiction treatments. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. DC-magnetron sputtering of ZnO:Al films on (00.1)Al2O3 substrates from slip-casting sintered ceramic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miccoli, I.; Spampinato, R.; Marzo, F.; Prete, P.; Lovergine, N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ZnO:Al was DC-sputtered on sapphire >350 °C by slip-casting sintered AZO target. • Films are highly (00.1)-oriented, smooth and transparent in the NIR–visible range. • Films growth rate decreases with temperature, while their grain size increases. • A high temperature reduction for sticking coefficients of impinging species is proved. • We prove that Thornton model does not apply to high-temperature DC-sputtered ZnO. - Abstract: High (>350 °C) temperature DC-sputtering deposition of ZnO:Al thin films onto single-crystal (00.1) oriented Al 2 O 3 (sapphire) substrates is reported, using a ultrahigh-density, low-resistivity and low-cost composite ceramic target produced by slip-casting (pressureless) sintering of ZnO–Al 2 O 3 (AZO) powders. The original combination of high-angle θ–2θ (Bragg–Brentano geometry) X-ray diffraction with low angle θ–2θ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) techniques allows us to define the AZO target composition and investigate the structural properties and surface/interface roughness of as-sputtered ZnO:Al films; besides, the growth dynamics of ZnO:Al is unambiguously determined. The target turned out composed of the sole wurtzite ZnO and spinel ZnAl 2 O 4 phases. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed highly (00.1)-oriented (epitaxial) ZnO:Al films, the material mean crystallite size being in the 13–20 nm range and increasing with temperature between 350 °C and 450 °C, while the film growth rate (determined via XRR measurements) decreases appreciably. XRR spectra also allowed to determine rms surface roughness <1 nm for present films and showed ZnO:Al density changes by only a few percent between 350 °C and 450 °C. The latter result disproves the often-adopted Thornton model for the description of the sputter-grown ZnO films and instead points out toward a reduction of the sticking coefficients of impinging species, as the main origin of film growth rate and grain size dependence with temperature. Zn

  9. Silver endotaxy in silicon under various ambient conditions and their use as surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juluri, R.R.; Ghosh, A.; Bhukta, A.; Sathyavathi, R.; Satyam, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    Search for reliable, robust and efficient substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) leads to the growth of various shapes and nanostructures of noble metals, and in particular, Ag nanostructures for this purpose. Coherently embedded (also known as endotaxial) Ag nanostructures in silicon substrates can be made robust and reusable SERS substrates. In this paper, we show the possibility of the growth of Ag endotaxial structures in Si crystal during Ar and low-vacuum annealing conditions while this is absent in O 2 and ultra high vacuum (UHV) annealing conditions and along with their respective use as SERS substrates. Systems annealed under air-annealing and low-vacuum conditions were found to show larger enhancement factors (typically ≈ 5 × 10 5 in SERS measurement for 0.5 nM Crystal Violet (CV) molecule) while the systems prepared under UHV-annealing conditions (where no endotaxial Ag structures were formed) were found to be not effective as SERS substrates. Extensive electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry techniques were used to understand the structural aspects. - Highlights: • Various aspects on the growth of endotaxial Ag nanostructures are presented. • Optimum amount of oxygen is necessary for the growth of endotaxial structures. • Reaction of oxygen with GeOx and SiOx plays a crucial role. • Ag nanostructures prepared under UHV conditions show low SERS activity • SERS enhancement is better for low-vacuum and argon annealing conditions

  10. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  11. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  12. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  13. Experimental investigation on hard turning using mixed ceramic insert under accelerated cooling environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanuj Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports on the application of accelerated cooling environment (ACE in hard turning of AISI D2 steel (55 ± 1HRC using mixed ceramic insert (Al2O3 + TiCN which is rarely being investigated and to address the major problems of brittle fracture of tool tip that arises through cutting forces and friction at tool-work and chip-tool interface. In spraying process, some portion of spraying coolant vaporize due to heat when it reaches to cutting zone where as remaining portion of coolant easily penetrate in cutting zone through capillary action and reduces friction as well as heat in cutting zone. Abrasion and chipping are noticed to be dominant wear mechanism. Cutting speed and depth of cut are significant for flank wear as well as cutting temperature whereas feed is significant for average surface roughness. Serrated chips have been identified at higher cutting speed and higher feeds. Optimal parametric combination is found to be d1-f1-v2 (0.1mm-0.04 m/min-108 m/min and tool life and machining cost per part are 70 minutes and Rs 76.76 respectively. Investigation shows the worthy of application of ACE in hard turning in industrial sectors ecologically and economically. Empirical models reveal statistically significance due to higher coefficient of correlations.

  14. Modeling of material properties of piezoelectric ceramics taking into account damage development under static compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, M; Nishikata, T; Okayasu, M

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out static compression tests in the poling direction for PZT ceramics and evaluated the material properties by measuring the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and electrostatic capacity at regular intervals. Then the variation in the material properties up to fracture was clarified. Also, the development of internal damage was also clarified quantitatively by evaluating a damage variable on the basis of the continuum damage mechanics. The damage variable was calculated from the ratio of the elastic coefficient to its initial value. In the present paper, the development of internal damage was formulated as an evolution equation of the damage variable. In the formulation, a threshold stress leading to the onset of damage was considered. Moreover, the variation in material properties was related to the damage variable and formulated as material functions of the damage variable. The development of internal damage and the variation in material properties were simulated by the equations proposed in the present paper and the validity of the equations was verified by comparing the predictions with experimental results. (paper)

  15. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  16. Neural substrates underlying the tendency to accept anger-infused ultimatum offers during dynamic social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilam, Gadi; Lin, Tamar; Raz, Gal; Azrielant, Shir; Fruchter, Eyal; Ariely, Dan; Hendler, Talma

    2015-10-15

    In managing our way through interpersonal conflict, anger might be crucial in determining whether the dispute escalates to aggressive behaviors or resolves cooperatively. The Ultimatum Game (UG) is a social decision-making paradigm that provides a framework for studying interpersonal conflict over division of monetary resources. Unfair monetary UG-offers elicit anger and while accepting them engages regulatory processes, rejecting them is regarded as an aggressive retribution. Ventro-medial prefrontal-cortex (vmPFC) activity has been shown to relate to idiosyncratic tendencies in accepting unfair offers possibly through its role in emotion regulation. Nevertheless, standard UG paradigms lack fundamental aspects of real-life social interactions in which one reacts to other people in a response contingent fashion. To uncover the neural substrates underlying the tendency to accept anger-infused ultimatum offers during dynamic social interactions, we incorporated on-line verbal negotiations with an obnoxious partner in a repeated-UG during fMRI scanning. We hypothesized that vmPFC activity will differentiate between individuals with high or low monetary gains accumulated throughout the game and reflect a divergence in the associated emotional experience. We found that as individuals gained more money, they reported less anger but also more positive feelings and had slower sympathetic response. In addition, high-gain individuals had increased vmPFC activity, but also decreased brainstem activity, which possibly reflected the locus coeruleus. During the more angering unfair offers, these individuals had increased dorsal-posterior Insula (dpI) activity which functionally coupled to the medial-thalamus (mT). Finally, both vmPFC activity and dpI-mT connectivity contributed to increased gain, possibly by modulating the ongoing subjective emotional experience. These ecologically valid findings point towards a neural mechanism that might nurture pro-social interactions by

  17. Ceramic component with reinforced protection against radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, J.; Laville, H.; Le Gal, P.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic components hardened against radiations are claimed (for example capacitors or ceramic substrates for semiconductors). They are prepared with a sintered ceramic containing a high proportion of heavy atoms (for instance barium titanate and a bismuth salt) provided with a glass layer containing a high proportion of light atoms. The two materials are joined by vitrification producing a diffusion zone at the interface [fr

  18. Micro-CT evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic ceramic brackets bonded with different bonding techniques and adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Fırat; Ersöz, Mustafa; Öztürk, Seyit Ahmet; Hatunoğlu, Erdem; Malkoç, Sıddık

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage under orthodontic ceramic brackets bonded with direct and different indirect bonding techniques and adhesives using micro-computed tomography. A total of 30 human maxillary premolars were randomly separated into five groups with six teeth in each group. In group I, teeth were bonded directly with Transbond XT (3M Unitek). In group II, group III, group IV, and group V, teeth were bonded through an indirect technique with Custom I.Q. (Reliance Orthodontic Products), Sondhi Rapid-Set (3M Unitek), RMbond (RMO), and Transbond IDB (3M Unitek), respectively, following the manufacturer's instructions. Micro-CT system model 1172 of Skyscan (Kontich, Belgium) was used to scan all samples. NRecon (Skyscan) version 1.6, CT-Analyser V.1.11 (Skyscan), and TView (SkyScan, Bvba) software programs were used for microleakage evaluation. Microleakage values between the test groups were assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, while the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for within-group comparisons. The level of significance was set at P Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance test, there were no significant differences among the tested groups, with regard to volume and percentage (microleakage/region of interest × 100) of microleakage values (P test showed that coronal microleakage volume and percentage values significantly differed for RMbond and Transbond IDB groups. In the study, only ceramic brackets were used and microleakage into mini gaps did not show up on the micro-CT image because 50% silver nitrate solution could not penetrate into mini gaps which are smaller than silver nitrate particles. Use of direct and indirect bonding techniques with different adhesives did not significantly affect the amount of microleakage. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Reliability of Ceramic Column Grid Array Interconnect Packages Under Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes advanced ceramic column grid array (CCGA) packaging interconnects technology test objects that were subjected to extreme temperature thermal cycles. CCGA interconnect electronic package printed wiring boards (PWBs) of polyimide were assembled, inspected nondestructively, and, subsequently, subjected to ex - treme-temperature thermal cycling to assess reliability for future deep-space, short- and long-term, extreme-temperature missions. The test hardware consisted of two CCGA717 packages with each package divided into four daisy-chained sections, for a total of eight daisy chains to be monitored. The package is 33 33 mm with a 27 27 array of 80%/20% Pb/Sn columns on a 1.27-mm pitch. The change in resistance of the daisy-chained CCGA interconnects was measured as a function of the increasing number of thermal cycles. Several catastrophic failures were observed after 137 extreme-temperature thermal cycles, as per electrical resistance measurements, and then the tests were continued through 1,058 thermal cycles to corroborate and understand the test results. X-ray and optical inspection have been made after thermal cycling. Optical inspections were also conducted on the CCGA vs. thermal cycles. The optical inspections were conclusive; the x-ray images were not. Process qualification and assembly is required to optimize the CCGA assembly, which is very clear from the x-rays. Six daisy chains were open out of seven daisy chains, as per experimental test data reported. The daisy chains are open during the cold cycle, and then recover during the hot cycle, though some of them also opened during the hot thermal cycle..

  20. Mechanical integrity of thin inorganic coatings on polymer substrates under quasi-static, thermal and fatigue loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leterrier, Y.; Mottet, A.; Bouquet, N.; Gillieron, D.; Dumont, P.; Pinyol, A.; Lalande, L.; Waller, J.H.; Manson, J.-A.E.

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between residual stress state, cohesive and adhesive properties of coatings on substrates is reviewed in this article. Attention is paid to thin inorganic coatings on polymers, characterized by a very high hygro-thermo-mechanical contrast between the brittle and stiff coating and the compliant and soft substrate. An approach to determine the intrinsic, thermal and hygroscopic contributions to the coating residual stress is detailed. The critical strain for coating failure, coating toughness and coating/substrate interface shear strength are derived from the analysis of progressive coating cracking under strain. Electro-fragmentation and electro-fatigue tests in situ in a microscope are described. These methods enable reproducing the thermo-mechanical loads present during processing and service life, hence identifying and modeling the critical conditions for failure. Several case studies relevant to food and pharmaceutical packaging, flexible electronics and thin film photovoltaic devices are discussed to illustrate the benefits and limits of the present methods and models.

  1. Light intensity and production parameters of phytocenoses cultivated on soil-like substrate under controlled [correction of controled] environment conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, A A; Ushakova, S A; Gribovskaya, I A; Tirranen, L S; Manukovsky, N S; Zolotukhin, I G; Karnachuk, R A; Gros, J B; Lasseur, Ch

    2003-01-01

    To increase the degree of closure of biological life support systems of a new generation, we used vermicomposting to involve inedible phytomass in the intra-system mass exchange. The resulting product was a soil-like substrate, which was quite suitable for growing plants (Manukovsky et al. 1996, 1997). However, the soil like substrate can be regarded as a candidate for inclusion in a system only after a comprehensive examination of its physical, chemical, and other characteristics. An important criterion is the ability of the soil-like substrate to supply the necessary mineral elements to the photosynthesizing component under the chosen cultivation conditions. Thus, the purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of enhancing the production activity of wheat and radish crops by varying the intensity of photosynthetically active radiation, without decreasing the harvest index. The increase of light intensity from 920 to 1150 micromoles m-2 s-1 decreased the intensity of apparent photosynthesis of the wheat crops and slightly increased the apparent photosynthesis of the radish crops The maximum total and grain productivity (kg/m2) of the wheat crops was attained at the irradiance of 920 micromoles m-2 s-1. Light intensity of 1150 micromoles m-2 s-1 decreased the productivity of wheat plants and had no significant effect on the productivity of the radish crops (kg/m2) as compared to 920 micromoles m-2 s-1. The qualitative and quantitative composition of microflora of the watering solution and substrate was determined by the condition of plants, developmental phase and light intensity. By the end of wheat growth under 1150 micromoles m-2 s-1 the numbers of bacteria of the coliform family and phytopathogenic bacteria in the watering solution and substrate were an order of magnitude larger than under other illumination conditions. The obtained data suggest that the cultivation of plants in a life support system on soil-like substrate from composts has a number of

  2. Designing the fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic composites under Hertzian stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kee Sung; Jang, Kyung Soon; Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae Woo; Han, In Sub; Woo, Sang Kuk

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Optimum fiber volume ratios in the SiC/SiC composite layers were designed under Hertzian stress. → FEM analysis and spherical indentation experiments were undertaken. → Boron nitride-pyrocarbon double coatings on the SiC fiber were effective. → Fiber volume ratio should be designed against flexural stress. -- Abstract: Finite element method (FEM) analysis and experimental studies are undertaken on the design of the fiber volume ratio in silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC composites under indentation contact stresses. Boron nitride (BN)/Pyrocarbon (PyC) are selected as the coating materials for the SiC fiber. Various SiC matrix/coating/fiber/coating/matrix structures are modeled by introducing a woven fiber layer in the SiC matrix. Especially, this study attempts to find the optimum fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramics under Hertzian stress. The analysis is performed by changing the fiber type, fiber volume ratio, coating material, number of coating layers, and stacking sequence of the coating layers. The variation in the stress for composites in relation to the fiber volume ratio in the contact axial or radial direction is also analyzed. The same structures are fabricated experimentally by a hot process, and the mechanical behaviors regarding the load-displacement are evaluated using the Hertzian indentation method. Various SiC matrix/coating/fiber/coating/matrix structures are fabricated, and mechanical characterization is performed by changing the coating layer, according to the introduction (or omission) of the coating layer, and the number of woven fiber mats. The results show that the damage mode changes from Hertzian stress to flexural stress as the fiber volume ratio increases in composites because of the decreased matrix volume fraction, which intensifies the radial crack damage. The result significantly indicates that the optimum fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramics should be designed for

  3. A Piezoelectric PZT Ceramic Mulitlayer Stack for Energy Harvesting Under Dynamic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Siochi, Emilie J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Zuo, Lei; Zhou, Wanlu; Tang, Xiudong; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting transducers (PEHTs) are commonly used in motion/vibration energy scavenging devices. To date, most researchers have focused on energy harvesting at narrow bandwidths around the mechanical resonance frequency, and most piezoelectric harvesting devices reported in the literature have very low effective piezoelectric coefficient (d(sub eff)) (PZT ceramic multilayer stack (PZT-Stack) with high effective piezoelectric coefficient for high-performance PEHTs. The PZT-Stack is composed of 300 layers of 0.1 mm thick PZT plates, with overall dimensions of 32.4 mm X 7.0 mm X 7.0 mm. Experiments were carried out with dynamic forces in a broad bandwidth ranging from 0.5 Hz to 25 kHz. The measured results show that the effective piezoelectric coefficient of the PZT-stack is about 1 X 10(exp 5) pC/N at off-resonance frequencies and 1.39 X 10(exp 6) pC/N at resonance, which is order of magnitude larger than that of traditional PEHTs. The effective piezoelectric coefficients (d(sub eff)) do not change significantly with applied dynamic forces having root mean square (RMS) values ranging from 1 N to 40 N. In resonance mode, 231 mW of electrical power was harvested at 2479 Hz with a dynamic force of 11.6 N(sub rms), and 7.6 mW of electrical power was generated at a frequency of 2114 Hz with 1 N(sub rms) dynamic force. In off-resonance mode, an electrical power of 18.7 mW was obtained at 680 Hz with a 40 N(sub rms) dynamic force. A theoretical model of energy harvesting for the PZT-Stack is established. The modeled results matched well with experimental measurements. This study demonstrated that high effective piezoelectric coefficient structures enable PEHTs to harvest more electrical energy from mechanical vibrations or motions, suggesting an effective design for high-performance low-footprint PEHTs with potential applications in military, aerospace, and portable electronics. In addition, this study provides a route for using piezoelectric multilayer

  4. A Piezoelectric PZT Ceramic Mulitlayer Stack for Energy Harvesting Under Dynamic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Siochi, Emilie J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Zuo, Lei; Zhou, Wanlu; Tang, Xiudong; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting transducers (PEHTs) are commonly used in motion/vibration energy scavenging devices. To date, most researchers have focused on energy harvesting at narrow bandwidths around the mechanical resonance frequency, and most piezoelectric harvesting devices reported in the literature have very low effective piezoelectric coefficient (d(sub eff)) (coefficients of about 100 pC/N. The level of harvested electrical power for CBPEHTs is on the order of microW even at resonance mode. In order to harvest more electrical energy across broader bandwidth, high effective piezoelectric coefficient structures are needed. In this study, we investigate a "33" longitudinal mode, piezoelectric PZT ceramic multilayer stack (PZT-Stack) with high effective piezoelectric coefficient for high-performance PEHTs. The PZT-Stack is composed of 300 layers of 0.1 mm thick PZT plates, with overall dimensions of 32.4 mm X 7.0 mm X 7.0 mm. Experiments were carried out with dynamic forces in a broad bandwidth ranging from 0.5 Hz to 25 kHz. The measured results show that the effective piezoelectric coefficient of the PZT-stack is about 1 X 10(exp 5) pC/N at off-resonance frequencies and 1.39 X 10(exp 6) pC/N at resonance, which is order of magnitude larger than that of traditional PEHTs. The effective piezoelectric coefficients (d(sub eff)) do not change significantly with applied dynamic forces having root mean square (RMS) values ranging from 1 N to 40 N. In resonance mode, 231 mW of electrical power was harvested at 2479 Hz with a dynamic force of 11.6 N(sub rms), and 7.6 mW of electrical power was generated at a frequency of 2114 Hz with 1 N(sub rms) dynamic force. In off-resonance mode, an electrical power of 18.7 mW was obtained at 680 Hz with a 40 N(sub rms) dynamic force. A theoretical model of energy harvesting for the PZT-Stack is established. The modeled results matched well with experimental measurements. This study demonstrated that high effective

  5. Neural substrates underlying stimulation-enhanced motor skill learning after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Stéphanie; Dricot, Laurence; Laloux, Patrice; Gradkowski, Wojciech; Desfontaines, Philippe; Evrard, Frédéric; Peeters, André; Jamart, Jacques; Vandermeeren, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Motor skill learning is one of the key components of motor function recovery after stroke, especially recovery driven by neurorehabilitation. Transcranial direct current stimulation can enhance neurorehabilitation and motor skill learning in stroke patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the retention of stimulation-enhanced motor skill learning involving a paretic upper limb have not been resolved. These neural substrates were explored by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Nineteen chronic hemiparetic stroke patients participated in a double-blind, cross-over randomized, sham-controlled experiment with two series. Each series consisted of two sessions: (i) an intervention session during which dual transcranial direct current stimulation or sham was applied during motor skill learning with the paretic upper limb; and (ii) an imaging session 1 week later, during which the patients performed the learned motor skill. The motor skill learning task, called the 'circuit game', involves a speed/accuracy trade-off and consists of moving a pointer controlled by a computer mouse along a complex circuit as quickly and accurately as possible. Relative to the sham series, dual transcranial direct current stimulation applied bilaterally over the primary motor cortex during motor skill learning with the paretic upper limb resulted in (i) enhanced online motor skill learning; (ii) enhanced 1-week retention; and (iii) superior transfer of performance improvement to an untrained task. The 1-week retention's enhancement driven by the intervention was associated with a trend towards normalization of the brain activation pattern during performance of the learned motor skill relative to the sham series. A similar trend towards normalization relative to sham was observed during performance of a simple, untrained task without a speed/accuracy constraint, despite a lack of behavioural difference between the dual transcranial direct current stimulation and sham

  6. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  7. Modeling cell-substrate de-adhesion dynamics under fluid shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Renu; Rani, Garima; Menon, Gautam I.; Pullarkat, Pramod A.

    2018-07-01

    Changes in cell-substrate adhesion are believed to signal the onset of cancer metastasis, but such changes must be quantified against background levels of intrinsic heterogeneity between cells. Variations in cell-substrate adhesion strengths can be probed through biophysical measurements of cell detachment from substrates upon the application of an external force. Here, we investigate, theoretically and experimentally, the detachment of cells adhered to substrates when these cells are subjected to fluid shear. We present a theoretical framework within which we calculate the fraction of detached cells as a function of shear stress for fast ramps as well as the decay in this fraction at fixed shear stress as a function of time. Using HEK and 3T3 fibroblast cells as experimental model systems, we extract characteristic force scales for cell adhesion as well as characteristic detachment times. We estimate force-scales of  ∼500 pN associated to a single focal contact, and characteristic time-scales of s representing cell-spread-area dependent mean first passage times to the detached state at intermediate values of the shear stress. Variations in adhesion across cell types are especially prominent when cell detachment is probed by applying a time-varying shear stress. These methods can be applied to characterizing changes in cell adhesion in a variety of contexts, including metastasis.

  8. Contribution of exogenous substrates to acetyl coenzyme A: Measurement by 13C NMR under non-steady-state conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malloy, C.R.; Jeffrey, F.M.H.; Thompson, J.R.; Sherry, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for the rapid determination of substrate selection in a manner that is not restricted to conditions of metabolic and isotopic steady state. Competition between several substrates can be assessed directly and continuously in a single experiment, allowing the effect of interventions to be studied. It is shown that a single proton-decoupled 13 C NMR spectrum of glutamate provides a direct measure of the contribution of exogenous 13 C-labeled substrates to acetyl-CoA without measurement of oxygen consumption and that steady-state conditions need not apply. Two sets of experiments were performed: one in which a metabolic steady state but a non-steady-state 13 C distribution was achieved and another in which both metabolism and labeling were not at steady state. In the first group, isolated rat hearts were supplied with [1,2- 13 C]acetate, [3- 13 C]lactate, and unlabeled glucose. 13 C NMR spectra of extracts from hearts perfused under identical conditions for 5 or 30 min were compared. In spite of significant differences in the spectra, the measured contributions of acetate, lactate, and unlabeled sources to acetyl-CoA were the same. In the second set of experiments, the same group of labeled substrates was used in a regional ischemia model in isolated rabbit hearts to show regional differences in substrate utilization under both metabolic and isotopic non steady state. The time resolution of these measurements may not be limited by technical contraints but by the rate of carbon flux in the citric acid cycle. Although this technique is demonstrated for the heart, it is applicable to all tissues

  9. Experimental study on surface wrinkling of silicon monoxide film on compliant substrate under thermally induced loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanwei; Kong, Yingxiao; Jiang, Wenchong; Wang, Zhiyong; Li, Linan; Wang, Shibin

    2017-06-01

    The wrinkling of a silicon monoxide thin film on a compliant poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrate structure was experimentally investigated in this study. The self-expansion effect of PDMS during film deposition was utilized to impose a pretensile strain on the structure through a specially made fixture. A laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) system with an in situ heating stage was employed for the real-time measurement. The Young’s modulus of the silicon monoxide thin film as well as the PDMS substrate was measured on the basis of the elasticity theory. Moreover, the effects of temperature variations on geometric parameters in the postbuckling state, such as wavelength and amplitude, were analyzed. It was proved that wavelength is relatively immune to thermal loads, while amplitude is much more sensitive.

  10. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications.

  11. Adherent diamond film deposited on Cu substrate by carbon transport from nanodiamond buried under Pt interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuezhang; Wei Qiuping; Yu Zhiming; Yang Taiming; Zhai Hao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adherent polycrystalline diamond films were grown on copper substrate by carbon transport. ► The nucleation density was increased to 10 11 cm −2 . ► Diamond films were a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. ► Diamond nucleation was based by carbon dissolving from UDDs to Pt interlayer and formation of sp 3 -bonded diamond clusters at the Pt surface. - Abstract: Diamond film deposited on Cu suffered from poor adhesion mainly due to the large mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients and the lack of affinity between carbon and Cu. Enhancing diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond through a Pt ultrathin interlayer, adherent diamond film was then deposited on Cu substrate without distinctly metallic interlayer. This novel nucleation mechanism increased diamond nucleation density to 10 11 cm −2 , and developed diamond film with a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Diamond film was characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscope, respectively. The composition of diamond film/Cu substrate interface was examined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The adhesion of diamond film was evaluated by indentation test. Those results show that a Pt ultrathin interlayer provides stronger chemically bonded interfaces and improve film adhesion.

  12. Adherent diamond film deposited on Cu substrate by carbon transport from nanodiamond buried under Pt interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xuezhang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Wei Qiuping, E-mail: qiupwei@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Yu Zhiming, E-mail: zhiming@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Yang Taiming; Zhai Hao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adherent polycrystalline diamond films were grown on copper substrate by carbon transport. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nucleation density was increased to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diamond films were a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diamond nucleation was based by carbon dissolving from UDDs to Pt interlayer and formation of sp{sup 3}-bonded diamond clusters at the Pt surface. - Abstract: Diamond film deposited on Cu suffered from poor adhesion mainly due to the large mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients and the lack of affinity between carbon and Cu. Enhancing diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond through a Pt ultrathin interlayer, adherent diamond film was then deposited on Cu substrate without distinctly metallic interlayer. This novel nucleation mechanism increased diamond nucleation density to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, and developed diamond film with a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Diamond film was characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscope, respectively. The composition of diamond film/Cu substrate interface was examined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The adhesion of diamond film was evaluated by indentation test. Those results show that a Pt ultrathin interlayer provides stronger chemically bonded interfaces and improve film adhesion.

  13. High Ms Fe16N2 thin film with Ag under layer on GaAs substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    (001) textured Fe16N2 thin film with Ag under layer is successfully grown on GaAs substrate using a facing target sputtering (FTS) system. After post annealing, chemically ordered Fe16N2 phase is formed and detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). High saturation magnetization (Ms) is measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). In comparison with Fe16N2 with Ag under layer on MgO substrate and Fe16N2 with Fe under layer on GaAs substrate, the current layer structure shows a higher Ms value, with a magnetically softer feature in contrast to the above cases. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is performed to characterize the binding energy of N atoms. To verify the role of strain that the FeN layer experiences in the above three structures, Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) is conducted to reveal a large in-plane lattice constant due to the in-plane biaxial tensile strain. INTRODUCTION

  14. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  15. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing atmosphere by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel. Corrosion research under chlorine gas condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Masayuki; Hanada, Keiji; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Aose, Shinichi; Kato, Toshihiro

    2002-12-01

    Pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts (RIAR process) has been recently developed for spent nuclear oxide fuel and discussed in feasibility study. It is required to improve the corrosion resistance of equipments such as electrolyzer because the process is operated in severe corrosion environment. In this study, the corrosion resistance of ceramic materials was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas condition. And further consideration about the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides were evaluated in molten salt. The result of thermodynamic calculation shows most of ceramic oxides have good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride, however the standard Gibb's free energies with carbon have negative value. On the other hand, eleven kinds of ceramic materials were examined by corrosion test, then silicon nitride, mullite and cordierite have a good corrosion resistance less than 0.1 mm/y. Cracks were not observed on the materials and flexural strength did not reduce remarkably after 480 hours test in molten salt with Cl 2 -O 2 bubbling. In conclusion, these three ceramic materials are most applicable materials for the pyrochemical reprocessing process with chlorine gas condition. (author)

  16. Effect of substrate mis-orientation on GaN thin films grown by MOCVD under different carrier gas condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong-Woo; Suzuki, Toshimasa [Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro, Saitama, 345-8501 (Japan); Aida, Hideo [NAMIKI Precision Jewel Co. Ltd., 3-8-22 Shinden, Adachi-ku, Tokyo, 123-8511 (Japan)

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the effect of a slight mis-orientation angle on surface and crystal quality of GaN thin films grown under different carrier gas conditions. Two types of carrier gas conditions were applied to the growth. One was pure H{sub 2} and the other was mixed N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}. As the result, we found dependence of surface and crystal quality of GaN thin films on the substrate mis-orientation angle, and they indicated almost the same tendency under both growth conditions. Therefore, it was confirmed that mis-orientation angle of sapphire substrate was one of the most critical factors for GaN thin films. Then, the effect of the additional N{sub 2} into the conventional H{sub 2} carrier gas was studied, and we found that the conversion of carrier gas from the conventional H{sub 2} to N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixture was effective against degradation of GaN crystallinity at any mis-orientation angle. Considering that the crystal quality of GaN thin films became insensitive to mis-orientation angle as the condition became more suitable for GaN growth, the optimal substrate mis-orientation angle was consequently decided to be approximately 0.15 from the morphological aspect. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. THE THICKNESS DEPENDENCE OF OXYGEN PERMEABILITY IN SOL-GEL DERIVED CGO-COFE2O4 THIN FILMS ON POROUS CERAMIC SUBSTRATES: A SPUTTERED BLOCKING LAYER FOR THICKNESS CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K

    2009-01-08

    Mixed conductive oxides are a topic of interest for applications in oxygen separation membranes as well as use in producing hydrogen fuel through the partial oxidation of methane. The oxygen flux through the membrane is governed both by the oxygen ionic conductivity as well as the material's electronic conductivity; composite membranes like Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}} (CGO)-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) use gadolinium doped ceria oxides as the ionic conducting material combined with cobalt iron spinel which serves as the electronic conductor. In this study we employ {approx} 50 nm sputtered CeO{sub 2} layers on the surface of porous CGO ceramic substrates which serve as solution 'blocking' layers during the thin film fabrication process facilitating the control of film thickness. Films with thickness of {approx} 2 and 4 microns were prepared by depositing 40 and 95 separate sol-gel layers respectively. Oxygen flux measurements indicated that the permeation increased with decreasing membrane thickness; thin film membrane with thickness on the micron level showed flux values an order of magnitude greater (0.03 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2} s) at 800 C as compared to 1mm thick bulk ceramic membranes (0.003 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2}).

  18. Chitooligomers preparation by chitosanase produced under solid state fermentation using shrimp by-products as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidheesh, T; Pal, Gaurav Kumar; Suresh, P V

    2015-05-05

    Solid state fermentation (SSF) conditions were statistically optimized for the production of chitosanase by Purpureocillium lilacinum CFRNT12 using shrimp by-products as substrate. Central composite design and response surface methodology were applied to evaluate the effect of variables and their optimization. Incubation temperature, incubation time, concentration of inoculum and yeast extract were found to influence the chitosanase production significantly. The R(2) value of 0.94 indicates the aptness of the model. The level of variables for optimal production of chitosanase was 32 ± 1°C temperature, 96 h incubation, 10.5% (w/v) inoculum, 1.05% (w/w) yeast extract and 65% (w/w) moisture content. The chitosanase production was found to increase from 2.34 ± 0.07 to 41.78 ± 0.73 units/g initial dry substrate after optimization. The crude chitosanase produced 4.43 mM of chitooligomers as exclusive end product from colloidal chitosan hydrolysis. These results indicate the potential of P. lilacinum CFRNT12 for the chitosanase production employing cost effective SSF using shrimp by-products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gold Nanoparticles on Functionalized Silicon Substrate under Coulomb Blockade Regime: An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchery, Olivier; Caillard, Louis; Dollfus, Philippe; Chabal, Yves J

    2018-01-18

    Single charge electronics offer a way for disruptive technology in nanoelectronics. Coulomb blockade is a realistic way for controlling the electric current through a device with the accuracy of one electron. In such devices the current exhibits a step-like increase upon bias which reflects the discrete nature of the fundamental charge. We have assembled a double tunnel junction on an oxide-free silicon substrate that exhibits Coulomb staircase characteristics using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as Coulomb islands. The first tunnel junction is an insulating layer made of a grafted organic monolayer (GOM) developed for this purpose. The GOM also serves for attaching AuNPs covalently. The second tunnel junction is made by the tip of an STM. We show that this device exhibits reproducible Coulomb blockade I-V curves at 40 K in vacuum. We also show that depending on the doping of the silicon substrate, the whole Coulomb staircase can be adjusted. We have developed a simulation approach based on the orthodox theory that was completed by calculating the bias dependent tunnel barriers and by including an accurate calculation of the band bending. This model accounts for the experimental data and the doping dependence of Coulomb oscillations. This study opens new perspectives toward designing new kind of single electron transistors (SET) based on this dependence of the Coulomb staircase with the charge carrier concentration.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor instability under curved substrates: An optimal transient growth analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, Gioele; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, François

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the stability of thin viscous films coated on the inside of a horizontal cylindrical substrate. In such a case, gravity acts both as a stabilizing force through the progressive drainage of the film and as a destabilizing force prone to form droplets via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The drainage solution, derived from lubrication equations, is found asymptotically stable with respect to infinitesimally small perturbations, although in reality, droplets often form. To resolve this paradox, we perform an optimal transient growth analysis for the first-order perturbations of the liquid's interface, generalizing the results of Trinh et al. [Phys. Fluids 26, 051704 (2014), 10.1063/1.4876476]. We find that the system displays a linear transient growth potential that gives rise to two different scenarios depending on the value of the Bond number (prescribing the relative importance of gravity and surface tension forces). At low Bond numbers, the optimal perturbation of the interface does not generate droplets. In contrast, for higher Bond numbers, perturbations on the upper hemicircle yield gains large enough to potentially form droplets. The gain increases exponentially with the Bond number. In particular, depending on the amplitude of the initial perturbation, we find a critical Bond number above which the short-time linear growth is sufficient to trigger the nonlinear effects required to form dripping droplets. We conclude that the transition to droplets detaching from the substrate is noise and perturbation dependent.

  1. Monolayer Boron Nitride Substrate Interactions with Graphene Under In-Plane and Perpendicular Strains: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2018-04-01

    Effects of strain on the electronic and optical properties of graphene on monolayer boron nitride (BN) substrate are investigated using first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. Strain-free graphene/BN has a small band gap of 97 meV at the K point. The magnitude of band gap increases with in-plane biaxial strain while it decreases with the perpendicular uniaxial strain. The ɛ2 (ω ) spectrum of graphene/BN bilayer for parallel polarization shows red and blue shifts by applying the in-plane tensile and compressive strains, respectively. Also the positions of peaks in the ɛ2 (ω ) spectrum are not significantly changed under perpendicular strain. The calculated results indicate that graphene on the BN substrate has great potential in microelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  2. Fatigue crack propagation under combined cyclic mechanical loading and electric field in piezoelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakihara, Kaori; Tanaka, Keisuke; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyoshi; Mukai, Hirokatsu

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation tests of PZT specimens were performed under cyclic four-point bending with and without superposition of electric fields. The specimens were poled in the longitudinal direction (PL specimens) perpendicular to the crack plane. The crack propagation rate for the case of open circuit was faster than that for the case of short circuit. The application of a negative or positive electric field parallel to the poling direction accelerated the crack propagation rate, and the amount of acceleration was larger for the case of the negative field. The change of the crack propagation rate with crack extension can be divided into three regions. In the region I, the crack propagation rate decreases with increasing crack length, and then turn to increase in the region III. In the region II, the propagation rate is nearly constant. The mechanisms of fatigue crack propagation were correlated to domain switching near the crack tip. The grain boundary fracture was predominant in the low-rate region, while transgranular fracture became abundant on the unstable fracture surface. (author)

  3. Cavitation damage of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.I.; Marinin, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation of ceramic material damage under the effect of cavitation field on their surface, formed in water under the face of exponential concentrator, connected with ultrasonic generator UZY-3-0.4. Amplitude of vibrations of concentrator face (30+-2)x10 -6 m, frequency-21 kHz. It was established that ceramics resistance to cavitation effect correlated with the product of critical of stress intensity factor and material hardness

  4. Requirements of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae,Y 10 for Bioconversion of Lignocellulose Substrates to Ethanol under Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rady, A.H.; Younis, N.A.; Sidkey, N.M.; Ouda, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Ethanol production increased gradually with increasing the incubation period to a maximum value at 72 hrs for rice straw, bagasse and CHW (Cellulosic hospital wastes) under simultaneous saccharification and fermentation technique (SSF). bagasse was the best substrate for maximum production . maximum Values of ethanol were recorded when crude cellulses were 1.79, 0.597 and 1.19 (FPU /ml fermentation medium) for substrates respectively. the optimum inoculum number of yeast was (9x10 8 free cells / ml for rice straw, (1.2x10 9 cells/ml) of immobilized and free yeast for bagasse and CHW respectively. Maximum yield was recorded with ph 5 at 30 degree C for the three substrates. Fe SO 4 .7H 2 O(0.05%) increased ethanol production from pretreated bagasse and CHW .L-Iysine increased the productivity for both bagasse and CHW. molasses (9 g/l) achieved the highest productivity from treated rice straw, while thiamine B1 (100 and 200 ppm) for treated bagsse and CHW respectively. Gamma rays at doses 0.05 and 0.8 K.Gy increased ethanol yield 7.5 and 2 % for treated bagasse and CHW respectively. Highest values recorded at 300,200 and 100 rpm. for treated rice straw, bagasse and CHW, respectively

  5. Quantum Dots obtained by LPE from under-saturated In-As liquid phases on GaAs substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz F E; Mishurnyi V; Gorbatchev A; De Anda F [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Av. Karacorum 1470, Col. Lomas 4a Sec., CP 78210San Luis PotosI (Mexico); Prutskij T, E-mail: fcoe_ov@prodigy.net.mx, E-mail: andre@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx [BUAP, Instituto de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 207, 72000, Puebla (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    In this work we inform about quantum dots (QD) obtained by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) on GaAs substrates from under-saturated In-As liquid phases. In our processes, we have prepared saturated In-rich liquid phases by dissolving an InAs wafer at one of the temperatures interval from 450 to 414 C for 60 minutes. The contact between In-As liquid phase and the GaAs substrate was always done at a constant temperature of 444 C for 5 seconds. Thus, the growth temperature for most of the samples was higher than the liquidus temperature. We think that the growth driving force is related to a transient process that occurs when the system is trying to reach equilibrium. Under the atom force microscope (AFM) we have observed nano-islands on the surfaces of the samples obtained from under-saturated liquid phases prepared at 438, 432 and 426 C. The 25 K photoluminescence spectrum shows a peak at a 1.33 eV, in addition to the GaAs related line.

  6. Mercury in wild mushrooms and underlying soil substrate from Koszalin, North-central Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Jedrusiak, Aneta; Lipka, Krzysztof; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Kawano, Masahide; Gucia, Magdalena; Brzostowski, Andrzej; Dadej, Monika

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations of total mercury were determined by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) in 221 caps and 221 stalks of 15 species of wild growing higher fungi/mushrooms and 221 samples of corresponding soil substrate collected in 1997-98 in Manowo County, near the city of Koszalin in North-central Poland. Mean mercury concentrations in caps and stalks of the mushroom species examined and soils varied between 30+/-31 and 920+/-280, 17+/-11 and 560+/-220, and 10+/-9 and 170+/-110 ng/g dry matter, respectively. Cap to stalk mercury concentration quotients were from 1.0+/-0.4 in poison pax (Paxillus involutus) to 2.8+/-0.7 in slippery jack (Suillus luteus). Brown cort (Cortinarius malicorius), fly agaric (Amanita muscaria), orange-brown ringless amanita (A. fulva), red-aspen bolete (Leccinum rufum) and mutagen milk cap (Lactarius necator) contained the highest concentrations of mercury both in caps and stalks, and mean concentrations varied between 600+/-750 and 920+/-280 and 370+/-470 and 560+/-220 ng/g dry matter, respectively. An estimate of daily intake of mercury from mushroom consumption indicated that the flesh of edible species of mushrooms may not pose hazards to human health even at a maximum consumption rate of 28 g/day. However, it should be noted that mercury intake from other foods will augment the daily intake rates. Species such as the sickener (Russula emetica), Geranium-scented russula (R. fellea) and poison pax (P. involutus) did not concentrate mercury as evidenced from the bioconcentration factors (BCFs: concentrations in mushroom/concentration in soil substrate), which were less than 1. Similarly, red-hot milk cap (L. rufus), rickstone funnel cap (Clitocybe geotropa) and European cow bolete (S. bovinus) were observed to be weak accumulators of mercury. Fly agaric (A. muscaria) accumulated great concentrations of mercury with BCFs reaching 73+/-42 and 38+/-22 in caps and stalks, respectively. Mercury BCFs of between 4.0+/-2.3 and 23

  7. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  8. Effect of substrate availability on nitrous oxide production by deammonification processes under anoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Yvonne; Beier, Maike; Rosenwinkel, Karl-Heinz

    2012-05-01

    Due to its high global warming potential, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions from wastewater treatment processes have recently received a high degree of attention. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of information regarding the microbiological processes leading to N(2)O production. In this study, two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors were operated with deammonification biomass to investigate the role of denitrification and the influence of substrate availability regarding N(2)O formation during the anoxic phase of deammonification. Three different operational phases were established: within the first phase conversion by anammox was favoured and after a transition phase, denitrification activity was promoted. Low nitrous oxide production was observed during stable operation aiming for anammox conversion. Pulsed inflow of the wastewater containing ammonium (NH(4)(+)) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) led to increased N(2)O production rates. Within the period of denitrification as dominating nitrogen conversion process, the nitrous oxide concentration level was higher during continuous inflow conditions, but the reaction to pulsed inflow was less pronounced. The results indicated that denitrification was responsible for N(2)O formation from the deammonification biomass. Operational settings to achieve suppression of denitrification processes to a large extend were deducted from the results of the experiments. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Anaerobic digestion of spent mushroom substrate under thermophilic conditions: performance and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zheng; Lin, Manhong; Fan, Jinlin; Chen, Yixuan; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Spent mushroom substrate (SMS) is the residue of edible mushroom production occurring in huge amounts. The SMS residue can be digested for biogas production in the mesophilic anaerobic digestion. In the present study, performance of batch thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) of SMS was investigated as well as the interconnected microbial population structure changes. The analyzed batch TAD process lasted for 12 days with the cumulative methane yields of 177.69 mL/g volatile solid (VS). Hydrolytic activities of soluble sugar, crude protein, and crude fat in SMS were conducted mainly in the initial phase, accompanied by the excessive accumulation of volatile fatty acids and low methane yield. Biogas production increased dramatically from days 4 to 6. The degradation rates of cellulose and hemicellulose were 47.53 and 55.08%, respectively. The high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons revealed that Proteobacteria (56.7%-62.8%) was the dominant phylum in different fermentative stages, which was highly specific compared with other anaerobic processes of lignocellulosic materials reported in the literature. Crenarchaeota was abundant in the archaea. The most dominant genera of archaea were retrieved as Methanothermobacter and Methanobacterium, but the latter decreased sharply with time. This study shows that TAD is a feasible method to handle the waste SMS.

  10. Organic matter composition and substrate diversity under elevated CO2 in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfaily, M. M.; Hess, N. J.; Koyama, A.; Evans, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about how rising atmospheric CO2 concentration will impact long-term plant biomass or the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) in arid ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the change in the molecular composition of SOM by high resolution mass spectrometry after 10 years exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility. Samples were collected from soil profiles from 0 to 1m in 0.2m increments under the dominant evergreen shrub (Larrea tridentata). The differences in the composition of SOM were more evident in soils close to the surface and consistent with higher bulk soil organic carbon (C) and total nitrogen (N) concentrations under elevated than ambient CO2, reflecting increased net productivity of shrubs under elevated CO2, which could be attributed to increased litter input from above-ground biomass and/or shallow roots, root exudation and/or microbial residues. This was further supported by the significant increase in the abundance of amino sugars-, protein- and carbohydrate-like compounds. These compounds are involved in diverse pathways ranging from sugars and amino-acid metabolism to lipid biosynthesis. This indicates increased activity and metabolism under elevated CO2 and suggests that elevated CO2 have altered microbial C use patterns, reflecting changes in the quality and quantity of soil C inputs. A significant increase in the mineral-bound soil organic C was also observed in the surface soils under elevated CO2. This was accompanied by increased microbial residues as identified by mass spectrometry that supports microbial lipid analysis, and reflecting accelerated microbial turnover under elevated CO2. Fungal neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFA) abundance doubled under elevated CO2. When provided with excess labile compounds, such as root exudates, and with limited supply of nutrients, fungi assimilate the excess labile C and store it as NLFA likely contributing to increased total N

  11. Behaviour of the hip joint endoprosthesis ceramic head with manufacturing inaccuracies under ISO 7206-5 loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuis, Vladimír; Janíček, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2003), s. 399-411 ISSN 1210-2717 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP101/01/P039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : micro-unevenness modelling * stress and failure probability analyses * Weibull weakest link theory Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  12. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    This work addresses the metal nanocluster growth process on prepatterned substrates, the development of atomistic simulation method with respect to an acceleration of the atomistic transition states, and the continuum model of the ion-beam inducing semiconductor surface pattern formation mechanism. Experimentally, highly ordered Ag nanocluster structures have been grown on pre-patterned amorphous SiO{sub 2} surfaces by oblique angle physical vapor deposition at room temperature. Despite the small undulation of the rippled surface, the stripe-like Ag nanoclusters are very pronounced, reproducible and well-separated. The first topic is the investigation of this growth process with a continuum theoretical approach to the surface gas condensation as well as an atomistic cluster growth model. The atomistic simulation model is a lattice-based kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) method using a combination of a simplified inter-atomic potential and experimental transition barriers taken from the literature. An effective transition event classification method is introduced which allows a boost factor of several thousand compared to a traditional KMC approach, thus allowing experimental time scales to be modeled. The simulation predicts a low sticking probability for the arriving atoms, millisecond order lifetimes for single Ag monomers and {approx}1 nm square surface migration ranges of Ag monomers. The simulations give excellent reproduction of the experimentally observed nanocluster growth patterns. The second topic specifies the acceleration scheme utilized in the metallic cluster growth model. Concerning the atomistic movements, a classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements

  13. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    This work addresses the metal nanocluster growth process on prepatterned substrates, the development of atomistic simulation method with respect to an acceleration of the atomistic transition states, and the continuum model of the ion-beam inducing semiconductor surface pattern formation mechanism. Experimentally, highly ordered Ag nanocluster structures have been grown on pre-patterned amorphous SiO{sub 2} surfaces by oblique angle physical vapor deposition at room temperature. Despite the small undulation of the rippled surface, the stripe-like Ag nanoclusters are very pronounced, reproducible and well-separated. The first topic is the investigation of this growth process with a continuum theoretical approach to the surface gas condensation as well as an atomistic cluster growth model. The atomistic simulation model is a lattice-based kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) method using a combination of a simplified inter-atomic potential and experimental transition barriers taken from the literature. An effective transition event classification method is introduced which allows a boost factor of several thousand compared to a traditional KMC approach, thus allowing experimental time scales to be modeled. The simulation predicts a low sticking probability for the arriving atoms, millisecond order lifetimes for single Ag monomers and {approx}1 nm square surface migration ranges of Ag monomers. The simulations give excellent reproduction of the experimentally observed nanocluster growth patterns. The second topic specifies the acceleration scheme utilized in the metallic cluster growth model. Concerning the atomistic movements, a classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements

  14. Neural substrates of cognitive control under the belief of getting neurofeedback training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eNinaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning to modulate one’s own brain activity is the fundament of neurofeedback (NF applications. Besides the neural networks directly involved in the generation and modulation of the neurophysiological parameter being specifically trained, more general determinants of NF efficacy such as self-referential processes and cognitive control have been frequently disregarded. Nonetheless, deeper insight into these cognitive mechanisms and their neuronal underpinnings sheds light on various open NF related questions concerning individual differences, brain-computer interface (BCI illiteracy as well as a more general model of NF learning. In this context, we investigated the neuronal substrate of these more general regulatory mechanisms that are engaged when participants believe that they are receiving NF. Twenty healthy participants (40-63 years, 10 female performed a sham NF paradigm during fMRI scanning. All participants were novices to NF-experiments and were instructed to voluntarily modulate their own brain activity based on a visual display of moving color bars. However, the bar depicted a recording and not the actual brain activity of participants. Reports collected at the end of the experiment indicate that participants were unaware of the sham feedback. In comparison to a passive watching condition, bilateral insula, anterior cingulate cortex and supplementary motor and dorsomedial and lateral prefrontal area were activated when participants actively tried to control the bar. In contrast, when merely watching moving bars, increased activation in the left angular gyrus was observed. These results show that the intention to control a moving bar is sufficient to engage a broad frontoparietal and cingulo-opercular network involved in cognitive control. The results of the present study indicate that tasks such as those generally employed in NF training recruit the neuronal correlates of cognitive control even when only sham NF is presented.

  15. Principles of motivation revealed by the diverse functions of neuropharmacological and neuroanatomical substrates underlying feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Brian A; Pratt, Wayne E; Will, Matthew J; Hanlon, Erin C; Bakshi, Vaishali P; Cador, Martine

    2013-11-01

    Circuits that participate in specific subcomponents of feeding (e.g., gustatory perception, peripheral feedback relevant to satiety and energy balance, reward coding, etc.) are found at all levels of the neural axis. Further complexity is conferred by the wide variety of feeding-modulatory neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that act within these circuits. An ongoing challenge has been to refine the understanding of the functional specificity of these neurotransmitters and circuits, and there have been exciting advances in recent years. We focus here on foundational work of Dr. Ann Kelley that identified distinguishable actions of striatal opioid peptide modulation and dopamine transmission in subcomponents of reward processing. We also discuss her work in overlaying these neuropharmacological effects upon anatomical pathways that link the telencephalon (cortex and basal ganglia) with feeding-control circuits in the hypothalamus. Using these seminal contributions as a starting point, we will discuss new findings that expand our understanding of (1) the specific, differentiable motivational processes that are governed by central dopamine and opioid transmission, (2) the manner in which other striatal neuromodulators, specifically acetylcholine, endocannabinoids and adenosine, modulate these motivational processes (including via interactions with opioid systems), and (3) the organization of the cortical-subcortical network that subserves opioid-driven feeding. The findings discussed here strengthen the view that incentive-motivational properties of food are coded by substrates and neural circuits that are distinguishable from those that mediate the acute hedonic experience of food reward. Striatal opioid transmission modulates reward processing by engaging frontotemporal circuits, possibly via a hypothalamic-thalamic axis, that ultimately impinges upon hypothalamic modules dedicated to autonomic function and motor pattern control. We will conclude by discussing

  16. Cellular, Molecular, and Genetic Substrates Underlying the Impact of Nicotine on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Thomas J.; Leach, Prescott T.

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder marked by long-lasting maladaptive changes in behavior and in reward system function. However, the factors that contribute to the behavioral and biological changes that occur with addiction are complex and go beyond reward. Addiction involves changes in cognitive control and the development of disruptive drug-stimuli associations that can drive behavior. A reason for the strong influence drugs of abuse can exert on cognition may be the striking overlap between the neurobiological substrates of addiction and of learning and memory, especially areas involved in declarative memory. Declarative memories are critically involved in the formation of autobiographical memories, and the ability of drugs of abuse to alter these memories could be particularly detrimental. A key structure in this memory system is the hippocampus, which is critically involved in binding multimodal stimuli together to form complex long-term memories. While all drugs of abuse can alter hippocampal function, this review focuses on nicotine. Addiction to tobacco products is insidious, with the majority of smokers wanting to quit; yet the majority of those that attempt to quit fail. Nicotine addiction is associated with the presence of drug-context and drug-cue associations that trigger drug seeking behavior and altered cognition during periods of abstinence, which contributes to relapse. This suggests that understanding the effects of nicotine on learning and memory will advance understanding and potentially facilitate treating nicotine addiction. The following sections examine: 1) how the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning change as nicotine administration transitions from acute to chronic and then to withdrawal from chronic treatment and the potential impact of these changes on addiction, 2) how nicotine usurps the cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, 3) the physiological changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to nicotine withdrawal

  17. Study on the substrate-induced crystallisation of amorphous SiC-precursor ceramics. TIB/A; Untersuchungen zur substratinduzierten Kristallisation amorpher SiC-Precursorkeramiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, C.

    2000-12-01

    In the present thesis the crystallization behaviour of amorphous silicon-carbon materials (SiC{sub x}) was studied. The main topic of the experimental studies formed thereby the epitactical crystallization of thin silicon carbide layers on monocrystalline substrates of silicon carbides or silicon. Furthermore by thermolysis of the polymer amorphous SiC{sub x}-powder was obtained.

  18. Near-field microwave detection of corrosion precursor pitting under thin dielectric coatings in metallic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.; Zoughi, R.; Austin, R.; Wood, N.; Engelbart, R.

    2003-01-01

    Detection of corrosion precursor pitting on metallic surfaces under various coatings and on bare metal is of keen interest in evaluation of aircraft fuselage. Near-field microwave nondestructive testing methods, utilizing open-ended rectangular waveguides and coaxial probes, have been used extensively for detection of surface flaws in metals, both on bare metal and under a dielectric coating. This paper presents the preliminary results of using microwave techniques to detect corrosion precursor pitting under paint and primer, applique and on bare metal. Machined pits of 500 μm diameter were detected using open-ended rectangular waveguides at V-Band under paint and primer and applique, and on bare metal. Using coaxial probes, machined pits with diameters down to 150 μm on bare metal were also detected. Relative pit size and density were shown on a corrosion-pitted sample using open-ended rectangular waveguides at frequencies of 35 GHz to 70 GHz. The use of Boeing's MAUS TM scanning systems provided improved results by alleviating standoff variation and scanning artifact. Typical results of this investigation are also presented

  19. Surface Effects and Challenges for Application of Piezoelectric Langasite Substrates in Surface Acoustic Wave Devices Caused by High Temperature Annealing under High Vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Marietta; Rane, Gayatri K; Kirbus, Benjamin; Menzel, Siegfried B; Gemming, Thomas

    2015-12-19

    Substrate materials that are high-temperature stable are essential for sensor devices which are applied at high temperatures. Although langasite is suggested as such a material, severe O and Ga diffusion into an O-affine deposited film was observed during annealing at high temperatures under vacuum conditions, leading to a damage of the metallization as well as a change of the properties of the substrate and finally to a failure of the device. Therefore, annealing of bare LGS (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 ) substrates at 800 ∘ C under high vacuum conditions is performed to analyze whether this pretreatment improves the suitability and stability of this material for high temperature applications in vacuum. To reveal the influence of the pretreatment on the subsequently deposited metallization, RuAl thin films are used as they are known to oxidize on LGS at high temperatures. A local study of the pretreated and metallized substrates using transmission electron microscopy reveals strong modification of the substrate surface. Micro cracks are visible. The composition of the substrate is strongly altered at those regions. Severe challenges for the application of LGS substrates under high-temperature vacuum conditions arise from these substrate damages, revealing that the pretreatment does not improve the applicability.

  20. Surface Effects and Challenges for Application of Piezoelectric Langasite Substrates in Surface Acoustic Wave Devices Caused by High Temperature Annealing under High Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietta Seifert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Substrate materials that are high-temperature stable are essential for sensor devices which are applied at high temperatures. Although langasite is suggested as such a material, severe O and Ga diffusion into an O-affine deposited film was observed during annealing at high temperatures under vacuum conditions, leading to a damage of the metallization as well as a change of the properties of the substrate and finally to a failure of the device. Therefore, annealing of bare LGS (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 substrates at 800 ∘ C under high vacuum conditions is performed to analyze whether this pretreatment improves the suitability and stability of this material for high temperature applications in vacuum. To reveal the influence of the pretreatment on the subsequently deposited metallization, RuAl thin films are used as they are known to oxidize on LGS at high temperatures. A local study of the pretreated and metallized substrates using transmission electron microscopy reveals strong modification of the substrate surface. Micro cracks are visible. The composition of the substrate is strongly altered at those regions. Severe challenges for the application of LGS substrates under high-temperature vacuum conditions arise from these substrate damages, revealing that the pretreatment does not improve the applicability.

  1. Mapping Common Aphasia Assessments to Underlying Cognitive Processes and Their Neural Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Elizabeth H; Skipper-Kallal, Laura M; Xing, Shihui; Fama, Mackenzie E; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the relationships between clinical tests, the processes they measure, and the brain networks underlying them, is critical in order for clinicians to move beyond aphasia syndrome classification toward specification of individual language process impairments. To understand the cognitive, language, and neuroanatomical factors underlying scores of commonly used aphasia tests. Twenty-five behavioral tests were administered to a group of 38 chronic left hemisphere stroke survivors and a high-resolution magnetic resonance image was obtained. Test scores were entered into a principal components analysis to extract the latent variables (factors) measured by the tests. Multivariate lesion-symptom mapping was used to localize lesions associated with the factor scores. The principal components analysis yielded 4 dissociable factors, which we labeled Word Finding/Fluency, Comprehension, Phonology/Working Memory Capacity, and Executive Function. While many tests loaded onto the factors in predictable ways, some relied heavily on factors not commonly associated with the tests. Lesion symptom mapping demonstrated discrete brain structures associated with each factor, including frontal, temporal, and parietal areas extending beyond the classical language network. Specific functions mapped onto brain anatomy largely in correspondence with modern neural models of language processing. An extensive clinical aphasia assessment identifies 4 independent language functions, relying on discrete parts of the left middle cerebral artery territory. A better understanding of the processes underlying cognitive tests and the link between lesion and behavior may lead to improved aphasia diagnosis, and may yield treatments better targeted to an individual's specific pattern of deficits and preserved abilities.

  2. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  3. A simple surrogate test method to rank the wear performance of prospective ceramic materials under hip prosthesis edge-loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anthony P; Brannon, Rebecca M

    2014-02-01

    This research has developed a novel test method for evaluating the wear resistance of ceramic materials under severe contact stresses simulating edge loading in prosthetic hip bearings. Simply shaped test specimens - a cylinder and a spheroid - were designed as surrogates for an edge-loaded, head/liner implant pair. Equivalency of the simpler specimens was assured in the sense that their theoretical contact dimensions and pressures were identical, according to Hertzian contact theory, to those of the head/liner pair. The surrogates were fabricated in three ceramic materials: Al2 O3 , zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA), and ZrO2 . They were mated in three different material pairs and reciprocated under a 200 N normal contact force for 1000-2000 cycles, which created small (material pairs were ranked by their wear resistance, quantified by the volume of abraded material measured using an interferometer. Similar tests were performed on edge-loaded hip implants in the same material pairs. The surrogates replicated the wear rankings of their full-scale implant counterparts and mimicked their friction force trends. The results show that a proxy test using simple test specimens can validly rank the wear performance of ceramic materials under severe, edge-loading contact stresses, while replicating the beginning stage of edge-loading wear. This simple wear test is therefore potentially useful for screening and ranking new, prospective materials early in their development, to produce optimized candidates for more complicated full-scale hip simulator wear tests. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Spreading of Non-Newtonian and Newtonian Fluids on a Solid Substrate under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Moutushi Dutta; Chandra, Subrata; Nag, Soma; Tarafdar, Sujata [Condensed Matter Physics Research Centre, Physics Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Das, Shantanu, E-mail: mou15july@gmail.com [Reactor Control Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Strongly non-Newtonian fluids namely, aqueous gels of starch, are shown to exhibit visco-elastic behavior, when subjected to a load. We study arrowroot and potato starch gels. When a droplet of the fluid is sandwiched between two glass plates and compressed, the area of contact between the fluid and plates increases in an oscillatory manner. This is unlike Newtonian fluids, where the area increases monotonically in a similar situation. The periphery moreover, develops an instability, which looks similar to Saffman Taylor fingers. This is not normally seen under compression. The loading history is also found to affect the manner of spreading. We attempt to describe the non-Newtonian nature of the fluid through a visco-elastic model incorporating generalized calculus. This is shown to reproduce qualitatively the oscillatory variation in the surface strain.

  5. Ceramic injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1988-01-01

    Interest in making complex net-shape ceramic parts with good surface finishing and sharp tolerances without machining is a driving force for studying the injection molding technique. This method consists of softhening the ceramic material by means of adding some plastic and heating in order to inject the mixture under pressure into a relatively cold mold where solidification takes place. Essentially, it is the same process used in thermoplastic industry but, in the present case, the ceramic powder load ranges between 80 to 90 wt.%. This work shows results obtained from the fabrication of pieces of different ceramic materials (alumina, barium titanate ferrites, etc.) in a small scale, using equipments developed and constructed in the laboratory. (Author) [es

  6. Numerical study of the spreading and solidification of a molten particle impacting onto a rigid substrate under plasma spraying conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oukach Soufiane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with simulation of the spreading and solidification of a fully molten particle impacting onto a preheated substrate under traditional plasma spraying conditions. The multiphase problem governing equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation taking into account heat transfer by conduction, convection and phase change are solved by using a Finite Element approach. The interface between molten particle and surrounding air, is tracked using the Level Set method. The effect of the Reynolds number on the droplet spreading and solidification, using a wide range of impact velocities (40-250m/s, is reported. A new correlation that predicts the final spread factor of splat as a function of Reynolds number is obtained. Thermal contact resistance, viscous dissipation, wettability and surface tension forces effects are taken into account.

  7. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  8. Robust, high temperature-ceramic membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Kathryn A.; Young, Jennifer S.

    2014-07-29

    A method of making ceramic membranes, and the ceramic membranes so formed, comprising combining a ceramic precursor with an organic or inorganic comonomer, forming the combination as a thin film on a substrate, photopolymerizing the thin film, and pyrolyzing the photopolymerized thin film.

  9. Sensitive Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive Ceramics is showing an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on ...... with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers. Finally the ceramic modules are mounted in a laser cut board that reflects the captured composition of the movement of the hands....

  10. Fracture-dissociation of ceramic liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Kwan; Oh, Jin-Rok; Her, Man Seung; Shim, Young Jun; Cho, Tae Yeun; Kwon, Sung Min

    2008-08-01

    The use of BIOLOX delta ceramic (CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) has been increasing. This ceramic prevents cracking by restraining the phase transformation due to the insertion of nano-sized, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia into the alumina matrix. This restrains the progress of cracking through the formation of platelet-like crystal or whiskers due to the addition of an oxide additive. We observed a case of BIOLOX delta ceramic liner (CeramTec AG) rim fracture 4 months postoperatively. Radiographs showed that the ceramic liner was subluxated from the acetabular cup. Scratches on the acetabular cup and femoral neck were seen, and the fracture was visible on the rim of the liner. Under electron microscope, metal particle coatings from the ceramic liner were identified. The ceramic liner, fracture fragments, and adjacent tissues were removed and replaced with a ceramic liner and femoral head of the same size and design. We believe the mechanism of the fracture-dissociation of the ceramic liner in this case is similar to a case of separation of the ceramic liner from the polyethylene shell in a sandwich-type ceramic-ceramic joint. To prevent ceramic liner fracture-dissociation, the diameter of the femoral neck needs to be decreased in a new design, while the diameter of the femoral head needs to be increased to ensure an increase in range of motion.

  11. Evaluation of the conversion efficiency of ceramic and metallic three way catalytic converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, H.; Costa, M.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic and metallic three way catalytic converters have been compared to assess the influence of the substrate geometrical and physical parameters on the exhaust gas conversions for several vehicle operating conditions. Both catalysts were placed on a vehicle equipped with a 2.8 l DOHC V6 spark ignition engine that was tested on a chassis dynamometer under steady state conditions for several engine speeds and loads. The data obtained include exhaust gas species concentrations and temperature taken both upstream and downstream of the catalytic converter, as well as temperatures in various locations within the substrate of the catalysts. The experimental data revealed that: (i) at low space velocities, the ceramic substrate presents better conversions, particularly for HC and CO, as compared to the metallic substrate, possibly because of its lower thermal conductivity which facilitates local ignition; (ii) at high space velocities, the metallic substrate presents better conversions, as compared to the ceramic substrate, mainly because of its larger geometric surface area and lower transverse Peclet number; and (iii) in general, the HC conversion for small space velocities is kinetically controlled while for high space velocities it is mass transfer limited; both limitations are less pronounced for the CO conversion and insignificant for the NO x conversion

  12. Light intensity and production parameters of phytocenoses cultivated on soil-like substrate under controled environment conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, A.; Ushakova, S.; Gribovskaya, I.; Tirranen, L.; Manukovsky, N.; Zolotukhin, I.

    To investigate feasibility of enhancing closedness in a new generation of biological life support systems (LSS) to involve the inedible phytomass into intrasystem mass exchange the vermicomposting method we have chosen made possible to produce soil-like substrate (SLS) suitable for growing plants. However, to use the SLS in life support systems call for investigation of its physical, chemical and other parameters. Of special importance among them is the capacity of SLS to provide the LSS photosynthesizing component with required mineral elements in selected cultivation conditions. In this connection the aim of this work was to study opportunities of enhancing pr4oduction activity of wheat and radish cenoses by varying the intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) without decreasing the harvest index. Increase of light intensity to 250 W/m 2 PAR decreased the intensity of visible photosynthesis of wheat cenosi and slightly increased visible photosynthesis of radish cenosis as compared to 200 W/m 2 PAR. The maximum productivity of wheat cenosis both total and seeds corresponded to the irradiance of 200 W/m 2 PAR. The light intensity of 250 W/m2 PAR decreased productivity of wheat plants and had no significant effect of the productivity of radish cenosis as compared to 200 W/m 2 PAR. Qualitative and quantitative composition of microflora of the watering solution and SLS was determined by the condition of plants, development phase and PAR intensity. By the end of wheat vegetation under 250 W/m 2 there were an order more bacteria of the colon rod group and phytopathogenic bacteria in the watering solution and SLS than under other illumination conditions. Investigation of the mineral composition of SLS and the watering solution demonstrated that one of the reasons of inadequate response of the cenosis under study to elevated PAR intensity may be deficiency of accessible forms of some mineral elements, e.g. nitrogen. The above said materials evidence that

  13. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  14. Toward Improved Lifetimes of Organic Solar Cells under Thermal Stress: Substrate-Dependent Morphological Stability of PCDTBT:PCBM Films and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Ho Chiu, Kar; Shahid Ashraf, Raja; Fearn, Sarah; Dattani, Rajeev; Cheng Wong, Him; Tan, Ching-Hong; Wu, Jiaying; Cabral, João T; Durrant, James R

    2015-10-15

    Morphological stability is a key requirement for outdoor operation of organic solar cells. We demonstrate that morphological stability and lifetime of polymer/fullerene based solar cells under thermal stress depend strongly on the substrate interface on which the active layer is deposited. In particular, we find that the stability of benchmark PCDTBT/PCBM solar cells under modest thermal stress is substantially increased in inverted solar cells employing a ZnO substrate compared to conventional devices employing a PSS substrate. This improved stability is observed to correlate with PCBM nucleation at the 50 nm scale, which is shown to be strongly influenced by different substrate interfaces. Employing this approach, we demonstrate remarkable thermal stability for inverted PCDTBT:PC70BM devices on ZnO substrates, with negligible (humidity exposure as widely reported previously, can also demonstrate enhanced morphological stability. As such we show that the choice of suitable substrate interfaces may be a key factor in achieving prolonged lifetimes for organic solar cells under thermal stress conditions.

  15. Modification of Structure and Tribological Properties of the Surface Layer of Metal-Ceramic Composite under Electron Irradiation in the Plasmas of Inert Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, K. V.; Mohovikov, A. A.; Yu, B.; Xu, Yu; Zhong, L.

    2018-01-01

    Metal-ceramic composites are the main materials for high-load parts in tribomechanical systems. Modern approaches to extend the operation life of tribomechanical systems are based on increasing the strength and tribological properties of the surface layer having 100 to 200 microns in depth. The essential improvement of the properties occurs when high dispersed structure is formed in the surface layer using high-energy processing. As a result of the dispersed structure formation the more uniform distribution of elastic stresses takes place under mechanical or thermal action, the energy of stress concentrators emergence significantly increases and the probability of internal defects formation reduces. The promising method to form the dispersed structure in the surface layer is pulse electron irradiation in the plasmas of inert gases combining electron irradiation and ion bombardment in one process. The present work reports upon the effect of pulse electron irradiation in plasmas of different inert gases with different atomic mass and ionization energy on the structure and tribological properties of the surface layer of TiC/(Ni-Cr) metal-ceramic composite with the volume ratio of the component being 50:50. It is experimentally shown that high-dispersed heterophase structure with a fraction of nanosized particles is formed during the irradiation. Electron microscopy study reveals that refining of the initial coarse TiC particles occurs via their dissolution in the molten metal binder followed by the precipitation of secondary fine particles in the interparticle layers of the binder. The depth of modified layer and the fraction of nanosized particles increase when the atomic number of the plasma gas increases and ionization energy decreases. The wear resistance of metal-ceramic composite improves in accordance to the formation of nanocrystalline structure in the surface layer.

  16. Ex situ protection of the European mudminnow (Umbra krameri Walbaum, 1792: Spawning substrate preference for larvae rearing under controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucska Balázs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Captive breeding programs of endangered fish species, such as the European mudminnow Umbra krameri, are essential for population restoration. To improve captive spawning and larvae rearing under controlled conditions, two experiments were carried out. In the first, the spawning substrate preference was tested in triplicate, where five different types of artificial surface were provided for mudminnow pairs:(isand, (iiartificial plants, (iiigravel, (ivsand + artificial plants and(vgravel + artificial plants. All fish preferred the gravel + artificial plant combination, which indicates that this type of surface could be the most appropriate for spawning in captivity. In the second trial, three feeding protocols were tested in triplicate under controlled conditions. In the first treatment fish were fed exclusively with Artemia nauplii; in the second treatment fish were fed with Artemiafor the first ten days then Artemia was gradually replaced with dry feed; for the third group the transition period started after 5 days of Artemia feeding. Although the survival rate of larvae could be maintained at a high level in some of the feeding protocols, a strong decrease in the growth rate was obvious in all diets containing dry food, which means that live food is essential for the first three weeks of mudminnow larvae rearing.

  17. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  18. Ceramic capacitor exhibiting graceful failure by self-clearing, method for fabricating self-clearing capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David Y [Chicago, IL; Saha, Sanjib [Santa Clara, CA

    2006-08-29

    A short-resistant capacitor comprises an electrically conductive planar support substrate having a first thickness, a ceramic film deposited over the support substrate, thereby defining a ceramic surface; and a metallic film deposited over the ceramic surface, said film having a second thickness which is less than the first thickness and which is between 0.01 and 0.1 microns.

  19. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  20. Material Performance of Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel under Selected LWR Design Basis Scenarios: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, B.; Sen, R.S.; Pope, M.A.; Ougouag, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The extension to LWRs of the use of Deep-Burn coated particle fuel envisaged for HTRs has been investigated. TRISO coated fuel particles are used in Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel within a SiC matrix rather than the graphite of HTRs. TRISO particles are well characterized for uranium-fueled HTRs. However, operating conditions of LWRs are different from those of HTRs (temperature, neutron energy spectrum, fast fluence levels, power density). Furthermore, the time scales of transient core behavior during accidents are usually much shorter and thus more severe in LWRs. The PASTA code was updated for analysis of stresses in coated particle FCM fuel. The code extensions enable the automatic use of neutronic data (burnup, fast fluence as a function of irradiation time) obtained using the DRAGON neutronics code. An input option for automatic evaluation of temperature rise during anticipated transients was also added. A new thermal model for FCM was incorporated into the code; so-were updated correlations (for pyrocarbon coating layers) suitable to estimating dimensional changes at the high fluence levels attained in LWR DB fuel. Analyses of the FCM fuel using the updated PASTA code under nominal and accident conditions show: (1) Stress levels in SiC-coatings are low for low fission gas release (FGR) fractions of several percent, as based on data of fission gas diffusion in UO 2 kernels. However, the high burnup level of LWR-DB fuel implies that the FGR fraction is more likely to be in the range of 50-100%, similar to Inert Matrix Fuels (IMFs). For this range the predicted stresses and failure fractions of the SiC coating are high for the reference particle design (500 (micro)mm kernel diameter, 100 (micro)mm buffer, 35 (micro)mm IPyC, 35 (micro)mm SiC, 40 (micro)mm OPyC). A conservative case, assuming 100% FGR, 900K fuel temperature and 705 MWd/kg (77% FIMA) fuel burnup, results in a 8.0 x 10 -2 failure probability. For a 'best-estimate' FGR fraction of 50

  1. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  4. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  5. Scratch and wear behaviour of plasma sprayed nano ceramics bilayer Al2O3-13 wt%TiO2/hydroxyapatite coated on medical grade titanium substrates in SBF environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-10-01

    Among the various coating techniques, plasma spray coating is an efficient technique to protect the metal surface from the various surface problems like wear and corrosion. The aim of this present work is to design and produce a bilayer coating on the non- toxic commercially pure titanium (denoted as CP-Ti) implant substrate in order to improve the biocompatibility and surface properties. To achieve that, Al2O3-13 wt%TiO2 (AT13) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) were coated on CP-Ti implant substrate using plasma spray coating technique. Further, the coated substrates were subjected to various characterization techniques. The crystallite size of coated HAP and its morphological studies were carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. The wear test on the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti implant surface was conducted using ball-on-disc tester under SBF environment at 37 °C, in order to determine the wear rate and the coefficient of friction. The adhesion strength of the bilayer coated surface was evaluated by micro scratch tester under the ramp load conditions with load range of 14-20 N. The above said studies were repeated on the single layer coated HAP and AT13 implant surfaces. The results reveal that the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti surface has the improved wear rate, coefficient of friction in compared to single layer coated HAP and AT13 surfaces.

  6. Pyroelectric response mechanism of barium strontium titanate ceramics in dielectric bolometer mode: The underlying essence of the enhancing effect of direct current bias field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Chaoliang; Cao, Sheng; Yan, Shiguang; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Wang, Genshui; Dong, Xianlin; Hu, Xu; Yang, Chunli

    2013-01-01

    Pyroelectric response mechanism of Ba 0.70 Sr 0.30 TiO 3 ceramics under dielectric bolometer (DB) mode was investigated by dielectric and pyroelectric properties measurement. The variations of total, intrinsic, and induced pyroelectric coefficients (p tot , p int , p ind ) with temperatures and bias fields were analyzed. p int plays the dominant role to p tot through most of the temperature range and p ind will be slightly higher than p int above T 0 . The essence of the enhancing effect of DC bias field on pyroelectric coefficient can be attributed to the high value of p int . This mechanism is useful for the pyroelectric materials (DB mode) applications.

  7. Evaluation of the onset of failure under mechanical and thermal stresses on luting agent for metal-ceramic and metal crowns by finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Agnihotri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term clinical failures of cemented prosthesis depend, to a large extent, on the integrity of the luting agent. The causative factors that lead to microfracture and, hence, failure of the luting agents are the stresses acting inside the oral cavity. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between stresses in the tooth and the failure potential of the luting agent. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis was performed on the mandibular second premolar. The behavior of zinc-phosphate and glass-ionomer were studied under different crowns (metal-ceramic and metal crown and loading conditions (mechanical force of 450 N acting vertically over the occlusal surface, thermal loads of 60° and 0°C. It was observed from the study that failure threshold of the luting agent was influenced both by the elastic modulus of the luting agent and by the type of the crown.

  8. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ceramic combustor mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  10. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  11. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  12. Ceramics: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J E

    1996-07-01

    The selection and application of synthetic materials for surgical implants has been directly dependent upon the biocompatibility profiles of specific prosthetic devices. The early rationale for ceramic biomaterials was based upon the chemical and biochemical inertness (minimal bioreactivity) of elemental compounds constituted into structural forms (materials). Subsequently, mildly reactive (bioactive), and partially and fully degradable ceramics were identified for clinical uses. Structural forms have included bulk solids or particulates with and without porosities for tissue ingrowth, and more recently, coatings onto other types of biomaterial substrates. The physical shapes selected were application dependent, with advantages and disadvantages determined by: (1) the basic material and design properties of the device construct; and (2) the patient-based functional considerations. Most of the ceramics (bioceramics) selected in the 1960s and 1970s have continued over the long-term, and the science and technology for thick and thin coatings have evolved significantly over the past decade. Applications of ceramic biomaterials range from bulk (100%) ceramic structures as joint and bone replacements to fully or partially biodegradable substrates for the controlled delivery of pharmaceutical drugs, growth factors, and morphogenetically inductive substances. Because of the relatively unique properties of bioceramics, expanded uses as structural composites with other biomaterials and macromolecular biologically-derived substances are anticipated in the future.

  13. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  14. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  15. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with volume 8, constitutes the proceedings of an international symposium on the fracture mechanics of ceramics. The topics discussed in this volume include the toughening of ceramics by whisker reinforcement; the mechanical properties of SiCwhisker-reinforced TZP; the fracture of brittle rock and oil shale under dynamic explosive loading; impact damage models of ceramic coatings used in gas turbine and diesel engines; the use of exploratory data analysis for the safety evaluation of structural ceramics; and proof testing methods for the reliability of structural ceramics used in gas turbines

  16. MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Saari, D. P.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-09-01

    The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater; (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

  17. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis

  18. Werkstoffwoche 98. Vol. 7. Symposium 9: Ceramics. Symposium 14: Simulation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, J.; Ziegler, G.; Hermel, W.; Riedel, H.

    1999-01-01

    The leading subject of this proceedings volume is ceramic materials, with papers on the following subject clusters: Processing (infiltration, sintering, forming) - Physics and chemistry of ceramics (functional ceramics, SiC, ceramic precursors, microstructural properties) - Novel concepts (composites, damage induced by oxidation and mechanical stress, performance until damage under mechanical and thermal stress, layers, nanocomposites). 28 of the conference papers have been prepared for individual retrieval from the ENERGY database. (orig./CB) [de

  19. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  20. Potential use of the facultative halophyte Chenopodium quinoa Willd. as substrate for biogas production cultivated with different concentrations of sodium chloride under hydroponic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcios, Ariel E; Weichgrebe, Dirk; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2016-03-01

    This project analyses the biogas potential of the halophyte Chenopodium quinoa Willd. In a first approach C. quinoa was grown with different concentrations of NaCl (0, 10 and 20 ppt NaCl) and the crop residues were used as substrate for biogas production. In a second approach, C. quinoa was grown with 0, 10, 20 and 30 ppt NaCl under hydroponic conditions and the fresh biomass was used as substrate. The more NaCl is in the culture medium, the higher the sodium, potassium, crude ash and hemicellulose content in the plant tissue whereas the calcium, sulfur, nitrogen and carbon content in the biomass decrease. According to this study, it is possible to produce high yields of methane using biomass of C. quinoa. The highest specific methane yields were obtained using the substrate from the plants cultivated at 10 and 20 ppt NaCl in both experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction phenomena at reactive metal/ceramic interfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-11-03

    The objective of this study was to understand the interface chemical reactions between stable ceramics and reactive liquid metals, and developing microstructure. Experiments were conducted at elevated temperatures where small metal samples of Zr and Zr-alloy were placed on top of selected oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrN, ZrC, and HfC). The sample stage was heated in high-purity argon to about 2000 C, held in most cases for five minutes at the peak temperature, and then cooled to room temperature at {approximately}20 c/min. An external video camera was used to monitor the in-situ wetting and interface reactions. Post-test examinations of the systems were conducted by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was determined that the Zr and the Zr-alloy are very active in the wetting of stable ceramics at elevated temperatures. In addition, in some systems, such as Zr/ZrN, a reactive transition phase formed between the ceramic and the metal. In other systems, such as Zr/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Zr/ZrC and Zr/HfC, no reaction products formed, but a continuous and strong joint developed under these circumstances also.

  2. Scratch and wear behaviour of plasma sprayed nano ceramics bilayer Al2O3-13 wt%TiO2/hydroxyapatite coated on medical grade titanium substrates in SBF environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite was synthesized by sol–gel route. • Bilayer (AT13/HAP) coating improves wear resistance of CP-Ti implant surface. • The microhardness values of bilayer coating surface were increased 4 times compared to uncoated sample surface. - Abstract: Among the various coating techniques, plasma spray coating is an efficient technique to protect the metal surface from the various surface problems like wear and corrosion. The aim of this present work is to design and produce a bilayer coating on the non- toxic commercially pure titanium (denoted as CP-Ti) implant substrate in order to improve the biocompatibility and surface properties. To achieve that, Al 2 O 3 -13 wt%TiO 2 (AT13) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) were coated on CP-Ti implant substrate using plasma spray coating technique. Further, the coated substrates were subjected to various characterization techniques. The crystallite size of coated HAP and its morphological studies were carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. The wear test on the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti implant surface was conducted using ball-on-disc tester under SBF environment at 37 °C, in order to determine the wear rate and the coefficient of friction. The adhesion strength of the bilayer coated surface was evaluated by micro scratch tester under the ramp load conditions with load range of 14–20 N. The above said studies were repeated on the single layer coated HAP and AT13 implant surfaces. The results reveal that the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti surface has the improved wear rate, coefficient of friction in compared to single layer coated HAP and AT13 surfaces

  3. Scratch and wear behaviour of plasma sprayed nano ceramics bilayer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-13 wt%TiO{sub 2}/hydroxyapatite coated on medical grade titanium substrates in SBF environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A., E-mail: arubankumarvit@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite was synthesized by sol–gel route. • Bilayer (AT13/HAP) coating improves wear resistance of CP-Ti implant surface. • The microhardness values of bilayer coating surface were increased 4 times compared to uncoated sample surface. - Abstract: Among the various coating techniques, plasma spray coating is an efficient technique to protect the metal surface from the various surface problems like wear and corrosion. The aim of this present work is to design and produce a bilayer coating on the non- toxic commercially pure titanium (denoted as CP-Ti) implant substrate in order to improve the biocompatibility and surface properties. To achieve that, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-13 wt%TiO{sub 2} (AT13) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) were coated on CP-Ti implant substrate using plasma spray coating technique. Further, the coated substrates were subjected to various characterization techniques. The crystallite size of coated HAP and its morphological studies were carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. The wear test on the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti implant surface was conducted using ball-on-disc tester under SBF environment at 37 °C, in order to determine the wear rate and the coefficient of friction. The adhesion strength of the bilayer coated surface was evaluated by micro scratch tester under the ramp load conditions with load range of 14–20 N. The above said studies were repeated on the single layer coated HAP and AT13 implant surfaces. The results reveal that the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti surface has the improved wear rate, coefficient of friction in compared to single layer coated HAP and AT13 surfaces.

  4. Development of a novel non-contact inspection technique to detect micro cracks under the surface of a glass substrate by thermal stress-induced light scattering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Yoshitaro; Terasaki, Nao; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2017-05-01

    Fine polishing techniques, such as a chemical mechanical polishing treatment, are important techniques in glass substrate manufacturing. However, these techniques may cause micro cracks under the surface of glass substrates because they used mechanical friction. A stress-induced light scattering method (SILSM), which was combined with light scattering method and mechanical stress effects, was proposed for inspecting surfaces to detect polishing-induced micro cracks. However, in the conventional SILSM, samples need to be loaded with physical contact, and the loading point is invisible in transparent materials. Here, we introduced a novel non-contact SILSM using a heating device. A glass substrate was heated first, and then the light scattering intensity of micro cracks was detected by a cooled charge-couple device camera during the natural cooling process. Results clearly showed during the decreasing surface temperature of a glass substrate, appropriate thermal stress is generated for detecting micro cracks by using the SILSM and light scattering intensity from micro cracks changes. We confirmed that non-contact thermal SILSM (T-SILSM) can detect micro cracks under the surface of transparent materials.

  5. Experimental and Simulated Investigations of Thin Polymer Substrates with an Indium Tin Oxide Coating under Fatigue Bending Loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiong-Shiun Hsu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced failure is a critical concern that influences the mechanical reliability of an indium tin oxide (ITO film deposited on a transparently flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrate. In this study, a cycling bending mechanism was proposed and used to experimentally investigate the influences of compressive and tensile stresses on the mechanical stability of an ITO film deposited on PET substrates. The sheet resistance of the ITO film, optical transmittance of the ITO-coated PET substrates, and failure scheme within the ITO film were measured to evaluate the mechanical stability of the concerned thin films. The results indicated that compressive and tensile stresses generated distinct failure schemes within an ITO film and both led to increased sheet resistance and optical transmittance. In addition, tensile stress increased the sheet resistance of an ITO film more easily than compressive stress did. However, the influences of both compressive and tensile stress on increased optical transmittance were demonstrated to be highly similar. Increasing the thickness of a PET substrate resulted in increased sheet resistance and optical transmittance regardless of the presence of compressive or tensile stress. Moreover, J-Integral, a method based on strain energy, was used to estimate the interfacial adhesion strength of the ITO-PET film through the simulation approach enabled by a finite element analysis.

  6. Adaptation of continuous biogas reactors operating under wet fermentation conditions to dry conditions with corn stover as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuk, Balázs; Kovács, Kornél L; Szuhaj, Márk; Rákhely, Gábor; Bagi, Zoltán

    2017-08-01

    Corn stover (CS) is the agricultural by-product of maize cultivation. Due to its high abundance and high energy content it is a promising substrate for the bioenergy sector. However, it is currently neglected in industrial scale biogas plants, because of its slow decomposition and hydrophobic character. To assess the maximum biomethane potential of CS, long-term batch fermentations were carried out with various substrate concentrations and particle sizes for 72 days. In separate experiments we adapted the biogas producing microbial community in wet fermentation arrangement first to the lignocellulosic substrate, in Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR), then subsequently, by continuously elevating the feed-in concentration, to dry conditions in solid state fermenters (SS-AD). In the batch tests, the CSTR experiment, the daily substrate loading was gradually increased from 1 to 2 g vs /L/day until the system produced signs of overloading. Then the biomass was transferred to SS-AD reactors and the adaptation process was studied. Although the specific methane yields were lower in the SS-AD arrangement (177 mL CH 4 /g vs in CSTR vs. 105 mL in SS-AD), the benefits of process operational parameters, i.e. lower energy consumption, smaller reactor volume, digestate amount generated and simpler configuration, may compensate the somewhat lower yield. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT SUBSTRATES ON THE GROWTH AND YIELD OF TOMATO (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill UNDER GREENHOUSE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Daniel Ortega-Martínez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill is the world's second most important vegetable. In Mexico, the crop gains economic and social relevance by the generation of foreign exchange and jobs, the production systems of this vegetable have been diversified in order to increase performance, incorporating innovative technologies such as plastic covers, drop irrigation and hydroponics. One of the main factors determining the success of the crop is the substrate, being the medium in which roots were developed which have great influence on the growth and development. In thisstudy, we evaluated during the crop season 2008-2009, the effect of substrate: pine sawdust, compost of sheep manure, agricultural land and red volcanic rock, on growth and yield of tomato. The experimental design used was randomized complete block with four repetitions and ten treatments were evaluated results from a combination of substrates in a volume of 1:1, each experimental unit consisted of four plants, the studied variables were subjected to an analysis of variance (ANOVA using the statistical package Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. The genotype used was Sun 7705. Significant differences between substrates, composting with sawdust mixing affected to a greater response for the variables height 4.61 m, 2.1 cm thick of stem, the fruits of greater weight 107.8 g, yield per plant and 4 kg and 25 kg/m-2. However, the number of flowers and clusters was higher in the sawdust substrate, so the composting with sawdust mixture may be a viable option for greenhouse tomato production.

  8. An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in

  9. An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in

  10. Coating of substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, J.A.; Nelson, R.L.; Woodhead, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The process is concerned with providing substrates with coatings obtainable from sols, for example to protect the substrate (such as in nuclear reactors or hydrocarbon cracking plant) or to provide a carrier for catalytically active material. Hitherto, coatings obtained from sols have had a high porosity and high surface area so that they have not been entirely satisfactory for the above applications. In the process described, dense, low-porosity coatings are provided by contacting the substrate with a sol of refractory material (e.g. CeO 2 or SiO 2 ) convertible to a gel of density at least 40% of the theoretical density of the refractory material, and converting the sol to the gel. Optionally, the gel may be converted to a ceramic coating by firing. (author)

  11. The TDDB Characteristics of Ultra-Thin Gate Oxide MOS Capacitors under Constant Voltage Stress and Substrate Hot-Carrier Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Shen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The breakdown characteristics of ultra-thin gate oxide MOS capacitors fabricated in 65 nm CMOS technology under constant voltage stress and substrate hot-carrier injection are investigated. Compared to normal thick gate oxide, the degradation mechanism of time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB of ultra-thin gate oxide is found to be different. It is found that the gate current (Ig of ultra-thin gate oxide MOS capacitor is more likely to be induced not only by Fowler-Nordheim (F-N tunneling electrons, but also by electrons surmounting barrier and penetrating electrons in the condition of constant voltage stress. Moreover it is shown that the time to breakdown (tbd under substrate hot-carrier injection is far less than that under constant voltage stress when the failure criterion is defined as a hard breakdown according to the experimental results. The TDDB mechanism of ultra-thin gate oxide will be detailed. The differences in TDDB characteristics of MOS capacitors induced by constant voltage stress and substrate hot-carrier injection will be also discussed.

  12. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  13. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  14. An Exploration into the Bacterial Community under Different Pasteurization Conditions during Substrate Preparation (Composting-Phase II) for Agaricus bisporus Cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Fabricio Rocha; Pecchia, John Andrew

    2018-02-01

    Substrate preparation (i.e., composting) for Agaricus bisporus cultivation is the most critical point of mushroom production. Among many factors involved in the composting process, the microbial ecology of the system is the underlying drive of composting and can be influenced by composting management techniques. Pasteurization temperature at the beginning of phase II, in theory, may influence the bacterial community and subsequently the "selectivity" and nutrition of the final substrate. Therefore, this hypothesis was tested by simulation in bioreactors under different pasteurization conditions (57 °C/6 h, 60 °C/2 h, and 68 °C/2 h), simulating conditions adopted by many producers. Bacterial diversity, based on 16S ribosomal RNA obtained by high-throughput sequencing and classified in operational taxonomic units (OTUs), was greater than previously reported using culture-dependent methods. Alpha diversity estimators show a lower diversity of OTUs under a high-temperature pasteurization condition. Bacillales order shows a relatively higher OTU abundance under a high-pasteurization temperature, which also was related to high ammonia emission measurements. On the other hand, beta diversity analysis showed no significantly changes in the bacterial community structure under different conditions. Agaricus bisporus mycelium growth during a standard spawn run period was significantly slower in the compost pasteurized at high temperature. Since the bacterial community structure was not greatly affected by different pasteurization conditions but by-products left (e.g., ammonia) at the end of compost conditioning varied, further studies need to be conducted to determine the functional role of the microbial communities found during substrate preparation for Agaricus bisporus cultivation.

  15. Research on Durability of Recycled Ceramic Powder Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. C.; Fang, W.; Xu, K. C.; Xie, L.

    2017-06-01

    Ceramic was ground into powder with 325 mesh and used to prepare for concrete. Basic mechanical properties, carbonation and chloride ion penetration of the concrete tests were conducted. In addition, 6-hour electric fluxes of recycled ceramic powder concrete were measured under loading. The results showed that the age strength of ceramics powder concrete is higher than that of the ordinary concrete and the fly ash concrete. The ceramic powder used as admixture would reduce the strength of concrete under no consideration of its impact factor; under consideration of the impact factor for ceramic powder as admixture, the carbonation resistance of ceramic powder concrete was significantly improved, and the 28 day carbonation depth of the ceramic powder concrete was only 31.5% of ordinary concrete. The anti-chloride-permeability of recycled ceramic powder concrete was excellent.

  16. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  17. Control of substrate oxidation in MOD cerawwwmic coating on low-activation ferritic steel with reduced-pressure atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Teruya; Muroga, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    An Er2O3 ceramic coating fabricated using the metal-organic decomposition (MOD) method on a Cr2O3-covered low-activation ferritic steel JLF-1 substrate was examined to improve hydrogen permeation barrier performance of the coating. The Cr2O3 layer was obtained before coating by heat treating the substrate at 700 °C under reduced pressures of baking. Preprocessing to obtain a Cr2O3 layer would provide flexibility in the coating process for blanket components and ducts. Moreover, the Cr2O3 layer suppressed hydrogen permeation through the JLF-1 substrate. While further optimization of the coating fabrication process is required, it would be possible to suppress hydrogen permeation significantly by multilayers of Cr2O3 and MOD oxide ceramic.

  18. The neuronal substrate of risky choice: an insight into the contributions of neuroimaging to the understanding of theories on decision making under risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorhold, Verena

    2008-04-01

    This chapter provides an overview of studies in the field of neuroscience that investigate some of the processes and concepts of risk perception, risky choice, and decision making under risk. First, early studies in the field of neuroscience addressing the diminished decision-making abilities in lesion patients are presented. A classical task in this research field is described along with its neural implications. After this, the underlying model, its hypotheses, and neuronal implications are discussed. Different aspects within risky decision making, such as the influence of memory, inhibition, motivation, and personality, on risky choice and the respective underlying neuronal substrate are described. After this, studies of risky decision making in healthy subjects are reviewed. A selection of studies shows that theories focusing on cognitive aspects only have to be enriched in order to allow for additional aspects within risky decision making (e.g., emotion). Next, the classical economic approaches and the development of theories incorporating further aspects within economical decision making and the underlying neuronal substrate will be presented. Finally, research in the field of neuroeconomics, focusing on the role of social decision making and evaluative judgment within risky decision making, is reviewed.

  19. Performance of different substrates in constructed wetlands planted with E. crassipes treating low-strength sewage under subtropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, M X; Carvalho, K Q; Passig, F H; Borges, A C; Filippe, T C; Azevedo, J C R; Nagalli, A

    2018-07-15

    The present study aimed to assess removal potential of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), total phosphorus (TP) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in synthetic wastewater simulating low-strength sewage by sequencing-batch mode constructed wetlands (CWs). Six CWs with three substrates (gravel, light expanded clay and clay bricks) and one CW of each substrate was planted with E. crassipes to verify the feasibility of using a floating macrophyte in CWs and verify the best optimized substrate. Results showed that the presence of E. crassipes enhanced the removal of COD for systems with gravel, increasing the removal efficiency from 37% in the unplanted system (CW G-U ) to 60% in the planted system (CW G-P ). The vegetated CW with clay bricks (CW B-P ) presented the best performance for both TKN and TAN removal, with maximum removal efficiencies of 68% and 35%, respectively. Phosphorus was observed to be efficiently removed in systems with clay bricks, both planted (CW B-U ) and unplanted (CW B-P ), with mean removal efficiencies of 82% and 87%, respectively, probably via adsorption. It was also observed that after 296days of operation, no desorption or increase on phosphorus in effluent samples were observed, thus indicating that the material was not yet saturated and phosphorus probably presents a strong binding to the media. ASA removal efficiency varied from 34% to 92% in CWs, probably due to plant uptake through roots and microbial biodegradation. Plant direct uptake varied from 4 to 74% of the total nitrogen and from 26 to 71% of the total phosphorus removed in CW G-P , CW C-P and CW B-P . E. crassipes was able to uptake up to 4.19g of phosphorus in CW C-P and 11.84g of nitrogen in CW B-P . The findings on this study suggest that E. crassipes could be used in CWs and clay bricks could significantly enhance phosphorus removal capacity in CWs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A facile precursor route to highly loaded metal/ceramic nanofibers as a robust surface-enhanced Raman template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jay Hoon; Joo, Yong Lak

    2017-09-01

    We report silver (Ag)/ceramic nanofibers with highly robust and sensitive optical sensory capabilities that can withstand harsh conditions. These nanofibers are fabricated by first electrospinning solutions of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) and metal precursor polymers, followed by subsequent series of heat treatment. The reported fabrication method demonstrate the effects of (i) the location of Ag crystals, (ii) crystal size and shape, and (iii) constituents of the ceramic matrix as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) templates with 10-6 M 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA). Notably, these silver/ceramic nanofibers preserved most of their highly sensitive localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) even under high temperature of 400 °C, in contrast to preformed Ag nanoparticles (NPs) in PVA nanofibers which lost most of its optical property presumably due to (i) Ag oxidation and (ii) loss of the matrix material. Among the ceramic substrates of ZrO2, Al2O3, and ZnO with silver crystals, we discovered that the ZnO substrate showed the most consistent and the strongest signal strength owing to the synergistic chemical and optical properties of the ZnO substrate. Moreover, the pure Ag nanofiber proved to be the best heat-resistant SERS template, owing to its (i) anisotropic morphology and (ii) thicker diameter when compared with other conventional Ag nanomaterials. These results demonstrated simple yet highly controllable fabrication of robust SERS templates, with potential applications in a catalytic sensory which is often exposed to harsh conditions.

  1. The composition and depth of green roof substrates affect the growth of Silene vulgaris and Lagurus ovatus species and the C and N sequestration under two irrigation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondoño, S; Martínez-Sánchez, J J; Moreno, J L

    2016-01-15

    Extensive green roofs are used to increase the surface area covered by vegetation in big cities, thereby reducing the urban heat-island effect, promoting CO2 sequestration, and increasing biodiversity and urban-wildlife habitats. In Mediterranean semi-arid regions, the deficiency of water necessitates the use in these roofs of overall native plants which are more adapted to drought than other species. However, such endemic plants have been used scarcely in green roofs. For this purpose, we tested two different substrates with two depths (5 and 10 cm), in order to study their suitability with regard to adequate plant development under Mediterranean conditions. A compost-soil-bricks (CSB) (1:1:3; v:v:v) mixture and another made up of compost and bricks (CB) (1:4; v:v) were arranged in two depths (5 and 10 cm), in cultivation tables. Silene vulgaris (Moench) Garcke and Lagurus ovatus L. seeds were sown in each substrate. These experimental units were subjected, on the one hand, to irrigation at 40% of the registered evapotranspiration values (ET0) and, on the other, to drought conditions, during a nine-month trial. Physichochemical and microbiological substrate characteristics were studied, along with the physiological and nutritional status of the plants. We obtained significantly greater plant coverage in CSB at 10 cm, especially for L. ovatus (80-90%), as well as a better physiological status, especially in S. vulgaris (SPAD values of 50-60), under irrigation, whereas neither species could grow in the absence of water. The carbon and nitrogen fixation by the substrate and the aboveground biomass were also higher in CSB at 10 cm, especially under L. ovatus - in which 1.32 kg C m(-2) and 209 g N m(-2) were fixed throughout the experiment. Besides, the enzymatic and biochemical parameters assayed showed that microbial activity and nutrient cycling, which fulfill a key role for plant development, were higher in CSB. Therefore, irrigation of 40% can

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  3. Cracking in thin films of colloidal particles on elastomeric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael; Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    The drying of thin colloidal films of particles is a common industrial problem (e.g paint drying, ceramic coatings). An often undesirable side effect is the appearance of cracks. As the liquid in a suspension evaporates, particles are forced into contact both with each other and the substrate, forming a fully wetted film. Under carefully controlled conditions the observed cracks grow orthogonal to the drying front, spaced at regular intervals along it. In this work we investigated the role of the substrate in constraining the film. Atomic force microscopy, was used to image the particle arrangements on the top and bottom surfaces of films, dried on liquid and glass substrates. We present convincing evidence that the interface prevents particle rearrangements at the bottom of the film, leading to a mismatch strain between upper and lower surfaces of the film which appears to drive cracking. We show that when the modulus of the substrate becomes comparable to the stresses measured in the films, the crack spacing is significantly altered. We also show that cracks do not form on liquid substrates. These combined experiments highlight the importance of substrate constraint in the crack formation mechanism.[4pt] [1] M.I. Smith, J.S. Sharp, Langmuir 27, 8009 (2011)

  4. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  5. Investigations on thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) with doped alumina ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janas, R.; Huebner, K.

    1976-01-01

    Alumina ceramics doped and burned under various conditions have been investigated with regard to their suitability for thermoluminescent dosimetry. The production of ceramics is described. The properties essential for dosimetric purposes, such as glow curve, energy dose characteristics, fading, recoverability, lower detection limit and energy dependence, are indicated. The advantages and disadvantages of alumina ceramics are compared. (author)

  6. Closure of mass exchange under use of a vegetable conveyer cultivated on a neutral and soil-like substrates as applied to BLSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velitchko, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander; Ushakova, Sofya

    To increase a closure level of mass exchange processes in bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) including a human a technology of plants cultivation on a soil-like substrate (SLS) consisting in a gradual decomposition of inedible plants biomass under its addition in the SLS was developed at the Institute of Biophysics SB RAS (Russia). In the given work the effect of periodical introduction of inedible plant biomass in the SLS on plants photosynthetic productivity and on the closure of mass exchange has been analyzed. Thereupon CO2 gas exchange and the certain vegetables' productivity under their cultivation in a conveyor regime on the SLS and on a neutral substrate with reference to the closure of mass exchange processes in BLSS have been studied in this work. The vegetables Raphanus sativus L., Brassica caulorapa L. Daucus carota L. and Beta vulgaris L. being prospective plantsrepresentatives of the BLSS phototrophic unit were taken as the research objects. The SLS was taken as an experiment substrate and an expanded clay aggregate as the control. The changeable Knop solution was used for the control, and an irrigation solution with the SLS extract was used for the experiment. Rapidity dynamics of CO2 consumption showed sharp distinctions of the ‘plants-SLS' system from the ‘plantsexpanded clay aggregate' system connected with the oxidation processes coursing in the SLS. The intensity of CO2 evolution from the SLS on average was 70% of the total plants conveyor's respiration. Thus a balance between the system's respiration and photosynthesis was often determined by the processes coursing in the SLS. Here the sharp CO2 evolution was recorded after introduction of the plants inedible biomass in the SLS. That peak was gradually coming down during 10-14 days after the beginning of every cycle of plants cultivation that was connected with intensification of plants photosynthesis and drop of decomposition intensity of the biomass introduced. Comparative

  7. Charge movement in a GaN-based hetero-structure field effect transistor structure with carbon doped buffer under applied substrate bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooth, Alexander; Uren, Michael J.; Cäsar, Markus; Kuball, Martin; Martin, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Charge trapping and transport in the carbon doped GaN buffer of a GaN-based hetero-structure field effect transistor (HFET) has been investigated under both positive and negative substrate bias. Clear evidence of redistribution of charges in the carbon doped region by thermally generated holes is seen, with electron injection and capture observed during positive bias. Excellent agreement is found with simulations. It is shown that these effects are intrinsic to the carbon doped GaN and need to be controlled to provide reliable and efficient GaN-based power HFETs

  8. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  9. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  10. Surface oxidation of porous ZrB2-SiC ceramic composites by continuous-wave ytterbium fibre laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmod, Dayang Salyani Abang; Glandut, Nicolas; Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface oxidation of ZrB 2 -SiC ceramic composites by Yb-fibre laser. • Round spiral laser pattern created for the surface oxidation. • Presence of laser-formed oxide scale and unaffected beneath regions. • Crazed but uncracked surface oxide. • A dense glassy SiO 2 -rich layer exhibited enhances oxidation resistance. - Abstract: Surface treatment of ceramic substrates by a laser beam can allow to incorporate interesting properties to these ceramics. In the present work, surface oxidation of ca. 30% porous ZrB 2 -SiC ceramic composites by using an ytterbium fibre laser was conducted. Oxidation of ceramic substrates through this process under ambient conditions has certain advantages compared to the classical oxidation method. A particular spiral laser pattern was created in order to produce an oxidized structure on ZrB 2 -SiC porous substrates. The laser parameters were as follows i.e., laser power of 50, 60 and 70 W, a beam diameter of 1.25 mm, velocity of 2 mm/s, acceleration and deceleration of 1 mm/s 2 . The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser-treated region was examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. At laser power of 70 W, the sample exhibits uniform oxidation. It revealed that the very porous bulk beneath remained unaffected and unoxidized because this laser-formed oxide scale protects the substrate from oxidation. The presence of oxidized and unaffected regions indicated a high degree of heat localization. The dense glassy SiO 2 -rich layer prevents the inward oxygen diffusion into the inner bulk hence enhances the oxidation resistance.

  11. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioh, E L; Tok, A I Y

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  12. Deposition and consolidation of porous ceramic films for membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal; Tricoli, Antonio; Johannessen, Tue

    The deposition of porous ceramic films for membrane separation can be done by several processes such as thermophoresis [1], dip-coating [2] and spray pyrolysis [3]. Here we present a high-speed method, in which ceramic nano-particles form a porous film by filtration on top of a porous ceramic...... substrate [4]. Ceramic nano-particles are generated in a flame, using either a premixed (gas) flame, in which a metal-oxide precursor is evaporated in an N2 stream, which is combusted with methane and air, or using a flame spray pyrolysis, in which a liquid metal-oxide precursor is sprayed through a nozzle...

  13. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  14. Neural substrates underlying balanced time perspective: A combined voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiqun; Chen, Zhiyi; Feng, Tingyong

    2017-08-14

    Balanced time perspective (BTP), which is defined as a mental ability to switch flexibly among different time perspectives Zimbardo and Boyd (1999), has been suggested to be a central component of positive psychology Boniwell and Zimbardo (2004). BTP reflects individual's cognitive flexibility towards different time frames, which leads to many positive outcomes, including positive mood, subjective wellbeing, emotional intelligence, fluid intelligence, and executive control. However, the neural basis of BTP is still unclear. To address this question, we quantified individual's deviation from the BTP (DBTP), and investigated the neural substrates of DBTP using both voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) methods VBM analysis found that DBTP scores were positively correlated with gray matter volume (GMV) in the ventral precuneus. We further found that DBTP scores were negatively associated with RSFCs between the ventral precuneus seed region and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ), parahippocampa gyrus (PHG), and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). These brain regions found in both VBM and RSFC analyses are commonly considered as core nodes of the default mode network (DMN) that is known to be involved in many functions, including episodic and autobiographical memory, self-related processing, theory of mind, and imagining the future. These functions of the DMN are also essential to individuals with BTP. Taken together, we provide the first evidence for the structural and functional neural basis of BTP, and highlight the crucial role of the DMN in cultivating an individual's BTP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia–ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal–ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis. Methods Vinyl-polysiloxane impressions of 12 zirconia–ceramic and 6 metal–ceramic FDPs with veneer fractures were taken from the patients at the end of a mean observation of 40.3 ± 2.8 months. Epoxy replicas were produced from these impressions [1]. All replicas were gold coated, and inspected under the optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for descriptive fractography. Results Among the 12 zirconia–ceramic FDPs, 2 had small chippings, 9 had large chippings, and 1 exhibited delamination. Out of 6 metal–ceramic FDPs, 5 had small chippings and 1 had large chipping. Descriptive fractographic analysis based on SEM observations revealed that fracture initiated from the wear facet at the occlusal surface in all cases, irrespective of the type of restoration. Significance Zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic FDPs all fractured from microcracks that emanated from occlusal wear facets. The relatively low fracture toughness and high residual tensile stress in porcelain veneer of zirconia restorations may contribute to the higher chipping rate and larger chip size in zirconia–ceramic FDPs relative to their metal–ceramic counterparts. The low veneer/core interfacial fracture energy of porcelain-veneered zirconia may result in the occurrence of delamination in zirconia–ceramic FDPs. PMID:26233469

  16. Ion-plated metal/ceramic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigsbee, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Knipe, R.K.; Ju, C.P.; Hock, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Elemental Cu and Ti films have been deposited onto magnesia-alumina-silica ceramic substrates with a plasma-aided physical vapour deposition (ion-plating) process. Modifications in the structure and chemistry of the film, interface and substrate regions were investigated as a function of deposition process parameters (eg applied bias, voltage and current). The strength of the Cu/ceramic interface was found to be strongly influenced by both applied substrate bias voltage and substrate roughness. Films deposited with an applied substrate bias showed increasing adhesive strength with increasing bias. Microchemical analysis indicated that this enhanced adhesion is directly correlated with the development of a chemically graded interface region. The adhesive strength of the ion plated Cu films was also found to be improved with increasing substrate smoothness. The behaviour of Ti was found to be quite different from that of Cu. Ti generally has superior adhesion. This adhesion decreased for films deposited with a high bias voltage/current. From interfacial TEM it is shown that this is due to the formation of a compound at the Ti/ceramic interface. The thickness of this compound is important in adhesion. (UK)

  17. Efficiency of a bagasse substrate in a biological bed system for the degradation of glyphosate, malathion and lambda-cyhalothrin under tropical climate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roffignac, Laure; Cattan, Philippe; Mailloux, Julie; Herzog, David; Le Bellec, Fabrice

    2008-12-01

    After the rinsing of spray equipment, the rinsing water contains polluting products. One way to avoid pollution is to bring the rinsing water over a purification system, a biological bed. The system consists of an impermeable tub filled with a biomix substrate that facilitates biodegradation of pesticides. Usually, straw is one component of the biomix. The objective of this study was to assess the efficiency of an unusual substrate, bagasse, a residue of sugar cane, for the degradation of three pesticides, glyphosate, malathion and lambda-cyhalothrin. Results showed that more than 99% of malathion and glyphosate were degraded in 6 months. In the biological bed, the DT(50) value for malathion was 17 days, for glyphosate 33 days and for lambda-cyhalothrin 43 days. The degradation rate of aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) residues from the degradation of glyphosate was slower than that of the other pesticides (DT(50) 69 days). Finally, the innocuousness of the biomix after 6 months of degradation was confirmed by biological tests. Although the degradation rates of the three pesticides in the present bagasse-based system were similar to those under temperate conditions, the degradation conditions were improved by comparison with those in soil under the given tropical conditions. Further benefits of this system are pesticide confinement, to avoid their dispersion in the environment by liquids or solids, and a lower overall cost. Finally, possibilities for optimising the bagasse-based system (e.g. management of the water content and nature of the biomix) are discussed.

  18. Modifications of optical properties with ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besmann, T.M.; Abdel-Latif, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    Coatings of ceramic materials that exhibited high thermal absorptivities and emissivities were chemical vapor deposited on graphite and refractory metals. In this paper the coatings prepared were SiC and B 4 C, and the substrates used were graphite, molybdenum, titanium, and Nb-1Zr. The coatings are characterized with regard to adherence, optical properties, and response to potential harsh environments

  19. Nanomechanics of hard films on compliant substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Earl David, Jr. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Emerson, John Allen (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Moody, Neville Reid; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Hales, Lucas (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Adams, David Price (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yeager,John (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Nyugen, Thao D. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Corona, Edmundo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kennedy, Marian S. (Clemson University, Clemson, SC); Cordill, Megan J. (Erich Schmid Institute, Leoben, Austria)

    2009-09-01

    Development of flexible thin film systems for biomedical, homeland security and environmental sensing applications has increased dramatically in recent years [1,2,3,4]. These systems typically combine traditional semiconductor technology with new flexible substrates, allowing for both the high electron mobility of semiconductors and the flexibility of polymers. The devices have the ability to be easily integrated into components and show promise for advanced design concepts, ranging from innovative microelectronics to MEMS and NEMS devices. These devices often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films where differing properties can lead to large residual stresses [5]. As long as the films remain substrate-bonded, they may deform far beyond their freestanding counterpart. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure where compressive stresses can lead to wrinkling, delamination, and buckling [6,7,8] while tensile stresses can lead to film fracture and decohesion [9,10,11]. In all cases, performance depends on film adhesion. Experimentally it is difficult to measure adhesion. It is often studied using tape [12], pull off [13,14,15], and peel tests [16,17]. More recent techniques for measuring adhesion include scratch testing [18,19,20,21], four point bending [22,23,24], indentation [25,26,27], spontaneous blisters [28,29] and stressed overlayers [7,26,30,31,32,33]. Nevertheless, sample design and test techniques must be tailored for each system. There is a large body of elastic thin film fracture and elastic contact mechanics solutions for elastic films on rigid substrates in the published literature [5,7,34,35,36]. More recent work has extended these solutions to films on compliant substrates and show that increasing compliance markedly changes fracture energies compared with rigid elastic solution results [37,38]. However, the introduction of inelastic substrate response significantly complicates the problem [10,39,40]. As

  20. Produção de mudas de meloeiro amarelo, sob cultivo protegido, em diferentes substratos Production of yellow melon seedlings in different substrates under protected cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Regina Pelizza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mudas mal formadas e debilitadas comprometem o desenvolvimento das culturas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a produção de mudas de meloeiro amarelo, sob cultivo protegido, em diferentes substratos. Este trabalho foi conduzido em telado, na Universidade Federal de Pelotas (RS, nos meses de novembro e dezembro. Testaram-se os seguintes substratos: T1 (vermicomposto bovino puro; T2 (substrato comercial Plantmax®; T3 (substrato comercial Húmus Fértil®; T4 (vermicomposto bovino 75% + casca de arroz carbonizada 25% e T5 (solo 75% + vermicomposto bovino 25%. Foram avaliados o índice de velocidade e a percentagem de emergência do 6º ao 9º dia; a altura, o comprimento da raiz principal, a massa seca das raízes e da parte aérea das mudas de meloeiro, aos 27 dias. Os substratos que proporcionaram maior índice de velocidade de emergência das mudas de meloeiro amarelo foram Húmus Fértil®, vermicomposto bovino puro e vermicomposto bovino 75% mais casca de arroz carbonizada 25%. Maior altura da muda é obtida com o substrato Húmus Fértil®. O comprimento da raiz principal foi maior com o uso de vermicomposto bovino puro, Húmus Fértil®, vermicomposto bovino puro mais casca de arroz carbonizada (VB75+CAC25, em comparação com solo 75% mais vermicomposto bovino 25%. A massa seca de raiz foi maior quando utilizado Húmus Fértil®, em comparação com solo 75% mais vermicomposto bovino 25%. É possível utilizar substratos isolados ou em combinação para a produção de mudas de meloeiro amarelo sob cultivo protegido. Porém, deve-se evitar o uso de solo 75% em combinação com vermicomposto bovino 25%.Weak and malformed seedlings compromise the development of the crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the production of yellow melon seedlings in different substrates under protected cultivation. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse during November and December, at the Federal University of Pelotas (RS. The following

  1. Interfaces in ceramic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    Internal interfaces in all-ceramic dispersion fuels (such as these for HTGRs) are discussed for two classes: BeO-based dispersions, and coated particles for graphite-based fuels. The following points are made: (1) The strength of a two-phase dispersion is controlled by the weaker dispersed phase bonded to the matrix. (2) Differential expansion between two phases can be controlled by an intermediate buffer zone of low density. (3) A thin ceramic coating should be in compression. (4) Chemical reaction between coating and substrate and mass transfer in service should be minimized. The problems of the nuclear fuel designer are to develop coatings for fission product retention, and to produce radiation-resistant interfaces. 44 references, 18 figures

  2. Cost-effective production of cellulose hydrolysing enzymes from Trichoderma sp. RCK65 under SSF and its evaluation in saccharification of cellulosic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhojit; Gupta, Rishi; Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma sp. is a potential cellulase producing mesophilic fungi which grow under mild acidic condition. In this study, growth and nutritional conditions were manipulated for the maximum and cost-effective production of cellulase using lab strain Trichoderma sp. RCK65 and checked for its efficiency in hydrolysis of Prosopis juliflora (a woody substrate). Preliminary studies suggested that when 48 h old secondary fungal culture (20 % v/w) was inoculated in wheat bran moistened with mineral salt solution (pH 4.5 and 1:3 solid to moisture ratio), incubated at 30 °C and after 72 h, it produced maximum cellulase (CMCase 145 U/gds, FPase 38 U/gds and β-glucosidase 105 U/gds). However, using statistical approach a S:L ratio (1:1) was surprisingly found to be optimum that improved cellulase that is CMCase activity by 6.21 %, FPase activity by 23.68 % and β-glucosidase activity by 37.28 %. The estimated cost of crude enzyme (Rs. 5.311/1000 FPase units) seems to be economically feasible which may be due to high enzyme titre, less cultivation time and low media cost. Moreover, when the crude enzyme was used to saccharify pretreated Prosopis juliflora (a woody substrate), it resulted up to 83 % (w/w) saccharification.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF COMPLEX EQUIPMENT FOR PLASMA SPRAY CERAMIC COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Okovity

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Develop a set equipment for plasma forming ceramic coatings. The article presents characteristics and parameters of the developed complex equipment for formation of plasma ceramic coatings as well as results of its testing. Methods of research is based on studies of structural elements composite plasma coatings system ZrO2 – Y2O3  obtained  using  developed complex equipment. One of the most effective ways to protect the components from high temperature corrosion and oxidation is formation on the surface of plasma thermal barrier coatings. For thermal barrier coating has very strict requirements: сharacterized by a smooth change of physico-mechanical properties (porosity, microhardness, elastic modulus in the cross section of the metal substrate to the outer ceramic layer; to withstand multiple cycles of thermal cycling from room temperature to the operating temperature; to maintain gastightness under operating conditions and thus ensure a sufficiently high level of adhesive strength. For realization of new technological schemes applying thermal barrier coatings with high operational characteristics was developed, patented and manufactured a range of new equipment. The experiments show that authors developed PBG-1 plasmatron and powder feeder PPBG-04 have at least 2–3 times the service life during the deposition of ceramic materials compared to the standard equipment of the company "Plasma-Technik", by changing the structure of the cathode-anode plasma torch assembly and construction of the delivery unit of the feeder to facilitate the uniform supply of the powder into the plasma jet and the best of his penetration. The result is better plasma coatings with improved operational characteristics: adhesion strength is increased to 1.3–2 times, material utilization in 1.5–1.6 times microhardness 1.2–1.4 times the porosity is reduced by 2–2.5 times.

  4. Testing Consent Order on Refractory Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This notice announces that EPA has signed signed an enforceable testing consent order under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), 15 U.S.C. section 2601 at seq., with three of the primary producers of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF).

  5. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  6. Simulation and performance study of ceramic THGEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Xie, Yu-Guang; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2015-06-01

    THGEMs based on a ceramic substrate have been successfully developed for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade, of 200 μm hole diameter, 600 μm pitch, 200 μm thickness, 80 μm rim, and 50 mm×50 mm sensitive area. FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used as a reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures using 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of a single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6×104 and 1.5×104 at Ne+CH4=95:5 and Ar + i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. Good gain stability was obtained during a more than 100 hour continuous test in Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using a 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of the ceramic THGEM were measured. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205173) and State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (H9294206TD)

  7. Substrate-induced instability in gas microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1992-12-01

    The results of a programme of research into substrate-induced gain instability in gas microstrip detectors are reported. Information has been collected on a wide range of substrates including many commonly available glasses and ceramics. A theoretical model of the gain instability is proposed. While we have not yet found an acceptable substrate for the construction of high flux detectors our experience points to electronically conductive glasses as the most promising source of a stable substrate. (Author)

  8. Fabrication and characterization of low temperature co-fired cordierite glass–ceramics from potassium feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianfang; Li, Zhen; Huang, Yanqiu; Li, Fei; Yang, Qiuran

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Low cost cordierite glass–ceramics were fabricated from potassium feldspar. • The glass–ceramics could be highly densified below 950 °C. • The glass–ceramics exhibit extraordinary properties. • The glass–ceramics can be used as LTCC substrates. • The excess SiO 2 improved the microstructure and properties of the glass–ceramics. -- Abstract: Cordierite glass–ceramics for low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrates were fabricated successfully using potassium feldspar as the main raw material. The sintering and crystallization behaviors of the glass–ceramics were investigated by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The results indicated that the glass–ceramics could be highly densified at 850 °C and the cordierite was the main crystalline phase precipitated from the glasses in the temperature range between 900 and 925 °C. The study also evaluated the physical properties including dielectric properties, thermal expansion and flexural strength of the glass–ceramics. The glass–ceramics showed low dielectric constants in the range of 6–8 and low dielectric losses in the range of 0.0025–0.01. The coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) are between 4.32 and 5.48 × 10 −6 K −1 and flexural strength of the glass–ceramics are 90–130 MPa. All of those qualify the glass–ceramics for further research to be used as potential LTCC substrates in the multilayer electronic substrate field. Additionally, the excess SiO 2 acted as a great role in improving the sinterability of the glasses, and the microstructure and dielectric properties of the relevant glass–ceramics

  9. Ceramic porous material and method of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Kim, Anthony Y.; Virden, Jud W.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a mesoporous ceramic membrane having substantially uniform pore size. Additionally, the invention includes aqueous and non-aqueous processing routes to making the mesoporous ceramic membranes. According to one aspect of the present invention, inserting a substrate into a reaction chamber at pressure results in reaction products collecting on the substrate and forming a membrane thereon. According to another aspect of the present invention, a second aqueous solution that is sufficiently immiscible in the aqueous solution provides an interface between the two solutions whereon the mesoporous membrane is formed. According to a further aspect of the present invention, a porous substrate is placed at the interface between the two solutions permitting formation of a membrane on the surface or within the pores of the porous substrate. According to yet another aspect of the present invention, mesoporous ceramic materials are formed using a non-aqueous solvent and water-sensitive precursors.

  10. Effect of Impact Angle on Ceramic Deposition Behavior in Composite Cold Spray: A Finite-Element Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Rohan; Song, Jun

    2017-10-01

    During the cold spraying of particle-reinforced metal matrix composite coatings (ceramic and metal particles mixture) on metal substrates, ceramic particles may either get embedded in the substrate/deposited coating or may rebound from the substrate surface. In this study, the dependence of the ceramic rebounding phenomenon on the spray angle and its effect on substrate erosion have been analyzed using finite-element analysis. From the numerical simulations, it was found that the ceramic particle density and substrate material strength played the major roles in determining the embedding and ceramic retention behavior. Substrate material erosion also influenced the ceramic retention, and the material loss increased as the impact angles decreased from normal. In general, the results concluded that decreasing the impact angle promoted the retention possibility of ceramics in the substrate. This study provides new theoretical insights into the effect of spray angles on the ceramic retention and suggests a new route toward optimizing the spraying process to increase the ceramic retention in composite coatings cold spray.

  11. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  12. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  13. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVDMullite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, V.; Auger, M. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Silicon carbide ceramics are the leading candidate materials for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants because of their unique combination of high temperature strength, high thermal conductivity, excellent thermal shock resistance, and good high temperature stability and oxidation resistance. Ceramic coatings are being considered for diesel engine cylinder liners, piston caps, valve faces and seats, piston rings, and for turbine components such as combustors, blades, stators, seals, and bearings. Under such conditions ceramics are better suited to high temperature environments than metals. For the first time, adherent crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion/oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments. These corrosive environments include thermal, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and coal slag.

  14. High density microelectronics package using low temperature cofirable ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, S.-L.; Hsi, C.-S.; Chen, L.-S.; Lin, W. K.

    1997-01-01

    Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC) is a relative new thick film process and has many engineering and manufacturing advantages over both the sequential thick film process and high temperature cofired ceramic modules. Because of low firing temperature, low sheet resistance metal conductors, commercial thick film resistors, and thick film capacitors can be buried in or printed on the substrates. A 3-D multilayer ceramic substrate can be prepared via laminating and co-firing process. The packing density of the LTCC substrates can be increased by this 3-D packing technology. At Kaohsiung Polytechnic Institute (KPI), a LTCC substrate system has been developed for high density packaging applications, which had buried surface capacitors and resistors. The developed cordierite-glass ceramic substrate, which has similar thermal expansion as silicon chip, is a promising material for microelectronic packaging. When the substrates were sintered at temperatures between 850-900 degree centigrade, a relative density higher than 96 % can be obtained. The substrate had a dielectric constant between 5.5 and 6.5. Ruthenium-based resistor pastes were used for resistors purposes. The resistors fabricated in/on the LTCC substrates were strongly depended on the microstructures developed in the resistor films. Surface resistors were laser trimmed in order to obtain specific values for the resistors. Material with composition Pb(Fe 2/3 W 1/3 ) x (Fe l/2 Nb l/2 ) y Ti 2 O 3 was used as dielectric material of the capacitor in the substrate. The material can be sintered at temperatures between 850-930 degree centigrade, and has dielectric constant as high as 26000. After cofiring, good adhesion between dielectric and substrate layers was obtained. Combing the buried resistors and capacitors together with the lamination of LTCC layer, a 3-dimensional multilayered ceramic package was fabricated. (author)

  15. High density microelectronics package using low temperature cofirable ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, S -L; Hsi, C -S; Chen, L -S; Lin, W K [Kaoshiung Polytechnic Institute Ta-Hsu, Kaoshiung (China)

    1998-12-31

    Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC) is a relative new thick film process and has many engineering and manufacturing advantages over both the sequential thick film process and high temperature cofired ceramic modules. Because of low firing temperature, low sheet resistance metal conductors, commercial thick film resistors, and thick film capacitors can be buried in or printed on the substrates. A 3-D multilayer ceramic substrate can be prepared via laminating and co-firing process. The packing density of the LTCC substrates can be increased by this 3-D packing technology. At Kaohsiung Polytechnic Institute (KPI), a LTCC substrate system has been developed for high density packaging applications, which had buried surface capacitors and resistors. The developed cordierite-glass ceramic substrate, which has similar thermal expansion as silicon chip, is a promising material for microelectronic packaging. When the substrates were sintered at temperatures between 850-900 degree centigrade, a relative density higher than 96 % can be obtained. The substrate had a dielectric constant between 5.5 and 6.5. Ruthenium-based resistor pastes were used for resistors purposes. The resistors fabricated in/on the LTCC substrates were strongly depended on the microstructures developed in the resistor films. Surface resistors were laser trimmed in order to obtain specific values for the resistors. Material with composition Pb(Fe{sub 2/3}W{sub 1/3}){sub x}(Fe{sub l/2}Nb{sub l/2}){sub y}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used as dielectric material of the capacitor in the substrate. The material can be sintered at temperatures between 850-930 degree centigrade, and has dielectric constant as high as 26000. After cofiring, good adhesion between dielectric and substrate layers was obtained. Combing the buried resistors and capacitors together with the lamination of LTCC layer, a 3-dimensional multilayered ceramic package was fabricated. (author)

  16. Design and characterization of a carbon-nanotube-reinforced adhesive coating for piezoelectric ceramic discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzara, G; Chang, F-K

    2009-01-01

    The silver paste electrode of piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic discs has been shown to produce a weak interface bond between a bare PZT and its paste coating under a peeling force. In this work, an investigation was conducted to reinforce the bond with a high density array of oriented carbon nanotube nano-electrodes (CNTs-NEA), between a bare PZT ceramic and a metal substrate. The ensuing design and fabrication of a carbon-nanotube-coated piezoelectric disc (CPZT) is presented along with a study of the bondline integrity of a CPZT mounted on a hosting structure. The CPZT has its electrode silver paste coating replaced with a high density array of CNTs-NEA. Mechanical tests were performed to characterize the shear strength of the bondline between CPZT discs and the substrate. The test results were compared with shear strengths of the bondlines made of pure non-conductive adhesive and adhesive with randomly mixed CNTs. The comparison showed the oriented CNT coating on PZTs could significantly enhance the interfacial shear strength. Through the microscopic examination, it was evident that the ratio between the CNT length (Lc) and the bond thickness (H) significantly influenced the bond strength of CPZT discs. Three major interface microstructure types and their corresponding failure modes for specific Lc/H values were identified. The study also showed that failure did not occur along the interface between the PZT ceramic element and the CNT coating

  17. Thickness dependence of magnetoelectric response for composites of Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} films on CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing, E-mail: wang-jing@nuaa.edu.cn; Zhu, Kongjun [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, College of Aerospace Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wu, Xia; Deng, Chaoyong [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Peng, Renci; Wang, Jianjun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Lab of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Using chemical solution spin-coating we grew Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} films of different thicknesses on highly dense CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics. X-ray diffraction revealed no other phases except Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In many of these samples we observed typical ferroelectric hysteresis loops, butterfly-shaped piezoelectric strains, and the magnetic-field-dependent magnetostriction. These behaviors caused appreciable magnetoelectric responses based on magnetic-mechanical-electric coupling. Our results indicated that the thickness of the Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} film was important in obtaining strong magnetoelectric coupling.

  18. An interdisciplinary approach to reconstruct a fractured tooth under an intact all ceramic crown: Case report with four years follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Bhandari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma causing the fracture of a restored tooth with the extracoronal full coverage prosthesis remaining intact is a common occurrence in dental practice. Reconstruction of the damaged tooth foundation and recementation of the crown can pose quite a challenge for the restorative dentist. This case report describes an innovative interdisciplinary chairside technique for the recementation of an all-ceramic crown on a fractured maxillary central incisor. The course of care described is effective, affordable, and saves time in comparison with other treatment options for such clinical situations.

  19. Surface oxidation of porous ZrB{sub 2}-SiC ceramic composites by continuous-wave ytterbium fibre laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmod, Dayang Salyani Abang, E-mail: dygsalyani@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia); Glandut, Nicolas [SPCTS, UMR 7315, CNRS, University of Limoges, European Ceramic Center, 12 Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges (France); Khan, Amir Azam [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia); Labbe, Jean-Claude [SPCTS, UMR 7315, CNRS, University of Limoges, European Ceramic Center, 12 Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges (France)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Surface oxidation of ZrB{sub 2}-SiC ceramic composites by Yb-fibre laser. • Round spiral laser pattern created for the surface oxidation. • Presence of laser-formed oxide scale and unaffected beneath regions. • Crazed but uncracked surface oxide. • A dense glassy SiO{sub 2}-rich layer exhibited enhances oxidation resistance. - Abstract: Surface treatment of ceramic substrates by a laser beam can allow to incorporate interesting properties to these ceramics. In the present work, surface oxidation of ca. 30% porous ZrB{sub 2}-SiC ceramic composites by using an ytterbium fibre laser was conducted. Oxidation of ceramic substrates through this process under ambient conditions has certain advantages compared to the classical oxidation method. A particular spiral laser pattern was created in order to produce an oxidized structure on ZrB{sub 2}-SiC porous substrates. The laser parameters were as follows i.e., laser power of 50, 60 and 70 W, a beam diameter of 1.25 mm, velocity of 2 mm/s, acceleration and deceleration of 1 mm/s{sup 2}. The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser-treated region was examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. At laser power of 70 W, the sample exhibits uniform oxidation. It revealed that the very porous bulk beneath remained unaffected and unoxidized because this laser-formed oxide scale protects the substrate from oxidation. The presence of oxidized and unaffected regions indicated a high degree of heat localization. The dense glassy SiO{sub 2}-rich layer prevents the inward oxygen diffusion into the inner bulk hence enhances the oxidation resistance.

  20. Surface analysis applied to metal-ceramic and bioceramic interfacial bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, R.St.C.; Arora, P.S.; Steveson, M.; Kawashima, N.; Cavallaro, G.P.; Ming, H.; Skinner, W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Low temperature plasma reactions, combined with sol-gel coatings, have been used to produce a variety of ceramic surface layers on metal substrates and interfacial layers between metals and oxides or other ceramics. These layers can be designed to be compositionally and functionally graded from the metal to bulk ceramic material, eg. silica, alumina, hydroxyapatite. The graded layers are generally <50nm thick, continuous, fully bonded to the substrate and deformable without disbonding. The objectives in design of these layers have been to produce: metal surfaces protected from oxidation, corrosion and acid attack; improved metal-ceramic bonding; and bioceramic titanium-based interfaces to bioactive hydroxyapatite for improved dental and medical implants. Modified Auger parameter studies for Si in XPS spectra show that the structure on the metal surfaces grades from amorphous, dehydroxylated silica on the outer surface through layer silicates, chain silicates, pyrosilicates to orthosilicates close to the metal interface. At the metal interface, detached grains of the metal are imaged with interpenetration of the oxide and silicate species linking the layer to the oxidised metal surface. The ∼30nm layer has a substantially increased frictional load compared with the untreated oxidised metal, i.e. behaviour consistent with either stronger adhesion of the coating to the substrate or a harder surface. The composition, structure and thickness of these layers can be controlled by the duration of each plasma reaction and the choice of the final reagent. The mechanisms of reaction in each process step have been elucidated with a combination of XPS, TOF-SIMS, TEM, SEM and FTIR. Similar, graded titanium/oxide/silicate/silica ceramic surface layers have been shown to form using the low temperature plasma reactions on titanium alloys used in medical and dental implants. Thicker (i.e. μm) overlayers of ceramic materials can be added to the graded surface layers

  1. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  2. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  3. Ceramic Parts for Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Carpenter, Harry W.; Tellier, Jim; Rollins, Clark; Stormo, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Abilities of ceramics to serve as turbine blades, stator vanes, and other elements in hot-gas flow of rocket engines discussed in report. Ceramics prime candidates, because of resistance to heat, low density, and tolerance of hostile environments. Ceramics considered in report are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and new generation of such ceramic composites as transformation-toughened zirconia and alumina and particulate- or whisker-reinforced matrices. Report predicts properly designed ceramic components viable in advanced high-temperature rocket engines and recommends future work.

  4. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  5. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  6. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  7. Ceramic transactions: Environmental and waste management issues in the ceramic industry. Volume 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.

    1994-01-01

    A symposium on environmental and waste management issues in the ceramic industry took place in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 19-22, 1993. The symposium was held in conjunction with the 95th Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society and was sponsored by the Ceramic Manufacturing Council, Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Committee with the Glass and Optical Materials, Basic Science, Cements, Nuclear, Refractory Ceramics, Structural Clay Products, Whitewares, Design, Electronics, Engineering Ceramics, and Materials and Equipment Divisions. This volume documents several of the papers that were presented at the symposium. Papers presented in this volume are categorized under the following headings: vitrification of hazardous and mixed wastes; waste glass properties and microstructure; processing of nuclear waste disposal glasses; waste form qualification; glass dissolution: modeling and mechanisms; systems and field testing of waste forms

  8. Influence of Heat-Treatment on the Adhesive Strength between a Micro-Sized Bonded Component and a Silicon Substrate under Bend and Shear Loading Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Chiemi

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive bend and shear tests of micro-sized bonded component have been performed to clarify the relationship between effects of heat-treatment on the adhesive strength and the bonded specimen shape using Weibull analysis. Multiple micro-sized SU-8 columns with four different diameters were fabricated on a Si substrate under the same fabrication condition. Heat-treatment can improve both of the adhesive bend and shear strength. The improvement rate of the adhesive shear strength is much larger than that of the adhesive bend strength, because the residual stress, which must change by heat-treatment, should effect more strongly on the shear loading. In case of bend type test, the adhesive bend strength in the smaller diameters (50 and 75 μm) widely vary, because the critical size of the natural defect (micro-crack) should vary more widely in the smaller diameters. In contrast, in case of shear type test, the adhesive shear strengths in each diameter of the columns little vary. This suggests that the size of the natural defects may not strongly influence on the adhesive shear strength. All the result suggests that both of the adhesive bend and shear strengths should be complicatedly affected by heat-treatment and the bonded columnar diameter

  9. Use of spectroscopic and imaging techniques to evaluate pretreated sugarcane bagasse as a substrate for cellulase production under solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Zúñiga, Ursula Fabiola; Bertucci Neto, Victor; Couri, Sonia; Crestana, Silvio; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2014-03-01

    The enzymatic cocktail of cellulases is one of the most costly inputs affecting the economic viability of the biochemical route for biomass conversion into biofuels and other chemicals. Here, the influence of liquid hot water, dilute acid, alkali, and combined acid/alkali pretreatments on sugarcane bagasse (SCB) used for cellulase production was investigated by means of spectroscopic and imaging techniques. Chemical composition and structural characteristics, such as crystallinity (determined by X-ray diffraction), functional groups (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy), were used to correlate SCB pretreatments with enzymatic biosynthesis by a strain of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger under solid-state fermentation. The combined acid/alkali pretreatment resulted in a SCB with higher cellulose content (86.7%). However, the high crystallinity (74%) of the resulting biomass was detrimental to microbial uptake and enzyme production. SCB pretreated with liquid hot water yielded the highest filter paper cellulase (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase), and xylanase activities (0.4, 14.9, and 26.1 U g(-1), respectively). The results showed that a suitable pretreatment for SCB to be used as a substrate for cellulase production should avoid severe conditions in order to preserve amorphous cellulose and to enhance the physical properties that assist microbial access.

  10. 2-Nitrobenzoate 2-Nitroreductase (NbaA) Switches Its Substrate Specificity from 2-Nitrobenzoic Acid to 2,4-Dinitrobenzoic Acid under Oxidizing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Seok; Go, Hayoung; Cha, Chang-Jun; Lee, Cheolju; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Lau, Peter C. K.

    2013-01-01

    2-Nitrobenzoate 2-nitroreductase (NbaA) of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KU-7 is a unique enzyme, transforming 2-nitrobenzoic acid (2-NBA) and 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid (2,4-DNBA) to the 2-hydroxylamine compounds. Sequence comparison reveals that NbaA contains a conserved cysteine residue at position 141 and two variable regions at amino acids 65 to 74 and 193 to 216. The truncated mutant Δ65-74 exhibited markedly reduced activity toward 2,4-DNBA, but its 2-NBA reduction activity was unaffected; however, both activities were abolished in the Δ193-216 mutant, suggesting that these regions are necessary for the catalysis and specificity of NbaA. NbaA showed different lag times for the reduction of 2-NBA and 2,4-DNBA with NADPH, and the reduction of 2,4-DNBA, but not 2-NBA, failed in the presence of 1 mM dithiothreitol or under anaerobic conditions, indicating oxidative modification of the enzyme for 2,4-DNBA. The enzyme was irreversibly inhibited by 5,5′-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and ZnCl2, which bind to reactive thiol/thiolate groups, and was eventually inactivated during the formation of higher-order oligomers at high pH, high temperature, or in the presence of H2O2. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry revealed the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds by involvement of the two cysteines at positions 141 and 194. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the cysteines at positions 39, 103, 141, and 194 played a role in changing the enzyme activity and specificity toward 2-NBA and 2,4-DNBA. This study suggests that oxidative modifications of NbaA are responsible for the differential specificity for the two substrates and further enzyme inactivation through the formation of disulfide bonds under oxidizing conditions. PMID:23123905

  11. Nano/micro particle beam for ceramic deposition and mechanical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Doo-Man; Kim, Min-Saeng; Kim, Min-Hyeng; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Yeo, Jun-Cheol; Lee, Caroline Sunyong

    2010-01-01

    Nano/micro particle beam (NPB) is a newly developed ceramic deposition and mechanical etching process. Additive (deposition) and subtractive (mechanical etching) processes can be realized in one manufacturing process using ceramic nano/micro particles. Nano- or micro-sized powders are sprayed through the supersonic nozzle at room temperature and low vacuum conditions. According to the process conditions, the ceramic powder can be deposited on metal substrates without thermal damage, and mechanical etching can be conducted in the same process with a simple change of process conditions and powders. In the present work, ceramic aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) thin films were deposited on metal substrates. In addition, the glass substrate was etched using a mask to make small channels. Deposited and mechanically etched surface morphology, coating thickness and channel depth were investigated. The test results showed that the NPB provides a feasible additive and subtractive process using ceramic powders.

  12. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  13. Produtividade do tomateiro em diferentes substratos e modelos de casas de vegetação Tomato crop production under different substrates and greenhouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar A. Carrijo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento com a cultura do tomate, foi instalado na Embrapa Hortaliças em Brasília, durante os anos de 2000 e 2001, para avaliar a produção do tomateiro em diferentes substratos e casas de vegetação. Os substratos utilizados foram casca de arroz, casca de arroz parcialmente carbonizada, fibra de coco verde, lã de rocha, maravalha, serragem e substrato para produção de mudas utilizado na Embrapa Hortaliças (150 L de terra de subsolo, 50 L de casca de arroz parcialmente carbonizada e 17 L de esterco de galinha. Os modelos de casas de vegetação utilizados foram teto em arco, arco com teto convectivo e capela. Não foi verificada diferença estatística significativa quanto a produção de frutos comerciais entre os substratos fibra de coco (10,4 kg m-2, serragem (9,3 kg m-2, casca de arroz carbonizada (9,3 kg m-2 e maravalha (9,0 kg m-2. A menor produção foi obtida com o substrato lã de rocha (6,4 kg m-2. Houve redução da produção entre os anos de cultivo, em torno de 33%, em decorrência de um intenso ataque de traça do tomateiro (Tuta absoluta em todas as casas de vegetação, prejudicando a produtividade. O maior peso médio dos frutos foi obtido sobre a fibra de coco (128 g m-2 e casca de arroz carbonizada (123 g m-2, independente do modelo de casa de vegetação utilizado.The trial was carried out at Embrapa Hortaliças, in Brasilia, Brazil, to evaluate the performance of tomato crop production during two years (2000 and 2001, under three greenhouse models and different types of substrates. The greenhouse models were arch roof; even span and an arch roof with upper convective aperture. The substrates were rice husk, carbonized rice husk, coconut fiber, sawdust, coarsed sawdust, rockwool and a substrate for seedling production used at Embrapa Hortaliças. No significant statistical difference was verified for tomatoes cultivated in coconut fiber (10,4 kg m-2, sawdust (9,9 kg m-2, carbonized rice husk (9,3 kg m-2 and

  14. Microstructural properties of BaTiO3 ceramics and thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundora C, A.; Portelles, J.J.; Siqueiros, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    A microstructural study of BaTiO 3 ceramics obtained by the conventional ceramic method is presented. Targets were produced to grow BaTiO 3 thin films by pulsed laser deposition on Pt/Ti/Si (100) substrates. X-ray diffraction, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-ray Photon Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to study the properties of the BaTiO 3 ceramic samples and thin films, as deposited and after an annealing process. (Author)

  15. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    OpenAIRE

    Ramm , D.; Hutchings , I.; Clyne , T.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharp...

  16. Literature Review of Polymer Derived Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Reuben James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs), also known as preceramic polymers, are valuable coating agents that are used to produce surface barriers on substrates such as stainless steel. These barriers protect against a multitude of environmental threats, and have been used since their research and development in 19772. This paper seeks to review and demonstrate the remarkable properties and versatility that PDCs have to offer, while also giving a brief overview of the processing techniques used today.

  17. Different in vitro behavior of two Ca3(PO42 based biomaterials, a glass-ceramic and a ceramic, having the same chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Guerrero-Lecuona

    2015-09-01

    The reactivity in simulated body fluid and Tris–HCl solutions was studied. Both materials showed bioactive behavior, but the glass-ceramic dissolved faster, releasing large proportion of Ca and P ions, which afterwards nucleated and precipitated. However, the ceramic was more stable under the same conditions in these solutions. Glass-ceramic composite has a more open structure and allowed the faster formation of a bone-like apatite layer than the ceramic.

  18. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  19. Ceramic ball grid array package stress analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, S. H. B. S.; Aziz, M. H. A.; Ong, N. R.; Sauli, Z.; Alcain, J. B.; Retnasamy, V.

    2017-09-01

    The ball grid array (BGA), a form of chip scale package (CSP), was developed as one of the most advanced surface mount devices, which may be assembled by an ordinary surface ball bumps are used instead of plated nickel and gold (Ni/Au) bumps. Assembly and reliability of the BGA's printed circuit board (PCB), which is soldered by conventional surface mount technology is considered in this study. The Ceramic Ball Grid Array (CBGA) is a rectangular ceramic package or square-shaped that will use the solder ball for external electrical connections instead of leads or wire for connections. The solder balls will be arranged in an array or grid at the bottom of the ceramic package body. In this study, ANSYS software is used to investigate the stress on the package for 2 balls and 4 balls of the CBGA package with the various force range of 1-3 Newton applied to the top of the die, top of the substrate and side of the substrate. The highest maximum stress was analyzed and the maximum equivalent stress was observed on the solder ball and the die. From the simulation result, the CBGA package with less solder balls experience higher stress compared to the package with many solder balls. Therefore, less number of solder ball on the CBGA package results higher stress and critically affect the reliability of the solder balls itself, substrate and die which can lead to the solder crack and also die crack.

  20. Development of ceramic roller bush for diesel fuel injection pump; Nenryo funsha pump yo ceramics sei roller bush no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, K; Kamiya, S; Fujimura, M; Tsuzuki, M [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan); Taniguchi, K [Denso Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics have been applied to roller bush for diesel fuel injection pump in order to improve the seizure resistance. It was found that ceramic roller bush made it possible to improve the seizure load by more than three times as compared to conventional metal roller bush when the kerosene was used as lubricant The ceramic roller bush proved to be durable under engine operating conditions. 6 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  2. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  3. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  4. Ceramic protective coatings applied by sol-gel or electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoch, A.

    1993-01-01

    Sol-gel and electrophoresis are the complementary techniques which may be used for obtaining the ceramic coatings. The composition of such a coatings depends on the composition of electrophoresis bath or sol solution. Thermal treatment is used for densifying the coating and promoting the adherence of coating to the substrate. In presented work silica, silica-alumina or alumina coatings are applied by sol-gel dip coating procedure on steel, aluminium or ceramic substrates. Electrophoresis is employed for obtaining zirconia, alumina or hydroxyapatite coatings on stainless steel. (author). 7 refs

  5. [Ceramic inlays and onlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, A W; de Kloet, H J; van der Kuy, P

    1996-11-01

    Large direct composite restorations can induce shrinkage related postoperative sensitivity. Indirect resin-bonded (tooth colored) restorations may perhaps prevent these complaints. Indirect bonded ceramics are especially attractive because of their biocompatibility and esthetic performance. Several procedures and techniques are currently available for the fabrication of ceramic restorations: firing, casting, heat-pressing and milling. In this article the different systems are described. Advantages, disadvantages and clinical performance of ceramic inlays are compared and discussed.

  6. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  7. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    PZT ), ceramics have attracted natural abundance. much attention for use in nonvolatile semiconductor mem- We attribute the observed spectra in Fig. I to...near a crack tip in piezoelectric ceramics of lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ) and barium titanate. They reasoned that the poling of ferroelectric... Texture in Ferroelastic Tetragonal Zirconia," J. Am. Ceram . Soc., 73 (1990) no. 6: 1777-1779. 27. J. F. Jue and A. Virkar, "Fabrication, Microstructural

  8. Piezo-electrostrictive ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Gi; Shin, Byeong Cheol

    1991-09-01

    This book deals with principle and the case of application of piezo-electrostrictive ceramics, which includes definition of piezoelectric materials and production and development of piezoelectric materials, coexistence of Pb(zr, Ti)O 3 ceramics on cause of coexistence in MPB PZT ceramics, electrostrictive effect of oxide type perovskite, practical piezo-electrostrictive materials, and breaking strength, evaluation technique of piezoelectric characteristic, and piezoelectric accelerometer sensor like printer head, ink jet and piezoelectric relay.

  9. Influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of rounded rod specimens. Plate specimens were fabricated from zirconia (ZrO2), feldspathic porcelain, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDG ceramics). Plate surfaces were either ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens with a 2.0-mm-diameter were fabricated from type 4 gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics (HP ceramics). Wear testing was performed by means of a wear testing apparatus under 5,000 reciprocal strokes of the rod specimen with 5.9 N vertical loading. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The gold alloy showed the maximal height loss (90.0 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground porcelain, whereas the HP ceramics exhibited maximal height loss (49.8 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground zirconia. There was a strong correlation between height loss of the rod and surface roughness of the underlying plates, for both the gold alloy and HP ceramics.

  10. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  11. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  12. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  13. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  14. Ceramic synthesis of 0.08BiGaO3-0.90BaTiO3-0.02LiNbO3 under high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Jin; Yong, Li; Mou-Sheng, Song; Lin, Chen; Xiao-Peng, Jia; Hong-An, Ma

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the preparation of 0.08BiGaO3-0.90BaTiO3-0.02LiNbO3 is investigated at pressure 3.8 GPa and temperature 1100-1200 °C. Experimental results indicate that not only is the sintered rate more effective, but also the sintered temperature is lower under high pressure and high temperature than those of under normal pressure. It is thought that the adscititious pressure plays the key role in this process, which is discussed in detail. The composition and the structure of the as-prepared samples are recorded by XRD patterns. The result shows that the phases of BaTiO3, BaBiO2.77, and Ba2Bi4Ti5O18 with piezoelectric ceramic performance generate in the sintered samples. Furthermore, the surface morphology characteristics of the typical samples are also investigated using a scanning electron microscope. It indicates that the grain size and surface structure of the samples are closely related to the sintering temperature and sintering time. It is hoped that this study can provide a new train of thought for the preparation of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with excellent performance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51172089), the Natural Science Foundation of Education Department of Guizhou Province, China (Grant Nos. KY [2013]183 and LH [2015]7232), and the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Tongren University, China (Grant No. DS1302).

  15. Reciprocating sliding behaviour of self-mated amorphous diamond-like carbon coatings on Si3N4 ceramics under tribological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, M.; Abreu, C.S.; Salgueiredo, E.; Almeida, F.A.; Fernandes, A.J.S.; Costa, F.M.; Gomes, J.R.; Silva, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering have been deposited on silicon nitride based substrates for tribological purposes. A conductive Si 3 N 4 /30% vol.TiN composite was produced for bias substrate application. Friction and wear properties of carbon coated self-mated pairs were assessed using a reciprocal motion ball-on-flat setup in unlubricated conditions with applied normal loads of 3 N and 5 N. The worn surfaces were studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to identify the prevalent wear mechanism. Unbiased and biased substrates behaved differently, the former undergoing premature delamination while the latter endured the tribological test conditions (3 N, ∼ 43 m). Very low friction coefficient values of ∼ 0.015 were sustained assuring remarkable wear behaviour. Surface grooving and wear debris accumulation in the sliding track lead to a roughness increase from the nominal rms value of ∼ 12 nm to ∼ 97 nm, although no weight loss and surface profile modification was quantifiable

  16. The effects of substrate layer thickness on piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting with a bimorph type cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosaari, Jaakko; Leinonen, Mikko; Juuti, Jari; Jantunen, Heli

    2018-06-01

    In this research four piezoelectric bimorph type cantilevers for energy harvesting were manufactured, measured and analyzed to study the effects of substrate layer thickness on energy harvesting efficiency and durability under different accelerations. The cantilevers had the same dimensions of the piezoelectric ceramic components, but had different thicknesses of the steel substrate (no steel, 30 μm, 50 μm and 75 μm). The cantilevers were tuned to the same resonance frequency with different sizes of tip mass (2.13 g, 3.84 g, 4.17 g and 5.08 g). The energy harvester voltage outputs were then measured across an electrical load near to the resonance frequency (∼40 Hz) with sinusoidal vibrations under different accelerations. The stress exhibited by the four cantilevers was compared and analyzed and their durability was tested with accelerations up to 2.5 g-forces.

  17. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis flammable range and dominant parameters for synthesizing several ceramics and intermetallic compounds under heat-loss condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Atsushi

    1996-01-01

    Extensive comparisons have been conducted between experimental and theoretical results for the nonadiabatic self-propagating high-temperature synthesis combustion characteristics of many solid-solid systems subjected to volumetric heat loss. The nonadiabatic flame propagation theory--which describes the premixed mode of bulk flame propagation supported by the nonpremixed reaction of dispersed nonmetal (or higher-melting point metal) particles in the liquid metal, with finite-rate reaction at the particle surface and temperature-sensitive Arrhenius-type condensed-phase mass diffusivity--is used to compare with experimental results with heat loss. Systems examined are ceramics (TiC, TiB 2 , and ZrB 2 ) and intermetallic compounds (NiAl, TiCo, and TiNi). By using a consistent set of physicochemical parameters for these systems, satisfactory quantitative agreement is demonstrated for the flammable range (defined in terms of the mixture ratio, degree of dilution, particle size, and/or compact diameter)

  18. Comparison of Heavy-Duty Scuffing Behavior between Chromium-Based Ceramic Composite and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Coated Ring Sliding against Cast Iron Liner under Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A running-in and starved lubrication experiment is designed to investigate the heavy-duty scuffing behavior of piston ring coatings against cast iron (Fe cylinder liner using the piston ring reciprocating liner test rig. The scuffing resistance of the piston ring with the chromium-based ceramic composite coating (CKS, and that with the thermally sprayed nickel-chromium-molybdenum coating (NCM is compared at different nominal pressures (40~100 MPa and temperatures (180~250 °C. With the failure time as a criterion, the rank order is as follows: NCM/Fe > CKS/Fe. Before the scoring occurs at the interface of the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL, the cast iron liner enters into a “polish wear” stage, and iron-based adhesive materials begin to form on the piston ring surface. With the macroscopic adhesion formation, the plastic shearing cycle causes surface damages mainly due to abrasive effects for the CKS/Fe pairs and adhesive effects for the NCM/Fe pairs.

  19. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  20. Effects of improved process for CuO-doped NKN lead-free ceramics on high-power piezoelectric transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song-Ling; Tsai, Cheng-Che; Liou, Yi-Cheng; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Li, Bing-Jing; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of the electrical proper- ties of CuO-doped (Na(0.5)K(0.5))NbO(3) (NKN) ceramics prepared separately using the B-site oxide precursor method (BO method) and conventional mixed-oxide method (MO method) on high-power piezoelectric transformers (PTs) were investigated. The performances of PTs made with these two substrates were compared. Experimental results showed that the output power and temperature stability of PTs could be enhanced because of the lower resonant impedance of the ceramics prepared using the BO method. In addition, the output power of PTs was more affected by the resonant impedance than by the mechanical quality factor (Q(m)) of the ceramics. The PTs fabricated with ceramics prepared using the BO method showed a high efficiency of more than 94% and a maximum output power of 8.98 W (power density: 18.3 W/cm(3)) with temperature increase of 3°C under the optimum load resistance (5 kΩ) and an input voltage of 150 V(pp). This output power of the lead-free disk-type PTs is the best reported so far.

  1. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Polyakov, A.I.; Petukhov, Yu.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Zashkvara, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  2. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabikin, Yu A; Polyakov, A I; Petukhov, Yu V; Bitenbaev, M I; Zashkvara, O V [Physical-Technical Inst., Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2000-04-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  3. Direct interfacial polymerization onto thin ceramic hollow fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, Evelien; de Wit, Patrick; Benes, Nieck E.

    2018-01-01

    Membrane separation under harsh conditions, such as high-p,T or in the presence of aggressive chemicals, requires a robust membrane support. In academia commonly ceramic disks are used for this purpose, but these disks posses a too low surface-area-to-volume ratio for practical applications. Ceramic

  4. Effects of irradiation on structural properties of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Hurley, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Stability of crystalline ceramic nuclear waste may be degraded by self-irradiation damage. Changes in density, strength, thermal conductivity, and lattice structure are of concern. Structural damage of ceramics under various radiation conditions is discussed and related to possible effects in nuclear waste

  5. Effects of irradiation on structural properties of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Hurley, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Stability of crystalline ceramic nuclear waste may be degraded by self-irradiation damage. Changes in density, strength, thermal conductivity, and lattice structure are of concern. In this paper, structural damage of ceramics under various radiation conditions is discussed and related to possible effects in nuclear waste

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study of Ceramic Foam Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laé, E.; Duval, H.; Rivière, C.; Le Brun, P.; Guillot, J.-B.

    Ceramic foam filtration is widely used to enable removal of non metallic inclusions from liquid aluminium. Its performances have been largely studied in the literature and some discrepancies remain amongst the published results. Consequently, a research program was deployed to evaluate the performances of a range of ceramic foam filters used under various conditions and to understand the inclusions capture mechanisms.

  7. New ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  8. Fiscal 1997 achievement report. Research and development of synergy ceramics; 1997 nendo synergy ceramics no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Research and development is conducted on two subjects, that is, 1) hyper organized structure control technology and 2) structural element control technology. In addition, joint research and development is conducted on the creation of new materials by hyper organized structure controlling, hyper organized structure controlling for ceramics by a structurization reaction process, designing of precursors to ceramics, and the hyper organized structure control for ceramics by nanostructure process control. The joint research and development endeavors further deal with re-entrusted projects which involve researches on sintered structure control by powdery particulate structure control; dynamic process of synergy ceramics; oxynitride liquids, glasses, and glass-ceramics; and multifunctional ceramic laminates for engineering applications. Under subject 1), researches are made on the development of precursors into ceramics by utilizing chemical reactions of organic metal compounds, and analyses are conducted into the effects, exerted by the molecular structures of precursors and the conditions of a reaction for their development into ceramics, on the microstructures and various properties of the ceramics to be composed. Under subject 2), high strength, great hardness, and high resistance to wear are realized by allowing the precipitation of nano-particulates in crystals of a fine and very compact sintered body of alumina. (NEDO)

  9. Effect of various intermediate ceramic layers on the interfacial stability of zirconia core and veneering ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Yeo, In-Sung; Yi, Yang-Jin; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effects of intermediate ceramics on the adhesion between the zirconia core and veneer ceramics. The polished surfaces of fully sintered Y-TZP blocks received three different treatments: (1) connector (C), (2) liner (L) or (3) wash layer (W). All the treated zirconia blocks were veneered with either (a) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (E) or (b) feldspathic porcelain (V) and divided into four groups (CE, CV, LE and WV). For the control group, the testing surfaces of metal blocks were veneered with feldspathic porcelain (VM). A half of the samples in each group (n = 21) were exposed to thermocycling, while the other half of the specimens were stored at room temperature under dry conditions. All specimens were subjected to the shear test and the failed surfaces were microscopically examined. The elemental distribution at the zirconia core/veneer interface was analyzed. The specimens in Groups CE and CV exhibited significantly greater mean bond strength values than those in Groups LE and WV, respectively (p ceramic substances into the zirconia surface. A glass-ceramic based connector is significantly more favorable to core/veneer adhesion than the other intermediate ceramics evaluated in the study. However, thermal cycling affected the bond strength at the core/veneer interface differently according to the intermediate ceramics.

  10. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  11. Ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  12. Hardness and electrochemical behavior of ceramic coatings on Inconel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. SUJAYA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of ceramic materials like alumina and silicon carbide are deposited on Inconel substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique using Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. Deposited films are characterized using UV-visible spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction. Composite microhardness of ceramic coated Inconel system is measured using Knoop indenter and its film hardness is separated using a mathematical model based on area-law of mixture. It is then compared with values obtained using nanoindentation method. Film hardness of the ceramic coating is found to be high compared to the substrates. Corrosion behavior of substrates after ceramic coating is studied in 3.5% NaCl solution by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The Nyquist and the Bode plots obtained from the EIS data are fitted by appropriate equivalent circuits. The pore resistance, the charge transfer resistance, the coating capacitance and the double layer capacitance of the coatings are obtained from the equivalent circuit. Experimental results show an increase in corrosion resistance of Inconel after ceramic coating. Alumina coated Inconel showed higher corrosion resistance than silicon carbide coated Inconel. After the corrosion testing, the surface topography of the uncoated and the coated systems are examined by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used.

  14. Ceramic membrane microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, T J; Gainer, J L; Kirwan, D J

    1992-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a ceramic microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor. In this type of reactor, the substrate solution permeates the ceramic membrane and reacts with an enzyme that has been immobilized within its porous interior. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of permeation rate on the observed kinetic parameters for the immobilized enzyme in order to assess possible mass transfer influences or shear effects. Kinetic parameters were found to be independent of flow rate for immobilized penicillinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Therefore, neither mass transfer nor shear effects were observed for enzymes immobilized within the ceramic membrane. Both the residence time and the conversion in the microfilter reactor could be controlled simply by regulating the transmembrane pressure drop. This study suggests that a ceramic microfilter reactor can be a desirable alternative to a packed bed of porous particles, especially when an immobilized enzyme has high activity and a low Michaelis constant.

  15. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon p–i–n solar cells deposited under well controlled ion bombardment using pulse-shaped substrate biasing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wank, M.A.; Swaaij, van R.A.C.M.M.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    We applied pulse-shaped biasing (PSB) to the expanding thermal plasma deposition of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers at substrate temperatures of 200¿°C and growth rates of about 1¿nm/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of intrinsic films showed a densification with increasing

  16. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells deposited under well controlled ion bombardment using pulse-shaped substrate biasing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wank, M. A.; van Swaaij, R.; R. van de Sanden,; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    We applied pulse-shaped biasing (PSB) to the expanding thermal plasma deposition of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers at substrate temperatures of 200 degrees C and growth rates of about 1?nm/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of intrinsic films showed a densification with

  17. Coating system to permit direct brazing of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadden, Charles H.; Hosking, F. Michael

    2003-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a ceramic component that enables direct brazing using a non-active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a ceramic component to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by using this brazing method. The ceramic can be high purity alumina. The method comprises applying a first coating of a silicon-bearing oxide material (e.g. silicon dioxide or mullite (3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.2SiO.sub.2) to the ceramic. Next, a thin coating of active metal (e.g. Ti or V) is applied. Finally, a thicker coating of a non-active metal (e.g. Au or Cu) is applied. The coatings can be applied by physical vapor deposition (PVD). Alternatively, the active and non-active metals can be co-deposited (e.g. by sputtering a target made of mullite). After all of the coatings have been applied, the ceramic can be fired at a high temperature in a non-oxidizing environment to promote diffusion, and to enhance bonding of the coatings to the substrate. After firing, the metallized ceramic component can be brazed to other components using a conventional non-active braze alloy. Alternatively, the firing and brazing steps can be combined into a single step. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  18. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramm, D.A.J.; Hutchings, I.M.; Clyne, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharply reducing the erosive wear at high erodent impact angles, whilst retaining the good erosion resistance of ceramics at low angles. It is shown that the proportion of metal and ceramic at the free surface can be specified so as to optimise the erosion resistance. Experiments have also been carried out on the resistance of the coatings to debonding during four-point bending of the coated substrate. Progress is being made towards the tailoring of composition profiles in graded coatings so as to optimise the combination of erosion resistance and adhesion. (orig.)

  19. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  20. Sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation under all-ceramic restorations: effects on demineralization and shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağlar, Serdar

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the caries resistant effects of sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation alone and combined with fluoride in comparison with fluoride application alone on enamel prepared for veneer restorations. And also, evaluated these treatments' effects on the shear bond strength of all-ceramic veneer restorations. One hundred and thirty-five human maxillary central teeth were assigned to groups of 1a-control, 1b-laser treated, 1c-fluoride treated, 1d-laser + fluoride treated for shear bond testing and to groups of 2a-positive control(non-demineralised), 2b-laser treated, 2c-fluoride treated, 2d-laser + fluoride treated, 2e-negative control (demineralised) for microhardness testing (n = 15, N = 135). Demineralisation solutions of microhardness measurements were used for the ICP-OES elemental analysis. The parameters for laser irradiation were as follows: power output, 0.25 W; total energy density, 62.5 J/cm 2 and energy density per pulse, 4.48 J/cm 2 with an irradiation time of 20 s and with no water cooling. Five percent NaF varnish was used as fluoride preparate. ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were performed (α = 5%). Surface treatments showed no significant effects on shear bond strength values (p = 0.579). However, significant differences were found in microhardness measurements and in elemental analysis of Ca and P amounts (p < 0.01). Surface-treated groups showed significantly high VNH values and significantly low ICP-OES values when compared with non-treated (-control) group while there were no significance among surface-treated groups regarding VHN and ICP-OES values. Sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG treatment alone or combined with fluoride is as an effective method as at least fluoride alone for preventing the prepared enamel to demineralization with no negative effect on shear bond strength.

  1. Experimental study on ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Dongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ceramic membrane oxygen generation technology has advantages of high concentration of produced oxygen and potential nuclear and biochemical protection capability. The present paper studies the ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation. Comparisons are made to have knowledge of the effects of two kinds of ceramic membrane separation technologies on oxygen generation, namely electricity driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (EDCMSOGT and pressure driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (PDCMSOGT. Experiments were conducted under different temperatures, pressures of feed air and produced oxygen flow rates. On the basis of these experiments, the flow rate of feed air, electric power provided, oxygen recovery rate and concentration of produced oxygen are compared under each working condition. It is concluded that the EDCMSOGT is the oxygen generation means more suitable for onboard conditions.

  2. Surface texturing of sialon ceramic by femtosecond pulsed laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Lerato C

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AlONSi(sub3)N(sub4) ceramic using the Ti: Sapphire Femtosecond laser system was investigated. Parametric analysis was conducted using surface drilling, unidirectional and cross-hatching machining procedures performed on the substrate at a varied power...

  3. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Ceramics (ICC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niihara, Koichi; Ohji, Tatsuki; Sakka, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Early in 2005, the American Ceramic Society, the European Ceramic Society and the Ceramic Society of Japan announced a collaborative effort to provide leadership for the global ceramics community that would facilitate the use of ceramic and glass materials. That effort resulted in an agreement to organize a new biennial series of the International Congress on Ceramics, convened by the International Ceramic Federation (ICF). In order to share ideas and visions of the future for ceramic and glass materials, the 1st International Congress on Ceramics (ICC1) was held in Canada, 2006, under the organization of the American Ceramic Society, and the 2nd Congress (ICC2) was held in Italy, 2008, hosted by the European Ceramic Society. Organized by the Ceramic Society of Japan, the 3rd Congress (ICC3) was held in Osaka, Japan, 14-18 November 2010. Incorporating the 23rd Fall Meeting of the Ceramic Society of Japan and the 20th Iketani Conference, ICC3 was also co-organized by the Iketani Science and Technology Foundation, and was endorsed and supported by ICF, Asia-Oceania Ceramic Federation (AOCF) as well as many other organizations. Following the style of the previous two successful Congresses, the program was designed to advance ceramic and glass technologies to the next generation through discussion of the most recent advances and future perspectives, and to engage the worldwide ceramics community in a collective effort to expand the use of these materials in both conventional as well as new and exciting applications. ICC3 consisted of 22 voluntarily organized symposia in the most topical and essential themes of ceramic and glass materials, including Characterization, design and processing technologies Electro, magnetic and optical ceramics and devices Energy and environment related ceramics and systems Bio-ceramics and bio-technologies Ceramics for advanced industry and safety society Innovation in traditional ceramics It also contained the Plenary Session and the

  4. Phenomenological description of depoling current in Pb0.99Nb0.02(Zr0.95Ti0.05)0.98O3 ferroelectric ceramics under shock wave compression: Relaxation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongdong; Du, Jinmei; Gu, Yan; Feng, Yujun

    2012-05-01

    By assuming a relaxation process for depolarization associated with the ferroelectric (FE) to antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transition in Pb0.99Nb0.02(Zr0.95Ti0.05)0.98O3 ferroelectric ceramics under shock wave compression, we build a new model for the depoling current, which is different from both the traditional constant current source (CCS) model and the phase transition kinetics (PTK) model. The characteristic relaxation time and new-equilibrated polarization are dependent on both the shock pressure and electric field. After incorporating a Maxwell s equation, the relaxation model developed applies to all the depoling currents under short-circuit condition and high-impedance condition. Influences of shock pressure, load resistance, dielectric property, and electrical conductivity on the depoling current are also discussed. The relaxation model gives a good description about the suppressing effect of the self-generated electric field on the FE-to-AFE phase transition at low shock pressures, which cannot be described by the traditional models. After incorporating a time- and electric-field-dependent repolarization, this model predicts that the high-impedance current eventually becomes higher than the short-circuit current, which is consistent with the experimental results in the literature. Finally, we make the comparison between our relaxation model and the traditional CCS model and PTK model.

  5. ZnO buffer layer for metal films on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Jon

    2014-09-16

    Dramatic improvements in metallization integrity and electroceramic thin film performance can be achieved by the use of the ZnO buffer layer to minimize interfacial energy between metallization and adhesion layers. In particular, the invention provides a substrate metallization method utilizing a ZnO adhesion layer that has a high work of adhesion, which in turn enables processing under thermal budgets typically reserved for more exotic ceramic, single-crystal, or metal foil substrates. Embodiments of the present invention can be used in a broad range of applications beyond ferroelectric capacitors, including microelectromechanical systems, micro-printed heaters and sensors, and electrochemical energy storage, where integrity of metallized silicon to high temperatures is necessary.

  6. preparation, characterization and formulation of nano-ceramic materials to be used for the separation of some heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    the synthesis of asymmetric composite and monolithic ceramic filters, with high performance quality, to be used in heavy metals separation is the aim of this study. asymmetric composite ceramic filter consisted of a macroporous or mesoporous substrate coated with several layers having lower pore size than the substrate usually microporous film. on the other hand, asymmetric monolithic ceramic filter is monolithic system having dual pore size distribution. ceramic filters synthesis was performed using polymeric sol-gel process. the optimization of synthesis parameters as well as the characterization was achieved to obtain ceramic filters with high separative properties. the synthesized ceramic filters were characterized using mercury porosimeter for pore size distribution analysis, BET method for specific surface areas measurements and BJH pore size distribution analysis, XRD analysis for crystalline phase identification and SEM for microstructure and morphology studies

  7. Contribution to the joining technique of SiC-ceramic using metallic interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottselig, B.; Gyarmati, E.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H.

    1989-07-01

    For ceramics to be feasible for technical uses suitable joining techniques must be developed that allow reliable ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal connections. As yet such procedures exist, based only on empirical studies omitting the reaction behaviour of the joining materials and the specific properties of the reaction products. For this reason the reaction behaviour of silicon carbide with selected metals and subsequently the compatibility of these reaction layers with the ceramic substrate were investigated. The results gained were then applied to silicon carbide joints using intermediate metallic layers. With the reaction phase Ti 3 SiC 2 , found to be the most suitable in basic experiments, joining strengths could be obtained relative tc the mean strength and Weibull modulus comparable to those of the ceramic starting material. (orig.) [de

  8. CERAMIC MEMBRANE ENABLING TECHNOLOGY FOR IMPROVED IGCC EFFICIENCY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi Prasad

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this program is to conduct a technology development program to advance the state-of-the-art in ceramic Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) to the level required to produce step change improvements in process economics, efficiency, and environmental benefits for commercial IGCC systems and other applications. The IGCC program is focused on addressing key issues in materials, processing, manufacturing, engineering and system development that will make the OTM a commercial reality. The objective of the OTM materials development task is to identify a suitable material that can be formed into a thin film to produce the target oxygen flux. This requires that the material have an adequate permeation rate, and thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical properties such that the material is able to be supported on the desired substrate and sufficient mechanical strength to survive the stresses involved in operation. The objective of the composite OTM development task is to develop the architecture and fabrication techniques necessary to construct stable, high performance, thin film OTMs supported on suitable porous, load bearing substrates. The objective of the process development task of this program to demonstrate the program objectives on a single OTM tube under test conditions simulating those of the optimum process cycle for the power plant

  9. Sol-gel applications for ceramic membrane preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, I.

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic membranes possessing superior properties compared to polymeric membranes are more durable under severe working conditions and therefore their service life is longer. The ceramic membranes are composed of some layers. The support is the layer composed of coarser ceramic structure and responsible for mechanical durability under filtration pressure and it is prepared by consolidation of ceramic powders. The top layer is composed of a finer ceramic micro-structure mainly responsible for the separation of components present in the fluid to be filtered and sol-gel method is a versatile tool to prepare such a tailor-made ceramic filtration structure with finer pores. Depending on the type of filtration (e.g. micro-filtration, ultra-filtration, nano-filtration) aiming separation of components with different sizes, sols with different particulate sizes should be prepared and consolidated with varying precursors and preparation conditions. The coating of sol on the support layer and heat treatment application to have a stable ceramic micro-structure are also important steps determining the final properties of the top layer. Sol-gel method with various controllable parameters (e.g. precursor type, sol formation kinetics, heat treatment conditions) is a practical tool for the preparation of top layers of ceramic composite membranes with desired physicochemical properties.

  10. Global Mechanical Response and Its Relation to Deformation and Failure Modes at Various Length Scales Under Shock Impact in Alumina AD995 Armor Ceramic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P; McCauley, J. W; Green, W. H; Bourne, N. K; Chen, M. W

    2008-01-01

    ... maps relating the experimentally measured global mechanical response of a material through matured shock wave diagnostics to the nature of concurrent deformation and damage generated at varying length scales under shock wave loading.

  11. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  12. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  14. Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics. Piezoelectric Actuators. Nano and Micropositioners. Vibration Control Systems. Computer Printers. Piezoelectric Transformers,Voltage Generators, Spark Plugs, Ultrasonic Motors,. Ultrasonic Generators and Sensors. Sonars, Medical Diagnostic. Computer Memories. NVFRAM ...

  15. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  16. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  17. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  18. Sintering characteristics of nano-ceramic coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Popma, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concentrates on sintering characteristics of nano-sized ceramic SiO2 particles. The sintering process is studied as a function of temperature using a conventional furnace and using a laser beam. The underlying idea is to combine the nanoceramic sol-gel concept with inkjet technology and

  19. Corrosion of technical ceramics by molten aluminium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, U.; Wolff, L.R.; Loo, van F.J.J.; Ziegler, G.; With, de G.; Terpstra, R.A.; Metselaar, R.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion investigations on various types of nonoxide technical ceramic materials, two types of silicon nitride (HIPRBSN and RBSN) and two types of silicon carbide (HIPSIC and SiSiC), were carried out in aluminum (Al99.99) melts. HIPRBSN showed nearly no corrosion attack under the most severe

  20. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2012-01-10

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing.

  1. Germinação de sementes de urucu em diferentes temperaturas e substratos Germination of annatto seeds under different temperatures and substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Vianna Lima

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, analisar o comportamento germinativo das sementes de urucu cultivar Casca Verde, com e sem escarificação, sob regime de diferentes temperaturas e substratos. O trabalho foi realizado no Laboratório de Tecnologia e Análise de Sementes do Centro de Ciências Agrárias da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (CCA-UFES. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o inteiramente casualizado, num esquema fatorial 2x6x4 (dois tratamentos físicos nas sementes, seis substratos e quatro temperaturas, totalizando 48 tratamentos, com quatro repetições de 50 sementes. Os tratamentos físicos foram: as sementes intactas e as sementes escarificadas; os substratos foram: a areia, a vermiculita, a fibra de coco, o pó de serra, o Plantmax e o rolo de papel Germitest ; e, as temperaturas testadas foram constantes de 20, 25 e 30ºC e alternada de 20-30ºC. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância e as médias comparadas pelo teste de Tukey. Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram maior porcentagem de germinação das sementes de urucu, semeadas nos substratos areia, vermiculita e rolo de papel; as temperaturas de 25, 30 e 20-30ºC foram mais adequadas para testes de germinação dessas sementes.This work was carried out with the objective to verify the effect of temperature and substrate on germinative capacity of annatto seeds. This study was developed in the Laboratories of Seed Analysis of Agrarian Science Center that belongs to the Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCA-UFES, located in Alegre ES, Brazil. The experimental design was 2x6x4 factorial involving: (i two treatments in the seeds, (ii six substrates, and (iii four temperatures. Four replications were realized using 50 seeds at each experimental unit. Treatments refer to intact and scarified seeds. Substrates utilized were sand, vermiculite, coconut fiber, wood fiber, Plantmax and paper roll. Temperatures employed were 20, 25, 30 and 20-30ºC. Average

  2. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  3. Large ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development. Ceramic-to-ceramic sealing has applications for several technologies that require large and/or complex vacuum-tight ceramic shapes. Information is provided concerning the assembly of complex monolithic ceramic shapes by bonding of subassemblies at temperatures ranging from 450 to 1500 0 C. Future applications and fabrication techniques for various materials are presented

  4. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, Sharma, E-mail: issaranu@gmail.com; Gayatri, Sharma, E-mail: sharmagayatri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  5. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  6. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  7. Comparison between PIII superficial treatment and ceramic coating in creep test of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, D.A.P.; Moura Neto, C.; Silva, M.M.; Ueda, M.; Oliveira, V.S.; Couto, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was evaluating the creep resistance of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with superficial treatment of PIII superficial treatment and ceramic coating in creep test of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. It was used Ti-6Al-4V alloy as cylindrical bars under forged and annealing of 190 deg C by 6 hours condition and cooled by air. The Ti-6Al-4V alloy after the superficial treatment of PIII and ceramic coating was submitted to creep tests at 600°C and 250 and 319 MPa under constant load mode. In the PIII treatment the samples was put in a vacuum reactor (76 x 10 -3 Pa) and implanted by nitrogen ions in time intervals between 15 and 120 minutes. Yttria (8 wt.%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with a CoNiCrAlY bond coat was atmospherically plasma sprayed on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by Sulzer Metco Type 9 MB. The obtained results suggest the ceramic coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy improved its creep resistance. (author)

  8. Biomass and lipid production of Chlorella protothecoides under heterotrophic cultivation on a mixed waste substrate of brewer fermentation and crude glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoyu; Walker, Terry H; Bridges, William C; Thornton, Charles; Gopalakrishnan, Karthik

    2014-08-01

    Biomass and lipid accumulation of heterotrophic microalgae Chlorella protothecoides by supplying mixed waste substrate of brewer fermentation and crude glycerol were investigated. The biomass concentrations of the old and the new C. protothecoides strains on day 6 reached 14.07 and 12.73 g/L, respectively, which were comparable to those in basal medium with supplement of glucose and yeast extract (BM-GY) (14.47 g/L for old strains and 11.43 g/L for new strains) (P>0.05). Approximately 81.5% of total organic carbon and 65.1% of total nitrogen in the mixed waste were effectively removed. The accumulated lipid productivities of the old and the new C. protothecoides strains in BM-GY were 2.07 and 1.61 g/L/day, respectively, whereas in the mixed waste, lipid productivities could reach 2.12 and 1.81 g/L/day, respectively. Our result highlights a new approach of mixing carbon-rich and nitrogen-rich wastes as economical and practical alternative substrates for biofuel production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface modification of ceramics. Ceramics no hyomen kaishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hioki, T. (Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-05

    Surface modification of ceramics and some study results using in implantation in surface modification are introduced. The mechanical properties (strength, fracture toughness, flaw resistance) of ceramics was improved and crack was repaired using surface modification by ion implantation. It is predicted that friction and wear properties are considerably affected because the hardness of ceramics is changed by ion implantation. Cementing and metalization are effective as methods for interface modification and the improvement of the adhesion power of the interface between metal and ceramic is their example. It was revealed that the improvement of mechanical properties of ceramics was achieved if appropriate surface modification was carried out. The market of ceramics mechanical parts is still small, therefore, the present situation is that the field of activities for surface modification of ceramics is also narrow. However, it is thought that in future, ceramics use may be promoted surely in the field like medicine and mechatronics. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Microstructure of vapor deposited coatings on curved substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G., E-mail: haydn@virginia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Rd., P.O. Box 400745, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Thermal barrier coating systems consisting of a metallic bond coat and ceramic over layer are widely used to extend the life of gas turbine engine components. They are applied using either high-vacuum physical vapor deposition techniques in which vapor atoms rarely experience scattering collisions during propagation to a substrate, or by gas jet assisted (low-vacuum) vapor deposition techniques that utilize scattering from streamlines to enable non-line-of-sight deposition. Both approaches require substrate motion to coat a substrate of complex shape. Here, direct simulation Monte Carlo and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation methods are combined to simulate the deposition of a nickel coating over the concave and convex surfaces of a model airfoil, and the simulation results are compared with those from experimental depositions. The simulation method successfully predicted variations in coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and porosity during both stationary and substrate rotated deposition. It was then used to investigate a wide range of vapor deposition conditions spanning high-vacuum physical vapor deposition to low-vacuum gas jet assisted vapor deposition. The average coating thickness was found to increase initially with gas pressure reaching a maximum at a chamber pressure of 8–10 Pa, but the best coating thickness uniformity was achieved under high vacuum deposition conditions. However, high vacuum conditions increased the variation in the coatings pore volume fraction over the surface of the airfoil. The simulation approach was combined with an optimization algorithm and used to investigate novel deposition concepts to tailor the local coating thickness.

  11. Microstructure of vapor deposited coatings on curved substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating systems consisting of a metallic bond coat and ceramic over layer are widely used to extend the life of gas turbine engine components. They are applied using either high-vacuum physical vapor deposition techniques in which vapor atoms rarely experience scattering collisions during propagation to a substrate, or by gas jet assisted (low-vacuum) vapor deposition techniques that utilize scattering from streamlines to enable non-line-of-sight deposition. Both approaches require substrate motion to coat a substrate of complex shape. Here, direct simulation Monte Carlo and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation methods are combined to simulate the deposition of a nickel coating over the concave and convex surfaces of a model airfoil, and the simulation results are compared with those from experimental depositions. The simulation method successfully predicted variations in coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and porosity during both stationary and substrate rotated deposition. It was then used to investigate a wide range of vapor deposition conditions spanning high-vacuum physical vapor deposition to low-vacuum gas jet assisted vapor deposition. The average coating thickness was found to increase initially with gas pressure reaching a maximum at a chamber pressure of 8–10 Pa, but the best coating thickness uniformity was achieved under high vacuum deposition conditions. However, high vacuum conditions increased the variation in the coatings pore volume fraction over the surface of the airfoil. The simulation approach was combined with an optimization algorithm and used to investigate novel deposition concepts to tailor the local coating thickness

  12. Integration Science and Technology of Silicon-Based Ceramics and Composites:Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic and composite parts starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance for high temperature applications, detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different technical approaches are required for the integration of ceramic to ceramic and ceramic to metal systems. Active metal brazing, in particular, is a simple and cost-effective method to integrate ceramic to metallic components. Active braze alloys usually contain a reactive filler metal (e.g., Ti, Cr, V, Hf etc) that promotes wettability and spreading by inducing chemical reactions with the ceramics and composites. In this presentation, various examples of brazing of silicon nitride to themselves and to metallic systems are presented. Other examples of joining of ceramic composites (C/SiC and SiC/SiC) using ceramic interlayers and the resulting microstructures are also presented. Thermomechanical characterization of joints is presented for both types of systems. In addition, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and integrated system testing under simulated application conditions will also be presented.

  13. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Ceramics for Molten Materials Containment, Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a project on Molten Materials Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface, molten materials containment samples of various ceramics were tested to determine their performance in contact with a melt of lunar regolith simulant. The test temperature was 1600 C with contact times ranging from 0 to 12 hours. Regolith simulant was pressed into cylinders with the approximate dimensions of 1.25 dia x 1.25cm height and then melted on ceramic substrates. The regolith-ceramic interface was examined after processing to determine the melt/ceramic interaction. It was found that the molten regolith wetted all oxide ceramics tested extremely well which resulted in chemical reaction between the materials in each case. Alumina substrates were identified which withstood contact at the operating temperature of a molten regolith electrolysis cell (1600 C) for eight hours with little interaction or deformation. This represents an improvement over alumina grades currently in use and will provide a lifetime adequate for electrolysis experiments lasting 24 hours or more. Two types of non-oxide ceramics were also tested. It was found that they interacted to a limited degree with the melt resulting in little corrosion. These ceramics, Sic and BN, were not wetted as well as the oxides by the melt, and so remain possible materials for molten regolith handling. Tests wing longer holding periods and larger volumes of regolith are necessary to determine the ultimate performance of the tested ceramics.

  15. Dinâmica do potencial matricial em substratos de pinus e coco sob ação da capilaridade Dynamics of matric potential on substrates of pine and coconut under the action of capillarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vinícius G Barreto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O tamanho médio de partículas e a porosidade dos substratos condicionam as propriedades matriciais, interferindo na capacidade de retenção e de transmissão da ��gua no meio. O conhecimento desses atributos é fundamental em processos de irrigação por capilaridade, para que o molhamento atinja as camadas superiores dos recipientes com níveis de tensão de água facilmente disponível. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo estudar a ascensão de água por capilaridade para determinar a posição mais apropriada do nível de saturação na ascensão capilar em recipientes com substratos de coco e pinus, de textura grossa e fina. Foram efetuados experimentos avaliando a ascensão de água por capilaridade em colunas segmentadas preenchidas com os substratos. Os valores de umidade em cada segmento foram calculados gravimetricamente e relacionados aos de tensão estimados pela curva de tensão dos substratos. Os substratos com textura fina apresentaram melhor elevação de água por capilaridade, com melhor elevação da umidade em níveis de tensão de água disponível. O substrato de coco fino apresentou água disponível em todo o perfil do recipiente, enquanto o de pinus apresentou as camadas superiores do recipiente com água retida em tensões abaixo do ponto de murcha permanente. O substrato fino de coco apresentou os melhores resultados para aplicação na irrigação por capilaridade, permitindo recomendar o seu uso com o nível de saturação posicionado a cinco centímetros do fundo do recipiente por quinze minutos.The average particle size and porosity of substrates affects the matrix properties of root growth media, interfering in water holding and water conductivity capacity through substrates. The knowledge of these attributes is essential in capillary irrigation processes to allow the wetting front reaches upper layers under easily available water tension. The present work had the objective to study the water rise by

  16. Influence of substrate on structural, morphological and optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    differences in crystallite sizes, microstrain and texture coefficient with respect to the employed substrates. The morphology of ... perties of ZnO thin films, the real effect on the structural ... related to the piezoelectric property, which is an impor- tant issue on ..... ceramics (New York: Springer Berlin Heidelberg) 2nd edn. Bai S N ...

  17. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  18. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  19. Dispersion toughened ceramic composites and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.; Lauf, R.J.

    1984-09-28

    Ceramic composites exhibiting increased fracture toughness are produced by the simultaneous codeposition of silicon carbide and titanium disilicide by chemical vapor deposition. A mixture of hydrogen, methyltrichlorosilane and titanium tetrachloride is introduced into a furnace containing a substrate such as graphite or silicon carbide. The thermal decomposition of the methyltrichlorosilane provides a silicon carbide matrix phase and the decomposition of the titanium tetrachloride provides a uniformly dispersed second phase of the intermetallic titanium disilicide within the matrix phase. The fracture toughness of the ceramic composite is in the range of about 6.5 to 7.0 MPa..sqrt..m which represents a significant increase over that of silicon carbide.

  20. Printed sub-100 nm polymer-derived ceramic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Binh; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Brent, Josh; Seraphin, Supapan; Loutfy, Raouf O; Peyghambarian, Nasser; Thomas, Jayan

    2013-05-01

    We proposed an unconventional fabrication technique called spin-on nanoprinting (SNAP) to generate and transfer sub-100 nm preceramic polymer patterns onto flexible and rigid substrates. The dimensions of printed nanostructures are almost the same as those of the mold, since the ceramic precursor used is a liquid. The printed patterns can be used as a replica for printing second-generation structures using other polymeric materials or they can be further converted to desirable ceramic structures, which are very attractive for high-temperature and harsh environment applications. SNAP is an inexpensive parallel process and requires no special equipment for operation.

  1. Method for producing ceramic bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunier, A.R. Jr.; Spangenberg, S.F.; Wijeyesekera, S.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for preparing a superconducting ceramic article. It comprises heating a powdered admixture comprising a source of yttria (Y 2 O 3 ), a source of barium monoxide and a source of cupric oxide to a temperature of from about 800 degrees Centigrade to 900 degrees Centigrade to allow the admixture to be densified under pressure to more than about 65 percent of the admixture's theoretical density but low enough to substantially preclude melting of the admixture; applying to the heated admixture isostatic pressure of between about 80,000 psi (5.5 x 10 2 MPa) and about the fracture stress of the heated admixture, for a period of time of from about 0.1 second to about ten minutes to form a densified article with a density of more than about 65 percent of the admixture's theoretical density; and annealing the densified article in the presence of gaseous oxygen under conditions sufficient to convert the densified article to a superconducting ceramic article having a composition comprising YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 - x where O < x < 0.6

  2. Development of clonal matrices of australian red cedar in different substrates under fertilizer doses Desenvolvimento de matrizes clonais de cedro Australiano em diferentes substratos sob doses de fertilizantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Peres Benatti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate fertilizers doses in different substrates for growth and development of clonal matrices of Australian Red Cedar [Toona ciliata var. australis (F. Muell. Bahadur], an experiment was conducted in a greenhouse. Five substrates were evaluate, with proportions by volume, the first consisting of 100% of Multiplant florestal®, the second of 50% vermiculite, 20% carbonized rice hulls, 20% soil and 10% coconut fiber, the third with 50% soil and 50% sand, the fourth was composed by 50% Multiplant florestal®, 10% soil and 40% coconut fiber and the fifth with 65% of Multiplant florestal®, 25% vermiculite and 10% carbonized rice hulls. The fertilizers doses applied were 0.0; 0.3; 0.6; 1.2; 2.4 of fertilization suggested by Malavolta (1980 for vases. The characteristics evaluated were: collar diameter of the matrices, production of dry mater by shoots, root system and total and accumulation of nutrients by shoot at the end of the experimental period of 150 days. The Australian Red Cedar plants have high nutritional requirements, as showed by the better development obtained with higher fertilizer doses than those suggested by Malavolta (1980. The substrate three provided the worst development to clonal matrices while the substrates 1, 4 and 5 provided the best environment for the development considering all the fertilizer doses and all variables.Com o objetivo de avaliar diferentes substratos com taxas de fertilizantes para o crescimento e desenvolvimento de matrizes clonais de cedro australiano [Toona ciliata var. australis (F. Muell. Bahadur], foi realizado um experimento em casa de vegetação. Foram avaliados cinco substratos, com as proporções em volume, sendo o primeiro composto por 100% Multiplant florestal®, o segundo de 50% Vermiculita, 20% casca de arroz carbonizada, 20% terra e 10% fibra de coco, o terceiro com 50% terra e 50% areia, o quarto com proporção de 50% Multiplant florestal®, 10% terra e 40% de fibra de coco e

  3. Simulation of green roof runoff under different substrate depths and vegetation covers by coupling a simple conceptual and a physically based hydrological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulis, Konstantinos X; Valiantzas, John D; Ntoulas, Nikolaos; Kargas, George; Nektarios, Panayiotis A

    2017-09-15

    In spite of the well-known green roof benefits, their widespread adoption in the management practices of urban drainage systems requires the use of adequate analytical and modelling tools. In the current study, green roof runoff modeling was accomplished by developing, testing, and jointly using a simple conceptual model and a physically based numerical simulation model utilizing HYDRUS-1D software. The use of such an approach combines the advantages of the conceptual model, namely simplicity, low computational requirements, and ability to be easily integrated in decision support tools with the capacity of the physically based simulation model to be easily transferred in conditions and locations other than those used for calibrating and validating it. The proposed approach was evaluated with an experimental dataset that included various green roof covers (either succulent plants - Sedum sediforme, or xerophytic plants - Origanum onites, or bare substrate without any vegetation) and two substrate depths (either 8 cm or 16 cm). Both the physically based and the conceptual models matched very closely the observed hydrographs. In general, the conceptual model performed better than the physically based simulation model but the overall performance of both models was sufficient in most cases as it is revealed by the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency index which was generally greater than 0.70. Finally, it was showcased how a physically based and a simple conceptual model can be jointly used to allow the use of the simple conceptual model for a wider set of conditions than the available experimental data and in order to support green roof design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  5. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  6. Biomass conservation potential of pottery/ceramic lined Mamta Stove: An improved stove promoted under National Programme on Improved Cookstoves in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, R.; Yadla, V.L. [M.S. Univ. of Baroda, Vadodara (India). Home Management Dept.

    1995-10-01

    To combat biomass scarcity and ensure a cleaner cooking environment with less drudgery, among other things, a variety of improved stoves are promoted under National Programme on Improved Cookstoves (NPIC). Mamta Stove (MS) is one among such improved stoves. An indepth study was undertaken covering a sample of twenty-five rural families with the primary objective of assessing fuel saving potential of MS under field conditions through Kitchen Performance Test (KPT). Conventional stove (CS) used in almost all the families was shielded horse-shoe shaped stove with a negligible proportion using three stone open fire. Nearly 88% depended only on zero private cost fuels. The mean number of persons for whom the stoves were used on the days of field measurements in case of CS and MS were 5.6 and 5.7 respectively with an SD of 1.16 and standard adult equivalent (SAE) was approximately 4. Cooking pots included a concave roasting pan, a deep frying pan and flat bottomed pots. The mean daily fuel consumption on CS and MS were estimated to be 4.88 kg and 3.75 kg respective, thereby, resulting in fuel saving to the tune of 24% on MS. The paper discusses at length the design features of CS and MS, meal pattern, cooking habits, need for user training, consumerism in the area of cooking and stove technology, economics of switching over to MS and policy implications of commercialization of hitherto subsidized stove program. Further, salient characteristics of high and low cooking fuel consumers on MS are presented to bring to limelight their profile.

  7. Synthetic flux as a whitening agent for ceramic tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues dos Santos, Geocris, E-mail: geocris.rodrigues@gmail.com [INNOVARE Inteligência Em Cerâmica, 13566-420 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento De Engenharia Dos Materiais, Universidade Federal De São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Salvetti, Alfredo Roque [Departamento De Física, Universidade Federal De Mato Grosso Do Sul (Brazil); Cabrelon, Marcelo Dezena [INNOVARE Inteligência Em Cerâmica, 13566-420 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento De Engenharia Dos Materiais, Universidade Federal De São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Morelli, Márcio Raymundo [Departamento De Engenharia Dos Materiais, Universidade Federal De São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The synthetic flux acts as a whitening agent of firing color in raw material ceramics. • The raw material ceramics have high levels of the iron oxides and red color. • The different process obtained red color clays with hematite and illite phases. • The whiteness ceramic obtained herein can be used in a porcelain tile industry. - Abstract: A synthetic flux is proposed as a whitening agent of firing color in tile ceramic paste during the sinterization process, thus turning the red firing color into whiteness. By using this mechanism in the ceramic substrates, the stoneware tiles can be manufactured using low cost clays with high levels of iron oxides. This method proved to be an economical as well as commercial strategy for the ceramic tile industries because, in Brazil, the deposits have iron compounds as mineral component (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in most of the raw materials. Therefore, several compositions of tile ceramic paste make use of natural raw materials, and a synthetic flux in order to understand how the interaction of the iron element, in the mechanism of firing color ceramic, occurs in this system. The bodies obtained were fired at 1100 °C for 5 min in air atmosphere to promote the color change. After the heating, the samples were submitted to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analyses. The results showed that the change of firing color occurs because the iron element, which is initially in the crystal structure of the hematite phase, is transformed into a new crystal (clinopyroxenes phase) formed during the firing, so as to make the final firing color lighter.

  8. Innovative lightweight substrate for stable optical benches and mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugi Grond, E.; Herren, A.; Mérillat, S.; Fermé, J. J.

    2017-11-01

    High precision space optics, such as spectrometers, relay optics, and filters, require ultra stable, lightweight platforms. These equipped platforms have on one side to survive the launch loads, on the other side they have to maintain their stability also under the varying thermal loads occurring in space. Typically such platforms have their equipment (prisms, etalons, beam expanders, etc.) mounted by means of classical bonding, hydro-catalytic bonding or optical contacting. Therefore such an optical bench requires to provide an excellent flatness, minimal roughness and is usually made of the same material as the equipment it carries (glass, glass ceramics). For space systems, mass is a big penalty, therefore such optical platforms are in most cases light weighted by means of machining features (i.e. pockets). Besides of being not extremely mass efficient, such pockets reduce the load carrying capability of the base material significantly. The challenge for Oerlikon Space, in this context, was to develop, qualify and deliver such optical benches, providing a substantial mass reduction compared to actual light weighted systems, while maintaining most of the full load carrying capacity of the base material. Additionally such a substrate can find an attractive application for mirror substrates. The results of the first development and of the first test results will be presented.

  9. High flow ceramic pot filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more

  10. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  11. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  12. The precursors effects on biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar; Aydınoğlu, Aysu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, effects of the starting material on chemical, physical, and biological properties of biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders (BHA) were investigated. Characterization and chemical analysis of BHA powders were performed by using XRD, FT-IR, and ICP-AES. Microstructural features such as size and morphology of the resulting BHA powders were characterized by using BET, nano particle sizer, pycnometer, and SEM. Additionally, biological properties of the BHA ceramic powders were also investigated by using water-soluble tetrazolium salts test (WST-1). According to the chemical analysis of BHA ceramic powders, chemical structures of ceramics which are prepared under different conditions and by using different starting materials show differences. Ceramic powders which are produced at 80°C are mainly composed of hydroxyapatite, dental hydroxyapatite (contain Na and Mg elements in addition to Ca), and calcium phosphate sulfide. However, these structures are altered at high temperatures such as 900°C depending on the features of starting materials and form various calcium phosphate ceramics and/or their mixtures such as Na-Mg-hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, Mg-Whitlockit, and chloroapatite. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that amorphous ceramics produced at 80°C and ceramics containing chloroapatite structure as main or secondary phases were found to be extremely cytotoxic. Furthermore, cell culture studies showed that highly crystalline pure hydroxyapatite structures were extremely cytotoxic due to their high crystallinity values. Consequently, the current study indicates that the selection of starting materials which can be used in the production of calcium phosphate ceramics is very important. It is possible to produce calcium phosphate ceramics which have sufficient biocompatibility at physiological pH values and by using appropriate starting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  14. Electron beam treatments of electrophoretic ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Riccardis, M.F.; Carbone, D.; Piscopiello, E.; Antisari, M. Vittori

    2008-01-01

    In this work a method to densify ceramic coating obtained by electrophoresis and to improve its adhesion to the substrate is proposed. It consists in irradiating the coating surface by electron beam (EB). Alumina and alumina-zirconia coatings were deposited on stainless steel substrates and treated by low power EB. SEM, XRD and TEM characterizations demonstrated that the sintering occurred. Moreover, it is shown that on alumina-zirconia coating the EB irradiation produced a composite material consisting principally of tetragonal zirconia particles immersed in an amorphous alumina matrix. The adhesion stress of EB treated coating was estimated by stud pull test and it was found to be comparable to that of plasma-sprayed coatings

  15. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  16. Post-growth annealing of zinc oxide thin films pulsed laser deposited under enhanced oxygen pressure on quartz and silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusop, M.; Uma, K.; Soga, T.; Jimbo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique at room temperature on quartz and single crystal silicon (1 0 0) substrates. The oxygen ambient gas pressure was attained at 6 Torr during the deposition. The deposited films were post-growth annealed in air at various annealing temperatures for 30 min. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical and electrical properties have been measured to study the properties of the films as a function of annealing temperatures. XRD has shown the strength of (0 0 2) peak increases and FWHM value decreases as the annealing temperatures increases from 200 to 600 deg. C. The post-growth annealed at 600 deg. C show dominant c-axis oriented hexagonal wurtize crystal structure and exhibit high average transmittance about 85% in the visible region and very sharp absorption edge at 376 nm with energy band gap of approximately 3.46 eV. Electrical measurement indicates the resistivity decreases with the annealing temperatures up to 600 deg. C, after which it increases with higher annealing temperatures at 800 deg. C. The complex of oxygen vacancy in the ZnO films may be the source of low conductivity in undoped ZnO films

  17. Magnetic domain-wall motion study under an electric field in a Finemet{sup ®} thin film on flexible substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Ngo Thi [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS-Université Paris XIII, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Mercone, Silvana, E-mail: silvana.mercone@univ-paris13.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS-Université Paris XIII, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Moulin, Johan [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622 Université Paris Sud/CNRS, Orsay (France); Bahoui, Anouar El; Faurie, Damien; Zighem, Fatih; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Haddadi, Halim [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS-Université Paris XIII, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2015-01-01

    We study the influence of applied in-plane elastic strains on the static magnetic configuration of a 530 nm magnetostrictive FeCuNbSiB (Finemet{sup ®}) thin film. The in-plane strains are induced via the application of a voltage to a piezoelectric actuator on which the film/substrate system was glued. A quantitative characterization of the voltage dependence of the induced-strain at the surface of the film was performed using a digital image correlation technique. Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) images at remanence (H=0 Oe and U=0 V) clearly reveal the presence of weak stripe domains. The effect of the voltage-induced strain shows the existence of a voltage threshold value for the strike configuration break. For a maximum strain of ε{sub XX}∼0.5×10{sup −3} we succeed in destabilizing the stripes configuration helping the setting up of a complete homogeneous magnetic pattern. - Highlights: • Elastic strain effect on the magnetic domain structure of a Finemet/Kapton is investigated. • External loading is applied thanks to a piezo-actuator on which the sample is glued. • The amount of strains was measured by the Digital Image Correlation technique. • Magnetic Force Microscopy showed high mobility of magnetic stripes domains. • Bending, curving and branching of domains go into maze-like pattern.

  18. On the modification of metal/ceramic interfaces by low energy ion/atom bombardment during film growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigsbee, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Knipe, R.K.; Hock, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Elemental Cu and Ti films have been deposited onto ceramic substrates with a plasma-aided physical vapor deposition (ion-plating) process. This paper discusses how the structure and chemistry of the metallic film and the metal/ceramic interface are modified by low energy ion and neutral atom bombardment. Emphasis is placed on determining how low energy ion/neutral atom bombardment affects the strength of the metal/ceramic interface. Analyses of the film, interface and substrate regions have employed scanning Auger microprobe, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, SEM/STEM-energy dispersive X-ray and TEM/STEM imaging and microdiffraction techniques. (Auth.)

  19. Ceramics like PZT-PMN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droescher, R.E.; Sousa, V.C.; Bergman, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work was to achieve piezoelectric ceramics referring to the system PZT-PMN Pb(Mg 1 / 3 Nb 2 / 3 Zr 0 , 52 Ti 0 , 48 )O 3 . Have been analysed ceramics like 0,65PZT-0,35PMN ((Pb(Mg 0 , 1167 Nb 0 , 2300 Zr 0 , 3380 Ti 0 , 3120 )O 3 ), 0,75PZT-0,25PMN ((Pb(Mg 0 , 083 Nb 0 . 1675 Zr 0 , 3900 Ti 0 , 3600 )O3) and the 0,85PZT-0,15PMN ((Pb(Mg 0,0500 Nb 0 , 1000 Zr 0 , 4420 Ti 0 , 4080 )O 3 ). The influence of the calcination and concentration of PZT on the lattice phases, microstructure and density was evaluated. Then, the method used was the mixed-oxide method, the samples were taken under different temperatures of calcination before the final sinterizing. The DRX and SEM techniques were used to identify the phases formed and analyse the microstructure, respectively. The main result revealed that, the better way is to realize three burns before the final sinterizing at 1200 o C/4 h . Like that, on obtain for sure the average lattice phases, like: perovskite, pyrochlore and PbO and also tend to densify the samples. (author)

  20. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Coto, Borja; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  1. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana, E-mail: a.zuzuarregui@nanogune.eu; Gregorczyk, Keith E. [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier [IK4-Tekniker, Iñaki Goenaga 5, 20600 Eibar (Spain); Rodríguez, Jorge [Torresol Energy (SENER Group), Avda. de Zugazarte 61, 48930 Las Arenas (Spain); Knez, Mato [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  2. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Rodríguez, Jorge; Knez, Mato

    2015-01-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur

  3. Nitrogenated compounds' biofiltration under alternative bacterium fixation substrates Biofiltración de compuestos nitrogenados bajo medios de fijación bacteriana alternativos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Carroza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the behavior of nitrification (NH4+, NO2- and NO3-, and performance, in terms of the surface TAN conversion rate (STR, volumetric TAN conversion rate (VTR and removal percentage of TAN (PTR among three fixation media of nitrifying bacteria (two alternatives (S1, S2 and one commercial (Co. The experiment was performed in two tests of 42 days each. Three isolated biofiltration systems were built for the experience, to which were added media colonized by bacteria as a "seed" to start the process of nitrification. Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl was attached as source of ammonium in reconditioned freshwater, also gradually adding inorganic carbon (HCO3- to maintain moderate water hardness. The average results for both tests indicate that the substrates S1 and S2 show a statistically similar behavior to the substrate Co (P > 0.05 during the first 33 days (until steady state. For the second test in terms of performance, STR values were 0.40, 0.39, 0.39 g TAN m-2 d-1 recorded for S2 and Co respectively; in terms of PRN, values were 92(3 9־/ and 93% for S1, S2 and Co, respectively. Regarding VTR, values of 72.31, 114.94, and 39.02 g TAN m-3 d-1 were recorded for S2 and Co respectively. Statistical analysis provided that for STR and PRN, no significant differences, were found. But for VTR, statistically significant differences between means were evaluated, registering for the S2 media the highest value of VTR.Se compara el comportamiento del proceso de nitrificación (NH4+, NO2- y NO3-, y el rendimiento, en términos de la tasa superficial de conversión de NAT, tasa volumétrica de conversión de NAT y porcentaje de remoción de NAT (PRN entre tres medios de fijación de bacterias nitrificantes, dos alternativos (S1, S2 y uno comercial (Co. La experiencia se realizó en dos pruebas de 42 días cada una. Se construyeron tres sistemas aislados para la experiencia, a los cuales se adicionaron medios colonizados por bacterias a modo de

  4. Synthesis, deposition and crystal growth of CZTS nanoparticles onto ceramic tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Calvet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The work presents a simple solvothermal method for CZTS nanoparticles preparation using hexadecylamine (HDA as a capping agent. The as-prepared CZTS powder was deposited as ink using Doctor Blade technique onto ceramic tile, as a substrate substituting the typical soda-lime glass. The as-prepared film was thermal treated at different temperatures in order to enhance the thin film crystallinity. CZTS crystal growth onto ceramic tile was obtained successfully for the first time.

  5. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  6. Piezoelectric displacement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This Good Practice Guide is intended to aid a user to perform displacement measurements on piezoelectric ceramic materials such as PZT (lead zirconium titanate) in either monolithic or multilayer form. The various measurement issues that the user must consider are addressed, and good measurement practise is described for the four most suitable methods. (author)

  7. Dense ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of articles of substantially pure dense ceramic materials, for use in severe environments. Si N is very suitable for use in such environments, but suffers from the disadvantage that it is not amenable to sintering. Some disadvantages of the methods normally used for making articles of Si N are mentioned. The method described comprises mixing a powder of the substantially pure ceramic material with an additive that promotes densification, and which is capable of nuclear transmutation into a gas when exposed to radiation, and hot pressing the mixture to form a billet. The billet is then irradiated to convert the additive into a gas which is held captive in the billet, and it is then subjected to a hot forging operation, during which the captive gas escapes and an article of substantially pure dense ceramic material is forged. The method is intended primarily for use for Si N, but may be applied to other ceramic materials. The additive may be Li or Be or their compounds, to the extent of at least 5 ppm and not more than 5% by weight. Irradiation is effected by proton or neutron bombardment. (UK)

  8. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  9. Ceramic analysis in Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilditch, J.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific, analytical or ‘archaeometric’ techniques for investigating ceramic material have been used within archaeology for over 50 years and now constitute an indispensable tool for archaeologists in the Aegean world (see Jones 1986 for a detailed summary of early work in Greece and Italy) and

  10. Ceramic solid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Center for Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-02-15

    Strategies for the design of ceramic solid electrolytes are reviewed. Problems associated with stoichiometric and doped compounds are compared. In the illustration of design principles, emphasis is given to oxide-ion electrolytes for use in solid-oxide fuel cells, oxygen pumps, and oxygen sensors

  11. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  12. Manufacturing conditioned roughness and wear of biomedical oxide ceramics for all-ceramic knee implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turger, Anke; Köhler, Jens; Denkena, Berend; Correa, Tomas A; Becher, Christoph; Hurschler, Christof

    2013-08-29

    Ceramic materials are used in a growing proportion of hip joint prostheses due to their wear resistance and biocompatibility properties. However, ceramics have not been applied successfully in total knee joint endoprostheses to date. One reason for this is that with strict surface quality requirements, there are significant challenges with regard to machining. High-toughness bioceramics can only be machined by grinding and polishing processes. The aim of this study was to develop an automated process chain for the manufacturing of an all-ceramic knee implant. A five-axis machining process was developed for all-ceramic implant components. These components were used in an investigation of the influence of surface conformity on wear behavior under simplified knee joint motion. The implant components showed considerably reduced wear compared to conventional material combinations. Contact area resulting from a variety of component surface shapes, with a variety of levels of surface conformity, greatly influenced wear rate. It is possible to realize an all-ceramic knee endoprosthesis device, with a precise and affordable manufacturing process. The shape accuracy of the component surfaces, as specified by the design and achieved during the manufacturing process, has a substantial influence on the wear behavior of the prosthesis. This result, if corroborated by results with a greater sample size, is likely to influence the design parameters of such devices.

  13. Highly Efficient Catalytic Synthesis of α-Amino Acids under Phase-Transfer Conditions with a Novel Catalyst/Substrate Pair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belokon, Yuri N.; Kochetkov, Konstantin A.; Churkina, Tatiana D.; Ikonnikov, Nikolai S.; Larionov, Oleg V.; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R.; Vyskočil, Štepán; North, Michael; Kagan, Henri B.

    2001-01-01

    A facile and fast enantioselective synthesis of α-amino acids with high ee values was achieved by the asymmetric alkylation of the glycine derivative under phase-transfer conditions with (R)- or (S)-2-amino-2'-hydroxy-1,1'-binaphthyl (NOBIN). The ee value of the catalyst can be as little as 40 %

  14. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    HERNANDES, Daiana Kelly Lopes; ARRAIS, Cesar Augusto Galvão; de LIMA, Erick; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; RODRIGUES, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C* ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable. PMID:27556211

  15. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Kelly Lopes HERNANDES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3 layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP, and chroma of low (LT and high (HT translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B and white (W background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C*ab=(a*2+b*2½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable.

  16. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Daiana Kelly Lopes; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Lima, Erick de; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Rodrigues, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C*ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable.

  17. Method for fabrication of ceramic dielectric films on copper foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Beihai; Narayanan, Manoj; Dorris, Stephen E.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2015-03-10

    The present invention provides a method for fabricating a ceramic film on a copper foil. The method comprises applying a layer of a sol-gel composition onto a copper foil. The sol-gel composition comprises a precursor of a ceramic material suspended in 2-methoxyethanol. The layer of sol-gel is then dried at a temperature up to about 250.degree. C. The dried layer is then pyrolyzed at a temperature in the range of about 300 to about 450.degree. C. to form a ceramic film from the ceramic precursor. The ceramic film is then crystallized at a temperature in the range of about 600 to about 750.degree. C. The drying, pyrolyzing and crystallizing are performed under a flowing stream of an inert gas. In some embodiments an additional layer of the sol-gel composition is applied onto the ceramic film and the drying, pyrolyzing and crystallizing steps are repeated for the additional layer to build up a thicker ceramic layer on the copper foil. The process can be repeated one or more times if desired.

  18. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1998-01-01

    'This report summarizes the work progress over the last 1.75 years of a 3 year project. The objectives of the project have been to develop a new class of ceramic-supported polymeric membranes that could be tailored-designed for a wide-range of applications in remediation and pollution prevention. To date, a new class of chemically-modified ceramic membranes was developed for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and for the pervaporation removal of volatile organics from aqueous systems. These new ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membranes are fabricated by modifying the pore surface of a ceramic membrane support by a graft polymerization process (Chaimberg and Cohen, 1994). The graft polymerization process consists of activating the membrane surface with alkoxy vinyl silanes onto which vinyl monomers are added via free-radical graft polymerization resulting in a thin surface layer of terminally anchored polymer chains. Reaction conditions are selected based on knowledge of the graft polymerization kinetics for the specific polymer/substrate system. The resultant ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membrane is a composite structure in which mechanical strength is provided by the ceramic support and the selectivity is determined by the covalently bonded polymer brush layer. Thus, one of the unique attributes of the CSP membrane is that it can be used in environments where the polymer layer is swollen (or even completely miscible) in the mixture to be separated (Castro et al., 1993). It is important to note that the above modification process is carried out under mild conditions (e.g., temperature of about 70 C) and is well suited for large scale commercial application. In a series of studies, the applicability of a polyvinylpyrrolidone CSP membrane was demonstrated for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsion under a variety of flow conditions (Castro et al.,1996). Improved membrane performance was achieved due to minimization of surface adsorption of the oil components

  19. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  20. Microstructural properties of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fundora C, A.; Portelles, J.J.; Siqueiros, J.M. [Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada. Apartado Postal 2861, 22800 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    A microstructural study of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics obtained by the conventional ceramic method is presented. Targets were produced to grow BaTiO{sub 3} thin films by pulsed laser deposition on Pt/Ti/Si (100) substrates. X-ray diffraction, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-ray Photon Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to study the properties of the BaTiO{sub 3} ceramic samples and thin films, as deposited and after an annealing process. (Author)

  1. [Preliminary study of bonding strength between diatomite-based dental ceramic and veneering porcelains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-li; Gao, Mei-qin; Cheng, Yu-ye; Zhang, Fei-min

    2015-04-01

    In order to choose the best veneering porcelain for diatomite-based dental ceramic substrate, the bonding strength between diatomite-based dental ceramics and veneering porcelains was measured, and the microstructure and elements distribution of interface were analyzed. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of diatomite-based dental ceramics was detected by dilatometry. Three veneering porcelain materials were selected with the best CTE matching including alumina veneering porcelain (group A), titanium porcelain veneering porcelain (group B), and E-max veneering porcelain (group C). Shear bonding strength was detected. SEM and EDS were used to observe the interface microstructure and element distribution. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 software package. The CTE of diatomite-based dental ceramics at 25-500 degrees centigrade was 8.85×10-6K-1. The diatomite-based substrate ceramics combined best with group C. Shear bonding strength between group A and C and group B and C both showed significant differences(P<0.05). SEM and EDS showed that the interface of group C sintered tightly and elements permeated on both sides of the interface. The diatomite-based substrate ceramics combines better with E-max porcelain veneer.

  2. Application of Hot-wire Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Fine Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangxi WANG

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic substrate is preferred in high density packaging due to its high electrical resistivity and moderate expansion coefficient. The thermal conductivity is a key parameter for packaging substrates. There are two common methods to measure the thermal conductivity, which are the hot-wire method and the laser-flash method. Usually, the thermal conductivities of porcelain is low and meet the measurement range of hot-wire method, and the measured value by hot-wire method has little difference with that by laser-flash method. In recent years, with the requirement of high-powered LED lighting, some kinds of ceramic substrates with good thermal conductivity have been developed and their thermal conductivity always measured by the means of laser flash method, which needs expensive instrument. In this paper, in order to detect the thermal conductivity of fine ceramic with convenience and low cost, the feasibility of replacing the laser flash method with hot wire method to measure thermal conductivity of ceramic composites was studied. The experiment results showed that the thermal conductivity value of fine ceramics measured by the hot-wire method is severely lower than that by the laser-flash method. However, there is a positive relationship between them. It is possible to measure the thermal conductivity of fine ceramic workpiece instantly by hot-wire method via a correction formula.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12543

  3. FORMATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT ON CERAMIC TILE SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk ÖZCAN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biocidal antimicrobial molecular barrier (BAMB solutions are known to provide antimicrobial effect on the surfaces in industrial applications. However, there has been a lack of scientific reports about the subject in the literature. In this study, in order to impart an antimicrobial surface property on ceramic surfaces, a BAMB solution was applied on gloss fired ceramic wall tile substrates and the surface antimicrobial activity results were compared with that of plain wall tiles (without BAMB application. The ceramic surfaces were cleaned, and stove dried at120°C prior to spray coating with a BAMB solution. The coated substrates were dried in the ambient. The intactness of the coatings was checked with the bromophenol blue test. The microstructural and molecular characterization of the BAMB coated surfaces were carried out with SEM imaging and surface FTIR, respectively. The antimicrobial activity tests of the surfaces were conducted according to ASTM E2180-07 (Standard Test Method for Determining the Activity of Incorporated Antimicrobial Agent in Polymeric or Hydrophobic Materials. The microorganisms used were Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 15442 bacteria. The BAMB coated surfaces showed less flocculent bacterial growth in comparison to uncoated ceramic surfaces leading to the conclusion that the BAMB improved the antimicrobial property.

  4. Experimental study on the penetration effect of ceramics composite projectile on ceramic / A3 steel compound targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di-qi Hu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the penetration of projectiles into ceramic composite armors, the nose of 30 mm standard projectile was replaced by a toughened ceramic nose, and the performance of ceramic-nose projectiles penetrating into ceramic/A3 steel composite targets has been experimentally researched. According to impact dynamics theory,, the performances of 30 mm ceramic-nose projectile and 30 mm standard projectile penetrating into the ceramic/A3 steel composite targets were analyzed and compared using DOP method, especially focusing on the effects made by different nose structures and materials. The aperture and depth of perforation of projectile into the armor plates as well as the residual mass of bullet core under the same conditions were comparatively analyzed. A numerical simulation was built and computed by ANSYS/LS-DYNA. Based on the simulated results, the penetration performance was further analyzed in terms of the residual mass of bullet core. The results show that the ceramic nose has a great effect on the protection of bullet core.

  5. Decapsulation Method for Flip Chips with Ceramics in Microelectronic Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T. I.; Duh, J. G.

    2008-06-01

    The decapsulation of flip chips bonded to ceramic substrates is a challenging task in the packaging industry owing to the vulnerability of the chip surface during the process. In conventional methods, such as manual grinding and polishing, the solder bumps are easily damaged during the removal of underfill, and the thin chip may even be crushed due to mechanical stress. An efficient and reliable decapsulation method consisting of thermal and chemical processes was developed in this study. The surface quality of chips after solder removal is satisfactory for the existing solder rework procedure as well as for die-level failure analysis. The innovative processes included heat-sink and ceramic substrate removal, solder bump separation, and solder residue cleaning from the chip surface. In the last stage, particular temperatures were selected for the removal of eutectic Pb-Sn, high-lead, and lead-free solders considering their respective melting points.

  6. Plasma spraying of bioactive glass-ceramics containing bovine bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamária Dobrádi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural bone derived glass-ceramics are promising biomaterials for implants. However, due to their price and weak mechanical properties they are preferably applied as coatings on load bearing implants. This paper describes result obtained by plasma spraying of bioactive glass-ceramics containing natural bone onto selected implant materials, such as stainless steel, alumina, and titanium alloy. Adhesion of plasma sprayed coating was tested by computed X-ray tomography and SEM of cross sections. The results showed defect free interface between the coating and substrate, without cracks or gaps. Dissolution rate of the coating in simulated body fluid (SBF was readily controlled by the bone additives (phase composition, as well as microstructure. The SBF treatment of the plasma sprayed coating did not influence the boundary between the coating and substrate.

  7. Processing and optimization of functional ceramic coatings and inorganic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyutu, Edward Kennedy G.

    Processing of functional inorganic materials including zero (0-D) dimensional (e.g. nanoparticles), 1-D (nanorods, nanofibers), and 2-D (films/coating) structures is of fundamental and technological interest. This research will have two major sections. The first part of section one focuses on the deposition of silicon dioxide onto a pre-deposited molybdenum disilicide coating on molybdenum substrates for both high (>1000 °C) and moderate (500-600 °C) temperature oxidation protection. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD/MOCVD) techniques will be utilized to deposit the metal suicide and oxide coatings. The focus of this study will be to establish optimum deposition conditions and evaluate the metal oxide coating as oxidation - thermal barriers for Mo substrates under both isothermal (static) and cyclic oxidation conditions. The second part of this section will involve a systematic evaluation of a boron nitride (BN) interface coating prepared by chemical vapor deposition. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are prospective candidates for high (>1000 °C) temperature applications and fiber- matrix interfaces are the dominant design parameters in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). An important goal of the study is to determine a set of process parameters, which would define a boron nitride (BN) interface coating by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process with respect to coating. In the first part of the second section, we will investigate a new approach to synthesize ultrafine metal oxides that combines microwave heating and an in-situ ultrasonic mixing of two or more liquid precursors with a tubular flow reactor. Different metal oxides such as nickel ferrite and zinc aluminate spinels will be studied. The synthesis of metal oxides were investigated in order to study the effects of the nozzle and microwave (INM process) on the purity, composition, and particle size of the resulting powders. The second part of this research section involves a study of microwave frequency

  8. Experimental Investigation on Ductile Mode Micro-Milling of ZrO2 Ceramics with Diamond-Coated End Mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Bian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ZrO2 ceramics are currently used in a broad range of industrial applications. However, the machining of post-sintered ZrO2 ceramic is a difficult task, due to its high hardness and brittleness. In this study, micro-milling of ZrO2 with two kinds of diamond-coated end mills has been conducted on a Kern MMP 2522 micro-milling center (Kern Microtechnik GmbH, Eschenlohe, Germany. To achieve a ductile mode machining of ZrO2, the feed per tooth and depth of cut was set in the range of a few micrometers. Cutting force and machined surface roughness have been measured by a Kistler MiniDynamometer (Kistler Group, Winterthur, Switzerland and a Talysurf 120 L profilometer (Taylor Hobson Ltd., Leicester, UK, respectively. Machined surface topography and tool wear have been examined under SEM. Experiment results show that the material can be removed in ductile mode, and mirror quality surface with Ra low as 0.02 μm can be achieved. Curled and smooth chips have been collected and observed. The axial cutting force Fz is always bigger than Fx and Fy, and presents a rising trend with increasing of milling length. Tool wear includes delamination of diamond coating and wear of tungsten carbide substrate. Without the protection of diamond coating, the tungsten carbide substrate was worn out quickly, resulting a change of tool tip geometry.

  9. Wonderland of ceramics superplasticity; Ceramics chososei no sekai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, F. [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It has been ten years since it was found that ceramics, which is strong and hard at room temperatures and does not deform at all, may exhibit a superplasticity phenomenon at high temperatures that it endlessly elongates when pulled as if it were chewing gum. This phenomenon is one of peculiar behaviours which nano-crystal ceramics, pulverized to an extent that the crystalline particle size is on the order of nanometers, show. The application of superplasticity made the material engineers`s old dream come true that hard ceramics are arbitrarily deformed and machined like metal. Using as models materials such as silicone nitride, alumina and zirconia, this paper describes the history and deformation mechanism of ceramics superplasticity, material design aiming at superplasticization and application of ceramics superplasticity to the machining technology. Furthermore, it describes the trend and future development of international joint researches on the basic surveys on ceramics superplasticity. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Prediction of thermal fatigue life of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, N.; Kamigaito, O.

    1979-01-01

    On the assumption that the thermal fatigue life of ceramics is determined mainly by the duration over which a crack reaches a small critical length, a prediction of the life was made by application of fracture mechanics to ceramics based on subcritical crack growth. Approximated formulae were derived. Experimental examination showed that the formulae proved to be valid for glass, sintered mullite under moderate shock severity, and zirconia. Data given by other authors also prove their validity. The deviation of the life from the formulae for sintered mullite under a thermal shock of extremely low severty, suggests that a certain mechanism, for example strengthening, is needed to understand the life of the sintered mullite. (author)

  11. Structural analysis of ELO-GaN grown on a sapphire substrate as the underlying layer of a GaN-based laser diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyajima, Takao; Hino, Tomonori; Narui, Hironobu [Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, 4-14-1 Asahi, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0014 (Japan); Takeda, Shingo; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Junji [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Kouto, Kamigori-cho, Hyogo (Japan); Kudo, Yoshihiro; Tomiya, Shigetaka [Materials Analysis Lab., Sony Corporation, 4-16-1 Okada, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan); Goto, Shu; Ikeda, Masao [Shiroishi Laser Ctr., Semiconductor Laser Div., Sony Corp., 3-53-2 Shiratori, Shiroishi, Miyagi 989-0734 (Japan)

    2007-01-15

    Using micro-beam X-ray diffraction (XRD), small c-axis tilting was observed in maskless epitaxially laterally overgrown GaN (ELO-GaN), which is a suitable underlying layer for realizing a reliable GaN-based blue-violet laser diode. By analyzing the micro-scale structure of ELO-GaN without coalescence and the ambient-temperature dependence of the tilting angle, we conclude that the small c-axis tilting is caused by compressive stress in the seed region of ELO-GaN. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  13. INFLUENCE OF SUBSTRATE TEMPERATURE ON STRUCTURAL, ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF ITO THIN FILMS PREPARED BY RF MAGNETRON SPUTTERING

    OpenAIRE

    BO HE; LEI ZHAO; JING XU; HUAIZHONG XING; SHAOLIN XUE; MENG JIANG

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films on glass substrates deposited by RF magnetron sputtering using ceramic target to find the optimal condition for fabricating optoelectronic devices. The structural, electrical and optical properties of the ITO films prepared at various substrate temperatures were investigated. The results indicate the grain size increases with substrate temperature increases. As the substrate temperature grew up, the resistivity of ITO films grea...

  14. International Engineering Foundation Conference on the Plastic Deformation of Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Brookes, Chris; Routbort, Jules

    1995-01-01

    This proceedings volume, "Plastic Deformation of Ceramics," constitutes the papers of an international symposium held at Snowbird, Utah from August 7-12, 1994. It was attended by nearly 100 scientists and engineers from more than a dozen countries representing academia, national laboratories, and industry. Two previous conferences on this topic were held at The Pennsylvania State University in 1974 and 1983. Therefore, the last major international conference focusing on the deformation of ceramic materials was held more than a decade ago. Since the early 1980s, ceramic materials have progressed through an evolutionary period of development and advancement. They are now under consideration for applications in engineering structures. The contents of the previous conferences indicate that considerable effort was directed towards a basic understanding of deformation processes in covalently bonded or simple oxide ceramics. However, now, more than a decade later, the focus has completely shifted. In particular, the...

  15. A historical perspective of synthetic ceramic and traditional feldspathic porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Stephen; Ahmad, Irfan

    2005-10-01

    Ceramics were invented by the Chinese during the T'ang Dynasty, where they quickly became a precious commodity. By the early 18th Century, ceramics found its way into dentistry due to its high strength, biocompatibility, and malleability. Today, ceramic materials are a staple in dentistry, available in both naturally based and partially synthetic formulas. Most recently they have become available as quartz-glass synthetic materials manufactured under controlled conditions to eliminate the inconsistencies and impurities inherent in the naturally based counterpart. This article details the discovery of porcelain and its role as a precious substance throughout the world and time, from its initial use as ornamental earthenware to its practical application in modern dentistry. Upon reading this article, the reader should: Understand the historical significance of porcelain. Recognize the fundamental constituents and physical properties of both natural feldspathic porcelains and fully synthetic ceramics used in dentistry.

  16. Development of a thin film vitreous bond based composite ceramic coating for corrosion and abrasion services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, B.

    2003-01-01

    IPC has been involved with the Alberta Research Council in developing a vitreous bond (VB) - based composite ceramic fluoropolymer coating technology. Compared to the present state of the art which is based on a hard discontinuous phase (ceramic particles) suspended in a soft continuous matrix (fluoropolymer mix) the novelty of our approach consists of designing a composite system in which both the ceramic and the fluoropolymer phases are continuous. The ceramic matrix will provide the strength and the erosion resistance for the fluoropolymer matrix even at high temperatures. The ceramic formulation employed is not affected by temperatures up to 500 o F while the fluoropolymer matrix provides a corrosion protection seal for the ceramic matrix. The inherent flexibility of the polymer matrix will protect against brittle fractures that may develop by handling or impact. Therefore the composite coating is able to withstand the deformation of the substrate without chipping or disbanding. The fluoropolymer matrix also provides dry lubrication properties further enhancing the erosion resistance of the ceramic phase. The thickness of the coating is very thin, in the 25 to 100 micron range. In summary, the coating technology is able to provide the following features: Corrosion protection levels similar to those of fluoropolymer coatings; Erosion resistance similar to that of ceramic coatings; Price comparable to that of polymer coatings; Exceptional wear resistance properties; and Capability for coating complicated shapes internally or externally or both. This paper will discuss the theory and development of this new technology and the resultant coating and potential properties. (author)

  17. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  18. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  19. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  20. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  1. Epitaxial Growth and Cracking Mechanisms of Thermally Sprayed Ceramic Splats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-jun

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, the epitaxial growth and cracking mechanisms of thermally sprayed ceramic splats were explored. We report, for the first time, the epitaxial growth of various splat/substrate combinations at low substrate temperatures (100 °C) and large lattice mismatch (- 11.26%). Our results suggest that thermal spray deposition was essentially a liquid-phase epitaxy, readily forming chemical bonding. The interface temperature was also estimated. The results convincingly demonstrated that atoms only need to diffuse and rearrange over a sufficiently short range during extremely rapid solidification. Concurrently, severe cracking occurred in the epitaxial splat/substrate systems, which indicated high tensile stress was produced during splat deposition. The origin of the tensile stress was attributed to the strong constraint of the locally heated substrate by its cold surroundings.

  2. Graphene on insulating crystalline substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akcoeltekin, S; El Kharrazi, M; Koehler, B; Lorke, A; Schleberger, M

    2009-01-01

    We show that it is possible to prepare and identify ultra-thin sheets of graphene on crystalline substrates such as SrTiO 3 , TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaF 2 by standard techniques (mechanical exfoliation, optical and atomic force microscopy). On the substrates under consideration we find a similar distribution of single layer, bilayer and few-layer graphene and graphite flakes as with conventional SiO 2 substrates. The optical contrast C of a single graphene layer on any of those substrates is determined by calculating the optical properties of a two-dimensional metallic sheet on the surface of a dielectric, which yields values between C = -1.5% (G/TiO 2 ) and C = -8.8% (G/CaF 2 ). This contrast is in reasonable agreement with experimental data and is sufficient to make identification by an optical microscope possible. The graphene layers cover the crystalline substrate in a carpet-like mode and the height of single layer graphene on any of the crystalline substrates as determined by atomic force microscopy is d SLG = 0.34 nm and thus much smaller than on SiO 2 .

  3. Advanced ceramic in structural engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Rodea, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The work deals with "Advanced Ceramics in Structural Engineering”. Throughout this work we present the different types of ceramic that are currently in wider use, and the main research lines that are being followed. Ceramics have very interesting properties, both mechanical and electrical and refractory where we can find some of the most interesting points of inquiry. Through this work we try tounderstand this complex world, analyzing both general and specific properties of ...

  4. The technical ceramics (second part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auclerc, S.; Poulain, E.

    2004-01-01

    This work deals with ceramics used in the nuclear and the automotive industries. Concerning the nuclear sector, ceramics are particularly used in reactors, in the treatment of radioactive wastes and for the storage of the ultimate wastes. Details are given about the different ceramics used. In the automobile sector, aluminium is principally used for its lightness and cordierite, basic material of catalyst supports is especially used in the automobile devices of cleansing. (O.M.)

  5. Ceramic superconductors II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This volume compiles papers on ceramic superconductors. Topics include: structural patterns in High-Tc superconductors, phase equilibria of barium oxide superconductors, localized electrons in tetragonal YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-δ/, lattice and defect structure and properties of rare earth/alkaline earth-copper-oxide superconductors, alternate candidates for High-Tc superconductors, perovskite-structure superconductors; superconductive thin film fabrication, and superconductor/polymer composites

  6. Piezoelectric Ceramics Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan, T

    2001-01-01

    ... the behavior of a piezoelectric material. We have attempted to cover the most common measurement methods as well as introduce parameters of interest. Excellent sources for more in-depth coverage of specific topics can be found in the bibliography. In most cases, we refer to lead zirconate titanate (PZT) to illustrate some of the concepts since it is the most widely used and studied piezoelectric ceramic to date.

  7. Application of Ceramic Bond Coating for Reusable Melting Crucible of Metallic Fuel Slugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Ko, Young-Mo; Park, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ki-Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel slugs of the driver fuel assembly have been fabricated by injection casting of the fuel alloys under a vacuum state or an inert atmosphere. Traditionally, metal fuel such as a U-Zr alloy system for SFR has been melted in slurry-coated graphite crucibles and cast in slurry-coated quartz tube molds to prevent melt/material interactions. Reactive coatings and porous coatings can be a source of melt contaminations, and fuel losses, respectively. Ceramic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TaC coating materials showed no penetration in the protective layer after a melt dipping test. However, the ceramic coating materials showed separations in the coating interface between the substrate and coating layer, or between the coating layer and fuel melt after the dipping test. All plasma-spray coated methods maintained a sound coating state after a dipping test with U-10wt.%Zr melt. A single coating Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(150) layer and double coating layer of TaC(50)-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100), showed a sound state or little penetration in the protective layer after a dipping test with U-10wt.%Zr-5wt.%RE melt. Injection casting experiments of U-10wt.%Zr and U-10wt.%Zr-5wt.%RE fuel slugs have been performed to investigate the feasibility of a reusable crucible of the metal fuel slugs. U–10wt.%Zr and U–10wt.%Zr–5wt.%RE fuel slugs have been soundly fabricated without significant interactions of the graphite crucibles. Thus, the ceramic plasma-spray coatings are thought to be promising candidate coating methods for a reusable graphite crucible to fabricate metal fuel slugs.

  8. Phase transition stability within ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.; Wang, D.

    1992-01-01

    Irreversible thermodynamics is applied to analyse nucleation, both in metals and ceramics, in order to distinguish the stability of metastable under cooled melts. The hypothesis of local equilibrium has been used to apply research results from equilibrium thermodynamics, for the study of irreversible processes. The under cooling equation for homogenous nucleation only depends on a coefficient which is not related to the melting point of the material. The calculated critical under cooling values for metals are compared with experimental data. The metastable phase formation of plasma-sprayed alumina and zircon coatings has been discussed based on irreversible thermodynamics. A critical under cooling parameter (β) is defined. The metastable phase formation of plasma-sprayed alumina and zircon has been discussed. The analysis shows that γ-Al 2 O 3 is first formed in the coating since it has a lower β value than α-Al 2 O 3 . Zircon dissociates into ZrO 2 and SiO 2 , and rapid quenching of plasma spraying prevents their re association. The cooling rate determines whether t-ZrO 2 or c-ZrO 2 will form in the sprayed coating. It can be confirmed by the experiments that the content of t-ZrO 2 will increase correspondingly as the sprayed particle size decreases. At high transition temperatures, c-ZrO 2 will be formed because of the anisotropic thermal expansion behaviour in the crystal structure. 22 refs., 2 tabs

  9. Ion conductivity of nasicon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoj, J.W.; Engell, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Nasicon ss ,Na 1 + X Zr 2 Si X P 3 - X O 12 o , X , 3, includes some of the best solid state sodium conductors known today. Compositions in the interval 1.6 , X , 2.6 show conductivities comparable to the best β double-prime-alumina ceramics. It is well known that the ion conductivity of β-alumina is strongly dependent on the texture of the ceramic. Here a similar behavior is reported for Nasicon ceramics. Ceramics of the bulk composition Na 2.94 Zr 1.49 Si 2.20 P 0.80 O 10.85 were prepared by a gel method. The final ceramics consist of Nasicon crystals with x = 2.14 and a glass phase. The grain size and texture of the ceramics were controlled by varying the thermal history of the gel based raw materials and the sintering conditions. The room temperature resistivity of the resulting ceramics varies from 3.65*10 3 ohm cm to 1.23*10 3 ohm cm. Using the temperature comparison method and estimates of the area of grain boundaries in the ceramics, the resistivity of the Nasicon phase is estimated to be 225 ohm cm at 25 degrees C. B 2 O 3 - or Al 2 O 3 -doping of the glass bearing Nasicon ceramic lower the room temperature resistivity by a factor 2 to 5. The dopants do not substitute into the Nasicon phase in substantial amounts

  10. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Paquin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop trademark, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research

  11. Alkaline resistant ceramics; Alkalimotstaandskraftiga keramer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westberg, Stig-Bjoern [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Despite durability in several environments, ceramics and refractories can not endure alkaline environments at high temperature. An example of such an environment is when burning biofuel in modern heat and power plants in which the demand for increasing efficiency results in higher combustion temperatures and content of alkaline substances in the flue gas. Some experiences of these environments has been gained from such vastly different equipment as regenerator chambers in the glass industry and MHD-generators. The grains of a ceramic material are usually bonded together by a glassy phase which despite it frequently being a minor constituent render the materials properties and limits its use at elevated temperature. The damage is usually caused by alkaline containing low-melting phases and the decrease of the viscosity of the bonding glass phase which is caused by the alkaline. The surfaces which are exposed to the flue gas in a modern power plant are not only exposed to the high temperature but also a corroding and eroding, particle containing, gas flow of high velocity. The use of conventional refractory products is limited to 1300-1350 deg C. Higher strength and fracture toughness as well as durability against gases, slag and melts at temperatures exceeding 1700 deg C are expected of the materials of the future. Continuous transport of corrosive compounds to the surface and corrosion products from the surface as well as a suitable environment for the corrosion to occur in are prerequisites for extensive corrosion to come about. The highest corrosion rate is therefore found in a temperature interval between the dew point and the melting point of the alkaline-constituent containing compound. It is therefore important that the corrosion resistance is sufficient in the environment in which alkaline containing melts or slag may appear. In environments such as these, even under normal circumstances durable ceramics, such as alumina and silicon carbide, are attacked

  12. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  13. Fabrication of silica ceramic membrane via sol-gel dip-coating method at different nitric acid amount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlib, N. A. Z.; Daud, F. D. M.; Mel, M.; Hairin, A. L. N.; Azhar, A. Z. A.; Hassan, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    Fabrication of silica ceramics via the sol-gel method has offered more advantages over other methods in the fabrication of ceramic membrane, such as simple operation, high purity homogeneous, well defined-structure and complex shapes of end products. This work presents the fabrication of silica ceramic membrane via sol-gel dip-coating methods by varying nitric acid amount. The nitric acid plays an important role as catalyst in fabrication reaction which involved hydrolysis and condensation process. The tubular ceramic support, used as the substrate, was dipped into the sol of Tetrethylorthosilicate (TEOS), distilled water and ethanol with the addition of nitric acid. The fabricated silica membrane was then characterized by (Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope) FESEM and (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) FTIR to determine structural and chemical properties at different amount of acids. From the XRD analysis, the fabricated silica ceramic membrane showed the existence of silicate hydrate in the final product. FESEM images indicated that the silica ceramic membrane has been deposited on the tubular ceramic support as a substrate and penetrate into the pore walls. The intensity peak of FTIR decreased with increasing of amount of acids. Hence, the 8 ml of acid has demonstrated the appropriate amount of catalyst in fabricating good physical and chemical characteristic of silica ceramic membrane.

  14. Enhanced Luminescent Properties in Tm3+/Dy3+ Co-doped Transparent Phosphate Glass Ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Yao L. Q.; Chen G. H.; Zhong H. J.; Cui S. C.; Li F.; Gan J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Novel Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glass and glass ceramic samples for white light emitting diodes were prepared by melt quenching method. Under 353 nm excitation, the colors of the luminescence of the glass and glass ceramic samples are white. The CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.338, 0.328) of the emission from the glass ceramic is close to the standard white-light illumination (0.333, 0.333). Compared to the glass, the fluorescence intensity in the glass ceramic is greatly enhanced.

  15. Tribological Behaviour of the Ceramic Coating Formed on Magnesium Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fei; Zhou Hai; Chen Qiang; Ge Yuanjing; Lv Fanxiu

    2007-01-01

    Micro-arc oxidation is a recently developed surface treatment technology under anodic oxidation. Through micro-arc oxidation, a ceramic coating is directly formed on the surface of magnesium alloy, by which its surface property is significantly improved. In this paper, a dense ceramic oxide coating was prepared on an AZ31 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation in a NaOH-Na 2 SiO 3 -NaB 4 O 7 -(NaPO 3 ) 6 electrolytic solution. Micro-structure, surface morphology and phase composition were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The tribological behavior of the micro-arc oxidation ceramic coating under dry sliding against GCr15 steel was evaluated on a ball-on-disc test rig. The results showed that the AZ31 alloy was characterized by adhesion wear and scuffing under dry sliding against the steel, while the surface micro-arc oxidation ceramic coating experienced much abated adhesion wear and scuffing under the same testing conditions. The micro-arc oxidation ceramic coating showed good friction-reducing and fair antiwear ability in dry sliding against the steel

  16. Advanced device for testing the electrical behavior of conductive coatings on flexible polymer substrates under oscillatory bending: comparison of coatings of sputtered indium-tin oxide and poly3,4ethylenedioxythiophene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Königer, Tobias; Münstedt, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    A special device was designed and set up to investigate the electrical behavior of conductive layers on flexible substrates under oscillatory bending. The resistance of conductive coatings can be measured during various oscillatory bending conditions. The bending radius, the amplitude and the frequency can be set to well-defined values. Furthermore, the setup allows us to apply tensile or compressive stress to the coating as well as both stresses alternately. Thus, various bending loads occurring in printable electronics applications can be simulated to investigate the electrical reliability of conductive coatings. In addition, it is possible to simulate different environmental conditions during oscillatory bending by running the device in an environmental chamber. Characterizations of the electrical behavior under oscillatory bending were carried out on commercially available polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) films sputtered with indium-tin oxide (ITO) and coated with poly3,4ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT). For coatings of sputtered ITO, a dramatic increase of the resistance is observed for bending radii smaller than 14 mm due to cracks spanning the whole sample width. The higher the amplitude, the more pronounced is the increase of the resistance. Coatings of PEDOT show high stability under oscillatory bending. There is no change in resistance observed for all bending radii and amplitudes applied over a large number of cycles

  17. Compact Ceramic Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewinsohn, Charles [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The objective of the proposed work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a step change in power plant efficiency at a commercially viable cost, by obtaining performance data for prototype, compact, ceramic microchannel heat exchangers. By performing the tasks described in the initial proposal, all of the milestones were met. The work performed will advance the technology from Technology Readiness Level 3 (TRL 3) to Technology Readiness Level 4 (TRL 4) and validate the potential of using these heat exchangers for enabling high efficiency solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or high-temperature turbine-based power plants. The attached report will describe how this objective was met. In collaboration with The Colorado School of Mines (CSM), specifications were developed for a high temperature heat exchanger for three commercial microturbines. Microturbines were selected because they are a more mature commercial technology than SOFC, they are a low-volume and high-value target for market entry of high-temperature heat exchangers, and they are essentially scaled-down versions of turbines used in utility-scale power plants. Using these specifications, microchannel dimensions were selected to meet the performance requirements. Ceramic plates were fabricated with microchannels of these dimensions. The plates were tested at room temperature and elevated temperature. Plates were joined together to make modular, heat exchanger stacks that were tested at a variety of temperatures and flow rates. Although gas flow rates equivalent to those in microturbines could not be achieved in the laboratory environment, the results showed expected efficiencies, robust operation under significant temperature gradients at high temperature, and the ability to cycle the stacks. Details of the methods and results are presented in this final report.

  18. Deodorant ceramic catalyst. Dasshu ceramics shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K. (Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)); Naka, R. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Concerning debromination to be used for the filter of deodorizing device, those of long life and high deodorizing performance are demanded a great deal. As one of this kind of debromination, a deodorant ceramic catalyst (mangantid) has been developed and put for practical use as deodorant for refrigerator. In this article, the information and knowledge obtained by the development of mangantid, the features as well as several properties of the product are stated. The deodorizing methods currently used practically are roughly divided into 6 kinds such as the adsorption method, the direct combustion method, the catalytic method and the oxidation method, but each of them has its own merit and demerit, hence it is necessary to select the method in accordance with the kind of odor and its generating condition. Mangantid is a compound body of high deodorant material in a honeycomb configuration, and has the features that in comparison with the existing deordorants, its pressure loss is smaller, its deodorizing rate is bigger, and acidic, neutral and basic gaseous components can be removed in a well-balanced manner. Deodorization with mangantid has the mechanism to let the odorous component contact and react with the catalyst and change the component to the non-odorous component in the temperature range from room temperature to the low temperature region. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. R-curve behaviour of ferroelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, N.Ya.; Kramarov, S.O.

    2004-01-01

    The attempt's made to identify and evaluate the regularities of developing the fractures in the ferroelectric ceramics and also-study the effect of the polishing operation on the strength characteristics of the piezoceramics. The R-curve behaviour in the ferroelectric ceramics is studied on the samples of the barium titanate and lead zirconate-titanate by the four-point bending with controlled surface fractures. It is established that increasing curve of resistance to the fracture growth is observed in the piezoceramics under the conditions of the fracture stable growth. The results obtained on the polished samples prove that the mechanical processing introduces the compression surface stresses into the piezoceramic materials [ru

  20. Efficient photoemission from robust ferroelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscolo, I.; Castellano, M.; Catani, L.; Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F.; Giannessi, L.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results on photoemission by ferroelectric ceramic disks, with a possible interpretation, are present. Two types of lead zirconate titanate lanthanum doped, PLZT, ceramics have been used for tests. 25 ps light pulses of 532 and 355 nm were used for excitation. The intensity ranged within the interval 0.1-3 GW/cm 2. The upper limit of the intensity was established by the damage threshold tested by the onset of ion emission. At low value of the intensity the yield was comparable at the two wavelengths. At the highest intensity of green light the emitted charge was 1 nC per 10 mm 2, but it was limited by the space charge effect. In fact, the applied field was only 20 kV/cm, allowed both by the mechanical design of the apparatus and the poor vacuum, 10 - 4 mbar. No surface processing was required. The measurement of the electron pulse length under way

  1. Method for producing textured substrates for thin-film photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The invention pertains to the production of ceramic substrates used in the manufacture of thin-film photovoltaic cells used for directly converting solar energy to electrical energy. Elongated ribbon-like sheets of substrate precursor containing a mixture of ceramic particulates, a binder, and a plasticizer are formed and then while green provided with a mechanically textured surface region used for supporting the thin film semiconductor of the photovoltaic cell when the sheets of the substrate precursor are subsequently cut into substrate-sized shapes and then sintered. The textured surface pattern on the substrate provides enhanced light trapping and collection for substantially increasing the solar energy conversion efficiency of thin-film photovoltaic cells.

  2. Integration Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics for Energy and Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of new and innovative materials has been known to culminate in major turning points in human history. The transformative impact and functional manifestation of new materials have been demonstrated in every historical era by their integration into new products, systems, assemblies, and devices. In modern times, the integration of new materials into usable products has a special relevance for the technological development and economic competitiveness of industrial societies. Advanced ceramic technologies dramatically impact the energy and environmental landscape due to potential wide scale applications in all aspects of energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include gas turbine propulsion systems, fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation, and waste disposal. Robust ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic components starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance under different operating conditions, the detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different approaches are required for the integration of ceramic-metal and ceramic-ceramic systems across length scales (macro to nano). In this presentation, a few examples of integration of ceramic to metals and ceramic to ceramic systems will be presented. Various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and

  3. Effect of ceramic thickness and shade on mechanical properties of a resin luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Rizkalla, Amin S; Santos, Gildo Coelho

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of ceramic thickness and shade on the Knoop hardness and dynamic elastic modulus of a dual-cured resin cement. Six ceramic shades (Bleaching, A1, A2, A3, A3.5, B3) and two ceramic thicknesses (1 mm, 3 mm) were evaluated. Disk specimens (diameter: 7 mm; thickness: 2 mm) of the resin cement were light cured under a ceramic block. Light-cured specimens without the ceramic block at distances of 1 and 3 mm were also produced. The Knoop hardness number (KHN), density, and dynamic Young's moduli were determined. Statistical analysis was conducted using ANOVA and a Tukey B rank order test (p = 0.05). The bleaching 1-mm-thick group exhibited significantly higher dynamic Young's modulus. Lower dynamic Young's moduli were observed for the 3-mm-thick ceramic groups compared to bleaching 3-mm-thick group, and no difference was found among the other 3-mm groups. For the KHN, when A3.5 3-mm-thick was used, the KHN was significantly lower than bleaching and A1 1-mm-thick ceramic; however, no difference was exhibited between the thicknesses of the same shade. The dual-cured resin cement studied irradiated through the 1-mm-thick ceramic with the lightest shade (bleaching ceramic) exhibited a better elastic modulus, and there was no effect in KHN of the resin cement when light cured under different ceramic shades and thicknesses (1 and 3 mm), except when the A3.5 3-mm-thick ceramic was used. Variolink II irradiated through ceramic with the lowest chroma exhibited the highest elastic modulus; therefore, the light activation method might not be the same for all clinical situations. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A CERAMIC TAMPER INDICATING SEAL: SRNL CONTRIBUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krementz, D.; Brinkman, K.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Weeks, G.

    2013-06-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

  5. Development of a ceramic tamper indicating seal: SRNL contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krementz, Dan; Brinkman, Kyle S.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Mendez-Torres, Adrian E.; Weeks, George E.

    2013-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

  6. Ceramic Adhesive and Methods for On-Orbit Repair of Re-Entry Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A.; Easler, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    This adhesive is capable of repairing damaged leading edge components of reentry vehicles while in space, and is novel with regard to its ability to be applied in the vacuum of space, and in a microgravity environment. Once applied, the adhesive provides thermal and oxidation protection to the substrate (in this case, reinforced carbon/carbon composites, RCCs) during re-entry of a space vehicle. Although there may be many formulations for repair adhesives, at the time of this reporting, this is the first known adhesive capable of an on-orbit repair. The adhesive is an engineered ceramic material composed of a pre-ceramic polymer and refractory powders in the form of a paste or putty that can be applied to a scratched, cracked, or fractured composite surface, covering and protecting the damaged area. The adhesive is then "cured" with a heat cycle, thereby cross-linking the polymer into a hardened material and bonding it to the substrate. During the heat of reentry, the material is converted to a ceramic coating that provides thermal and oxidative stability to the repaired area, thus allowing the vehicle to pass safely from space into the upper atmosphere. Ceramic powders such as SiC, ZrB2 and Y2O3 are combined with allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS) resin, and are mixed to form a paste adhesive. The material is then applied to the damaged area by brush, spatula, trowel, or other means to fill cracks, gaps, and holes, or used to bond patches onto the damaged area. The material is then cured, in a vacuum, preferably at 250F (approximately equal to 121C) for two hours. The re-entry heating of the vehicle at temperatures in excess of 3,000F (approximately equal to 1,650C) then converts this material into a ceramic coating. This invention has demonstrated advantages in resistance to high temperatures, as was demonstrated in more than 100 arc-jet tests in representative environments at NASA. Extensive testing verified oxidation protection for the repaired substrate (RCC

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects

  8. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  9. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  10. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Functional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 21-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie Lynn; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment. Broadly speaking the two classes of materials are oxide-based CMCs and non-oxide based CMCs. The non-oxide CMCs are primarily silicon-based. Under conditions prevalent in the gas turbine hot section the water vapor formed in the combustion of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons reacts with the surface-SiO2 to form volatile products. Progressive surface recession of the SiC-SiC CMC component, strength loss as a result of wall thinning and chemical changes in the component occur, which leads to the loss of structural integrity and mechanical strength and becomes life limiting to the equipment in service. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC-SiC CMCs include the incorporation of an external barrier coating to provide surface protection to the CMC substrate. The coating system has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The relevant early coatings work was focused on coatings for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithic ceramics operating under severely corrosive conditions. The development of EBCs for gas turbine hot section components was built on the early work for silicon-based monolithics. The first generation EBC is a three-layer coating, which in its simplest configuration consists of a silicon (Si) base coat applied on top of the CMC, a barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS) surface coat resistant to water vapor attack, and a mullite-based intermediate coating layer between the Si base coat and BSAS top coat. This system can be represented as Si-Mullite-BSAS. While this baseline EBC presented a significant improvement over the uncoated SiC-SiC CMC, for the very long durations of 3-4 years or more expected for industrial operation further improvements in coating durability are desirable. Also, for very demanding applications with higher component temperatures but shorter service lives more rugged EBCs

  13. Soudage par explosion thermique sous charge de cermets poreux à base de TiC-Ni sur substrat en acier-comportement tribologique Welding of porous TiC–Ni based cermets on substrate steel by thermal explosion under load-tribological behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemboub Samia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans ce travail, nous nous intéressons à l'élaboration de cermets à base de TiC-Ni par dispersion de particules de carbures, oxydes ou borures dans une matrice de nickel, grâce à la technique de l'explosion thermique sous une charge de 20 MPa. La combustion de mélanges actifs (Ti-C-Ni-An où An = Al2O3, MgO, SiC, TiB2, WC, basée sur la réaction de synthèse de TiC (ΔHf298K = −184 kJ/mole, génère des cermets complexes. Un court maintien sous charge du cermet à 1373 K, après l'explosion thermique, permet son soudage sur un substrat en acier XC55. Les cermets obtenus dans ces conditions demeurent poreux et conservent une porosité de l'ordre de 25–35 %. La densité relative du cermet, sa dureté et son comportement tribologique, dépendront de la nature de l'addition dans les mélanges de départ. Porous TiC-Ni based cermets were obtained by dispersion of carbides, oxides or borides particles in a nickel matrix thanks to the thermal explosion technique realized under a load of 20 MPa. The combustion of active mixtures (Ti-C-Ni-An where An = Al2O3, MgO, SiC, TiB2 or WC based on the titanium carbide reaction synthesis (ΔHf = −184 kJ/mol, generates porous complex cermets. After the thermal explosion, a short maintenance under load at 1373 K of the combustion product, allows at the same time the cermets welding on a carbon steel substrate. The obtained cermets under these conditions preserve a porosity of about 25–35%. The relative density, hardness and tribological behaviour of the complex cermets depend on the additions nature (An in the starting mixtures.

  14. Parâmetros fisiológicos de mudas de copaíba sob diferentes substratos e condições de sombreamento Physiological parameters in seedlings of copaiba under different shade conditions and substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Reis Dutra

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar parâmetros fisiológicos de mudas de copaíba produzidas sob o efeito de diferentes níveis de sombreamento e tipos de substratos. O experimento teve a duração de 130 dias e foi conduzido em blocos casualizados no esquema fatorial 5x4, com cinco substratos: Bioplant®; 70% vermiculita + 30% casca de arroz carbonizada; 40% vermiculita + 30% casca de arroz carbonizada + 30% fibra de coco; 50% vermiculita + 30% casca de arroz carbonizada + 20% areia; 70% vermiculita + 15% casca de arroz carbonizada + 15% vermicomposto de resíduo de indústria têxtil; quatro níveis de sombreamento (100, 70, 50 e 30% do pleno sol e três repetições. O nível de sombreamento de 50% em relação ao pleno sol possibilitou a produção de mudas de copaíba com maiores teores de clorofila b e clorofila total, além de proporcionar os menores valores de transpiração diária e ao longo do dia das plantas. A área foliar, os teores de clorofila e a transpiração das mudas de copaíba independem do tipo de substrato, podendo ser produzidas em qualquer um dos meios de crescimento avaliados.This research aimed to evaluate physiological parameters of seedlings of copaiba produced under the effect of different shading levels and types of substrates. The experiment lasted 130 days and was conducted in randomized blocks in factorial scheme 5x4 with five substrates: Bioplant®, 70% vermiculite + 30% rice hulls, 40% vermiculite + 30% rice charred hulls + 30% fiber coconut, 50% vermiculite + 30% rice charred hulls + 20% sand, 70% vermiculite + 15% rice charred hulls + 15% vermicompost residue of textile industry; four shading levels (100, 70, 50 and 30% full sun and three replications. The shade level of 50% compared to full sun, enabled the production of seedlings of Copaiba with higher concentrations of chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll, and provided the lowest daily transpiration throughout the day and the plants. The leaf

  15. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  16. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  17. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) Sic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  18. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  19. Zirconia based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressiani, J.C.; Bressiani, A.H.A.

    1989-05-01

    Within the new generation of ceramic materials, zirconia continues to attract ever increasing attention of scients, technologists and users by virtue of its singular combination of properties and being able to perform thermo-mechanical, electroeletronic, chemico-biological functions. Nevertheless, in order to obtain these properties, a through understanding of the phase transformation mechanisms and microstructural changes is necessary. This paper discusses the main parameters that require control during fabrication of these materials to obtain desired properties for a specific application. (author) [pt

  20. Directionally Solidified Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Vidrio , Vol. 44 [5] (2005) pp 347 - 352. 9. F. W. Dynys and A. Sayir, "Self Assemble Silicide Architectures by Directional Solidification," Journal...Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [4] (2004) pp 753 - 758. 21. A. Sayir and F. S. Lowery, "Combustion-Resistance of Silicon-Based Ceramics...Espafiola de Cerdmica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [3], 2004. ISSN-0366-3175-BSCVB9. 14 37. P. Berger, A. Sayir and M. H. Berger, "Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic

  1. Formulation and synthesis by melting process of titanate enriched glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Fillet, C.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.; McGlinn, P.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide containment for the separated radionuclides in stable oxide phases with proven resistance to leaching and irradiation damage and in consequence to obtain a glass ceramic or a ceramic material using a vitrification process. Sphene glass ceramic, zirconolite glass ceramic and zirconolite enriched ceramic have been fabricated and characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX and DTA

  2. Nano-ceramics and its molding technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Xu Yunshu

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ceramics and its related knowledge were introduced. Fabrication of nano-ceramic powder, as well as the molding and sintering technologies of nano-ceramics were reviewed. Features of the present molding technologies were analyzed. The applications of nano-ceramics were prospected. (authors)

  3. Preparation of 147Pm ceramic source core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielcarski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preparation of ceramic pellets containing fixed promethium-147 is described. Incorporation rate of 147 Pm into the ceramic material was determined. The leachability and vaporization of promethium from the obtained ceramics was investigated. The ceramic pellets prepared by the described procedure, mounted in special holders, can be applied as point sources in beta backscatter thickness gauges. (author)

  4. Surface modification technique of structural ceramics: ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Zhijian; Miao Hezhuo; Si Wenjie; Qi Longhao; Li Wenzhi

    2003-01-01

    Through reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of the existed surface modification techniques, a new technique, ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating, was proposed. Using the proposed technique, the surfaces of silicon nitride ceramics were modified by Ti ion implantation, and then three kinds of ternary coatings, (Ti,Al)N, (Ti,Zr)N and (Ti,Cr)N, were deposited on the as-implanted ceramics. The coatings prepared by this technique are of high-hardness and well adhesive to the ceramic substrates. The maximal hardness measured by nanoindentation tests is more than 40 GPa. The maximal critical load by nanoscratch tests is more than 60 mN. The cutting tools prepared by this technique with the presented coatings are of excellent performance in industrial applications. The technique may be promising for the surface modification of structural ceramics. (orig.)

  5. Nanosecond Tm:Y2O3 ceramic laser passively Q-switched by a Ho:LuAG ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Huang, Haitao; Wang, Shiqiang; Shen, Deyuan

    2018-02-01

    A passively Q-switched 2.05-μm Tm:Y2O3 ceramic laser, employing Ho:LuAG ceramic as a saturable absorber, was demonstrated for the first time. Under the absorbed pump power of 20.5 W, a maximum output power of 497 mW was obtained. Pulses with a minimum pulse width of 642 ns under the repetition rate of 33 kHz were achieved. Our works validate that Ho-doped materials have good potential for passive Q-switching of Tm-doped lasers at 2-μm wavelength region.

  6. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  7. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 degrees C, a higher temperature (1450 degrees C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature

  8. Using rice straw to manufacture ceramic bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov German Ivanovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the co-authors offer their advanced and efficient methodologies for the recycling of the rice straw, as well as the novel approaches to the ceramic brick quality improvement through the application of the rice straw as the combustible additive and through the formation of amorphous silica in the course of the rice straw combustion. The co-authors provide characteristics of the raw materials, production techniques used to manufacture ceramic bricks, and their basic properties in the article. The co-authors describe the simulated process of formation of amorphous silica. The process in question has two independent steps (or options: 1 rice straw combustion and ash formation outside the oven (in the oxidizing medium, and further application of ash as the additive in the process of burning clay mixtures; 2 adding pre-treated rice straw as the combustible additive into the clay mixture, and its further burning in compliance with the pre-set temperature mode. The findings have proven that the most rational pre-requisite of the rice straw application in the manufacturing of ceramic bricks consists in feeding milled straw into the clay mixture to be followed by molding, drying and burning. Brick samples are highly porous, and they also demonstrate sufficient compressive strength. The co-authors have also identified optimal values of rice straw and ash content in the mixtures under research.

  9. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  10. Cementation of Glass-Ceramic Posterior Restorations: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Breemer, Carline R. G.; Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Cune, Marco S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive review is to systematically organize the current knowledge regarding the cementation of glass-ceramic materials and restorations, with an additional focus on the benefits of Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS). Materials and Methods. An extensive literature search concerning the cementation of single-unit glass-ceramic posterior restorations was conducted in the databases of MEDLINE (Pubmed), CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), and EMBASE. To be considered for inclusion, in vitro and in vivo studies should compare different cementation regimes involving a “glass-ceramic/cement/human tooth” complex. Results and Conclusions. 88 studies were included in total. The in vitro data were organized according to the following topics: (micro)shear and (micro)tensile bond strength, fracture strength, and marginal gap and integrity. For in vivo studies survival and quality of survival were considered. In vitro studies showed that adhesive systems (3-step, etch-and-rinse) result in the best (micro)shear bond strength values compared to self-adhesive and self-etch systems when luting glass-ceramic substrates to human dentin. The highest fracture strength is obtained with adhesive cements in particular. No marked clinical preference for one specific procedure could be demonstrated on the basis of the reviewed literature. The possible merits of IDS are most convincingly illustrated by the favorable microtensile bond strengths. No clinical studies regarding IDS were found. PMID:26557651

  11. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  12. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  13. Imparting Icephobicity with Substrate Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzius, Thomas; Vasileiou, Thomas; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-11-01

    Ice accumulation poses serious safety and performance issues for modern infrastructure. Rationally designed superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated potential as a passive means to mitigate ice accretion; however, further studies on solutions that reduce impalement and contact time for impacting supercooled droplets are urgently needed. Here we demonstrate the collaborative effect of substrate flexibility and surface texture on enhancing icephobicity and repelling viscous droplets. We first investigate the influence of increased viscosity on impalement resistance and droplet-substrate contact time. Then we examine the effect of droplet partial solidification on recoil by impacting supercooled water droplets onto surfaces containing ice nucleation promoters. We demonstrate a passive method for shedding partially solidified droplets that does not rely on the classic recoil mechanism. Using an energy-based model, we identify a previously unexplored mechanism whereby the substrate oscillation governs the rebound process by efficiently absorbing the droplet kinetic energy and rectifying it back, allowing for droplet recoil. This mechanism applies for a range of droplet viscosities and ice slurries, which do not rebound from rigid superhydrophobic substrates. Partial support of the Swiss National Science Foundation under Grant No. 162565 and the European Research Council under Advanced Grant No. 669908 (INTICE) is acknowledged.

  14. The depolarization performances of 0.97PbZrO3-0.03Ba(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 ceramics under hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rigu; Nie, Hengchang; Liu, Zhen; Peng, Ping; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Wang, Genshui

    2018-02-01

    Several 0.97PbZrO3-0.03Ba(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (0.97PZ-0.03BMN) ceramics were prepared via the columbite precursor method. Their microstructures and pressure-dependent ferroelectric and depolarization performances were then studied. The X-ray diffraction patterns of ground and fresh samples indicate that a main rhombohedral symmetry crystal structure is present in the bulk and that it sits alongside a trace quantity of an orthorhombic antiferroelectric phase that results from the effect of grinding on the surface. The remanent polarization (Pr) of the 0.97PZ-0.03BMN reached 32.4 μC/cm2 at 4.5 kV/mm and ambient pressure. In an in situ pressure-induced current measurement, more than 91% of the retained Pr of the pre-poled sample was released when the pressure was increased from 194 MPa to 238 MPa. That this pressure-driven depolarization should be attributed to the pressure-induced ferroelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition is supported by the emergence of double P-E loops at high hydrostatic pressures. Moreover, the 0.97PZ-0.03BMN ceramics exhibit no temperature-induced phase transitions and little related polarization loss up to 125 °C, which suggests that Pr has excellent thermal stability. The sharp depolarization behavior at low pressures and excellent temperature stability reveal that our 0.97PZ-0.03BMN ceramics exhibit superior performances in mechanical-electrical energy conversion applications.

  15. Bioactive glass–ceramic coating for enhancing the in vitro corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Xinyu; Cai Shu; Dou Ying; Xu Guohua; Huang Kai; Ren Mengguo; Wang Xuexin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sol–gel derived 45S5 glass–ceramic coating was prepared on Mg alloy substrate. ► The corrosion resistance of glass–ceramic coated Mg alloy was markedly improved. ► The corrosion behavior of the coated sample varied due to the cracking of coating. - Abstract: In this work, a bioactive 45S5 glass–ceramic coating was synthesized on magnesium (Mg) alloy substrate by using a sol–gel dip-coating method, to improve the initial corrosion resistance of AZ31 Mg alloy. The surface morphology and phase composition of the glass–ceramic coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The coating composed of amorphous phase and crystalline phase Na 2 Ca 2 Si 3 O 9 , with the thickness of ∼1.0 μm, exhibited a uniform and crack-free surface morphology. The corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated Mg alloy substrates was investigated by the electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization tests recorded an increase of potential (E corr ) form −1.60 V to −1.48 V, and a reduction of corrosion current density (i corr ) from 4.48 μA cm −2 to 0.16 μA cm −2 , due to the protection provided by the glass–ceramic coating. Immersion tests also showed the markedly improved corrosion resistance of the coated sample over the immersion period of 7 days. Moreover, after 14 days of immersion in SBF, the corrosion resistance of the coated sample declined due to the cracking of the glass–ceramic coating, which was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The results suggested that the 45S5 glass–ceramic coated Mg alloy could provide a suitable corrosion behavior for use as degradable implants.

  16. Compatibility tests between Solar Salt and thermal storage ceramics from inorganic industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, Fabrice; Falcoz, Quentin; Veron, Emmanuel; Py, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ESEM and XRD characterizations have been performed. • Compatibility of these ceramics with the conventional binary Solar Salt is tested at 500 °C. • Tested ceramics have relevant properties to store thermal energy up to 1000 °C. • Feasibility of using ceramics as filler materials in thermocline is demonstrated. - Abstract: This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using several post-industrial ceramics as filler materials in a direct thermocline storage configuration. The tested ceramics, coming from several industrial processes (asbestos containing waste treatment, coal fired power plants or metallurgic furnaces) demonstrate relevant properties to store thermal energy by sensible heat up to 1000 °C. Thus, they represent at low-cost a promising, efficient and sustainable approach for thermal energy storage. In the present study, the thermo-chemical compatibility of these ceramics with the conventional binary Solar Salt is tested at medium temperature (500 °C) under steady state. In order to determine the feasibility of using such ceramics as filler material, Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) characterizations have been performed to check for their chemical and structural evolution during corrosion tests. The final objective is to develop a molten salt thermocline direct storage system using low-cost shaped ceramic as structured filler material. Most of the tested ceramics present an excellent corrosion resistance in molten Solar Salt and should significantly decrease the current cost of concentrated solar thermal energy storage system

  17. Ceramic material suitable for repair of a space vehicle component in a microgravity and vacuum environment, method of making same, and method of repairing a space vehicle component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium diboride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  18. Sintering and annealing effects on undoped yttria transparent ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letue, Laetitia; Petit, Johan, E-mail: johan.petit@onera.fr; Ritti, Marie-Hélène; Lalanne, Sylvie; Landais, Stéphane

    2017-06-15

    Transparent yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) ceramics were processed by several densifications steps without any doping species. The green bodies were obtained by the aqueous way and sintered at high temperature under vacuum and then under high pressure. We studied the effects of different sintering cycles and air annealing at different steps of the process on the density and the grain growth. We also focused on the reaction between yttria ceramics and BN-coated graphite crucible which occurs during HIP. We noted that a low heating rate and two annealing steps are necessary to improve our samples’ transparency. - Highlights: • The quality of transparent ceramics is compared with the tested process parameters. • Air annealing is critical when using a carbon environment in the process. • Intra-granular pores, and so the final transparency, are directly linked to the sintering heating rates.

  19. Light Weight Ceramic Ablators for Mars Follow-on Mission Vehicle Thermal Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Hsu, Ming-Ta; Turan, Ryan

    1994-01-01

    New Light Weight Ceramic Ablators (LCA) were produced by using ceramic and carbon fibrous substrates, impregnated with silicone and phenolic resins. The special infiltration techniques (patent pending) were developed to control the amount of organic resins in the highly porous fiber matrices so that the final densities of LCA's range from 0.22 to 0.24 g/cc. This paper presents the thermal and ablative performance of the Silicone Impregnated Reusable Ceramic Ablators (SIRCA) in simulated entry conditions for Mars-Pathfinder in the Ames 60 MW Interaction Heating Facility (I HF). Arc jet test results yielded no evidence of char erosion and mass loss at high stagnation pressures to 0.25 atm. Minimal silica melt was detected on surface char at a stagnation pressure of 0.31 atm. Four ceramic substrates were used in the production of SIRCA's to obtain the effective of boron oxide present in substrate so the thermal performance of SIRCA's. A sample of SIRCA was also exposed to the same heating condition for five cycles and no significant mass loss or recession was observed. Tensile testing established that the SIRCA tensile strength is about a factor of two higher than that of the virgin substrates. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) of the char in nitrogen and air showed no evidence of free carbon in the char. Scanning Electron Microscopy of the post test sample showed that the char surface consists of a fibrous structure that was sealed with a thin layer of silicon oxide melt.

  20. Adhesion of electrolessly deposited nickel-phosphorus on alumina ceramic : an assessment of the current status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, J.W.; With, de G.

    1993-01-01

    Literature data on the adhesion of electrolessly deposited Ni(P) films on alumina ceramic substrates are reviewed in this paper. The influences of conditions of successive etching, nucleation and metallization processes on adhesion are discussed as well as the effect of subsequent annealing