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Sample records for underlies glycogen storage

  1. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  2. Type V glycogen storage disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type V glycogen storage disease (GSD V) is a rare inherited condition in which the body is not able to break down glycogen. ... can provide more information and resources: Association for ... Disease -- www.agsdus.org National Organization for Rare Disease ...

  3. Liver cirrhosis in glycogen storage disease Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertling, Fabian; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gerner, Patrick; Baba, Hideo A; Franzel, Julia; Schlune, Andrea; Meissner, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease Ib is an inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism leading to impaired glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. Cardinal symptoms include fasting hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis and hepatomegaly as well as neutropenia. We report for the first time on the development of liver cirrhosis in a nine-year-old boy in the course of glycogen storage disease Ib and discuss possible underlying pathomechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Downregulation of SIRT1 signaling underlies hepatic autophagy impairment in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ho Cho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia leads to impaired glucose homeostasis and metabolic manifestations including hepatomegaly caused by increased glycogen and neutral fat accumulation. A recent report showed that G6Pase-α deficiency causes impairment in autophagy, a recycling process important for cellular metabolism. However, the molecular mechanism underlying defective autophagy is unclear. Here we show that in mice, liver-specific knockout of G6Pase-α (L-G6pc-/- leads to downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 signaling that activates autophagy via deacetylation of autophagy-related (ATG proteins and forkhead box O (FoxO family of transcriptional factors which transactivate autophagy genes. Consistently, defective autophagy in G6Pase-α-deficient liver is characterized by attenuated expressions of autophagy components, increased acetylation of ATG5 and ATG7, decreased conjugation of ATG5 and ATG12, and reduced autophagic flux. We further show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency results in activation of carbohydrate response element-binding protein, a lipogenic transcription factor, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ, a lipid regulator, and suppressed expression of PPAR-α, a master regulator of fatty acid β-oxidation, all contributing to hepatic steatosis and downregulation of SIRT1 expression. An adenovirus vector-mediated increase in hepatic SIRT1 expression corrects autophagy defects but does not rectify metabolic abnormalities associated with G6Pase-α deficiency. Importantly, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector-mediated restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression corrects metabolic abnormalities, restores SIRT1-FoxO signaling, and normalizes defective autophagy. Taken together, these data show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency-mediated down-regulation of SIRT1 signaling underlies defective hepatic autophagy in GSD-Ia.

  5. Type I Glycogen Storage Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most common form of glycogen storage disease, accounting for 25% of all cases. It is an ... Links Videos Webinars About ALF OVERVIEW Programs About Liver Disease Ask the Experts People ALF ...

  6. Type I Glycogen Storage Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Glycogen Storage Disease Type ...

  7. Genetic and Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gholami

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage diseases are a group of inborn error of metabolism and characterized by accumulation of glycogen in various tissues. The overall incidence of glycogen storage diseases is estimated 1 per 20,000-43,000 live births. There are twelve distinct diseases that are commonly considered to be glycogen storage diseases and classified based on enzyme deficiency and affected tissue. We searched all review articles and books in the national and international databases which considered as inherited metabolic disorders and the genetic associations of these disorders. A large number of enzymes intervene in the synthesis and degradation of glycogen which is regulated by hormones. Several hormones, including insulin, glucagon and cortisol regulate the relationship between glycolysis, glycogenosis, and glycogen synthesis.These diseases are divided into three major groups: disorders that affected liver, disorders that affected muscle and those which are generalized. Glycogen storage diseases are called by a Roman numerical that reflects the historical sequence of their discovery by an enzyme defect or by the author's name of the first description.

  8. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made......A 30-yr-old woman presented with 2 consecutive miscarriages within 7 mo. Histopathologic examination of the placental tissue showed intracytoplasmic inclusion vacuoles with a strong reaction in Periodic acid-Schiff staining and a slightly pallor reaction in alcian blue staining. Additional...... on histopathologic examination. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis and to offer prenatal genetic testing in future pregnancies....

  9. Glycogen storage in tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Jocelyne M T; Khan, Aasma A; Waldman, Stephen D

    2008-08-01

    Recent focus in cartilage tissue engineering has been to develop functional tissue that can survive after implantation. One such determinant is the ability of the engineered tissue to be able to sustain its metabolic activity post-implantation. In vivo, chondrocytes contain stores of intracellular glycogen to support metabolism and it is unknown whether these cells can store glycogen during tissue growth in vitro. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the appropriate nutrient conditions to elicit glycogen storage in tissue-engineered cartilage. Isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were seeded in scaffold-free, 3D culture and grown under different nutrient conditions (glucose concentrations and media volumes) for 4 weeks. Intracellular glycogen storage, glucose utilization and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation of the engineered tissues were then evaluated. Glucose concentration (5-10 mM) and media volume (1-4 ml) had no apparent effect on cartilaginous tissue formation. However, glucose consumption by the cells increased in proportion to the volume of medium provided. Lactate production was similarly affected but in direct proportion to the glucose consumed, indicating a change in glucose utilization. Similarly, under elevated medium volume, engineered tissues stained positive for intracellular glycogen, which was also confirmed biochemically (1 ml, 1 +/- 2; 2 ml, 13 +/- 4; 4 ml, 13 +/- 3 microg/construct). The storage of intracellular glycogen in engineered cartilage can be elicited by culturing the constructs in elevated volumes of medium (>or=1 ml medium/million cells), which might help to ensure appropriate metabolic function after implantation. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Glycogen storage disease type IV Glycogen storage disease type IV Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is an inherited disorder ...

  11. A case of glycogen storage disease type III

    OpenAIRE

    Kırış, S.; Özdoğan, O.C.; Avşar, E.; Kalaycı, C.; Tözün, N.; Ulusoy, N.B.

    1996-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are hereditary metabolic disorders leading to the storage in cells of glycogen of normal or abnormal structure.We report a case of glycogen storage disease Type III which was diagnosed in October 1993.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type III

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Glycogen storage disease type III Glycogen storage disease type III Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glycogen storage disease type III (also known as GSDIII or Cori ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Glycogen storage disease type I Glycogen storage disease type I Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glycogen storage disease type I (also known as GSDI or von ...

  14. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    oxidation. Such changes may be detrimental for persons with GSD from a metabolic perspective. However, exercise may alter skeletal muscle substrate metabolism in ways that are beneficial for patients with GSD, such as improving exercise tolerance and increasing fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a regular......Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase...... in glycogen storage that disrupts contractile function and/or 2) a reduced substrate turnover below the block, which inhibits skeletal muscle ATP production. Immobility is associated with metabolic alterations in muscle leading to an increased dependence on glycogen use and a reduced capacity for fatty acid...

  15. Menorrhagia in patients with type I glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Stephanie L; El-Gharbawy, Areeg H; Kasturi, Vellore G; James, Andra; Kishnani, Priya S

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate menorrhagia in a cohort of women with glycogen storage disease type I because it appears to be an under-recognized problem in females of reproductive age. A retrospective chart review was performed on 13 menstruating patients with glycogen storage disease type I (age 23-48 years) for a diagnosis of menorrhagia. Nine (69%) (confidence interval 0.39-0.91) women had development of menorrhagia. Median hemoglobin values in these patients were generally low (range 9.5-12.85 g/dL) but not different from those of the nonmenorrhagia group (hemoglobin range 9.55-11.0 g/dL) with glycogen storage disease type I. Four patients with menorrhagia required hospitalization or emergency department visits for treatment of menorrhagia. Two of the four patients hospitalized required blood transfusion, with an additional patient requiring a transfusion during pregnancy. Eight patients (89%) either were recommended to have or required medical or surgical treatment of their menorrhagia. Glycogen storage disease type I is associated with menorrhagia. The evaluation should include assessment of coagulation functions and referral to a gynecologist, hematologist, or both, because bleeding diathesis and polycystic ovary syndrome are common in patients with glycogen storage disease type I.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Glycogen storage disease type V Glycogen storage disease type V Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glycogen storage disease type V (also known as GSDV or McArdle ...

  17. Pregnancies in glycogen storage disease type Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Danielle H. J.; Rake, Jan Peter; Schwarz, Martin; Ullrich, Kurt; Weinstein, David A.; Merkel, Martin; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Smit, G. Peter A.

    OBJECTIVE: Reports on pregnancies in women with glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) are scarce. Because of improved life expectancy, pregnancy is becoming an important issue. We describe 15 pregnancies by focusing on dietary treatment, biochemical parameters, and GSD-Ia complications. STUDY

  18. Disturbed lipid metabolism in glycogen storage disease type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, RHJ; Smit, GPA; Kuipers, F

    2002-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase, the enzyme catalysing the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) to glucose. GSD1 is associated with severe hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis. The underlying mechanisms

  19. Preclinical Development of New Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Baodong; Brooks, Elizabeth D.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) consists of more than 10 discrete conditions for which the biochemical and genetic bases have been determined, and new therapies have been under development for several of these conditions. Gene therapy research has generated proof-of-concept for GSD types I (von Gierke disease) and II (Pompe disease). Key features of these gene therapy strategies include the choice of vector and regulatory cassette, and recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing t...

  20. Molecular analysis of glycogen storage disease type Ia in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Mahmoud S. K., Khorrami A., Rafeey M., Ghergherehchi R. and Sima M. D. 2017 Molecular analysis of glycogen storage disease type Ia in Iranian Azeri ... G6PC gene; Azeri Turkish; glycogen storage disease type Ia; novel mutation; Azeri Turkish sequencing. ... Approximately 5 ml of intravenous blood samples were col-.

  1. RENAL COMPLICATIONS IN GLYCOGEN-STORAGE-DISEASE TYPE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REITSMABIERENS, WCC

    1993-01-01

    Deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase is the biochemical defect in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). Normally this enzyme is present in the liver, intestine and kidneys. The lack of the enzyme in the kidney makes it obvious that glycogen storage will not be restricted to the liver

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma in glycogen storage disease type IV

    OpenAIRE

    de Moor, R A; Schweizer, J; van Hoek, B; Wasser, M; Vink, R; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P

    2000-01-01

    A 13 year old patient with juvenile type IV glycogen storage disease died of the complications of hepatocellular carcinoma. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of hepatocellular carcinoma in association with type IV glycogen storage disease.



  3. Diabetes mellitus in a patient with glycogen storage disease type Ia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Aviva; Ohri, Anupam

    2017-11-12

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia is a genetic disorder that is associated with persistent fasting hypoglycemia and the inability to produce endogenous glucose. The development of diabetes with glycogen storage disease is exceedingly rare. The underlying pathogenesis for developing diabetes in these patients is unclear, and there are no guidelines for treatment. We describe a case of a 34-year-old woman of South Asian descent with glycogen storage disease type Ia, who developed uncontrolled diabetes mellitus as a young adult. Hyperglycemia was noted after childbirth, and worsened years later. Treatment for diabetes was difficult due to risks of hypoglycemia from her underlying glycogen storage disease. With minimal hypoglycemic events, the patient's blood glucose improved with exercise in combination with a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor and an alpha glucosidase inhibitor. We report a rare case of diabetes in the setting of glycogen storage disease-Ia. Based on the literature, there appears to be a relationship between glycogen storage disease and metabolic syndrome, which likely plays a role in the pathogenesis. The management of glycemic control remains a clinical challenge, requiring management of both fasting hypoglycemia from glycogen storage disease, as well as post-prandial hyperglycemia from diabetes mellitus.

  4. Glycogen storage disease type III diagnosis and management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishnani, Priya S; Austin, Stephanie L; Arn, Pamela; Bali, Deeksha S; Boney, Anne; Case, Laura E; Chung, Wendy K; Desai, Dev M; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Haller, Ronald; Smit, G Peter A; Smith, Alastair D; Hobson-Webb, Lisa D; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Weinstein, David A; Watson, Michael S

    2010-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is a rare disease of variable clinical severity affecting primarily the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. It is caused by deficient activity of glycogen debranching enzyme, which is a key enzyme in glycogen degradation. Glycogen storage disease type III manifests a wide clinical spectrum. Individuals with glycogen storage disease type III present with hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and growth retardation. Those with type IIIa have symptoms related to liver disease and progressive muscle (cardiac and skeletal) involvement that varies in age of onset, rate of disease progression, and severity. Those with type IIIb primarily have symptoms related to liver disease. This guideline for the management of glycogen storage disease type III was developed as an educational resource for health care providers to facilitate prompt and accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of patients. An international group of experts in various aspects of glycogen storage disease type III met to review the evidence base from the scientific literature and provided their expert opinions. Consensus was developed in each area of diagnosis, treatment, and management. This management guideline specifically addresses evaluation and diagnosis across multiple organ systems (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal/nutrition, hepatic, musculoskeletal, and neuromuscular) involved in glycogen storage disease type III. Conditions to consider in a differential diagnosis stemming from presenting features and diagnostic algorithms are discussed. Aspects of diagnostic evaluation and nutritional and medical management, including care coordination, genetic counseling, hepatic transplantation, and prenatal diagnosis, are addressed. A guideline that will facilitate the accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of individuals with glycogen storage disease type III was developed. This guideline will help health care providers recognize patients with all forms of

  5. Transgenic overexpression of protein targeting to glycogen markedly increases adipocytic glycogen storage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurczak, Michael J; Danos, Arpad M; Rehrmann, Victoria R; Allison, Margaret B; Greenberg, Cynthia C; Brady, Matthew J

    2007-03-01

    Adipocytes express the rate-limiting enzymes required for glycogen metabolism and increase glycogen synthesis in response to insulin. However, the physiological function of adipocytic glycogen in vivo is unclear, due in part to the low absolute levels and the apparent biophysical constraints of adipocyte morphology on glycogen accumulation. To further study the regulation of glycogen metabolism in adipose tissue, transgenic mice were generated that overexpressed the protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) glycogen-targeting subunit (PTG) driven by the adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2) promoter. Exogenous PTG was detected in gonadal, perirenal, and brown fat depots, but it was not detected in any other tissue examined. PTG overexpression resulted in a modest redistribution of PP1 to glycogen particles, corresponding to a threefold increase in the glycogen synthase activity ratio. Glycogen synthase protein levels were also increased twofold, resulting in a combined greater than sixfold enhancement of basal glycogen synthase specific activity. Adipocytic glycogen levels were increased 200- to 400-fold in transgenic animals, and this increase was maintained to 1 yr of age. In contrast, lipid metabolism in transgenic adipose tissue was not significantly altered, as assessed by lipogenic rates, weight gain on normal or high-fat diets, or circulating free fatty acid levels after a fast. However, circulating and adipocytic leptin levels were doubled in transgenic animals, whereas adiponectin expression was unchanged. Cumulatively, these data indicate that murine adipocytes are capable of storing far higher levels of glycogen than previously reported. Furthermore, these results were obtained by overexpression of an endogenous adipocytic protein, suggesting that mechanisms may exist in vivo to maintain adipocytic glycogen storage at a physiological set point.

  6. The electrodiagnostic characteristics of Glycogen Storage Disease Type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson-Webb, Lisa D; Austin, Stephanie L; Bali, Deeksha S; Kishnani, Priya S

    2010-07-01

    Glycogen Storage Disease Type III, also known as debrancher deficiency or Cori disease, is an autosomal recessive disorder recognized for both its hepatic and muscle manifestations. The neuromuscular manifestations of Glycogen Storage Disease Type III are not well characterized. In this study, we attempt to better define the disorder. The medical records of 40 patients with Glycogen Storage Disease Type III seen at Duke University during 1990-2009 were reviewed. The medical records of all patients with nerve conduction studies and/or electromyography were examined. Twelve patients with Glycogen Storage Disease Type III (aged 5-55 years) had undergone nerve conduction studies +/- electromyography. Three of these cases are presented in detail. Nine patients had Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa, two patients had Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIb, and the clinical subtype of one patient was unknown. All had nerve conduction studies and of those nerves tested, abnormalities in the median motor response were most common, corresponding to previously described, intrinsic hand muscle weakness. Electromyography was performed in eight patients and myopathic findings were present in six individuals. Abnormal electrodiagnostic findings were more common in older patients. The two patients with Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIb had electrodiagnostic evidence of nerve involvement with minor myopathic findings. The neuromuscular manifestations of Glycogen Storage Disease Type III include myopathy and neuropathy and are more likely to occur with increasing age, even in those diagnosed with Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIb. Intrinsic hand muscle weakness is likely due to a combination of nerve and muscle dysfunction, a finding that may have implications for treatment.

  7. Liver transplantation for type I and type IV glycogen storage disease

    OpenAIRE

    Selby, R.; Starzl, T.E.; Yunis, E.; Todo, S.; Tzakis, A.G.; Brown, B.I.; Kendall, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Progressive liver failure or hepatic complications of the primary disease led to orthotopic liver transplantation in eight children with glycogen storage disease over a 9-year period. One patient had glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I (von Gierke disease) and seven patients had type IV GSD (Andersen disease). As previously reported [19], a 16.5-year-old-girl with GSD type I was successfully treated in 1982 by orthotopic liver transplantation under cyclosporine and steroid immunosuppression...

  8. UNUSUAL EUGLYCEMIC PRESENTATION OF GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE TYPE 1B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaprakash Sosale

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage diseases are infrequently reported metabolic disorder. Diagnosis and treatment of these conditions is a challenge to the clinician given its complexity and life threatening consequences

  9. Metabolic control of von Gierke disease (glycogen storage disease type Ia) in pregnancy: maintenance of euglycemia with cornstarch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M P; Compton, A; Drugan, A; Evans, M I

    1990-03-01

    In patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia, glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency reduces the liver's ability to generate free glucose from glycogen. Without a continuous, exogenous source of glucose, severe hypoglycemia and subsequent metabolic perturbations occur. Our observations of a patient with glycogen storage disease type Ia, who also had a clomiphene-induced triplet gestation, suggest that cornstarch, which can be catabolized by debranching enzymes, may be used to maintain a constant state of maternal and fetal euglycemia and correct many metabolic abnormalities. Our data suggest that patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia can be safely managed in pregnancy under a tightly monitored and regulated protocol of raw cornstarch feedings.

  10. A highly prevalent equine glycogen storage disease is explained by constitutive activation of a mutant glycogen synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maile, C A; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Mahalingan, K K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1) is associated with a missense mutation (R309H) in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, enhanced glycogen synthase (GS) activity and excessive glycogen and amylopectate inclusions in muscle. METHODS: Equine muscle biochemical and reco...

  11. A new muscle glycogen storage disease associated with glycogenin-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfatti, Edoardo; Nilsson, Johanna; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola; Hernandez-Lain, Aurelio; Michel, Fabrice; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Cristina; Viennet, Gabriel; Akman, H Orhan; Kornblum, Cornelia; Van den Bergh, Peter; Romero, Norma B; Engel, Andrew G; DiMauro, Salvatore; Oldfors, Anders

    2014-12-01

    We describe a slowly progressive myopathy in 7 unrelated adult patients with storage of polyglucosan in muscle fibers. Genetic investigation revealed homozygous or compound heterozygous deleterious variants in the glycogenin-1 gene (GYG1). Most patients showed depletion of glycogenin-1 in skeletal muscle, whereas 1 showed presence of glycogenin-1 lacking the C-terminal that normally binds glycogen synthase. Our results indicate that either depletion of glycogenin-1 or impaired interaction with glycogen synthase underlies this new form of glycogen storage disease that differs from a previously reported patient with GYG1 mutations who showed profound glycogen depletion in skeletal muscle and accumulation of glycogenin-1. © 2014 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  12. Muscular glycogen storage diseases without increased glycogen content on histoplathological examination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, M.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Niezen-Koning, K. E.; van Diggelen, O. P.; van Spronsen, F. J.

    Histopathological findings of muscle biopsies from five patients with two different muscular glycogen storage diseases (mGSD) were presented. From these investigations it emerged that the yield of histopathology in mGSD is low. In only one of five patients histopathological findings gave a clue

  13. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in Males with Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Evelyn M; Lehman, Anna; Acott, Philip; Gillis, Jane; Metzger, Daniel L; Sirrs, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 is an autosomal recessive disorder with an incidence of 1 in 100,000. Long-term complications include chronic blood glucose lability, lactic academia, short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, gout, progressive renal insufficiency, systemic or pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas at risk for malignant transformation, anemia, vitamin D deficiency, hyperuricemic nephrocalcinosis, inflammatory bowel syndrome (type 1b), hypertriglyceridemia, and irregular menstrual cycles. We describe hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as a novel complication in glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1. Case Studies and Methods: Four unrelated patients with GSD 1a (N = 1) and 1b (N = 3) were found to have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosed at different ages. Institutional Research Ethics Board approval was obtained as appropriate. Participant consent was obtained. A retrospective chart review was performed and clinical symptoms and results of investigations summarized as a case series. All patients were confirmed biochemically to have low luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), and correspondingly low total testosterone. Clinical symptoms of hypogonadism varied widely. Investigations for other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were unremarkable. In addition, all patients were found to have disproportionately low bone mineral density at the lumbar spine compared to the hip. Common to all patients was erratic metabolic control, including recurrent hypoglycemia and elevated lactate levels. Recurrent elevations in cortisol in response to hypoglycemia may be the underlying pathology leading to suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release. Incorporating clinical and/or biochemical screening of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be important in the management of this disease. Testosterone therapy however needs to be carefully considered because of the risk of hepatic adenomas.

  14. Glycogen storage disease type 3: A management challenge in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glycogen storage disease type 3: A management challenge in pregnancy. OG Okunoye, C Deakin, S Maguire. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  15. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  16. Liver transplantation in glycogen storage disease type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Susanna J. B.; Visser, Gepke; Smit, Peter G. P. A.; Fuchs, Sabine A.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), an inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism, is caused by defects in the glucose-6-transporter/glucose-6-phosphatase complex, which is essential in glucose homeostasis. Two types exist, GSDIa and GSDIb, each caused by different defects in the complex. GSDIa is

  17. Molecular analysis of glycogen storage disease type Ia in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) are caused by abnormalities in enzymes that are involved in the regulation of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. GSD I, an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, is the most common GSD and has four subtypes. Here, we examined GSD Ia caused by the defective ...

  18. Guidelines for management of glycogen storage disease type I - European study on glycogen storage disease type I (ESGSD I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rake, JP; Visser, G; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Ullrich, K; Smit, GPA

    2002-01-01

    Life-expectancy in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I) has improved considerably. Its relative rarity implies that no metabolic centre has experience of large series of patients and experience with long-term management and follow-up at each centre is limited. There is wide variation in methods

  19. Consensus guidelines for management of glycogen storage disease type 1b - European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Rake, JP; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Moses, S; Ullrich, K; Wendel, U; Smit, GPA

    2002-01-01

    Life expectancy in glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) has improved considerably. Its relative rarity implies that no metabolic centre has experience of large series of patients and therefore experience with long-term management and follow-up at each centre is limited. There is wide variation in

  20. Characterization and pathogenesis of anemia in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David Q; Carreras, Caroline T; Fiske, Laurie M; Austin, Stephanie; Boree, Danielle; Kishnani, Priya S; Weinstein, David A

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the frequency and causes of anemia in glycogen storage disease type I. Hematologic data and iron studies were available from 202 subjects (163 with glycogen storage disease Ia and 39 with glycogen storage disease Ib). Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentrations less than the 5th percentile for age and gender; severe anemia was defined as presence of a hemoglobin glycogen storage disease Ia, 68/163 patients were anemic at their last follow-up. Preadolescent patients tended to have milder anemia secondary to iron deficiency, but anemia of chronic disease predominated in adults. Severe anemia was present in 8/163 patients, of whom 75% had hepatic adenomas. The anemia improved or resolved in all 10 subjects who underwent resection of liver lesions. Anemia was present in 72% of patients with glycogen storage disease Ib, and severe anemia occurred in 16/39 patients. Anemia in patients with glycogen storage disease Ib was associated with exacerbations of glycogen storage disease enterocolitis, and there was a significant correlation between C-reactive protein and hemoglobin levels (P = 0.036). Anemia is a common manifestation of both glycogen storage disease Ia and Ib, although the pathophysiology appears to be different between these conditions. Those with severe anemia and glycogen storage disease Ia likely have hepatic adenomas, whereas glycogen storage disease enterocolitis should be considered in those with glycogen storage disease Ib.

  1. Glycogen storage disease type III: modified Atkins diet improves myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorandan, Sebene; Meyer, Uta; Hartmann, Hans; Das, Anibh Martin

    2014-11-28

    Frequent feeds with carbohydrate-rich meals or continuous enteral feeding has been the therapy of choice in glycogen storage disease (Glycogenosis) type III. Recent guidelines on diagnosis and management recommend frequent feedings with high complex carbohydrates or cornstarch avoiding fasting in children, while in adults a low-carb-high-protein-diet is recommended. While this regimen can prevent hypoglycaemia in children it does not improve skeletal and heart muscle function, which are compromised in patients with glycogenosis IIIa. Administration of carbohydrates may elicit reactive hyperinsulinism, resulting in suppression of lipolysis, ketogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and activation of glycogen synthesis. Thus, heart and skeletal muscle are depleted of energy substrates. Modified Atkins diet leads to increased blood levels of ketone bodies and fatty acids. We hypothesize that this health care intervention improves the energetic balance of muscles. We treated 2 boys with glycogenosis IIIa aged 9 and 11 years with a modified Atkins diet (10 g carbohydrate per day, protein and fatty acids ad libitum) over a period of 32 and 26 months, respectively. In both patients, creatine kinase levels in blood dropped in response to Atkins diet. When diet was withdrawn in one of the patients he complained of chest pain, reduced physical strength and creatine kinase levels rapidly increased. This was reversed when Atkins diet was reintroduced. One patient suffered from severe cardiomyopathy which significantly improved under diet. Patients with glycogenosis IIIa benefit from an improved energetic state of heart and skeletal muscle by introduction of Atkins diet both on a biochemical and clinical level. Apart from transient hypoglycaemia no serious adverse effects were observed.

  2. Medical-Nutritional Intervention in a Jordanian Child with Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIA: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Zeidaneen Safaa A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glycogen storage disease (GSD type IIIa is a rare inborn error of metabolism characterized by a deficiency in glycogen disbranching enzymes. Nutritional intervention is a cornerstone in the medical care plane.

  3. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia: Linkage of Glucose, Glycogen, Lactic Acid, Triglyceride, and Uric Acid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Sakine; Weinstein, David A.; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I.; Gedik, Reyhan; Schaefer, Ernst J.

    2013-01-01

    Case Summary A female presented in infancy with hypotonia, undetectable serum glucose, lactic acidosis, and triglycerides > 5,000 mg/dl. The diagnosis of type 1A glycogen storage disease (GSD) was made by liver biopsy that showed increased glycogen and absent glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme activity. She was treated with dextrose feeding, which was replaced by frequent cornstarch feeding, with improvement of her metabolic parameters. At age 18 years she had marked hypertriglyceridemia (3,860 mg/dl) and eruptive xanthomas, and was treated with fenofibrate, atorvastatin, and fish oil. At age 29 years she was noted to have multiple liver adenomas, severe anemia, and hyperuricemia. Aggressive cornstarch therapy was commenced with a goal of maintaining her blood glucose levels > 75 mg/dl and lactate levels 75 mg/dl is critical in the management of this disease. PMID:23312056

  4. Liver adenomas in glycogen storage disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunelle, F.; Tammam, S.; Chaumont, P.; Odievre, M.

    1984-02-01

    The authors report the ultrasound and angiographic features of adenomas occurring in children with glycogen storage disease. Seven cases from 83 patients were diagnosed either by ultrasound preoperative angiography or during surgery. The lesions appear on ultrasound as multiple rounded intrahepatic masses. Their degree of echogenicity as well of vascularity on angiography is highly variable. Ultrasound is the modality of choice in detecting adeynomas. No malignant degeneration was observed.

  5. Liver adenomas in glycogen storage disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelle, F.; Tammam, S.; Chaumont, P.; Odievre, M.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report the ultrasound and angiographic features of adenomas occurring in children with glycogen storage disease. Seven cases from 83 patients were diagnosed either by ultrasound preoperative angiography or during surgery. The lesions appear on ultrasound as multiple rounded intrahepatic masses. Their degree of echogenicity as well of vascularity on angiography is highly variable. Ultrasound is the modality of choice in detecting adeynomas. No malignant degeneration was observed. (orig.)

  6. Natural Progression of Canine Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth D; Yi, Haiqing; Austin, Stephanie L; Thurberg, Beth L; Young, Sarah P; Fyfe, John C; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-02-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is caused by a deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme activity. Hepatomegaly, muscle degeneration, and hypoglycemia occur in human patients at an early age. Long-term complications include liver cirrhosis, hepatic adenomas, and generalized myopathy. A naturally occurring canine model of GSD IIIa that mimics the human disease has been described, with progressive liver disease and skeletal muscle damage likely due to excess glycogen deposition. In the current study, long-term follow-up of previously described GSD IIIa dogs until 32 mo of age (n = 4) and of family-owned GSD IIIa dogs until 11 to 12 y of age (n = 2) revealed that elevated concentrations of liver and muscle enzyme (AST, ALT, ALP, and creatine phosphokinase) decreased over time, consistent with hepatic cirrhosis and muscle fibrosis. Glycogen deposition in many skeletal muscles; the tongue, diaphragm, and heart; and the phrenic and sciatic nerves occurred also. Furthermore, the urinary biomarker Glc4, which has been described in many types of GSD, was first elevated and then decreased later in life. This urinary biomarker demonstrated a similar trend as AST and ALT in GSD IIIa dogs, indicating that Glc4 might be a less invasive biomarker of hepatocellular disease. Finally, the current study further demonstrates that the canine GSD IIIa model adheres to the clinical course in human patients with this disorder and is an appropriate model for developing novel therapies.

  7. Preclinical Development of New Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baodong; Brooks, Elizabeth D.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) consists of more than 10 discrete conditions for which the biochemical and genetic bases have been determined, and new therapies have been under development for several of these conditions. Gene therapy research has generated proof-of-concept for GSD types I (von Gierke disease) and II (Pompe disease). Key features of these gene therapy strategies include the choice of vector and regulatory cassette, and recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing tissue-specific promoters have achieved a high degree of efficacy. Efficacy of gene therapy for Pompe disease depend upon the induction of immune tolerance to the therapeutic enzyme. Efficacy of von Gierke disease is transient, waning gradually over the months following vector administration. Small molecule therapies have been evaluated with the goal of improving standard of care therapy or ameliorating the cellular abnormalities associated with specific GSDs. The receptor-mediated uptake of the therapeutic enzyme in Pompe disease was enhanced by administration of β2 agonists. Rapamycin reduced the liver fibrosis observed in GSD III. Further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD, if efficacy from preclinical research is observed in future clinical trials and these treatments become clinically available. PMID:26122079

  8. Preclinical Development of New Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baodong; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) consists of more than 10 discrete conditions for which the biochemical and genetic bases have been determined, and new therapies have been under development for several of these conditions. Gene therapy research has generated proof-of-concept for GSD types I (von Gierke disease) and II (Pompe disease). Key features of these gene therapy strategies include the choice of vector and regulatory cassette, and recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing tissue-specific promoters have achieved a high degree of efficacy. Efficacy of gene therapy for Pompe disease depend upon the induction of immune tolerance to the therapeutic enzyme. Efficacy of von Gierke disease is transient, waning gradually over the months following vector administration. Small molecule therapies have been evaluated with the goal of improving standard of care therapy or ameliorating the cellular abnormalities associated with specific GSDs. The receptor-mediated uptake of the therapeutic enzyme in Pompe disease was enhanced by administration of β2 agonists. Rapamycin reduced the liver fibrosis observed in GSD III. Further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD, if efficacy from preclinical research is observed in future clinical trials and these treatments become clinically available.

  9. Histochemical Effects of “Verita WG” on Glycogen and Lipid Storage in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio L. Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenka Georgieva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed in the present work is to study the effects of fosetyl-Al and fenamidone based fungicide (“Verita WG” on glycogen storage and expression of lipid droplets in common carp (Cyprinus carpio, L. liver. Concentrations of the test chemical were 30 mg/L, 38 mg/L and 50 mg/L under laboratory conditions. We used PAS-reaction for detection of glycogen storage and Sudan III staining for detection of lipid droplets in common carp hepatocytes. Hence, we found that the amount of glycogen and the fat storage in the liver increased proportionally with the increased fungicide concentrations. We also found conglomerates of accumulated glycogen in certain hepatocytes at all used concentrations. Overall, the results demonstrated enhanced glyconeogenesis and fat accumulation in the common carp liver, exposed to the test chemical.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shin YS, Kilimann MW. Mutations in the liver glycogen phosphorylase gene (PYGL) underlying glycogenosis type VI. Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Apr;62(4):785-91. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Chang S, Rosenberg MJ, Morton ...

  11. Dietary Management of the Ketogenic Glycogen Storage Diseases

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    Kaustuv Bhattacharya MBBS, MRCPCH, FRACP, MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The glycogen storage diseases (GSDs comprise a group of rare inherited disorders of glycogen metabolism. The hepatic glycogenolytic forms of these disorders are typically associated with hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly. For GSD I, secondary metabolic disturbances include fasting hyperlactatemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Glycogen storage disease III is caused by reduced activity of the debrancher enzyme, GSD VI by phosphorylase, and GSD IX by phosphorylase kinase. It has often been reported that the non-GSD I group of disorders have a benign course. However, myopathy, cardiomyopathy, and cirrhosis have been reported significant clinical morbidities associated with GSD III and IX in particular. There have been a range of reports indicating high-protein diets, high-fat diets, medium chain triglyceride (MCT, modified Atkins diet, and therapeutic ketones as rescuing severe phenotypes of GSD III in particular. The etiology of these severe phenotypes has not been defined. Cases presented in this report indicate potential harm from excessive simple sugar use in GSD IX C. Review of the literature indicates that most interventions have reduced the glycemic load and provide alternate substrates for energy in rescue situations. Prevention of complications is most likely to occur with a mixed balanced low glycemic index diet potentially with relative increases in protein.

  12. Pregnancy in women with glycogen storage disease Ia and Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrecchia, Iris A; Guenette, Ginny; Potocik, Elizabeth A; Weinstein, David A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 9 decades since glycogen storage disease (GSD) was described, an almost universally fatal disease has become one where women are living well into adulthood and choosing to bear children. This inborn error of metabolism associated with the creation and utilization of glycogen, when untreated, manifests with unrelenting hypoglycemia. The initiation of continuous feeds has improved outcomes, and later in 1982, the administration of intermittent doses of cornstarch in water provided a continuous supply of exogenous glucose. As metabolic control has improved, morbidity has decreased. Glycogen storage disease Ib has the same severity of hypoglycemia as GSD Ia, with associated immune disturbance. Prior to the introduction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), infections caused significant mortality in GSD Ib. Pregnancy in patients with GSD Ia and Ib poses unique challenges during gestation and delivery. Good metabolic control before conception and throughout pregnancy is directly related to successful outcomes. There is no nursing literature to date addressing perinatal and neonatal care in this population.

  13. [Renal involvement in glycogen storage disease type 1: Practical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Chehida, Amel; Bensmaïl, Takoua; Ben Rehouma, Faten; Ben Abdelaziz, Rim; Azzouz, Hatem; Boudabbous, Hela; Slim Abdelmoula, Mohamed; Abdelhak, Sonia; Kaabachi, Naziha; Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Tebib, Néji

    2015-07-01

    To investigate risk factors of renal complications in glycogen storage disease type I, in order to identify practical implications for renal preservation. A retrospective study of 38 patients with glycogen storage disease type I. The patients studied were 8.6 years old in average (1.5 to 22 years) and were followed during 7.4 ± 4.5 years. Hypercalciuria was detected in 23 patients and was related to acidosis (P=0.028), higher lactate levels (5.9 ± 3.5 versus 3.7 ± 1.7 mmol/L; P=0.013) and smaller height (-2.1 ± 1.5 SD versus -0.8 ± 1.5 SD; P=0.026). Urolithiasis was diagnosed in 7 cases. Glomerular disease (19/38) was more frequent in cases with severe hypertriglyceridemia (P=0.042) and occurred at an older age (P=0.007). Microalbuminuria occurred in 15/31 cases; ACE inhibitors were prescribed in only 8 cases. The frequency of renal complications did not differ according to the diet group (continuous enteral feeding or uncooked starch). Logistic regression concluded as risk factors: lactic acidosis for tubular disease and age>10 years for glomerular disease. Renal involvement is common in glycogen storage disease type I patients. Tubular abnormalities are precocious, related to lactic acidosis and may be detected by monitoring of urinary calcium. Glomerular hyperfiltration is the first stage of a progressive glomerular disease and is related to age. Practical implications for renal preservation are discussed based on our results and literature. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. CT of the liver in glycogen storage disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takayuki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Tamura, Ryo; Takahashi, Shoki

    1999-12-01

    We evaluated the density of the liver and focal hepatic lesions in 13 cases of glycogen storage disease by CT scans. The liver parenchyma showed various density on precontrast CT scans. Multiple focal lesions were demonstrated in four cases. We diagnosed as adenomas in three cases. Most adenomas were well enhanced on postcontrast CT scans. Spontaneous regression with/without intratumoral hemorrhage was noted. One lesion enlarged and was diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma pathologically. MRI with superparamagnetic iron oxide was more useful rather than CT. (author)

  15. CT of the liver in glycogen storage disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Tamura, Ryo; Takahashi, Shoki

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the density of the liver and focal hepatic lesions in 13 cases of glycogen storage disease by CT scans. The liver parenchyma showed various density on precontrast CT scans. Multiple focal lesions were demonstrated in four cases. We diagnosed as adenomas in three cases. Most adenomas were well enhanced on postcontrast CT scans. Spontaneous regression with/without intratumoral hemorrhage was noted. One lesion enlarged and was diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma pathologically. MRI with superparamagnetic iron oxide was more useful rather than CT. (author)

  16. Identification of mutations in Type IV glycogen storage disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Y.; Kishnani, P.; Chen, Y.T. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type IV glycogen storage disease (GSD IV, Andersen disease) is caused by a deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) activity, which results in the accumulation of glycogen with unbranched, long, outer chains in the tissues. The molecular basis of the disease is not known. We studied four patients with the disease; three with typical presentation of progressive liver cirrhosis and failure, and one with severe and fatal neonatal hypotonia and cardiomyopathy. Southern blot analysis with EcoRI or MspI did not detect gross DNA rearrangement, deletion or duplication in patients` glycogen branching enzyme genes. Northern analysis with total cellular RNAs isolated from skin fibroblast MI strains of three patients with typical clinical presentation showed a normal level and size (2.95 kb) of GBE mRNA hybridization band in two and absent mRNA hybridization band in the remaining one. The patient with atypical severe neonatal hypotonia demonstrated a less intense and smaller size (2.75 kb) of mRNA hybridization band. A 210 hp deletion from nucleotide sequence 873 to 1082 which causes 70 amino acids missing from amino acid sequence 262 to 331 was detected in all 17 clones sequenced from the fatal hypotonia patient. This deletion is located in the region which is highly conserved between prokaryotic, yeast and human GBE polypeptide sequences, and also includes the first of the four regions which constitute the catalytic active sites of most of amylolytic enzymes. A point mutation C-T (1633) which changes the amino acid from Arginine to Cystine was found in 19 of 20 cDNA clones from a patient with classical clinical presentation. This point mutation was unique to this patient and was not observed in three other patients or normal controls. This is the first report on the molecular basis of GSD IV and our data indicated the presence of extensive genetic heterogeneity in the disease.

  17. Mouse model of glycogen storage disease type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai-Ming; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2014-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is caused by a deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE), which is encoded by the Agl gene. GDE deficiency leads to the pathogenic accumulation of phosphorylase limit dextrin (PLD), an abnormal glycogen, in the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. To further investigate the pathological mechanisms behind this disease and develop novel therapies to treat this disease, we generated a GDE-deficient mouse model by removing exons after exon 5 in the Agl gene. GDE reduction was confirmed by western blot and enzymatic activity assay. Histology revealed massive glycogen accumulation in the liver, muscle, and heart of the homozygous affected mice. Interestingly, we did not find any differences in the general appearance, growth rate, and life span between the wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous affected mice with ad libitum feeding, except reduced motor activity after 50 weeks of age, and muscle weakness in both the forelimb and hind legs of homozygous affected mice by using the grip strength test at 62 weeks of age. However, repeated fasting resulted in decreased survival of the knockout mice. Hepatomegaly and progressive liver fibrosis were also found in the homozygous affected mice. Blood chemistry revealed that alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were significantly higher in the homozygous affected mice than in both wild-type and heterozygous mice and the activity of these enzymes further increased with fasting. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity was normal in young and adult homozygous affected mice. However, the activity was significantly elevated after fasting. Hypoglycemia appeared only at a young age (3 weeks) and hyperlipidemia was not observed in our model. In conclusion, with the exception of normal lipidemia, these mice recapitulate human GSD IIIa; moreover, we found that repeated fasting was detrimental to these mice. This mouse model will

  18. Glycogen storage disease type Ia: linkage of glucose, glycogen, lactic acid, triglyceride, and uric acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Sakine; Weinstein, David A; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I; Gedik, Reyhan; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2012-01-01

    A female presented in infancy with hypotonia, undetectable serum glucose, lactic acidosis, and triglycerides >5000 mg/dL. The diagnosis of type 1A glycogen storage disease was made via the result of a liver biopsy, which showed increased glycogen and absent glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme activity. The patient was treated with dextrose administered orally, which was replaced by frequent feedings of cornstarch, which resulted in an improvement of her metabolic parameters. At age 18 years of age, she had marked hypertriglyceridemia (3860 mg/dL) and eruptive xanthomas and was treated with fenofibrate, atorvastatin, and fish oil. At age 29 years she was noted to have multiple liver adenomas, severe anemia, and hyperuricemia. Aggressive cornstarch therapy was commenced with a goal of maintaining her blood glucose levels >75 mg/dL and lactate levels triglycerides 179, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 32, and calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 154. Her weight was stable with a body mass index of 24.8 kg/m(2). Her liver adenomas had decreased in size, and her anemia and hyperuricemia had improved. She was homozygous for the R83C missense mutation in G6PC. Our data indicate that optimized metabolic control to maintain blood glucose levels >75 mg/dL is critical in the management of this disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Semyachkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data available in the literature, which reflect the manifestations, diagnosis, and current treatments of the rare (orphan inherited disease glycogen storage disease type II or Pomp disease in children, as well as its classification. The infant form is shown to be most severe, resulting in death from cardiovascular or pulmonary failure generally within the first year of a child’s life. Emphasis is laid on major difficulties in the differential and true diagnosis of this severe disease. Much attention is given to the new pathogenetic treatment — genetically engineered enzyme replacement drug Myozyme®. The authors describe their clinical case of a child with the juvenile form of glycogen storage disease type II (late-onset Pompe disease. Particular emphasis is laid on the clinical symptoms of the disease and its diagnostic methods, among which the morphological analysis of a muscle biopsy specimen by light and electron microscopies, and enzyme and DNA diagnoses are of most importance. The proband was found to have significant lysosomal glycogen accumulation in the muscle biopsy specimen, reduced lymphocyte acid α-1,4-glucosidase activity to 4,2 nM/mg/h (normal value, 13,0—53,6 nM/mg/h, described in the HGMD missense mutation database from 1000 G>A p.Gly334er of the GAA in homozygous state, which verified the diagnosis of Pompe disease. 

  20. Inherent lipid metabolic dysfunction in glycogen storage disease IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Hua; Gong, Qi-Ming; Ling, Yun; Huang, Chong; Yu, De-Min; Gu, Lei-Lei; Liao, Xiang-Wei; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Hu, Xi-Qi; Han, Yue; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2014-12-05

    We studied two patients from a nonconsanguineous family with life-long abnormal liver function, hepatomegaly and abnormal fatty acid profiles. Abnormal liver function, hypoglycemia and muscle weakness are observed in various genetic diseases, including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency and glycogen storage diseases. The proband showed increased free fatty acids, mainly C8 and C10, resembling fatty acid oxidation disorder. However, no mutation was found in ACADM and ACADL gene. Sequencing of theamylo-alpha-1, 6-glucosidase, 4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL) gene showed that both patients were compound heterozygotes for c.118C > T (p.Gln40X) and c.753_756 del CAGA (p.Asp251Glufsx29), whereas their parents were each heterozygous for one of these mutations. The AGL protein was undetectable in EBV-B cells from the two patients. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated a significant different pattern of gene expression in both of patients’ cells, including genes involving in the PPAR signaling pathway, fatty acid biosynthesis, lipid synthesis and visceral fat deposition and metabolic syndrome. This unique gene expression pattern is probably due to the absence of AGL, which potentially accounts for the observed clinical phenotypes of hyperlipidemia and hepatocyte steatosis in glycogen storage disease type IIIa.

  1. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years, all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months, and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r = 0.561; p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  2. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Berenice L; Souza, Carolina F M de; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Refosco, Lilia; Epifanio, Matias; Nalin, Tatiele; Vieira, Sandra M G; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years), all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months), and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r=0.561; p=0.008). Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular Genetics of Type 1 Glycogen Storage Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Chou J; Mansfield

    1999-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1), also known as von Gierke disease, is caused by a deficiency in the activity of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). It is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, kidney enlargement, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia. The disease presents with both clinical and biochemical heterogeneity consistent with the existence of two major subgroups, GSD-1a and GSD-1b, which have been confirmed at the molecular genetic level. GSD-1a, the most prevalent form, is caused by mutations in the G6Pase gene that abolish or greatly reduce enzymatic activity. The gene maps to chromosome 17q21 and encodes a microsomal transmembrane protein. Animal models of GSD-1a exist and are being exploited to delineate the disease more precisely. It has been proposed that GSD-1b is caused by a defect in the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate transporter. The gene responsible for GSD-1b has been mapped to chromosome 11q23 and a cDNA encoding a microsomal transmembrane protein has been identified. The function of this putative GSD-1b protein remains to be determined. These recent developments, along with newly characterized animal models of GSD-1a, are increasing our understanding of the interrelationship between the components of the G6Pase complex and type 1 glycogen storage diseases.

  4. Glycogen storage disease type III : diagnosis, genotype, management, clinical course and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sentner, Christiaan P.; Hoogeveen, Irene J.; Weinstein, David A.; Santer, Rene; Murphy, Elaine; McKiernan, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Beauchamp, Nicholas J.; Taybert, Joanna; Laforet, Pascal; Petit, Francois M.; Hubert, Aurelie; Labrune, Philippe; Smit, G. Peter A.; Derks, Terry G. J.

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII) is a rare disorder of glycogenolysis due to AGL gene mutations, causing glycogen debranching enzyme deficiency and storage of limited dextrin. Patients with GSDIIIa show involvement of liver and cardiac/skeletal muscle, whereas GSDIIIb patients display only

  5. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel D. Torok MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a rare and highly fatal disease that has been reported in 8 patients with glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI. We describe an additional case of an acute presentation of PAH in a 14-year-old patient with GSDI, which was successfully treated with inhaled nitric oxide and sildenafil. We investigated the incidence of PAH in 28 patients with GSDI on routine echocardiography and found no evidence of PAH and no significant cardiac abnormalities. This study highlights that PAH is a rare disease overall, but our case report and those previously described suggest an increased incidence in patients with GSDI. Should cardiopulmonary symptoms develop, clinicians caring for patients with GSDI should have a high degree of suspicion for acute PAH and recognize that prompt intervention can lead to survival in this otherwise highly fatal disease.

  6. Large animal models and new therapies for glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth D; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD), a unique category of inherited metabolic disorders, were first described early in the twentieth century. Since then, the biochemical and genetic bases of these disorders have been determined, and an increasing number of animal models for GSD have become available. At least seven large mammalian models have been developed for laboratory research on GSDs. These models have facilitated the development of new therapies, including gene therapy, which are undergoing clinical translation. For example, gene therapy prolonged survival and prevented hypoglycemia during fasting for greater than one year in dogs with GSD type Ia, and the need for periodic re-administration to maintain efficacy was demonstrated in that dog model. The further development of gene therapy could provide curative therapy for patients with GSD and other inherited metabolic disorders.

  7. Aggressive therapy improves cirrhosis in glycogen storage disease type IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilianidis, Laurie A; Fiske, Laurie M; Siegel, Sara; Lumpkin, Chris; Hoyt, Kate; Wasserstein, Melissa; Weinstein, David A

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IX (GSD IX) is described as a benign condition that often does not require treatment. Most patients with the disease are thought to outgrow the childhood manifestations, which include hepatomegaly, poor growth, and ketosis with or without hypoglycemia. Long term complications including fibrosis and cirrhosis have seldom been reported in the most common subtype, GSD IXα. We present two cases of children with GSD IXα who had fibrosis at the time of diagnosis in addition to the commonly reported disease manifestations. Structured therapy with frequent doses of uncooked cornstarch and protein supplementation was initiated, and both children responded with improved growth velocity, increased energy, decreased hepatomegaly and improved well-being. Additionally, radiographic features of fibrosis improved. We propose that GSD IXα is not a benign condition. Even in patients with a less severe presentation, consideration of a structured treatment regimen to improve quality of life appears warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Noncompaction myocardium in association with type Ib glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeppert, Benjamin; Lindner, Martin; Vogel, Monika Nadja; Warth, Arne; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Renner, Marcus; Schnabel, Philipp; Schirmacher, Peter; Autschbach, Frank; Weichert, Wilko

    2012-10-15

    Noncompaction myocardium is a rare disorder assumed to occur as an arrest of the compaction process during the normal development of the heart. Left ventricular noncompaction has been reported to be associated with a variety of cardiac and extracardiac, especially neuromuscular abnormalities. Moreover, it has been suggested that metabolic alterations could be responsible for the noncompaction. However, no association of noncompaction myocardium with type Ib glycogen storage disease (GSD) has been reported so far. Type Ib GSD is due to a defect of a transmembrane protein which results, similar to type Ia GSD, in hypoglycemia, a markedly enlarged liver and, additionally, in neutropenia, recurrent infections, and inflammatory bowel disease. Until now, no muscular or cardiac involvement has been described in type Ib GSD patients. The present case represents the first report of a noncompaction myocardium in a child with type Ib GSD who died of sudden clinical deterioration at the age of four. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular prenatal diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Y; Abdenur, J E; Eng, C M; Desnick, R J

    1996-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia, von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by the deficiency of D-glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Since this enzyme is expressed primarily in hepatocytes, couples at risk for GSD type Ia relied on fetal liver biopsy for prenatal diagnosis. The recent isolation of the G6Pase gene and identification of several disease-causing mutations have permitted molecular prenatal diagnosis using amniocytes or chorionic villi. Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed in an Ashkenazi Jewish family in whom a previous child was homoallelic and both parents were heterozygous for the R83C mutation. Molecular analysis revealed that the fetus was not affected. The prenatal diagnosis was confirmed postnatally by biochemical and molecular studies. Thus, the molecular prenatal diagnosis of GSD type Ia can be safely and accurately made in the first trimester.

  10. Activation of glycolysis and apoptosis in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Yang, Liu; Damodaran, Tirupapuliyur; Desai, Dev; Diehl, Anna Mae; Alzate, Oscar; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-08-01

    The deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, von Gierke disease; MIM 232200), an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism associated with life-threatening hypoglycemia, growth retardation, renal failure, hepatic adenomas, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver involvement includes the massive accumulation of glycogen and lipids due to accumulated glucose-6-phosphate and glycolytic intermediates. Proteomic analysis revealed elevations in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and other enzymes involved in glycolysis. GAPDH was markedly increased in murine G6Pase-deficient hepatocytes. The moonlighting role of GAPDH includes increasing apoptosis, which was demonstrated by increased TUNEL assay positivity and caspase 3 activation in the murine GSD-Ia liver. These analyses of hepatic involvement in GSD-Ia mice have implicated the induction of apoptosis in the pathobiology of GSD-Ia.

  11. Hepatic adenomatosis in glycogen storage disease type Ia: report of a case with unusual histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmar, Keith E; Burchette, James L; Creager, Andrew J

    2003-10-01

    Hepatic adenomatosis is a well-known complication of glycogen storage disease type Ia (von Gierke disease). Although most of these tumors have an appearance similar to sporadic hepatocellular adenomas, unusual histologic features have been reported, including Mallory hyaline, varying degrees of fibrosis, and aggregates of neutrophils. We report the fourth case of Mallory hyaline in the adenomas of glycogen storage disease type Ia in a 28-year-old woman undergoing segmental hepatectomy for enlarging liver nodules. Other prominent findings included steatohepatitis and nonspecific granulomatous inflammation--2 findings that are commonly seen in sporadic adenomas but not, to our knowledge, previously reported in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

  12. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease Type 1a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L.; Pan, C.J.; Sidbury, J.B.; Chou, J.Y. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-10-22

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a is caused by the deficiency of d-glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. Despite both a high incidence and morbidity, the molecular mechanisms underlying this deficiency have eluded characterization. In the present study, the molecular and biochemical characterization of the human G6Pase complementary DNA, its gene, and the expressed protein, which is indistinguishable from human microsomal G6Pase are reported. Several mutations in the G6Pase gene of affected individuals that completely inactivate the enzyme have been identified. These results establish the molecular basis of this disease and open the way for future gene therapy.

  13. Adiponectin levels correlate with the severity of hypertriglyceridaemia in glycogen storage disease Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, R. H. J.; Smit, G. P. A.; Reijngoud, D. -J.; Kuipers, F.

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) is characterized by severe hypercholesterolaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia. Little is known about the aetiology of the hyperlipidaemia in GSD Ia. Adipokines play an important regulatory role in lipid metabolism. We investigated whether adipokine

  14. Stone forming risk factors in patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Charles D; Chandrashekar, Aravind S; Robinson, Marnie R; Cantor, David A; Sullivan, Jennifer; Haleblian, George E; Leitao, Victor A; Sur, Roger L; Borawski, Kristy M; Koeberl, Dwight; Kishnani, Priya S; Preminger, Glenn M

    2010-03-01

    Patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease have an increased recurrent nephrolithiasis rate. We identified stone forming risk factors in patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease vs those in stone formers without the disease. Patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease were prospectively enrolled from our metabolic clinic. Patient 24-hour urine parameters were compared to those in age and gender matched stone forming controls. We collected 24-hour urine samples from 13 patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease. Average +/- SD age was 27.0 +/- 13.0 years and 6 patients (46%) were male. Compared to age and gender matched hypocitraturic, stone forming controls patients had profound hypocitraturia (urinary citrate 70 vs 344 mg daily, p = 0.009). When comparing creatinine adjusted urinary values, patients had profound hypocitraturia (0.119 vs 0.291 mg/mg creatinine, p = 0.005) and higher oxalate (0.026 vs 0.021 mg/mg creatinine, p = 0.038) vs other stone formers. Patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease have profound hypocitraturia, as evidenced by 24-hour urine collections, even compared to other stone formers. This may be related to a recurrent nephrolithiasis rate greater than in the overall population. These findings may be used to support different treatment modalities, timing and/or doses to prevent urinary lithiasis in patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease. 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the inability to break down a complex sugar called glycogen. The different forms of the condition can affect glycogen breakdown ... main source of cellular energy is a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose is stored in ... the effects of gene mutations on the respective protein subunits ...

  16. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ib: The First Case in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ju Hsiao

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease (GSD type Ib is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate translocase activity. The elder brother of the proband died at age 20 months, and GSD Ia, a disease caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase, was the diagnosis. The proband developed hypoglycemia shortly after birth. Dietary therapy was instituted immediately, but his growth was poor and there were repeated episodes of pyogenic infection. Neutropenia had been observed since 6 months of age, but the diagnosis of GSD Ib was established only at 18 months of age after two mutations (c.354_355insC (p. W118fsX12 and c.736T >C (p.W246R were detected on his SLC37A4 gene. Regular administration of G-CSF rapidly improved his health and decreased his hospital stay. Although GSD Ib is very rare in Taiwan, correct diagnosis is essential to save the lives of such patients.

  17. Vascular Dysfunction in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Angelina V.; Correia, Catherine E.; Haller, Michael J.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Weinstein, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine cardiovascular disease risk in a larger cohort of patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD) I through the use of noninvasive measures of arterial function and anatomy. Study design Carotid intima media thickness (IMT), radial artery tonometry, and brachial artery reactivity were performed in 28 patients with GSD I (13F/15M, mean age 23 years) and 23 control subjects (19F/4M, mean age 23 years). Results The primary outcome measure, mean left distal IMT was greater in the GSD cohort (0.500 ± 0.055 mm) than in the control group (0.457 ± 0.039 mm) (P = .002, adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index). Mean augmentation index measured by radial artery tonometry was higher in the GSD cohort (16.4% ± 14.0%) than in the control group (2.4% ± 8.7%) (P < .001). No significant difference was observed between mean brachial artery reactivity in the GSD cohort (6.3% ± 4.9% change) versus control subjects (6.6% ± 5.1% change) (P = .46). Conclusions GSD I is associated with arterial dysfunction evident by increased IMT and augmentation index. Patients with GSD I may be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:19101686

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in glycogen storage disease type 1b. Results of the European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G.; Rake, J.P.; Labrune, P.; Leonard, J.V.; Moses, S.; Ullrich, K.; Wendel, U.; Groenier, K.H.; Smit, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD-1b) have neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction that predispose to frequent infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), for which granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) is given. To investigate the use and the value of GCSF treatment in

  19. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skeletal muscle, glycogen stored in muscle cells is broken down to supply the cells with energy. The ... that is stored in the liver can be broken down rapidly when glucose is needed to maintain ...

  20. Bone mineral density in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minarich, Laurie A; Kirpich, Alexander; Fiske, Laurie M; Weinstein, David A

    2012-04-05

    Purpose:The aim of this study was to characterize the pathogenesis of low bone mineral density in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib.Methods:A retrospective chart review performed at the University of Florida Glycogen Storage Disease Program included patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib for whom dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis was performed. A Z-score less than -2 SD was considered low. Analysis for association of bone mineral density with age, gender, presence of complications, mean triglyceride and 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, duration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy, and history of corticosteroid use was performed.Results:In glycogen storage disease Ia, 23/42 patients (55%) had low bone mineral density. Low bone mineral density was associated with other disease complications (P = 0.02) and lower mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (P = 0.03). There was a nonsignificant trend toward lower mean triglyceride concentration in the normal bone mineral density group (P = 0.1).In patients with glycogen storage disease type Ib, 8/12 (66.7%) had low bone mineral density. We did not detect an association with duration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy (P = 0.68), mean triglyceride level (P = 0.267), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.3), or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (P = 0.63) concentration, and there was no evidence that corticosteroid therapy was associated with lower bone mineral density (P = 1).Conclusion:In glycogen storage disease type Ia, bone mineral density is associated with other complications and 25-hydroxyvitamin D status. In glycogen storage disease type Ib, bone mineral density was not associated with any covariates analyzed, suggesting multifactorial etiology or reflecting a small sample.Genet Med advance online publication 5 April 2012.

  1. Liver transplantation for type I and type IV glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, R; Starzl, T E; Yunis, E; Todo, S; Tzakis, A G; Brown, B I; Kendall, R S

    1993-01-01

    Progressive liver failure or hepatic complications of the primary disease led to orthotopic liver transplantation in eight children with glycogen storage disease over a 9-year period. One patient had glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I (von Gierke disease) and seven patients had type IV GSD (Andersen disease). As previously reported [19], a 16.5-year-old-girl with GSD type I was successfully treated in 1982 by orthotopic liver transplantation under cyclosporine and steroid immunosuppression. The metabolic consequences of the disease have been eliminated, the renal function and size have remained normal, and the patient has lived a normal young adult life. A late portal venous thrombosis was treated successfully with a distal splenorenal shunt. Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in seven children with type N GSD who had progressive hepatic failure. Two patients died early from technical complications. The other five have no evidence of recurrent hepatic amylopectinosis after 1.1-5.8 postoperative years. They have had good physical and intellectual maturation. Amylopectin was found in many extrahepatic tissues prior to surgery, but cardiopathy and skeletal myopathy have not developed after transplantation. Postoperative heart biopsies from patients showed either minimal amylopectin deposits as long as 4.5 years following transplantation or a dramatic reduction in sequential biopsies from one patient who initially had dense myocardial deposits. Serious hepatic derangement is seen most commonly in types I and IV GSD. Liver transplantation cures the hepatic manifestations of both types. The extrahepatic deposition of abnormal glycogen appears not to be problematic in type I disease, and while potentially more threatening in type IV disease, may actually exhibit signs of regression after hepatic allografting.

  2. A novel mutation in the glycogen synthase 2 gene in a child with glycogen storage disease type 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycogen storage disease type 0 is an autosomal recessive disease presenting in infancy or early childhood and characterized by ketotic hypoglycemia after prolonged fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperlactatemia. Sixteen different mutations have been identified to date in the gene which encodes hepatic glycogen synthase, resulting in reduction of glycogen storage in the liver. Case Presentation Biochemical evaluation as well as direct sequencing of exons and exon-intron boundary regions of the GYS2 gene were performed in a patient presenting fasting hypoglycemia and postprandial hyperglycemia and her parents. The patient was found to be compound heterozygous for one previously reported nonsense mutation (c.736 C>T; R243X) and a novel frameshift mutation (966_967delGA/insC) which introduces a stop codon 21 aminoacids downstream from the site of the mutation that presumably leads to loss of 51% of the COOH-terminal part of the protein. The glycemia and lactatemia of the parents after an oral glucose tolerance test were evaluated to investigate a possible impact of the carrier status on the metabolic profile. The mother, who presented a positive family history of type 2 diabetes, was classified as glucose intolerant and the father, who did not exhibit metabolic changes after the glucose overload, had an antecedent history of hypoglycemia after moderate alcohol ingestion. Conclusion The current results expand the spectrum of known mutations in GYS2 and suggest that haploinsufficiency could explain metabolic abnormalities in heterozygous carriers in presence of predisposing conditions. PMID:20051115

  3. The molecular basis of type 1 glycogen storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, J Y

    2001-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1), also known as von Gierke disease, is a group of autosomal recessive metabolic disorders caused by deficiencies in the activity of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) system that consists of at least two membrane proteins, glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) and G6Pase. G6PT translocates glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) from cytoplasm to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and G6Pase catalyzes the hydrolysis of G6P to produce glucose and phosphate. Therefore, G6PT and G6Pase work in concert to maintain glucose homeostasis. Deficiencies in G6Pase and G6PT cause GSD-1a and GSD-1b, respectively. Both manifest functional G6Pase deficiency characterized by growth retardation, hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, kidney enlargement, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidemia. GSD-1b patients also suffer from chronic neutropenia and functional deficiencies of neutrophils and monocytes, resulting in recurrent bacterial infections as well as ulceration of the oral and intestinal mucosa. The G6Pase gene maps to chromosome 17q21 and encodes a 36-kDa glycoprotein that is anchored to the ER by 9 transmembrane helices with its active site facing the lumen. Animal models of GSD-1a have been developed and are being exploited to delineate the disease more precisely and to develop new therapies. The G6PT gene maps to chromosome 11q23 and encodes a 37-kDa protein that is anchored to the ER by 10 transmembrane helices. A functional assay for the recombinant G6PT protein has been established, which showed that G6PT functions as a G6P transporter in the absence of G6Pase. However, microsomal G6P uptake activity was markedly enhanced in the simultaneous presence of G6PT and G6Pase. The cloning of the G6PT gene now permits animal models of GSD-1b to be generated. These recent developments are increasing our understanding of the GSD-l disorders and the G6Pase system, knowledge that will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic approaches for

  4. Activation of Basal Gluconeogenesis by Coactivator p300 Maintains Hepatic Glycogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia; Meng, Shumei; Ma, Anlin; Radovick, Sally; Wondisford, Fredric E.

    2013-01-01

    Because hepatic glycogenolysis maintains euglycemia during early fasting, proper hepatic glycogen synthesis in the fed/postprandial states is critical. It has been known for decades that gluconeogenesis is essential for hepatic glycogen synthesis; however, the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this report, we show that depletion of hepatic p300 reduces glycogen synthesis, decreases hepatic glycogen storage, and leads to relative hypoglycemia. We previously reported that insulin suppressed gluconeogenesis by phosphorylating cAMP response element binding protein-binding protein (CBP) at S436 and disassembling the cAMP response element-binding protein-CBP complex. However, p300, which is closely related to CBP, lacks the corresponding S436 phosphorylation site found on CBP. In a phosphorylation-competent p300G422S knock-in mouse model, we found that mutant mice exhibited reduced hepatic glycogen content and produced significantly less glycogen in a tracer incorporation assay in the postprandial state. Our study demonstrates the important and unique role of p300 in glycogen synthesis through maintaining basal gluconeogenesis. PMID:23770612

  5. A highly prevalent equine glycogen storage disease is explained by constitutive activation of a mutant glycogen synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maile, C A; Hingst, J R; Mahalingan, K K; O'Reilly, A O; Cleasby, M E; Mickelson, J R; McCue, M E; Anderson, S M; Hurley, T D; Wojtaszewski, J F P; Piercy, R J

    2017-01-01

    Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1) is associated with a missense mutation (R309H) in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, enhanced glycogen synthase (GS) activity and excessive glycogen and amylopectate inclusions in muscle. Equine muscle biochemical and recombinant enzyme kinetic assays in vitro and homology modelling in silico, were used to investigate the hypothesis that higher GS activity in affected horse muscle is caused by higher GS expression, dysregulation, or constitutive activation via a conformational change. PSSM1-affected horse muscle had significantly higher glycogen content than control horse muscle despite no difference in GS expression. GS activity was significantly higher in muscle from homozygous mutants than from heterozygote and control horses, in the absence and presence of the allosteric regulator, glucose 6 phosphate (G6P). Muscle from homozygous mutant horses also had significantly increased GS phosphorylation at sites 2+2a and significantly higher AMPKα1 (an upstream kinase) expression than controls, likely reflecting a physiological attempt to reduce GS enzyme activity. Recombinant mutant GS was highly active with a considerably lower K m for UDP-glucose, in the presence and absence of G6P, when compared to wild type GS, and despite its phosphorylation. Elevated activity of the mutant enzyme is associated with ineffective regulation via phosphorylation rendering it constitutively active. Modelling suggested that the mutation disrupts a salt bridge that normally stabilises the basal state, shifting the equilibrium to the enzyme's active state. This study explains the gain of function pathogenesis in this highly prevalent polyglucosan myopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Glycogen storage disease type 1 and diabetes: learning by comparing and contrasting the two disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajas, F; Labrune, P; Mithieux, G

    2013-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1) and diabetes may look at first like totally opposite disorders, as diabetes is characterized by uncontrolled hyperglycaemia, whereas GSD1 is characterized by severe fasting hypoglycaemia. Diabetes is due to a failure to suppress endogenous glucose production (EGP) in the postprandial state because of either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance. In contrast, GSD1 is characterized by a lack of EGP. However, both diseases share remarkably similar patterns in terms of pathophysiology such as the long-term progression of renal dysfunction and hepatic steatosis leading to renal failure and the development of hepatic tumours, respectively. Thus, much may be learned from considering the similarities between GSD1 and diabetes, especially in the metabolic pathways underlying nephropathy and fatty liver, and perhaps even more from their differences. In this review, the differences between diabetes and GSD1 are first highlighted, as both are characterized by alterations in EGP. The molecular pathways involved in liver pathologies, including steatosis, hepatomegaly (glycogenic hepatopathy) and the development of liver tumours are also compared. These pathologies are mainly due to the accumulation of lipids and/or glycogen in hepatocytes. Finally, the similar pathways leading to nephropathy in both diabetic and GSD1 patients are described. In conclusion, comparisons of these pathologies should lead to a better understanding of the crucial role of EGP in the control of glucose and energy homoeostasis. Moreover, it may highlight similar therapeutic targets for the two disorders. Thus, this review suggests that the treatment of adult patients with either GSD1 or diabetes could be carried out by the same specialists-diabetologists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical features and genetic analysis of 7 patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease typeⅡ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan YANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective In order to make a well understanding on glycogen storage disease typeⅡ (GSDⅡ, this paper explored clinical features and genetic analysis of 7 patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease typeⅡ.  Methods Clinical data of 7 patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ were collected and acid α-glucosidase (GAA gene sequencing was performed.  Results Seven patients who belong to 4 families were at the age of 13-31 years old. The first symptom occurred at 6-17 years old, and the age at first and definitive diagnosis was 12-29 and 12-30 years old, respectively. The initial symptoms were mostly related to limb girdle muscular atrophy and weakness. The GAA activity ranged from 0 to 5.27 nmol/(mg·h. Sequencing analysis revealed 14 sequence variants, including 2 novel mutations (Q81X and c.1355_1356delC, 2 pseudodeficiency alleles (G576S and E689K, 8 polymorphic loci, and 2 sequence variants previously related with glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ pathogenesis (W746C and D645E.  Conclusions Due to the apparently diagnostic delay, prognosis of patients with glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ could be improved by increasing the clinician's awareness of the disease. It is essential to combine clinical history with GAA activity and GAA gene analysis when we make a definitive diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ. Though siblings share the same set of GAA mutations, the phenotype regarding the course and severity of disease could vary substantially. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.008

  8. Muscle glycogen storage disease 0 presenting recurrent syncope with weakness and myalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukigara, Sayuri; Liang, Wen-Chen; Komaki, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Tokiko; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Sugie, Hideo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Nishino, Ichizo

    2012-02-01

    Muscle glycogen storage disease 0 (GSD0) is caused by glycogen depletion in skeletal and cardiac muscles due to deficiency of glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1), which is encoded by the GYS1 gene. Only two families with this disease have been identified. We report a new muscle GSD0 patient, a Japanese girl, who had been suffering from recurrent attacks of exertional syncope accompanied by muscle weakness and pain since age 5 years until she died of cardiac arrest at age 12. Muscle biopsy at age 11 years showed glycogen depletion in all muscle fibers. Her loss of consciousness was gradual and lasted for hours, suggesting that the syncope may not be simply caused by cardiac event but probably also contributed by metabolic distress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevention of complications in glycogen storage disease type Ia with optimization of metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambska, M; Labrador, E B; Kuo, C L; Weinstein, D A

    2017-08-01

    Prior to 1971, type Ia glycogen storage disease was marked by life-threatening hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, severe failure to thrive, and developmental delay. With the introduction of continuous feeds in the 1970s and cornstarch in the 1980s, the prognosis improved, but complications almost universally developed. Changes in the management of type Ia glycogen storage disease have resulted in improved metabolic control, and this manuscript reviews the increasing evidence that complications can be delayed or prevented with optimal metabolic control as previously was seen in diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Establishment and directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from glycogen storage disease type Ib patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Daisuke; Maeda, Tohru; Ito, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yoko; Ohte, Mariko; Ukai, Akane; Nakamura, Katsunori; Enosawa, Shin; Toyota, Masashi; Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Okita, Hajime; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Akutsu, Hidenori; Umezawa, Akihiro; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2013-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSDIb) is caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT), which leads to neutrophil dysfunction. However, the underlying causes of these dysfunctions and their relationship with glucose homeostasis are unclear. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold a great promise for advances in developmental biology, cell-based therapy and modeling of human disease. Here, we examined the use of iPSCs as a model for GSDIb. In this study, one 2-year-old patient was genetically screened and diagnosed with GSDIb. We established iPSCs and differentiated these cells into hepatocytes and neutrophils, which comprise the main pathological components of GSDIb. Cells that differentiated into hepatocytes exhibited characteristic albumin secretion and indocyanine green uptake. Moreover, iPSC-derived cells generated from patients with GSDIb metabolic abnormalities recapitulated key pathological features of the diseases affecting the patients from whom they were derived, such as glycogen, lactate, pyruvate and lipid accumulation. Cells that were differentiated into neutrophils also showed the GSDIb pathology. In addition to the expression of neutrophil markers, we showed increased superoxide anion production, increased annexin V binding and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, consistent with the GSDIb patient's neutrophils. These results indicate valuable tools for the analysis of this pathology and the development of future treatments. © 2013 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2013 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. A novel mutation in the glycogen synthase 2 gene in a child with glycogen storage disease type 0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Maria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycogen storage disease type 0 is an autosomal recessive disease presenting in infancy or early childhood and characterized by ketotic hypoglycemia after prolonged fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperlactatemia. Sixteen different mutations have been identified to date in the gene which encodes hepatic glycogen synthase, resulting in reduction of glycogen storage in the liver. Case Presentation Biochemical evaluation as well as direct sequencing of exons and exon-intron boundary regions of the GYS2 gene were performed in a patient presenting fasting hypoglycemia and postprandial hyperglycemia and her parents. The patient was found to be compound heterozygous for one previously reported nonsense mutation (c.736 C>T; R243X and a novel frameshift mutation (966_967delGA/insC which introduces a stop codon 21 aminoacids downstream from the site of the mutation that presumably leads to loss of 51% of the COOH-terminal part of the protein. The glycemia and lactatemia of the parents after an oral glucose tolerance test were evaluated to investigate a possible impact of the carrier status on the metabolic profile. The mother, who presented a positive family history of type 2 diabetes, was classified as glucose intolerant and the father, who did not exhibit metabolic changes after the glucose overload, had an antecedent history of hypoglycemia after moderate alcohol ingestion. Conclusion The current results expand the spectrum of known mutations in GYS2 and suggest that haploinsufficiency could explain metabolic abnormalities in heterozygous carriers in presence of predisposing conditions.

  12. Reproducibility and absolute quantification of muscle glycogen in patients with glycogen storage disease by 13C NMR spectroscopy at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinicke, Katja; Dimitrov, Ivan E; Romain, Nadine; Cheshkov, Sergey; Ren, Jimin; Malloy, Craig R; Haller, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) offers a noninvasive method to assess glycogen levels in skeletal muscle and to identify excess glycogen accumulation in patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD). Despite the clinical potential of the method, it is currently not widely used for diagnosis or for follow-up of treatment. While it is possible to perform acceptable 13C MRS at lower fields, the low natural abundance of 13C and the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio of 13C MRS makes it desirable to utilize the advantage of increased signal strength offered by ultra-high fields for more accurate measurements. Concomitant with this advantage, however, ultra-high fields present unique technical challenges that need to be addressed when studying glycogen. In particular, the question of measurement reproducibility needs to be answered so as to give investigators insight into meaningful inter-subject glycogen differences. We measured muscle glycogen levels in vivo in the calf muscle in three patients with McArdle disease (MD), one patient with phosphofructokinase deficiency (PFKD) and four healthy controls by performing 13C MRS at 7T. Absolute quantification of the MRS signal was achieved by using a reference phantom with known concentration of metabolites. Muscle glycogen concentration was increased in GSD patients (31.5±2.9 g/kg w. w.) compared with controls (12.4±2.2 g/kg w. w.). In three GSD patients glycogen was also determined biochemically in muscle homogenates from needle biopsies and showed a similar 2.5-fold increase in muscle glycogen concentration in GSD patients compared with controls. Repeated inter-subject glycogen measurements yield a coefficient of variability of 5.18%, while repeated phantom measurements yield a lower 3.2% system variability. We conclude that noninvasive ultra-high field 13C MRS provides a valuable, highly reproducible tool for quantitative assessment of glycogen levels in health and disease.

  13. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage in muscle during prolonged insulin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hansen, S A; Hansen, B F

    1988-01-01

    The extent to which muscle glycogen concentrations can be increased during exposure to maximal insulin concentrations and abundant glucose was investigated in the isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Perfusion for 7 h in the presence of 20,000 microU/ml insulin and 11-13 mM glucose...... increased muscle glycogen concentrations to maximal values 2, 3, and 3.5 times above normal fed levels in fast-twitch white, slow-twitch red, and fast-twitch red fibers, respectively. Glucose uptake decreased (mean +/- SE) from 34.9 +/- 1.2 mumol.g-1.h-1 at 0 h to 7.5 +/- 0.7 after 7 h of perfusion. During...... the perfusion muscle glycogen synthase activity decreased and free intracellular glucose and glucose 6-phosphate increased indicating that glucose disposal was impaired. However, glucose transport as measured by the uptake of 3-O-[14C]methyl-D-glucose was also markedly decreased after 5 and 7 h of perfusion...

  14. Hepatocytes Contribute to Residual Glucose Production in a Mouse Model for Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, Brenda S.; Boss, Andreas; van Dijk, Theo H.; Soty, Maud; Wolters, Henk; Mutel, Elodie; Groen, Albert K.; Derks, Terry G. J.; Mithieux, Gilles; Heerschap, Arend; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Rajas, Fabienne; Oosterveer, Maaike H.

    2017-01-01

    It is a long-standing enigma how glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I patients retain a limited capacity for endogenous glucose production despite the loss of glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Insight into the source of residual endogenous glucose production is of clinical importance given the risk

  15. Use of modified cornstarch therapy to extend fasting in glycogen storage disease types Ia and Ib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia, Catherine E.; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Lee, Philip J.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Shankar, Meena N.; Smit, G. Peter A.; Weinstein, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD) is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase resulting in severe fasting hypoglycemia. Objective: We compared the efficacy of a new modified starch with the currently used cornstarch therapy in patients with type Ia and Ib GSD. Design: This was

  16. Molecular characterization of hepatocellular adenomas developed in patients with glycogen storage disease type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderaro, Julien; Labrune, Philippe; Morcrette, Guillaume; Rebouissou, Sandra; Franco, Dominique; Prevot, Sophie; Quaglia, Alberto; Bedossa, Pierre; Libbrecht, Louis; Terracciano, Luigi; Smit, G. Peter A.; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    Background & Aims: Hepatocellular adenomas (HCA) are benign liver tumors mainly related to oral contraception and classified into 4 molecular subgroups: inflammatory (IHCA), HNF1A-inactivated (H-HCA), beta-catenin-activated (bHCA) or unclassified (UHCA). Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD) is a

  17. Liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease types I, III, and IV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matern, D; Starzl, TE; Arnaout, W; Barnard, J; Bynon, JS; Dhawan, A; Emond, J; Haagsma, EB; Hug, G; Lachaux, A; Smit, GPA; Chen, YT

    1999-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) types I, III, and IV can be associated with severe liver disease. The possible development of hepatocellular carcinoma and/or hepatic failure make these GSDs potential candidates for liver transplantation. Early diagnosis and initiation of effective dietary therapy

  18. Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI With a Novel Mutation in PYGL Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadisan, Barath; Ranganath, Prajnya

    2017-09-15

    Glycogen storage disease type VI (GSD-VI) presents with failure to thrive and also fibrosis in some cases, without cirrhosis. 2½-year-old girl presented with short stature, transaminase elevation and significant fibrosis, suggesting GSD-III. A pathogenic mutation in PYGL gene suggested GSD-VI. GSD-VI should be a differential diagnosis whenever GSD-III is suspected.

  19. Iliopsoas abscess as a complication of glycogen storage disease 1b

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    Marcos Prada-Arias

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of iliopsoas abscess secondary to inflammatory bowel disease associated to glycogen storage disease 1b in a 12-year-old boy. To the best of our knowledge, a similar case has not been reported in medical literature.

  20. A convenient diagnostic function test of peripheral blood neutrophils in glycogen storage disease type Ib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A.J.; Visser, G; Van Zwieten, R; Gruszczynska, B; Poll-The, DWEET; Smit, GPA

    Neutrophils from patients suffering from glycogen storage disease type To (GSD-Ib) show several defects, one of which is a decreased rate of glucose utilization. In this study, we established experimental conditions to show the stimulation of the neutrophil respiratory burst by extracellular

  1. Renal Function in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I, Natural Course, and Renopreservative Effects of ACE Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Danielle H. J.; Rake, Jan Peter; Navis, Gerjan; Fidler, Vaclav; van Dael, Catharina M. L.; Smit, G. Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Renal failure is a major complication in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). We studied the natural course of renal function in GSD I patients. We studied differences between patients in optimal and nonoptimal metabolic control and possible renoprotective effects of

  2. A novel GBE1 gene variant in a child with glycogen storage disease type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Samar M; Murphree, Marine I; Mounajjed, Taofic; El-Youssef, Mounif; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV is an autosomal recessive disorder of carbohydrates caused by deficiency of amylo-1-4-glycanoglycosyltransferase, which leads to accumulation of amylopectin-like polysaccharides in tissues including liver, heart and neuromuscular system. More than 40 different mutations in the glycogen branching enzyme gene (GBE1) have been described. In this study, we report a 2-year-old boy who presented with developmental delay and muscle weakness. He subsequently was diagnosed with glycogen storage disease type IV based on a liver biopsy histology and electron microscopy. Glycogen branching enzyme activity was in the low range. Genetic analysis demonstrated a novel heterozygous variant (c.760A>G; p.Thr254Ala) in exon 6 of the GBE1 gene, which is believed to be pathogenic. This variant was inherited from the patient's mother who was asymptomatic with normal glycogen branching enzyme activity. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal additional variations in the GBE1 gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased de novo lipogenesis and delayed conversion of large VLDL into intermediate density lipoprotein particles contribute to Hyperlipidemia in glycogen storage disease type 1a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Prinsen, Berthil H.; Van Der Velden, Monique De Sain; Rake, Jan-Peter; Boer, Theo; Smit, G. Peter A.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Kuipers, Folkert

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD-1a) is a metabolic disorder characterized by fasting-induced hypoglycemia, hepatic steatosis, and hyperlipidemia. The mechanisms underlying the lipid abnormalities are largely unknown. To investigate these mechanisms seven GSD-1a patients and four healthy

  4. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa

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    Haiqing Yi

    2012-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR. The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions.

  5. Insight into "Consensus recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of glycogen storage disease typeⅡ"

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    Hong-zhi GUAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease typeⅡ (GSDⅡ is a rare progressive lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA. The gene is located in 17q25.3. Diagnosis has been classically made by means of muscular biopsy. Nowadays it is more convenient to screen GAA in dried blood sample followed by GAA assessment in lymphocytes or fibroblasts or by the genetic analysis of mutations. Besides non-specific multiprofessional management, there is a specific enzyme replacement therapy (ERT since 2006 which compensates for the missing enzyme by administration of recombinant produced enzyme. "Consensus recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ", published on Natl Med J China in 2013, gives us a novel and compressive insight into this rare disease. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.003

  6. Molecular analysis of the AGL gene: identification of 25 novel mutations and evidence of genetic heterogeneity in patients with Glycogen Storage Disease Type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Jennifer L; Austin, Stephanie L; Boyette, Keri; Kanaly, Angela; Veerapandiyan, Aravind; Rehder, Catherine; Kishnani, Priya S; Bali, Deeksha S

    2010-07-01

    Glycogen Storage Disease Type III (limit dextrinosis; Cori or Forbes disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder of glycogen metabolism caused by deficient activity of glycogen debranching enzyme in liver and muscle (Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa) or liver only (Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIb). These two clinically distinct phenotypes are caused by mutations in the same gene (amylo-1,6-glucosidase or AGL). Although most patients with Glycogen Storage Disease Type III have private mutations, common mutations have been identified in some populations, and two specific mutations in exon 3, c.18_19delGA (p.Gln6HisfsX20) and c.16C>T (p.Gln6X), are associated with the Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIb phenotype. To further examine the heterogeneity found in Glycogen Storage Disease Type III patients, we have sequenced the AGL gene in 34 patients with a clinically and/or biochemically confirmed diagnosis of Glycogen Storage Disease Type III. We have identified 38 different mutations (25 novel and 13 previously reported) and have compiled a list of all mutations previously reported in the literature. We conclude that Glycogen Storage Disease Type III is a highly heterogeneous disorder usually requiring full gene sequencing to identify both pathogenic mutations. The finding of at least one of the two exon 3 mutations in all of the Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIb patients tested allows for diagnosis of this subtype without the need for a muscle biopsy.

  7. Clinical and genetic characteristics of 17 Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease type IXa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangwei; Yuan, Yuheng; Ma, Mingsheng; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Weimin; Yao, Fengxia; Qiu, Zhengqing

    2017-09-05

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type IXa is caused by PHKA2 mutation, which accounts for about 75% of all the GSD type IX cases. Here we first summarized the clinical data and analyzed the PHKA2 gene of 17 Chinese male patients suspected of having GSD type IXa. Clinical symptoms of our patients included hepatomegaly, growth retardation, and liver dysfunction. The clinical and biochemical manifestations improved and even disappeared with age. We detected 14 mutations in 17 patients, including 8 novel mutations; exons 2 and 4 were hot spots in this research. In conclusion, glycogen storage disease type IXa is a mild disorder with a favorable prognosis, and there was no relationship between genotype and phenotype of this disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV: A Case With Histopathologic Findings in First-Trimester Placental Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B; Lund, Allan M

    2016-01-01

    A 30-yr-old woman presented with 2 consecutive miscarriages within 7 mo. Histopathologic examination of the placental tissue showed intracytoplasmic inclusion vacuoles with a strong reaction in Periodic acid-Schiff staining and a slightly pallor reaction in alcian blue staining. Additional molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made on histopathologic examination. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis and to offer prenatal genetic testing in future pregnancies.

  9. Progression of renal damage in glycogen storage disease type I is associated to hyperlipidemia: a multicenter prospective Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Daniela; Cozzolino, Mariarosaria; Minopoli, Giorgia; Balivo, Francesca; Parini, Rossella; Rigoldi, Miriam; Paci, Sabrina; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Burlina, Alberto; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2015-04-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors decrease glomerular hyperfiltration but not microalbuminuria and proteinuria in glycogen storage disease type I. In the current study, we demonstrated that severe hyperlipidemia is associated with ACE-inhibitor ineffectiveness. We underline the importance of adequate metabolic control in glycogen storage disease type I. A combination therapy with ACE-inhibitors and lipid lowering drugs might be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. McArdle's disease (glycogen storage disease type V) and anesthesia--a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Georg

    2013-09-01

    McArdles disease (glycogen storage disease type v) is a rare condition in which energy-metabolism in the muscle is hampered. A case report is presented and the possible risk for perioperative complications including malignant hyperthermia is discussed. A checklist for the anesthesiological management of patients with McArdles disease is provided. A short overview of anesthesiological challenges and perioperative complications of other glycogen storage diseases is given. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Clinical study of respiratory function in patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease typeⅡ

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    Wei-na JIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Late-onset glycogen storage disease typeⅡ(GSDⅡ, Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disease exhibiting progressive proximal skeletal muscle weakness and respiratory muscle involvement, caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA. Most of patients died of respiratory failure.  Methods Eleven patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ underwent respiratory function evaluation, whose diagnosis was confirmed by muscle pathology, GAA activity assay and gene analysis. Respiratory function evaluation included upright and supine position of forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume at the first second (FEV1, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP, maximal expiratory pressure (MEP and cough peak flow (CPF. All data were compared with predicted value. The decreased value between upright and supine position FVC ( △ FVC were calculated. The correlation between respiratory function and the age of onset, disease course, motor function, GAA activity were analyzed.  Results All of 11 patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ showed declined respiratory function compared with predicted value. The upright FVC, upright FEV1, △ FVC, MIP, MEP and CPF declined in 10, 10, 8, 11, 10, and 10 patients, respectively. All patients had normal FEV1/FVC in both upright and supine position. There was no correlation between upright FVC, △ FVC and the onset age, disease course, motor function, GAA activity statistically.  Conclusions Pulmonary dysfunction is common in late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ, with restrictive ventilatory impairment more predominant, which is caused by inspiratory muscle weakness. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.007

  12. Reproducibility and absolute quantification of muscle glycogen in patients with glycogen storage disease by 13C NMR spectroscopy at 7 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Heinicke

    Full Text Available Carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS offers a noninvasive method to assess glycogen levels in skeletal muscle and to identify excess glycogen accumulation in patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD. Despite the clinical potential of the method, it is currently not widely used for diagnosis or for follow-up of treatment. While it is possible to perform acceptable 13C MRS at lower fields, the low natural abundance of 13C and the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio of 13C MRS makes it desirable to utilize the advantage of increased signal strength offered by ultra-high fields for more accurate measurements. Concomitant with this advantage, however, ultra-high fields present unique technical challenges that need to be addressed when studying glycogen. In particular, the question of measurement reproducibility needs to be answered so as to give investigators insight into meaningful inter-subject glycogen differences. We measured muscle glycogen levels in vivo in the calf muscle in three patients with McArdle disease (MD, one patient with phosphofructokinase deficiency (PFKD and four healthy controls by performing 13C MRS at 7T. Absolute quantification of the MRS signal was achieved by using a reference phantom with known concentration of metabolites. Muscle glycogen concentration was increased in GSD patients (31.5±2.9 g/kg w. w. compared with controls (12.4±2.2 g/kg w. w.. In three GSD patients glycogen was also determined biochemically in muscle homogenates from needle biopsies and showed a similar 2.5-fold increase in muscle glycogen concentration in GSD patients compared with controls. Repeated inter-subject glycogen measurements yield a coefficient of variability of 5.18%, while repeated phantom measurements yield a lower 3.2% system variability. We conclude that noninvasive ultra-high field 13C MRS provides a valuable, highly reproducible tool for quantitative assessment of glycogen levels in health and disease.

  13. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Vissing, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise is accompanied by muscle damage and impaired glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis during subsequent recovery. Recently, it was shown that the role and regulation of glycogen in skeletal muscle are dependent on its subcellular localization, and that glycogen synthesis, as described by the product of glycogen particle size and number, is dependent on the time course of recovery after exercise and carbohydrate availability. In the present study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of glycogen in fibers with high (type I) and low (type II) mitochondrial content during post-exercise recovery from eccentric contractions. Analysis was completed on five male subjects performing an exercise bout consisting of 15 x 10 maximal eccentric contractions. Carbohydrate-rich drinks were subsequently ingested throughout a 48 h recovery period and muscle biopsies for analysis included time points 3, 24 and 48 h post exercise from the exercising leg, whereas biopsies corresponding to prior to and at 48 h after the exercise bout were collected from the non-exercising, control leg. Quantitative imaging by transmission electron microscopy revealed an early (post 3 and 24 h) enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen (defined as glycogen particles located within the myofibrils) of type I fibers, which was associated with an increase in the number of particles. In contrast, late in recovery (post 48 h), intermyofibrillar, intramyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen in both type I and II fibers were lower in the exercise leg compared with the control leg, and this was associated with a smaller size of the glycogen particles. We conclude that in the carbohydrate-supplemented state, the effect of eccentric contractions on glycogen metabolism depends on the subcellular localization, muscle fiber’s oxidative capacity, and the time course of recovery. The early enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen after the eccentric contractions may

  14. Molecular mechanisms of neutrophil dysfunction in glycogen storage disease type Ib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Hyun Sik; Weinstein, David A.; Lee, Young Mok; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib) is an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by neutropenia and impaired glucose homeostasis resulting from a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) transporter (G6PT). The underlying cause of GSD-Ib neutropenia is an enhanced neutrophil apoptosis, but patients also manifest neutrophil dysfunction of unknown etiology. Previously, we showed G6PT interacts with the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase-β (G6Pase-β) to regulate the availability of G6P/glucose in neutrophils. A deficiency in G6Pase-β activity in neutrophils impairs both their energy homeostasis and function. We now show that G6PT-deficient neutrophils from GSD-Ib patients are similarly impaired. Their energy impairment is characterized by decreased glucose uptake and reduced levels of intracellular G6P, lactate, adenosine triphosphate, and reduced NAD phosphate, whereas functional impairment is reflected in reduced neutrophil respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and calcium mobilization. We further show that the mechanism of neutrophil dysfunction in GSD-Ib arises from activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/peroxisome-proliferators–activated receptor-γ pathway. PMID:24565827

  15. Clinical characteristics and muscle glycogen concentrations in warmblood horses with polysaccharide storage myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Susannah S; Nicholson, Anne M; Williams, Zoë J; Valberg, Stephanie J

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize clinical findings for polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) in warmblood horses with type 1 PSSM (PSSM1; caused by mutation of the glycogen synthase 1 gene) and type 2 PSSM (PSSM2; unknown etiology). SAMPLE Database with 3,615 clinical muscle biopsy submissions. PROCEDURES Reported clinical signs and serum creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were retrospectively analyzed for horses with PSSM1 (16 warmblood and 430 nonwarmblood), horses with PSSM2 (188 warmblood and 646 nonwarmblood), and warmblood horses without PSSM (278). Lameness examinations were reviewed for 9 warmblood horses with PSSM2. Muscle glycogen concentrations were evaluated for horses with PSSM1 (14 warmblood and 6 nonwarmblood), warmblood horses with PSSM2 (13), and horses without PSSM (10 warmblood and 6 nonwarmblood). RESULTS Rhabdomyolysis was more common for horses with PSSM1 (12/16 [75%] warmblood and 223/303 [74%] nonwarmblood) and nonwarmblood horses with PSSM2 (221/436 [51%]) than for warmblood horses with PSSM2 (39/147 [27%]). Gait abnormality was more common in warmblood horses with PSSM2 (97/147 [66%]) than in warmblood horses with PSSM1 (1/16 [7%]), nonwarmblood horses with PSSM2 (176/436 [40%]), and warmblood horses without PSSM (106/200 [53%]). Activities of CK and AST were similar in warmblood horses with and without PSSM2. Muscle glycogen concentrations in warmblood and nonwarmblood horses with PSSM1 were significantly higher than concentrations in warmblood horses with PSSM2. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICIAL RELEVANCE Rhabdomyolysis and elevated muscle glycogen concentration were detected in horses with PSSM1 regardless of breed. Most warmblood horses with PSSM2 had stiffness and gait abnormalities with CK and AST activities and muscle glycogen concentrations within reference limits.

  16. Systemic Correction of Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV by an AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haiqing; Zhang, Quan; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Yang, Chunyu; Thurberg, Beth L; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-03-01

    Deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) causes glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV), which is characterized by the accumulation of a less branched, poorly soluble form of glycogen called polyglucosan (PG) in multiple tissues. This study evaluates the efficacy of gene therapy with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector in a mouse model of adult form of GSD IV (Gbe1 ys/ys ). An AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) vector containing a human GBE expression cassette (AAV-GBE) was intravenously injected into 14-day-old Gbe1 ys/ys mice at a dose of 5 × 10 11 vector genomes per mouse. Mice were euthanized at 3 and 9 months of age. In the AAV-treated mice at 3 months of age, GBE enzyme activity was highly elevated in heart, which is consistent with the high copy number of the viral vector genome detected. GBE activity also increased significantly in skeletal muscles and the brain, but not in the liver. The glycogen content was reduced to wild-type levels in muscles and significantly reduced in the liver and brain. At 9 months of age, though GBE activity was only significantly elevated in the heart, glycogen levels were significantly reduced in the liver, brain, and skeletal muscles of the AAV-treated mice. In addition, the AAV treatment resulted in an overall decrease in plasma activities of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and creatine kinase, and a significant increase in fasting plasma glucose concentration at 9 months of age. This suggests an alleviation of damage and improvement of function in the liver and muscles by the AAV treatment. This study demonstrated a long-term benefit of a systemic injection of an AAV-GBE vector in Gbe1 ys/ys mice.

  17. Hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is a feature of Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia (GSDIa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Benjamin L; Sinha, Rohit A; Wu, Yajun; Singh, Brijesh K; Lim, Andrea; Hirayama, Masahiro; Landau, Dustin J; Bay, Boon Huat; Koeberl, Dwight D; Yen, Paul M

    2017-03-20

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa, von Gierke disease) is the most common glycogen storage disorder. It is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase, an enzyme which catalyses the final step of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. Clinically, GSDIa is characterized by fasting hypoglycaemia and hepatic glycogen and triglyceride overaccumulation. The latter leads to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and the formation of hepatic adenomas and carcinomas. Currently, little is known about the function of various organelles and their impact on metabolism in GSDIa. Accordingly, we investigated mitochondrial function in cell culture and mouse models of GSDIa. We found impairments in oxidative phosphorylation and changes in TCA cycle metabolites, as well as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deranged mitochondrial ultra-structure in these model systems. Mitochondrial content also was decreased, likely secondary to decreased mitochondrial biogenesis. These deleterious effects culminated in the activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of GSDIa, and identify a new potential target for the treatment of this disease. They also provide new insight into the role of carbohydrate overload on mitochondrial function in other hepatic diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  18. A case of perioperative glucose control by using an artificial pancreas in a patient with glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Ryu; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-03-01

    A 57-year-old woman was diagnosed with type I glycogen storage disease in her twenties. She had undergone hepatectomy under general anesthesia with epidural anesthesia. Fifty minutes after the induction of anesthesia, a 20-gauge venous catheter was inserted in the patient's right hand, and an artificial pancreas (STG-55, Nikkiso Co., Tokyo, Japan) was connected for continuous glucose monitoring and automatic glucose control. Insulin was infused when the blood glucose level reached 120 mg/dL or higher, and glucose was infused when the level fell to 100 mg/dL or lower. After the Pringle maneuver, the blood glucose level increased, and insulin was administered automatically via an artificial pancreas. Hypoglycemia did not occur during the operation. After total parenteral nutrition was started in the intensive care unit (ICU), the blood glucose level increased, and the artificial pancreas controlled the blood glucose level through automatic insulin administration. Thirty-four hours after admission to the ICU, the artificial pancreas was removed because the blood sampling failed. After the removal of the artificial pancreas, blood glucose level was measured every 2 h until extubation. During the ICU stay, hypoglycemia never occurred, with the average blood glucose level being 144 mg/dL. In conclusion, the use of an artificial pancreas for perioperative blood glucose management in a patient with glycogen storage disease had the beneficial effect of enabling the management of blood glucose levels without hypoglycemia.

  19. Hepatocytes contribute to residual glucose production in a mouse model for glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmans, Brenda S; Boss, Andreas; van Dijk, Theo H; Soty, Maud; Wolters, Henk; Mutel, Elodie; Groen, Albert K; Derks, Terry G J; Mithieux, Gilles; Heerschap, Arend; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Rajas, Fabienne; Oosterveer, Maaike H

    2017-12-01

    It is a long-standing enigma how glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I patients retain a limited capacity for endogenous glucose production despite the loss of glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Insight into the source of residual endogenous glucose production is of clinical importance given the risk of sudden death in these patients, but so far contradictory mechanisms have been proposed. We investigated glucose-6-phosphatase-independent endogenous glucose production in hepatocytes isolated from a liver-specific GSD Ia mouse model (L-G6pc -/- mice) and performed real-time analysis of hepatic glucose fluxes and glycogen metabolism in L-G6pc -/- mice using state-of-the-art stable isotope methodologies. Here we show that G6pc-deficient hepatocytes are capable of producing glucose. In vivo analysis of hepatic glucose metabolism revealed that the hepatic glucokinase flux was decreased by 95% in L-G6pc -/- mice. It also showed increased glycogen phosphorylase flux in L-G6pc -/- mice, which is coupled to the release of free glucose through glycogen debranching. Although the ex vivo activities of debranching enzyme and lysosomal acid maltase, two major hepatic α-glucosidases, were unaltered in L-G6pc -/- mice, pharmacological inhibition of α-glucosidase activity almost completely abolished residual glucose production by G6pc-deficient hepatocytes. Our data indicate that hepatocytes contribute to residual glucose production in GSD Ia. We show that α-glucosidase activity, i.e. glycogen debranching and/or lysosomal glycogen breakdown, contributes to residual glucose production by GSD Ia hepatocytes. A strong reduction in hepatic GCK flux in L-G6pc-/- mice furthermore limits the phosphorylation of free glucose synthesized by G6pc-deficient hepatocytes, allowing the release of glucose into the circulation. The almost complete abrogation of GCK flux in G6pc-deficient liver also explains the contradictory reports on residual glucose production in GSD Ia patients. (Hepatology

  20. Glycogen storage disease type III-hepatocellular carcinoma a long-term complication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demo, Erin; Frush, Donald; Gottfried, Marcia; Koepke, John; Boney, Anne; Bali, Deeksha; Chen, Y.T.; Kishnani, Priya S.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Glycogen storage disease III (GSD III) is caused by a deficiency of glycogen-debranching enzyme which causes an incomplete glycogenolysis resulting in glycogen accumulation with abnormal structure (short outer chains resembling limit dextrin) in liver and muscle. Hepatic involvement is considered mild, self-limiting and improves with age. With increased survival, a few cases of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have been reported. Methods A systematic review of 45 cases of GSD III at our center (20 months to 67 years of age) was reviewed for HCC, 2 patients were identified. A literature review of HCC in GSD III was performed and findings compared to our patients. Conclusions GSD III patients are at risk for developing HCC. Cirrhosis was present in all cases and appears to be responsible for HCC transformation There are no reliable biomarkers to monitor for HCC in GSD III. Systematic evaluation of liver disease needs be continued in all patients, despite lack of symptoms. Development of guidelines to allow for systematic review and microarray studies are needed to better delineate the etiology of the hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with GSD III. PMID:17196294

  1. Glycogen storage disease type III: diagnosis, genotype, management, clinical course and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentner, Christiaan P; Hoogeveen, Irene J; Weinstein, David A; Santer, René; Murphy, Elaine; McKiernan, Patrick J; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Beauchamp, Nicholas J; Taybert, Joanna; Laforêt, Pascal; Petit, François M; Hubert, Aurélie; Labrune, Philippe; Smit, G Peter A; Derks, Terry G J

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII) is a rare disorder of glycogenolysis due to AGL gene mutations, causing glycogen debranching enzyme deficiency and storage of limited dextrin. Patients with GSDIIIa show involvement of liver and cardiac/skeletal muscle, whereas GSDIIIb patients display only liver symptoms and signs. The International Study on Glycogen Storage Disease (ISGSDIII) is a descriptive retrospective, international, multi-centre cohort study of diagnosis, genotype, management, clinical course and outcome of 175 patients from 147 families (86 % GSDIIIa; 14 % GSDIIIb), with follow-up into adulthood in 91 patients. In total 58 AGL mutations (non-missense mutations were overrepresented and 21 novel mutations were observed) were identified in 76 families. GSDIII patients first presented before the age of 1.5 years, hepatomegaly was the most common presenting clinical sign. Dietary management was very diverse and included frequent meals, uncooked cornstarch and continuous gastric drip feeding. Chronic complications involved the liver (hepatic cirrhosis, adenoma(s), and/or hepatocellular carcinoma in 11 %), heart (cardiac involvement and cardiomyopathy, in 58 % and 15 %, respectively, generally presenting in early childhood), and muscle (pain in 34 %). Type 2 diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in eight out of 91 adult patients (9 %). In adult patients no significant correlation was detected between (non-) missense AGL genotypes and hepatic, cardiac or muscular complications. This study demonstrates heterogeneity in a large cohort of ageing GSDIII patients. An international GSD patient registry is warranted to prospectively define the clinical course, heterogeneity and the effect of different dietary interventions in patients with GSDIII.

  2. A new variant in PHKA2 is associated with glycogen storage disease type IXa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rodríguez-Jiménez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucogenosis type IX is caused by pathogenic variants of the PHKA2 gene. Herein, we report a patient with clinical symptoms compatible with Glycogen Storage Disease type IXa. PYGL, PHKA1, PHKA2, PHKB and PHKG2 genes were analyzed by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS. We identified the previously undescribed hemizygous missense variant NM_000292.2(PHKA2:c.1963G>A, p.(Glu655Lys in PHKA2 exon 18. In silico analyses showed two possible pathogenic consequences: it affects a highly conserved amino acid and disrupts the exon 18 canonical splice donor site. The variant was found as a “de novo” event.

  3. Progress in genetic diagnosis and management of glycogen storage disease typeⅡ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ (GSD Ⅱ is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary metabolic disorder characterized by progressive atrophy and weakness of skeletal muscle. It can be confirmed by clinical history, acid α-glucosidase (GAA testing and GAA mutations. Early targeting treatment and nursing can improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients with GSDⅡ. Progress in genetic diagnosis and management of GSDⅡ will be reviewed in this paper. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.005

  4. Histological Changes on Liver Glycogen Storage in Mice (Mus musculus) Caused by Unbalanced Diets

    OpenAIRE

    Ulusoy, Esma; Eren, Banu

    2008-01-01

    Weight-losing diets have appealed to people who want to lose weight in the short-term. They usually apply high-protein (HP) diets (like Atkin’s, Stillman’s, Scarsdale) which they practice for 2 weeks or so. Unfortunately, these people who have rapid weight loss return to their old habits and quickly regain the weight lost. We have shown in previous work that actually these weight losses have been associated with body fluids, protein and glycogen storage. In our study, we examined the effect o...

  5. Glycogen storage disease type 1a in three siblings with the G270V mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvari, R; Isam, J; Moses, S W

    1999-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (von Gierke disease, GSD1a) is caused by the deficiency of microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity. The cloning of G6Pase cDNA and characterization of the human G6Pase gene enabled the identification of the mutations causing GSD1a. Here we report on the clinical and biochemical features of three GSD1a siblings of a Muslin Arab family with a G270V mutation. Two older patients presented with an unusually mild clinical and biochemical course.

  6. The second-meal phenomenon is associated with enhanced muscle glycogen storage in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Ana; Leverton, Emily; Solanky, Bhavana; Ravikumar, Balasubramanian; Snaar, Johanna E M; Morris, Peter G; Taylor, Roy

    2009-07-02

    The rise in blood glucose after lunch is less if breakfast has been eaten. The metabolic basis of this second-meal phenomenon remains uncertain. We hypothesized that storage of ingested glucose as glycogen could be responsible during the post-meal suppression of plasma NEFAs (non-esterified fatty acids; 'free' fatty acids). In the present study we determined the metabolic basis of the second-meal phenomenon. Healthy subjects were studied on two separate days, with breakfast and without breakfast in a random order. We studied metabolic changes after a standardized test lunch labelled with 3 g of 13C-labelled (99%) glucose. Changes in post-prandial muscle glycogen storage were measured using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rise in plasma glucose after lunch was significantly less if breakfast had been taken (0.9+/-0.3 compared with 3.2+/-0.3 mmol/l, with and without breakfast respectively; Pglycogen signal was greater 5 h after lunch on the breakfast day (103+/-21 compared with 48+/-12 units; Pglycogen synthesis consequent upon sustained suppression of plasma NEFA concentrations.

  7. [A case of glycogen storage disease type I with hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Yukiko; Ota, Hideo; Mikami, Koji; Nagase, Hirotsugu; Mukai, Ryota; Okada, Kazuyuki; Ide, Yoshihito; Yanagisawa, Tetsu; Maruyama, Kentaro; Murata, Kohei; Yokouchi, Hideoki; Nagase, Atsuhiko; Tamai, Masamitsu; Kinuta, Masakatsu

    2009-11-01

    The patient was a 55-year-old female. In 1997, she was diagnosed as type-I glycogen storage disease (von Gierke disease). In March 2002, abdominal ultrasound tomography revealed an early enhanced lesion at liver S2, which suspected to a well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). From 2002 to 2006, she received three times trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) at enhanced lesions. But abdominal computer tomography (CT) revealed a 3.6 cm-in diameter early enhanced lesion near this tumor at S2, which was suspected to a diagnosis of recurrent HCC in December 2008. Therefore, she received a partial hepatectomy at S2. This resected specimen was diagnosed as poorly differentiated HCC. This patient is still alive with no recurrence after 6 months from operation. In conclusion, it might be effective for an early detection of recurrent HCC to see the doctor for a long regular checkup, because the growth of HCC with glycogen storage disease would be very slow.

  8. Glycogen Shunt Activity and Glycolytic Supercompensation in Astrocytes May Be Distinctly Mediated via the Muscle Form of Glycogen Phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Emil; Bak, Lasse K; Walls, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen is the main storage form of glucose in the brain. In contrast with previous beliefs, brain glycogen has recently been shown to play important roles in several brain functions. A fraction of metabolized glucose molecules are being shunted through glycogen before reentering the glycolytic...... pathway, a phenomenon known as the glycogen shunt. The significance of glycogen in astrocyte energetics is underlined by high activity of the glycogen shunt and the finding that inhibition of glycogen degradation, under some conditions leads to a disproportional increase in glycolytic activity, so......-called glycolytic supercompensation. Glycogen phosphorylase, the key enzyme in glycogen degradation, is expressed in two different isoforms in brain, the muscle and the brain isoform. Recent studies have illustrated how these are differently regulated. In the present study, we investigate the role of the two...

  9. [Clinical sequelae of 17 cases with glycogen storage disease type II/Pompe disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han-bing; Zhang, Wei-min; Qiu, Jia-jing; Meng, Yan; Qiu, Zheng-qing

    2012-06-01

    To analyze and summarize the characteristics of glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease) patients according to the clinical description and prognosis. Seventeen Chinese patients diagnosed by acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme activity test were reviewed. Clinical data tables were designed. Interviews were made via phone calls. Information was collected to reach the objective. Four of 17 patients diagnosed by acid alpha-glucosidase are infantile-onset, symptoms started between 2 to 6 months after birth with increased serum creatine kinase and cardiac problems, with or without respiratory concerns. Other 13 patients were later-onset cases, and their symptoms started between 2 to 22 years of age with increased serum creatine kinase. Eleven later-onset patients started with muscle weakness, 2 patients developed respiratory insufficiency, 2 patients showed scoliosis, and 1 patient expressed increased serum creatine kinase with abnormal liver function. Just 3 of the later-onset patients were treated with mechanical ventilator and adjuvant therapy, others were not. All patients' acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme activity analysis showed lower than 10% of normal. Fourteen patients were tested by muscle biopsy pathology, and 9 of them progressed to glycogen storage disease type II; 10 patients received genetic analysis, and 6 of them had two mutations which cause the disorder. Twelve of the 17 patients were interviewed successfully. In 3 of the infant-onset patients the disease resulted in death from respiratory failure, and 1 is still alive at the age of 1 year and 7 months. In 4 of 8 later-onset patients the disease resulted in death from respiratory failure between 3 to 5 years after onset of symptoms. Three of 4 survivors had increased muscle weakness, and 1 patient kept alive with ventilator without any changes. Seven of 12 interviewed patients died, the mortality rate was 58.3%. Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease) present differently in the

  10. Impaired autophagy contributes to muscle atrophy in glycogen storage disease type II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Fanin, Marina; Masiero, Eva; Angelini, Corrado; Sandri, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The autophagy-lysosome system is essential for muscle cell homeostasis and its dysfunction has been linked to muscle disorders that are typically distinguished by massive autophagic buildup. Among them, glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is characterized by the presence of large glycogen-filled lysosomes in the skeletal muscle, due to a defect in the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). The accumulation of autophagosomes is believed to be detrimental for myofiber function. However, the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of GSDII is still unclear. To address this issue we monitored autophagy in muscle biopsies and myotubes of early and late-onset GSDII patients at different time points of disease progression. Moreover we also analyzed muscles from patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Our data suggest that autophagy is a protective mechanism that is required for myofiber survival in late-onset forms of GSDII. Importantly, our findings suggest that a normal autophagy flux is important for a correct maturation of GAA and for the uptake of recombinant human GAA. In conclusion, autophagy failure plays an important role in GSDII disease progression, and the development of new drugs to restore the autophagic flux should be considered to improve ERT efficacy.

  11. Molecular diagnosis of glycogen storage disease and disorders with overlapping clinical symptoms by massive parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Ana I; Medrano, Celia; Navarrete, Rosa; Desviat, Lourdes R; Merinero, Begoña; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Vitoria, Isidro; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Pérez, Belen

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) is an umbrella term for a group of genetic disorders that involve the abnormal metabolism of glycogen; to date, 23 types of GSD have been identified. The nonspecific clinical presentation of GSD and the lack of specific biomarkers mean that Sanger sequencing is now widely relied on for making a diagnosis. However, this gene-by-gene sequencing technique is both laborious and costly, which is a consequence of the number of genes to be sequenced and the large size of some genes. This work reports the use of massive parallel sequencing to diagnose patients at our laboratory in Spain using either a customized gene panel (targeted exome sequencing) or the Illumina Clinical-Exome TruSight One Gene Panel (clinical exome sequencing (CES)). Sequence variants were matched against biochemical and clinical hallmarks. Pathogenic mutations were detected in 23 patients. Twenty-two mutations were recognized (mostly loss-of-function mutations), including 11 that were novel in GSD-associated genes. In addition, CES detected five patients with mutations in ALDOB, LIPA, NKX2-5, CPT2, or ANO5. Although these genes are not involved in GSD, they are associated with overlapping phenotypic characteristics such as hepatic, muscular, and cardiac dysfunction. These results show that next-generation sequencing, in combination with the detection of biochemical and clinical hallmarks, provides an accurate, high-throughput means of making genetic diagnoses of GSD and related diseases.Genet Med 18 10, 1037-1043.

  12. Acoustically accessible window determination for ultrasound mediated treatment of glycogen storage disease type Ia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shutao; Raju, Balasundar I.; Leyvi, Evgeniy; Weinstein, David A.; Seip, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is caused by an inherited single-gene defect resulting in an impaired glycogen to glucose conversion pathway. Targeted ultrasound mediated delivery (USMD) of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to liver in conjunction with microbubbles may provide a potential treatment for GSDIa patients. As the success of USMD treatments is largely dependent on the accessibility of the targeted tissue by the focused ultrasound beam, this study presents a quantitative approach to determine the acoustically accessible liver volume in GSDIa patients. Models of focused ultrasound beam profiles for transducers of varying aperture and focal lengths were applied to abdomen models reconstructed from suitable CT and MRI images. Transducer manipulations (simulating USMD treatment procedures) were implemented via transducer translations and rotations with the intent of targeting and exposing the entire liver to ultrasound. Results indicate that acoustically accessible liver volumes can be as large as 50% of the entire liver volume for GSDIa patients and on average 3 times larger compared to a healthy adult group due to GSDIa patients' increased liver size. Detailed descriptions of the evaluation algorithm, transducer-and abdomen models are presented, together with implications for USMD treatments of GSDIa patients and transducer designs for USMD applications.

  13. Evaluation of glycogen storage disease as a cause of ketotic hypoglycemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laurie M; Corrado, Michelle M; van der Ende, Rixt M; Derks, Terry G J; Chen, Margaret A; Siegel, Sara; Hoyt, Kate; Correia, Catherine E; Lumpkin, Christopher; Flanagan, Theresa B; Carreras, Caroline T; Weinstein, David A

    2015-05-01

    Ketone formation is a normal response when hypoglycemia occurs. Since the majority of children with recurrent hypoglycemia cannot be diagnosed with a known endocrine or metabolic disorder on a critical sample, ketotic hypoglycemia has been described as the most common cause of low blood glucose concentrations in children. Critical samples, however, will miss the ketotic forms of glycogen storage disease (GSD), which present with elevated ketones, hypoglycemia, and normal hormonal concentrations. A total of 164 children (96 boys, 68 girls) were enrolled in the study. Prediction of pathogenicity of DNA changes using computer modeling confirmed pathology in 20 individuals [four GSD 0, two GSD VI, 12 GSD IX alpha, one GSD IX beta, one GSD IX gamma] (12%). Boys were most likely to have changes in the PHKA2 gene, consistent with GSD IX alpha, an X-linked disorder. Mutations in genes involved in glycogen synthesis and degradation were commonly found in children with idiopathic ketotic hypoglycemia. GSD IX is likely an unappreciated cause of ketotic hypoglycemia in children, while GSD 0 and VI are relatively uncommon. GSD IX alpha should particularly be considered in boys with unexplained hypoglycemia.

  14. Mutations in PHKA2 are responsible for X-linked liver glycogen storage disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, J.; Coucke, P.; Dams, E. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)

    1994-09-01

    X-linked liver glycogenosis type I (XLG I) is due to a deficiency of phosphorylase kinase (PHK), a key enzyme in the control of glycogen breakdown. XLG I is the most common glycogen storage disease. Patients show hepatomegaly, growth retardation and elevation of liver enzymes as their main clinical symptoms. We assigned the XLG I gene to the chromosomal region Xp22 by linkage analysis in six XLG I families. As the liver {alpha}-subunit of PHK (PHKA2) was also localized to Xp22, PHKA2 was considered a candidate gene for XLG I. In this study, we searched for mutations in 6 exons of the PHDA2 gene of 9 unrelated XLG I patients by SSCP analysis. This revealed three point mutations present in three different patients. Two of these mutations introduce a premature stop codon leading to a truncated protein. The third mutation abolishes a 5{prime} splice site consensus sequence leading to exon skipping. All three mutations therefore result in a PHKA2 protein that lacks several amino acids, what most probably affects enzyme function or stability. These findings indicate that PHKA2 is the XLG I gene.

  15. Increased lipogenesis and resistance of lipoproteins to oxidative modification in two patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, RHJ; Rake, JP; Visser, G; Neese, RA; Hellerstein, MK; van Duyvenvoorde, W; Princen, HMG; Stellaard, F; Smit, GPA; Kuipers, F

    We describe 2 patients with glycogen storage disease type la and severe hyperlipidemia without premature atherosclerosis. Susceptibility of low-density lipoproteins to oxidation was decreased, possibly related to the similar to40-fold increase in palmitate synthesis altering lipoprotein saturated

  16. Carbon sink removal: Increased photosynthetic production of lactic acid by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 in a glycogen storage mutant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, A.D.; Angermayr, S.A.; Puthan Veetil, V.; Osnato, A.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of pathways for carbon-storage in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 has been suggested as a strategy to increase the size of the available pyruvate pool for the production of (heterologous) chemical commodities. Here we show that deletion of the pathway for glycogen synthesis

  17. Microbial Profile of Supragingival and Subgingival Plaque of Patients With Glycogen Storage Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chealsea E. Garcia DDS, MS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD are either orally fed (ORF or gastronomy-tube fed (GTF with cornstarch to maintain normal glucose levels. It is not known whether the use of cornstarch affects the microbiological oral profile of patients with GSD. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare supragingival and subgingival plaque samples collected from 53 participants with GSD (2-56 years—29 ORF and 24 GTF. The 16S sequence bacterial profiles of plaque DNA were obtained and a total of 768 probes were detected across the plaque groups. Orally fed patients showed higher means of cariogenic species and periodontal health-associated species, whereas GTF patients showed higher means of periopathogenic species ( P < .05. Orally fed patients exhibited high levels of caries pathogens and lower levels of periodontal pathogens possibly due to the acidic environment created by their cornstarch diet, when compared to GTF patients.

  18. Lipids in hepatic glycogen storage diseases: pathophysiology, monitoring of dietary management and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Terry G J; van Rijn, Margreet

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic glycogen storage diseases (GSD) underscore the intimate relationship between carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The hyperlipidemias in hepatic GSD reflect perturbed intracellular metabolism, providing biomarkers in blood to monitor dietary management. In different types of GSD, hyperlipidemias are of a different origin. Hypertriglyceridemia is most prominent in GSD type Ia and associated with long-term outcome morbidity, like pancreatitis and hepatic adenomas. In the ketotic subtypes of GSD, hypertriglyceridemia reflects the age-dependent fasting intolerance, secondary lipolysis and increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The role of high protein diets is established for ketotic types of GSD, but non-traditional dietary interventions (like medium-chain triglycerides and the ketogenic diet) in hepatic GSD are still controversial and necessitate further studies. Patients with these rare inherited disorders of carbohydrate metabolism meet several criteria of the metabolic syndrome, therefore close monitoring for cardiovascular diseases in ageing GSD patients may be justified.

  19. Neutrophilia and elevated serum cytokines are implicated in glycogen storage disease type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Youn; Chen, Li-Yuan; Yiu, Wai Han; Weinstein, David A.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2008-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) patients deficient in glucose-6-phosphatase-α manifest a disturbed glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that disturbed glucose homeostasis might affect myeloid functions. Here we show that GSD-Ia mice exhibit normal neutrophil activities but have elevated myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow and spleen. Interestingly, GSD-Ia mice exhibit a persistent increase in peripheral blood neutrophil counts along with elevated serum levels of granulocyte colony stimulating factor and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant. Taken together, our results suggest that a loss of glucose homeostasis can compromise the immune system, resulting in neutrophilia. This may explain some of the unexpected clinical manifestations seen in GSD-Ia. PMID:17659284

  20. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B.; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.; Correia, Catherine E.; Mah, Cathryn S.; Weinstein, David A.; Conlon, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases. PMID:21318173

  1. Congenital glycogen storage disease in a South American coati (Nasua nasua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Peter D; Loynachan, Alan T

    2013-09-01

    A 14-mo-old South American coati (Nasua nasua) was submitted for necropsy to the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. The coati had a history of progressive neurologic signs beginning 3 mo prior to euthanasia. At necropsy, the coati was in thin body condition, but no other significant findings were evident. Histopathologic findings included moderate distension of neuronal cell bodies by finely vesiculated cytoplasm within the cerebrum, cerebellum, spinal cord, and intestinal ganglia. Hepatocytes and macrophages in the lung, spleen, and liver were similarly affected. Transmission electron microscopy showed numerous electrondense membranous cytoplasmic bodies, swirls, and vesicular profiles within neuronal lysosomes in the brain. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a naturally occurring congenital glycogen storage disease in a South American coati and the family Procyonidae.

  2. Peripheral neuropathy in glycogen storage disease type III: Fact or myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin, Bastien; Laforět, Pascal; Labrune, Philippe; Fournier, Emmanuel; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether peripheral neuropathy is a feature of glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) in adult patients. Medical records of a cohort of adult GSD IIIa patients who underwent electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS) were reviewed, and the results were correlated with physical examination findings. Sixteen patients underwent EMG and NCS; 4 complained of exercise intolerance, 1 of foot paresthesia, and 11 of muscle weakness (3 proximal, 8 distal). None of the patients had sensory deficits on clinical examination. All motor and sensory conduction velocities and sensory amplitudes were within reference ranges. EMG showed myopathic motor unit potentials in 15 of the 16 patients. Based on the clinical examination and the NCS and EMG results, we did not identify any peripheral nerve involvement in our adult patients diagnosed with GSD III. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Hyperlipidemia in glycogen storage disease type III: Effect of age and metabolic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, A. V.; Sentner, C. P.; Correia, C. E.; Theriaque, D. W.; Shuster, J. J.; Smit, G. P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary While the presence of hyperlipidaemia in glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib is generally accepted, few investigators have adequately assessed lipid profiles of GSD III in children, in whom the presence of hyperlipidaemia may be most prominent. We analysed the lipid profiles in 44 GSD III patients from 6 months to 30 years of age. Hypertriglyceridaemia and hypercholesterolaemia were common in children younger than 3 years of age. Hypertriglyceridaemia correlated negatively with age, and may reflect increased severity of hypoglycaemia in this younger population. The presence of hyperlipidaemia during childhood in these patients identifies another GSD population that could be at risk for early cardiovascular disease (CVD). Consequently, the outcome of clinical trials investigating the vascular effect of hyperlipidaemia in GSD applies to types other than GSD I. PMID:18709545

  4. Evaluation of central nervous system in patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Yusuf; Gürakan, Figen; Saltık Temizel, İnci Nur; Demir, Hülya; Oğuz, Kader Karlı; Yalnızoğlu, Dilek; Topçu, Meral; Özen, Hasan; Yüce, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate structure and functions of central nervous system (CNS) in children with glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a. Neurological examination, psychometric tests, electroencephalography (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), visual evoked potentials (VEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) were performed. The results were compared between patients with good and poor metabolic control and healthy children. Twenty-three patients with GSD type 1a were studied. Twelve patients were in poor metabolic control group and 11 patients in good metabolic control group. Five patients had intellectual disability, 10 had EEG abnormalities, seven had abnormal VEP and two had abnormal BAEP results. MRI was abnormal in five patients. There was significant correlation between the number of hypoglycemic attacks and MRI abnormalities. Central nervous system may be affected in GSD type 1a even in patients with normal neurologic examination. Accumulation of abnormal results in patients with poor metabolic control supports the importance of metabolic control in GSD type 1a.

  5. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Specht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  6. CHIMERISM AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION FOR TYPE IV GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE AND TYPE 1 GAUCHER’S DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, Anthony J.; Trucco, Massimo; Ricordi, Camillo; Ildstad, Suzanne; Terasaki, Paul I.; Murase, Noriko; Kendall, Ross S.; Kocova, Mirjana; Rudert, William A.; Zeevi, Adriana; Van Thiel, David

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver transplantation for type IV glycogen storage disease (branching-enzyme deficiency) results in the resorption of extrahepatic deposits of amylopectin, but the mechanism of resorption is not known. Methods We studied two patients with type IV glycogen storage disease 37 and 91 months after liver transplantation and a third patient with lysosomal glucocerebrosidase deficiency (type 1 Gaucher’s disease), in whom tissue glucocerebroside deposition had decreased 26 months after liver replacement, to determine whether the migration of cells from the allograft (microchimerism) could explain the improved metabolism of enzyme-deficient tissues in the recipient. Samples of blood and biopsy specimens of the skin, lymph nodes, heart, bone marrow, or intestine were examined immunocytochemically with the use of donor-specific monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies and the polymerase chain reaction, with preliminary amplification specific to donor alleles of the gene for the beta chain of HLA-DR molecules, followed by hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. Results Histopathological examination revealed that the cardiac deposits of amylopectin in the patients with glycogen storage disease and the lymph-node deposits of glucocerebroside in the patient with Gaucher’s disease were dramatically reduced after transplantation. Immunocytochemical analysis showed cells containing the HLA phenotypes of the donor in the heart and skin of the patients with glycogen storage disease and in the lymph nodes, but not the skin, of the patient with Gaucher’s disease. Polymerase-chain-reaction analysis demonstrated donor HLA-DR DNA in the heart of both patients with glycogen storage disease, in the skin of one of them, and in the skin, intestine, blood, and bone marrow of the patient with Gaucher’s disease. Conclusions Systemic microchimerism occurs after liver allotransplantation and can ameliorate pancellular enzyme deficiencies. PMID:8437594

  7. Pituitary hypoplasia and growth hormone deficiency in a woman with glycogen storage disease type Ia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagdelen Selcuk

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Growth retardation is one of the cardinal manifestations of glycogen storage disease type Ia. It is unclear which component of the growth hormone and/or insulin-like growth factor axis is primarily disrupted, and management of growth impairment in these patients remains controversial. Here we report the first case in the literature where glycogen storage disease type Ia is associated with pituitary hypoplasia and growth hormone deficiency. Case presentation A 20-year-old woman with glycogen storage disease type Ia was admitted to our endocrinology department because of growth retardation. Basal and overnight growth hormone sampling at 2-hour intervals demonstrated low levels; however, provocative testing revealed a relatively normal growth hormone response. A hypoplastic anterior pituitary with preserved growth hormone response to provocative testing suggested the possibility of growth hormone neurosecretory dysfunction and/or primary pituitary involvement. Conclusion Pituitary hypoplasia may result from growth hormone-releasing hormone deficiency, a condition generally known as growth hormone neurosecretory dysfunction. It is an abnormality with a spontaneous and pulsatile secretion pattern, characterized by short stature, growth retardation and normal serum growth hormone response to provocative testing. However, in the case described in this report, a normal although relatively low growth hormone response during insulin tolerance testing and pituitary hypoplasia suggested that primary pituitary involvement or growth hormone neurosecretory dysfunction may occur in glycogen storage disease type Ia. This is a potential cause of growth failure associated with a lower somatotroph mass, and may explain the variable responsiveness to growth hormone replacement therapy in people with glycogen storage disease.

  8. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs

    2015-01-01

    content during post-exercise recovery from eccentric contractions. Analysis was completed on five male subjects performing an exercise bout consisting of 15 x 10 maximal eccentric contractions. Carbohydrate-rich drinks were subsequently ingested throughout a 48 h recovery period and muscle biopsies...... in both type I and II fibers were lower in the exercise leg compared with the control leg, and this was associated with a smaller size of the glycogen particles. We conclude that in the carbohydrate-supplemented state, the effect of eccentric contractions on glycogen metabolism depends on the subcellular...... localization, muscle fiber's oxidative capacity, and the time course of recovery. The early enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen after the eccentric contractions may entail important implications for muscle function and fatigue resistance....

  9. Efficacy of helper-dependent adenovirus vector-mediated gene therapy in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Sun, B; Bird, A; Chen, Y T; Oka, K; Chan, L

    2007-07-01

    Genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, also known as von Gierke disease; MIM 232200), an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism associated with life-threatening hypoglycemia and growth retardation. We tested whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated hepatic delivery of G6Pase would lead to prolonged survival and sustained correction of the metabolic abnormalities in G6Pase knockout (KO) mice, a model for a severe form of GSD-Ia. An HDAd vector encoding G6Pase was administered intravenously (2 or 5 x 10(12)vector particles/kg) to 2-week-old (w.o.) G6Pase-KO mice. Following HDAd vector administration survival was prolonged to a median of 7 months, in contrast to untreated affected mice that did not survive past 3 weeks of age. G6Pase levels increased more than tenfold between 3 days and 28 weeks after HDAd injection (P < 0.03). The weights of untreated 2 w.o. G6Pase-KO mice were approximately half those of their unaffected littermates, and treatment stimulated their growth to the size of wild-type mice. Severe hypoglycemia and hypercholesterolemia, which are hallmarks of GSD-Ia both in humans and in mice, were also restored to normalcy by the treatment. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was markedly reduced. The efficacy of HDAd-G6Pase treatment in reversing the physiological and biochemical abnormalities associated with GSD-Ia in affected G6Pase-KO mice justifies further preclinical evaluation in murine and canine models of GSD-Ia.

  10. Glycogen storage disease type III in Egyptian children: a single centre clinico-laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Karaksy, Hanaa; Anwar, Ghada; El-Raziky, Mona; Mogahed, Engy; Fateen, Ekram; Gouda, Amr; El-Mougy, Fatma; El-Hennawy, Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of glycogen debrancher enzyme and is characterised by clinical variability. We herein describe the clinical and laboratory findings in 31 Egyptian patients with GSD III presenting to the Paediatric Hepatology Unit, Cairo University, Egypt. Eighteen patients (58%) were males. Their ages ranged between 6 months to 12 years. The main presenting complaint was progressive abdominal distention in 55%. Twelve patients (38.7%) had a history of recurrent attacks of convulsions; four had an erroneous diagnosis of hypocalcaemia and epilepsy. Doll-like facies was noted in 90%. Abdominal examination of all cases revealed abdominal distention and soft hepatomegaly which had bright echogenicity by ultrasound. Hypertriglyceridaemia was present in 93.6%, hyperlactacidaemia in 51.6% and hyperuricaemia in 19.4%. Liver biopsy showed markedly distended hepatocytes with well distinct cytoplasmic boundaries and 32% had macrovesicular fatty changes. Serum creatine kinase was elevated in 64.6% of patients and correlated positively and significantly with age (r=0.7 and P=<0.001), while serum triglycerides correlated negatively with age (r=-0.4 and P=0.05). Blood glucose assessment and search for hepatomegaly in an infant with recurrent seizures may prevent delay in the diagnosis. A huge soft liver reaching the left midclavicular line that appears echogenic on ultrasonography is characteristic of GSD III. A distended hepatocyte with rarified cytoplasm is pathognomonic but not diagnostic. Hypertriglyceridaemia correlates negatively with age, in contrary to CK level. Copyright © 2014 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reversal of glycogen storage disease type IIIa-related cardiomyopathy with modification of diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zori, R. T.; McCune, H.; Maisenbacher, M. K.; Ivsic, T.; Weinstein, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is caused by a deficiency in debranching enzyme, which leads to an accumulation of abnormal glycogen called limit dextrin in affected tissues. Muscle and liver involvement is present in GSD type IIIa, while the defect is limited to the liver only in GSD type IIIb. Besides skeletal muscle involvement, a cardiomyopathy resembling idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is seen. Management consists of maintaining normoglycaemia by supplementation with cornstarch therapy and/or protein. While studies are lacking regarding the best treatment for skeletal muscle disease, a high-protein diet was previously reported to be beneficial. No cases of improvement in cardiomyopathy have been reported. Our patient presented in infancy with hypoglycaemia and hepatomegaly. His prescribed management consisted of cornstarch supplementation and a high-protein diet providing 20% of his total energy needs. At 16 years of age, he developed a severe cardiomyopathy with a left ventricular mass index of 209 g/m2. The cardiomyopathy remained stable on a protein intake of 20–25% of total energy. At age 22 years, the diet was changed to increase his protein intake to 30% of total energy and minimize his cornstarch therapy to only what was required to maintain normoglycaemia. Dramatic improvement in the cardiomyopathy occurred. Over one year, his left ventricular mass index decreased from 159.7 g/m2 to 78 g/m2 (normal 50–86 g/m2) and the creatine kinase levels decreased from 455 U/L to 282 U/L. Avoidance of overtreatment with carbohydrate and a high-protein diet can reverse and may prevent cardiomyopathy. PMID:19322675

  12. Glycogen storage disease type 1a in Israel: biochemical, clinical, and mutational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvari, R; Lei, K J; Bashan, N; Hershkovitz, E; Korman, S H; Barash, V; Lerman-Sagie, T; Mandel, H; Chou, J Y; Moses, S W

    1997-10-31

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (von Gierke disease, GSD 1a) is caused by the deficiency of microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity which catalyzes the final common step of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The recent cloning of the G6Pase cDNA and characterization of the human G6Pase gene enabled the characterization of the mutations causing GSD 1a. This, in turn, allows the introduction of a noninvasive DNA-based diagnosis that provides reliable carrier testing and prenatal diagnosis. In this study, we report the biochemical and clinical characteristics as well as mutational analyses of 12 Israeli GSD 1a patients of different families, who represent most GSD 1a patients in Israel. The mutations, G6Pase activity, and glycogen content of 7 of these patients were reported previously. The biochemical data and clinical findings of all patients were similar and compatible with those described in other reports. All 9 Jewish patients, as well as one Muslim Arab patient, presented the R83C mutation. Two Muslim Arab patients had the V166G mutation which was not found in other patients' populations. The V166G mutation, which was introduced into the G6Pase cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis following transient expression in COS-1 cells, was shown to cause complete inactivation of the G6Pase. The characterization of all GSD 1a mutations in the Israeli population lends itself to carrier testing in these families as well as to prenatal diagnosis, which was carried out in 2 families. Since all Ashkenzai Jewish patients harbor the same mutation, our study suggests that DNA-based diagnosis may be used as an initial diagnostic step in Ashkenazi Jews suspected of having GSD 1a, thereby avoiding liver biopsy.

  13. Clinical presentation and biochemical findings children with glycogen storage disease type 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, A.; Suleman, H.; Arshad, H.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the clinical pattern of presentation and biochemical characteristics of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a in children at a tertiary referral centre. Study Design: Descriptive/ cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric, division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of the Children's hospital, Lahore over a period of 11 years. Patients and Methods: Confirmed cases of glycogen storage disease (clinical plus biochemical findings consistent with GSD 1a and proven on liver biopsy) were enrolled in this study from neonatal age till 18 years. Data was retrieved from files and electronic record for these cases. Diagnosis was made on the basis of history, clinical findings including hepatomegaly, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypoglycemia and hyperuricemia (if present). Diagnosis was confirmed on liver biopsy. Patients with other storage disorders and benign and malignant tumours were excluded from the study. Results: Total patients included in the study were 360 with male to female ratio of 1.25:1. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 25.6 months (age range from one month to 18 years). Most common presentation was abdominal distension (83%) followed by failure to thrive (69%) and recurrent wheezing and diarrhoea (44%) each. Seizures were present in only 1/3rd of children. Other presentations included vomiting, respiratory distress, altered sensorium, nephrocalcinosis, epistaxis and hypothyroidism. Few patients around 11% presented with acute hepatitis and later were diagnosed as GSD. Significant hepatomegaly was evident in almost all patients but nephromegaly was present in only 5.5% patients. All children had marked hypertriglyceridemia but cholesterol levels were raised in 1/3rd of children. A large majority of children had deranged ALT more than 2 times of normal and around 38% children had marked anemia. Significant hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis was documented in around 1/3rd of children

  14. Late-Onset Glycogen Storage Disease Type II (Pompe’s Disease with a Novel Mutation: A Malaysian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiew Fu Liong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe’s disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid α-1,4-glucosidase, resulting in excessive accumulation of glycogen in the lysosomes and cytoplasm of all tissues, most notably in skeletal muscles. We present a case of adult-onset Pompe’s disease with progressive proximal muscles weakness over 5 years and respiratory failure on admission, requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. Electromyography showed evidence of myopathic process with small amplitudes, polyphasic motor unit action potentials, and presence of pseudomyotonic discharges. Muscle biopsy showed glycogen-containing vacuoles in the muscle fibers consistent with glycogen storage disease. Genetic analysis revealed two compound heterozygous mutations at c.444C>G (p.Tyr148* in exon 2 and c.2238G>C (p.Trp746Cys in exon 16, with the former being a novel mutation. This mutation has not been reported before, to our knowledge. The patient was treated with high protein diet during the admission and subsequently showed good clinical response to enzyme replacement therapy with survival now to the eighth year. Conclusion. In patients with late-onset adult Pompe’s disease, careful evaluation and early identification of the disease and its treatment with high protein diet and enzyme replacement therapy improve muscle function and have beneficial impact on long term survival.

  15. [Identification of a novel mutation of AGL gene in two siblings affected with glycogen storage disease type IIIa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Lin, Weixia; Mao, Man; Song, Yuanzong

    2017-08-10

    To detect potential mutation of the AGL gene in two siblings affected with glycogen storage disease type IIIa. Clinical data of the two siblings was collected and analyzed. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral venous blood samples from the patients and their parents. All exons and their flanking sequences of the AGL gene were subjected to PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. Suspected mutation was verified in 75 healthy controls. The main clinical features of the two siblings included hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly, along with markedly elevated liver and myocardial enzymes. Genetic analysis revealed that both siblings harbored compound heterozygous mutations c.1735+1G>T and c.959-1G>C of the AGL gene. Among these, the splicing mutation c.959-1G>C was a novel one with an allele frequency of glycogen storage disease type IIIa. The c.959-1G>C has enriched the spectrum of AGL gene mutations.

  16. Polyglucosan Bodies in Placental Extravillious Trophoblast for the Diagnosis of Fatal Perinatal Neuromuscular Type Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiming; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Wright, James R

    2017-01-01

    The fatal infantile neuromuscular type is the most severe form of glycogen storage disease type IV. We report a case of a 22-day-old female neonate born at 34 weeks gestation with polyhyramnios, fetal hydrops, and severe hypotonia. Placental examination revealed numerous periodic acid schiff (PAS)-positive diastase-resistant polyglucosan bodies in the cytoplasm of extravillous trophoblast predominantly in the placental basal plate. Muscle biopsy and autopsy findings supported a diagnosis of neuromuscular-type glycogen storage disease IV with extensive involvement of skeletal muscle, heart, and liver. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular genetic testing. We could only find one prior report in the English literature that describes placental pathological changes. Our findings suggest that placental examination can be a useful adjunct for early diagnosis, as placentas are often received for pathological examination shortly after birth and usually before a diagnostic muscle biopsy can be performed. Pathologists need to be aware of characteristic placental features.

  17. Whole exome sequencing in foetal akinesia expands the genotype-phenotype spectrum of GBE1 glycogen storage disease mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Todd, Emily J; Yau, Kyle S; Kresoje, Nina; Sivadorai, Padma; Friend, Kathryn; Riley, Kate; Manton, Nicholas D; Blumbergs, Peter; Fietz, Michael; Duff, Rachael M; Davis, Mark R; Allcock, Richard J; Laing, Nigel G

    2013-02-01

    The clinically and genetically heterogenous foetal akinesias have low rates of genetic diagnosis. Exome sequencing of two siblings with phenotypic lethal multiple pterygium syndrome identified compound heterozygozity for a known splice site mutation (c.691+2T>C) and a novel missense mutation (c.956A>G; p.His319Arg) in glycogen branching enzyme 1 (GBE1). GBE1 mutations cause glycogen storage disease IV (GSD IV), including a severe foetal akinesia sub-phenotype. Re-investigating the muscle pathology identified storage material, consistent with GSD IV, which was confirmed biochemically. This study highlights the power of exome sequencing in genetically heterogeneous diseases and adds multiple pterygium syndrome to the phenotypic spectrum of GBE1 mutation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gastric cancer following a liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease type Ia (von Gierke disease): A case report

    OpenAIRE

    XIAO, HUA; BIAN, JIANMIN; ZHANG, LEI; WANG, ZHAOMING; DING, AIXING

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia; also termed von Gierke disease) is an inherited metabolic disorder resulting from a glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency. Liver transplantation is considered to be the most effective treatment for GSD-Ia patients. In the present study, the case of a patient with GSD-Ia who received a liver transplantation at 17 years of age is presented. During the 12 years following transplantation, the patient’s quality of life markedly improved. However, recently, the ...

  19. Multiple adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma in a renal transplant patient with glycogen storage disease type 1a (von Gierke disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossmann, J; Scheuermann, E H; Frilling, A; Geiger, H; Dietrich, C F

    2001-07-27

    We report on a 42-year-old female patient with glycogen storage disease type 1a (von Gierke disease, GSD 1a) who developed hepatic adenomas and finally a hepatocellular carcinoma 10 years after renal transplantation. The tumor was resected; however, the patient died 6 months later as a result of fulminant carcinoma recurrence. In patients who have GSD 1a with terminal renal failure, combined liver and kidney transplantation may be considered at an early stage of the disease.

  20. Malignant transformation of hepatocellular adenoma with bone marrow metaplasia arising in glycogen storage disease type I: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Iguchi, Tomohiro; Yamagata, Motoyuki; Sonoda, Takashi; Yanagita, Kimihiko; Fukahori, Tetsuhiro; Tsujita, Eiji; Aishima, Shinichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Malignant transformation of hepatocellular adenoma (HA) is relatively rare and has been reported to be associated with dysregulation of the β-catenin pathway. The presence of bone marrow metaplasia in HA is an uncommon histological characteristic. The current report presents the case of a 46-year-old woman with glycogen storage disease type I (von Gierke's disease) who underwent resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) arising in a HA with associated bone marrow metaplasia producing three ...

  1. Disordered Eating and Body Esteem Among Individuals with Glycogen Storage Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Theresa B; Sutton, Jill A; Brown, Laurie M; Weinstein, David A; Merlo, Lisa J

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) is an inherited disorder that requires a complex medical regimen to maintain appropriate metabolic control. Previous research has suggested the disease is associated with decreased quality of life, and clinical experience suggests that patients are at risk for disordered eating behaviors that may significantly compromise their health. The current study assessed eating attitudes, eating disorder symptoms, and body image among 64 patients with GSD ranging from 7-52 years old (M = 18.5 years old). About half the participants were male (n = 33, 51.6%). Most participants were diagnosed with GSD Type I (n = 52, 81.3%). Quantitative and qualitative analyses were utilized. Results indicated that 14.8% of children and 11.1% of adolescents/adults with GSD met the clinical cutoff for dysfunctional attitudes toward eating, suggesting high likelihood for presence of an eating disorder. However, traditional eating disorder symptoms (e.g., binging, purging, fasting, etc.) were less prevalent in the GSD sample compared to population norms (t = -6.45, p peers regarding their bodies, especially during childhood and adolescence. However, they reported growing acceptance of their bodies with age and reported less negative attitudes and behaviors. Assessing mental health, including symptoms of disordered eating and low body esteem, among individuals with GSD should be an important component of clinical care.

  2. Recent development and gene therapy for glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Janice Y; Kim, Goo-Young; Cho, Jun-Ho

    2017-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) that is expressed primarily in the liver, kidney, and intestine. G6Pase-α catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) to glucose and phosphate in the terminal step of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, and is a key enzyme for endogenous glucose production. The active site of G6Pase-α is inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen. For catalysis, the substrate G6P must be translocated from the cytoplasm into the ER lumen by a G6P transporter (G6PT). The functional coupling of G6Pase-α and G6PT maintains interprandial glucose homeostasis. Dietary therapies for GSD-Ia are available, but cannot prevent the long-term complication of hepatocellular adenoma that may undergo malignant transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma. Animal models of GSD-Ia are now available and are being exploited to both delineate the disease more precisely and develop new treatment approaches, including gene therapy.

  3. A study of glycogen storage disease with 99Tcm-MIBI gated myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L G; Gao, J Q; Liu, X M; Huang, J M; Li, X Z

    2013-12-01

    Gated myocardial perfusion imaging (G-MPI) is regularly performed using single-photon emission computed tomography. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of 99Tcm-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) myocardial imaging in glycogen storage disease (GSD). 99Tcm-MIBI G-MPI was performed in nine patients with clinically proven GSD. QGS quantitative software was used for processing and interpretation. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) were automatically generated. The myocardium was divided into seven segments, 20 sub-segments and a five-point scoring system was used. Seven out of nine cases were abnormal and the positive rate of G-MPI was 77.8 %. Sixty-two sub-segments of injured myocardium were detected in 140 sub-segments of seven abnormal patients. One injured segment was observed in one patient (14.3 %), two segments were detected in two patients (28.6 %) and three or more abnormal segments were observed in four patients (57.1 %). 99Tcm-MIBI G-MPI can detect myocardial damage in GSD as a non-invasive method. It plays an important role in the clinic.

  4. Renal sonographic findings of type I glycogen storage disease in infancy and early childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan); Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Lee, Hung-Chang [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan); Taipei Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2005-08-01

    Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD-I) is an inherited disorder affecting glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The characteristic manifestations are hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlacticacidemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Renal disease is regarded as a long-term complication and is reported mainly in older patients. We report the renal manifestations and renal ultrasonographic findings of GSD-I in infancy and early childhood in order to assess the role of renal sonography in the diagnosis of GSD-I. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital's database for patients with GSD-I from January 1993 to September 2004. The records of five patients were reviewed for this study. These five patients were diagnosed when they were younger than 3 years old. Data extracted from the charts included the initial extrarenal and renal manifestations, laboratory data, and imaging studies. We analyzed the indications for, and results of, renal sonography. In addition to the clinical presentations and laboratory abnormalities, all five children had nephromegaly and increased echogenicity on ultrasonography on their first visit, although only a minor degree of tubular dysfunction was noted clinically. Three of these five patients had nephrocalcinosis or renal stones or both. Hyperechoic large kidneys, nephrocalcinosis, and renal stones are common in GSD-I. They can be present in early infancy. Abnormalities on renal sonography might suggest GSD-I in a patient with suspected inborn errors of metabolism. (orig.)

  5. Partial correction of neutrophil dysfunction by oral galactose therapy in glycogen storage disease type Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letkemann, Rudolf; Wittkowski, Helmut; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Podskabi, Teodor; Haslam, Stuart M; Föll, Dirk; Dell, Anne; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib) is characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. Mass spectrometric glycomic profiling of GSD-Ib neutrophils showed severely truncated N-glycans, lacking galactose. Experiments indicated the hypoglycosylation of the electron transporting subunit of NADPH oxidase, which is crucial for the defense against bacterial infections. In phosphoglucomutase 1 (PGM1) deficiency, an inherited disorder with an enzymatic defect just one metabolic step ahead, hypogalactosylation can be successfully treated by dietary galactose. We hypothesized the same pathomechanism in GSD-Ib and started a therapeutic trial with oral galactose and uridine. The aim was to improve neutrophil dysfunction through the correction of hypoglycosylation in neutrophils. The GSD-Ib patient was treated for 29weeks. Monitoring included glycomics analysis of the patient's neutrophils and neutrophil function tests including respiratory burst activity, phagocytosis and migration. Although no substantial restoration of neutrophil glycosylation was found, there was partial improvement of respiratory burst activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Muscle Ultrasound in Patients with Glycogen Storage Disease Types I and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Renate J; Sentner, Christiaan P; Smit, G Peter A; Maurits, Natasha M; Derks, Terry G J; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Sival, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    In glycogen storage diseases (GSDs), improved longevity has resulted in the need for neuromuscular surveillance. In 12 children and 14 adults with the "hepatic" (GSD-I) and "myopathic" (GSD-III) phenotypes, we cross-sectionally assessed muscle ultrasound density (MUD) and muscle force. Children with both "hepatic" and "myopathic" GSD phenotypes had elevated MUD values (MUD Z-scores: GSD-I > 2.5 SD vs. GSD-III > 1 SD, p GSD-III children, p < 0.05), concurring with pronounced muscle weakness (GSD-III adults vs. GSD-I adults, p < 0.05) of myopathic distribution. Children with "hepatic" and "myopathic" GSD phenotypes were both found to have myopathy. Myopathy stabilizes in "hepatic" GSD-I adults, whereas it progresses in "myopathic" GSD-III adults. Muscle ultrasonography provides an excellent, non-invasive tool for neuromuscular surveillance per GSD phenotype. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Necrotic foci, elevated chemokines and infiltrating neutrophils in the liver of glycogen storage disease type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Youn; Weinstein, David A.; Starost, Matthew F.; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) patients manifest the long-term complication of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) of unknown etiology. We showed previously that GSD-Ia mice exhibit neutrophilia and elevated serum cytokine levels. This study was conducted to evaluate whether human GSD-Ia patients exhibit analogous increases and whether in GSD-Ia mice a correlation exists between immune abnormalities and, biochemical and histological alterations in the liver. Methods Differential leukocyte counts and cytokine levels were investigated in GSD-Ia patients. Hepatic chemokine production, neutrophil infiltration, and histological abnormalities were investigated in GSD-Ia mice. Results We show that GSD-Ia patients exhibit increased peripheral neutrophil counts and serum interleukin-8 (IL-8). Compared to normal subjects, HCA-bearing GSD-Ia patients have a 2.8-fold higher serum IL8 concentration, while GSD-Ia patients without HCA have a 1.4-fold higher concentration. Hepatic injury in GSD-Ia mice is evidenced by necrotic foci, markedly elevated infiltrating neutrophils, and increased hepatic production of chemokines. Conclusion Peripheral neutrophilia and elevated serum chemokines are characteristic of GSD-Ia with HCA-bearing GSD-Ia patients having the highest serum IL-8. In GSD-Ia mice these elevations correlate with elevated hepatic chemokine levels, neutrophil infiltration, and necrosis. Taken together, peripheral neutrophilia and increased serum chemokines may indicate hepatic injuries in GSD-Ia PMID:18191274

  8. Novel SLC37A4 Mutations in Korean Patients With Glycogen Storage Disease Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung Doo; Ko, Jung Min; Lee, Jeongho; Lee, Dong Hwan; Hong, Suk Jin; Ki, Chang Seok; Lee, Soo Youn; Kim, Jong Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2017-05-01

    Molecular techniques are fundamental for establishing an accurate diagnosis and therapeutic approach of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). We aimed to evaluate SLC37A4 mutation spectrum in Korean GSD Ib patients. Nine Korean patients from eight unrelated families with GSD Ib were included. SLC37A4 mutations were detected in all patients with direct sequencing using a PCR method and/or whole-exome sequencing. A comprehensive review of previously reported SLC37A4 mutations was also conducted. Nine different pathogenic SLC37A4 mutations were identified in the nine patients with GSD Ib. Among them, four novel mutations were identified: c.148G>A (pGly50Arg), c.320G>A (p.Trp107*), c.412T>C (p.Trp138Arg), and c.818G>A (p.Gly273Asp). The most common mutation type was missense mutations (66.7%, 6/9), followed by nonsense mutations (22.2%, 2/9) and small deletion mutations (11.1%, 1/9). The most common mutation identified in the Korean population was c.443C>T (p.Ala148Val), which comprised 39.9% (7/18) of all tested alleles. This mutation has not been reported in GSD Ib patients in other ethnic populations. This study expands knowledge of the SLC37A4 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD Ib. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  9. Cross-sectional retrospective study of muscle function in patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decostre, Valérie; Laforêt, Pascal; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; De Antonio, Marie; Leveugle, Sylvain; Ollivier, Gwenn; Canal, Aurélie; Kachetel, Kahina; Petit, François; Eymard, Bruno; Behin, Anthony; Wahbi, Karim; Labrune, Philippe; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by liver and muscle impairment. This study aimed to identify promising muscle function measures for future studies on natural disease progression and therapeutic trials. The age-effect on the manual muscle testing (MMT), the hand-held dynamometry (HHD), the motor function measure (MFM) and the Purdue pegboard test was evaluated by regression analysis in a cross-sectional retrospective single site study. In patients aged between 13 and 56 years old, the Purdue pegboard test and dynamometry of key pinch and knee extension strength were age-sensitive with annual losses of 1.49, 1.10 and 0.70% of the predicted values (%pred), respectively. The MFM score and handgrip strength were also age-sensitive but only in patients older than 29 and 37 years old with annual losses of 1.42 and 1.84%pred, respectively. Muscle strength assessed by MMT and elbow extension measured by HHD demonstrated an annual loss of less than 0.50%pred and are thus unlikely to be promising outcome measures for future clinical trials. In conclusion, our results identified age-sensitive outcomes from retrospective data and may serve for future longitudinal studies in which an estimation of the minimal number of subjects is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Renal sonographic findings of type I glycogen storage disease in infancy and early childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2005-01-01

    Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD-I) is an inherited disorder affecting glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The characteristic manifestations are hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlacticacidemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Renal disease is regarded as a long-term complication and is reported mainly in older patients. We report the renal manifestations and renal ultrasonographic findings of GSD-I in infancy and early childhood in order to assess the role of renal sonography in the diagnosis of GSD-I. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital's database for patients with GSD-I from January 1993 to September 2004. The records of five patients were reviewed for this study. These five patients were diagnosed when they were younger than 3 years old. Data extracted from the charts included the initial extrarenal and renal manifestations, laboratory data, and imaging studies. We analyzed the indications for, and results of, renal sonography. In addition to the clinical presentations and laboratory abnormalities, all five children had nephromegaly and increased echogenicity on ultrasonography on their first visit, although only a minor degree of tubular dysfunction was noted clinically. Three of these five patients had nephrocalcinosis or renal stones or both. Hyperechoic large kidneys, nephrocalcinosis, and renal stones are common in GSD-I. They can be present in early infancy. Abnormalities on renal sonography might suggest GSD-I in a patient with suspected inborn errors of metabolism. (orig.)

  11. Glycogen storage disease type IX and growth hormone deficiency presenting as severe ketotic hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodax, Juanita K; Uysal, Serife; Quintos, Jose Bernardo; Phornphutkul, Chanika

    2017-02-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type IX and growth hormone (GH) deficiency cause ketotic hypoglycemia via different mechanisms and are not known to be associated. We describe a patient presenting with severe ketotic hypoglycemia found to have both GSD IX and isolated GH deficiency. A 3-year-and-11-month-old boy with a history of prematurity, autism, developmental delay, seizures, and feeding difficulty was admitted for poor weight gain and symptomatic hypoglycemia. He was nondysmorphic, with a height of 93.8 cm (2%, -1.97 SDS), and has no hepatomegaly. He developed symptomatic hypoglycemia, with a serum glucose level of 37 mg/dL after 14 h of fasting challenge. Critical sample showed a GH of 0.24 ng/mL. GH provocative stimulation testing was done with a peak GH of 2.8 ng/mL. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypoplastic pituitary gland. Given the clinical symptoms, suspicion for mitochondrial disease was high. Dual Genome Panel by Massively Parallel Sequencing revealed a hemizygous variant c.721A>G (p1241V) in the X-linked PHKA2 gene, a causative gene for GSD IX. Red blood cell PhK enzyme activity testing was low, supporting the diagnosis. Given the patient's developmental delays that were not explained by GH deficiency alone, further investigation showed two unrelated conditions resulting in deranged metabolic adaptation to fasting leading to severe hypoglycemia.

  12. NATURAL HISTORY OF HEPATOCELLULAR ADENOMA FORMATION IN GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE TYPE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David Q.; Fiske, Laurie M.; Carreras, Caroline T.; Weinstein, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To characterize the natural history and factors related to hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) development in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). Study design Retrospective chart review was performed for 117 patients with GSD I. Kaplan-Meier analysis of HCA progression among two groups of patients with GSD Ia (five-year mean triglyceride concentration ≤500 mg/dL and >500 mg/dL); analysis of serum triglyceride concentration, body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS), and height SDS between cases at time of HCA diagnosis and age- and sex-matched controls. Results Logrank analysis of Kaplan-Meier survival curve demonstrated a significant difference in progression to HCA between the five-year mean triglyceride groups (p = 0.008). No significant difference was detected in progression to adenoma event between sexes. Serum triglyceride concentration was significantly different at time of diagnosis of adenoma (737±422 mg/dL) compared with controls (335±195 mg/dL) (p = 0.009). Differences in height SDS (p = 0.051) and BMI SDS (p = 0.066) approached significance in our case-control analysis. Conclusion Metabolic control may be related to HCA formation in patients with GSD Ia. Optimizing metabolic control remains critical, and further studies are warranted to understand the pathogenesis of adenoma development. PMID:21481415

  13. Two new mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene cause glycogen storage disease in Hungarian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvari, R; Lei, K J; Szonyi, L; Narkis, G; Moses, S; Chou, J Y

    1997-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (von Gierke disease, GSD-1A) is caused by the deficiency of microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity which catalyzes the final common step of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The cloning of the G6Pase cDNA and characterization of the human G6Pase gene enabled the identification of the mutations causing GSD-1a. This, in turn, allows the development of non-invasive DNA-based diagnosis that provides reliable carrier testing and prenatal diagnosis. Here we report on two new mutations E110Q and D38V causing GSD-1a in two Hungarian patients. The analyses of these mutations by site-directed mutagenesis followed by transient expression assays demonstrated that E110Q retains 17% of G6Pase enzymatic activity while the D38V abolishes the enzymatic activity. The patient with the E110Q has G222R as his other mutation. G222R was also shown to preserve about 4% of the G6Pase enzymatic activity. Nevertheless, the patient presented with the classical severe symptomatology of the GSD-1a.

  14. The gene for glycogen-storage disease type 1b maps to chromosome 11q23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annabi, B; Hiraiwa, H; Mansfield, B C; Lei, K J; Ubagai, T; Polymeropoulos, M H; Moses, S W; Parvari, R; Hershkovitz, E; Mandel, H; Fryman, M; Chou, J Y

    1998-02-01

    Glycogen-storage disease type 1 (GSD-1), also known as "von Gierke disease," is caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity. There are four distinct subgroups of this autosomal recessive disorder: 1a, 1b, 1c, and 1d. All share the same clinical manifestations, which are caused by abnormalities in the metabolism of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). However, only GSD-1b patients suffer infectious complications, which are due to both the heritable neutropenia and the functional deficiencies of neutrophils and monocytes. Whereas G6Pase deficiency in GSD-1a patients arises from mutations in the G6Pase gene, this gene is normal in GSD-1b patients, indicating a separate locus for the disorder in the 1b subgroup. We now report the linkage of the GSD-1b locus to genetic markers spanning a 3-cM region on chromosome 11q23. Eventual molecular characterization of this disease will provide new insights into the genetic bases of G6P metabolism and neutrophil-monocyte dysfunction.

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma and focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver in a glycogen storage disease patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuriya, Yoshihiro; Oshita, Akihiko; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Amano, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Arihiro, Kouji; Ohdan, Hideki

    2012-06-27

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia; also called von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder of carbohydrate metabolism caused by glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency. There have been many reports describing hepatic tumors in GSD patients; however, most of these reports were of hepatocellular adenomas, whereas there are only few reports describing focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We report a case with GSD-Ia who had undergone a partial resection of the liver for FNH at 18 years of age and in whom moderately differentiated HCC had developed. Preoperative imaging studies, including ultrasonography, dynamic computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, revealed benign and malignant features. In particular, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT revealed the atypical findings that FDG accumulated at high levels in the non-tumorous hepatic parenchyma and low levels in the tumor. Right hemihepatectomy was performed. During the perioperative period, high-dose glucose and sodium bicarbonate were administered to control metabolic acidosis. He had multiple recurrences of HCC at 10 mo after surgery and was followed-up with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. The tumor was already highly advanced when it was found by chance; therefore, a careful follow-up should be mandatory for GSD-I patients as they are at a high risk for HCC, similar to hepatitis patients.

  16. Perioperative management of benign hepatic tumors in patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshita, Akihiko; Itamoto, Toshiyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Ohdan, Hideki; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Asahara, Toshimasa

    2008-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia; von Gierke disease) is an inherited disorder caused by glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency, and there have been some reports of hepatic tumors in patients with this disease. We report two patients with benign hepatic tumors with GSD-Ia. One is a 19-year-old man who underwent segmentectomy 4 for a focal nodular hyperplasia, and the other is a 31-year-old woman who underwent segmentectomies 3, 5, and 6 for hepatic adenomas. Two significant perioperative complications, resulting from the carbohydrate metabolic disorders, hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis, occurred in both patients. We managed the metabolic complications successfully by administering a sufficient volume of glucose intravenously. Close perioperative monitoring of blood glucose and lactate concentrations is essential in the perioperative management of patients with GSD-Ia. The intravenous administration of glucose, starting with a smaller dose and then increasing the dose, is adequate management for lactic acidosis with or without hypoglycemia during the perioperative period.

  17. Heteroduplex analysis: a useful screening method for glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, T; Tsuruta, Y; Chiba, K

    1998-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa), also known as von Gierke disease, is the most common and severe disease of glycogenoses and is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and transmitted by an autosomal recessive trait. The encoding gene of G6Pase is composed of only five exons and each exon is short. With heteroduplex analysis (HDA) method, we analyzed the genomic DNA from a patient diagnosed with GSDIa and from her parents. Exons II and IV of the patient showed heteroduplex bands. The mother had a heteroduplex band of exon II, and the father had a heteroduplex band of exon IV. In a mini-slab electrophoresis, exons II and IV of the patient did not show clear heteroduplex bands, but they appeared broader than the others, which made us suspect that they were heteroduplex bands. HDA is an easy and simple method and can verify mutant homozygous DNA fragments by adding wild-type DNA. We think that HDA may be a very useful screening method for the detection of novel genomic mutation in GSDIa in large-scale and mini-slab electrophoresis.

  18. Antibodies to CBir1 are Associated with Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael K.; Valentine, John F.; Weinstein, David A.; Polyak, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ib is a congenital disorder of glycogen metabolism that is associated with neutropenia, neutrophil and monocyte dysfunction, and an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that mimics a Crohn's disease phenotype. The enteric microflora is implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD; however, its role in the development of GSD-associated IBD is unknown. Antibody reactivity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), Escherichia coli outer membrane porin C (anti-OmpC) and bacterial flagellin (anti-CBir1) have been associated with Crohn's disease in the general population, but they have an undetermined association in children and adults with GSD-Ib. Our goal was to examine the association of ASCA, anti-OmpC and anti-CBir1 with the clinical features of GSD-Ib enterocolitis. Methods A retrospective review identified 19 GSD-Ib patients with or without a known diagnosis of enterocolitis. Radiographic, endoscopic and serologic data were collected and assays for ASCA, anti-OmpC, and anti-CBir1 obtained. Results Seven patients had combined radiographic, endoscopic, and histological evidence of intestinal inflammation; the majority had ileocolonic involvement. Seventeen of 19 (89%) patients had elevated anti-CBir1 levels (6/7 in the IBD group and 11/12 in the no clinical evidence of IBD group). Thirteen of 19 (68%) had elevated anti-OmpC levels (5/7 in the IBD group and 8/12 in the no clinical evidence of IBD group). Eleven of 19 (58%) patients had elevated ASCA IgA levels (4/7 in the IBD group and 7/12 in the no clinical evidence of IBD group). Conclusion Nearly all of the GSD type Ib patients had elevated anti-CBir1 levels. The antibody did not differentiate those with and without a diagnosis of GSD-Ib-associated IBD. Seroreactivity to flagellin may represent immune dysfunction rather than active enterocolitis in this patient population. Long-term follow-up of the group without known IBD is required to determine if these antibodies can

  19. A novel neuromuscular form of glycogen storage disease type IV with arthrogryposis, spinal stiffness and rare polyglucosan bodies in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfatti, Edoardo; Barnerias, Christine; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola; Gitiaux, Cyril; Benezit, Audrey; Oldfors, Anders; Carlier, Robert-Yves; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Romero, Norma B

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is an autosomal recessive disorder causing polyglucosan storage in various tissues. Neuromuscular forms present with fetal akinesia deformation sequence, lethal myopathy, or mild hypotonia and weakness. A 3-year-old boy presented with arthrogryposis, motor developmental delay, weakness, and rigid spine. Whole body MRI revealed fibroadipose muscle replacement but sparing of the sartorius, gracilis, adductor longus and vastus intermedialis muscles. Polyglucosan bodies were identified in muscle, and GBE1 gene analysis revealed two pathogenic variants. We describe a novel neuromuscular GSD IV phenotype and confirm the importance of muscle morphological studies in early onset neuromuscular disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Diffuse reticuloendothelial system involvement in type IV glycogen storage disease with a novel GBE1 mutation: a case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoulas, Pilar L; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Roy, Angshumoy; Bali, Deeksha S; Finegold, Milton J; Craigen, William J

    2012-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of glycogen metabolism caused by mutations in the GBE1 gene that encodes the 1,4-alpha-glucan-branching enzyme 1. Its clinical presentation is variable, with the most common form presenting in early childhood with primary hepatic involvement. Histologic manifestations in glycogen storage disease type IV typically consist of intracytoplasmic non-membrane-bound inclusions containing abnormally branched glycogen (polyglucosan bodies) within hepatocytes and myocytes. We report a female infant with classic hepatic form of glycogen storage disease type IV who demonstrated diffuse reticuloendothelial system involvement with the spleen, bone marrow, and lymph nodes infiltrated by foamy histiocytes with intracytoplasmic polyglucosan deposits. Sequence analysis of the GBE1 gene revealed compound heterozygosity for a previously described frameshift mutation (c.1239delT) and a novel missense mutation (c.1279G>A) that is predicted to alter a conserved glycine residue. GBE enzyme analysis revealed no detectable activity. A review of the literature for glycogen storage disease type IV patients with characterized molecular defects and deficient enzyme activity reveals most GBE1 mutations to be missense mutations clustering in the catalytic enzyme domain. Individuals with the classic hepatic form of glycogen storage disease type IV tend to be compound heterozygotes for null and missense mutations. Although the extensive reticuloendothelial system involvement that was observed in our patient is not typical of glycogen storage disease type IV, it may be associated with severe enzymatic deficiency and a poor outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase—Modulatory Subunit Knockout Mouse Shows Normal Insulin Sensitivity but Reduced Liver Glycogen Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Lavoie, Suzie

    2016-04-21

    Glutathione (GSH) deficits have been observed in several mental or degenerative illness, and so has the metabolic syndrome. The impact of a decreased glucose metabolism on the GSH system is well-known, but the effect of decreased GSH levels on the energy metabolism is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sensitivity to insulin in the mouse knockout (KO) for the modulatory subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis. Compared to wildtype (WT) mice, GCLM-KO mice presented with reduced basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. During an insulin tolerance test, GCLM-KO mice showed a normal fall in glycemia, indicating normal insulin secretion. However, during the recovery phase, plasma glucose levels remained lower for longer in KO mice despite normal plasma glucagon levels. This is consistent with a normal counterregulatory hormonal response but impaired mobilization of glucose from endogenous stores. Following a resident-intruder stress, during which stress hormones mobilize glucose from hepatic glycogen stores, KO mice showed a lower hyperglycemic level despite higher plasma cortisol levels when compared to WT mice. The lower hepatic glycogen levels observed in GCLM-KO mice could explain the impaired glycogen mobilization following induced hypoglycemia. Altogether, our results indicate that reduced liver glycogen availability, as observed in GCLM-KO mice, could be at the origin of their lower basal and challenged glycemia. Further studies will be necessary to understand how a GSH deficit, typically observed in GCLM-KO mice, leads to a deficit in liver glycogen storage.

  2. Cardiac Involvement in Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV: Two Cases and the Two Ends of a Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Aksu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV is an autosomal recessive disorder due to the deficiency of α 1,4-glucan branching enzyme, resulting in an accumulation of amylopectin-like polysaccharide in various systems. We describe two cases, a 23-year-old girl with dilated cardiomyopathy who presented with progressive dyspnea and fatigue and a 28-year-old girl with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who was asymptomatic, secondary to the accumulation of amylopectin-like fibrillar glycogen, in heart. In both patients, the diagnosis was confirmed by enzyme assessment. Our patients showed that GSD IV is not only liver or skeletal muscle disease, but also it can be presented in different form of the spectrum of cardiomyopathy from dilated to hypertrophic and from asymptomatic to decompensated heart failure. Also, to our knowledge, this is the first hypertrophic cardiomyopathy case due to GSD IV in the literature.

  3. Fifteen years of follow-up of a liver transplant recipient with glycogen storage disease type Ia (Von Gierke disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya Aparicio, A C; Bernal Bellido, C; Tinoco González, J; Garcia Ruíz, S; Aguilar Romero, L; Marín Gómez, L M; Suárez Artacho, G; Alamo Martínez, J M; Serrano Díez-Canedo, J; Padillo Ruíz, F J; Gomez Bravo, M A

    2013-01-01

    Von Gierke's disease or glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is an infrequent metabolic disease caused by an atypical accumulation of glycogen. The principal cause of this pathology is deficiency of the glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme. Herein we have reported a case of a young man with a history of Von Gierke's disease (GSD-Ia) since childhood who developed hepatocellular adenomatosis brought to light by ultrasounds and TACs. The patient began to develop early chronic renal failure, necessitating simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation. Years later continuous reviews at the nephrology and hepatobiliopancreatic surgery services show he has a good quality of life and a normal hepatorenal profile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Historical highlights and unsolved problems in glycogen storage disease type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Shimon W

    2002-10-01

    Thirty-three years after Von Gierke described the first patient with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1) in 1929, the Coris detected glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. The first mutation of this enzyme was identified 41 years later and subsequently the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21, its enzyme topology defined, a nine transmembrane helical model suggested, an enzyme deficient knockout mouse created and by infusing an adenoviral vector associated murine G6Pase gene, correction of the clinical and laboratory abnormalities was observed. A similar successful gene transfer has been performed in enzyme deficient canine puppies. To explain the function of the G6Pase complex, a multicomponent translocase catalytic model has been proposed in which different transporters shuttle glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and glucose across the microsomal membrane. It was suggested that GSD1b patients suffered from a G6P transporter (G6PT) defect and the first mutation in the G6PT gene subsequently recognised. The gene mapped to chromosome 11q23 and its structural organisation was defined which showed a close functional linkage between G6PT and hydrolysis. Nordlie identified the first patient with Pi transport deficiency (GSD1c). However putative GSD1c and 1d patients based on kinetic studies were found to harbour mutations in the G6PT gene so that GSD1 patients are presently divided into 1a and non-1a. G6PT deficient patients suffer from numerical and functional leucocyte defects. A mRNA leucocyte G6PT deficiency has been suggested to account for the glucose phosphorylation and subsequent calcium sequestration defects observed in theses cells. Inflammatory bowel disease which occurs frequently in GSD non-1a patients has been related to their leucocyte abnormalities. Dietary management of GSD1 patients, designed to maintain a normal blood glucose level can be achieved during the night by nocturnal gastric infusions of glucose-containing solution or

  5. Glycogen metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva-Andany, María M; González-Lucán, Manuel; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Ameneiros-Rodríguez, Eva

    2016-06-01

    In the human body, glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose stored mainly in the liver and the skeletal muscle that supplies glucose to the blood stream during fasting periods and to the muscle cells during muscle contraction. Glycogen has been identified in other tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, adipose tissue, and erythrocytes, but glycogen function in these tissues is mostly unknown. Glycogen synthesis requires a series of reactions that include glucose entrance into the cell through transporters, phosphorylation of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate, isomerization to glucose 1-phosphate, and formation of uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose, which is the direct glucose donor for glycogen synthesis. Glycogenin catalyzes the formation of a short glucose polymer that is extended by the action of glycogen synthase. Glycogen branching enzyme introduces branch points in the glycogen particle at even intervals. Laforin and malin are proteins involved in glycogen assembly but their specific function remains elusive in humans. Glycogen is accumulated in the liver primarily during the postprandial period and in the skeletal muscle predominantly after exercise. In the cytosol, glycogen breakdown or glycogenolysis is carried out by two enzymes, glycogen phosphorylase which releases glucose 1-phosphate from the linear chains of glycogen, and glycogen debranching enzyme which untangles the branch points. In the lysosomes, glycogen degradation is catalyzed by α-glucosidase. The glucose 6-phosphatase system catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose 6-phosphate to glucose, a necessary step for free glucose to leave the cell. Mutations in the genes encoding the enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism cause glycogen storage diseases.

  6. Is Type 2 Diabetes a Glycogen Storage Disease of Pancreatic β Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Frances M; Rohm, Maria; Clark, Anne; Brereton, Melissa F

    2017-07-05

    Elevated plasma glucose leads to pancreatic β cell dysfunction and death in type 2 diabetes. Glycogen accumulation, due to impaired metabolism, contributes to this "glucotoxicity" via dysregulated biochemical pathways promoting β cell dysfunction. Here, we review emerging data, and re-examine published findings, on the role of glycogen in β cells in normoglycemia and in diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Mitochondrial dysfunction in children with hepatic forms of glycogen storage disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatova, O V; Izmaĭlova, T D; Surkov, A N; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Poliakova, S I; Miroshkina, L V; Semenova, G F; Samokhina, I V; Kapustina, E Iu; Dukhova, Z N; Potapov, A S; Petrichuk, S V

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess mitochondrial dysfunction severity in patients with hepatic forms of glycogen storage disease (GSD). We examined 53 children with GSD in the dynamics. Distribution of children by disease types was: 1st group--children with GSD type I, 2nd group--children with GSD type III, 3rd group--children with GSD type VI and IX; comparison group consisted of 34 healthy children. Intracellular dehydrogenases activity: succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), glycerol-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GPDH). nicotinamideadenin-H-dehydrogenase (NADH-D) and lactatdehydrogenase (LDH) was measured using the quantitative cytochemical method in the peripheral lymphocytes. It was revealed decrease of SDH- (p < 0.001) and GPDH-activities (p < 0.001), along with increase of the NADH-D activity (p < 0.05) in all patients with GSD, (SDH/ NADH-D) index was decreased (p < 0.001). LDH activity was increased in groups 1 (p < 0.05) and 3 (p < 0.01), compared with comparison group. The most pronounced intracellular enzymes activity deviations were observed in children with GSD type I, that correspond to more severe clinical form of GSD. It was found strong correlation between intracellular enzymes activity and both hepatomegaly level (R = 0.867) and metabolic acidosis severity (R = 0.987). Our investigation revealed features of mitochondrial dysfunction in children with GSD, depending on the GSD type. Activities of lymphocytes enzymes correlates with the main disease severity parameters and can be used as an additional diagnostic criteria in children with hepatic form of GSD.

  8. Glycogen storage disease type Ib neutrophils exhibit impaired cell adhesion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Goo-Young; Lee, Young Mok; Kwon, Joon Hyun; Jun, Hyun Sik; Chou, Janice

    2017-01-22

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis, neutropenia, and neutrophil dysfunction, is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT). Neutrophils play an essential role in the defense against invading pathogens. The recruitment of neutrophils towards the inflammation sites in response to inflammatory stimuli is a tightly regulated process involving rolling, adhesion, and transmigration. In this study, we investigated the role of G6PT in neutrophil adhesion and migration using in vivo and in vitro models. We showed that the GSD-Ib (G6pt -/- ) mice manifested severe neutropenia in both blood and bone marrow, and treating G6pt -/- mice with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) corrected neutropenia. However, upon thioglycolate challenge, neutrophils from both untreated and G-CSF-treated G6pt -/- mice exhibited decreased ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity. In vitro migration and cell adhesion of G6PT-deficient neutrophils were also significantly impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to enhanced apoptosis or altered fMLP receptor expression. Remarkably, the expression of the β2 integrins CD11a and CD11b, which are critical for cell adhesion, was greatly decreased in G6PT-deficient neutrophils. This study suggests that deficiencies in G6PT cause impairment in neutrophil adhesion and migration via aberrant expression of β2 integrins, and our finding should facilitate the development of novel therapies for GSD-Ib. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glycogen Storage Disease type 1a – a secondary cause for hyperlipidemia: report of five cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) is a rare metabolic disorder, caused by deficient activity of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. It produces fasting induced hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly, usually manifested in the first semester of life. Besides, it is also associated with growth delay, anemia, platelet dysfunction, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis. Hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia are almost always present and hepatocellular adenomas and renal dysfunction frequent late complications. Methods The authors present a report of five adult patients with GSD Ia followed in internal medicine appointments and subspecialties. Results Four out of five patients were diagnosed in the first 6 months of life, while the other one was diagnosed in adult life after the discovery of hepatocellular adenomas. In two cases genetic tests were performed, being identified the missense mutation R83C in one, and the mutation IVS4-3C > G in the intron 4 of glucose-6-phosphatase gene, not previously described, in the other. Growth retardation was present in 3 patients, and all of them had anemia, increased bleeding tendency and hepatocellular adenomas; osteopenia/osteoporosis was present in three cases. All but one patient had marked hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia, with evidence of endothelial dysfunction in one case and of brain damage with refractory epilepsy in another case. Proteinuria was present in two cases and end-stage renal disease in another case. There was a great variability in the dietary measures; in one case, liver transplantation was performed, with correction of the metabolic derangements. Conclusions Hyperlipidemia is almost always present and only partially responds to dietary and drug therapy; liver transplantation is the only definitive solution. Although its association with premature atherosclerosis is rare, there have been reports of endothelial dysfunction, raising the possibility for increased cardiovascular risk in this group of

  10. Progressive development of renal cysts in glycogen storage disease type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorgjieva, Monika; Raffin, Margaux; Duchampt, Adeline; Perry, Ariane; Stefanutti, Anne; Brevet, Marie; Tortereau, Antonin; Dubourg, Laurence; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Mabille, Mylène; Pelissou, Coralie; Lassalle, Louis; Labrune, Philippe; Mithieux, Gilles; Rajas, Fabienne

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is a rare metabolic disease due to glucose-6 phosphatase deficiency, characterized by fasting hypoglycemia. Patients also develop chronic kidney disease whose mechanisms are poorly understood. To decipher the process, we generated mice with a kidney-specific knockout of glucose-6 phosphatase (K.G6pc -/- mice) that exhibited the first signs of GSDI nephropathy after 6 months of G6pc deletion. We studied the natural course of renal deterioration in K.G6pc -/- mice for 18 months and observed the progressive deterioration of renal functions characterized by early tubular dysfunction and a later destruction of the glomerular filtration barrier. After 15 months, K.G6pc -/- mice developed tubular-glomerular fibrosis and podocyte injury, leading to the development of cysts and renal failure. On the basis of these findings, we were able to detect the development of cysts in 7 out of 32 GSDI patients, who developed advanced renal impairment. Of these 7 patients, 3 developed renal failure. In addition, no renal cysts were detected in six patients who showed early renal impairment. In conclusion, renal pathology in GSDI is characterized by progressive tubular dysfunction and the development of polycystic kidneys that probably leads to the development of irreversible renal failure in the late stages. Systematic observations of cyst development by kidney imaging should improve the evaluation of the disease's progression, independently of biochemical markers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Liver-directed gene therapy for murine glycogen storage disease type Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Joon Hyun; Lee, Young Mok; Cho, Jun-Ho; Kim, Goo-Young; Anduaga, Javier; Starost, Matthew F; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2017-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type-Ib (GSD-Ib), deficient in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT), is characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis, myeloid dysfunction, and long-term risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA). We examined the efficacy of G6PT gene therapy in G6pt-/- mice using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors, directed by either the G6PC or the G6PT promoter/enhancer. Both vectors corrected hepatic G6PT deficiency in murine GSD-Ib but the G6PC promoter/enhancer was more efficacious. Over a 78-week study, using dose titration of the rAAV vectors, we showed that G6pt-/- mice expressing 3-62% of normal hepatic G6PT activity exhibited a normalized liver phenotype. Two of the 12 mice expressing < 6% of normal hepatic G6PT activity developed HCA. All treated mice were leaner and more sensitive to insulin than wild-type mice. Mice expressing 3-22% of normal hepatic G6PT activity exhibited higher insulin sensitivity than mice expressing 44-62%. The levels of insulin sensitivity correlated with the magnitudes of hepatic carbohydrate response element binding protein signaling activation. In summary, we established the threshold of hepatic G6PT activity required to prevent tumor formation and showed that mice expressing 3-62% of normal hepatic G6PT activity maintained glucose homeostasis and were protected against age-related obesity and insulin resistance. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Pregnancy in glycogen storage disease type Ib: gestational care and report of first successful deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli, Aditi I; Lee, Philip J; Correia, Catherine E; Rodriguez, Christina; Bhattacharya, Kaustav; Steinkrauss, Linda; Stanley, Charles A; Weinstein, David A

    2010-12-01

    Patients with type Ia glycogen storage disease (GSD) have been surviving well into adulthood since continuous glucose therapy was introduced in the 1970s, and there have been many documented successful pregnancies in women with this condition. Historically, few individuals with type Ib GSD, however, survived into adulthood prior to the introduction of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the late 1980s. There are no previously published reports of pregnancies in GSD type Ib. In this case report we describe the course and management of five successful pregnancies in three patients with GSD type Ib. Patient 1 experienced an increase in glucose requirement in all three of her pregnancies, starting from the second trimester onwards. There were no major complications related to neutropenia except for oral ulcers. The infants did well, except for respiratory distress in two of them at birth. Patient 2 used cornstarch to maintain euglycemia, but precise dosing was not part of her regimen, and, hence, an increase in metabolic demands was difficult to demonstrate. She developed a renal calculus and urinary tract infection during her pregnancy and had chronic iron deficiency anemia but no neutropenia. The neonate did well after delivery. Patient 3 had poor follow-up during pregnancy. Increasing glucose requirements, worsening lipid profile, neutropenia associated with multiple infections, and anemia were noted. The newborn infant did well after delivery. In addition to the case reports, the challenges of the usage of G-CSF, the treatment of enterocolitis, and comparisons with the management of GSD Ia are discussed.

  13. Molecular genetic analysis and phenotypic characteristics of a consanguineous family with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yili; Wang, Liyin; Li, Jun; Wu, Beibei; Wu, Huiping; Luo, Yue; Jin, Zi-Bing; Shan, Xiaoou

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type‑Ia (GSD‑Ia) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by a mutation in the gene encoding glucose‑6‑phosphate‑α (G6PC). The present study reported the case of a 3‑month‑old female Chinese patient with GSD‑Ia born to consanguineous parents. The aim of the present study was to identify the precise mutation of the G6PC gene associated with this family and to describe the phenotypic characteristics of the patient. A comprehensive examination was performed on the patient, including physical examination, vein blood gas analysis, abdominal sonography and biochemical analyses. In addition, gene sequencing was performed on the coding region of the G6PC gene to identify the mutation. The patient was diagnosed with GSD‑Ia and a G6PC missense mutation of c.518T>C (p.L173P) located in a highly conserved area was identified. The mutation is in a non‑helical region of the protein, which previous studies have suggested should result in a lesser effect on G6PC enzymatic activity and milder phenotypic characteristics compared with mutations located in helical regions. However, the severity of the disease phenotype in the subject of the present study was inconsistent with that predicted from her genotype. The patient suffered from serious hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, increased triglycerides, hepatic dysfunction, clear hepatomegaly and nephromegaly. The incidence of the p.L173P mutation may be relatively high in the Chinese population. Knowledge of the various phenotypic presentations of the p.L173P mutation may beneficial for future investigations.

  14. Novel mutations in PHKA2 gene in glycogen storage disease type IX patients from Hong Kong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chi-Kong; Hui, Joannie; Fong, Fion N Y; To, Ka-Fai; Fok, Tai-Fai; Tang, Nelson L S; Tsui, Stephen K W

    2011-02-01

    The diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type IX is often complicated by the complexity of the phosphorylase kinase enzyme (PHK), and molecular analysis is the preferred way to provide definitive diagnosis. Here we reported two novel mutations found in two GSD type IX patients with different residual enzyme activities from Hong Kong, China using genetic analysis and, provided the molecular interpretation of the deficient PHK activity. These two newly described mutations would be useful for the study of future GSD patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Adult onset glycogen storage disease type II (adult onset Pompe disease): report and magnetic resonance images of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Gaizo, Andrew [Emory University School of Medicine, Radiology Resident, Atlanta, GA (United States); Banerjee, Sima [Emory University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Atlanta, GA (United States); Terk, Michael [Emory University School of Medicine, Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII), also referred to as Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency, is a rare inherited condition caused by a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme activity. The condition is often classified by age of presentation, with infantile and late onset variants (Laforet et al. J Neurology 55:1122-8, 2000). Late onset tends to present with progressive proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency (Winkel et al. J Neurology 252:875-84, 2005). We report two cases of biopsy confirmed adult onset GSDII, along with key Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. (orig.)

  16. Adult onset glycogen storage disease type II (adult onset Pompe disease): report and magnetic resonance images of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Gaizo, Andrew; Banerjee, Sima; Terk, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII), also referred to as Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency, is a rare inherited condition caused by a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme activity. The condition is often classified by age of presentation, with infantile and late onset variants (Laforet et al. J Neurology 55:1122-8, 2000). Late onset tends to present with progressive proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency (Winkel et al. J Neurology 252:875-84, 2005). We report two cases of biopsy confirmed adult onset GSDII, along with key Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. (orig.)

  17. Hepatorenal correction in murine glycogen storage disease type I with a double-stranded adeno-associated virus vector.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Luo, Xiaoyan

    2011-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (-\\/-) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg\\/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2\\/7, dsAAV2\\/8, and dsAAV2\\/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2\\/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2\\/7 and dsAAV2\\/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2\\/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (-\\/-) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2\\/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2\\/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (-\\/-) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism.

  18. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  19. Salinity Effects on Strategies of Glycogen Utilization in Livers of Euryhaline Milkfish (Chanos chanos) under Hypothermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Huang, Jian-Jun; Yeh, Chun-Yi; Tang, Cheng-Hao; Hwang, Lie-Yueh; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2018-01-01

    The fluctuation of temperature affects many physiological responses in ectothermic organisms, including feed intake, growth, reproduction, and behavior. Changes in environmental temperatures affect the acquisition of energy, whereas hepatic glycogen plays a central role in energy supply for the homeostasis of the entire body. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycogenolysis, is also an indicator of environmental stress. Here, we examined the effects of salinity on glycogen metabolism in milkfish livers under cold stress. A reduction of feed intake was observed in both freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW) milkfish under cold adaptation. At normal temperature (28°C), compared to the FW milkfish, the SW milkfish exhibited greater mRNA abundance of the liver isoform of GP (Ccpygl), higher GP activity, and less glycogen content in the livers. Upon hypothermal (18°C) stress, hepatic Ccpygl mRNA expression of FW milkfish surged at 3 h, declined at 6 and 12 h, increased again at 24 h, and increased significantly after 96 h. Increases in GP protein, GP activity, and the phosphorylation state and the breakdown of glycogen were also found in FW milkfish livers after 12 h of exposure at 18°C. Conversely, the Ccpygl transcript levels in SW milkfish were downregulated after 1 h of exposure at 18°C, whereas the protein abundance of GP, GP activity, and glycogen content were not significantly altered. Taken together, under 18°C cold stress, FW milkfish exhibited an acute response with the breakdown of hepatic glycogen for maintaining energy homeostasis of the entire body, whereas no change was observed in the hepatic glycogen content and GP activity of SW milkfish because of their greater tolerance to cold conditions. PMID:29483878

  20. Salinity Effects on Strategies of Glycogen Utilization in Livers of Euryhaline Milkfish (Chanos chanos under Hypothermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Chang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The fluctuation of temperature affects many physiological responses in ectothermic organisms, including feed intake, growth, reproduction, and behavior. Changes in environmental temperatures affect the acquisition of energy, whereas hepatic glycogen plays a central role in energy supply for the homeostasis of the entire body. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycogenolysis, is also an indicator of environmental stress. Here, we examined the effects of salinity on glycogen metabolism in milkfish livers under cold stress. A reduction of feed intake was observed in both freshwater (FW and seawater (SW milkfish under cold adaptation. At normal temperature (28°C, compared to the FW milkfish, the SW milkfish exhibited greater mRNA abundance of the liver isoform of GP (Ccpygl, higher GP activity, and less glycogen content in the livers. Upon hypothermal (18°C stress, hepatic Ccpygl mRNA expression of FW milkfish surged at 3 h, declined at 6 and 12 h, increased again at 24 h, and increased significantly after 96 h. Increases in GP protein, GP activity, and the phosphorylation state and the breakdown of glycogen were also found in FW milkfish livers after 12 h of exposure at 18°C. Conversely, the Ccpygl transcript levels in SW milkfish were downregulated after 1 h of exposure at 18°C, whereas the protein abundance of GP, GP activity, and glycogen content were not significantly altered. Taken together, under 18°C cold stress, FW milkfish exhibited an acute response with the breakdown of hepatic glycogen for maintaining energy homeostasis of the entire body, whereas no change was observed in the hepatic glycogen content and GP activity of SW milkfish because of their greater tolerance to cold conditions.

  1. Protein targeting to glycogen is a master regulator of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    E. Ruchti; P.J. Roach; A.A. DePaoli-Roach; P.J. Magistretti; I. Allaman

    2016-01-01

    The storage and use of glycogen, the main energy reserve in the brain, is a metabolic feature of astrocytes. Glycogen synthesis is regulated by Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG), a member of specific glycogen-binding subunits of protein phosphatase-1 (PPP1). It positively regulates glycogen synthesis through de-phosphorylation of both glycogen synthase (activation) and glycogen phosphorylase (inactivation). In cultured astrocytes, PTG mRNA levels were previously shown to be enhanced by the ...

  2. Profiling of lipid and glycogen accumulations under different growth conditions in the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Aoki, Motohide; Ju, Xiaohui; Ueda, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujiwara, Shoko; Umemura, Tomonari; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Minoda, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Galdieria sulphuraria grows efficiently and produces a large amount of biomass in acidic conditions at high temperatures. It has great potential to produce biofuels and other beneficial compounds without becoming contaminated with other organisms. In G. sulphuraria, biomass measurements and glycogen and lipid analyses demonstrated that the amounts and compositions of glycogen and lipids differed when cells were grown under autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions. Maximum biomass production was obtained in the mixotrophic culture. High amounts of glycogen were obtained in the mixotrophic cultures, while the amounts of neutral lipids were similar between mixotrophic and heterotrophic cultures. The amounts of neutral lipids were highest in red algae, including thermophiles. Glycogen structure and fatty acids compositions largely depended on the growth conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Tophaceous gout in a female premenopausal patient with an unexpected diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type Ia: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingqing; Zeng, Xuejun

    2016-11-01

    A young female with recurrent tophaceous gout and infertility presented to our clinic. On clinical evaluation, hypoglycaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, lactic acidosis, and hepatomegaly were noted. Targeted gene sequencing revealed a novel composite heterozygous c.190G>T/c.508C>T mutation in the G6PC gene of the patient, leading to a diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type Ia. Her father possessed a heterozygous c.190G>T mutation, and her mother possessed a heterozygous c.508C>T mutation. A search of the previous literature revealed 16 reported cases of glycogen storage disease type Ia with gout. Here, we describe a female patient with gout, review previous cases, and discuss the mechanisms of gout and hyperuricaemia in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

  4. Dietary Tools To Modulate Glycogen Storage in Gilthead Seabream Muscle: Glycerol Supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Tomé S.; Matos, Elisabete; Cordeiro, Odete D.

    2012-01-01

    seabream. Two diets were tested in duplicate (n = 42/tank). Results show 5% inclusion of crude glycerol in gilthead seabream diets induces increased muscle glycogen, ATP levels and firmness, with no deleterious effects in terms of growth, proximate composition, fatty acid profile, oxidative state...

  5. Gain of function AMP-activated protein kinase γ3 mutation (AMPKγ3R200Q) in pig muscle increases glycogen storage regardless of AMPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Tracy L; Park, Sungkwon; Roach, Peter J; Gerrard, David E

    2016-06-01

    Chronic activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases glycogen content in skeletal muscle. Previously, we demonstrated that a mutation in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1(R615C)) blunts AMPK phosphorylation in longissimus muscle of pigs with a gain of function mutation in the AMPKγ3 subunit (AMPKγ3(R200Q)); this may decrease the glycogen storage capacity of AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) muscle. Therefore, our aim in this study was to utilize our pig model to understand how AMPKγ3(R200Q) and AMPK activation contribute to glycogen storage and metabolism in muscle. We selected and bred pigs in order to generate offspring with naturally occurring AMPKγ3(R200Q), RyR1(R615C), and AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) mutations, and also retained wild-type littermates (control). We assessed glycogen content and parameters of glycogen metabolism in longissimus muscle. Regardless of RyR1(R615C), AMPKγ3(R200Q) increased the glycogen content by approximately 70%. Activity of glycogen synthase (GS) without the allosteric activator glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) was decreased in AMPKγ3(R200Q) relative to all other genotypes, whereas both AMPKγ3(R200Q) and AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) muscle exhibited increased GS activity with G6P. Increased activity of GS with G6P was not associated with increased abundance of GS or hexokinase 2. However, AMPKγ3(R200Q) enhanced UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase 2 (UGP2) expression approximately threefold. Although UGP2 is not generally considered a rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen synthesis, our model suggests that UGP2 plays an important role in increasing flux to glycogen synthase. Moreover, we have shown that the capacity for glycogen storage is more closely related to the AMPKγ3(R200Q) mutation than activity. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  6. Drug induced exocytosis of glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Christopher T; Fuller, Maria; Hopwood, John J; Meikle, Peter J; Brooks, Doug A

    2016-10-28

    Pompe disease is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase, and this leads to glycogen accumulation in the autolysosomes of patient cells. Glycogen storage material is exocytosed at a basal rate in cultured Pompe cells, with one study showing up to 80% is released under specific culture conditions. Critically, exocytosis induction may reduce glycogen storage in Pompe patients, providing the basis for a therapeutic strategy whereby stored glycogen is redirected to an extracellular location and subsequently degraded by circulating amylases. The focus of the current study was to identify compounds capable of inducing rapid glycogen exocytosis in cultured Pompe cells. Here, calcimycin, lysophosphatidylcholine and α-l-iduronidase each significantly increased glycogen exocytosis compared to vehicle-treated controls. The most effective compound, calcimycin, induced exocytosis through a Ca 2+ -dependent mechanism, although was unable to release a pool of vesicular glycogen larger than the calcimycin-induced exocytic pore. There was reduced glycogen release from Pompe compared to unaffected cells, primarily due to increased granule size in Pompe cells. Drug induced exocytosis therefore shows promise as a therapeutic approach for Pompe patients but strategies are required to enhance the release of large molecular weight glycogen granules. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. A founder AGL mutation causing glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit identified through whole-exome sequencing: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau-Nepton, Isabelle; Okubo, Minoru; Grabs, Rosemarie; Mitchell, John; Polychronakos, Constantin; Rodd, Celia

    2015-02-03

    Glycogen storage disease type III is caused by mutations in both alleles of the AGL gene, which leads to reduced activity of glycogen-debranching enzyme. The clinical picture encompasses hypoglycemia, with glycogen accumulation leading to hepatomegaly and muscle involvement (skeletal and cardiac). We sought to identify the genetic cause of this disease within the Inuit community of Nunavik, in whom previous DNA sequencing had not identified such mutations. Five Inuit children with a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type IIIa were recruited to undergo genetic testing: 2 underwent whole-exome sequencing and all 5 underwent Sanger sequencing to confirm the identified mutation. Selected DNA regions near the AGL gene were also sequenced to identify a potential founder effect in the community. In addition, control samples from 4 adults of European descent and 7 family members of the affected children were analyzed for the specific mutation by Sanger sequencing. We identified a homozygous frame-shift deletion, c.4456delT, in exon 33 of the AGL gene in 2 children by whole-exome sequencing. Confirmation by Sanger sequencing showed the same mutation in all 5 patients, and 5 family members were found to be carriers. With the identification of this mutation in 5 probands, the estimated prevalence of genetically confirmed glycogen storage disease type IIIa in this region is among the highest worldwide (1:2500). Despite identical mutations, we saw variations in clinical features of the disease. Our detection of a homozygous frameshift mutation in 5 Inuit children determines the cause of glycogen storage disease type IIIa and confirms a founder effect. © 2015 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  8. X-linked glycogen storage disease IXa manifested in a female carrier due to skewed X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun Young; Lam, Ching-wan; Tong, Sui-Fan; Siu, Wai-Kwan

    2013-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) is a group of inherited metabolic disorders due to enzymatic deficiency involved in glycogen breakdown. In various subtypes of GSD, GSD IXa is an X-linked recessive disorder, which only manifested in males. Here, we report a case of X-linked GSD IXa manifested in a female Chinese patient accompanying a skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). A 29-y-old Chinese female was admitted to evaluate mild hepatomegaly, which was repeatedly observed in serial abdominal ultrasonographic examinations. GSDIXa was suspected. To identify the mutation and the disease mechanism, we performed sequencing analysis of the PHKA2 gene, XCI assay and cDNA expression analysis. Sequencing analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation in the PHKA2 gene (c.3614C>T; p.P1205L) of the patient. In XCI assay, the proband showed a skewed XCI pattern cDNA expression analysis showed a preferential expression of the mutant allele in leukocytes of the patient. This is a rare report of X-linked GSD IXa manifested in a female carrier with skewed XCI. Skewed XCI can play a key role in the manifestation of X-linked recessive disorders in female carriers. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neonatal Gene Therapy of Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia Using a Feline Immunodeficiency Virus–based Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshpun, Albert; Condiotti, Reba; N Waddington, Simon; Peer, Michael; Zeig, Eli; Peretz, Sima; Simerzin, Alina; Chou, Janice; Pann, Chi-Jiunn; Giladi, Hilla; Galun, Eithan

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), also known as von Gierke disease, is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase), a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. From birth, affected individuals cannot maintain normal blood glucose levels and suffer from a variety of metabolic disorders, leading to life-threatening complications. Gene therapy has been proposed as a possible option for treatment of this illness. Vectors have been constructed from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus, because the wild-type virus does not cause disease in humans. Previously, we have shown that these vectors are capable of integrating stably into hepatocyte cell lines and adult murine livers and lead to long-term transgene expression. In the current work, we have assessed the ability to attenuate disease symptoms in a murine model of GSD-Ia. Single administration of FIV vectors containing the human G6Pase gene to G6Pase-α−/− mice did not change the biochemical and pathological phenotype. However, a double neonatal administration protocol led to normalized blood glucose levels, significantly extended survival, improved body weight, and decreased accumulation of liver glycogen associated with the disease. This approach shows a promising paradigm for treating GSD-Ia patients early in life thereby avoiding long-term consequences. PMID:20571544

  10. Neonatal gene therapy of glycogen storage disease type Ia using a feline immunodeficiency virus-based vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshpun, Albert; Condiotti, Reba; Waddington, Simon N; Peer, Michael; Zeig, Eli; Peretz, Sima; Simerzin, Alina; Chou, Janice; Pann, Chi-Jiunn; Giladi, Hilla; Galun, Eithan

    2010-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), also known as von Gierke disease, is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha (G6Pase), a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. From birth, affected individuals cannot maintain normal blood glucose levels and suffer from a variety of metabolic disorders, leading to life-threatening complications. Gene therapy has been proposed as a possible option for treatment of this illness. Vectors have been constructed from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus, because the wild-type virus does not cause disease in humans. Previously, we have shown that these vectors are capable of integrating stably into hepatocyte cell lines and adult murine livers and lead to long-term transgene expression. In the current work, we have assessed the ability to attenuate disease symptoms in a murine model of GSD-Ia. Single administration of FIV vectors containing the human G6Pase gene to G6Pase-alpha(-/-) mice did not change the biochemical and pathological phenotype. However, a double neonatal administration protocol led to normalized blood glucose levels, significantly extended survival, improved body weight, and decreased accumulation of liver glycogen associated with the disease. This approach shows a promising paradigm for treating GSD-Ia patients early in life thereby avoiding long-term consequences.

  11. Mutation profile of the GAA gene in 40 Italian patients with late onset glycogen storage disease type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo, A L E; Bembi, B; Donnarumma, M; Filocamo, M; Parenti, G; Rossi, M; Merlini, L; Buratti, E; De Filippi, P; Dardis, A; Stroppiano, M; Ciana, G; Pittis, M G

    2006-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is a recessively inherited disorder due to the deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) that results in impaired glycogen degradation and its accumulation in the lysosomes. We report here the complete molecular analysis of the GAA gene performed on 40 Italian patients with late onset GSDII. Twelve novel alleles have been identified: missense mutations were functionally characterized by enzyme activity and protein processing in a human GAA-deficient cell line while splicing mutations were studied by RT-PCR and in silico analysis. A complex allele was also identified carrying three different alterations in cis. The c.-32-13T > G was the most frequent mutation, present as compound heterozygote in 85% of the patients (allele frequency 42.3%), as described in other late onset GSDII Caucasian populations. Interestingly, the c.-32-13T > G was associated with the c.2237G > A (p.W746X) in nine of the 40 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlations are discussed with particular emphasis on the subgroup carrying the c.-32-13T > G/c.2237G > A genotype.

  12. Glycogen storage disease type Ia : recent experience with mutation analysis, a summary of mutations reported in the literature and a newly developed diagnostic flowchart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rake, JP; ten Berge, AM; Visser, G; Verlind, E; Niezen-Koning, KE; Buys, CHCM; Smit, GPA; Scheffer, H

    We studied the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) gene of 30 unrelated glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) patients using single strand conformation, polymorphism (SSCP) prior to automated sequencing of exons revealing an aberrant SSCP pattern. In all patients we could identify mutations on both

  13. Structured Dietary Management Dramatically Improves Marked Transaminitis, Metabolic and Clinical Profiles in Glycogen Storage Disease Type IXa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit S. Karande DCH, FRACP

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type IXa (GSD IXa presents in childhood with hepatomegaly, poor growth, and ketotic hypoglycemia. Clinical course is usually mild, often not requiring treatment with attenuation of symptoms with increasing age. The phenotypic spectrum has recently expanded to include more severe involvement with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis warranting dietary therapy. We report a 2-year-old boy with a severe phenotype of GSD IXa presenting with a massive hepatomegaly, significant transaminitis, recurrent ketotic hypoglycemia, and short stature. Aggressive dietary management with regular feeds, frequent uncooked cornstarch doses, and protein supplementation resulted in clinical improvements including enhanced growth velocity, energy levels, overall well-being, and reduction in hepatomegaly with restitutions in biochemical parameters. We concur with a recent report which proposed that GSD IXa is not always a mild condition but instead part of an expanding phenotypic spectrum warranting intensive dietary management to optimize metabolic control and quality of life.

  14. The significance of clinical and laboratory features in the diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type v: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Jun; Shin, Ha Young; Cho, Yu Na; Kim, Seung Min; Choi, Young-Chul

    2014-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type V (GSD-V) is the most common disorder of muscle glycogenosis with characteristic clinical and laboratory findings. A 32-yr-old woman complained of exercise intolerance and myoglobulinuria since early adolescence. She reported several episodes of second-wind phenomenon. Physical examination did not show any neurological abnormality, including fixed muscle weakness or atrophy. Serum creatine kinase level was 1,161 IU/L at rest. The result of the non-ischemic forearm exercise test was compatible with GSD-V. Mutation analysis identified the compound heterozygous mutations of the PYGM, p.D510fs and p.F710del, which has not yet been reported in Korea. The present case recognizes that detail clinical and laboratory analysis is the first step in the diagnosis of GSD-V.

  15. [History case of multiple hepatic adenomas in adolescent with severe course of glycogen storage disease type lb].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkov, A N; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Potapov, A S; Savost'yanov, K V; Pushkov, A A; Nikitin, A G; Polyakova, S I; Ryazanov, M V; Kustova, O V; Barskii, V I; Stepanyan, M Yu

    2014-01-01

    We represented a case history of multiple hepatic adenomas in an adolescent with severe clinical course of glycogen storage disease type lb (compound heterozygous mutations c.1042_1043delCT and c.817G>A in the SLC37A4). The patient was prescribed a raw cornstarch and hepatoprotectors therapy, but he and his parents had low compliance to treatment. At the age of 13,5 years ultrasound investigation and computed tomography revealed multiple adenomas. Due to the severe condition of the patient it was impossible to perform focal hepatic biopsy. At present time the patient receives treatment focused on correction of metabolic disturbances, thereafter an applicability of exploratory puncture will be settled for the further patient surveillance. The modern data on causes and risk factors of hepatic adenomas in such patients, the possibility of their malignization, the algorithm of the follow-up and the methods of treatment are presented in the discussion.

  16. Involvement of endocrine system in a patient affected by glycogen storage disease 1b: speculation on the role of autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Daniela; Della Casa, Roberto; Balivo, Francesca; Minopoli, Giorgia; Rossi, Alessandro; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2014-03-19

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is an inherited metabolic defect of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis due to mutations of the SLC37A4 gene and to defective transport of glucose-6-phosphate. The clinical presentation of GSD1b is characterized by hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, fasting hypoglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Patients affected by GSD1b also show neutropenia and/or neutrophil dysfunction that cause increased susceptibility to recurrent bacterial infections. GSD1b patients are also at risk for inflammatory bowel disease. Occasional reports suggesting an increased risk of autoimmune disorders in GSD1b patients, have been published. These complications affect the clinical outcome of the patients. Here we describe the occurrence of autoimmune endocrine disorders including thyroiditis and growth hormone deficiency, in a patient affected by GSD1b. This case further supports the association between GSD1b and autoimmune diseases.

  17. Glycogen Synthesis in Glycogenin 1-Deficient Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Ruiz-Ruiz, Cristina; Vissing, John

    2017-01-01

    Context: Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type XV is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GYG1 gene that codes for the core molecule of muscle glycogen, glycogenin 1. Nonetheless, glycogen is present in muscles of glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting an alternative for glycogen buildup...

  18. Clinical efficacy of Myozyme on one ventilator dependent patient with late-onset glycogen storage disease typeⅡ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan YANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effect of Myozyme on one ventilator dependent patient with late-onset glycogen storage disease typeⅡ (GSDⅡ.  Methods Myozyme infusion was administered based on manufacturer's recommendations at 20 mg/kg every 2 to 4 weeks, beginning at actual body weight, and was continuously treated for 6 times. No premedication was performed except 5 mg dexamethasone was administered at the first use of Myozyme. Clinical assessment was completed every day and was lasted for 16 months including motor function, the time free of ventilation, and the change of respiration parameters.  Results Myozyme was well tolerated without adverse reactions. Pain on shoulder began to alleviate the next day after taking Myozyme. With the prolonged time and increased number of taking drugs, the time free of ventilation and doing in-situ stepping prolonged, and the speed of stepping in-situ also increased. Besides, the strength of lifting the upper limbs increased, and both the time and speed of walking free of ventilation prolonged. The maximus curative effect occured at the 7th month (3 months after drug withdrawal after treatment and returned to pre-treatment levels at the 8th month (4 months after drug withdrawal. The pain on shoulder was the first symptom that got improved, and the fastest symptom that returned to baseline.  Conclusions Myozyme has positive effect on ventilated patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.009

  19. A Txnrd1-dependent metabolic switch alters hepatic lipogenesis, glycogen storage, and detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Sonya V; Eriksson, Sofi; Xu, Jianqiang; Prigge, Justin R; Talago, Emily A; Meade, Tesia A; Meade, Erin S; Capecchi, Mario R; Arnér, Elias S J; Schmidt, Edward E

    2013-10-01

    Besides helping to maintain a reducing intracellular environment, the thioredoxin (Trx) system impacts bioenergetics and drug metabolism. We show that hepatocyte-specific disruption of Txnrd1, encoding Trx reductase-1 (TrxR1), causes a metabolic switch in which lipogenic genes are repressed and periportal hepatocytes become engorged with glycogen. These livers also overexpress machinery for biosynthesis of glutathione and conversion of glycogen into UDP-glucuronate; they stockpile glutathione-S-transferases and UDP-glucuronyl-transferases; and they overexpress xenobiotic exporters. This realigned metabolic profile suggested that the mutant hepatocytes might be preconditioned to more effectively detoxify certain xenobiotic challenges. Hepatocytes convert the pro-toxin acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) into cytotoxic N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). APAP defenses include glucuronidation of APAP or glutathionylation of NAPQI, allowing removal by xenobiotic exporters. We found that NAPQI directly inactivates TrxR1, yet Txnrd1-null livers were resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Txnrd1-null livers did not have more effective gene expression responses to APAP challenge; however, their constitutive metabolic state supported more robust GSH biosynthesis, glutathionylation, and glucuronidation systems. Following APAP challenge, this effectively sustained the GSH system and attenuated damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel method for detection of glycogen in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurat, Alexander V; Segvich, Dyann M; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Glycogen, a branched polymer of glucose, functions as an energy reserve in many living organisms. Abnormalities in glycogen metabolism, usually excessive accumulation, can be caused genetically, most often through mutation of the enzymes directly involved in synthesis and degradation of the polymer leading to a variety of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). Microscopic visualization of glycogen deposits in cells and tissues is important for the study of normal glycogen metabolism as well as diagnosis of GSDs. Here, we describe a method for the detection of glycogen using a renewable, recombinant protein which contains the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) from starch-binding domain containing protein 1 (Stbd1). We generated a fusion protein containing g lutathione S-transferase, a cM c eptitope and the tbd1 BM (GYSC) for use as a glycogen-binding probe, which can be detected with secondary antibodies against glutathione S-transferase or cMyc. By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we demonstrate that GYSC binds glycogen and two other polymers of glucose, amylopectin and amylose. Immunofluorescence staining of cultured cells indicate a GYSC-specific signal that is co-localized with signals obtained with anti-glycogen or anti-glycogen synthase antibodies. GYSC-positive staining inside of lysosomes is observed in individual muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase, a well-characterized model of GSD II (Pompe disease). Co-localized GYSC and glycogen signals are also found in muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in malin, a model for Lafora disease. These data indicate that GYSC is a novel probe that can be used to study glycogen metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. [Clinical and gene mutation analysis of three children with late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J H; Qiu, W J; Fang, D; Ye, J; Han, L S; Zhang, H W; Yu, Y G; Liang, L L; Gu, X F

    2017-06-02

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and laboratory features of three children with late-onset type Ⅱ glycogen storage disease(GSD) who presented with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and to analyze the effect of five mutations identified on the acid-α-glucosidase (GAA) activity and stability. Method: Three cases of children with muscle weakness were included in this study.GAA activity was analyzed in Dried Blood Spot of the patients.DNA was extracted from peripheral blood in all the patients and their parents and subjected to polymerase chain reaction and directly sequencing of GAA gene.Five mutant pcDNA3.1-myc-his-GAA expression plasmids(p.G478R, p.P361L, p.P266S, p.Q323X, p.R672Q) were constructed and transient instantaneously transfected into 293T cells to analyze the enzyme activity and stability of GAA. Result: All the three children had the onset of disease at 3 years or 1.5 years of age.They presented with developmental delay, muscle weakness and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.GAA activity of 3 patients was 2.65, 3.55 and 1.51 pmol(punch·h)(8.00-98.02)respectively. Genetic analysis found 5 mutations (p.G478R, p. P361L, p. P266S, p. Q323X, p. R672Q), and all of these 3 cases had clinical manifestations and were diagnosed as late-onset type Ⅱ glycogen storage disease.Five mutant pcDNA3.1-myc-his-GAA expression plasmids were transfected into 293T cells.Five mutant enzyme activities were found to be only 9.9%-22.5% of the wild-type enzyme activity and the protein expression of the five mutants was 32.0%-63.9% compared with the wild type. Conclusion: This study reports 3 children with late-onset GSD Ⅱ accompanied by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and compensatory stage of cardiac function in addition to limb muscle weakness.Five pathogenic mutations were identified, and these 5 mutations result in decreased GAA activity and GAA expression by in vitro functional analysis.

  2. Multiple calcium oxalate stone formation in a patient with glycogen storage disease type I (von Gierke's disease) and renal tubular acidosis type I: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    兼松, 明弘; 清川, 岳彦; 筧, 善行; 竹内, 秀雄

    1993-01-01

    A case of multiple urinary stones in a patient with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) is reported. In spite of the presence of hyperuricemia, these stones did not consist of uric acid, but mainly of calcium oxalate. Laboratory studies revealed distal renal tubular acidosis and hypocitraturia, but no significant abnormality in calcium metabolism. We discussed the mechanism of calcium stone formation in our case, and its prophylactic treatment by oral administration of citrate compound.

  3. Clinical and biochemical heterogeneity between patients with glycogen storage disease type IA: the added value of CUSUM for metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeks, Fabian; Steunenberg, Thomas A H; de Boer, Foekje; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Williams, Monique; Burghard, Rob; Rajas, Fabienne; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Weinstein, David A; Derks, Terry G J

    2017-09-01

    To study heterogeneity between patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia), a rare inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Descriptive retrospective study of longitudinal clinical and biochemical data and long-term complications in 20 GSD Ia patients. We included 11 patients with homozygous G6PC mutations and siblings from four families carrying identical G6PC genotypes. To display subtle variations for repeated triglyceride measurements with respect to time for individual patients, CUSUM-analysis graphs were constructed. Patients with different homozygous G6PC mutations showed important differences in height, BMI, and biochemical parameters (i.e., lactate, uric acid, triglyceride, and cholesterol concentrations). Furthermore, CUSUM-analysis predicts and displays subtle changes in longitudinal blood triglyceride concentrations. Siblings in families also displayed important differences in biochemical parameters (i.e., lactate, uric acid, triglycerides, and cholesterol concentrations) and long-term complications (i.e., liver adenomas, nephropathy, and osteopenia/osteoporosis). Differences between GSD Ia patients reflect large clinical and biochemical heterogeneity. Heterogeneity between GSD Ia patients with homozygous G6PC mutations indicate an important role of the G6PC genotype/mutations. Differences between affected siblings suggest an additional role (genetic and/or environmental) of modifying factors defining the GSD Ia phenotype. CUSUM-analysis can facilitate single-patient monitoring of metabolic control and future application of this method may improve precision medicine for patients both with GSD and remaining inherited metabolic diseases.

  4. PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type IX: prevalence of deletion mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung-Doo; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-04-21

    Molecular diagnosis of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) is important to enable accurate diagnoses and make appropriate therapeutic plans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD type IX. Thirteen Korean patients were tested for PHKA2 mutations using direct sequencing and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. A comprehensive review of the literature on previously reported PHKA2 mutations in other ethnic populations was conducted for comparison. Among 13 patients tested, six unrelated male patients with GSD IX aged 2 to 6 years at the first diagnostic work-up for hepatomegaly with elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were found to have PHKA2 mutations. These patients had different PHKA2 mutations: five were known mutations (c.537 + 5G > A, c.884G > A [p.Arg295His], c.3210_3212delGAG [p.Arg1072del], exon 8 deletion, and exons 27-33 deletion) and one was a novel mutation (exons 18-33 deletion). Notably, the most common type of mutation was gross deletion, in contrast to other ethnic populations in which the most common mutation type was sequence variant. This study expands our knowledge of the PHKA2 mutation spectrum of GSD IX. Considering the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD IX, molecular diagnostic methods for deletions should be conducted in conjunction with direct sequence analysis to enable accurate molecular diagnosis of this disease in the Korean population.

  5. Current status of hepatic glycogen storage disease in Japan: clinical manifestations, treatments and long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Jun; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Ohura, Toshihiro; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Yorifuji, Tohru; Kasahara, Mureo; Horikawa, Reiko; Endo, Fumio

    2013-05-01

    Many reports have been published on the long-term outcome and treatment of hepatic glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) overseas; however, none have been published from Japan. We investigated the clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis of 127 hepatic GSD patients who were evaluated and treated between January 1999 and December 2009. A characteristic genetic pattern was noted in the Japanese GSD patients: most GSD Ia patients had the g727t mutation, and many GSD Ib patients had the W118R mutation. Forty-one percent (14/34) of GSD Ia patients and 18% (2/11) of GSD Ib patients of ages 13 years 4 months had liver adenoma. Among subjects aged 10 years, 19% (7/36) of the GSD Ia patients and none of the GSD Ib patients had renal dysfunction. The mean height of male GSD Ia patients aged 18 years was 160.8±10.6 cm (n=14), and that of their female counterparts was 147.8±3.80 cm (n=9). Patients with hepatic GSDs develop a variety of symptoms but can survive in the long term by diet therapy, corn starch treatment and supportive care. Liver transplantation for hepatic GSDs is an important treatment strategy and can help improve the patients'quality of life.

  6. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: Prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke-Jian Lei; Hungwen Chen; Ji-Lan Liu [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient`s biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type la disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease. 22 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Gastric cancer following a liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease type Ia (von Gierke disease): A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua; Bian, Jianmin; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhaoming; Ding, Aixing

    2014-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia; also termed von Gierke disease) is an inherited metabolic disorder resulting from a glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency. Liver transplantation is considered to be the most effective treatment for GSD-Ia patients. In the present study, the case of a patient with GSD-Ia who received a liver transplantation at 17 years of age is presented. During the 12 years following transplantation, the patient's quality of life markedly improved. However, recently, the patient was diagnosed with de novo gastric cancer following a biopsy. Thus, a total gastrectomy with lymph node dissection was performed and the tumor was histologically determined to be a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma (histopathological stage, pT4N1M0). The patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 10 without any complications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of de novo gastric cancer in a patient with GSD-Ia to be reported.

  8. Isolation of the gene for murine glucose-6-phosphatase, the enzyme deficient in glycogen storage disease type 1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, L L; Lei, K J; Pan, C J; Sakata, S F; Ruppert, S; Schutz, G; Chou, J Y

    1993-10-15

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase, the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis catalyzing the terminal step in gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. Despite its clinical importance, this membrane-bound enzyme has eluded molecular characterization. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a murine glucose-6-phosphatase cDNA by screening a mouse liver cDNA library differentially with mRNA populations representing the normal and the albino deletion mouse known to express markedly reduced glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Additionally, we identified the gene that consists of 5 exons. Biochemical analyses indicate that the in vitro expressed enzyme is indistinguishable from mouse liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase exhibiting essentially identical kinetic constants, latency, thermal lability, and vanadate sensitivity. The characterization of the murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene opens the way for studying the molecular basis of GSD type 1a in humans and its etiology in an animal model.

  9. Very low-density lipoprotein apolipoprotein B-100 turnover in glycogen storage disease type Ia (von Gierke disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, A S; Watt, G F; Lynas, J; Winder, A F; Wray, R

    2001-10-01

    Mixed hyperlipidaemia is a common finding in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia). Although cross-sectional studies have demonstrated increases in intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDLs) and reductions in lipoprotein lipase activity, no studies have investigated the dynamics of apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B) metabolism in GSD Ia. This study investigated apoB turnover in GSD Ia using an exogenous labelling method in one sib from a kinship with established GSD Ia. The study demonstrated normal hepatic secretion of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), but hypocatabolism of VLDL, probably due to lack of lipoprotein lipase activity. The production rate of IDL was slightly increased, but the turnover rate of low-density lipoprotein was normal. The findings suggest that, as well as a corn starch diet and dietary fat restriction, treatment of severe mixed hyperlipidaemia in GSD Ia and its attendant risk of pancreatitis should possibly involve fibrates that activate lipoprotein lipase and may enhance the clearance of IDL, rather than omega-3 fatty acids, which principally suppress hepatic secretion of VLDL.

  10. Incorporation of phosphate into glycogen by glycogen synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Christopher J; Segvich, Dyann M; Mahalingan, Krishna; Chikwana, Vimbai M; Kirley, Terence L; Hurley, Thomas D; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    The storage polymer glycogen normally contains small amounts of covalently attached phosphate as phosphomonoesters at C2, C3 and C6 atoms of glucose residues. In the absence of the laforin phosphatase, as in the rare childhood epilepsy Lafora disease, the phosphorylation level is elevated and is associated with abnormal glycogen structure that contributes to the pathology. Laforin therefore likely functions in vivo as a glycogen phosphatase. The mechanism of glycogen phosphorylation is less well-understood. We have reported that glycogen synthase incorporates phosphate into glycogen via a rare side reaction in which glucose-phosphate rather than glucose is transferred to a growing polyglucose chain (Tagliabracci et al. (2011) Cell Metab13, 274-282). We proposed a mechanism to account for phosphorylation at C2 and possibly at C3. Our results have since been challenged (Nitschke et al. (2013) Cell Metab17, 756-767). Here we extend the evidence supporting our conclusion, validating the assay used for the detection of glycogen phosphorylation, measurement of the transfer of (32)P from [β-(32)P]UDP-glucose to glycogen by glycogen synthase. The (32)P associated with the glycogen fraction was stable to ethanol precipitation, SDS-PAGE and gel filtration on Sephadex G50. The (32)P-signal was not affected by inclusion of excess unlabeled UDP before analysis or by treatment with a UDPase, arguing against the signal being due to contaminating [β-(32)P]UDP generated in the reaction. Furthermore, [(32)P]UDP did not bind non-covalently to glycogen. The (32)P associated with glycogen was released by laforin treatment, suggesting that it was present as a phosphomonoester. The conclusion is that glycogen synthase can mediate the introduction of phosphate into glycogen, thereby providing a possible mechanism for C2, and perhaps C3, phosphorylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α deficiency leads to metabolic reprogramming in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun-Ho; Kim, Goo-Young; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2018-04-15

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC), a key enzyme in endogenous glucose production. This autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and long-term complications of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma (HCA/HCC). We have shown that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency-mediated steatosis leads to defective autophagy that is frequently associated with carcinogenesis. We now show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency also leads to enhancement of hepatic glycolysis and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) that can contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis. The enhanced hepatic glycolysis is reflected by increased lactate accumulation, increased expression of many glycolytic enzymes, and elevated expression of c-Myc that stimulates glycolysis. The increased HMS is reflected by increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and elevated production of NADPH and the reduced glutathione. We have previously shown that restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression in G6Pase-α-deficient liver corrects metabolic abnormalities, normalizes autophagy, and prevents HCA/HCC development in GSD-Ia. We now show that restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression normalizes both glycolysis and HMS in GSD-Ia. Moreover, the HCA/HCC lesions in L-G6pc-/- mice exhibit elevated levels of hexokinase 2 (HK2) and the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) which play an important role in aerobic glycolysis and cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency causes metabolic reprogramming, leading to enhanced glycolysis and elevated HMS that along with impaired autophagy can contribute to HCA/HCC development in GSD-Ia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Correction of a Canine Model of Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David A.; Correia, Catherine E.; Conlon, Thomas; Specht, Andrew; Verstegen, John; Onclin-Verstegen, Karine; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Dhaliwal, Gurmeet; Mirian, Layla; Cossette, Holly; Falk, Darin J.; Germain, Sean; Clement, Nathalie; Porvasnik, Stacy; Fiske, Laurie; Struck, Maggie; Ramirez, Harvey E.; Jordan, Juan; Andrutis, Karl; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa; von Gierke disease; MIM 232200) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Patients with GSDIa are unable to maintain glucose homeostasis and suffer from severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidosis. The canine model of GSDIa is naturally occurring and recapitulates almost all aspects of the human form of disease. We investigated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-based therapy to treat the canine model of GSDIa. After delivery of a therapeutic rAAV2/8 vector to a 1-day-old GSDIa dog, improvement was noted as early as 2 weeks posttreatment. Correction was transient, however, and by 2 months posttreatment the rAAV2/8-treated dog could no longer sustain normal blood glucose levels after 1 hr of fasting. The same animal was then dosed with a therapeutic rAAV2/1 vector delivered via the portal vein. Two months after rAAV2/1 dosing, both blood glucose and lactate levels were normal at 4 hr postfasting. With more prolonged fasting, the dog still maintained near-normal glucose concentrations, but lactate levels were elevated by 9 hr, indicating that partial correction was achieved. Dietary glucose supplementation was discontinued starting 1 month after rAAV2/1 delivery and the dog continues to thrive with minimal laboratory abnormalities at 23 months of age (18 months after rAAV2/1 treatment). These results demonstrate that delivery of rAAV vectors can mediate significant correction of the GSDIa phenotype and that gene transfer may be a promising alternative therapy for this disease and other genetic diseases of the liver. PMID:20163245

  13. The effect of tailoring of cornstarch intake on stature in children with glycogen storage disease type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Karaksy, Hanaa; El-Raziky, Mona S; Anwar, Ghada; Mogahed, Engy

    2015-01-01

    To determine the individual fasting tolerance for patients with glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) and to assess their linear growth velocity after tailoring of dose intervals of oral uncooked cornstarch. A prospective cohort study included 32 patients with GSD III aged 6 months-11.5 years (median: 3.3 years). The fasting tolerance of each patient was determined as the time interval between starch administration until the drop in blood glucose level was below 60 mg/dL. Some 27 patients (84.4%) developed hypoglycemia. The intervals between oral cornstarch administration were tailored for each child according to his/her individual fasting tolerance. After a 6-month follow up there was a significant reduction in seizure attacks (p<0.01) and liver size (p<0.01), but there was no statistically significant difference in liver transaminase and serum lactate levels. There was a significant improvement in height (p<0.01) and linear growth velocity (p<0.05) of these patients after at least a 12-month follow up. Adjusting the intervals between the cornstarch doses for each patient with GSD III, according to individual fasting tolerance test was very beneficial and resulted in improvement of the linear growth velocity and reduction in the frequency of hypoglycemic seizures as well as the size of the liver. Individual scheduling of cornstarch doses prevents complications in those who develop hypoglycemia at short intervals; it also allows some relaxation in schedule for those who can tolerate longer fasting hours to improve their appetite and prolong their uninterrupted sleep hours.

  14. Outcomes of liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease: a matched-control study and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Anurag; Rankin, Rebecca; Segev, Dorry L; Thuluvath, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    The clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD) who undergo liver transplantation (LT) have not been well defined. In this study, our objective was to determine the outcome of LT in patients with GSD and compare it with a comparable group of patients without GSD (matched controls). UNOS data from 1986 to 2007 were used for this study. For each GSD patient (n = 95; men 62%) who was transplanted, three patients (n = 285, men 60%) without GSD (case controls) matched for age ± five yr, year of transplantation and donor risk index (DRI) ± 0.2 were identified from the UNOS database in a random manner. Unadjusted patient survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and significance determined by log-rank test. The mean age of the group was 17.9 yr. GSD patients had lower BMI (22 vs. 24, p = 0.002), lower serum bilirubin (2.7 vs. 13.5 mg/dL, p < 0.0001), higher serum albumin (3.7 vs. 3.1 g/dL, p < 0.0001), and higher wait-list time (239 vs. 74 d, p < 0.0001) compared to case controls. Recipient age and DRI were similar between the groups. Tumors were more common in GSD group (13.7% vs. 5%). Patient survival was significantly better (p = 0.024) in GSD group at one, five, and 10 yr (82%, 76%, and 64%) than non-GSD (73%, 65%, and 59%) group. In this matched-control study, patients who underwent LT for GSD had a better long-term survival than a comparable group of patients without GSD. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Co-inheritance of the membrane frizzled-related protein ocular phenotype and glycogen storage disease type Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameesh, Maha; Ganesh, Anuradha; Harikrishna, Beena; Al Zuhaibi, Sana; Scott, Patrick; Al Kalbani, Sami; Al Thihli, Khalid

    2017-12-01

    To report co-occurrence of two rare recessive conditions, the membrane frizzled-related protein (MFRP)-related ocular phenotype and glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD-1b), in three siblings in an Omani family. Biallelic mutations in the MFRP gene (chromosome 11q23) result in a distinct ocular phenotype characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, foveoschisis, optic nerve head drusen, and posterior microphthalmos. GSD-1b is an autosomal-recessive disorder caused by mutations in SLC37A4 gene located in the same chromosomal region. An Omani family with three siblings diagnosed with GSD-1b presented with ocular manifestations of progressive visual impairment and diminution of night vision. All siblings underwent a standard ophthalmic and clinical genetic evaluation. Full sequencing of the MFRP and SLC37A4 genes and haplotype analysis was carried out. The three children (2F:1M) aged 13, 17, and 18 years were born to consanguineous parents. Their best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/60 to 20/15. Ophthalmic exam revealed bilateral optic disc drusen, foveoschisis, and pigmentary retinopathy, hyperopia of +12 to +15.5 diopters, and decreased axial length (15.8-16.39 mm) in all affected siblings. Full-field electroretinography showed rod-cone dysfunction. Sequence analysis revealed two novel variants in a homozygous state in the SLC37A4 and MFRP genes in all the affected patients. We report the MFRP-related ocular phenotype in three siblings with GSD-1b. Molecular genetic studies identified novel mutations in the MFRP and SLC37A4 genes. Co-inheritance of a haplotype harboring mutations in both loci on chromosome 11q23 resulted in co-occurrence of the MFRP-related ocular phenotype and GSD-1b. This has not been reported previously.

  16. Use of modified cornstarch therapy to extend fasting in glycogen storage disease types Ia and Ib1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Catherine E; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Lee, Philip J; Shuster, Jonathan J; Theriaque, Douglas W; Shankar, Meena N; Smit, G Peter A; Weinstein, David A

    2013-01-01

    Background Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD) is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase resulting in severe fasting hypoglycemia. Objective We compared the efficacy of a new modified starch with the currently used cornstarch therapy in patients with type Ia and Ib GSD. Design This was a randomized, 2-d, double-blinded, crossover pilot study comparing the commonly used uncooked cornstarch with the experimental starch in 12 subjects (6 GSDIa, 6 GSDIb) aged ≥13 y. At 2200, the subjects were given 100 g of digestible starch, and glucose and lactate were measured hourly until the subject's plasma glucose concentration reached 60 mg/dL or until the subject had fasted for 10 h. The order in which the products were tested was randomized in a blinded fashion. Results The matched-pair Gehan rank test for censored survival was used to compare the therapies. The experimental starch maintained blood glucose concentrations significantly longer than did the traditional therapy (P = 0.013) in the 2-sided analysis. Most of the benefit was found to be after glucose concentrations fell below 70 mg/dL. The currently used cornstarch resulted in higher peak glucose concentrations and a more rapid rate of fall than did the new starch. Conclusions The experimental starch was superior to standard therapy in preventing hypoglycemia (≤60 mg/dL). This therapy may allow patients with GSD to sleep through the night without awakening for therapy while enhancing safety. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether alternative dosing will further improve control in the therapeutic blood glucose range. PMID:18996862

  17. Adeno-associated virus-mediated correction of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David A; Correia, Catherine E; Conlon, Thomas; Specht, Andrew; Verstegen, John; Onclin-Verstegen, Karine; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Dhaliwal, Gurmeet; Mirian, Layla; Cossette, Holly; Falk, Darin J; Germain, Sean; Clement, Nathalie; Porvasnik, Stacy; Fiske, Laurie; Struck, Maggie; Ramirez, Harvey E; Jordan, Juan; Andrutis, Karl; Chou, Janice Y; Byrne, Barry J; Mah, Cathryn S

    2010-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa; von Gierke disease; MIM 232200) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha. Patients with GSDIa are unable to maintain glucose homeostasis and suffer from severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidosis. The canine model of GSDIa is naturally occurring and recapitulates almost all aspects of the human form of disease. We investigated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-based therapy to treat the canine model of GSDIa. After delivery of a therapeutic rAAV2/8 vector to a 1-day-old GSDIa dog, improvement was noted as early as 2 weeks posttreatment. Correction was transient, however, and by 2 months posttreatment the rAAV2/8-treated dog could no longer sustain normal blood glucose levels after 1 hr of fasting. The same animal was then dosed with a therapeutic rAAV2/1 vector delivered via the portal vein. Two months after rAAV2/1 dosing, both blood glucose and lactate levels were normal at 4 hr postfasting. With more prolonged fasting, the dog still maintained near-normal glucose concentrations, but lactate levels were elevated by 9 hr, indicating that partial correction was achieved. Dietary glucose supplementation was discontinued starting 1 month after rAAV2/1 delivery and the dog continues to thrive with minimal laboratory abnormalities at 23 months of age (18 months after rAAV2/1 treatment). These results demonstrate that delivery of rAAV vectors can mediate significant correction of the GSDIa phenotype and that gene transfer may be a promising alternative therapy for this disease and other genetic diseases of the liver.

  18. Prevention of Hepatocellular Adenoma and Correction of Metabolic Abnormalities in Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia by Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mok; Jun, Hyun Sik; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Lin, Su Ru; Wilson, Lane H.; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), is caused by deficiencies in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) that hydrolyzes glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) to glucose. G6Pase-α activity depends upon the G6P transporter (G6PT) that translocates G6P from the cytoplasm into the ER lumen. The functional coupling of G6Pase-α and G6PT maintains interprandial glucose homeostasis. We have previously shown that gene therapy mediated by AAV-GPE, an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing G6Pase-α directed by the human G6PC promoter/enhancer (GPE), completely normalizes hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency in GSD-Ia (G6pc−/−) mice for at least 24 weeks. However, a recent study showed that, within 78 weeks of gene deletion, all mice lacking G6Pase-α in the liver develop HCA. We now show that gene therapy mediated by AAV-GPE maintains efficacy for at least 70–90 weeks for mice expressing more than 3% of wild type hepatic G6Pase-α activity. The treated mice displayed normal hepatic fat storage, normal blood metabolite and glucose tolerance profiles, reduced fasting blood insulin levels, maintained normoglycemia over a 24-hour fast, and had no evidence of hepatic abnormalities. After a 24-hour fast, hepatic G6PT mRNA levels in G6pc−/− mice receiving gene therapy were markedly increased. Since G6PT transport is the rate-limiting step in microsomal G6P metabolism it may explain why the treated G6pc−/− mice could sustain prolonged fasts. The low fasting blood insulin levels and lack of hepatic steatosis may explain the absence of HCA. Conclusion These results confirm that AAV-GPE-mediated gene transfer corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency in murine GSD-Ia and prevents chronic HCA formation. PMID:22422504

  19. Increasing the carbohydrate storage capacity of plants by engineering a glycogen-like polymer pool in the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicke, Simona; Seung, David; Egli, Barbara; Devers, Emanuel A; Streb, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    Global demand for higher crop yields and for more efficient utilization of agricultural products will grow over the next decades. Here, we present a new concept for boosting the carbohydrate content of plants, by channeling photosynthetically fixed carbon into a newly engineered glucose polymer pool. We transiently expressed the starch/glycogen synthases from either Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Cyanidioschyzon merolae, together with the starch branching enzyme from C. merolae, in the cytosol of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. This effectively built a UDP-glucose-dependent glycogen biosynthesis pathway. Glycogen synthesis was observed with Transmission Electron Microscopy, and the polymer structure was further analyzed. Within three days of enzyme expression, glycogen content of the leaf was 5-10 times higher than the starch levels of the control. Further, the leaves produced less starch and sucrose, which are normally the carbohydrate end-products of photosynthesis. We conclude that after enzyme expression, the newly fixed carbohydrates were routed into the new glycogen sink and trapped. Our approach allows carbohydrates to be efficiently stored in a new subcellular compartment, thus increasing the value of vegetative crop tissues for biofuel production or animal feed. The method also opens new potential for increasing the sink strength of heterotrophic tissues. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pregnancy and associated events in women receiving enzyme replacement therapy for late-onset glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohman, Philippa J; Scott, Elaine; Richfield, Linda; Ramaswami, Uma; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD II or Pompe disease; OMIM; 232 300) is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficiency of α-glucosidase and accumulation of glycogen in muscle. Clinical symptoms include weakness of skeletal and respiratory muscles and, in infants, cardiomyopathy. Patients with GSD II receive infusions of recombinant α-glucosidase (enzyme replacement therapy; ERT), which slow the progression of the disease. ERT is given to male and female patients of all ages but as yet little is documented on the effects of continuing ERT during pregnancy. The aim of this case series was therefore to ascertain the pregnancy outcomes of women with GSD II on ERT and to describe adverse events associated with pregnancy, delivery and therapy. The medical records of eight women attending the Royal Free Hospital Lysosomal Storage Disorders Unit were reviewed. Four of the eight women had seven pregnancies over a period of 8 years. In this series GSD II was associated with interventional deliveries but normal neonates. Cessation of ERT in early pregnancy resulted in deterioration of maternal symptoms and emergence of allergic reactions on restarting ERT. Individualized care plans are required to ensure the best neonatal and maternal outcomes. Consideration should be given to the potential benefits to mother and fetus of continuing ERT during pregnancy. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. In Vivo Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Targeted Integration of a Glucose-6-phosphatase Transgene Promotes Survival in Mice With Glycogen Storage Disease Type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Dustin J; Brooks, Elizabeth Drake; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Mefferd, Adam; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Gersbach, Charles A; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) is caused by glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency in association with severe, life-threatening hypoglycemia that necessitates lifelong dietary therapy. Here we show that use of a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) targeted to the ROSA26 safe harbor locus and a ROSA26-targeting vector containing a G6PC donor transgene, both delivered with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, markedly improved survival of G6Pase knockout (G6Pase-KO) mice compared with mice receiving the donor vector alone (P Ia, as compared with normal littermates, at 8 months following vector administration (P Ia. PMID:26865405

  2. Exon Redefinition by a Point Mutation within Exon 5 of the Glucose-6-Phosphatase Gene is the Major Cause of Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1a in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kajihara, Susumu; Matsuhashi, Sachiko; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Kido, Keiko; Tsuji, Kazue; Tanae, Ayako; Fujiyama, Shigetoshi; Itoh, Tadashi; Tanigawa, Keiichiro; Uchida, Masako; Setoguchi, Yoichi; Motomura, Mitsuaki; Mizuta, Toshihiko; Sakai, Takahiro

    1995-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). We have identified a novel mutation in the G6Pase gene of a individual with GSD type 1a. The cDNA from the patient's liver revealed a 91-nt deletion in exon 5. The genomic DNA from the patient's white blood cells revealed no deletion or mutation at the splicing junction of intron 4 and exon 5. The 3' splicing occurred 91 bp from th...

  3. Nutritional Status and Body Composition in Patients With Hepatic Glycogen Storage Diseases Treated With Uncooked Cornstarch—A Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna B. dos Santos MSc

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic glycogen storage diseases (GSDs are genetic diseases associated with fasting hypoglycemia. Periodic intake of uncooked cornstarch is one of the treatment strategies available for those disorders. For reasons that are still not clear, patients with hepatic GSDs may be overweight. Aims: To assess nutritional status and body composition in patients with hepatic GSDs receiving uncooked cornstarch. Methods: The sample included 25 patients with hepatic GSD (type Ia = 14; Ib = 6; III = 3; IXα = 1; IXβ = 1, with a median age of 11.0 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 9.0-17.5, matched by age and gender with 25 healthy controls (median age = 12.0 years, IQR = 10.0-17.5. Clinical, biochemical, and treatment-related variables were obtained from medical records. Nutritional status and body composition were prospectively evaluated by bioelectrical impedance. Results: Patients and controls did not differ with regard to age and gender. Height was significantly reduced in patients (median = 1.43 m, IQR = 1.25-1.54 in comparison to controls (median = 1.54 m, IQR = 1.42-1.61; P = .04. Body mass index for age z -score and fat mass percentage were higher in patients (median = 1.84, IQR = 0.55-3.06; and 27.5%, IQR = 22.6-32.0, respectively than in controls (median = 0.86, IQR = −0.55 to 1.82; P = .04 and 21.1%, IQR = 13.0-28.3; P = .01, respectively. When patients were stratified by type, those with GSD Ia had significantly higher adiposity (median fat mass = 28.7%, IQR = 25.3-32.9 than those with GSD III and GSD IXα/β (median fat mass = 20.9%, IQR = 14.9-22.6; P = .02. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that patients with hepatic GSD on treatment with cornstarch, especially those with GSD Ia, exhibit abnormalities in nutritional status and body composition, such as short stature and a trend toward overweight and obesity.

  4. Pathogenesis of growth failure and partial reversal with gene therapy in murine and canine Glycogen Storage Disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth Drake; Little, Dianne; Arumugam, Ramamani; Sun, Baodong; Curtis, Sarah; Demaster, Amanda; Maranzano, Michael; Jackson, Mark W; Kishnani, Priya; Freemark, Michael S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen Storage Disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) in humans frequently causes delayed bone maturation, decrease in final adult height, and decreased growth velocity. This study evaluates the pathogenesis of growth failure and the effect of gene therapy on growth in GSD-Ia affected dogs and mice. Here we found that homozygous G6pase (-/-) mice with GSD-Ia have normal growth hormone (GH) levels in response to hypoglycemia, decreased insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 levels, and attenuated weight gain following administration of GH. Expression of hepatic GH receptor and IGF 1 mRNAs and hepatic STAT5 (phospho Y694) protein levels are reduced prior to and after GH administration, indicating GH resistance. However, restoration of G6Pase expression in the liver by treatment with adeno-associated virus 8 pseudotyped vector expressing G6Pase (AAV2/8-G6Pase) corrected body weight, but failed to normalize plasma IGF 1 in G6pase (-/-) mice. Untreated G6pase (-/-) mice also demonstrated severe delay of growth plate ossification at 12 days of age; those treated with AAV2/8-G6Pase at 14 days of age demonstrated skeletal dysplasia and limb shortening when analyzed radiographically at 6 months of age, in spite of apparent metabolic correction. Moreover, gene therapy with AAV2/9-G6Pase only partially corrected growth in GSD-Ia affected dogs as detected by weight and bone measurements and serum IGF 1 concentrations were persistently low in treated dogs. We also found that heterozygous GSD-Ia carrier dogs had decreased serum IGF 1, adult body weights and bone dimensions compared to wild-type littermates. In sum, these findings suggest that growth failure in GSD-Ia results, at least in part, from hepatic GH resistance. In addition, gene therapy improved growth in addition to promoting long-term survival in dogs and mice with GSD-Ia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Liquid storage tanks under vertical excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Until recently, the hydrodynamic effects on liquid storage tanks induced by an earthquake excitation were basically treated for the horizontal component of the earthquake. Recent studies, however, showed that the hydrodynamic effects due to the vertical component of an earthquake may be significant. In these studies the tank is assumed to be fixed at the bottom. This paper is concerned with the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid storage tanks induced by vertical earthquake input excitation. First, the fluid-tank system is treated as a fixed-base system and a simple formula is obtained for the coupled fluid-structure natural frequency. Second, additional interaction effects due to the foundation flexibility on the fluid-tank system are investigated. It is concluded that the foundation flexibility may have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid storage tanks under a vertical ground shaking

  6. Seasonal changes in lipid composition and glycogen storage associated with freeze-tolerance of the earthworm, Dendrobaena octaedra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Overgaard, J.; Tollarová, Michaela; Hedlund, K.; Petersen, S. O.; Holmstrup, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 179, č. 5 (2009), s. 569-577 ISSN 0174-1578 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : earthworms * freeze-tolerance * glycogen Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.897, year: 2009

  7. Protein targeting to glycogen is a master regulator of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Ruchti, E.

    2016-10-08

    The storage and use of glycogen, the main energy reserve in the brain, is a metabolic feature of astrocytes. Glycogen synthesis is regulated by Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG), a member of specific glycogen-binding subunits of protein phosphatase-1 (PPP1). It positively regulates glycogen synthesis through de-phosphorylation of both glycogen synthase (activation) and glycogen phosphorylase (inactivation). In cultured astrocytes, PTG mRNA levels were previously shown to be enhanced by the neurotransmitter noradrenaline. To achieve further insight into the role of PTG in the regulation of astrocytic glycogen, its levels of expression were manipulated in primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes using adenovirus-mediated overexpression of tagged-PTG or siRNA to downregulate its expression. Infection of astrocytes with adenovirus led to a strong increase in PTG expression and was associated with massive glycogen accumulation (>100 fold), demonstrating that increased PTG expression is sufficient to induce glycogen synthesis and accumulation. In contrast, siRNA-mediated downregulation of PTG resulted in a 2-fold decrease in glycogen levels. Interestingly, PTG downregulation strongly impaired long-term astrocytic glycogen synthesis induced by insulin or noradrenaline. Finally, these effects of PTG downregulation on glycogen metabolism could also be observed in cultured astrocytes isolated from PTG-KO mice. Collectively, these observations point to a major role of PTG in the regulation of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes and indicate that conditions leading to changes in PTG expression will directly impact glycogen levels in this cell type.

  8. Characterization of the highly branched glycogen from the thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria and comparison with other glycogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; Stuart, Marc C A; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-01-01

    The thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria synthesizes glycogen when growing under heterotrophic conditions. Structural characterization revealed that G. sulphuraria glycogen is the most highly branched glycogen described to date, with 18% of α-(1→6) linkages. Moreover, it differs

  9. Key role of glycogen storage in high K+-induced contraction of the smooth muscles of the bovine trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Takeharu; Fujieda, Tomoe; Eto, Yuta; Nagai, Yuta; Sasaki, Noriyasu; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Urakawa, Norimoto; Shimizu, Kazumasa

    2012-10-01

    To elucidate the role of glycogen in the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle, we investigated the changes in the glycogen contents of the bovine trachea during contractions induced by high K(+) and hypoxia (achieved by bubbling N(2) instead of O(2)), either in a glucose-free condition or in the presence of iodoacetic acid (IAA), an inhibitor of glycolysis. Hyperosmotic addition of 65 mM KCl (H-65 K(+)) induced a sustained contraction. A glucose-free condition did not affect H-65 K(+)-induced contraction. However, hypoxia slightly inhibited the contraction, and glucose-free PSS with hypoxia or IAA remarkably inhibited the H-65 K(+)-induced contraction. H-65 K(+) induced a sustained increase in reduced pyridine nucleotide (PNred) fluorescence, representing glycolysis activity. Hypoxia alone slightly enhanced PNred fluorescence, and when combined with a glucose-free condition, it remarkably enhanced the H-65 K(+)-induced PNred fluorescence. IAA inhibited PNred fluorescence. In the presence of H-65 K(+), a glucose-free condition, hypoxia and the combination of glucose-free PSS and hypoxia decreased the glycogen contents. However, IAA had no effect on glycogen contents. Although hypoxia or glucose-free PSS did not affect PCr and ATP contents, the combination of hypoxia and glucose-free PSS or IAA induced a gradual decrease of PCr content. In conclusion, we suggest that endogenous glycogen was utilized to increase the activity of glycolysis for maintaining high K(+)-induced contraction of the bovine trachea in the glucose -free and/or hypoxic condition.

  10. Catalytic isoforms Tpk1 and Tpk2 of Candida albicans PKA have non-redundant roles in stress response and glycogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Romina; Kronberg, Florencia; Biondi, Ricardo M; Passeron, Susana

    2009-05-01

    Candida albicans cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is coded by two catalytic subunits (TPK1 and TPK2) and one regulatory subunit (BCY1). In this organism the cAMP/PKA signalling pathway mediates basic cellular processes, such as the yeast-to-hyphae transition and cell cycle regulation. In the present study, we investigated the role of C. albicans PKA in response to saline, heat and oxidative stresses as well as in glycogen storage. To fine-tune the analysis, we performed the studies on several C. albicans PKA mutants having heterozygous or homozygous deletions of TPK1 and/or TPK2 in a different BCY1 genetic background. We observed that tpk1Delta/tpk1Delta strains developed a lower tolerance to saline exposure, heat shock and oxidative stress, while wild-type and tpk2Delta/tpk2Delta mutants were resistant to these stresses, indicating that both isoforms play different roles in the stress response pathway. We also found that regardless of the TPK background, heterozygous and homozygous BCY1 mutants were highly sensitive to heat treatment. Surprisingly, we observed that those strains devoid of one or both TPK1 alleles were defective in glycogen storage, while strains lacking Tpk2 accumulated higher levels of the polysaccharide, indicating that Tpk1 and Tpk2 have opposite roles in carbohydrate metabolism.

  11. Glycogen phosphorylation and Lafora disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Covalent phosphorylation of glycogen, first described 35 years ago, was put on firm ground through the work of the Whelan laboratory in the 1990s. But glycogen phosphorylation lay fallow until interest was rekindled in the mid 2000s by the finding that it could be removed by a glycogen-binding phosphatase, laforin, and that mutations in laforin cause a fatal teenage-onset epilepsy, called Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylation is due to phosphomonoesters at C2, C3 and C6 of glucose residues. Phosphate is rare, ranging from 1:500 to 1:5000 phosphates/glucose depending on the glycogen source. The mechanisms of glycogen phosphorylation remain under investigation but one hypothesis to explain C2 and perhaps C3 phosphate is that it results from a rare side reaction of the normal synthetic enzyme glycogen synthase. Lafora disease is likely caused by over-accumulation of abnormal glycogen in insoluble deposits termed Lafora bodies in neurons. The abnormality in the glycogen correlates with elevated phosphorylation (at C2, C3 and C6), reduced branching, insolubility and an enhanced tendency to aggregate and become insoluble. Hyperphosphorylation of glycogen is emerging as an important feature of this deadly childhood disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Contribution of glycogen in supporting axon conduction in the peripheral and central nervous systems: the role of lactate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus M Brown

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of glycogen in the central nervous system is intimately linked with the glycolytic pathway. Glycogen is synthesized from glucose, the primary substrate for glycolysis, and degraded to glucose-6-phosphate. The metabolic cost of shunting glucose via glycogen exceeds that of simple phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate by hexokinase; thus, there must be a metabolic advantage in utilizing this shunt pathway. The dogmatic view of glycogen as a storage depot persists, based on initial descriptions of glycogen supporting neural function in the face of aglycemia. The variable latency to conduction failure, dependent upon tissue glycogen levels, provided convincing evidence of the role played by glycogen in supporting neural function. Glycogen is located predominantly in astrocytes in the central nervous system, thus for glycogen to benefit neural elements, intercellular metabolic communication must exist in the form of astrocyte to neuron substrate transfer. Experimental evidence supports a model where glycogen is metabolized to lactate in astrocytes, with cellular expression of monocarboxylate transporters and enzymes appropriately located for lactate shuttling between astrocytes and neural elements, where lactate acts as a substrate for oxidative metabolism. Biosensor recordings have demonstrated a significant steady concentration of lactate present on the periphery of both central white matter and peripheral nerve under unstimulated baseline conditions, indicating continuous cellular efflux of lactate to the interstitium. The existence of this lactate pool argues we must reexamine the ‘on demand’ shuttling of lactate between cellular elements, and suggests continuous lactate efflux surplus to immediate neural requirements.

  13. Glycogen storage disease type Ia : four novel mutations (175delGG, R170X, G266V and V338F) identified. Mutations in brief no. 220. Online

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rake, J P; ten Berge, A M; Verlind, E; Visser, G; Niezen-Koning, K E; Buys, C H; Smit, G P; Scheffer, H

    1999-01-01

    Deficient activity of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) causes glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia). We analysed the G6Pase gene of 16 GSD Ia patients using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis prior to automated sequencing of exon(s) revealing an aberrant SSCP pattern. In all

  14. Postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M; van Loon, Luc J C; Hawley, John A

    2017-05-01

    Since the pioneering studies conducted in the 1960s in which glycogen status was investigated using the muscle biopsy technique, sports scientists have developed a sophisticated appreciation of the role of glycogen in cellular adaptation and exercise performance, as well as sites of storage of this important metabolic fuel. While sports nutrition guidelines have evolved during the past decade to incorporate sport-specific and periodized manipulation of carbohydrate (CHO) availability, athletes attempt to maximize muscle glycogen synthesis between important workouts or competitive events so that fuel stores closely match the demands of the prescribed exercise. Therefore, it is important to understand the factors that enhance or impair this biphasic process. In the early postexercise period (0-4 h), glycogen depletion provides a strong drive for its own resynthesis, with the provision of CHO (~1 g/kg body mass) optimizing this process. During the later phase of recovery (4-24 h), CHO intake should meet the anticipated fuel needs of the training/competition, with the type, form, and pattern of intake being less important than total intake. Dietary strategies that can enhance glycogen synthesis from suboptimal amounts of CHO or energy intake are of practical interest to many athletes; in this scenario, the coingestion of protein with CHO can assist glycogen storage. Future research should identify other factors that enhance the rate of synthesis of glycogen storage in a limited time frame, improve glycogen storage from a limited CHO intake, or increase muscle glycogen supercompensation. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Evaluation of the biotinidase activity in hepatic glycogen storage disease patients. Undescribed genetic finding associated with atypical enzymatic behavior: an outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angaroni, Celia J; Giner-Ayala, Alicia N; Hill, Lorena P; Guelbert, Norberto B; Paschini-Capra, Ana E; Dodelson de Kremer, Raquel

    2010-10-01

    Repeated evaluation of biotinidase (BTD) activity was carried out for a long-term follow-up in patients with hepatic glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). The results indicated inter-intra variability among the GSD-Ia, GSD-III and GSD-IX patients. In addition, a c.1330G>C transversion in the BTD gene, resulting in a p.Asp444His substitution was detected in one allele of a GSD-Ia patient with sustained normal enzyme activity. Thus far, it is necessary to be cautious in the interpretation of the results of BTD activity as a presumptive GSD diagnostic element. It is not known why plasma BTD activity increases in GSDs patients, or the clinical importance of the increment. When viewed from a global perspective, there are some lines of biotin biology that could indicate a relationship between BTD´s behavior and GSDs.

  16. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  17. Liquid storage tanks under seismic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.; Aziz Uras, R.; Chang, Y.W.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear power plant has to be designed to withstand any earthquakes that may occur at its location. Since a nuclear power plant has many liquid storage tanks, the dynamic response of these tanks under seismic excitations must be properly analyzed in order to design these tanks to survive the earthquakes to which they may be subjected. The dynamic response of liquid-storage tanks subjected to ground excitations has been the subject of numerous studies in the past thirty years. However, most of the studies were focused on the responses of the tanks such that the contained liquid can be considered to be incompressible and inviscid. Thus, the effect of liquid viscosity on the dynamic response of the liquid-tank system is often ignored. This is justified for water-storage tanks because water has a very small viscosity. However, there are cases where the liquid viscosity is not small in comparison with that of water. For such cases the designs of these tanks based on the inviscid assumption become questionable, and the effect of viscosity on the dynamic response needs to be assessed. To the best of our knowledge, due to the complexity of the problem, the effect of viscosity has not been studied satisfactorily to date. Since the governing equations are very complicated if viscosity is included in the analysis, the closed form solutions in most cases are unattainable. Therefore, it is necessary to use a computer code to solve the equations numerically. The computer code used in this study is the finite element code, FLUSTR-ANL (FLUid-STRucture interaction code developed at Argonne National Laboratory). In this study, the tanks are assumed to be rigid and rigidly supported on their bases, and the responses are considered to be linear

  18. Liquid storage tanks under seismic excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yu; Uras, R.A.; Chang, Yao W.

    1993-08-01

    The safety and reliable performance of nuclear power plants is of great concern to both the nuclear community and the general public. A nuclear power plant has to be designed to withstand any earthquakes that may occur at its location. Since a nuclear power plant has many liquid storage tanks, the dynamic response of these tanks under seismic excitations must properly analyzed in order to design these tanks to survive the earthquakes to which they may be subjected. The dynamic response of liquid-storage tanks subjected to ground excitations has been the subject of numerous studies in the past thirty years. However, most of the studies were focused on the responses of the tanks such that the contained liquid can be considered to be incompressible and inviscid. Thus, the effect of liquid viscosity on the dynamic response of the liquid-tank system is often ignored. This is justified for water-storage tanks because water has a very small viscosity. However, there are cases where the liquid viscosity is not small in comparison with that of water. For such cases the designs of these tanks based on the inviscid assumption become questionable, and the effect of viscosity on the dynamic response needs to be assessed. To the best of our knowledge, due to the complexity of the problem, the effect of viscosity has not been studied satisfactorily to date. Since the governing equations are very complicated if viscosity is included in the analysis, the closed form solutions in most cases are unattainable. Therefore, it is necessary to use a computer code to solve the equations-numerically. The computer code used in this study is the finite element code, FLUSTR-ANL(FLUid-STRucture interaction code developed at Argonne National Laboratory) (Chang et al.1988). In this study, the tanks are assumed to be rigid and rigidly supported on their bases, and the responses are considered to be linear.

  19. Black Seed Thymoquinone Improved Insulin Secretion, Hepatic Glycogen Storage, and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba M. A. Abdelrazek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the metabolic diseases having several complications. Nigella sativa oil (NSO might have beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetic complications. Thirty-two mature male Wistar rats were equally divided into four experimental groups: control, control NSO 2 mL/kg, streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic, and diabetic (STZ-induced treated with oral NSO 2 mg/kg for 30 days. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, insulin, and lipid profile levels were determined. Pancreatic and hepatic tissues were used for catalase and GSH. Histopathology, hepatic glycogen contents, insulin immunohistochemistry, and pancreatic islet morphometry were performed. NSO 2 mL/kg was noticed to decrease (P<0.05 FBG and increase (P<0.05 insulin levels in diabetic rats than in diabetic nontreated animals. Lipid profile showed significant (P<0.5 improvement in diabetic rats that received NSO 2 mL/kg than in the diabetic group. Both pancreatic and hepatic catalase and GSH activities revealed a significant (P<0.05 increment in the diabetic group treated with NSO than in the diabetic animals. NSO improved the histopathological picture and hepatic glycogen contents of the diabetic group as well as increased (P<0.05 insulin immunoreactive parts % and mean pancreatic islet diameter. NSO exerts ameliorative and therapeutic effects on the STZ-induced diabetic male Wistar rats.

  20. Reduced bone mineral density in glycogen storage disease type III: evidence for a possible connection between metabolic imbalance and bone homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Daniela; Rossi, Alessandro; Pivonello, Rosario; Del Puente, Antonio; Pivonello, Claudia; Cangemi, Giuliana; Negri, Mariarosaria; Colao, Annamaria; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2016-05-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII) is an inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism caused by deficient activity of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE). It is characterized by liver, cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle involvement. The presence of systemic complications such as growth retardation, ovarian polycystosis, diabetes mellitus and osteopenia/osteoporosis has been reported. The pathogenesis of osteopenia/osteoporosis is still unclear. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) in GSDIII patients and the role of metabolic and endocrine factors and physical activity on bone status. Nine GSDIII patients were enrolled (age 2-20years) and compared to eighteen age and sex matched controls. BMD was evaluated by Dual-emission-X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and Quantitative ultrasound (QUS). Clinical and biochemical parameters of endocrine system function and bone metabolism were analyzed. Serum levels of the metabolic control markers were evaluated. Physical activity was evaluated by administering the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). GSDIII patients showed reduced BMD detected at both DXA and QUS, decreased serum levels of IGF-1, free IGF-1, insulin, calcitonin, osteocalcin (OC) and increased serum levels of C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX). IGF-1 serum levels inversely correlated with AST and ALT serum levels. DXA Z-score inversely correlated with cholesterol and triglycerides serum levels and directly correlated with IGF-1/IGFBP3 molar ratio. No difference in physical activity was observed between GSDIII patients and controls. Our data confirm the presence of reduced BMD in GSDIII. On the basis of the results, we hypothesized that metabolic imbalance could be the key factor leading to osteopenia, acting through different mechanisms: chronic hyperlipidemia, reduced IGF-1, Insulin and OC serum levels. Thus, the mechanism of osteopenia/osteoporosis in GSDIII is probably multifactorial

  1. The upstream enhancer elements of the G6PC promoter are critical for optimal G6PC expression in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mok; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Koeberl, Dwight D; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2013-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type-Ia (GSD-Ia) patients deficient in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) manifest impaired glucose homeostasis characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidemia. Two efficacious recombinant adeno-associated virus pseudotype 2/8 (rAAV8) vectors expressing human G6Pase-α have been independently developed. One is a single-stranded vector containing a 2864-bp of the G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-GPE) and the other is a double-stranded vector containing a shorter 382-bp minimal G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-miGPE). To identify the best construct, a direct comparison of the rAAV8-GPE and the rAAV8-miGPE vectors was initiated to determine the best vector to take forward into clinical trials. We show that the rAAV8-GPE vector directed significantly higher levels of hepatic G6Pase-α expression, achieved greater reduction in hepatic glycogen accumulation, and led to a better toleration of fasting in GSD-Ia mice than the rAAV8-miGPE vector. Our results indicated that additional control elements in the rAAV8-GPE vector outweigh the gains from the double-stranded rAAV8-miGPE transduction efficiency, and that the rAAV8-GPE vector is the current choice for clinical translation in human GSD-Ia. © 2013.

  2. Minimal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity required to sustain survival and prevent hepatocellular adenoma formation in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mok; Kim, Goo-Young; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) activity. In a previous 70–90 week-study, we showed that a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer that restores more than 3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity in G6pc−/− mice corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency with no evidence of HCA. We now examine the minimal hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to confer therapeutic efficacy. We show that rAAV-treated G6pc−/− mice expressing 0.2% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity suffered from frequent hypoglycemic seizures at age 63–65 weeks but mice expressing 0.5–1.3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-LL mice) sustain 4–6 h of fast and grow normally to age 75–90 weeks. Despite marked increases in hepatic glycogen accumulation, the AAV-LL mice display no evidence of hepatic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis, or HCA. Interprandial glucose homeostasis is maintained by the G6Pase-α/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) complex, and G6PT-mediated microsomal G6P uptake is the rate-limiting step in endogenous glucose production. We show that hepatic G6PT activity is increased in AAV-LL mice. These findings are encouraging for clinical studies of G6Pase-α gene-based therapy for GSD-Ia. PMID:26937391

  3. Determining mutations in G6PC and SLC37A4 genes in a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease types Ia and Ib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Paschoalete Carlin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease (GSD comprises a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by deficiency of the enzymes that regulate the synthesis or degradation of glycogen. Types Ia and Ib are the most prevalent; while the former is caused by deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase, the latter is associated with impaired glucose-6-phosphate transporter, where the catalytic unit of G6Pase is located. Over 85 mutations have been reported since the cloning of G6PC and SLC37A4 genes. In this study, twelve unrelated patients with clinical symptoms suggestive of GSDIa and Ib were investigated by using genetic sequencing of G6PC and SLC37A4 genes, being three confirmed as having GSD Ia, and two with GSD Ib. In seven of these patients no mutations were detected in any of the genes. Five changes were detected in G6PC, including three known point mutations (p.G68R, p.R83C and p.Q347X and two neutral mutations (c.432G > A and c.1176T > C. Four changes were found in SLC37A4: a known point mutation (p.G149E, a novel frameshift insertion (c.1338_1339insT, and two neutral mutations (c.1287G > A and c.1076-28C > T. The frequency of mutations in our population was similar to that observed in the literature, in which the mutation p.R83C is also the most frequent one. Analysis of both genes should be considered in the investigation of this condition. An alternative explanation to the negative results in this molecular study is the possibility of a misdiagnosis. Even with a careful evaluation based on laboratory and clinical findings, overlap with other types of GSD is possible, and further molecular studies should be indicated.

  4. Minimal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity required to sustain survival and prevent hepatocellular adenoma formation in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mok Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA, is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC activity. In a previous 70–90 week-study, we showed that a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector-mediated gene transfer that restores more than 3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity in G6pc−/− mice corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency with no evidence of HCA. We now examine the minimal hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to confer therapeutic efficacy. We show that rAAV-treated G6pc−/− mice expressing 0.2% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity suffered from frequent hypoglycemic seizures at age 63–65 weeks but mice expressing 0.5–1.3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-LL mice sustain 4–6 h of fast and grow normally to age 75–90 weeks. Despite marked increases in hepatic glycogen accumulation, the AAV-LL mice display no evidence of hepatic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis, or HCA. Interprandial glucose homeostasis is maintained by the G6Pase-α/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT complex, and G6PT-mediated microsomal G6P uptake is the rate-limiting step in endogenous glucose production. We show that hepatic G6PT activity is increased in AAV-LL mice. These findings are encouraging for clinical studies of G6Pase-α gene-based therapy for GSD-Ia.

  5. Diagnosis and management of glycogen storage disease type I: a practice guideline of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishnani, Priya S; Austin, Stephanie L; Abdenur, Jose E; Arn, Pamela; Bali, Deeksha S; Boney, Anne; Chung, Wendy K; Dagli, Aditi I; Dale, David; Koeberl, Dwight; Somers, Michael J; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Weinstein, David A; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I; Watson, Michael S

    2014-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I) is a rare disease of variable clinical severity that primarily affects the liver and kidney. It is caused by deficient activity of the glucose 6-phosphatase enzyme (GSD Ia) or a deficiency in the microsomal transport proteins for glucose 6-phosphate (GSD Ib), resulting in excessive accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver, kidney, and intestinal mucosa. Patients with GSD I have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, including hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and growth retardation. Individuals with GSD type Ia typically have symptoms related to hypoglycemia in infancy when the interval between feedings is extended to 3–4 hours. Other manifestations of the disease vary in age of onset, rate of disease progression, and severity. In addition, patients with type Ib have neutropenia, impaired neutrophil function, and inflammatory bowel disease. This guideline for the management of GSD I was developed as an educational resource for health-care providers to facilitate prompt, accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of patients. A national group of experts in various aspects of GSD I met to review the evidence base from the scientific literature and provided their expert opinions. Consensus was developed in each area of diagnosis, treatment, and management. This management guideline specifically addresses evaluation and diagnosis across multiple organ systems (hepatic, kidney, gastrointestinal/nutrition, hematologic, cardiovascular, reproductive) involved in GSD I. Conditions to consider in the differential diagnosis stemming from presenting features and diagnostic algorithms are discussed. Aspects of diagnostic evaluation and nutritional and medical management, including care coordination, genetic counseling, hepatic and renal transplantation, and prenatal diagnosis, are also addressed. A guideline that facilitates accurate diagnosis and optimal management of patients with

  6. [Effect of insulin on retinal glycogen content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansel, N; Rungger-Brändle, E; Hitz-Kueng, N; Niemeyer, G

    2000-05-01

    The effect of insulin on glucose and glycogen metabolism in peripheral organs is well known. However, information about the action of this peptide in the retina is incomplete. We addressed the questions whether insulin influences glycogen content in the cat retina and whether glycogen breakdown is triggered by lack of glucose. Eyes from adult cats were enucleated under deep barbiturate and fentanylanesthesia. Retinas were snap frozen either before or following arterial in vitro perfusion. Three conditions were studied: a) Perfusion with a glucose- and insulin-free medium; b) perfusion with the addition of physiologic glucose concentration; and c) in combination with insulin. Glycogen content was determined by in vitro measurement of glucose converted from glycogen. The reference value for retinal glycogen after enucleation (10 min of ischemia) is 2.4 micrograms glucose/mg protein. Glucose- and insulin-free perfusion for 80 min following "normoglycemia" reduced the amount of retinal glycogen by one third. Perfusion for 3 h with 5.5 mM glucose led to a small increase of the partly depleted glycogen stores. Insulin, in contrast, markedly augmented the glycogen content. Insulin led to an increase in retinal glycogen content, indicating an influence of this peptide on retinal glucose and glycogen metabolism. However, it appears that glycogen might play a dynamic role in retinal metabolism as a buffer between abrupt changes in focal metabolic demands that occur during normal glucose supply rather than acting solely as an emergency energy reserve for neural function during hypoglycemia.

  7. Salinity Effects on Strategies of Glycogen Utilization in Livers of Euryhaline Milkfish (Chanos chanos) under Hypothermal Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Huang, Jian-Jun; Yeh, Chun-Yi; Tang, Cheng-Hao; Hwang, Lie-Yueh; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2018-01-01

    The fluctuation of temperature affects many physiological responses in ectothermic organisms, including feed intake, growth, reproduction, and behavior. Changes in environmental temperatures affect the acquisition of energy, whereas hepatic glycogen plays a central role in energy supply for the homeostasis of the entire body. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycogenolysis, is also an indicator of environmental stress. Here, we examined the effects of sal...

  8. Enhanced accumulation of glycogen, lipids and polyhydroxybutyrate under optimal nutrients and light intensities in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshupanee, T; Incharoensakdi, A

    2014-04-01

    Glycogen (GL) and lipids (LP) are efficient biofuel substrates, whereas polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a potent biodegradable plastic. This study aimed to increase accumulation of these three compounds in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Under autophototrophic growth, co-accumulation of the three compounds reached maximum level in a mid-stationary phase at 39·2% of dry weight (22·7% GL, 14·1% LP and 2·4% PHB). Nitrogen deprivation increased this to 61·5% (36·8% GL, 11·2% LP and 13·5% PHB), higher than that achieved by phosphorus, sulfur, iron or calcium deprivation. Combining nitrogen deprivation with 0·4% (w/v) glucose addition for heterophototrophic growth and optimizing the light intensity (200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) ) synergistically enhanced combined accumulation to 71·1% of biomass (41·3% GL, 16·7% LP and 13·1% PHB), a higher level than previously reported in Synechocystis. However, the maximum coproductivity of GL, LP and PHB (at 0·72 g l(-1) ) was obtained in the 12-day heterophototrophic culture without nitrogen deprivation. Accumulation of GL, LP and PHB was enhanced under both autophototrophic and heterophototrophic conditions by optimizations of nutrient and light supplies. This study provides a means for increasing co-production of potent bioenergy substrates and useful biomaterials in Synechocystis which may also be applicable to other cyanobacteria. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Yam Storability and Economic Benefits of Storage Under the Modern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines yam storability and the economic benefits of storage under the modern (underground) and the traditional (yam barn) storage technologies in Southeastern Nigeria. Data were collected mainly from 55 respondents who were interviewed, as well as from measurement of storage parameters on yam ...

  10. Determination of the glycogen content in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porcellinis, Alice De; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-01-01

    of non-coding RNA. At the same time, efforts are being made to redirect carbon from glycogen to desirable products in genetically engineered cyanobacteria to enhance product yields. Several methods are used to determine the glycogen contents in cyanobacteria, with variable accuracies and technical......Cyanobacteria accumulate glycogen as a major intracellular carbon and energy storage during photosynthesis. Recent developments in research have highlighted complex mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, including the diel cycle of biosynthesis and catabolism, redox regulation, and the involvement...... complexities. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the reliable determination of the glycogen content in cyanobacteria that can be performed in a standard life science laboratory. The protocol entails the selective precipitation of glycogen from the cell lysate and the enzymatic depolymerization...

  11. In vivo hepatic lipid quantification using MRS at 7 Tesla in a mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ratiney, Helene; Mutel, Elodie; Guillou, Herve; Mithieux, Gilles; Pilleul, Frank; Rajas, Fabienne; Beuf, Olivier; Cavassila, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of liver lipid content and composition is needed in preclinical research to investigate steatosis and steatosis-related disorders. The purpose of this study was to quantify in vivo hepatic fatty acid content and composition using a method based on short echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 7 Tesla. A mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a with inducible liver-specific deletion of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene (L-G6pc−/−) mice and control mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 9 months. In control mice, hepatic lipid content was found significantly higher with the HF/HS diet than with the standard diet. As expected, hepatic lipid content was already elevated in L-G6pc−/− mice fed a standard diet compared with control mice. L-G6pc−/− mice rapidly developed steatosis which was not modified by the HF/HS diet. On the standard diet, estimated amplitudes from olefinic protons were found significantly higher in L-G6pc−/− mice compared with that in control mice. L-G6pc−/− mice showed no noticeable polyunsaturation from diallylic protons. Total unsaturated fatty acid indexes measured by gas chromatography were in agreement with MRS measurements. These results showed the great potential of high magnetic field MRS to follow the diet impact and lipid alterations in mouse liver. PMID:23596325

  12. In vivo hepatic lipid quantification using MRS at 7 Tesla in a mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ratiney, Helene; Mutel, Elodie; Guillou, Herve; Mithieux, Gilles; Pilleul, Frank; Rajas, Fabienne; Beuf, Olivier; Cavassila, Sophie

    2013-07-01

    The assessment of liver lipid content and composition is needed in preclinical research to investigate steatosis and steatosis-related disorders. The purpose of this study was to quantify in vivo hepatic fatty acid content and composition using a method based on short echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 7 Tesla. A mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a with inducible liver-specific deletion of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene (L-G6pc(-/-)) mice and control mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 9 months. In control mice, hepatic lipid content was found significantly higher with the HF/HS diet than with the standard diet. As expected, hepatic lipid content was already elevated in L-G6pc(-/-) mice fed a standard diet compared with control mice. L-G6pc(-/-) mice rapidly developed steatosis which was not modified by the HF/HS diet. On the standard diet, estimated amplitudes from olefinic protons were found significantly higher in L-G6pc(-/-) mice compared with that in control mice. L-G6pc(-/-) mice showed no noticeable polyunsaturation from diallylic protons. Total unsaturated fatty acid indexes measured by gas chromatography were in agreement with MRS measurements. These results showed the great potential of high magnetic field MRS to follow the diet impact and lipid alterations in mouse liver.

  13. Reappraisal of the Role of Portacaval Shunting in the Growth of Patients With Glycogen Storage Disease Type I in the Era of Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, YoungRok; Yi, Nam-Joon; Ko, Jae-Sung; Moon, Jin-Soo; Suh, Suk-Won; Lee, Jeong-Moo; Jeong, Jae-Hong; Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Hae-Won; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2016-03-01

    Instead of dietary modification, surgical management is considered for correcting growth retardation, poor metabolic control, and hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) in glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I. The records of 55 GSD type I patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-two patients underwent only dietary management (group D) and 23 underwent surgical management (group S). In group S, 17 underwent portacaval shunting (PCS), 13 underwent liver transplantation (LT; 7 underwent both PCS and LT). Height-for-age and body mass index-for-age Z-scores based on World Health Organization data were used to compare growth patterns before and after surgery. Changes in metabolic abnormalities and HCA after operation were also investigated. Height-for-age Z-scores for group S were higher by an average of 0.377 compared to that for group D. Metabolic abnormalities often disappeared after LT but improved partially after PCS. De novo HCA was detected in 4 patients (13%) from group D, 12 (100%) who underwent PCS, and none who underwent LT. One case of hepatocellular carcinoma and one of hemorrhage from a HCA were noted in group D. Two cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, 2 of hemorrhage, and 1 of necrosis were noted after PCS. Surgery yielded greater growth improvement than dietary management. However, after PCS, metabolic abnormalities remained unresolved, and the de novo HCA rate was high. Portacaval shunting can be used to improve growth in GSD type I patients when LT is not possible, but close observation for metabolic abnormalities and HCA is essential.

  14. Malignant Transformation of Hepatic Adenoma in Glycogen Storage Disease Type-1a: Report of an Exceptional Case Diagnosed on Surveillance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay D Baheti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular adenoma is a heterogeneous group of benign neoplasms arising from hepatocellular cells and can be subclassified into four major groups based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. These four subtypes are hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF 1α-inactivated, β-catenin-activated, inflammatory, and unclassified adenomas. Immunohistochemistry studies have demonstrated that since β-catenin-activated adenomas have a higher risk of malignant transformation, the identification of the subtype of adenoma remains crucial in patient management. However, malignant transformation of hepatic adenoma without β-catenin overexpression can be seen in 30-65% cases. We report a case of malignant transformation of hepatic adenoma without overexpression of β-catenin in a 31-year-old man with a known glycogen storage disease (GSD Type-1a, which was diagnosed on surveillance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The MRI showed a mild interval increase in one lesion with relative stability of the other adenomas. The lesion was presumed to be suspicious for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and was confirmed on pathology.

  15. Hemodynamic changes during the anhepatic phase in pediatric patient with biliary atresia versus glycogen storage disease undergoing living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-W; Lu, H-F; Chiang, M-H; Chen, C-L; Wang, C-H; Cheng, K-W; Jawan, B; Huang, C-J; Wu, S-C

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic changes caused by clamping of the inferior vena cava and portal vein in biliary atresia (BA) versus glycogen storage disease (GSD) patients undergoing living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) without venovenous bypass. We reviewed retrospectively the anesthesia charts of pediatric LDLT patients. Age, weight, height, blood loss, blood product use and fluid replacement between groups were compared with Mann-Whitney test, and systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP) before clamping of the inferior vena cava, and 4 measurements during anhepatic phase and 5 minutes after reperfusion were compared with analysis of variance. One hundred four BA patients (GI) and 12 GSD patients (GII) showed mean total blood loss among GI to be more than among GII, but the blood products and crystalloids infused during the operation were not significantly different. The changes of SBP, HR, and CVP after clamping of the IVC were significantly different between groups. CVP of GII was lower than GI, indicating that venous return among GII was more affected, subsequently showing lower SBP and higher HR. Total clamping of the inferior vena cava resulted a greater decrease in CVP in GII with subsequently lower SBP and faster HR compared with GI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel homozygous no-stop mutation in G6PC gene from a Chinese patient with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lei-Lei; Li, Xin-Hua; Han, Yue; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Gong, Qi-Ming; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2014-02-25

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and growth retardation. It is caused by mutations in the G6PC gene encoding Glucose-6-phosphatase. To date, over 80 mutations have been identified in the G6PC gene. Here we reported a novel mutation found in a Chinese patient with abnormal transaminases, hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and short stature. Direct sequencing of the coding region and splicing-sites in the G6PC gene revealed a novel no-stop mutation, p.*358Yext*43, leading to a 43 amino-acid extension of G6Pase. The expression level of mutant G6Pase transcripts was only 7.8% relative to wild-type transcripts. This mutation was not found in 120 chromosomes from 60 unrelated healthy control subjects using direct sequencing, and was further confirmed by digestion with Rsa I restriction endonuclease. In conclusion, we revealed a novel no-stop mutation in this study which expands the spectrum of mutations in the G6PC gene. The molecular genetic analysis was indispensable to the diagnosis of GSD-Ia for the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The natural history of glycogen storage disease types VI and IX: Long-term outcome from the largest metabolic center in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscher, Anne; Patel, Jaina; Hewson, Stacy; Nagy, Laura; Feigenbaum, Annette; Kronick, Jonathan; Raiman, Julian; Schulze, Andreas; Siriwardena, Komudi; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2014-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) types VI and IX are caused by phosphorylase system deficiencies. To evaluate the natural history and long-term treatment outcome of the patients with GSD-VI and -IX, we performed an observational retrospective case study of 21 patients with confirmed diagnosis of GSD-VI or -IX. All patients with GSD-VI or -IX, diagnosed at The Hospital for Sick Children, were included. Electronic and paper charts were reviewed for clinical features, biochemical investigations, molecular genetic testing, diagnostic imaging, long-term outcome and treatment by two independent research team members. All information was entered into an Excel database. We report on the natural history and treatment outcomes of the 21 patients with GSD-VI and -IX and 16 novel pathogenic mutations in the PHKA2, PHKB, PHKG2 and PYGL genes. We report for the first time likely liver adenoma on liver ultrasound and liver fibrosis on liver biopsy specimens in patients with GSD-VI and mild cardiomyopathy on echocardiography in patients with GSD-VI and -IXb. We recommend close monitoring in all patients with GSD-VI and -IX for the long-term liver and cardiac complications. There is a need for future studies if uncooked cornstarch and high protein diet would be able to prevent long-term complications of GSD-VI and -IX. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In Vivo Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Targeted Integration of a Glucose-6-phosphatase Transgene Promotes Survival in Mice With Glycogen Storage Disease Type IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Dustin J; Brooks, Elizabeth Drake; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Mefferd, Adam; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Gersbach, Charles A; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2016-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) is caused by glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency in association with severe, life-threatening hypoglycemia that necessitates lifelong dietary therapy. Here we show that use of a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) targeted to the ROSA26 safe harbor locus and a ROSA26-targeting vector containing a G6PC donor transgene, both delivered with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, markedly improved survival of G6Pase knockout (G6Pase-KO) mice compared with mice receiving the donor vector alone (P < 0.04). Furthermore, transgene integration has been confirmed by sequencing in the majority of the mice treated with both vectors. Targeted alleles were 4.6-fold more common in livers of mice with GSD Ia, as compared with normal littermates, at 8 months following vector administration (P < 0.02). This suggests a selective advantage for vector-transduced hepatocytes following ZFN-mediated integration of the G6Pase vector. A short-term experiment also showed that 3-month-old mice receiving the ZFN had significantly-improved biochemical correction, in comparison with mice that received the donor vector alone. These data suggest that the use of ZFNs to drive integration of G6Pase at a safe harbor locus might improve vector persistence and efficacy, and lower mortality in GSD Ia.

  19. Application of whole exome sequencing to a rare inherited metabolic disease with neurological and gastrointestinal manifestations: a congenital disorder of glycosylation mimicking glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Woo, Hye In; Choe, Byung-Ho; Park, Seungman; Yoon, Yeomin; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Kim, Dong Sub; Kwon, Soonhak; Park, Hyung-Doo

    2015-04-15

    Rare inherited metabolic diseases with neurological and gastrointestinal manifestations can be misdiagnosed as other diseases or remain as disorders with indeterminate etiologies. This study aims to provide evidence to recommend the utility of whole exome sequencing in clinical diagnosis of a rare inherited metabolic disease. A 4-month-old female baby visited an outpatient clinic due to poor weight gain, repeated seizure-like episodes, developmental delay, and unexplained hepatomegaly with abnormal liver function test results. Although liver biopsy revealed moderate fibrosis with a suggested diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD), no mutations were identified either by single gene approach for GSD (G6PC and GAA) or by next generation sequencing panels for GSD (including 21 genes). Whole exome sequencing of the patient revealed compound heterozygous mutations of PMM2: c.580C>T (p.Arg194*) and c.713G>C (p.Arg238Pro) which mutations were associated with congenital disorder of glycosylation Ia (CDG-Ia: PMM2-CDG). We successfully applied exome sequencing to diagnose the first reported Korean patient with CDG-Ia, which was misdiagnosed as GSD. Whole exome sequencing may prove to be the preferred strategy for analysis of clinical features that do not readily suggest a specific diagnosis, such as those observed in inherited metabolic diseases, including CDG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Exon redefinition by a point mutation within exon 5 of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is the major cause of glycogen storage disease type 1a in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajihara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Kido, Keiko [Saga Medical (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). We have identified a novel mutation in the G6Pase gene of a individual with GSD type 1a. The cDNA from the patient`s liver revealed a 91-nt deletion in exon 5. The genomic DNA from the patient`s white blood cells revealed no deletion or mutation at the splicing junction of intron 4 and exon 5. The 3{prime} splicing occurred 91 bp from the 5{prime} site of exon 5 (at position 732 in the coding region), causing a substitution of a single nucleotide (G to T) at position 727 in the coding region. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression of allelic minigene constructs into animal cells. Another eight unrelated families of nine Japanese patients were all found to have this mutation. This mutation is a new type of splicing mutation in the G6Pase gene, and 91% of patients and carriers suffering from GSD1a in Japan are detectable with this splicing mutation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Evidence for the absence of cerebral glucose-6-phosphatase activity in glycogen storage disease type I (Von Gierke's disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.; Philippart, M.

    1981-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is characterized by a functional deficit in glucose-6-phosphatase that normally hydrolyzes glucose-6-PO/sub 4/ to glucose. This enzyme is primarily found in liver, kidney, and muscle but it is also present in brain, where it appears to participate in the regulation of cerebral tissue glucose. Since most neurological symptoms in GSD-I patients involve systemic hypoglycemia, previous reports have not examined possible deficiencies in phosphatase activity in the brain. Positron computed tomography, F-18-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and a tracer kinetic model for FDG were used to measure the cortical plasma/tissue forward and reverse transport, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation rate constants, tissue/plasma concentration gradient, tissue concentration turnover rate for this competitive analog of glucose, and the cortical metabolic rates for glucose. Studies were carried out in age-matched normals (N = 13) and a single GSD-I patient. The dephosphorylation rate constant in the GSD-I patient was about one tenth the normal value indicating a low level of cerebral phosphatase activity. The other measured parameters were within normal limits except for the rate of glucose phosphorylation which reflected a cortical glucose metabolic rate one half the normal value. Since glucose transport and tissue glucose concentration was normal, the reduced cortical glucose metabolism probably results from the use of alternative substrates (..beta..-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) which are consistently elevated in the plasma of GSD-I patients.

  2. Exon redefinition by a point mutation within exon 5 of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is the major cause of glycogen storage disease type 1a in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, S; Matsuhashi, S; Yamamoto, K; Kido, K; Tsuji, K; Tanae, A; Fujiyama, S; Itoh, T; Tanigawa, K; Uchida, M

    1995-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). We have identified a novel mutation in the G6Pase gene of a individual with GSD type 1a. The cDNA from the patient's liver revealed a 91-nt deletion in exon 5. The genomic DNA from the patient's white blood cells revealed no deletion or mutation at the splicing junction of intron 4 and exon 5. The 3' splicing occurred 91 bp from the 5' site of exon 5 (at position 732 in the coding region), causing a substitution of a single nucleotide (G to T) at position 727 in the coding region. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression of allelic minigene constructs into animal cells. Another eight unrelated families of nine Japanese patients were all found to have this mutation. This mutation is a new type of splicing mutation in the G6Pase gene, and 91% of patients and carriers suffering from GSD1a in Japan are detectable with this splicing mutation.

  3. Case report: Hepatocellular carcinoma in type 1a glycogen storage disease with identification of a glucose-6-phosphatase gene mutation in one family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T; Ozawa, T; Kawasaki, T; Yasumi, K; Wang, D Y; Kitagawa, M; Takehira, Y; Tamakoshi, K; Yamada, M; Kida, H; Sugie, H; Nakamura, H; Sugimura, H

    1999-06-01

    A 40-year-old man with glycogen storage disease type 1a (von Gierke disease, GSD1a) developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Cold single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) with 12% glycerol identified the G727T mutation in the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) gene, which has been reported to be the most common mutation in Japanese GSD1a patients. This case report is the first documentation of HCC in a case with G727T mutation. Given the prevalence of HCC in GSD1a with various germline mutations, analysis is needed to confirm that the germline mutation in this case is really related to hepatocarcinogenesis. DNA analysis of the family pedigree of this case, revealed three individuals with GSD1a and seven heterozygous carriers of the G727T mutation. As the diagnosis of GSD1a in this family was made only after these three patients reached adulthood, DNA diagnosis may help early identification of GSD1a patients and prevention of the progression of the disease. This DNA-based diagnosis permits prenatal diagnosis in at-risk patients and may facilitate screening and counselling of patients clinically suspected of having this disease.

  4. Estimation of glucose carbon recycling in children with glycogen storage disease: A 13C NMR study using [U-13C]glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalderon, B.; Korman, S.H.; Gutman, A.; Lapidot, A.

    1989-01-01

    A stable isotope procedure to estimate hepatic glucose carbon recycling and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which glucose is produced in patients lacking glucose 6-phosphatase is described. A total of 10 studies was performed in children with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) and type III (GSD-III) and control subjects. A primed dose-constant nasogastric infusion of D-[U- 13 C]glucose or an infusion diluted with nonlabeled glucose solution was administered following different periods of fasting. Hepatic glucose carbon recycling was estimated from 13 C NMR spectra. The values obtained for GSD-I patients coincided with the standard [U- 13 C]glucose dilution curve. These results indicate that the plasma glucose of GSD-I subjects comprises only a mixture of 99% 13 C-enriched D-[U- 13 C]glucose and unlabeled glucose but lacks any recycled glucose. Significantly different glucose carbon recycling values were obtained for two GSD-III patients in comparison to GSD-I patients. The results eliminate a mechanism for glucose production in GSD-I children involving gluconeogenesis. However, glucose release by amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity would result in endogenous glucose production of non- 13 C-labeled and nonrecycled glucose carbon, as was found in this study. In GSD-III patients gluconeogenesis is suggested as the major route for endogenous glucose synthesis. The contribution of the triose-phosphate pathway in these patients has been determined

  5. Extended phenotype description and new molecular findings in late onset glycogen storage disease type II: a northern Italy population study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remiche, Gauthier; Ronchi, Dario; Magri, Francesca; Lamperti, Costanza; Bordoni, Andreina; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by acid alpha-1,4-glucosidase deficiency and associated with recessive mutations in its coding gene GAA. Few studies have provided so far a detailed phenotypical characterization in late onset GSDII (LO-GSDII) patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation has been previously attempted with controversial results. We aim to provide an in-depth description of a cohort (n = 36) of LO-GSDII patients coming from the north of Italy and compare our population's findings to the literature. We performed a clinical record-based retrospective and prospective study of our patients. LO-GSDII in our cohort covers a large variability of phenotype including subtle clinical presentation and did not differ significantly from previous data. In all patients, molecular analysis disclosed GAA mutations, five of them being novel. To assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations we divided IVS1-32-13T>G heterozygous patients into two groups following the severity of the mutations on the second allele. Our patients harbouring "severe" mutations (n = 21) presented a strong tendency to have more severe phenotypes and more disability, more severe phenotypes and more disability, higher prevalence of assisted ventilation and a shorter time of evolution to show it. The determination of prognostic factors is mandatory in order to refine the accuracy of prognostic information, to develop follow-up strategy and, more importantly, to improve the decision algorithm for enzyme replacement therapy administration. The demonstration of genotype-phenotype correlations could help to reach this objective. Clinical assessment homogeneity is required to overcome limitations due to the lack of power of most studies.

  6. Taxing fossil fuels under speculative storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumen, Semih; Unalmis, Deren; Unalmis, Ibrahim; Unsal, D. Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Long-term environmental consequences of taxing fossil fuel usage have been extensively studied in the literature. However, these taxes may also impose several short-run macroeconomic policy challenges, the nature of which remains underexplored. This paper investigates the mechanisms through which environmental taxes on fossil fuel usage can affect the main macroeconomic variables in the short-run. We concentrate on a particular mechanism: speculative storage. Formulating and using a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model, calibrated for the United States, with an explicit storage facility and nominal rigidities, we show that in designing environmental tax policies it is crucial to account for the fact that fossil fuel prices are subject to speculation. The existence of forward-looking speculators in the model improves the effectiveness of tax policies in reducing fossil fuel usage. Improved policy effectiveness, however, is costly: it drives inflation and interest rates up, while impeding output. Based on this tradeoff, we seek an answer to the question how monetary policy should interact with environmental tax policies in our DSGE model of fossil fuel storage. We show that, in an environment with no speculative storers, monetary policy should respond to output along with CPI inflation in order to minimize the welfare losses brought by taxes. However, when the storage facility is activated, responding to output in the monetary policy rule becomes less desirable.

  7. Long-Term Efficacy Following Readministration of an Adeno-Associated Virus Vector in Dogs with Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaster, Amanda; Luo, Xiaoyan; Curtis, Sarah; Williams, Kyha D.; Landau, Dustin J.; Drake, Elizabeth J.; Kozink, Daniel M.; Bird, Andrew; Crane, Bayley; Sun, Francis; Pinto, Carlos R.; Brown, Talmage T.; Kemper, Alex R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is the inherited deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), primarily found in liver and kidney, which causes life-threatening hypoglycemia. Dogs with GSD-Ia were treated with double-stranded adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors encoding human G6Pase. Administration of an AAV9 pseudotyped (AAV2/9) vector to seven consecutive GSD-Ia neonates prevented hypoglycemia during fasting for up to 8 hr; however, efficacy eventually waned between 2 and 30 months of age, and readministration of a new pseudotype was eventually required to maintain control of hypoglycemia. Three of these dogs succumbed to acute hypoglycemia between 7 and 9 weeks of age; however, this demise could have been prevented by earlier readministration an AAV vector, as demonstrated by successful prevention of mortality of three dogs treated earlier in life. Over the course of this study, six out of nine dogs survived after readministration of an AAV vector. Of these, each dog required readministration on average every 9 months. However, two were not retreated until >34 months of age, while one with preexisting antibodies was re-treated three times in 10 months. Glycogen content was normalized in the liver following vector administration, and G6Pase activity was increased in the liver of vector-treated dogs in comparison with GSD-Ia dogs that received only with dietary treatment. G6Pase activity reached approximately 40% of normal in two female dogs following AAV2/9 vector administration. Elevated aspartate transaminase in absence of inflammation indicated that hepatocellular turnover in the liver might drive the loss of vector genomes. Survival was prolonged for up to 60 months in dogs treated by readministration, and all dogs treated by readministration continue to thrive despite the demonstrated risk for recurrent hypoglycemia and mortality from waning efficacy of the AAV2/9 vector. These preclinical data support the further translation of AAV

  8. Hepatic lentiviral gene transfer prevents the long-term onset of hepatic tumours of glycogen storage disease type 1a in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clar, Julie; Mutel, Elodie; Gri, Blandine; Creneguy, Alison; Stefanutti, Anne; Gaillard, Sophie; Ferry, Nicolas; Beuf, Olivier; Mithieux, Gilles; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Rajas, Fabienne

    2015-04-15

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD1a) is a rare disease due to the deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) catalytic subunit (encoded by G6pc), which is essential for endogenous glucose production. Despite strict diet control to maintain blood glucose, patients with GSD1a develop hepatomegaly, steatosis and then hepatocellular adenomas (HCA), which can undergo malignant transformation. Recently, gene therapy has attracted attention as a potential treatment for GSD1a. In order to maintain long-term transgene expression, we developed an HIV-based vector, which allowed us to specifically express the human G6PC cDNA in the liver. We analysed the efficiency of this lentiviral vector in the prevention of the development of the hepatic disease in an original GSD1a mouse model, which exhibits G6Pase deficiency exclusively in the liver (L-G6pc(-/-) mice). Recombinant lentivirus were injected in B6.G6pc(ex3lox/ex3lox). SA(creERT2/w) neonates and G6pc deletion was induced by tamoxifen treatment at weaning. Magnetic resonance imaging was then performed to follow up the development of hepatic tumours. Lentiviral gene therapy restored glucose-6 phosphatase activity sufficient to correct fasting hypoglycaemia during 9 months. Moreover, lentivirus-treated L-G6pc(-/-) mice presented normal hepatic triglyceride levels, whereas untreated mice developed steatosis. Glycogen stores were also decreased although liver weight remained high. Interestingly, lentivirus-treated L-G6pc(-/-) mice were protected against the development of hepatic tumours after 9 months of gene therapy while most of untreated L-G6pc(-/-) mice developed millimetric HCA. Thus the treatment of newborns by recombinant lentivirus appears as an attractive approach to protect the liver from the development of steatosis and hepatic tumours associated to GSD1a pathology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Determination of the Glycogen Content in Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Porcellinis, Alice; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-07-17

    Cyanobacteria accumulate glycogen as a major intracellular carbon and energy storage during photosynthesis. Recent developments in research have highlighted complex mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, including the diel cycle of biosynthesis and catabolism, redox regulation, and the involvement of non-coding RNA. At the same time, efforts are being made to redirect carbon from glycogen to desirable products in genetically engineered cyanobacteria to enhance product yields. Several methods are used to determine the glycogen contents in cyanobacteria, with variable accuracies and technical complexities. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the reliable determination of the glycogen content in cyanobacteria that can be performed in a standard life science laboratory. The protocol entails the selective precipitation of glycogen from the cell lysate and the enzymatic depolymerization of glycogen to generate glucose monomers, which are detected by a glucose oxidase-peroxidase (GOD-POD) enzyme coupled assay. The method has been applied to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, two model cyanobacterial species that are widely used in metabolic engineering. Moreover, the method successfully showed differences in the glycogen contents between the wildtype and mutants defective in regulatory elements or glycogen biosynthetic genes.

  10. Function of trehalose and glycogen in cell cycle progression and cell viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silljé, H H; Paalman, J W; ter Schure, E G; Olsthoorn, S Q; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, Johannes; Verrips, C T

    Trehalose and glycogen accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when growth conditions deteriorate. It has been suggested that aside from functioning as storage factors and stress protectants, these carbohydrates may be required for cell cycle progression at low growth rates under carbon limitation.

  11. Glycogen storage disease type 1b: an early onset severe phenotype associated with a novel mutation (IVS4) in the glucose 6-phosphate translocase (SLC37A4) gene in a Turkish patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, M M; Aykan, E; Yilmaz, G; Aytekin, C; Karaer, K; Açoğlu, E A

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders that include types Ia and Ib. GSD-Ib is caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) caused by a mutation in the SLC37A4 gene coding for G6PT. Glycogen storage disease is characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and chronic neutropenia. Herein we describe a 4-month-old Turkish patient with early onset and severe typical clinical features of GSD-1b in which a novel mutation in the SLC37A4 gene was detected. After the bone marrow examination parenteral antibiotic therapy and subcutaneous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were started. Due to the severe neutropenia the patient had developed nosocomial sepsis and the dose of G-CSF was increased. After 2 months later from the initial treatment of the G-CSF he developed splenomegaly and urinary complications. Despite maximal therapy he had an extremely poor quality of life and life-threatening complications due to impaired bone marrow function. As the patient required continual hospitalization he was schedule for bone marrow transplantation.

  12. Brain glycogen in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Jordi; Guinovart, Joan J

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain at much lower concentrations than in muscle or liver. However, by characterizing an animal depleted of brain glycogen, we have shown that the polysaccharide plays a key role in learning capacity and in activity-dependent changes in hippocampal synapse strength. Since glycogen is essentially found in astrocytes, the diverse roles proposed for this polysaccharide in the brain have been attributed exclusively to these cells. However, we have demonstrated that neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia. However, these cells can store only minute amounts of glycogen, since the progressive accumulation of this molecule leads to neuronal loss. Loss-of-function mutations in laforin and malin cause Lafora disease. This condition is characterized by the presence of high numbers of insoluble polyglucosan bodies, known as Lafora bodies, in neuronal cells. Our findings reveal that the accumulation of this aberrant glycogen accounts for the neurodegeneration and functional consequences, as well as the impaired autophagy, observed in models of this disease. Similarly glycogen synthase is responsible for the accumulation of corpora amylacea, which are polysaccharide-based aggregates present in the neurons of aged human brains. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism is important under stress conditions and that neuronal glycogen accumulation contributes to neurodegenerative diseases and to aging-related corpora amylacea formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Glycogen autophagy in glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoulas, O B; Kalamidas, S A; Kondomerkos, D J

    2006-01-01

    Glycogen autophagy, the sequestration and degradation of cell glycogen in the autophagic vacuoles, is a selective, hormonally controlled and highly regulated process, representing a mechanism of glucose homeostasis under conditions of demand for the production of this sugar. In the newborn animals, this process is induced by glucagon secreted during the postnatal hypoglycemia and inhibited by insulin and parenteral glucose, which abolishes glucagon secretion. Hormonal action is mediated by the cAMP/protein kinase A (induction) and phosphoinositides/mTOR (inhibition) pathways that converge on common targets, such as the protein phosphatase 2A to regulate autophgosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid glucosidase and glycogen autophagy. Intralysosomal phosphate exchange reactions, which are affected by changes in the calcium levels and acid mannose 6- and acid glucose 6-phosphatase activities, can modify the intralysosomal composition in phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated glucose and promote the exit of free glucose through the lysosomal membrane. Glycogen autophagy-derived nonphosphorylated glucose assists the hyaloplasmic glycogen degradation-derived glucose 6-phosphate to combat postnatal hypoglycemia and participates in other metabolic pathways to secure the fine tuning of glucose homeostasis during the neonatal period.

  14. Estimation of glucose carbon recycling in children with glycogen storage disease: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalderon, B.; Korman, S.H.; Gutman, A.; Lapidot, A. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1989-06-01

    A stable isotope procedure to estimate hepatic glucose carbon recycling and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which glucose is produced in patients lacking glucose 6-phosphatase is described. A total of 10 studies was performed in children with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) and type III (GSD-III) and control subjects. A primed dose-constant nasogastric infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)glucose or an infusion diluted with nonlabeled glucose solution was administered following different periods of fasting. Hepatic glucose carbon recycling was estimated from {sup 13}C NMR spectra. The values obtained for GSD-I patients coincided with the standard (U-{sup 13}C)glucose dilution curve. These results indicate that the plasma glucose of GSD-I subjects comprises only a mixture of 99% {sup 13}C-enriched D-(U-{sup 13}C)glucose and unlabeled glucose but lacks any recycled glucose. Significantly different glucose carbon recycling values were obtained for two GSD-III patients in comparison to GSD-I patients. The results eliminate a mechanism for glucose production in GSD-I children involving gluconeogenesis. However, glucose release by amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity would result in endogenous glucose production of non-{sup 13}C-labeled and nonrecycled glucose carbon, as was found in this study. In GSD-III patients gluconeogenesis is suggested as the major route for endogenous glucose synthesis. The contribution of the triose-phosphate pathway in these patients has been determined.

  15. Effect of VSL#3 Probiotic in a Patient with Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia and Irritable Bowel Disease-like Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnero-Gregorio, Miguel; Molares-Vila, Alberto; Corbalán-Rivas, Alberte; Villaverde-Taboada, Carlos; Rodríguez-Cerdeira, Carmen

    2018-02-13

    Gut Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic gastrointestinal disorders characterised by relapsing and remitting inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The two most common types of IBDs are ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia present with gastrointestinal symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, bloating and changes in stool form or frequency, which is clinically difficult to distinguish from IBD. We report the case of a 36-year-old man with GSD type Ia and IBD-like disease. A commercial probiotic (VSL#3®) was chosen as a nutritional supplement treatment because of its high content of microbial species and strains. Three different tests were performed: normal-dose, no-dose and half-dose tests. The study periods for the normal-dose, no-dose and half-dose tests were 4 weeks from the treatment initiation, 72 h from the end of the previous period and 4 weeks to 6 months after the end of the 72-h period, respectively. When the probiotic treatment was stopped, he experienced several symptoms similar to those before the start of the treatment. The intestinal symptoms were less severe with the half-dose nutritional supplement treatment than with no treatment. Probiotics may reduce the number of irritable gut episodes and improve the patient's well-being and overall quality of life. More studies are needed to determine whether the improvement in more severe cases of GSD is due mainly to changes in the composition of the gut microbiota, as in this patient.

  16. 3'-UTR SNP rs2229611 in G6PC1 affects mRNA stability, expression and Glycogen Storage Disease type-Ia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthi, Sellamuthu; Rajeshwari, Mohan; Francis, Amirtharaj; Saravanan, Matheshwaran; Varalakshmi, Perumal; Houlden, Henry; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem

    2017-08-01

    The frequency of rs2229611, previously reported in Chinese, Caucasians, Japanese and Hispanics, was investigated for the first time in Indian ethnicity. We analyzed its role in the progression of Glycogen Storage Disease type-Ia (GSD-Ia) and breast cancer. Genotype data on rs2229611 revealed that the risk of GSD-Ia was higher (P=0.0195) with CC compared to TT/TC genotypes, whereas no such correlation was observed with breast cancer cases. We observed a strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) among rs2229611 and other disease causing G6PC1 variants (|D'|=1, r 2 =1). Functional validation performed in HepG2 cells using luciferase constructs showed significant (P<0.05) decrease in expression than wild-type 3'-UTR due to curtailed mRNA stability. Furthermore, AU-rich elements (AREs) mediated regulation of G6PC1 expression characterized using 3'-UTR deletion constructs showed a prominent decrease in mRNA stability. We then examined whether miRNAs are involved in controlling G6PC1 expression using pmirGLO-UTR constructs, with evidence of more distinct inhibition in the reporter function with rs2229611. These data suggests that rs2229611 is a crucial regulatory SNP which in homozygous state leads to a more aggressive disease phenotype in GSD-Ia patients. The implication of this result is significant in predicting disease onset, progression and response to disease modifying treatments in patients with GSD-Ia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, A. R. R.; Ryman, Brenda E.

    1971-01-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance. PMID:5289293

  18. Carbohydrate-response-element-binding protein (ChREBP) and not the liver X receptor α (LXRα) mediates elevated hepatic lipogenic gene expression in a mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefhorst, Aldo; Schreurs, Marijke; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Cortés, Victor A; Havinga, Rick; Herling, Andreas W; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Groen, Albert K; Kuipers, Folkert

    2010-12-01

    GSD-1 (glycogen storage disease type 1) is caused by an inherited defect in glucose-6-phosphatase activity, resulting in a massive accumulation of hepatic glycogen content and an induction of de novo lipogenesis. The chlorogenic acid derivative S4048 is a pharmacological inhibitor of the glucose 6-phosphate transporter, which is part of glucose-6-phosphatase, and allows for mechanistic studies concerning metabolic defects in GSD-1. Treatment of mice with S4048 resulted in an ~60% reduction in blood glucose, increased hepatic glycogen and triacylglycerol (triglyceride) content, and a markedly enhanced hepatic lipogenic gene expression. In mammals, hepatic expression of lipogenic genes is regulated by the co-ordinated action of the transcription factors SREBP (sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein)-1c, LXRα (liver X receptor α) and ChREBP (carbohydrate-response-element-binding protein). Treatment of Lxra-/- mice and Chrebp-/- mice with S4048 demonstrated that ChREBP, but not LXRα, mediates the induction of hepatic lipogenic gene expression in this murine model of GSD-1. Thus ChREBP is an attractive target to alleviate derangements in lipid metabolism observed in patients with GSD-1.

  19. Glycogen storage disease type Ia mice with less than 2% of normal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity restored are at risk of developing hepatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Goo-Young; Lee, Young Mok; Kwon, Joon Hyun; Cho, Jun-Ho; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Starost, Matthew F; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2017-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) and carcinoma (HCC), is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC). We have previously shown that G6pc-/- mice receiving gene transfer mediated by rAAV-G6PC, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing G6Pase-α, and expressing 3-63% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity maintain glucose homeostasis and do not develop HCA/HCC. However, the threshold of hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to prevent tumor formation remained unknown. In this study, we constructed rAAV-co-G6PC, a rAAV vector expressing a codon-optimized (co) G6Pase-α and showed that rAAV-co-G6PC was more efficacious than rAAV-G6PC in directing hepatic G6Pase-α expression. Over an 88-week study, we showed that both rAAV-G6PC- and rAAV-co-G6PC-treated G6pc-/- mice expressing 3-33% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV mice) maintained glucose homeostasis, lacked HCA/HCC, and were protected against age-related obesity and insulin resistance. Of the eleven rAAV-G6PC/rAAV-co-G6PC-treated G6pc-/- mice harboring 0.9-2.4% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-low mice), 3 expressing 0.9-1.3% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity developed HCA/HCC, while 8 did not (AAV-low-NT). Finally, we showed that the AAV-low-NT mice exhibited a phenotype indistinguishable from that of AAV mice expressing ≥3% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity. The results establish the threshold of hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to prevent HCA/HCC and show that GSD-Ia mice harboring <2% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity are at risk of tumor development. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Glycogen metabolism in humans ? ??

    OpenAIRE

    Adeva-Andany, Mar?a M.; Gonz?lez-Luc?n, Manuel; Donapetry-Garc?a, Crist?bal; Fern?ndez-Fern?ndez, Carlos; Ameneiros-Rodr?guez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In the human body, glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose stored mainly in the liver and the skeletal muscle that supplies glucose to the blood stream during fasting periods and to the muscle cells during muscle contraction. Glycogen has been identified in other tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, adipose tissue, and erythrocytes, but glycogen function in these tissues is mostly unknown. Glycogen synthesis requires a series of reactions that include glucose entrance into the cell through...

  1. Glycogen and its metabolism: some new developments and old themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Peter J.; Depaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose that acts as a store of energy in times of nutritional sufficiency for utilization in times of need. Its metabolism has been the subject of extensive investigation and much is known about its regulation by hormones such as insulin, glucagon and adrenaline (epinephrine). There has been debate over the relative importance of allosteric compared with covalent control of the key biosynthetic enzyme, glycogen synthase, as well as the relative importance of glucose entry into cells compared with glycogen synthase regulation in determining glycogen accumulation. Significant new developments in eukaryotic glycogen metabolism over the last decade or so include: (i) three-dimensional structures of the biosynthetic enzymes glycogenin and glycogen synthase, with associated implications for mechanism and control; (ii) analyses of several genetically engineered mice with altered glycogen metabolism that shed light on the mechanism of control; (iii) greater appreciation of the spatial aspects of glycogen metabolism, including more focus on the lysosomal degradation of glycogen; and (iv) glycogen phosphorylation and advances in the study of Lafora disease, which is emerging as a glycogen storage disease. PMID:22248338

  2. Muscle glycogen remodeling and glycogen phosphate metabolism following exhaustive exercise of wild type and laforin knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Jose M; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Meyer, Catalina M; Segvich, Dyann M; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2015-09-11

    Glycogen, the repository of glucose in many cell types, contains small amounts of covalent phosphate, of uncertain function and poorly understood metabolism. Loss-of-function mutations in the laforin gene cause the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Lafora disease, characterized by increased glycogen phosphorylation and the formation of abnormal deposits of glycogen-like material called Lafora bodies. It is generally accepted that the phosphate is removed by the laforin phosphatase. To study the dynamics of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylation in vivo under physiological conditions, mice were subjected to glycogen-depleting exercise and then monitored while they resynthesized glycogen. Depletion of glycogen by exercise was associated with a substantial reduction in total glycogen phosphate and the newly resynthesized glycogen was less branched and less phosphorylated. Branching returned to normal on a time frame of days, whereas phosphorylation remained suppressed over a longer period of time. We observed no change in markers of autophagy. Exercise of 3-month-old laforin knock-out mice caused a similar depletion of glycogen but no loss of glycogen phosphate. Furthermore, remodeling of glycogen to restore the basal branching pattern was delayed in the knock-out animals. From these results, we infer that 1) laforin is responsible for glycogen dephosphorylation during exercise and acts during the cytosolic degradation of glycogen, 2) excess glycogen phosphorylation in the absence of laforin delays the normal remodeling of the branching structure, and 3) the accumulation of glycogen phosphate is a relatively slow process involving multiple cycles of glycogen synthesis-degradation, consistent with the slow onset of the symptoms of Lafora disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Muscle Glycogen Remodeling and Glycogen Phosphate Metabolism following Exhaustive Exercise of Wild Type and Laforin Knockout Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Jose M.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Meyer, Catalina M.; Segvich, Dyann M.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen, the repository of glucose in many cell types, contains small amounts of covalent phosphate, of uncertain function and poorly understood metabolism. Loss-of-function mutations in the laforin gene cause the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Lafora disease, characterized by increased glycogen phosphorylation and the formation of abnormal deposits of glycogen-like material called Lafora bodies. It is generally accepted that the phosphate is removed by the laforin phosphatase. To study the dynamics of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylation in vivo under physiological conditions, mice were subjected to glycogen-depleting exercise and then monitored while they resynthesized glycogen. Depletion of glycogen by exercise was associated with a substantial reduction in total glycogen phosphate and the newly resynthesized glycogen was less branched and less phosphorylated. Branching returned to normal on a time frame of days, whereas phosphorylation remained suppressed over a longer period of time. We observed no change in markers of autophagy. Exercise of 3-month-old laforin knock-out mice caused a similar depletion of glycogen but no loss of glycogen phosphate. Furthermore, remodeling of glycogen to restore the basal branching pattern was delayed in the knock-out animals. From these results, we infer that 1) laforin is responsible for glycogen dephosphorylation during exercise and acts during the cytosolic degradation of glycogen, 2) excess glycogen phosphorylation in the absence of laforin delays the normal remodeling of the branching structure, and 3) the accumulation of glycogen phosphate is a relatively slow process involving multiple cycles of glycogen synthesis-degradation, consistent with the slow onset of the symptoms of Lafora disease. PMID:26216881

  4. The role of insulin, glucagon, dexamethasone, and leptin in the regulation of ketogenesis and glycogen storage in primary cultures of porcine hepatocytes prepared from 60 kg pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fígares, I; Shannon, A E; Wray-Cahen, D; Caperna, T J

    2004-08-01

    A study was conducted to elucidate hormonal control of ketogenesis and glycogen deposition in primary cultures of porcine hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from pigs (54-68 kg) by collagenase perfusion and seeded into collagen-coated T-25 flasks. Monolayers were established in medium containing fetal bovine serum for 1 day and switched to a serum-free medium for the remainder of the culture period. Hepatocytes were maintained in DMEM/M199 containing 1% DMSO, dexamethasone (10(-6) or 10(-7) M), linoleic acid (3.4 x 10(-5) M), and carnitine (10(-3) M) for 3 days. On the first day of serum-free culture, insulin was added at 1 or 100 ng/ml and glucagon was added at 0, 1, or 100 ng/ml. Recombinant human leptin (200 ng/ml) was added during the final 24 h; medium and all cells were harvested on the third day. Concentrations of acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate (ketone bodies) in media and glycogen deposition in the cellular compartment were determined. Ketogenesis was highly stimulated by glucagon (1 and 100 ng/ml) and inhibited by insulin. In contrast, glycogen deposition was stimulated by insulin and attenuated by glucagon; high insulin was also associated with a reduction in the ketone body ratio (acetoacetate:beta-hydroxybutyrate). High levels of dexamethasone stimulated ketogenesis, but inhibited glycogen deposition at low insulin. Culture of cells with leptin for 24 h, over the range of insulin, glucagon, and dexamethasone concentrations had no effect on either glycogen deposition or ketogenesis. These data suggest that while adult porcine hepatocytes are indeed sensitive to hormonal manipulation, leptin has no direct influence on hepatic energy metabolism in swine.

  5. Storage of pineapple fruits under different conditions: implication on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was carried out at Abeokuta to investigate the effects of storage conditions popularly used in Abeokuta metropolis on freshly harvested pineapple fruits. The pineapple fruits were harvested from a farmer's field and stored for 40 days under three conditions: refridgeration (mean temperature 10 0 C), Ambient ...

  6. Behavior of whey protein concentrates under extreme storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overseas demand for whey protein concentrates (WPC) has increased steadily in recent years. Emergency aid foods often include WPC, but shelf-life studies of whey proteins under different shipment and storage conditions have not been conducted in the last 50 yr. Microbial quality, compound form...

  7. Key management and encryption under the bounded storage model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draelos, Timothy John; Neumann, William Douglas; Lanzone, Andrew J.; Anderson, William Erik

    2005-11-01

    There are several engineering obstacles that need to be solved before key management and encryption under the bounded storage model can be realized. One of the critical obstacles hindering its adoption is the construction of a scheme that achieves reliable communication in the event that timing synchronization errors occur. One of the main accomplishments of this project was the development of a new scheme that solves this problem. We show in general that there exist message encoding techniques under the bounded storage model that provide an arbitrarily small probability of transmission error. We compute the maximum capacity of this channel using the unsynchronized key-expansion as side-channel information at the decoder and provide tight lower bounds for a particular class of key-expansion functions that are pseudo-invariant to timing errors. Using our results in combination with Dziembowski et al. [11] encryption scheme we can construct a scheme that solves the timing synchronization error problem. In addition to this work we conducted a detailed case study of current and future storage technologies. We analyzed the cost, capacity, and storage data rate of various technologies, so that precise security parameters can be developed for bounded storage encryption schemes. This will provide an invaluable tool for developing these schemes in practice.

  8. Storage and degradation of poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate in activated sludge under aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dircks, Klaus; Henze, Mogens; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    results approximately 90% of the total potential growth occurs in the famine period utilising the stored PHB. The degradation rate for PHB in the famine period is found to be dependent on the level of PHB obtained at the end of the feast period. It was found that multiple order kinetics gives a good...... description of the rate of PHB degradation. The examined sludge of low SRT origin is found to degrade PHB faster than long SRT sludge at high fractions of PHB. The observed yield of glycogen on PHB in the famine period is in the range of 0.22–0.33 g COD/g COD depending on the SRT. The storage pool of glycogen...

  9. Characterization of the highly branched glycogen from the thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria and comparison with other glycogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; Stuart, Marc C A; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-08-01

    The thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria synthesizes glycogen when growing under heterotrophic conditions. Structural characterization revealed that G. sulphuraria glycogen is the most highly branched glycogen described to date, with 18% of α-(1→6) linkages. Moreover, it differs from other glycogens because it is composed of short chains only and has a substantially smaller molecular weight and particle size. The physiological role of this highly branched glycogen in G. sulphuraria is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The structure of cardiac glycogen in healthy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besford, Quinn A; Sullivan, Mitchell A; Zheng, Ling; Gilbert, Robert G; Stapleton, David; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2012-12-01

    Transmission electron micrographs of glycogen extracted from healthy mouse hearts reveal aggregate structures around 133 nm in diameter. These structures are similar to, but on average somewhat smaller than, the α-particles of glycogen found in mammalian liver. Like the larger liver glycogens, these new particles in cardiac tissue appear to be aggregates of β-particles. Free β-particles are also present in liver, and are the only type of particle seen in skeletal muscle. They have diameters from 20 to 50 nm. We discuss the number distributions of glycogen particle diameters and the implications for the structure-function relationship of glycogens in these tissues. We point out the possible implications for the study of glycogen storage diseases, and of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L.?acidophilus?NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP - amy - pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and gro...

  12. Deleterious effects of neuronal accumulation of glycogen in flies and mice

    OpenAIRE

    Duran, Jordi; Tevy, María Florencia; Garcia-Rocha, Mar; Calbó, Joaquim; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2012-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, most neurons keep glycogen synthase (GS) in an inactive form and do not show detectable levels of glycogen. Nevertheless, aberrant glycogen accumulation in neurons is a hallmark of patients suffering from Lafora disease or other polyglucosan disorders. Although these diseases are associated with mutations in genes involved in glycogen metabolism, the role of glycogen accumulation remains elusive. Here, we generated mouse and fly models expressing an active form...

  13. Identification of differentially expressed genes in chickens differing in muscle glycogen content and meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthey Sylvain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The processing ability of poultry meat is highly related to its ultimate pH, the latter being mainly determined by the amount of glycogen in the muscle at death. The genetic determinism of glycogen and related meat quality traits has been established in the chicken but the molecular mechanisms involved in variations in these traits remain to be fully described. In this study, Chicken Genome Arrays (20 K were used to compare muscle gene expression profiles of chickens from Fat (F and Lean (L lines that exhibited high and low muscle glycogen content, respectively, and of individuals exhibiting extremely high (G+ or low (G- muscle glycogen content originating from the F2 cross between the Fat and Lean lines. Real-time RT-PCR was subsequently performed to validate the differential expression of genes either selected from the microarray analysis or whose function in regulating glycogen metabolism was well known. Results Among the genes found to be expressed in chicken P. major muscle, 197 and 254 transcripts appeared to be differentially expressed on microarrays for the F vs. L and the G+ vs. G- comparisons, respectively. Some involved particularly in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism were selected for further validation studies by real-time RT-PCR. We confirmed that, as in mammals, the down-regulation of CEBPB and RGS2 coincides with a decrease in peripheral adiposity in the chicken, but these genes are also suggested to affect muscle glycogen turnover through their role in the cAMP-dependent signalling pathway. Several other genes were suggested to have roles in the regulation of glycogen storage in chicken muscle. PDK4 may act as a glycogen sensor in muscle, UGDH may compete for glycogen synthesis by using UDP-glucose for glucoronidation, and PRKAB1, PRKAG2, and PHKD may impact on glycogen turnover in muscle, through AMP-activated signalling pathways. Conclusions This study is the first stage in the understanding of molecular

  14. Cutting Edge: Increased Autoimmunity Risk in Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1b Is Associated with a Reduced Engagement of Glycolysis in T Cells and an Impaired Regulatory T Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Daniela; Carbone, Fortunata; Minopoli, Giorgia; La Rocca, Claudia; Perna, Francesco; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-05-15

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD-1b) is an autosomal-recessive disease caused by mutation of glucose-6-phosphate transporter and characterized by altered glycogen/glucose homeostasis. A higher frequency of autoimmune diseases has been observed in GSD-1b patients, but the molecular determinants leading to this phenomenon remain unknown. To address this question, we investigated the effect of glucose-6-phosphate transporter mutation on immune cell homeostasis and CD4 + T cell functions. In GSD-1b subjects, we found lymphopenia and a reduced capacity of T cells to engage glycolysis upon TCR stimulation. These phenomena associated with reduced expression of the FOXP3 transcription factor, lower suppressive function in peripheral CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells, and an impaired capacity of CD4 + CD25 - conventional T cells to induce expression of FOXP3 after suboptimal TCR stimulation. These data unveil the metabolic determinant leading to an increased autoimmunity risk in GSD-1b patients. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Glycogen metabolism in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2004-02-01

    It has been reported that glycogen levels in retina vary with retinal vascularization. However, the electrical activity of isolated retina depends on glucose supply, suggesting that it does not contain energetic reserves. We determined glycogen levels and pyruvate and lactate production under various conditions in isolated retina. Ex vivo retinas from light- and dark-adapted rats showed values of 44 +/- 0.3 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein, respectively. The glycogen content of retinas from light-adapted animals was reduced by 50% when they were transferred to darkness. Glycogen levels were low in retinas incubated in glucose-free media and increased in the presence of glucose. The highest glycogen values were found in media containing 20 mm of glucose. A rapid increase in lactate production was observed in the presence of glucose. Surprisingly, glycogen levels were the lowest and lactate production was also very low in the presence of 30 mm glucose. Our results suggest that glycogen can be used as an immediate accessible energy reserve in retina. We speculate on the possibility that gluconeogenesis may play a protective role by removal of lactic acid.

  16. Lie construction affects information storage under high memory load condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuqiu; Wang, Chunjie; Jiang, Haibo; He, Hongjian; Chen, Feiyan

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that lying consumes cognitive resources, especially working memory (WM) resources. Considering the dual functions that WM might play in lying: holding the truth-related information and turning the truth into lies, the present study examined the relationship between the information storage and processing in the lie construction. To achieve that goal, a deception task based on the old/new recognition paradigm was designed, which could manipulate two levels of WM load (low-load task using 4 items and high-load task using 6 items) during the deception process. The analyses based on the amplitude of the contralateral delay activity (CDA), a proved index of the number of representations being held in WM, showed that the CDA amplitude was lower in the deception process than that in the truth telling process under the high-load condition. In contrast, under the low-load condition, no CDA difference was found between the deception and truth telling processes. Therefore, we deduced that the lie construction and information storage compete for WM resources; when the available WM resources cannot meet this cognitive demand, the WM resources occupied by the information storage would be consumed by the lie construction.

  17. In transit storage of radioactive material under national customs administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Moreno, S.; Rodriguez, C.E.; Cesario, R.H.; Milsztain, C.; Pollach, L.; Liossa, R.

    1998-01-01

    A model of an 'in transit storage of radioactive materials' under National Customs Administration control is described account the relevant Custom House Legislation and the Nuclear Regulatory Standards in force in Argentina. Evaluation of the physical protection systems applied to the above mentioned storage by means of a software named 'IntruBuster' is also described. This software is routinely updated and is also used by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority to evaluate the adequacy of physical protection systems implemented at nuclear installations in the Country. The interaction with National and International related Organisations to minimise the probability of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials is another important aspect to be considered. This is particularly true in those cases in which the administration of these stores is privately operated. Finally, the paper described the experience obtained in the implementation of the above mentioned software as well as prosecution and control activities by the Custom House and the Nuclear Authority of Argentina. (authors)

  18. Glycogen distribution in adult and geriatric mice brains

    KAUST Repository

    Alrabeh, Rana

    2017-05-01

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cell type in the brain, undergo a number of roles in brain physiology; among them, the energetic support of neurons is the best characterized. Contained within astrocytes is the brain’s obligate energy store, glycogen. Through glycogenolysis, glycogen, a storage form of glucose, is converted to pyruvate that is further reduced to lactate and transferred to neurons as an energy source via MCTs. Glycogen is a multi-branched polysaccharide synthesized from the glucose uptaken in astrocytes. It has been shown that glycogen accumulates with age and contributes to the physiological ageing process in the brain. In this study, we compared glycogen distribution between young adults and geriatric mice to understand the energy consumption of synaptic terminals during ageing using computational tools. We segmented and densely reconstructed neuropil and glycogen granules within six (three 4 month old old and three 24 month old) volumes of Layer 1 somatosensory cortex mice brains from FIB-SEM stacks, using a combination of semi-automated and manual tools, ilastik and TrakEM2. Finally, the 3D visualization software, Blender, was used to analyze the dataset using the DBSCAN and KDTree Nearest neighbor algorithms to study the distribution of glycogen granules compared to synapses, using a plugin that was developed for this purpose. The Nearest Neighbors and clustering results of 6 datasets show that glycogen clusters around excitatory synapses more than inhibitory synapses and that, in general, glycogen is found around axonal boutons more than dendritic spines. There was no significant accumulation of glycogen with ageing within our admittedly small dataset. However, there was a homogenization of glycogen distribution with age and that is consistent with published literature. We conclude that glycogen distribution in the brain is not a random process but follows a function distribution.

  19. Path dependence of lithium ion cells aging under storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Laisuo; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Jun; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Xie, Fengchao; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates path dependence of lithium ion cells that are stored under static and non-static conditions. In the static storage tests, the levels of temperature and state of charge (SOC) are kept constant. The results of 12 tests from a combination of three temperatures and four SOCs show that, as expected, the cell ages faster at higher temperature and higher SOC. However, the cell aging mode, while consistent for all the evaluated temperatures, is different at 95% SOC from that at lower SOCs. In the non-static storage tests, the levels of temperature and SOC vary with time during the test process. The effect of the sequence of stress levels on cell aging is studied statistically using the statistical method of analysis of variation (ANOVA). It is found that cell capacity fade is path independent of both SOC and temperature, while cell resistance increase is path dependent on SOC and path independent of temperature. Finally, rate-based empirical aging models are adopted to fit the cell aging in the static storage tests. The aging model for capacity fade is demonstrated to be applicable to the non-static tests with errors between -3% and +3% for all the tested conditions over 180 days.

  20. Glycemic index: effect of food storage under low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Cassab Carreira

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the influence of food storage under low temperature (-20ºC and the resistant starch formation, both on the glycemic index (GI. The GI of only cooked and cooked and stored foods under -20ºC for 30 days was evaluated in short-term tests with humans. Significant increase on the RS content was evidenced for all the stored foods. The food storage resulted in a significant decrease on the GI of beans and chick-peas; the GI of pasta remained the same and the GI of corn meal increased. Thus, the RS formation showed reduced influence on the glycemic index. The storage of starchy foods under low temperature can collaborate to the RS intake but its effect on the GI will depend on the characteristics of the carbohydrates of each food.O estudo foi realizado para avaliar a influência do armazenamento de alimentos sob baixa temperatura e a formação de amido resistente sobre o índice glicêmico (IG. O IG de alimentos cozidos ou cozidos e armazenados a -20ºC por 30 dias foi avaliado em ensaios de curta duração com humanos. Aumento significativo no conteúdo de AR foi evidenciado para todos os alimentos armazenados. O armazenamento dos alimentos resultou em significativa redução no IG do feijão e do grão de bico. O IG do macarrão foi o mesmo e da polenta sofreu aumento. Desta forma, a evidenciada formação de AR mostrou reduzida influência no IG. O armazenamento de alimentos fonte de amido sob baixa temperatura pode colaborar com a ingestão de AR, mas o efeito sobre o IG vai depender das características dos carboidratos de cada alimento.

  1. Evaluation of placental glycogen storage in mild diabetic rats Avaliação dos estoques de glicogênio placentário em ratas com diabete moderado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Bueno

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the placental glycogen storage and fetal development in the pregnancy of neonatally streptozocin-induced diabetic rats and to establish relation with glycemia and insulin levels. METHODS: At the birth day, 147 female rats were randomly distributed in two experimental groups: 1 Non-diabetic Group (Control, n=45 - received the vehicle; 2 Diabetic Group (STZ, n=102 - received 100 mg streptozocin/kg in neonatal period. At day 0 of pregnancy, adult female rats were included in the control group when presented glycemia below 120 mg/dL and, in the group STZ with glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dL. At day 21 of pregnancy, blood samples were collected for glycemia and insulin determination, and placentas withdrawn for placental glycogen determination. The newborns (NB were classified in small (SGA, appropriate (AGA and large (LGA for gestational age. RESULTS: Rats STZ presented higher glycemia at days 0 and 14 of pregnancy. At end of pregnancy, rats STZ showed higher proportion of NB SGA and LGA; reduced rate of NB AGA and unaltered glycemia, insulin and placental glycogen determinations. CONCLUSION: Mild diabetes altered the maternal glycemia in the early pregnancy, impairing future fetal development, but it caused no alteration on insulin and placental glycogen determination, confirming that this glycemic intensity was insufficient to change glycogen metabolism.OBJETIVO: Avaliar os estoques de glicogênio placentário e o desenvolvimento fetal na prenhez de ratas com diabete moderado induzido no período neonatal e relacionar com glicemia e níveis de insulina. MÉTODOS: No dia de nascimento, foram distribuídas aleatoriamente 147 ratas em dois grupos experimentais: 1 Grupo Não-diabético (Controle, n=45 - recebeu o veículo; 2 Grupo Diabético (STZ, n=102 - recebeu 100 mg streptozocin/kg peso corpóreo. No dia 0 de prenhez, foram incluídas ratas controle que apresentassem glicemia baixo de 120 mg/dL e, no grupo STZ, com glicemia

  2. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L. acidophilus NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP-amy-pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and growth phase-dependent, and were repressed by glucose. The highest intracellular glycogen content was observed in early log-phase cells grown on trehalose, which was followed by a drastic decrease of glycogen content prior to entering stationary phase. In raffinose-grown cells, however, glycogen accumulation gradually declined following early log phase and was maintained at stable levels throughout stationary phase. Raffinose also induced an overall higher temporal glg expression throughout growth compared with trehalose. Isogenic ΔglgA (glycogen synthase) and ΔglgB (glycogen-branching enzyme) mutants are glycogen-deficient and exhibited growth defects on raffinose. The latter observation suggests a reciprocal relationship between glycogen synthesis and raffinose metabolism. Deletion of glgB or glgP (glycogen phosphorylase) resulted in defective growth and increased bile sensitivity. The data indicate that glycogen metabolism is involved in growth maintenance, bile tolerance and complex carbohydrate utilization in L. acidophilus. PMID:23879596

  3. Structural basis for the recruitment of glycogen synthase by glycogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeqiraj, Elton; Tang, Xiaojing; Hunter, Roger W; García-Rocha, Mar; Judd, Andrew; Deak, Maria; von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Alexander; Kurinov, Igor; Guinovart, Joan J; Tyers, Mike; Sakamoto, Kei; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-07-15

    Glycogen is a primary form of energy storage in eukaryotes that is essential for glucose homeostasis. The glycogen polymer is synthesized from glucose through the cooperative action of glycogen synthase (GS), glycogenin (GN), and glycogen branching enzyme and forms particles that range in size from 10 to 290 nm. GS is regulated by allosteric activation upon glucose-6-phosphate binding and inactivation by phosphorylation on its N- and C-terminal regulatory tails. GS alone is incapable of starting synthesis of a glycogen particle de novo, but instead it extends preexisting chains initiated by glycogenin. The molecular determinants by which GS recognizes self-glucosylated GN, the first step in glycogenesis, are unknown. We describe the crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans GS in complex with a minimal GS targeting sequence in GN and show that a 34-residue region of GN binds to a conserved surface on GS that is distinct from previously characterized allosteric and binding surfaces on the enzyme. The interaction identified in the GS-GN costructure is required for GS-GN interaction and for glycogen synthesis in a cell-free system and in intact cells. The interaction of full-length GS-GN proteins is enhanced by an avidity effect imparted by a dimeric state of GN and a tetrameric state of GS. Finally, the structure of the N- and C-terminal regulatory tails of GS provide a basis for understanding phosphoregulation of glycogen synthesis. These results uncover a central molecular mechanism that governs glycogen metabolism.

  4. Aerobic storage under dynamic conditions in activated sludge processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majone, M.; Dircks, K.

    1999-01-01

    In activated sludge processes, several plant configurations (like plug-flow configuration of the aeration tanks, systems with selectors, contact-stabilization processes or SBR processes) impose a concentration gradient of the carbon sources to the biomass. As a consequence, the biomass grows under...... mechanisms can also contribute to substrate removal, depending on the microbial composition and the previous "history" of the biomass. In this paper the type and the extent of this dynamic response is discussed by review of experimental studies on pure cultures, mixed cultures and activated sludges...... and with main reference to its relevance on population dynamics in the activated sludge. Possible conceptual approaches to storage modelling are also presented, including both structured and unstructured modelling. (C) 1999 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Storage quality of shelled green peas under modified atmosphere packaging at different storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anurag, Rahul K; Manjunatha, M; Jha, Shyam Narayan; Kumari, Leena

    2016-03-01

    Storage quality of shelled green peas (Pisum sativum var. sativum L) was investigated under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP: perforated and non perforated) compared to unsealed samples, respectively, at T1 (4 ± 1 °C and 94 ± 2 % RH) and T2 (10 ± 1 °C and 90 ± 2 % RH) for each sample and during period of storage (8, 16 and 24 days). Modified atmosphere (MA) was created using low density polyethylene (LDPE) film packages having 107 μm of film thickness and package size of 0.022 m(2). Quality parameters viz., weight loss (WL), total phenolic content (TPC), instrumental colour, ascorbic acid (AA) and sensory characteristics were evaluated during storage period. Weight loss was in the range of 0.18 to 3.54 (zero perforation at T1), 0.21 to 6.48(unsealed samples at T2) and 0.31 to 9.64 % (zero perforation at T1) after 8, 16 and 24 days of storage, respectively. Total phenolic content significantly increased to 102.47-161.54 mg/100 g from an initial value of 91.53 mg/100 g for all the samples and treatments studied. The MAP non perforated sample stored at T2 recorded maximum Hunter 'L' and '-a' colour values than all other samples. A significant decrease in AA content was observed in all the samples with maximum loss (53.77 %) in unsealed sample stored at T2, whereas MAP (3 perforations) sample stored at T1 retained maximum AA (90.50 %). Sensory quality analysis revealed that MAP (3 perforations) sample stored at T1 was in acceptable quality, with good appearance and overall acceptance. The study shows that shelled green peas can be stored in MAP with 3 perforations (0.4 mm dia) in the temperature range of 4 to 10 °C and 90-94 % RH to extend shelf life with marketable quality for 24 days.

  6. Properties of thermoplastic polymers used for hydrogen storage under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jousse, F.; Mazabraud, P.; Icard, B.; Mosdale, R.; Serre-Combe, P.

    2000-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen is one of the points of development of industrial applications of fuel cells of type PEMFC ( Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell). Developing an effective system of storage remains major. Ameliorations concerning the storage density of energy, the cost and facilities and the storage must be considered especially for the mobile applications. Among different approaches possible, the absorption on carbon nanotubes, the production by hydrides in the organic solutions or storage hyperbar in the gas state seem the most promising way. The storage of hydrogen gas at ambient temperature today appears as the simplest technical solution, the most advanced and the most economic solution. However, the energy density of hydrogen being weaker than that of the traditional fuels, of the quantities more important must be stored at equivalent rate. Hyperbar storage (higher pressure has 350 bar) of hydrogen makes it possible to reduce the volume of the tanks and strengthens the argument for their weights and cost

  7. Intracellular accumulation of trehalose and glycogen in an extreme oligotroph, Rhodococcus erythropolis N9T-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Takanori; Funamizu, Yuhei; Yoshida, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    An extreme oligotroph, Rhodococcus erythropolis N9T-4, showed intracellular accumulation of trehalose and glycogen under oligotrophic conditions. No trehalose accumulation was observed in cells grown on the rich medium. Deletion of the polyphosphate kinase genes enhanced the trehalose accumulation and decreases the intracellular glycogen contents, suggesting an oligotrophic relationship between among the metabolic pathways of trehalose, glycogen, and inorganic polyphosphate biosyntheses.

  8. Impaired bone metabolism in glycogen storage disease type 1 is associated with poor metabolic control in type 1a and with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy in type 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, D; Pivonello, R; Cozzolino, M; Della Casa, R; Balivo, F; Del Puente, A; Dionisi-Vici, C; Cotugno, G; Zuppaldi, C; Rigoldi, M; Parini, R; Colao, A; Andria, G; Parenti, G

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1) is a rare and genetically heterogeneous metabolic defect of gluconeogenesis due to mutations of either the G6PC gene (GSD1a) or the SLC37A4 gene (GSD1b). Osteopenia is a known complication of GSD1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of poor metabolic control and/or use of GSD1-specific treatments on bone mineral density (BMD) and metabolism in GSD1 patients. In a multicenter, cross-sectional case-control study, we studied 38 GSD1 (29 GSD1a and 9 GSD1b) patients. Clinical, biochemical and instrumental parameters indicative of bone metabolism were analyzed; BMD was evaluated by dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry and quantitative ultrasound. Both GSD1a and GSD1b patients showed reduced BMD compared with age-matched controls. In GSD1a patients, these abnormalities correlated with compliance to diet and biochemical indicators of metabolic control. In GSD1b patients, BMD correlated with the age at first administration and the duration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy. Our data indicate that good metabolic control and compliance with diet are highly recommended to improve bone metabolism in GSD1a patients. GSD1b patients on G-CSF treatment should be carefully monitored for the risk of osteopenia/osteoporosis.

  9. Regulation of glycogen synthesis in rat skeletal muscle after glycogen-depleting contractile activity: effects of adrenaline on glycogen synthesis and activation of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase.

    OpenAIRE

    Franch, J; Aslesen, R; Jensen, J

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the effects of insulin and adrenaline on the rate of glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscles after electrical stimulation in vitro. The contractile activity decreased the glycogen concentration by 62%. After contractile activity, the glycogen stores were fully replenished at a constant and high rate for 3 h when 10 m-i.u./ml insulin was present. In the absence of insulin, only 65% of the initial glycogen stores was replenished. Adrenaline decreased insulin-stimulated glycogen s...

  10. Glycogen synthase from the parabasalian parasite Trichomonas vaginalis: An unusual member of the starch/glycogen synthase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Wayne A; Pradhan, Prajakta; Madhan, Nayasha; Gist, Galen C; Brittingham, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasitic protist, is the causative agent of the common sexually-transmitted infection trichomoniasis. The organism has long been known to synthesize substantial glycogen as a storage polysaccharide, presumably mobilizing this compound during periods of carbohydrate limitation, such as might be encountered during transmission between hosts. However, little is known regarding the enzymes of glycogen metabolism in T. vaginalis. We had previously described the identification and characterization of two forms of glycogen phosphorylase in the organism. Here, we measure UDP-glucose-dependent glycogen synthase activity in cell-free extracts of T. vaginalis. We then demonstrate that the TVAG_258220 open reading frame encodes a glycosyltransferase that is presumably responsible for this synthetic activity. We show that expression of TVAG_258220 in a yeast strain lacking endogenous glycogen synthase activity is sufficient to restore glycogen accumulation. Furthermore, when TVAG_258220 is expressed in bacteria, the resulting recombinant protein has glycogen synthase activity in vitro, transferring glucose from either UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to glycogen and using both substrates with similar affinity. This protein is also able to transfer glucose from UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to maltose and longer oligomers of glucose but not to glucose itself. However, with these substrates, there is no evidence of processivity and sugar transfer is limited to between one and three glucose residues. Taken together with our earlier work on glycogen phosphorylase, we are now well positioned to define both how T. vaginalis synthesizes and utilizes glycogen, and how these processes are regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Glycogen synthase isoforms in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803: identification of different roles to produce glycogen by targeted mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ho Yoo

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 belongs to cyanobacteria which carry out photosynthesis and has recently become of interest due to the evolutionary link between bacteria and plant species. Similar to other bacteria, the primary carbohydrate storage source of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is glycogen. While most bacteria are not known to have any isoforms of glycogen synthase, analysis of the genomic DNA sequence of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 predicts that this strain encodes two isoforms of glycogen synthase (GS for synthesizing glycogen structure. To examine the functions of the putative GS genes, each gene (sll1393 or sll0945 was disrupted by double cross-over homologous recombination. Zymogram analysis of the two GS disruption mutants allowed the identification of a protein band corresponding to each GS isoform. Results showed that two GS isoforms (GSI and GSII are present in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, and both are involved in glycogen biosynthesis with different elongation properties: GSI is processive and GSII is distributive. Total GS activities in the mutant strains were not affected and were compensated by the remaining isoform. Analysis of the branch-structure of glycogen revealed that the sll1393- mutant (GSI- produced glycogen containing more intermediate-length chains (DP 8-18 at the expense of shorter and longer chains compared with the wild-type strain. The sll0945- mutant (GSII- produced glycogen similar to the wild-type, with only a slightly higher proportion of short chains (DP 4-11. The current study suggests that GS isoforms in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 have different elongation specificities in the biosynthesis of glycogen, combined with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glycogen branching enzyme.

  12. Optimal Placement of Energy Storage and Wind Power under Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Meneses de Quevedo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid growth in the amount of wind energy connected to distribution grids, they are exposed to higher network constraints, which poses additional challenges to system operation. Based on regulation, the system operator has the right to curtail wind energy in order to avoid any violation of system constraints. Energy storage systems (ESS are considered to be a viable solution to solve this problem. The aim of this paper is to provide the best locations of both ESS and wind power by optimizing distribution system costs taking into account network constraints and the uncertainty associated to the nature of wind, load and price. To do that, we use a mixed integer linear programming (MILP approach consisting of loss reduction, voltage improvement and minimization of generation costs. An alternative current (AC linear optimal power flow (OPF, which employs binary variables to define the location of the generation, is implemented. The proposed stochastic MILP approach has been applied to the IEEE 69-bus distribution network and the results show the performance of the model under different values of installed capacities of ESS and wind power.

  13. Optimal Time to Invest Energy Storage System under Uncertainty Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongma Moon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model to determine the optimal investment time for energy storage systems (ESSs in a price arbitrage trade application under conditions of uncertainty over future profits. The adoption of ESSs can generate profits from price arbitrage trade, which are uncertain because the future marginal prices of electricity will change depending on supply and demand. In addition, since the investment is optional, an investor can delay adopting an ESS until it becomes profitable, and can decide the optimal time. Thus, when we evaluate this investment, we need to incorporate the investor’s option which is not captured by traditional evaluation methods. In order to incorporate these aspects, we applied real option theory to our proposed model, which provides an optimal investment threshold. Our results concerning the optimal time to invest show that if future profits that are expected to be obtained from arbitrage trade become more uncertain, an investor needs to wait longer to invest. Also, improvement in efficiency of ESSs can reduce the uncertainty of arbitrage profit and, consequently, the reduced uncertainty enables earlier ESS investment, even for the same power capacity. Besides, when a higher rate of profits is expected and ESS costs are higher, an investor needs to wait longer. Also, by comparing a widely used net present value model to our real option model, we show that the net present value method underestimates the value for ESS investment and misleads the investor to make an investment earlier.

  14. Keyword-based Ciphertext Search Algorithm under Cloud Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Xunyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of network storage services, cloud storage have the advantage of high scalability , inexpensive, without access limit and easy to manage. These advantages make more and more small or medium enterprises choose to outsource large quantities of data to a third party. This way can make lots of small and medium enterprises get rid of costs of construction and maintenance, so it has broad market prospects. But now lots of cloud storage service providers can not protect data security.This result leakage of user data, so many users have to use traditional storage method.This has become one of the important factors that hinder the development of cloud storage. In this article, establishing keyword index by extracting keywords from ciphertext data. After that, encrypted data and the encrypted index upload cloud server together.User get related ciphertext by searching encrypted index, so it can response data leakage problem.

  15. Allele copy number and underlying pathology are associated with subclinical severity in equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Rosie J; Livesey, Leanda; Schumacher, John; Henke, Nicole; Massey, Claire; Brock, Kenny V; Fernandez-Fuente, Marta; Piercy, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1), a common glycogenosis associated with an R309H founder mutation in the glycogen synthase 1 gene (GYS1), shares pathological features with several human myopathies. In common with related human disorders, the pathogenesis remains unclear in particular, the marked phenotypic variability between affected animals. Given that affected animals accumulate glycogen and alpha-crystalline polysaccharide within their muscles, it is possible that physical disruption associated with the presence of this material could exacerbate the phenotype. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological changes in horses with PSSM1, and specifically, to investigate the hypothesis that the severity of underlying pathology, (e.g. vacuolation and inclusion formation) would (1) be higher in homozygotes than heterozygotes and (2) correlate with clinical severity. Resting and post-exercise plasma creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzyme activity measurements and muscle pathology were assessed in matched cohorts of PSSM1 homozygotes, heterozygotes or control horses. Median (interquartile range (IR)) resting CK activities were 364 (332-764) U/L for homozygotes, 301 (222-377) U/L for heterozygotes and 260 (216-320) U/L for controls, and mean (+/- SD) AST activity for homozygotes were 502 (+/116) U/L, for heterozygotes, 357 (+/-92) U/L and for controls, 311 (+/-64) U/L and were significantly different between groups (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01 respectively). Resting plasma AST activity was significantly associated with the severity of subsarcolemmal vacuolation (rho = 0.816; P = 0.01) and cytoplasmic inclusions (rho = 0.766; P = 0.01). There were fewer type 2× and more type 2a muscle fibres in PSSM1-affected horses. Our results indicate that PSSM1 has incomplete dominance. Furthermore, the association between plasma muscle enzyme activity and severity of underlying pathology suggests that physical disruption of

  16. Allele copy number and underlying pathology are associated with subclinical severity in equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosie J Naylor

    Full Text Available Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1, a common glycogenosis associated with an R309H founder mutation in the glycogen synthase 1 gene (GYS1, shares pathological features with several human myopathies. In common with related human disorders, the pathogenesis remains unclear in particular, the marked phenotypic variability between affected animals. Given that affected animals accumulate glycogen and alpha-crystalline polysaccharide within their muscles, it is possible that physical disruption associated with the presence of this material could exacerbate the phenotype. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological changes in horses with PSSM1, and specifically, to investigate the hypothesis that the severity of underlying pathology, (e.g. vacuolation and inclusion formation would (1 be higher in homozygotes than heterozygotes and (2 correlate with clinical severity. Resting and post-exercise plasma creatine kinase (CK and aspartate aminotransferase (AST enzyme activity measurements and muscle pathology were assessed in matched cohorts of PSSM1 homozygotes, heterozygotes or control horses. Median (interquartile range (IR resting CK activities were 364 (332-764 U/L for homozygotes, 301 (222-377 U/L for heterozygotes and 260 (216-320 U/L for controls, and mean (+/- SD AST activity for homozygotes were 502 (+/116 U/L, for heterozygotes, 357 (+/-92 U/L and for controls, 311 (+/-64 U/L and were significantly different between groups (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01 respectively. Resting plasma AST activity was significantly associated with the severity of subsarcolemmal vacuolation (rho = 0.816; P = 0.01 and cytoplasmic inclusions (rho = 0.766; P = 0.01. There were fewer type 2× and more type 2a muscle fibres in PSSM1-affected horses. Our results indicate that PSSM1 has incomplete dominance. Furthermore, the association between plasma muscle enzyme activity and severity of underlying pathology suggests that physical disruption of

  17. Glycogen Synthesis in Glycogenin 1-Deficient Patients: A Role for Glycogenin 2 in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krag, Thomas O; Ruiz-Ruiz, Cristina; Vissing, John

    2017-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type XV is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GYG1 gene that codes for the core molecule of muscle glycogen, glycogenin 1. Nonetheless, glycogen is present in muscles of glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting an alternative for glycogen buildup. A likely candidate is glycogenin 2, an isoform expressed in the liver and heart but not in healthy skeletal muscle. We wanted to investigate the formation of glycogen and changes in glycogen metabolism in patients with GSD type XV. Two patients with mutations in the GYG1 gene were investigated for histopathology, ultrastructure, and expression of proteins involved in glycogen synthesis and metabolism. Apart from occurrence of polyglucosan (PG) bodies in few fibers, glycogen appeared normal in most cells, and the concentration was normal in patients with GSD type XV. We found that glycogenin 1 was absent, but glycogenin 2 was present in the patients, whereas the opposite was the case in healthy controls. Electron microscopy revealed that glycogen was present between and not inside myofibrils in type II fibers, compromising the ultrastructure of these fibers, and only type I fibers contained PG bodies. We also found significant changes to the expression levels of several enzymes directly involved in glycogen and glucose metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating expression of glycogenin 2 in glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting that glycogenin 2 rescues the formation of glycogen in patients with glycogenin 1 deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  18. Contributions of Glycogen to Astrocytic Energetics during Brain Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A.; Cruz, Nancy F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is the major store of glucose in brain and is mainly in astrocytes. Brain glycogen levels in unstimulated, carefully-handled rats are 10-12 mol/g, and assuming that astrocytes account for half the brain mass, astrocytic glycogen content is twice as high. Glycogen turnover is slow under basal conditions, but it is mobilized during activation. There is no net increase in incorporation of label from glucose during activation, whereas label release from pre-labeled glycogen exceeds net glycogen consumption, which increases during stronger stimuli. Because glycogen level is restored by non-oxidative metabolism, astrocytes can influence the global ratio of oxygen to glucose utilization. Compensatory increases in utilization of blood glucose during inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase are large and approximate glycogenolysis rates during sensory stimulation. In contrast, glycogenolysis rates during hypoglycemia are low due to continued glucose delivery and oxidation of endogenous substrates; rates that preserve neuronal function in the absence of glucose are also low, probably due to metabolite oxidation. Modeling studies predict that glycogenolysis maintains a high level of glucose-6-phosphate in astrocytes to maintain feedback inhibition of hexokinase, thereby diverting glucose for use by neurons. The fate of glycogen carbon in vivo is not known, but lactate efflux from brain best accounts for the major metabolic characteristics during activation of living brain. Substantial shuttling coupled with oxidation of glycogen-derived lactate is inconsistent with available evidence. Glycogen has important roles in astrocytic energetics, including glucose sparing, control of extracellular K+ level, oxidative stress management, and memory consolidation; it is a multi-functional compound. PMID:24515302

  19. A patient with glycogen storage disease type Ib presenting with acute myeloid leukemia (AML bearing monosomy 7 and translocation t(3;8(q26;q24 after 14 years of treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glycogen storage disease type Ib is an autosomal recessive transmitted disorder of glycogen metabolism caused by mutations in the glucose-6-phosphate translocase gene on chromosome 11q23 and leads to disturbed glycogenolysis as well as gluconeogenesis. Besides hepatomegaly, growth retardation, hypoglycemia, hyperlactatemia, hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia, patients suffer from neutropenia associated with functional defects predisposing for severe infections. In order to attenuate these complications, long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is common but this is associated with an increased risk for acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with inherited bone marrow failures such as severe congenital neutropenia. Onset of these myeloid malignancies is linked to cytogenetic aberrations involving chromosome 7. In addition, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is known to stimulate proliferation of monosomy 7 cells in vitro. To our knowledge, we report for the first time a case report of a patient with glycogen storage disease type Ib, who developed acute myeloid leukemia with a classical monosomy 7 and acute myeloid leukemia-associated translocation t(3;8(q26;q24 after 14 years of continuous treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Case presentation A 28-year-old Turkish man with glycogen storage disease type Ib was admitted to our department because of dyspnea and increasing fatigue. He also presented with gum bleeding, bone pain in his legs, night sweats, recurrent episodes of fever with temperatures up to 39°C and hepatosplenomegaly. A blood count taken on the day of admission showed pancytopenia and a differential count displayed 30% blasts. A bone marrow biopsy was taken which showed a hypercellular marrow with dysplastic features of all three cell lines, while blast count was 20%. Classical cytogenetic analyses as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization

  20. Dysregulation of multiple facets of glycogen metabolism in a murine model of Pompe disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Taylor

    Full Text Available Pompe disease, also known as glycogen storage disease (GSD type II, is caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA. The resulting glycogen accumulation causes a spectrum of disease severity ranging from a rapidly progressive course that is typically fatal by 1 to 2 years of age to a slower progressive course that causes significant morbidity and early mortality in children and adults. The aim of this study is to better understand the biochemical consequences of glycogen accumulation in the Pompe mouse. We evaluated glycogen metabolism in heart, triceps, quadriceps, and liver from wild type and several strains of GAA(-/- mice. Unexpectedly, we observed that lysosomal glycogen storage correlated with a robust increase in factors that normally promote glycogen biosynthesis. The GAA(-/- mouse strains were found to have elevated glycogen synthase (GS, glycogenin, hexokinase, and glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P, the allosteric activator of GS. Treating GAA(-/- mice with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of glycogen, GS, glycogenin, and G-6-P. Lysosomal glycogen storage also correlated with a dysregulation of phosphorylase, which normally breaks down cytoplasmic glycogen. Analysis of phosphorylase activity confirmed a previous report that, although phosphorylase protein levels are identical in muscle lysates from wild type and GAA(-/- mice, phosphorylase activity is suppressed in the GAA(-/- mice in the absence of AMP. This reduction in phosphorylase activity likely exacerbates lysosomal glycogen accumulation. If the dysregulation in glycogen metabolism observed in the mouse model of Pompe disease also occurs in Pompe patients, it may contribute to the observed broad spectrum of disease severity.

  1. Convective instability of sludge storage under evaporation and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill; Tatyana, Lyubimova

    2014-05-01

    The sludge storages are an important part of production cycle at salt manufacturing, water supply, etc. A quality of water in the storage depends on mixing of pure water and settled sediment. One of the leading factors is thermal convection. There are two main mechanisms of the layer instability exist. First, it is instability of water due to evaporation from the free surface [1]. It cools the water from upside, increases the particles concentration and leads to the instability in the near-surface layer. Second, the sediment absorbs a solar radiation and heats the liquid from below making it unstable in the near-bottom area. We assume the initial state is the mechanical equilibrium. The water and sediment particles are motionless, the sediment forms a uniform sludge layer of thickness z0, there are no evaporation and heating by solar energy, and the temperature has a linear profile is determined by fixed upper and bottom temperatures of the layer. Taking into account the evaporation and solar radiation absorption, we obtain a non-stationary solution for the temperature using Fourier series method. The local temperature gradients increases rapidly with time, and local Rayleigh number can be estimated by thermal conduction length Lt: Raloc(z,t) = gβ(δT(z,t)/δz)L4t-/νΞ , Lt ~ √Ξt, (1) where g is gravity acceleration, β, ν and Ξ are thermal volume expansion coefficient, kinematic viscosity and thermal conductivity of the liquid, respectively. Raloc* reaches the critical value at finite time t* and water motion begins. The maximal power of solar radiation in visible band equals 230 Wt/m2 at the latitude of "Uralkalii" salt manufacturer (Berezniki, Perm Region, Russian Federation). We neglect IR and UV radiation because of its huge absorption by water [2]. The evaporation speed is found using results for shallow water reservoir [3] and meteorological data for Berezniki [4]. We get the t*~ 6 · 102 s (10 min) for the layer of 1 m depth and t*~ 2 · 103 s (40

  2. Physiological responses of Indian jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.) fruit to storage temperature under modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Laxman; Pareek, Sunil; Shukla, Kunj B

    2013-06-01

    The effect of storage temperature on physiological responses in Indian jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk. cv. Gola) fruit was investigated. Freshly harvested fruits at physiological maturity characterised by colour-turning stage were stored at ambient temperature, 12 and 6 °C for 21, 35 and 35 days respectively. Headspace O2, CO2 and C2H4, moisture content, respiration, ethylene production, firmness, tristimulus colour, chroma, hue angle and chilling injury index were monitored during fruit storage. Rates of respiration and ethylene production increased after 1 week of storage at ambient temperature, while peaks were observed after 2 weeks at 12 and 6 °C. Headspace O2 decreased continuously during storage, while CO2 and C2H4 increased at all storage temperatures. Moisture content and firmness also decreased during storage. Hunter L* values increased during storage, which correlated with the darkening of fruit colour. Fruit stored at ambient temperature did not show any chilling injury symptoms, while chilling injury appeared on day 28 under 12 °C storage and on day 21 under 6 °C storage. Indian jujube fruit showed high rates of respiration and ethylene production that were significantly affected by different storage temperatures. Lower temperatures increased the shelf life of the fruit, but chilling injury was a problem under 6 °C storage. Indian jujube fruit could be stored at 6 °C for up to 35 days if chilling injury could be alleviated. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Storage of 'Laetitia' plums ( Prunus salicina ) under controlled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upon removal from the cold storage chamber and after four days in ambient conditions (20±2°C/60±5% RH), the fruit were assessed in terms of: respiration and ethylene production rates; flesh firmness; texture; titrable acidity; red color index and hue angle (ho) of the skin; incidence of fruit cracking and internal breakdown ...

  4. Mass spectrometric quantification of glycogen to assess primary substrate accumulation in the Pompe mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Maria; Duplock, Stephen; Turner, Christopher; Davey, Philippa; Brooks, Doug A; Hopwood, John J; Meikle, Peter J

    2012-02-15

    Glycogen storage in the α-glucosidase knockout((6neo/6neo)) mouse recapitulates the biochemical defect that occurs in the human condition; as such, this mouse serves as a model for the inherited metabolic deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase known as Pompe disease. Although this model has been widely used for the assessment of therapies, the time course of glycogen accumulation that occurs as untreated Pompe mice age has not been reported. To address this, we developed a quantitative method involving amyloglucosidase digestion of glycogen and quantification of the resulting free glucose by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was sensitive enough to measure as little as 0.1 μg of glycogen in tissue extracts with intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of less than 12%. Quantification of glycogen in tissues from Pompe mice from birth to 26 weeks of age showed that, in addition to the accumulation of glycogen in the heart and skeletal muscle, glycogen also progressively accumulated in the brain, diaphragm, and skin. Glycogen storage was also evident at birth in these tissues. This method may be particularly useful for longitudinal assessment of glycogen reduction in response to experimental therapies being trialed in this model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Glycogen metabolism in the glucose-sensing and supply-driven β-cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Lotta E; Nicholas, Lisa M; Filipsson, Karin; Sun, Jiangming; Medina, Anya; Al-Majdoub, Mahmoud; Fex, Malin; Mulder, Hindrik; Spégel, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Glycogen metabolism in β-cells may affect downstream metabolic pathways controlling insulin release. We examined glycogen metabolism in human islets and in the rodent-derived INS-1 832/13 β-cells and found them to express the same isoforms of key enzymes required for glycogen metabolism. Our findings indicate that glycogenesis is insulin-independent but influenced by extracellular glucose concentrations. Levels of glycogen synthase decrease with increasing glucose concentrations, paralleling accumulation of glycogen. We did not find cAMP-elicited glycogenolysis and insulin secretion to be causally related. In conclusion, our results reveal regulated glycogen metabolism in human islets and insulin-secreting cells. Whether glycogen metabolism affects insulin secretion under physiological conditions remains to be determined. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Muscle glycogen stores and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Håkan; Nielsen, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    function during fatigue is not well understood and a direct cause-and-effect relationship between glycogen and muscle function remains to be established. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not homogeneously distributed in skeletal muscle fibres, but rather localized in distinct...... the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). We and others have provided experimental evidence in favour of a direct role of decreased glycogen, localized within the myofibrils, for the reduction in SR Ca2+ release during fatigue. This is consistent with compartmentalized energy turnover and distinctly localized glycogen...

  7. 41 CFR 302-8.300 - Under what authority am I provided storage during school recess?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Overseas Dependents School (DoDDS) Teachers § 302-8.300 Under what authority am I provided storage during school recess? (a) Description. The Department of Defense Overseas Teachers Pay and Personnel... I provided storage during school recess? 302-8.300 Section 302-8.300 Public Contracts and Property...

  8. Glycogen metabolism and the homeostatic regulation of sleep

    KAUST Repository

    Petit, Jean-Marie

    2014-11-16

    In 1995 Benington and Heller formulated an energy hypothesis of sleep centered on a key role of glycogen. It was postulated that a major function of sleep is to replenish glycogen stores in the brain that have been depleted during wakefulness which is associated to an increased energy demand. Astrocytic glycogen depletion participates to an increase of extracellular adenosine release which influences sleep homeostasis. Here, we will review some evidence obtained by studies addressing the question of a key role played by glycogen metabolism in sleep regulation as proposed by this hypothesis or by an alternative hypothesis named “glycogenetic” hypothesis as well as the importance of the confounding effect of glucocorticoïds. Even though actual collected data argue in favor of a role of sleep in brain energy balance-homeostasis, they do not support a critical and direct involvement of glycogen metabolism on sleep regulation. For instance, glycogen levels during the sleep-wake cycle are driven by different physiological signals and therefore appear more as a marker-integrator of brain energy status than a direct regulator of sleep homeostasis. In support of this we provide evidence that blockade of glycogen mobilization does not induce more sleep episodes during the active period while locomotor activity is reduced. These observations do not invalidate the energy hypothesis of sleep but indicate that underlying cellular mechanisms are more complex than postulated by Benington and Heller.

  9. Investigating longevity of corrosion inhibitors and performance of deicer products under storage or after pavement application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the longevity of corrosion inhibitors and the performance of inhibited deicer products under storage or after pavement application. No significant degradation of corrosion inhibitor or loss of chlorides was seen during the months...

  10. Variations in Glycogen Synthesis in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells with Altered Pluripotent States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Richard J.; Zhang, Guofeng; Garfield, Susan H.; Shi, Yi-Jun; Chen, Kevin G.; Robey, Pamela G.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent very promising resources for cell-based regenerative medicine. It is essential to determine the biological implications of some fundamental physiological processes (such as glycogen metabolism) in these stem cells. In this report, we employ electron, immunofluorescence microscopy, and biochemical methods to study glycogen synthesis in hPSCs. Our results indicate that there is a high level of glycogen synthesis (0.28 to 0.62 μg/μg proteins) in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) compared with the glycogen levels (0 to 0.25 μg/μg proteins) reported in human cancer cell lines. Moreover, we found that glycogen synthesis was regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) and the glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) pathway. Our observation of glycogen bodies and sustained expression of the pluripotent factor Oct-4 mediated by the potent GSK-3 inhibitor CHIR-99021 reveals an altered pluripotent state in hPSC culture. We further confirmed glycogen variations under different naïve pluripotent cell growth conditions based on the addition of the GSK-3 inhibitor BIO. Our data suggest that primed hPSCs treated with naïve growth conditions acquire altered pluripotent states, similar to those naïve-like hPSCs, with increased glycogen synthesis. Furthermore, we found that suppression of phosphorylated glycogen synthase was an underlying mechanism responsible for altered glycogen synthesis. Thus, our novel findings regarding the dynamic changes in glycogen metabolism provide new markers to assess the energetic and various pluripotent states in hPSCs. The components of glycogen metabolic pathways offer new assays to delineate previously unrecognized properties of hPSCs under different growth conditions. PMID:26565809

  11. Pregnancies in Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Daniëlle HJ; Rake, Jan Peter; Schwarz, Martin; Ullrich, Kurt; Weinstein, David A; Merkel, Martin; Sauer, Pieter JJ; Smit, G Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Objective Reports on pregnancies in women with GSD-Ia are scarce. Due to improved life expectancy, pregnancy is becoming an important issue. We describe 15 pregnancies focusing on dietary treatment, biochemical parameters and GSD-Ia complications. Study Design Carbohydrate requirements (mg/kg/min), triglyceride and uric acid levels, liver ultrasonography and creatinine clearance were investigated before, during and after pregnancy. Data of the newborns were obtained from the records. Results In the first trimester, a significant increase in carbohydrate requirements was observed (p=0,007). Most patients had acceptable triglyceride and uric acid levels during pregnancy. No increase in size/number of adenomas was seen. In 3/4 patients, a decrease in GFR was observed after pregnancy. In three pregnancies, lactic acidosis developed during delivery with severe multi-organ failure in one. All but one of the children are healthy and show good psychomotor development. Conclusion Successful pregnancies are possible in GSD-Ia patients, although specific GSD-Ia related risks are present. PMID:18241814

  12. Factors affecting accumulation and degradation of curdlan, trehalose and glycogen in cultures of Cellulomonas flavigena strain KU (ATCC 53703).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardana, Lakmal S; Gall, Aaron R; Buller, Clarence S; Esch, Steven W; Kenyon, William J

    2011-03-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena strain KU (ATCC 53703) is a cellulolytic, Gram-positive bacterium which produces large quantities of an insoluble exopolysaccharide (EPS) when grown in minimal media with a high carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio. Earlier studies proved the EPS is structurally identical to the linear β-1,3-glucan known as curdlan and provided evidence that the EPS functions as a carbon and energy reserve compound. We now report that C. flavigena KU also accumulates two intracellular, glucose-storage carbohydrates under conditions of carbon and energy excess. These carbohydrates were partially purified and identified as the disaccharide trehalose and a glycogen/amylopectin-type polysaccharide. A novel method is described for the sequential fractionation and quantitative determination of all three carbohydrates from culture samples. This fractionation protocol was used to examine the effects of C/N ratio and osmolarity on the accumulation of cellular carbohydrates in batch culture. Increasing the C/N of the growth medium caused a significant accumulation of curdlan and glycogen but had a relatively minor effect on accumulation of trehalose. In contrast, trehalose levels increased in response to increasing osmolarity, while curdlan levels declined and glycogen levels were generally unaffected. During starvation for an exogenous source of carbon and energy, only curdlan and glycogen showed substantial degradation within the first 24 h. These results support the conclusion that extracellular curdlan and intracellular glycogen can both serve as short-term reserve compounds for C. flavigena KU and that trehalose appears to accumulate as a compatible solute in response to osmotic stress.

  13. Modified glycogen as construction material for functional biomimetic microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabyk, Mariia; Hruby, Martin; Vetrik, Miroslav; Kucka, Jan; Proks, Vladimir; Parizek, Martin; Konefal, Rafal; Krist, Pavel; Chvatil, David; Bacakova, Lucie; Slouf, Miroslav; Stepanek, Petr

    2016-11-05

    We describe a conceptually new, microfibrous, biodegradable functional material prepared from a modified storage polysaccharide also present in humans (glycogen) showing strong potential as direct-contact dressing/interface material for wound healing. Double bonds were introduced into glycogen via allylation and were further exploited for crosslinking of the microfibers. Triple bonds were introduced by propargylation and served for further click functionalization of the microfibers with bioactive peptide. A simple solvent-free method allowing the preparation of thick layers was used to produce microfibers (diameter ca 2μm) from allylated and/or propargylated glycogen. Crosslinking of the samples was performed by microtron beta-irradiation, and the irradiation dose was optimized to 2kGy. The results from biological testing showed that these highly porous, hydrophilic, readily functionalizable materials were completely nontoxic to cells growing in their presence. The fibers were gradually degraded in the presence of cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Is Glycogenin Essential for Glycogen Synthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfors, Anders

    2017-07-05

    Glycogen synthesis requires a priming oligosaccharide, formed by autoglucosylation of glycogenin, a core protein in glycogen particles. In this edition of Cell Metabolism, Testoni et al. (2017) challenge this generally accepted concept by demonstrating that glycogenin inactivation in mice results in an increased amount of glycogen and not glycogen depletion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantification of the glycogen cascade system: the ultrasensitive responses of liver glycogen synthase and muscle phosphorylase are due to distinctive regulatory designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh KV

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways include intricate networks of reversible covalent modification cycles. Such multicyclic enzyme cascades amplify the input stimulus, cause integration of multiple signals and exhibit sensitive output responses. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase by reversible covalent modification cycles exemplifies signal transduction by enzyme cascades. Although this system for regulating glycogen synthesis and breakdown appears similar in all tissues, subtle differences have been identified. For example, phosphatase-1, a dephosphorylating enzyme of the system, is regulated quite differently in muscle and liver. Do these small differences in regulatory architecture affect the overall performance of the glycogen cascade in a specific tissue? We address this question by analyzing the regulatory structure of the glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells at steady state. Results The glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells was analyzed at steady state and the results were compared with literature data. We found that the cascade system exhibits highly sensitive switch-like responses to changes in cyclic AMP concentration and the outputs are surprisingly different in the two tissues. In muscle, glycogen phosphorylase is more sensitive than glycogen synthase to cyclic AMP, while the opposite is observed in liver. Furthermore, when the liver undergoes a transition from starved to fed-state, the futile cycle of simultaneous glycogen synthesis and degradation switches to reciprocal regulation. Under such a transition, different proportions of active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase can coexist due to the varying inhibition of glycogen-synthase phosphatase by active phosphorylase. Conclusion The highly sensitive responses of glycogen synthase in liver and phosphorylase in muscle to primary stimuli can be attributed to distinctive regulatory designs in the glycogen cascade system. The different

  16. Technical and experimental features of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of brain glycogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Francisca; Gruetter, Rolf; Lei, Hongxia

    2017-07-15

    In the brain, glycogen is a source of glucose not only in emergency situations but also during normal brain activity. Altered brain glycogen metabolism is associated with energetic dysregulation in pathological conditions, such as diabetes or epilepsy. Both in humans and animals, brain glycogen levels have been assessed non-invasively by Carbon-13 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ( 13 C-MRS) in vivo. With this approach, glycogen synthesis and degradation may be followed in real time, thereby providing valuable insights into brain glycogen dynamics. However, compared to the liver and muscle, where glycogen is abundant, the sensitivity for detection of brain glycogen by 13 C-MRS is inherently low. In this review we focus on strategies used to optimize the sensitivity for 13 C-MRS detection of glycogen. Namely, we explore several technical perspectives, such as magnetic field strength, field homogeneity, coil design, decoupling, and localization methods. Furthermore, we also address basic principles underlying the use of 13 C-labeled precursors to enhance the detectable glycogen signal, emphasizing specific experimental aspects relevant for obtaining kinetic information on brain glycogen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The biochemical mechanism of hypoxia-induced mobilization of glycogen in cultured cancer cell

    OpenAIRE

    Mung, KL; Wong, NS

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic reprogramming is one of the strategies adopted by cancer cells to survive hypoxic conditions. Recent findings suggest that hypoxic cancer cells derive the energy that they need through glycolysis using glucose mobilized from intracellular glycogen reserve. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is the major rate-determining enzyme for glycogen mobilization in many normal cells under the condition of starvation or physical exercise. The lysosomal alpha-glucosidase (GAA) has also bee...

  18. Human brain glycogen content and metabolism: implications on its role in brain energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Gülin; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Kumar, Anjali; Criego, Amy B; Benedict, Luke E; Rao, Jyothi P; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Van De Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Gruetter, Rolf

    2007-03-01

    The adult brain relies on glucose for its energy needs and stores it in the form of glycogen, primarily in astrocytes. Animal and culture studies indicate that brain glycogen may support neuronal function when the glucose supply from the blood is inadequate and/or during neuronal activation. However, the concentration of glycogen and rates of its metabolism in the human brain are unknown. We used in vivo localized 13C-NMR spectroscopy to measure glycogen content and turnover in the human brain. Nine healthy volunteers received intravenous infusions of [1-(13)C]glucose for durations ranging from 6 to 50 h, and brain glycogen labeling and washout were measured in the occipital lobe for up to 84 h. The labeling kinetics suggest that turnover is the main mechanism of label incorporation into brain glycogen. Upon fitting a model of glycogen metabolism to the time courses of newly synthesized glycogen, human brain glycogen content was estimated at approximately 3.5 micromol/g, i.e., three- to fourfold higher than free glucose at euglycemia. Turnover of bulk brain glycogen occurred at a rate of 0.16 micromol.g-1.h-1, implying that complete turnover requires 3-5 days. Twenty minutes of visual stimulation (n=5) did not result in detectable glycogen utilization in the visual cortex, as judged from similar [13C]glycogen levels before and after stimulation. We conclude that the brain stores a substantial amount of glycogen relative to free glucose and metabolizes this store very slowly under normal physiology.

  19. Astrocyte glycogen metabolism is required for neural activity during aglycemia or intense stimulation in mouse white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angus M; Sickmann, Helle M; Fosgerau, Keld; Lund, Trine M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Ransom, Bruce R

    We tested the hypothesis that inhibiting glycogen degradation accelerates compound action potential (CAP) failure in mouse optic nerve (MON) during aglycemia or high-intensity stimulation. Axon function was assessed as the evoked CAP, and glycogen content was measured biochemically. Isofagomine, a novel inhibitor of central nervous system (CNS) glycogen phosphorylase, significantly increased glycogen content under normoglycemic conditions. When MONs were bathed in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) containing 10 mM glucose, the CAP failed 16 min after exposure to glucose-free aCSF. MONs bathed in aCSF plus isofagomine displayed accelerated CAP failure on glucose removal. Similar results were obtained in MONs bathed in 30 mM glucose, which increased baseline glycogen concentration. The ability of isofagomine to increase glycogen content thus was not translated into delayed CAP failure. This is likely due to the inability of the tissue to metabolize glycogen in the presence of isofagomine, highlighting the importance of glycogen in sustaining neural function during aglycemia. The hypothesis that glycogen breakdown supports intense neural activity was tested by blocking glycogen breakdown during periods of high-frequency stimulation. The CAP area declined more rapidly when glycogen metabolism was inhibited by isofagomine, explicitly showing an important physiological role for glycogen metabolism during neural activity. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Molecular and Microbial Mechanisms Increasing Soil C Storage Under Future Rates of Anthropogenic N Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zak, Donald R.

    2017-11-17

    A growing body of evidence reveals that anthropogenic N deposition can reduce the microbial decay of plant detritus and increase soil C storage across a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems. This aspect of global change has the potential to constrain the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere, and hence slow the pace of climate warming. The molecular and microbial mechanisms underlying this biogeochemical response are not understood, and they are not a component of any coupled climate-biogeochemical model estimating ecosystem C storage, and hence, the future climate of an N-enriched Earth. Here, we report the use of genomic-enabled approaches to identify the molecular underpinnings of the microbial mechanisms leading to greater soil C storage in response to anthropogenic N deposition, thereby enabling us to better anticipate changes in soil C storage.

  1. 13C MRS Studies of the Control of Hepatic Glycogen Metabolism at High Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corin O. Miller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycogen is the primary intracellular storage form of carbohydrates. In contrast to most tissues where stored glycogen can only supply the local tissue with energy, hepatic glycogen is mobilized and released into the blood to maintain appropriate circulating glucose levels, and is delivered to other tissues as glucose in response to energetic demands. Insulin and glucagon, two current targets of high interest in the pharmaceutical industry, are well-known glucose-regulating hormones whose primary effect in liver is to modulate glycogen synthesis and breakdown. The purpose of these studies was to develop methods to measure glycogen metabolism in real time non-invasively both in isolated mouse livers, and in non-human primates (NHPs using 13C MRS.Methods: Livers were harvested from C57/Bl6 mice and perfused with [1-13C] Glucose. To demonstrate the ability to measure acute changes in glycogen metabolism ex-vivo, fructose, glucagon, and insulin were administered to the liver ex-vivo. The C1 resonance of glycogen was measured in real time with 13C MRS using an 11.7T (500 MHz NMR spectrometer. To demonstrate the translatability of this approach, NHPs (male rhesus monkeys were studied in a 7 T Philips MRI using a partial volume 1H/13C imaging coil. NPHs were subjected to a variable IV infusion of [1-13C] glucose (to maintain blood glucose at 3-4x basal, along with a constant 1 mg/kg/min infusion of fructose. The C1 resonance of glycogen was again measured in real time with 13C MRS. To demonstrate the ability to measure changes in glycogen metabolism in vivo, animals received a glucagon infusion (1 μg/kg bolus followed by 40 ng/kg/min constant infusion half way through the study on the second study session.Results: In both perfused mouse livers and in NHPs, hepatic 13C-glycogen synthesis (i.e., monotonic increases in the 13C-glycogen NMR signal was readily detected. In both paradigms, addition of glucagon resulted in cessation of glycogen

  2. Quantitative trait loci associated with longevity of lettuce seeds under conventional and controlled deterioration storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwember, Andrés R; Bradford, Kent J

    2010-10-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds have poor shelf life and exhibit thermoinhibition (fail to germinate) above ∼25°C. Seed priming (controlled hydration followed by drying) alleviates thermoinhibition by increasing the maximum germination temperature, but reduces lettuce seed longevity. Controlled deterioration (CD) or accelerated ageing storage conditions (i.e. elevated temperature and relative humidity) are used to study seed longevity and to predict potential seed lifetimes under conventional storage conditions. Seeds produced in 2002 and 2006 of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas×L. serriola accession UC96US23 were utilized to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed longevity under CD and conventional storage conditions. Multiple longevity-associated QTLs were identified under both conventional and CD storage conditions for control (non-primed) and primed seeds. However, seed longevity was poorly correlated between the two storage conditions, suggesting that deterioration processes under CD conditions are not predictive of ageing in conventional storage conditions. Additionally, the same QTLs were not identified when RIL populations were grown in different years, indicating that lettuce seed longevity is strongly affected by production environment. Nonetheless, a major QTL on chromosome 4 [Seed longevity 4.1 (Slg4.1)] was responsible for almost 23% of the phenotypic variation in viability of the conventionally stored control seeds of the 2006 RIL population, with improved longevity conferred by the Salinas allele. QTL analyses may enable identification of mechanisms responsible for the sensitivity of primed seeds to CD conditions and breeding for improved seed longevity.

  3. Characteristics of soil stability and carbon sequestration under water storage and drainage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Han, J. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the influence of saline alkali soil on soil physical properties, stability and organic carbon storage under water storage and drainage, and to provide scientific basis for improving soil quality in Fuping County of Shaanxi Province, China. Saline alkali soil model test was conducted and the process was assessed with two different methods: i) traditional drainage and ecological water storage, measure and analyze 0-30 cm soil bulk density, porosity, field water capacity, mean mass diameter (MWD), geological mean diameter (GMD), stability of water stable aggregate (WASR), aggregate destruction rate (PAD), fractal dimension (D) and; ii) organic carbon storage, comprehensively analyze the relationship between stability index and soil organic carbon. The results show that: (1) compared with traditional drainage treatment, water treatment may effectively reduce the soil bulk density by 1.3%-4.2%, and improve soil porosity and field capacity at the same time; (2) under dry and wet screen treatment, soil stability, the water storing treatment is higher than the drainage treatment. Performance trend of soil MWD and GMD increases with the increase of soil depth. The stability of soil water stable aggregates increased 14.5%-53.4%. The average aggregate destruction rate was 3.2% lower than that of the drainage treatment and the difference is obvious (Pfractal dimension and soil organic carbon storage. The correlation coefficient is, respectively, R2=0.86 and R2=0.94, and the difference is obvious (P<0.05). To sum up, the water storage treatment can effectively improve the soil quality, improve soil stability and soil organic carbon storage, which can be a good control of saline alkali soil.

  4. [Influence of different iron compounds on lipid complex of vitamin fortified wheat flour under storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'eva, I S; Baĭkov, V G; Vorob'eva, V M; Shatniuk, L N

    2009-01-01

    Influence of different iron compounds at combined vitamin fortification on hygienic and biochemical properties of freshly grounded first-class wheat flour under storage was studied. It proved, that more intensive oxidative and hydrolytic processes take place in the lipid complex of the flour, fortified with ferrous sulfate heptahydrate.

  5. The effect of antenatal administration of solcoseryl on hepatic glycogen synthesis in rat fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H; Cheng, K M; Araki, T

    1993-06-01

    The effect of antenatal solcoseryl administration on hepatic glycogen synthesis and storage was studied in normal developing and intrauterine growth-retarded (IUGR) rat fetuses using biochemical analyses. The maximal effect of solcoseryl occurred 2 hours after administration. The glycogen content of the liver showed a significant increase in normal and IUGR fetuses with antenatal solcoseryl administration compared to their non-solcoseryl counterparts (p solcoseryl administration. Active synthase also increased in normal fetuses with antenatal solcoseryl administration (p solcoseryl administration stimulates hepatic glycogen synthesis and storage in IUGR rat fetuses, and thus might favorably influence the development of neonatal hypoglycemia.

  6. The nutritional status of Methanosarcina acetivorans regulates glycogen metabolism and gluconeogenesis and glycolysis fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Martínez, Michel Geovanni; Encalada, Rusely; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Reyes-García, Marco Antonio; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Gluconeogenesis is an essential pathway in methanogens because they are unable to use exogenous hexoses as carbon source for cell growth. With the aim of understanding the regulatory mechanisms of central carbon metabolism in Methanosarcina acetivorans, the present study investigated gene expression, the activities and metabolic regulation of key enzymes, metabolite contents and fluxes of gluconeogenesis, as well as glycolysis and glycogen synthesis/degradation pathways. Cells were grown with methanol as a carbon source. Key enzymes were kinetically characterized at physiological pH/temperature. Active consumption of methanol during exponential cell growth correlated with significant methanogenesis, gluconeogenic flux and steady glycogen synthesis. After methanol exhaustion, cells reached the stationary growth phase, which correlated with the rise in glycogen consumption and glycolytic flux, decreased methanogenesis, negligible acetate production and an absence of gluconeogenesis. Elevated activities of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthetase complex and pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase suggested the generation of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate for glycogen synthesis. In the early stationary growth phase, the transcript contents and activities of pyruvate phosphate dikinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glycogen synthase decreased, whereas those of glycogen phosphorylase, ADP-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase increased. Therefore, glycogen and gluconeogenic metabolites were synthesized when an external carbon source was provided. Once such a carbon source became depleted, glycolysis and methanogenesis fed by glycogen degradation provided the ATP supply. Weak inhibition of key enzymes by metabolites suggested that the pathways evaluated were mainly transcriptionally regulated. Because glycogen metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis are not present in all methanogens, the overall data suggest that glycogen storage might represent an environmental

  7. Stability of selected volatile contact allergens in different patch test chambers under different storage conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Kristian Fredløv; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Christensen, Lars Porskjaer

    2012-01-01

    storage conditions. Methods. Petrolatum samples of methyl methacrylate (MMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA), 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate (2-HPA), cinnamal and eugenol in patch test concentrations were stored in three different test chambers (IQ chamber™, IQ Ultimate™, and Van der Bend® transport...... during storage in the refrigerator. For these two chamber systems, the contact allergen concentration dropped below the stability limit in the following order: MMA, cinnamal, 2-HPA, eugenol, and 2-HEMA. In the Van der Bend® transport container, the contact allergens exhibited acceptable stability under...

  8. Hexokinase 2, glycogen synthase and phosphorylase play a key role in muscle glycogen supercompensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, José M; Rovira, Jordi; Nielsen, Jakob N

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen-depleting exercise can lead to supercompensation of muscle glycogen stores, but the biochemical mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not completely understood.......Glycogen-depleting exercise can lead to supercompensation of muscle glycogen stores, but the biochemical mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not completely understood....

  9. 13C Mrs Studies of the Control of Hepatic Glycogen Metabolism at High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Corin O.; Cao, Jin; Zhu, He; Chen, Li M.; Wilson, George; Kennan, Richard; Gore, John C.

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Glycogen is the primary intracellular storage form of carbohydrates. In contrast to most tissues where stored glycogen can only supply the local tissue with energy, hepatic glycogen is mobilized and released into the blood to maintain appropriate circulating glucose levels, and is delivered to other tissues as glucose in response to energetic demands. Insulin and glucagon, two current targets of high interest in the pharmaceutical industry, are well known glucose-regulating hormones whose primary effect in liver is to modulate glycogen synthesis and breakdown. The purpose of these studies was to develop methods to measure glycogen metabolism in real time non-invasively both in isolated mouse livers, and in non-human primates (NHPs) using 13C MRS. Methods: Livers were harvested from C57/Bl6 mice and perfused with [1-13C] Glucose. To demonstrate the ability to measure acute changes in glycogen metabolism ex-vivo, fructose, glucagon, and insulin were administered to the liver ex-vivo. The C1 resonance of glycogen was measured in real time with 13C MRS using an 11.7T (500 MHz) NMR spectrometer. To demonstrate the translatability of this approach, NHPs (male rhesus monkeys) were studied in a 7 T Philips MRI using a partial volume 1H/13C imaging coil. NPHs were subjected to a variable IV infusion of [1-13C] glucose (to maintain blood glucose at 3-4x basal), along with a constant 1 mg/kg/min infusion of fructose. The C1 resonance of glycogen was again measured in real time with 13C MRS. To demonstrate the ability to measure changes in glycogen metabolism in vivo, animals received a glucagon infusion (1 μg/kg bolus followed by 40 ng/kg/min constant infusion) half way through the study on the second study session. Results: In both perfused mouse livers and in NHPs, hepatic 13C-glycogen synthesis (i.e. monotonic increases in the 13C-glycogen NMR signal) was readily detected. In both paradigms, addition of glucagon resulted in cessation of glycogen synthesis

  10. Fission product release model for failed plate-type fuel element and storage under water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Silva, A.T. e; Teodoro, C.A.; Damy, M. de A.

    2005-01-01

    Plate-type fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored mainly under deionized water of storage pools. When cladding failure occurs in such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion through a postulated small cylindrical failure. As a consequence, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a failed fuel plate. The proposed model reproduces the linear increasing of 137 Cs specific activity observed in sipping tests already performed on failed plate-type fuel elements. (author)

  11. A model for release of fission products from a breached fuel plate under wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Seerban, R.S.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Silva, A.T. e; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Damy, M. de A.; Teodoro, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    MTR fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored worldwide mainly under the water of storage pools. When cladding breach is present in one or more fuel plates of such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion of nuclides of a radioactive fission product either through a postulated small cylindrical breach or directly from a large circular hole in the cladding. In each case, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a breached fuel plate. Regarding sipping tests already performed at the IEA-R1 research reactor on breached MTR fuel elements, the proposed model correlates successfully the specific activity of 137 Cs, measured as a function of time, with the evaluated size of the cladding breach. (author)

  12. A model for release of fission products from a breached fuel plate under wet storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Seerban, R.S.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Silva, A.T. e; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Damy, M. de A.; Teodoro, C.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    MTR fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored worldwide mainly under the water of storage pools. When cladding breach is present in one or more fuel plates of such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion of nuclides of a radioactive fission product either through a postulated small cylindrical breach or directly from a large circular hole in the cladding. In each case, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a breached fuel plate. Regarding sipping tests already performed at the IEA-R1 research reactor on breached MTR fuel elements, the proposed model correlates successfully the specific activity of {sup 137}Cs, measured as a function of time, with the evaluated size of the cladding breach. (author)

  13. Swelling of rat hepatocytes stimulates glycogen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baquet, A.; Hue, L.; Meijer, A. J.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Plomp, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    In hepatocytes from fasted rats, several amino acids are known to stimulate glycogen synthesis via activation of glycogen synthase. The hypothesis that an increase in cell volume resulting from amino acid uptake may be involved in the stimulation of glycogen synthesis is supported by the following

  14. The glycogen metabolism via Akt signaling is important for the secretion of enamel matrix in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Otsu, Keishi; Ohshima, Hayato; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2016-02-01

    Cells alter their energy metabolism depending on the stage of differentiation or various environments. In the ameloblast differentiation of continuous growing mouse incisors, we found temporary glycogen storage in preameloblasts before the start of enamel matrix secretion and investigated the relationship between enamel matrix secretion and glycogen metabolism. Immunohistochemistry showed that in the transitional stage from preameloblasts to secretory ameloblasts, the glycogen synthase changed from the inactive form to the active form, the expression of glycogen phosphorylase increased, and further, the levels of IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor and activated Akt increased. These results suggested that the activation of Akt signaling via IGF is linked to the onset of both glycogen metabolism and enamel matrix deposition. In the experiments using organ culture and ameloblast cell line, the activation of Akt signaling by IGF-1 stimulated glycogen metabolism through the up-regulation of Glut-1,-4 and Gsk-3β and the dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase. Subsequently, they resulted in increased enamel matrix secretion. In contrast, some inhibitors of Akt signals and glycogen synthesis/degradation down-regulated enamel matrix secretion. Taking these findings together, glycogen metabolism via Akt signaling is an essential system for the secretion of enamel matrix in ameloblast differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Proglycogen and macroglycogen: artifacts of glycogen extraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony P; Barnes, Phillip D; Palmer, T Norman; Fournier, Paul A

    2008-04-01

    Most recent studies on the physiology of proglycogen and macroglycogen in skeletal muscles have adopted a homogenization-free acid extraction protocol to separate these 2 pools of glycogen. The purposes of this study were to determine (a) whether this protocol is suitable; (b) if the acid-insoluble glycogen fraction corresponds to proglycogen; and (c) if this fraction accounts for most of the changes in muscle glycogen content, irrespective of muscle fiber types. Using the rat as our experimental model, this study shows that when the conditions of acid extraction are optimized, 52% to 64% of glycogen in rat muscles is found as acid-soluble glycogen as opposed to approximately 16% when glycogen is extracted using a homogenization-free extraction protocol. Moreover, there is no evidence that the acid-insoluble glycogen corresponds to proglycogen because gel chromatography of the acid-insoluble and acid-soluble glycogen fractions shows similar elution profiles of high-molecular weight glycogen. Finally, irrespective of muscle fiber types, the acid-soluble glycogen accounts for most of the changes in total muscle glycogen levels during the fasting-to-fed transition, whereas the levels of the acid-insoluble glycogen remain stable or increase marginally. In conclusion, this study shows that the homogenization-free acid extraction of muscle glycogen underestimates the proportion of acid-soluble glycogen and that the findings of the studies that have adopted such an extraction protocol to examine the physiology of acid-insoluble and acid-soluble glycogens require reexamination.

  16. Stability of Capsaicinoids and Antioxidants in Dry Hot Peppers under Different Packaging and Storage Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qumer Iqbal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of the quality and storage life of perishable fruits and vegetables is a major challenge for the food industry. In this study, the effects of different temperatures, packaging materials and storage time on the stability of capsaicinoids and antioxidants, such as total carotenoids, ascorbic acid and total phenolic compounds, were studied in three commercially cultivated hot pepper hybrids, namely Sky Red, Maha and Wonder King. For this purpose, dry whole pods were packed in jute bags and low-density polyethylene bags (LDPE, stored for five months under controlled conditions at 20, 25 or 30 ○C and analyzed on Day 0 and at 50-day intervals until Day 150. The three hot pepper hybrids differed significantly with respect to their capsaicinoids and antioxidant concentrations, but the results indicated that with the increase in storage temperature and time, a gradual and steady decrease in these levels was equally observed for all hybrids. Overall, mean concentrations after five months were significantly reduced by 22.6% for ascorbic acid, 19.0% for phenolic compounds, 17% for carotenoids and 12.7% for capsaicinoids. The trends of capsaicinoids and antioxidants evolution were decreasing gradually during storage until Day 150, this effect being more pronounced at higher temperature. Furthermore, the disappearance rates of capsaicinoids and antioxidants were higher in peppers packed in jute bags than in those wrapped with LDPE. In conclusion, despite the sensitivity of capsaicinoids and antioxidants to oxygen, light and moisture, the packaging in natural jute or synthetic LDPE plastic bags, as well as the storage at ambient temperature preserved between 77.4% and 87.3% of the initial amounts of these health- and nutrition-promoting compounds during five months’ storage.

  17. Thermal behavior of neutron shielding material, NS-4-FR, under long term storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, N.; O-iwa, A.; Asano, R.; Horita, R.; Kusunoki, K.

    2004-01-01

    NS-4-FR, Epoxy-Resin, has been widely used as a neutron shielding material for casks. It is recognized that the resin will degrade during storage and loose weight under high temperature conditions. Most of the examinations for the resin degrading behavior were conducted with rather small bare resin specimens. However, the actual quantity of neutron shielding is quite large and is covered by the cask body. To confirm the degrading behavior of the resin under the long-term storage conditions, we performed the test on the specimen with the same cross-section as the actual design, Hitz B69. The resin test vessels were made out of stainless steel and equipped with flange

  18. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Lenskjold, Toke; Jacoby, Anne Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates a role for glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and in cognitive disturbances; however, the natural variation in GSK-3β activity over time is unknown. We aimed to investigate GSK-3β activity over time and its possible correlation...

  19. Creatine ingestion augments dietary carbohydrate mediated muscle glycogen supercompensation during the initial 24 h of recovery following prolonged exhaustive exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Paul A; Fox, John; Peirce, Nicholas; Jones, Simon W; Casey, Anna; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2016-08-01

    Muscle glycogen availability can limit endurance exercise performance. We previously demonstrated 5 days of creatine (Cr) and carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion augmented post-exercise muscle glycogen storage compared to CHO feeding alone in healthy volunteers. Here, we aimed to characterise the time-course of this Cr-induced response under more stringent and controlled experimental conditions and identify potential mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon. Fourteen healthy, male volunteers cycled to exhaustion at 70 % VO2peak. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest immediately post-exercise and after 1, 3 and 6 days of recovery, during which Cr or placebo supplements (20 g day(-1)) were ingested along with a prescribed high CHO diet (37.5 kcal kg body mass(-1) day(-1), >80 % calories CHO). Oral-glucose tolerance tests (oral-GTT) were performed pre-exercise and after 1, 3 and 6 days of Cr and placebo supplementation. Exercise depleted muscle glycogen content to the same extent in both treatment groups. Creatine supplementation increased muscle total-Cr, free-Cr and phosphocreatine (PCr) content above placebo following 1, 3 and 6 days of supplementation (all P glycogen content noticeably above placebo after 1 day of supplementation (P glycogen super-compensation, and demonstrates this occurred during the initial 24 h of post-exercise recovery (when muscle total-Cr had increased by <10 %). This marked response ensued without apparent treatment differences in muscle insulin sensitivity (oral-GTT, muscle GLUT4 mRNA), osmotic stress (muscle c-fos and HSP72 mRNA) or muscle cell volume (muscle water content) responses, such that another mechanism must be causative.

  20. Effects of training distance on feed intake, growth, body condition and muscle glycogen content in young Standardbred horses fed a forage-only diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringmark, S; Revold, T; Jansson, A

    2017-10-01

    This study examined feed intake, growth, body condition, muscle glycogen content and nutrition-related health in 16 Standardbred horses fed a high-energy, forage-only diet ad libitum and allocated to either a control training programme (C-group) or a training programme with the high-intensity training distance reduced by 30% (R-group), from January as 2-year olds until December as 3-year olds. Feed intake was recorded on 10 occasions during 3 consecutive days. Body weight was recorded once in a week and height, body condition score (BCS), rump fat thickness and thickness of the m. longissimus dorsi were measured at 7±3-week intervals throughout the study. Muscle biopsies of the m. gluteus medius were taken in December as 2-year olds and in November as 3-year olds and analysed for glycogen content. Nutrition-related health disorders were noted when they occurred. Horses consumed 1.7% to 2.6% dry matter of BW, corresponding to 19 to 28 MJ metabolisable energy/100 kg BW. There were no differences between training groups in feed intake or any of the body measurements. The pooled weekly BCS was maintained between 4.8 and 5.1 (root mean square error (RMSE)=0.4). Muscle glycogen content was 587 and 623 mmol/kg dry weight (RMSE=68) as 2- and 3-year olds, respectively, and there was no difference between training groups. When managed under normal conditions, no nutrition-related health disorders or stereotypic behaviours were observed. It was concluded that the training programme did not affect feed intake, growth, BCS or muscle glycogen content. In addition, the forage-only diet did not appear to prohibit muscle glycogen storage, growth or maintenance of body condition, and seemed to promote good nutrition-related health.

  1. Urine storage under refrigeration preserves the sample in chemical, cellularity and bacteriuria analysis of ACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Cristina Barcellos Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The analysis of urine abnormal constituents and sediment (ACS comprises tests of great diagnostic and prognostic value in clinical practice. When the analysis of ACS cannot be performed within two hours after collection, the sample must be preserved in order to avoid pre-analytical interferences. Refrigeration is the most applied technique due to its cost effectiveness. Moreover, it presents fewer inconveniences when compared to chemical preservation. However, changes in ACS may also occur in samples under refrigeration. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the influence of refrigeration at 2 to 8ºC on the storage of urine samples within 24 hours. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A total of 80 urine samples were selected from patients admitted at Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF university hospital, which were tested for ACS at room temperature and stored under refrigeration for 6, 12 and 24 hours. RESULTS: The results showed that refrigeration proved to be effective when compared to samples kept at room temperature, inasmuch as the physical, chemical, microbial and cellularity features were preserved. Nevertheless, crystalluria was present after a 6- hour storage period. CONCLUSION: The tests revealed that cooling preserved cellularity and chemical characteristics of urine samples for up to 12 hours. Nonetheless, the precipitation of crystals was evident in this storage method. Thus, the possible consequences of storing urine samples for ACS test under these conditions should be included in the analysis report.

  2. Glycogen Supercompensation in the Rat Brain After Acute Hypoglycemia is Independent of Glucose Levels During Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, João M N; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Gruetter, Rolf

    2017-06-01

    Patients with diabetes display a progressive decay in the physiological counter-regulatory response to hypoglycemia, resulting in hypoglycemia unawareness. The mechanism through which the brain adapts to hypoglycemia may involve brain glycogen. We tested the hypothesis that brain glycogen supercompensation following hypoglycemia depends on blood glucose levels during recovery. Conscious rats were submitted to hypoglycemia of 2 mmol/L for 90 min and allowed to recover at different glycemia, controlled by means of i.v. glucose infusion. Brain glycogen concentration was elevated above control levels after 24 h of recovery in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. This glycogen supercompensation was independent of blood glucose levels in the post-hypoglycemia period. In the absence of a preceding hypoglycemia insult, brain glycogen concentrations were unaltered after 24 h under hyperglycemia. In the hypothalamus, which controls peripheral glucose homeostasis, glycogen levels were unaltered. Overall, we conclude that post-hypoglycemia glycogen supercompensation occurs in several brain areas and its magnitude is independent of plasma glucose levels. By supporting brain metabolism during recurrent hypoglycemia periods, glycogen may have a role in the development of hypoglycemia unawareness.

  3. "Fluorescent glycogen" formation with sensibility for in vivo and in vitro detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzao, M Carmen; Espiña, Begoña; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Vega, Felix V; Rubiolo, Juan A; Baba, Otto; Terashima, Tatsuo; Botana, Luis M

    2008-08-01

    There are presently many methods of detecting complex carbohydrates, and particularly glycogen. However most of them require radioisotopes or destruction of the tissue and hydrolysis of glycogen to glucose. Here we present a new method based on the incorporation of 2-NBDG (2-{N-[7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazol 4-yl] amino}-2-deoxyglucose), a D-glucose fluorescent derivative, into glycogen. Two kinds of approaches were carried out by using Clone 9 rat hepatocytes as a cellular model; (1) Incubation of cell lysates with 2-NBDG, carbohydrate precipitation in filters and measurement of fluorescence in a microplate reader (2) Incubation of living hepatocytes with 2-NBDG and recording of fluorescence images by confocal microscopy. 2-NBDG labeled glycogen in both approaches. We confirmed this fact by comparison to the labeling obtained with a specific monoclonal anti-glycogen antibody. Also drugs that trigger glycogen synthesis or degradation induced an increase or decrease of fluorescence, respectively. This is a simple but efficient method of detecting glycogen with 2-NBDG. It could be used to record changes in glycogen stores in living cells and cell-free systems and opens the prospect of understanding the role of this important energy reserve under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  4. Brain Glycogen Decreases During Intense Exercise Without Hypoglycemia: The Possible Involvement of Serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes, a source of lactate as a neuronal energy source, decreases during prolonged exercise with hypoglycemia. However, brain glycogen dynamics during exercise without hypoglycemia remain unknown. Since intense exercise increases brain noradrenaline and serotonin as known inducers for brain glycogenolysis, we hypothesized that brain glycogen decreases with intense exercise not accompanied by hypoglycemia. To test this hypothesis, we employed a well-established acute intense exercise model of swimming in rats. Rats swam for fourteen 20 s bouts with a weight equal to 8 % of their body mass and were sacrificed using high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation to inactivate brain enzymes for accurate detection of brain glycogen and monoamines. Intense exercise did not alter blood glucose, but did increase blood lactate levels. Immediately after exercise, brain glycogen decreased and brain lactate increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, cortex, and brainstem. Simultaneously, serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and brainstem mutually increased and were associated with decreased brain glycogen. Intense swimming exercise that does not induce hypoglycemia decreases brain glycogen associated with increased brain lactate, implying an importance of glycogen in brain energetics during intense exercise even without hypoglycemia. Activated serotonergic regulation is a possible underlying mechanism for intense exercise-induced glycogenolysis at least in the hippocampus and brainstem.

  5. Hexokinase 2, glycogen synthase and phosphorylase play a key role in muscle glycogen supercompensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Irimia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glycogen-depleting exercise can lead to supercompensation of muscle glycogen stores, but the biochemical mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not completely understood. METHODS: Using chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS as an exercise model, the tibialis anterior muscle of rabbits was stimulated for either 1 or 24 hours, inducing a reduction in glycogen of 90% and 50% respectively. Glycogen recovery was subsequently monitored during 24 hours of rest. RESULTS: In muscles stimulated for 1 hour, glycogen recovered basal levels during the rest period. However, in those stimulated for 24 hours, glycogen was supercompensated and its levels remained 50% higher than basal levels after 6 hours of rest, although the newly synthesized glycogen had fewer branches. This increase in glycogen correlated with an increase in hexokinase-2 expression and activity, a reduction in the glycogen phosphorylase activity ratio and an increase in the glycogen synthase activity ratio, due to dephosphorylation of site 3a, even in the presence of elevated glycogen stores. During supercompensation there was also an increase in 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, correlating with a stable reduction in ATP and total purine nucleotide levels. CONCLUSIONS: Glycogen supercompensation requires a coordinated chain of events at two levels in the context of decreased cell energy balance: First, an increase in the glucose phosphorylation capacity of the muscle and secondly, control of the enzymes directly involved in the synthesis and degradation of the glycogen molecule. However, supercompensated glycogen has fewer branches.

  6. Testing and evaluation of different energy storage devices for piezoelectric energy harvesting under road conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Pratheek

    The increasing needs in green technology have propelled the rapid development in energy conversion and the advancement of electric energy storage systems. A viable storage technology is needed to store intermittent electrical energy in different electronic applications. In this thesis, recent progress on the chemistry and design of batteries is summarized with their challenges and improvements. Along with that, electrolytic capacitors are also reviewed with their types, advantages and disadvantages of each in short. Super capacitors having higher surface area and thinner dielectrics than conventional capacitors along with hybrid capacitors, are discussed in detail. The potential of a hybrid capacitor, Ni(OH)2/ Active Carbon, compared with Ni-Cd batteries and electrolytic capacitors in the application of energy storage for high way energy harvesting has been explored in this work. Both the battery and the hybrid capacitor has been tested under various experimental conditions and their properties in relation to their chemical compositions are compared. The results obtained from the experiments have been analyzed and the most suitable energy storage devices have been selected with their application potential evaluated before drawing conclusion reported in this thesis.

  7. Seed storage at elevated partial pressure of oxygen, a fast method for analysing seed ageing under dry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, S P C; Surki, A A; de Vos, R C H; Kodde, J

    2012-11-01

    Despite differences in physiology between dry and relative moist seeds, seed ageing tests most often use a temperature and seed moisture level that are higher than during dry storage used in commercial practice and gene banks. This study aimed to test whether seed ageing under dry conditions can be accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. methods: Dry barley (Hordeum vulgare), cabbage (Brassica oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and soybean (Glycine max) seeds were stored between 2 and 7 weeks in steel tanks under 18 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. Storage under high-pressure nitrogen gas or under ambient air pressure served as controls. The method was compared with storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % relative humidity and long-term storage at the laboratory bench. Germination behaviour, seedling morphology and tocopherol levels were assessed. The ageing of the dry seeds was indeed accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. The morphological ageing symptoms of the stored seeds resembled those observed after ageing under long-term dry storage conditions. Barley appeared more tolerant of this storage treatment compared with lettuce and soybean. Less-mature harvested cabbage seeds were more sensitive, as was the case for primed compared with non-primed lettuce seeds. Under high-pressure oxygen storage the tocopherol levels of dry seeds decreased, in a linear way with the decline in seed germination, but remained unchanged in seeds deteriorated during storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % RH. Seed storage under high-pressure oxygen offers a novel and relatively fast method to study the physiology and biochemistry of seed ageing at different seed moisture levels and temperatures, including those that are representative of the dry storage conditions as used in gene banks and commercial practice.

  8. Seed storage at elevated partial pressure of oxygen, a fast method for analysing seed ageing under dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, S. P. C.; Surki, A. A.; de Vos, R. C. H.; Kodde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite differences in physiology between dry and relative moist seeds, seed ageing tests most often use a temperature and seed moisture level that are higher than during dry storage used in commercial practice and gene banks. This study aimed to test whether seed ageing under dry conditions can be accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. Methods Dry barley (Hordeum vulgare), cabbage (Brassica oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and soybean (Glycine max) seeds were stored between 2 and 7 weeks in steel tanks under 18 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. Storage under high-pressure nitrogen gas or under ambient air pressure served as controls. The method was compared with storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % relative humidity and long-term storage at the laboratory bench. Germination behaviour, seedling morphology and tocopherol levels were assessed. Key Results The ageing of the dry seeds was indeed accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. The morphological ageing symptoms of the stored seeds resembled those observed after ageing under long-term dry storage conditions. Barley appeared more tolerant of this storage treatment compared with lettuce and soybean. Less-mature harvested cabbage seeds were more sensitive, as was the case for primed compared with non-primed lettuce seeds. Under high-pressure oxygen storage the tocopherol levels of dry seeds decreased, in a linear way with the decline in seed germination, but remained unchanged in seeds deteriorated during storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % RH. Conclusions Seed storage under high-pressure oxygen offers a novel and relatively fast method to study the physiology and biochemistry of seed ageing at different seed moisture levels and temperatures, including those that are representative of the dry storage conditions as used in gene banks and commercial practice. PMID:22967856

  9. Activity of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase in normal and cirrhotic rat liver during glycogen synthesis from glucose or fructose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezborodkina, Natalia N; Chestnova, Anna Yu; Okovity, Sergey V; Kudryavtsev, Boris N

    2014-03-01

    Cirrhotic patients often demonstrate glucose intolerance, one of the possible causes being a decreased glycogen-synthesizing capacity of the liver. At the same time, information about the rates of glycogen synthesis in the cirrhotic liver is scanty and contradictory. We studied the dynamics of glycogen accumulation and the activity of glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) in the course of 120min after per os administration of glucose or fructose to fasted rats with CCl4-cirrhosis or fasted normal rats. Blood serum and liver pieces were sampled for examinations. In the normal rat liver administration of glucose/fructose initiated a fast accumulation of glycogen, while in the cirrhotic liver glycogen was accumulated with a 20min delay and at a lower rate. In the normal liver GS activity rose sharply and GPa activity dropped in the beginning of glycogen synthesis, but 60min later a high synthesis rate was sustained at the background of a high GS and GPa activity. Contrariwise, in the cirrhotic liver glycogen was accumulated at the background of a decreased GS activity and a low GPa activity. Refeeding with fructose resulted in a faster increase in the GS activity in both the normal and the cirrhotic liver than refeeding with glucose. To conclude, the rate of glycogen synthesis in the cirrhotic liver is lower than in the normal one, the difference being probably associated with a low GS activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Phosphorylation-dependent translocation of glycogen synthase to a novel structure during glycogen resynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Cadefau, Joan A; Cussó, Roser

    2005-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has been the subject of extensive research, but the mechanisms by which it is regulated are still not fully understood. It is well accepted that the rate-limiting enzymes in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis are glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GPh), respectively...... stimulation of rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, we show GS and GPh intracellular redistribution at the beginning of glycogen resynthesis after contraction-induced glycogen depletion. We identify a new "player," a new intracellular compartment involved in skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism. They are spherical...

  11. Microbiological spoilage and investigation of volatile profile during storage of sea bream fillets under various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlapani, Foteini F; Mallouchos, Athanasios; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Boziaris, Ioannis S

    2014-10-17

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) profile was determined during storage of sea bream (Sparus aurata) fillets under air and Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP - CO2/O2/N2: 60/10/30) at 0, 5 and 15°C. Microbiological, TVB-N (Total Volatile Base Nitrogen) and sensory changes were also monitored. Shelf-life of sea bream fillets stored under air was 14, 5 and 2days (d) at 0, 5 and 15°C respectively, while under MAP was 18, 8, and 2d at 0, 5 and 15°C respectively. At the end of shelf life, the total microbial population ranged from 7.5 to 8.5logcfu/g. Pseudomonas spp. were among the dominant spoilage microorganisms in all cases, however growth of Brochothrix thermosphacta and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) were favoured under MAP compared to air. TVB-N production was favoured at higher temperatures and under air compared to lower temperatures and MAP. TVB-N increased substantially from the middle of storage and its value never reached concentrations higher than 30-35mgN/100g, which is the legislation limit, making it a poor chemical spoilage index (CSI). A lot of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and ethyl esters that were detected in the present study have been reported as bacterial metabolites, others as products of chemical oxidation while others as aroma constituents. VOCs such as 3-methylbutanal, acetic acid, ethanol, ethyl esters of isovaleric and 2-methylbutyric acids, 1-penten-3-ol, 1-octen-3-ol and cis-4-heptenal appeared from the early or middle stages and increased until the end of storage. From those only 3-methylbutanal, acetic acid, ethanol and the ethyl esters have been reported as microbial origin, making them potential CSI candidates of sea bream fillets. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Can Carbon Fluxes Explain Differences in Soil Organic Carbon Storage under Aspen and Conifer Forest Overstories?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antra Boča

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate- and management-induced changes in tree species distributions are raising questions regarding tree species-specific effects on soil organic carbon (SOC storage and stability. Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. is the most widespread tree species in North America, but fire exclusion often promotes the succession to conifer dominated forests. Aspen in the Western US have been found to store more SOC in the mineral soil than nearby conifers, but we do not yet fully understand the source of this differential SOC accumulation. We measured total SOC storage (0–50 cm, characterized stable and labile SOC pools, and quantified above- and belowground litter inputs and dissolved organic carbon (DOC fluxes during snowmelt in plots located in N and S Utah, to elucidate the role of foliage vs. root detritus in SOC storage and stabilization in both ecosystems. While leaf litterfall was twice as high under aspen as under conifers, input of litter-derived DOC with snowmelt water was consistently higher under conifers. Fine root (<2 mm biomass, estimated root detritus input, and root-derived DOC fluxes were also higher under conifers. A strong positive relationship between root and light fraction C content suggests that root detritus mostly fueled the labile fraction of SOC. Overall, neither differences in above- and belowground detritus C inputs nor in detritus-derived DOC fluxes could explain the higher and more stable SOC pools under aspen. We hypothesize that root–microbe–soil interactions in the rhizosphere are more likely to drive these SOC pool differences.

  13. Kinetics of protein and textural changes in Atlantic salmon under frozen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera Barraza, Fabián Alberto; León, Roberto Agustín Quevedo; Álvarez, Patricia Ximena López

    2015-09-01

    Fish proteins are highly susceptible to changes during frozen storage, leading to modifications in protein solubility, functionality, and structure, which affect the rheological properties, which, in turn, contribute to changes in techno-functional properties. Under frozen storage, these changes are the result of many physical and chemical modifications, especially structural and functional protein changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify protein and textural changes during frozen storage of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets at four temperatures (268 K, 264 K, 260 K and 255 K). The Weibullian model was applied in order to understand the quality changes. Results for all frozen storage temperatures showed that total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) did not reach the regulated limits (30-35 mg/100 g muscle), salt-soluble protein (SSP) decreased systematically and total nitrogen (TN) was constant. Hardness, adhesiveness, gumminess and chewiness levels decreased systematically at all temperatures, but cohesiveness and springiness values were relatively constant over time, at the same given temperature. A comparison between different temperatures showed an increase in the measurements observed. A kinetic analysis for TVBN, SSP, hardness, adhesiveness and chewiness, was performed. All quality indicators, except TVBN, showed reaction rates inversely proportional to the temperature, and fractional shape factors or orders of reaction. Using the Weibullian model, this study demonstrates that, in complex biological processes, quality indicators do not have an integer kinetic order and reaction rates are strongly temperature-dependent. Thus, this kind of model can be used to improve understanding, prediction, and control of the frozen storage process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Retention of short chain fatty acids under drying and storage conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Santos Souza

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cheese whey permeate was used as a substrate for the fermentation of Propionibacterium freudenreichi PS1 for the production of short chain fatty acids, components of the bio-aroma of Swiss cheese. The liquid bio-aroma was encapsulated by spray drying under different conditions of air inlet temperature and feed rate. A study was carried out on the stability of the bio-aroma during storage in laminated packages at 30 °C for 96 days using the product showing the greatest retention of acetic and propionic acids. The results showed that the best drying conditions were an air entrance temperature of 180 °C and a feed rate of 24 g/min resulting in particles with a smooth surface and few invaginations and micro-fissures. However, 72% of the acetic acid and 80% of the propionic acid were lost during storage showing that the wall material used was inadequate to guarantee product stability.

  15. Revisiting Glycogen Content in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Kumar, Anjali; Moheet, Amir; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen provides an important glucose reservoir in the brain since the concentration of glucosyl units stored in glycogen is several fold higher than free glucose available in brain tissue. We have previously reported 3-4 µmol/g brain glycogen content using in vivo (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in conjunction with [1-(13)C]glucose administration in healthy humans, while higher levels were reported in the rodent brain. Due to the slow turnover of bulk brain glycogen in humans, complete turnover of the glycogen pool, estimated to take 3-5 days, was not observed in these prior studies. In an attempt to reach complete turnover and thereby steady state (13)C labeling in glycogen, here we administered [1-(13)C]glucose to healthy volunteers for 80 h. To eliminate any net glycogen synthesis during this period and thereby achieve an accurate estimate of glycogen concentration, volunteers were maintained at euglycemic blood glucose levels during [1-(13)C]glucose administration and (13)C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured by (13)C MRS approximately every 12 h. Finally, we fitted the data with a biophysical model that was recently developed to take into account the tiered structure of the glycogen molecule and additionally incorporated blood glucose levels and isotopic enrichments as input function in the model. We obtained excellent fits of the model to the (13)C-glycogen data, and glycogen content in the healthy human brain tissue was found to be 7.8 ± 0.3 µmol/g, a value substantially higher than previous estimates of glycogen content in the human brain.

  16. Ablation of PPP1R3G reduces glycogen deposition and mitigates high-fat diet induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongxian; Gu, Jin; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Zilong; Pan, Yi; Chen, Yan

    2017-01-05

    Glycogen and triglyceride are two major forms of energy storage in the body and provide the fuel during different phases of food deprivation. However, how glycogen metabolism is linked to fat deposition in adipose tissue has not been clearly characterized. We generated a mouse model with whole-body deletion of PPP1R3G, a glycogen-targeting subunit of protein phosphatase-1 required for glycogen synthesis. Upon feeding with high-fat diet, the body weight and fat composition are significantly reduced in the PPP1R3G -/- mice compared to the wild type controls. The metabolic rate of the mice as measured by O 2 consumption and CO 2 production is accelerated by PPP1R3G deletion. The high-fat diet-induced liver steatosis is also slightly relieved by PPP1R3G deletion. The glycogen level in adipose tissue is reduced by PPP1R3G deletion. In 3T3L1 cells, overexpression of PPP1R3G leads to increases of both glycogen and triglyceride levels. In conclusion, our study indicates that glycogen is actively involved in fat accumulation in adipose tissue and obesity development upon high-fat diet. Our study also suggests that PPP1R3G is an important player that links glycogen metabolism to lipid metabolism in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. RESULTS OF LIFE QUALITY EVALUATION IN CHILDREN WITH HEPATIC VARIANT OF GLYCOGEN DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Surkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease (glycogenosis is a common name for a group of hereditary diseases characterized by excessive accumulation of glycogen with normal or altered structure in various organs and tissues, most often – in liver and muscles. This pathology is still diagnosed late and not completely; this considerably aggravates the disease’s prognosis. The modern stage of glycogenoses’ study is characterized by many unsolved issues; in particular, there are no clear examination and complex rehabilitation algorithms for such patients. Moreover, the authors have not revealed any literary data on the study of life quality of children with glycogen storage disease. The article presents results of the authors’ studies of life quality and its connection with clinical-paraclinic parameters in patients with this pathology.

  18. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of cerebral glycogen metabolism in animals and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Ameer; Choi, In-Young; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen serves as an important energy reservoir in the human body. Despite the abundance of glycogen in the liver and skeletal muscles, its concentration in the brain is relatively low, hence its significance has been questioned. A major challenge in studying brain glycogen metabolism has been the lack of availability of non-invasive techniques for quantification of brain glycogen in vivo. Invasive methods for brain glycogen quantification such as post mortem extraction following high energy microwave irradiation are not applicable in the human brain. With the advent of 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), it has been possible to measure brain glycogen concentrations and turnover in physiological conditions, as well as under the influence of stressors such as hypoglycemia and visual stimulation. This review presents an overview of the principles of the 13C MRS methodology and its applications in both animals and humans to further our understanding of glycogen metabolism under normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as hypoglycemia unawareness. PMID:24676563

  19. Abnormal glycogen chain length pattern, not hyperphosphorylation, is critical in Lafora disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Felix; Sullivan, Mitchell A; Wang, Peixiang; Zhao, Xiaochu; Chown, Erin E; Perri, Ami M; Israelian, Lori; Juana-López, Lucia; Bovolenta, Paola; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Steup, Martin; Minassian, Berge A

    2017-07-01

    Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal progressive epilepsy essentially caused by loss-of-function mutations in the glycogen phosphatase laforin or the ubiquitin E3 ligase malin. Glycogen in LD is hyperphosphorylated and poorly hydrosoluble. It precipitates and accumulates into neurotoxic Lafora bodies (LBs). The leading LD hypothesis that hyperphosphorylation causes the insolubility was recently challenged by the observation that phosphatase-inactive laforin rescues the laforin-deficient LD mouse model, apparently through correction of a general autophagy impairment. We were for the first time able to quantify brain glycogen phosphate. We also measured glycogen content and chain lengths, LBs, and autophagy markers in several laforin- or malin-deficient mouse lines expressing phosphatase-inactive laforin. We find that: (i) in laforin-deficient mice, phosphatase-inactive laforin corrects glycogen chain lengths, and not hyperphosphorylation, which leads to correction of glycogen amounts and prevention of LBs; (ii) in malin-deficient mice, phosphatase-inactive laforin confers no correction; (iii) general impairment of autophagy is not necessary in LD We conclude that laforin's principle function is to control glycogen chain lengths, in a malin-dependent fashion, and that loss of this control underlies LD. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  20. Glycogen resynthesis rate following cross-country skiing is closely correlated to skeletal muscle glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt

    INTRODUCTION: In skeletal muscle, glucose is stored as glycogen, which is a major source of energy during most forms of muscle activity. It is now well recognized that muscle glycogen stores are closely related to performance and endurance capacity. Thus, successful competition or training depends...... on an optimal glycogen resynthesis rate before a subsequent exercise session. The purpose of present study was to evaluate the glycogen resynthesis rate in elite cross-country (cc) skiers, following exhaustive exercise, and to examine the role of muscular glycogen content on the resynthesis rate. METHOD: Ten...... as 4h and 22h after the race and analyzed for glycogen content. Figure 1. Correlation between muscle glycogen resynthesis rate and glycogen content after and in the rocery period after exercise. Line indicate best fit of all the data points (r2 = 0.41, p

  1. Aflatoxins in Rice Artificially Contaminated with Aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus under Natural Storage in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Satoshi; Doi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Masahiko; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Ikeda, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin (AFT) contamination is frequent in foods grown in tropical regions, including rice. Although AFTs are generally not found in temperate-region foods, global warming has affected typical temperate-region climates, potentially permitting the contamination of foods with AFT-producing Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus). Here we investigated the AFT production in rice during storage under natural climate conditions in Japan. We examined AFTs in brown rice and rough rice artificially contaminated with A. flavus for 1 year in Japan, and we subjected AFTs in white rice to the same treatment in airtight containers and examined the samples in warm and cold seasons, simulating the storage of white rice in general households. In the brown rice, AFTs increased after 2 months (March) and peaked after 9 months (October). The AFT contamination in the rough rice was minimal. After the polishing and cooking of the brown rice, AFTs were undetectable. In the white rice stored in airtight containers, AFTs increased after 1 month (August) and peaked after 2 months (September). Minimal AFTs were detected in the cold season. Thus, AFT contamination in rice may occur in temperate regions following A. flavus contamination. The storage of rice as rough rice could provide be useful for avoiding AFT contamination.

  2. Large storage operations under climate change: expanding uncertainties and evolving tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Matteo; Anghileri, Daniela; Castelletti, Andrea; Vu, Phuong Nam; Soncini-Sessa, Rodolfo

    2016-03-01

    In a changing climate and society, large storage systems can play a key role for securing water, energy, and food, and rebalancing their cross-dependencies. In this letter, we study the role of large storage operations as flexible means of adaptation to climate change. In particular, we explore the impacts of different climate projections for different future time horizons on the multi-purpose operations of the existing system of large dams in the Red River basin (China-Laos-Vietnam). We identify the main vulnerabilities of current system operations, understand the risk of failure across sectors by exploring the evolution of the system tradeoffs, quantify how the uncertainty associated to climate scenarios is expanded by the storage operations, and assess the expected costs if no adaptation is implemented. Results show that, depending on the climate scenario and the time horizon considered, the existing operations are predicted to change on average from -7 to +5% in hydropower production, +35 to +520% in flood damages, and +15 to +160% in water supply deficit. These negative impacts can be partially mitigated by adapting the existing operations to future climate, reducing the loss of hydropower to 5%, potentially saving around 34.4 million US year-1 at the national scale. Since the Red River is paradigmatic of many river basins across south east Asia, where new large dams are under construction or are planned to support fast growing economies, our results can support policy makers in prioritizing responses and adaptation strategies to the changing climate.

  3. Important accounting issues for carbon dioxide capture and storage projects under the UNFCCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefeli, S.; Bosi, M.; Philibert, C.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) provides options for making continued use of fossil fuels more compatible with pollution abatement policies. This paper evaluated policy issues related to CCS, with particular focus on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into geological storage sites. Before any carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) CCS activities can be included in the portfolio of climate change mitigation activities, several issues need to be resolved such as the development of appropriate accounting and baselines rules and monitoring modalities. Guidance and policies on baselines and the accounting of emission reductions are critical to ensure that CCS projects can benefit from CO 2 markets and are recognized under various mitigation schemes. This paper examined the major issues that should considered along with changes to current accounting approaches. Issues that need to be addressed in order to prepare national inventories for the inclusion of CCS under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and emission reduction schemes such as the European greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme were first presented, followed by an examination of CCS issues under project-based mechanisms such as the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism. The importance of clear definitions and monitoring guidelines for the proper accounting of CCS were also highlighted. 12 refs., 2 figs

  4. Review: Alterations in placental glycogen deposition in complicated pregnancies: Current preclinical and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akison, Lisa K; Nitert, Marloes Dekker; Clifton, Vicki L; Moritz, Karen M; Simmons, David G

    2017-06-01

    Normal placental function is essential for optimal fetal growth. Transport of glucose from mother to fetus is critical for fetal nutrient demands and can be stored in the placenta as glycogen. However, the function of this glycogen deposition remains a matter of debate: It could be a source of fuel for the placenta itself or a storage reservoir for later use by the fetus in times of need. While the significance of placental glycogen remains elusive, mounting evidence indicates that altered glycogen metabolism and/or deposition accompanies many pregnancy complications that adversely affect fetal development. This review will summarize histological, biochemical and molecular evidence that glycogen accumulates in a) placentas from a variety of experimental rodent models of perturbed pregnancy, including maternal alcohol exposure, glucocorticoid exposure, dietary deficiencies and hypoxia and b) placentas from human pregnancies with complications including preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). These pregnancies typically result in altered fetal growth, developmental abnormalities and/or disease outcomes in offspring. Collectively, this evidence suggests that changes in placental glycogen deposition is a common feature of pregnancy complications, particularly those associated with altered fetal growth. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. REVISITING GLYCOGEN CONTENT IN THE HUMAN BRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Öz, Gülin; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Kumar, Anjali; Moheet, Amir; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen provides an important glucose reservoir in the brain since the concentration of glucosyl units stored in glycogen is several fold higher than free glucose available in brain tissue. We have previously reported 3–4 µmol/g brain glycogen content using in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in conjunction with [1-13C]glucose administration in healthy humans, while higher levels were reported in the rodent brain. Due to the slow turnover of bulk brain glycogen in humans, compl...

  6. The Csr System Regulates Escherichia coli Fitness by Controlling Glycogen Accumulation and Energy Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Cinquemani, Eugenio; Portais, Jean-Charles; Enjalbert, Brice; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2017-10-31

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli , the posttranscriptional regulatory system Csr was postulated to influence the transition from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis. Here, we explored the role of the Csr system in the glucose-acetate transition as a model of the glycolysis-to-gluconeogenesis switch. Mutations in the Csr system influence the reorganization of gene expression after glucose exhaustion and disturb the timing of acetate reconsumption after glucose exhaustion. Analysis of metabolite concentrations during the transition revealed that the Csr system has a major effect on the energy levels of the cells after glucose exhaustion. This influence was demonstrated to result directly from the effect of the Csr system on glycogen accumulation. Mutation in glycogen metabolism was also demonstrated to hinder metabolic adaptation after glucose exhaustion because of insufficient energy. This work explains how the Csr system influences E. coli fitness during the glycolysis-gluconeogenesis switch and demonstrates the role of glycogen in maintenance of the energy charge during metabolic adaptation. IMPORTANCE Glycogen is a polysaccharide and the main storage form of glucose from bacteria such as Escherichia coli to yeasts and mammals. Although its function as a sugar reserve in mammals is well documented, the role of glycogen in bacteria is not as clear. By studying the role of posttranscriptional regulation during metabolic adaptation, for the first time, we demonstrate the role of sugar reserve played by glycogen in E. coli Indeed, glycogen not only makes it possible to maintain sufficient energy during metabolic transitions but is also the key component in the capacity of cells to resume growth. Since the essential posttranscriptional regulatory system Csr is a major regulator of glycogen accumulation, this work also sheds light on the central role of posttranscriptional regulation in metabolic adaptation. Copyright © 2017 Morin et al.

  7. Modified-atmosphere storage under subatmospheric pressure and beef quality: I. Microbiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, P; Hiesberger, J; Giefing, S; Smulders, F J M

    2006-09-01

    The microflora was studied in beef stored in stainless steel containers kept under reduced pressure (20 to 30 kPa) in a modified atmosphere (70% N2 + 30% CO2 or pure CO2) at 3 to 4 degrees C and 0 to 1 degrees C at a headspace:meat volume ratio of 2:1. Samples were obtained at weekly intervals, 1 to 3 times. Total colony counts (TCC) for Pseudomonas spp. and Brochothrix thermosphacta were generally 1 to 2 log10 cfu greater than in the control group of vacuum-packaged beef cuts stored at the same temperatures. In containers with the 70% N2 + 30% CO2 atmosphere at 20 to 30 kPa and 3 to 4 degrees C, substantial growth of Pseudomonas sp. was observed (median of 6 log10 cfu/cm2 at d 21 of storage compared with 3 log10 cfu/cm2 for vacuum-packaged beef). Pseudomonas counts were lower when the container system was held at 0 to 1 degrees C, especially when combined with the pure CO2 atmosphere. As expected for CO2-enriched atmospheres, B. thermosphacta was the dominant spoilage bacterium, in the same log10 order as the TCC. Lowering the storage temperature and changing the atmosphere to pure CO2 resulted in a reduction of 1 log10 for TCC (median values after 2 wk of storage). Although pathogenic bacteria such as Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes were not detected in any sample, further studies are necessary to evaluate potential growth risks. The results demonstrate that CO2-enriched and O2-depleted atmospheres under low pressure have a limited effect on reducing bacterial growth, probably because the antibacterial activity of CO2 is proportional to the effective concentration of this gas in the headspace. At pressures of 20 to 30 kPa, a headspace with pure CO2 would still contain only approximately 20 to 30% CO2.

  8. The relationship between groundwater ages, streamflow ages, and storage selection functions under stationary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuijs, W.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Waters in aquifers are often much older than the streamwaters that drain them. Simple physically based reasoning suggests that these age contrasts should be expected wherever catchments are heterogeneous. However, a general quantitative catchment-scale explanation of these age contrasts remains elusive. We show that under stationary conditions conservation of mass and age dictate that the age distribution of water stored in a catchment can be directly estimated from the age distribution of its outflows, and vice versa. This in turn implies that the catchment's preference for the release or retention of waters of different ages can be estimated directly from the age distribution of outflow under stationary conditions. Using simple models of transit times, we show that the mean age of stored water can range from half as old as the mean age of streamflow (for plug flow conditions) to almost infinitely older (for strongly preferential flow). Streamflow age distributions reported in the literature often have long upper tails, consistent with preferential flow and implying that storage ages are substantially older than streamflow ages. Mean streamflow ages reported in the literature imply that most streamflow originates from a thin veneer of total groundwater storage. This preferential release of young streamflow implies that most groundwater is exchanged only slowly with the surface, and consequently must be very old. Where information is available for both storage ages and streamflow ages, our analysis establishes consistency relationships through which each could be used to better constrain the other. By quantifying the relationship between groundwater and streamflow ages, our analysis provides tools to jointly assess both of these important catchment properties.

  9. KIAA1199 interacts with glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) to promote glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Masato; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Togashi, Yosuke; Sakai, Kazuko; De Velasco, Marco A; Tomida, Shuta; Nishio, Kazuto

    2014-08-30

    The KIAA1199 gene was first discovered to be associated with non-syndromic hearing loss. Recently, several reports have shown that the up-regulation of KIAA1199 is associated with cancer cell migration or invasion and a poor prognosis. These findings indicate that KIAA1199 may be a novel target for cancer therapy. Therefore, we explored in detail the function of KIAA1199 in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction of KIAA1199 protein with intracellular proteins in cancer cells. To this end, we expressed KIAA1199-MBP fusion protein and performed a pull-down assay. In addition, KIAA1199-overexpressing cancer cell lines were constructed using a retroviral vector and were used for further experiments. A pull-down analysis showed that the glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) interacted with the C-terminal region of KIAA1199 protein. Furthermore, we observed the interaction of KIAA1199 with glycogen phosphorylase brain form (PYGB) under serum-free conditions. The interaction promoted glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival. Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 plays an important role in glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival and that it may represent a novel target for cancer therapy.

  10. Cacao Cultivation under Diverse Shade Tree Cover Allows High Carbon Storage and Sequestration without Yield Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Rajab, Yasmin; Leuschner, Christoph; Barus, Henry; Tjoa, Aiyen; Hertel, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    One of the main drivers of tropical forest loss is their conversion to oil palm, soy or cacao plantations with low biodiversity and greatly reduced carbon storage. Southeast Asian cacao plantations are often established under shade tree cover, but are later converted to non-shaded monocultures to avoid resource competition. We compared three co-occurring cacao cultivation systems (3 replicate stands each) with different shade intensity (non-shaded monoculture, cacao with the legume Gliricidia sepium shade trees, and cacao with several shade tree species) in Sulawesi (Indonesia) with respect to above- and belowground biomass and productivity, and cacao bean yield. Total biomass C stocks (above- and belowground) increased fivefold from the monoculture to the multi-shade tree system (from 11 to 57 Mg ha-1), total net primary production rose twofold (from 9 to 18 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). This increase was associated with a 6fold increase in aboveground biomass, but only a 3.5fold increase in root biomass, indicating a clear shift in C allocation to aboveground tree organs with increasing shade for both cacao and shade trees. Despite a canopy cover increase from 50 to 93%, cacao bean yield remained invariant across the systems (variation: 1.1-1.2 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). The monocultures had a twice as rapid leaf turnover suggesting that shading reduces the exposure of cacao to atmospheric drought, probably resulting in greater leaf longevity. Thus, contrary to general belief, cacao bean yield does not necessarily decrease under shading which seems to reduce physical stress. If planned properly, cacao plantations under a shade tree cover allow combining high yield with benefits for carbon sequestration and storage, production system stability under stress, and higher levels of animal and plant diversity.

  11. Refeeding-Induced Brown Adipose Tissue Glycogen Hyper-Accumulation in Mice Is Mediated by Insulin and Catecholamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmean, Christopher M.; Bobe, Alexandria M.; Yu, Justin C.; Volden, Paul A.; Brady, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) generates heat during adaptive thermogenesis through a combination of oxidative metabolism and uncoupling protein 1-mediated electron transport chain uncoupling, using both free-fatty acids and glucose as substrate. Previous rat-based work in 1942 showed that prolonged partial fasting followed by refeeding led to a dramatic, transient increase in glycogen stores in multiple fat depots. In the present study, the protocol was replicated in male CD1 mice, resulting in a 2000-fold increase in interscapular BAT (IBAT) glycogen levels within 4–12 hours (hr) of refeeding, with IBAT glycogen stores reaching levels comparable to fed liver glycogen. Lesser effects occurred in white adipose tissues (WAT). Over the next 36 hr, glycogen levels dissipated and histological analysis revealed an over-accumulation of lipid droplets, suggesting a potential metabolic connection between glycogenolysis and lipid synthesis. 24 hr of total starvation followed by refeeding induced a robust and consistent glycogen over-accumulation similar in magnitude and time course to the prolonged partial fast. Experimentation demonstrated that hyperglycemia was not sufficient to drive glycogen accumulation in IBAT, but that elevated circulating insulin was sufficient. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of catecholamine production reduced refeeding-induced IBAT glycogen storage, providing evidence of a contribution from the central nervous system. These findings highlight IBAT as a tissue that integrates both canonically-anabolic and catabolic stimulation for the promotion of glycogen storage during recovery from caloric deficit. The preservation of this robust response through many generations of animals not subjected to food deprivation suggests that the over-accumulation phenomenon plays a critical role in IBAT physiology. PMID:23861810

  12. Refeeding-induced brown adipose tissue glycogen hyper-accumulation in mice is mediated by insulin and catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmean, Christopher M; Bobe, Alexandria M; Yu, Justin C; Volden, Paul A; Brady, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) generates heat during adaptive thermogenesis through a combination of oxidative metabolism and uncoupling protein 1-mediated electron transport chain uncoupling, using both free-fatty acids and glucose as substrate. Previous rat-based work in 1942 showed that prolonged partial fasting followed by refeeding led to a dramatic, transient increase in glycogen stores in multiple fat depots. In the present study, the protocol was replicated in male CD1 mice, resulting in a 2000-fold increase in interscapular BAT (IBAT) glycogen levels within 4-12 hours (hr) of refeeding, with IBAT glycogen stores reaching levels comparable to fed liver glycogen. Lesser effects occurred in white adipose tissues (WAT). Over the next 36 hr, glycogen levels dissipated and histological analysis revealed an over-accumulation of lipid droplets, suggesting a potential metabolic connection between glycogenolysis and lipid synthesis. 24 hr of total starvation followed by refeeding induced a robust and consistent glycogen over-accumulation similar in magnitude and time course to the prolonged partial fast. Experimentation demonstrated that hyperglycemia was not sufficient to drive glycogen accumulation in IBAT, but that elevated circulating insulin was sufficient. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of catecholamine production reduced refeeding-induced IBAT glycogen storage, providing evidence of a contribution from the central nervous system. These findings highlight IBAT as a tissue that integrates both canonically-anabolic and catabolic stimulation for the promotion of glycogen storage during recovery from caloric deficit. The preservation of this robust response through many generations of animals not subjected to food deprivation suggests that the over-accumulation phenomenon plays a critical role in IBAT physiology.

  13. Refeeding-induced brown adipose tissue glycogen hyper-accumulation in mice is mediated by insulin and catecholamines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Carmean

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT generates heat during adaptive thermogenesis through a combination of oxidative metabolism and uncoupling protein 1-mediated electron transport chain uncoupling, using both free-fatty acids and glucose as substrate. Previous rat-based work in 1942 showed that prolonged partial fasting followed by refeeding led to a dramatic, transient increase in glycogen stores in multiple fat depots. In the present study, the protocol was replicated in male CD1 mice, resulting in a 2000-fold increase in interscapular BAT (IBAT glycogen levels within 4-12 hours (hr of refeeding, with IBAT glycogen stores reaching levels comparable to fed liver glycogen. Lesser effects occurred in white adipose tissues (WAT. Over the next 36 hr, glycogen levels dissipated and histological analysis revealed an over-accumulation of lipid droplets, suggesting a potential metabolic connection between glycogenolysis and lipid synthesis. 24 hr of total starvation followed by refeeding induced a robust and consistent glycogen over-accumulation similar in magnitude and time course to the prolonged partial fast. Experimentation demonstrated that hyperglycemia was not sufficient to drive glycogen accumulation in IBAT, but that elevated circulating insulin was sufficient. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of catecholamine production reduced refeeding-induced IBAT glycogen storage, providing evidence of a contribution from the central nervous system. These findings highlight IBAT as a tissue that integrates both canonically-anabolic and catabolic stimulation for the promotion of glycogen storage during recovery from caloric deficit. The preservation of this robust response through many generations of animals not subjected to food deprivation suggests that the over-accumulation phenomenon plays a critical role in IBAT physiology.

  14. No effect of glycogen level on glycogen metabolism during high intensity exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Katleen; Hespel, P.; Eynde, Bart Vanden

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effect of glycogen supercompensation on glycogen breakdown, muscle and blood lactate accumulation, blood-pH, and performance during short-term high-intensity exercise. Young healthy volunteers performed two supramaximal (125% of VO2max) exercise tests on a bicycle ergometer...... and blood-lactate, and the fall in blood-pH were similar during N and CHR. In protocol 2, time to exhaustion was identical for N and CHR. It is concluded that during short-term intense exercise during which muscle glycogen availability exceeds glycogen demand, rate of glycogen breakdown, lactate...

  15. Starch Binding Domain-containing Protein 1 Plays a Dominant Role in Glycogen Transport to Lysosomes in Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Yi, Haiqing; Yang, Chunyu; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-08-05

    A small portion of cellular glycogen is transported to and degraded in lysosomes by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) in mammals, but it is unclear why and how glycogen is transported to the lysosomes. Stbd1 has recently been proposed to participate in glycogen trafficking to lysosomes. However, our previous study demonstrated that knockdown of Stbd1 in GAA knock-out mice did not alter lysosomal glycogen storage in skeletal muscles. To further determine whether Stbd1 participates in glycogen transport to lysosomes, we generated GAA/Stbd1 double knock-out mice. In fasted double knock-out mice, glycogen accumulation in skeletal and cardiac muscles was not affected, but glycogen content in liver was reduced by nearly 73% at 3 months of age and by 60% at 13 months as compared with GAA knock-out mice, indicating that the transport of glycogen to lysosomes was suppressed in liver by the loss of Stbd1. Exogenous expression of human Stbd1 in double knock-out mice restored the liver lysosomal glycogen content to the level of GAA knock-out mice, as did a mutant lacking the Atg8 family interacting motif (AIM) and another mutant that contains only the N-terminal 24 hydrophobic segment and the C-terminal starch binding domain (CBM20) interlinked by an HA tag. Our results demonstrate that Stbd1 plays a dominant role in glycogen transport to lysosomes in liver and that the N-terminal transmembrane region and the C-terminal CBM20 domain are critical for this function. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. [The regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycogen synthase activities by insulin superfamily peptides in myometrium of pregnant women and its impairments under different types of diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, L A; Chistiakova, O V

    2009-01-01

    The regulatory effects of insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and relaxin on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities have been studied in myometrium of pregnant women of control group and with diabetes mellitus of different etiology. In patients with type 1 diabetes G6PDH activity did not differ from the control group, but the enzyme activity was sharply decreased in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. In the control group maximal stimulation of G6PDH activity was observed at 10(-9) M of peptides and their stimulating effect decreased in the following order: insulin > relaxin > IGF-1. In pregnant women with types 1 diabetes insulin effect on the enzyme activity was lower than in the control, and the effects of IGF-1 and relaxin were absent. In the group of pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes the effects of insulin and IGF-1 were decreased, but the effect of relaxin was somewhat higher thus giving the following order in their efficiency relaxin > IGF-1 = insulin. At 10(-9) M peptides exhibited similar stimulating effects on the active form of GS-I, but had no influence on the total enzyme activity in the control group of pregnant women. In patients with type 1 diabetes GS activity remained unchanged (versus control), and peptides did not stimulate the enzyme activity. In patients with type 2 diabetes a significant decrease in GS activity was accompanied by the decrease in the effect of peptides, giving the following order of their efficiency: insulin = IGF-1 > relaxin. In myometrium of pregnant women with gestational (treated and untreated) diabetes GS activity decreased, the effect of insulin was weaker, whereas the effects of relaxin and IGF-1 increased thus giving the following order of their efficiency: relaxin > IGF-1 > insulin. Insulin therapy of type 1 diabetes incompletely restored sensitivity of the enzymes to the peptide actions. At the same time, in women

  17. The effect of a high carbohydrate diet and glycogen depletion on graded maximal exercise

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 義雄; 細井, 輝男; 竹内, 敏子; 朴, 哲浩; 金, 享烈; 荒井, 康夫; Yoshio, Kobayashi; Teruo, Hosoi; Toshiko, Takeuchi; Cheol-Ho, Pak; Hyung-Ryul, Kim; Yasuo, Arai; 中京大学教養部健康スポーツ科学研究室; 中京大学教養部健康スポーツ科学研究室; 中京大学教養部健康スポーツ科学研究室

    1997-01-01

    The present investigation examined the influence of dietary carbohydrate (CHO) on the performance of graded maximal exercise on a bicycle ergometer. A group of highly trained college students [mean age 22.2 (SD 1.6) years] completed three trials of graded maximal exercise under three dietary conditions; normal diet (ND), glycogen depleted (CHD), and glycogen loaded (CHL) conditions with each trial separated by five days. Measurements of work done, maximal oxygen intake (Vo_), serum lactae, gl...

  18. Valuation of storage under zonal pricing market structure. Case study: Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oprescu, Bogdan; Quoilin, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The European Commission has proposed to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions to 80-95% below 1990 levels by 2050. Intermediately there is a binding legislation regarding the climate and energy targets for 2020. These targets, known as the ''20-20-20'' targets, set three key objectives for 2020: a 20% reduction in EU greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels, raising the share of EU energy consumption produced from renewable resources to 20% and a 20% improvement in the EU's energy efficiency. This policy is to be followed by the actions proposed in a policy framework for climate and energy in the period from 2020 to 2030: a new reduction target for domestic GHG emissions of 40% compared to 1990 for the year 2030, a target at European level for renewable energy of at least 27% for the year 2030 and a proposal for a 30% energy savings target for 2030. The 2020 targets for Italy translate into a 17% share of gross final energy consumption being delivered by Electricity from Renewable Energy Sources (RES-E). Various studies consider the integration of energy storage at the same time as RES-E as a solution to provide more flexibility in the energy system. Even though some studies model the electricity in higher detail, the case of Italy is rarely covered as an individual country. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the impact of adding storage in the Italian power system under different assumptions. The base case is the simplified assumption of a copper plate system where no transmission constraints are considered. This is then compared to the zonal dispatch which considers a simplified grid to underline the importance of locational signals for storage.

  19. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. linked by α-(1- 4) glycosidic bonds into chains and chains. branch via α-(1- 6) linkage. Branching points are about every fourth residue – allows. glucose ...

  20. Calendar aging of commercial graphite/LiFePO4 cell - Predicting capacity fade under time dependent storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolleau, Sébastien; Delaille, Arnaud; Gualous, Hamid; Gyan, Philippe; Revel, Renaud; Bernard, Julien; Redondo-Iglesias, Eduardo; Peter, Jérémy

    2014-06-01

    In applications such as electrical transportation, most of the battery life is spent under storage. Understanding and estimating aging under storage, also named as calendar aging, is therefore a prerequisite for cell life prediction. This work investigates aging behavior upon storage of a commercial 15 Ah lithium-ion graphite/iron phosphate cell. Performance decline during 450 days of storage under nine stationary conditions is analyzed using non-destructive electrochemical tests. Temperature is found to be more detrimental than State of Charge (SoC). Most often, degradation models express the accumulated degradation with respect to time and aging conditions. In this article, a simple modeling approach is proposed focusing on the degradation rate to predict capacity fade. This permits predicting cell degradation under time dependent storage conditions (SoC and temperature) which are usually experienced in real applications. Model prediction is compared to experimental calendar aging data obtained over 625 days in a controlled time dependent temperature storage conditions. Predictions are in good agreement with experimental results as the absolute error on capacity prediction never exceeds 3% over 400 days and 5% over 625 days.

  1. Assessment of Shelf-Life Ability of Apples cv. ‘Auksis’ after Long-term Storage Under Different Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhņeviča-Radenkova Karina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current research was to ascertain the shelf-life ability of apple ‘Auksis’ after 6 months of cold storage under different conditions. The effect of storage conditions such as: cold storage under normal atmosphere (NA, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP + cold storage, and ultra-low oxygen (ULO-controlled atmosphere (CA [2.0% CO2 and 1.0% O2 (ULO1 and 2.5% CO2 and 1.5% O2 (ULO2] on the quality of apples during shelf-life was evaluated. Apple fruits immediately after cold storage and after 25 days of maintaining at market condition had been evaluated. The physical (firmness, weight losses, chemical (total soluble solids and acid contents, and sensory (aroma, taste, acidity, sweetness, juiciness, and color characteristics of apples had been evaluated after 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 days to ascertain maximal shelf-life. Results from sensory evaluation indicated that apples treated with 1-MCP and stored at NA were characterized with distinctive aroma, whereas apples stored under CA were poor in sweetness and had remarkable acidity and juiciness. Apples that were stored in cold had pronounced aroma and color but without taste. Based on the evaluation by panelist, maximum shelf-life of apples that were kept under cold storage and ULO1 was 15 days, whereas that of apples that had been treated with 1-MCP and stored at NA and those stored in ULO2 was 25 days.

  2. Human synthetic sebum formulation and stability under conditions of use and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, P W

    2009-02-01

    The human skin surface and hair are generally coated with a thin film of liquid phase sebaceous lipids. This surface lipid film contributes to the cosmetic properties of the skin. Synthetic sebum has been used for studies on properties of skin and hair. However, there has been no standardized formulation of synthetic sebum and many of the synthetic sebum formulations that have been used do not closely resemble actual sebum. In this study, a formulation for a standardized and inexpensive synthetic sebum is proposed, and the chemical stability of this lipid mixture is demonstrated under conditions of use and storage. The proposed synthetic sebum consists of 17% fatty acid, 44.7% triglyceride, 25% wax monoester (jojoba oil) and 12.4% squalene. This lipid mixture takes up approximately 6% of its weight in water when equilibrated in an atmosphere saturated with water vapour. It is stable on exposure to the atmosphere at 32 degrees C for at least 48 h, and it is also stable on storage at 4 or -20 degrees C, either dry or in chloroform : methanol solution for at least 6 months. This synthetic sebum could be useful in studies on cosmetic properties of the skin surface or hair, on penetration of chemicals into the skin or in development of standardized tests of laundry detergent performance.

  3. Effect of storage time under home refrigeration conditions on the quality of opened drinking milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Brodziak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study was to determine the effect of the duration of storage of opened drinking milk (pasteurized, micro-filtered and UHT under home refrigeration conditions on indicators of its freshness (acidity and TBC, nutritional value (contents of fat, protein, lactose, dry matter, nondenatured whey proteins and free fatty acids and organoleptic characteristics. Refrigeration was found to ensure that opened micro-filtered and pasteurized milk was suitable for consumption for 4 days and UHT milk for at least 7 days. Significant changes in the quality characteristics of protein and fat fractions were not observed until the 7th day of storage. The greatest changes in the content of whey proteins were observed in micro-filtered milk, expressed as decrease of individual proteins of about 20 % each. Pasteurized milk was the most susceptible to lipolysis that resulted in the greatest quantity of saturated free fatty acids. Lipolytic changes affected the acidity of product and thereby led to slight changes in its odor and flavor.

  4. [Physical and chemical evaluation during refrigeration storage of salted catfish (Pseudoplatystoma sp.) in brine solution, and packed under vacuum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Diana; Barrero, Marinela; Kodaira, Makie

    2009-06-01

    Salting fish in the south Venezuelan towns are still the main method of preserving fish including cutt, and salting fish process, storage and commercialization. As the result, salted-dried fish is particularly susceptible to spoilage by a number of factors, including lipid oxidation, browning meat. Packing salted fish product is an alternative increasing storage life time reducing lost of quality and enhancing the storage time. The present study evaluated the physic, chemist, and sensory quality of fish fillet from cat fish (Pseudoplatystoma sp.) from Apure state, Venezuela. Fillet fish were placed in brine solution at 36% of sodium chloride 1:2 fillet: brine solution; after, they were packed under followed conditions: vacuum, vacuum and storage under refrigeration condition, and room temperature. The results showed significant differences (p refrigeration temperature after three moths. The best conditions treatment was vacuum packing and refrigeration at 4 degrees C.

  5. Changes in protein characteristics during soybean storage under adverse conditions as related to tofu making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanbin; Chang, Sam K C

    2013-01-16

    Soybeans stored under adverse conditions decrease in protein recovery (content) in the soymilk and tofu yield. This study investigated how protein structural changes contributed to the decrease in tofu yield. Soymilks were produced from original soybeans (Proto and IA2032 cultivars) and adversely stored soybeans, respectively, and soymilk protein contents were adjusted to the same level before making into tofu. Tofu yield was compared with that made from soybeans without protein content adjustment. For understanding protein structural changes, soy proteins were extracted from Proto soybean by using different solvents, including distilled water, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 2-mercaptoethanol. The proteins in the extracts were analyzed by using SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Results showed that tofu yield was more significantly affected by protein structural characteristics than the protein content in soymilk. Different levels of aggregations among 7S and 11S proteins during adverse storage were responsible for decreasing protein recovery in the soymilk.

  6. Water loss in table grapes: model development and validation under dynamic storage conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericsem PEREIRA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Water loss is a critical problem affecting the quality of table grapes. Temperature and relative humidity (RH are essential in this process. Although mathematical modelling can be applied to measure constant temperature and RH impacts, it is proved that variations in storage conditions are normally encountered in the cold chain. This study proposed a methodology to develop a weight loss model for table grapes and validate its predictions in non-constant conditions of a domestic refrigerator. Grapes were maintained under controlled conditions and the weight loss was measured to calibrate the model. The model described the water loss process adequately and the validation tests confirmed its predictive ability. Delayed cooling tests showed that estimated transpiration rates in subsequent continuous temperature treatment was not significantly influenced by prior exposure conditions, suggesting that this model may be useful to estimate the weight loss consequences of interruptions in the cold chain.

  7. Storage of a lithium-ion secondary battery under micro-gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Yoshitsugu; Ooto, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Eguro, Takashi; Sakai, Shigeru; Yoshida, Teiji; Takahashi, Keiji; Uno, Masatoshi; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Tajima, Michio; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    'HAYABUSA' is a Japanese inter-planetary spacecraft built for the exploration of an asteroid named 'ITOKAWA.' The spacecraft is powered by a 13.2 Ah lithium-ion secondary battery. To realize maximum performance of the battery for long flight operation, the state-of-charge (SOC) of the battery was maintained at ca. 65% during storage, in case it is required for a loss of attitude control. The capacity of the battery was measured during flight operations. Along with the operation in orbit, a ground-test battery was discharged, and both results showed a good agreement. This result confirmed that the performance of the lithium-ion secondary battery stored under micro-gravity conditions is predictable using a ground-test battery.

  8. Study of the effects of 1-MCP to blueberry under cold storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shenchen; Chu, Huailiang; Chen, Xiaomin; Yuan, Huwei; Qiu, Lingling; Zhao, Liang; Yan, Daoliang; Zheng, Bingsong

    2017-04-01

    Blueberry is one of the thinnest exocarp fruits in the world, which is difficult to keep fresh due to the special structure of its skin. 1-Methlcyclopropene (1-MCP) is able to combine with ethylene(ETH) receptor. In this study we investigated the effect of 1-MCP on rotting rate, weight loss ratio, soluble sugar content, titratable acid content, antioxidant enzyme activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosun ‘O Neal’ and ‘North Road’) under cold storage. 1-MCP reduced the rotting rate, weight loss ratio and MDA content, while keeping high-leveled stability in antioxidant enzyme activities, soluble sugar content and titratable acid content. These results showed the role of 1-MCP in alleviating the negative effects of blueberry and suggested that 1-MCP could be used as a preservative for keeping thin exocarp fruit in fresh.

  9. The maximum allowable temperature of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding under dry storage condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Yoshiki, Shinya; Yasuda, Takayoshi; Nakatsuka, Masafumi.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, creep properties of both irradiated and unirradiated zircaloy-2 tube were investigated to evaluate the maximum allowable temperature of spent fuel cladding under dry storage condition. The results obtained were as follow; (1) Creep rate of irradiated tube was lower than that of unirradiated tube on the test conditions that creep deformation occurred easily (applied stress was high). And creep rates of both the tubes were almost the same on the test conditions with low applied stress. The maximum creep strain of irradiated tube reached 13 % without failure. From these results, it was suggested that the maximum allowable temperature calculation using creep equation of unirradiated tube gave safety-side prediction, if strain criteria of 1 % was used. (2) The maximum allowable temperature of BWR type fuel cladding was evaluated through creep equation of unirradiated zircaloy-2 tube and strain criteria of 1 %. The temperature was given corresponding to the cooling time and internal pressure of spent fuel. (author)

  10. Stability of X-band EPR signals from fingernails under vacuum storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholom, Sergey; McKeever, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    EPR signals of different origin have been tested in human finger- and toe-nails with an X-band EPR technique for different conditions of nail storage. Three different signals were identified, namely a singlet at g = 2.005, a doublet at g = 2.004 with a splitting constant A = 1.8 mT, and an anisotropic signal at g1 = 2.057, g2 = 2.029 and g3 = 2.003 (positions of local extrema). All EPR spectra from nails, whether irradiated or mechanically stressed, can be described as a superposition of these three signals. The singlet is responsible for the background signal (BG), is the main component of radiation-induced signals (RIS) for low doses (100 Gy or lower) and also contributes to mechanically-induced signals (MIS). This signal is quite stable under vacuum storage, but can be reduced almost to zero by soaking in water. The behavior of this signal under ambient conditions depends on many factors, such as absorbed dose, air humidity, and ambient illumination intensity at the place of storage. The doublet arises after exposure of nails to high (few hundreds Gy and higher) doses or after mechanical stress of samples. Depending on how this signal was obtained, it may have bulk or surface locations with quite different stability properties. The surface-located doublet (generated on the nail edges during cutting or clipping) is quite unstable and decays over about two hours for samples stored at ambient conditions and within several seconds for samples immersed in water. The volume-distributed doublet decays within a few minutes in water, several hours at ambient conditions and several days in vacuum. The anisotropic signal may also be generated by both ionizing radiation and mechanical stress; this signal is quite stable in vacuum and decays over several days at ambient conditions or a few tens of minutes in water. The reference lines for the above-described three EPR signals were obtained and a procedure of spectra deconvolution was developed and tested on samples exposed

  11. Typical Daily Power Curve Mining for Energy Storage Systems under Smoothing Power Fluctuation Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyun Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the application scenario of smoothing photovoltaic (PV power fluctuation, a novel typical daily power curve mining method is developed for a battery energy storage system (BESS that utilizes the power probability distribution and Bloch spherical quantum genetic algorithm. The charging/discharging of BESS is analyzed by applying fuzzy-c means clustering techniques. In the mining approach, at any sample time, those distribution intervals containing concentrated power points are individually located by using probability distribution information and Bloch spherical quantum genetic algorithm. Character power for the specified interval can also be determined using Bloch spherical quantum genetic algorithm. Next, a roulette principal is employed, to determine one value from the character power data as a typical value of the mined power curve at the sample time. By connecting the typical power at each sample time, the typical daily power curve for BESS is achieved. Based on typical power curve, decision-maker can master the important operating parameters of BESS and analyze optimal capacity allocation. By error evaluation indexes between the mined typical daily power curve and power curve under different weather patterns, the simulation results verify that the mined power curve can address the operating power of the BESS under different weather patterns.

  12. Glycogen production for biofuels by the euryhaline cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 from an oceanic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Shimpei; Nishida, Atsumi; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Chang, Jo-Shu; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria and microalgae have attracted attention as an alternative carbon source for the next generation of biofuels. Glycogen abundantly accumulated in cyanobacteria is a promising feedstock which can be converted to ethanol through saccharification and fermentation processes. In addition, the utilization of marine cyanobacteria as a glycogen producer can eliminate the need for a freshwater supply. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a fast-growing marine coastal euryhaline cyanobacteria, however, the glycogen yield has not yet been determined. In the present study, the effects of light intensity, CO2 concentration, and salinity on the cell growth and glycogen content were investigated in order to maximize glycogen production in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. The optimal culture conditions for glycogen production in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 were investigated. The maximum glycogen production of 3.5 g L(-1) for 7 days (a glycogen productivity of 0.5 g L(-1) d(-1)) was obtained under a high light intensity, a high CO2 level, and a nitrogen-depleted condition in brackish water. The glycogen production performance in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 was the best ever reported in the α-polyglucan (glycogen or starch) production of cyanobacteria and microalgae. In addition, the robustness of glycogen production in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 to salinity was evaluated in seawater and freshwater. The peak of glycogen production of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 in seawater and freshwater were 3.0 and 1.8 g L(-1) in 7 days, respectively. Glycogen production in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 maintained the same level in seawater and half of the level in freshwater compared with the optimal result obtained in brackish water. We conclude that Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 has high glycogen production activity and glycogen can be provided from coastal water accompanied by a fluctuation

  13. Carcass glycogen repletion on carbohydrate re-feeding after starvation.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D J; Palmer, T N

    1987-01-01

    In mice, the response of carcass glycogen to glucose re-feeding after starvation is biphasic. The initial repletive phase is followed by partial (greater than 50%) glycogen mobilization. This turnover of carcass glycogen in response to carbohydrate re-feeding may play an important role in the provision of C3 precursors for hepatic glycogen synthesis.

  14. Glycogen metabolism has a key role in the cancer microenvironment and provides new targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zois, Christos E; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells and contributes to their adaption within the tumour microenvironment and resistance to anticancer therapies. Recently, glycogen metabolism has become a recognised feature of cancer cells since it is upregulated in many tumour types, suggesting that it is an important aspect of cancer cell pathophysiology. Here, we provide an overview of glycogen metabolism and its regulation, with a focus on its role in metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells under stress conditions such as hypoxia, glucose deprivation and anticancer treatment. The various methods to detect glycogen in tumours in vivo as well as pharmacological modulators of glycogen metabolism are also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic value of targeting glycogen metabolism as a strategy for combinational approaches in cancer treatment.

  15. A whole-body model for glycogen regulation reveals a critical role for substrate cycling in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely, and sometimes rapid, metabolic adaptation to changes in food supply is critical for survival as an organism moves from the fasted to the fed state, and vice versa. These transitions necessitate major metabolic changes to maintain energy homeostasis as the source of blood glucose moves away from ingested carbohydrates, through hepatic glycogen stores, towards gluconeogenesis. The integration of hepatic glycogen regulation with extra-hepatic energetics is a key aspect of these adaptive mechanisms. Here we use computational modeling to explore hepatic glycogen regulation under fed and fasting conditions in the context of a whole-body model. The model was validated against previous experimental results concerning glycogen phosphorylase a (active and glycogen synthase a dynamics. The model qualitatively reproduced physiological changes that occur during transition from the fed to the fasted state. Analysis of the model reveals a critical role for the inhibition of glycogen synthase phosphatase by glycogen phosphorylase a. This negative regulation leads to high levels of glycogen synthase activity during fasting conditions, which in turn increases substrate (futile cycling, priming the system for a rapid response once an external source of glucose is restored. This work demonstrates that a mechanistic understanding of the design principles used by metabolic control circuits to maintain homeostasis can benefit from the incorporation of mathematical descriptions of these networks into "whole-body" contextual models that mimic in vivo conditions.

  16. Quality Changes of N-3 PUFAs Enriched and Conventional Eggs under Different Home Storage Conditions with Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenkang Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs enriched eggs are popular for their enrichment of PUFAs, but their freshness and quality are prone to decline with time, particularly if storage conditions are not well maintained. Home storage is the last but a neglected important tach in eggs supply chain, but few studies are available on the egg storage in the home stage. This study aimed to evaluate the internal quality change of both n-3 PUFAs enriched and conventional eggs by simulating eggs stored at consumers’ home in refrigeration and under room temperature. The egg quality indices (Haugh unit, yolk index, weight, and albumen pH were adopted and analyzed for both storage conditions. Wireless sensor network (WSN was used for real-time monitoring of the temperature and humidity during storage. The results showed that temperature, humidity and time of storage all have an influence on the freshness of both n-3 PUFAs enriched and conventional eggs and there is no significant difference happened to n-3 PUFAs enriched eggs and conventional eggs. Refrigeration can decelerate the quality deterioration of both n-3 PUFAs enriched and conventional eggs and consumers should be educated about how to maintain the internal quality of eggs during home storage.

  17. Nuclear Glycogen Inclusions in Canine Parietal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, S; Lepri, E; Dall'Aglio, C; Marchesi, M C; Vitellozzi, G

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear glycogen inclusions occur infrequently in pathologic conditions but also in normal human and animal tissues. Their function or significance is unclear. To the best of the authors' knowledge, no reports of nuclear glycogen inclusions in canine parietal cells exist. After initial observations of nuclear inclusions/pseudoinclusions during routine histopathology, the authors retrospectively examined samples of gastric mucosa from dogs presenting with gastrointestinal signs for the presence of intranuclear inclusions/pseudoinclusions and determined their composition using histologic and electron-microscopic methods. In 24 of 108 cases (22%), the authors observed various numbers of intranuclear inclusions/pseudoinclusions within scattered parietal cells. Nuclei were characterized by marked karyomegaly and chromatin margination around a central optically empty or slightly eosinophilic area. The intranuclear inclusions/pseudoinclusions stained positive with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and were diastase sensitive, consistent with glycogen. Several PAS-positive/diastase-sensitive sections were further examined by transmission electron microscopy, also using periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-silver proteinate (PA-TCH-SP) staining to identify polysaccharides. Ultrastructurally, the nuclear inclusions were composed of electron-dense particles that were not membrane bound, without evidence of nuclear membrane invaginations or cytoplasmic organelles in the nuclei, and positive staining with PA-TCH-SP, confirming a glycogen composition. No cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were observed, suggesting that the intranuclear glycogen inclusions were probably synthesized in loco. Nuclear glycogen inclusions were not associated with gastritis or colonization by Helicobacter-like organisms ( P > .05). Our findings suggest that nuclear glycogen inclusions in canine parietal cells could be an incidental finding. Nevertheless, since nuclear glycogen is present in several pathologic

  18. Regulation of glycogen synthesis and glycolysis by insulin, pH and cell volume. Interactions between swelling and alkalinization in mediating the effects of insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Peak, M; al-Habori, M; Agius, L

    1992-01-01

    The effects of changes in cell volume and pH on glycogen synthesis and glycolysis and their control by insulin were investigated in hepatocyte cultures. 1. Cell acidification, by increasing [CO2] from 2.5% to 5%, inhibited glycolysis and stimulated glycogen synthesis. The inhibition of glycolysis was also observed in Na(+)-free media and when K+ uptake was inhibited, but the stimulation of glycogen synthesis was abolished under these conditions, suggesting that it is secondary to ionic or vol...

  19. Experimental characterization and modelling of the alteration of fractured cement under CO2 storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdoulghafour, Halidi

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to characterize and to model the hydrodynamic and thermochemical processes leading to the alteration of the wellbore cement materials under borehole conditions. Percolation experiments were performed on fractured cement samples under CO 2 storage conditions (60 C and 10 MPa). Injection flow rate was dictated by the fracture aperture of each sample. CO 2 enriched brine was flowed along the fracture aperture, and permeability changes as well as chemical evolution of major cations were continuously acquired during the experiment time. Reaction paths developed by the alteration of the cement were characterized using microtomography and ESEM images. The experiments conducted using samples presenting large fracture apertures during 5 h showed that permeability was maintained constant during the experiment time. Three reacted layers were displaying by the alteration of portlandite and CSH. Long term experiment (26 h) conducted with large initial fracture aperture showed a decrease of the permeability after 15 hours of CO 2 exposure. Otherwise, experiments performed on samples presenting narrow apertures indicated the conversion of portlandite and CSH to calcite leading to the permeability reduction and the fracture clogging. Assemblages of phases and chemical changes were modelled using GEMS-PSI speciation code. We studied also using a coupled transport-reactive model the conditions leading to the cement alteration and the formation of associated layers. (author)

  20. Immature pea seeds: effect of storage under modified atmosphere packaging and sanitation with acidified sodium chlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Elena; Venzke Klug, Tâmmila; Martínez-Sánchez, Ascensión; Artés-Hernandez, Francisco; Aguayo, Encarna; Artés, Francisco; Fernández, Juan A; Gómez, Perla A

    2017-10-01

    Appropriate sanitation is a priority for extending the shelf life and promoting the consumption of immature pea seeds, as processing accelerates quality deterioration and microbial growth. The combined effect of disinfection with acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) or sodium hypochlorite (SH) and packaging under a passive modified atmosphere (MAP) at 1 or 4 °C on quality was analysed. After 14 days, greenness and vitamin C had decreased, especially in the SH-disinfected samples. Total phenols and antioxidant capacity were not affected by disinfection. Proteins levels fell by around 27%, regardless of the sanitizer and storage temperature. Compared with the initial microbial load, samples stored at 1 °C showed an increase of 1 log CFU g -1 in psychrophiles when treated with SH, whereas no increase of note occurred with ASC. In general, microbial counts were always below 3 log CFU g -1 for all the treatments. Immature pea seeds could be stored for 14 days at 1-4 °C under MAP with only minor quality changes. Disinfection with ASC resulted in better sensory quality, higher content of vitamin C and lower psychrophile counts. More research is needed to analyse the effect of these treatments on other quality parameters. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Estimation of energy storage capacity in power system in japan under future demand and supply factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Ikuo; Tanaka, Toshikatsu

    1996-01-01

    The desirable capacity of future energy storage facility in power system in Japan is discussed in this paper, putting emphasis on future new electric demand/supply factors such as CO 2 emission problems and social structure change. The two fundamental demand scenarios are considered; one is base case scenario which extrapolates the trend until now and the other is social structure change scenario. The desirable capacity of the energy storage facility is obtained from the result of optimum generation mix which minimizes the yearly expenses of the target year (2030 and 2050). The result shows that the optimum capacity of energy storage facility is about 10 to 15%. The social structure change and demand side energy storage have great influences on the optimum capacity of supply side storage. The former increases storage capacity. The latter reduces it and also contributes to the reduction of generation cost. Suppression of CO 2 emission basically affects to reduce the storage capacity. The load following operation of nuclear plant also reduces the optimum storage capacity in the case it produces surplus energy at night. Though there exist many factors which increase or decrease the capacity of energy storage facility, as a whole, it is concluded that the development of new energy storage technology is necessary for future. (author)

  2. Glycogen metabolism in aerobic mixed cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dircks, Klaus; Beun, J.J.; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    of glycogen and subsequent growth occur without significant loss of energy, as compared with direct growth on glucose. For kinetic modeling, Monod kinetics is used most commonly in activated sludge models to describe the rate of microbial transformation. Monod kinetics, however, does not provide a good...... description of the data obtained. Second-order kinetics gives a better description of the rate of glycogen degradation. Formation and consumption of glycogen appears to be much faster than for PHB. (C) 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc....

  3. Glycogenic Hepatopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Atmaca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare cause of high transaminase levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This condition, characterized by elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly, is caused by irreversible and excessive accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. This is a case report on a 19-year-old male case, diagnosed with glycogenic hepatopathy. After the diagnosis was documented by liver biopsy, the case was put on glycemic control which led to significant decline in hepatomegaly and liver enzymes. It was emphasized that, in type 1 diabetes mellitus cases, hepatopathy should also be considered in the differential diagnoses of elevated liver enzyme and hepatomegaly.

  4. Restoration of Muscle Glycogen and Functional Capacity: Role of Post-Exercise Carbohydrate and Protein Co-Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah F. Alghannam

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of post-exercise recovery nutrition has been well described in recent years, leading to its incorporation as an integral part of training regimes in both athletes and active individuals. Muscle glycogen depletion during an initial prolonged exercise bout is a main factor in the onset of fatigue and so the replenishment of glycogen stores may be important for recovery of functional capacity. Nevertheless, nutritional considerations for optimal short-term (3–6 h recovery remain incompletely elucidated, particularly surrounding the precise amount of specific types of nutrients required. Current nutritional guidelines to maximise muscle glycogen availability within limited recovery are provided under the assumption that similar fatigue mechanisms (i.e., muscle glycogen depletion are involved during a repeated exercise bout. Indeed, recent data support the notion that muscle glycogen availability is a determinant of subsequent endurance capacity following limited recovery. Thus, carbohydrate ingestion can be utilised to influence the restoration of endurance capacity following exhaustive exercise. One strategy with the potential to accelerate muscle glycogen resynthesis and/or functional capacity beyond merely ingesting adequate carbohydrate is the co-ingestion of added protein. While numerous studies have been instigated, a consensus that is related to the influence of carbohydrate-protein ingestion in maximising muscle glycogen during short-term recovery and repeated exercise capacity has not been established. When considered collectively, carbohydrate intake during limited recovery appears to primarily determine muscle glycogen resynthesis and repeated exercise capacity. Thus, when the goal is to optimise repeated exercise capacity following short-term recovery, ingesting carbohydrate at an amount of ≥1.2 g kg body mass−1·h−1 can maximise muscle glycogen repletion. The addition of protein to carbohydrate during post

  5. Integrated application of transcriptomics and metabolomics provides insights into glycogen content regulation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Busu; Song, Kai; Meng, Jie; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2017-09-11

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important marine fishery resource, which contains high levels of glycogen that contributes to the flavor and the quality of the oyster. However, little is known about the molecular and chemical mechanisms underlying glycogen content differences in Pacific oysters. Using a homogeneous cultured Pacific oyster family, we explored these regulatory networks at the level of the metabolome and the transcriptome. Oysters with the highest and lowest natural glycogen content were selected for differential transcriptome and metabolome analysis. We identified 1888 differentially-expressed genes, seventy-five differentially-abundant metabolites, which are part of twenty-seven signaling pathways that were enriched using an integrated analysis of the interaction between the differentially-expressed genes and the differentially-abundant metabolites. Based on these results, we found that a high expression of carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), indicative of increased fatty acid degradation, is associated with a lower glycogen content. Together, a high level of expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and high levels of glucogenic amino acids likely underlie the increased glycogen production in high-glycogen oysters. In addition, the higher levels of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase (HK) and pyruvate kinase (PK), as well as of the TCA cycle enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), imply that there is a concomitant up-regulation of energy metabolism in high-glycogen oysters. High-glycogen oysters also appeared to have an increased ability to cope with stress, since the levels of the antioxidant glutathione peroxidase enzyme 5 (GPX5) gene were also increased. Our results suggest that amino acids and free fatty acids are closely related to glycogen content in oysters. In addition, oysters with a high glycogen content have a greater energy production capacity and a greater ability to cope with

  6. Restoration of Muscle Glycogen and Functional Capacity: Role of Post-Exercise Carbohydrate and Protein Co-Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghannam, Abdullah F; Gonzalez, Javier T; Betts, James A

    2018-02-23

    The importance of post-exercise recovery nutrition has been well described in recent years, leading to its incorporation as an integral part of training regimes in both athletes and active individuals. Muscle glycogen depletion during an initial prolonged exercise bout is a main factor in the onset of fatigue and so the replenishment of glycogen stores may be important for recovery of functional capacity. Nevertheless, nutritional considerations for optimal short-term (3-6 h) recovery remain incompletely elucidated, particularly surrounding the precise amount of specific types of nutrients required. Current nutritional guidelines to maximise muscle glycogen availability within limited recovery are provided under the assumption that similar fatigue mechanisms (i.e., muscle glycogen depletion) are involved during a repeated exercise bout. Indeed, recent data support the notion that muscle glycogen availability is a determinant of subsequent endurance capacity following limited recovery. Thus, carbohydrate ingestion can be utilised to influence the restoration of endurance capacity following exhaustive exercise. One strategy with the potential to accelerate muscle glycogen resynthesis and/or functional capacity beyond merely ingesting adequate carbohydrate is the co-ingestion of added protein. While numerous studies have been instigated, a consensus that is related to the influence of carbohydrate-protein ingestion in maximising muscle glycogen during short-term recovery and repeated exercise capacity has not been established. When considered collectively, carbohydrate intake during limited recovery appears to primarily determine muscle glycogen resynthesis and repeated exercise capacity. Thus, when the goal is to optimise repeated exercise capacity following short-term recovery, ingesting carbohydrate at an amount of ≥1.2 g kg body mass -1 ·h -1 can maximise muscle glycogen repletion. The addition of protein to carbohydrate during post-exercise recovery may be

  7. Malin decreases glycogen accumulation by promoting the degradation of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG)

    OpenAIRE

    Worby, Carolyn A.; Gentry, Matthew S.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2007-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease that results in progressive myoclonus epilepsy and death. LD is caused by mutations in either the E3 ubiquitin ligase malin or the dual-specificity phosphatase laforin. A hallmark of LD is the accumulation of insoluble glycogen in the cytoplasm of cells from most tissues. Glycogen metabolism is regulated by phosphorylation of key metabolic enzymes. One regulator of this phosphorylation is protein targeting to glycogen (PT...

  8. High glycogen levels enhance glycogen breakdown in isolated contracting skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The influence of supranormal muscle glycogen levels on glycogen breakdown in contracting muscle was investigated. Rats either rested or swam for 3 h and subsequently had their isolated hindquarters perfused after 21 h with access to food. Muscle glycogen concentrations were measured before and af...... by mechanisms exerted within the muscle cells. Intramuscular lipolysis and net protein breakdown are unaffected. There seems to be no close linkage between needs and mobilization of fuel within the working muscle....

  9. Green Tea Polyphenol Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Enhance Glycogen Synthesis and Inhibit Lipogenesis in Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane J. Y. Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP against metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes by suppressing appetite and nutrient absorption have been well reported. However the direct effects and mechanisms of GTP on glucose and lipid metabolism remain to be elucidated. Since the liver is an important organ involved in glucose and lipid metabolism, we examined the effects and mechanisms of GTP on glycogen synthesis and lipogenesis in HepG2 cells. Concentrations of GTP containing 68% naturally occurring (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG were incubated in HepG2 cells with high glucose (30 mM under 100 nM of insulin stimulation for 24 h. GTP enhanced glycogen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. 10 μM of EGCG significantly increased glycogen synthesis by 2fold (P<0.05 compared with insulin alone. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of Ser9 glycogen synthase kinase 3β and Ser641 glycogen synthase was significantly increased in GTP-treated HepG2 cells compared with nontreated cells. 10 μM of EGCG also significantly inhibited lipogenesis (P<0.01. We further demonstrated that this mechanism involves enhanced expression of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase α and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in HepG2 cells. Our results showed that GTP is capable of enhancing insulin-mediated glucose and lipid metabolism by regulating enzymes involved in glycogen synthesis and lipogenesis.

  10. Dysregulation of glycogen synthase COOH- and NH2-terminal phosphorylation by insulin in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Context: Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal is impaired in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is tightly linked to impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake and storage. Impaired activation of glycogen synthase (GS) by insulin is a well-established defect in both obesity and T2DM......, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Design and Participants: Insulin action was investigated in a matched cohort of lean healthy, obese nondiabetic, and obese type 2 diabetic subjects by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique combined with muscle biopsies. Activity, site-specific phosphorylation....... The exaggerated insulin resistance in T2DM compared with obese subjects was not reflected by differences in site 3 phosphorylation but was accompanied by a significantly higher site 1b phosphorylation during insulin stimulation. Hyperphosphorylation of another Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase-II target...

  11. A study on oxidation treatment of uranium metal chip under controlling atmosphere for safe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Ji, Chul Goo; Bae, Sang Oh; Woo, Yoon Myeoung; Kim, Jong Goo; Ha, Yeong Keong

    2011-01-01

    The U metal chips generated in developing nuclear fuel and a gamma radioisotope shield have been stored under immersion of water in KAERI. When the water of the storing vessels vaporizes or drains due to unexpected leaking, the U metal chips are able to open to air. A new oxidation treatment process was raised for a long time safe storage with concepts of drying under vacuum, evaporating the containing water and organic material with elevating temperature, and oxidizing the uranium metal chips at an appropriate high temperature under conditions of controlling the feeding rate of oxygen gas. In order to optimize the oxidation process the uranium metal chips were completely dried at higher temperature than 300 .deg. C and tested for oxidation at various temperatures, which are 300 .deg. C, 400 .deg. C, and 500 .deg. C. When the oxidation temperature was 400 .deg. C, the oxidized sample for 7 hours showed a temperature rise of 60 .deg. C in the self-ignition test. But the oxidized sample for 14 hours revealed a slight temperature rise of 7 .deg. C representing a stable behavior in the self-ignition test. When the temperature was 500 .deg. C, the shorter oxidation for 7 hours appeared to be enough because the self-ignition test represented no temperature rise. By using several chemical analyses such as carbon content determination, X-ray deflection (XRD), Infrared spectra (IR) and Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) on the oxidation treated samples, the results of self-ignition test of new oxidation treatment process for U metal chip were interpreted and supported

  12. Carbon burial and storage in tropical salt marshes under the influence of sea level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Fernández, A C; Carnero-Bravo, V; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A; Pérez-Bernal, L H; Amaya-Monterrosa, O A; Bojórquez-Sánchez, S; López-Mendoza, P G; Cardoso-Mohedano, J G; Dunbar, R B; Mucciarone, D A; Marmolejo-Rodríguez, A J

    2018-07-15

    Coastal vegetated habitats can be important sinks of organic carbon (C org ) and mitigate global warming by sequestering significant quantities of atmospheric CO 2 and storing sedimentary C org for long periods, although their C org burial and storage capacity may be affected by on-going sea level rise and human intervention. Geochemical data from published 210 Pb-dated sediment cores, collected from low-energy microtidal coastal wetlands in El Salvador (Jiquilisco Bay) and in Mexico (Salada Lagoon; Estero de Urias Lagoon; Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve) were revisited to assess temporal changes (within the last 100years) of C org concentrations, storage and burial rates in tropical salt marshes under the influence of sea level rise and contrasting anthropization degree. Grain size distribution was used to identify hydrodynamic changes, and δ 13 C to distinguish terrigenous sediments from those accumulated under the influence of marine transgression. Although the accretion rate ranges in all sediment records were comparable, C org concentrations (0.2-30%), stocks (30-465Mgha -1 , by extrapolation to 1m depth), and burial rates (3-378gm -2 year -1 ) varied widely within and among the study areas. However, in most sites sea level rise decreased C org concentrations and stocks in sediments, but increased C org burial rates. Lower C org concentrations were attributed to the input of reworked marine particles, which contribute with a lower amount of C org than terrigenous sediments; whereas higher C org burial rates were driven by higher mass accumulation rates, influenced by increased flooding and human interventions in the surroundings. C org accumulation and long-term preservation in tropical salt marshes can be as high as in mangrove or temperate salt marsh areas and, besides the reduction of C org stocks by ongoing sea level rise, the disturbance of the long-term buried C org inventories might cause high CO 2 releases, for which they must be protected as a part of

  13. Optimal control, investment and utilization schemes for energy storage under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhosseini, Niloufar Sadat

    Energy storage has the potential to offer new means for added flexibility on the electricity systems. This flexibility can be used in a number of ways, including adding value towards asset management, power quality and reliability, integration of renewable resources and energy bill savings for the end users. However, uncertainty about system states and volatility in system dynamics can complicate the question of when to invest in energy storage and how best to manage and utilize it. This work proposes models to address different problems associated with energy storage within a microgrid, including optimal control, investment, and utilization. Electric load, renewable resources output, storage technology cost and electricity day-ahead and spot prices are the factors that bring uncertainty to the problem. A number of analytical methodologies have been adopted to develop the aforementioned models. Model Predictive Control and discretized dynamic programming, along with a new decomposition algorithm are used to develop optimal control schemes for energy storage for two different levels of renewable penetration. Real option theory and Monte Carlo simulation, coupled with an optimal control approach, are used to obtain optimal incremental investment decisions, considering multiple sources of uncertainty. Two stage stochastic programming is used to develop a novel and holistic methodology, including utilization of energy storage within a microgrid, in order to optimally interact with energy market. Energy storage can contribute in terms of value generation and risk reduction for the microgrid. The integration of the models developed here are the basis for a framework which extends from long term investments in storage capacity to short term operational control (charge/discharge) of storage within a microgrid. In particular, the following practical goals are achieved: (i) optimal investment on storage capacity over time to maximize savings during normal and emergency

  14. Label-free quantitative proteomics to investigate strawberry fruit proteome changes under controlled atmosphere and low temperature storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Luo, Zisheng; Huang, Xinhong; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Pengyu; Ma, Hongyuan; Li, Xihong; Ban, Zhaojun; Liu, Xia

    2015-04-29

    To elucidate the mechanisms contributing to fruit responses to senescence and stressful environmental stimuli under low temperature (LT) and controlled atmosphere (CA) storage, a label-free quantitative proteomic investigation was conducted in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa, Duch. cv. 'Akihime'). Postharvest physiological quality traits including firmness, total soluble solids, total acidity, ascorbic acid and volatile production were characterized following storage under different conditions. The observed post-storage protein expression profiles may be associated with delayed senescence features in strawberry. A total of 454 proteins were identified in differentially treated strawberry fruits. Quantitative analysis, using normalized spectral counts, revealed 73 proteins common to all treatments, which formed three clusters in a hierarchical clustering analysis. The proteins spanned a range of functions in various metabolic pathways and networks involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, volatile biosynthesis, phenylpropanoid activity, stress response and protein synthesis, degradation and folding. After CA and LT storage, 16 (13) and 11 (17) proteins, respectively, were significantly increased (decreased) in abundance, while expression profile of 12 proteins was significantly changed by both CA and LT. To summarize, the differential variability of abundance in strawberry proteome, working in a cooperative manner, provided an overview of the biological processes that occurred during CA and LT storage. Controlled atmosphere storage at an optimal temperature is regarded to be an effective postharvest technology to delay fruit senescence and maintain fruit quality during shelf life. Nonetheless, little information on fruit proteomic changes under controlled atmosphere and/or low temperature storage is available. The significance of this paper is that it is the first study employing a label-free approach in the investigation of strawberry fruit response to

  15. Operation of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system under conditions of stochastic change of wind energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczewski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the issues of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system (WT-FESS) operation under real conditions. Stochastic changes of wind energy in time cause significant fluctuations of the system output power and as a result have a negative impact on the quality of the generated electrical energy. In the author's opinion it is possible to reduce the aforementioned effects by using an energy storage of an appropriate type and capacity. It was assumed that based on the technical parameters of a wind turbine-energy storage system and its geographical location one can determine the boundary capacity of the storage, which helps prevent power cuts to the grid at the assumed probability. Flywheel energy storage was selected due to its characteristics and technical parameters. The storage capacity was determined based on an empirical relationship using the results of the proposed statistical and energetic analysis of the measured wind velocity courses. A detailed algorithm of the WT-FESS with the power grid system was developed, eliminating short-term breaks in the turbine operation and periods when the wind turbine power was below the assumed level.

  16. Operation of a Wind Turbine-Flywheel Energy Storage System under Conditions of Stochastic Change of Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the issues of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system (WT-FESS) operation under real conditions. Stochastic changes of wind energy in time cause significant fluctuations of the system output power and as a result have a negative impact on the quality of the generated electrical energy. In the author's opinion it is possible to reduce the aforementioned effects by using an energy storage of an appropriate type and capacity. It was assumed that based on the technical parameters of a wind turbine-energy storage system and its geographical location one can determine the boundary capacity of the storage, which helps prevent power cuts to the grid at the assumed probability. Flywheel energy storage was selected due to its characteristics and technical parameters. The storage capacity was determined based on an empirical relationship using the results of the proposed statistical and energetic analysis of the measured wind velocity courses. A detailed algorithm of the WT-FESS with the power grid system was developed, eliminating short-term breaks in the turbine operation and periods when the wind turbine power was below the assumed level. PMID:25215326

  17. Fuel treatment effects on tree-based forest carbon storage and emissions under modeled wildfire scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Hurteau; M. North

    2009-01-01

    Forests are viewed as a potential sink for carbon (C) that might otherwise contribute to climate change. It is unclear, however, how to manage forests with frequent fire regimes to maximize C storage while reducing C emissions from prescribed burns or wildfire. We modeled the effects of eight different fuel treatments on treebased C storage and release over a century,...

  18. Effects of origin, seasons and storage under different temperatures on germination of Senecio vulgaris (Asteraceae) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndihokubwayo, Noel; Nguyen, Viet-Thang; Cheng, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    Invasive plants colonize new environments, become pests and cause biodiversity loss, economic loss and health damage. Senecio vulgaris L. (Common groundsel, Asteraceae), a widely distributing cosmopolitan weed in the temperate area, is reported with large populations in the north-eastern and south-western part, but not in southern, central, or north-western parts of China. We studied the germination behavior of S. vulgaris to explain the distribution and the biological invasion of this species in China. We used seeds originating from six native and six invasive populations to conduct germination experiments in a climate chamber and under outdoor condition. When incubated in a climate chamber (15 °C), seeds from the majority of the populations showed >90% germination percentage (GP) and the GP was equal for seeds with a native and invasive origin. The mean germination time (MGT) was significantly different among the populations. Under outdoor conditions, significant effects of origin, storage conditions (stored at 4 °C or ambient room temperature, ca. 27 °C) and seasons (in summer or autumn) were observed on the GP while the MGT was only affected by the season. In autumn, the GP (38.6%) was higher and the MGT was slightly longer than that in summer. In autumn, seeds stored at 4 °C showed higher GP than those stored at ambient room temperature (ca.27 °C), and seeds from invasive populations revealed higher GP than those from native populations. The results implied that the high temperature in summer has a negative impact on the germination and might cause viability loss or secondary dormancy to S. vulgaris seeds. Our study offers a clue to exploring what factor limits the distribution of S. vulgaris in China by explaining why, in the cities in South-East China and central China such as Wuhan, S. vulgaris cannot establish natural and viable populations.

  19. 78 FR 2990 - Bear Creek Storage Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. CP13-34-000] Bear Creek..., 2012, Bear Creek Storage Company, L.L.C. (Bear Creek), 569 Brookwood Village, Suite 749, Birmingham....208, 157.213 and 157.216 of the Commission's Regulations under the Natural Gas Act, and Bear Creek's...

  20. Seed storage at elevated partial pressure of oxygen, a fast method for analysing seed ageing under dry conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.P.C.; Surki, A.A.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Kodde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite differences in physiology between dry and relative moist seeds, seed ageing tests most often use a temperature and seed moisture level that are higher than during dry storage used in commercial practice and gene banks. This study aimed to test whether seed ageing under

  1. Operation of a Wind Turbine-Flywheel Energy Storage System under Conditions of Stochastic Change of Wind Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Tomczewski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the issues of a wind turbine-flywheel energy storage system (WT-FESS) operation under real conditions. Stochastic changes of wind energy in time cause significant fluctuations of the system output power and as a result have a negative impact on the quality of the generated electrical energy. In the author’s opinion it is possible to reduce the aforementioned effects by using an energy storage of an appropriate type and capacity. It was assumed that based on the technical pa...

  2. Hyper-hippocampal glycogen induced by glycogen loading with exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soya, Mariko; Matsui, Takashi; Shima, Takeru; Jesmin, Subrina; Omi, Naomi; Soya, Hideaki

    2018-01-19

    Glycogen loading (GL), a well-known type of sports conditioning, in combination with exercise and a high carbohydrate diet (HCD) for 1 week enhances individual endurance capacity through muscle glycogen supercompensation. This exercise-diet combination is necessary for successful GL. Glycogen in the brain contributes to hippocampus-related memory functions and endurance capacity. Although the effect of HCD on the brain remains unknown, brain supercompensation occurs following exhaustive exercise (EE), a component of GL. We thus employed a rat model of GL and examined whether GL increases glycogen levels in the brain as well as in muscle, and found that GL increased glycogen levels in the hippocampus and hypothalamus, as well as in muscle. We further explored the essential components of GL (exercise and/or diet conditions) to establish a minimal model of GL focusing on the brain. Exercise, rather than a HCD, was found to be crucial for GL-induced hyper-glycogen in muscle, the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. Moreover, EE was essential for hyper-glycogen only in the hippocampus even without HCD. Here we propose the EE component of GL without HCD as a condition that enhances brain glycogen stores especially in the hippocampus, implicating a physiological strategy to enhance hippocampal functions.

  3. High glycogen levels enhance glycogen breakdown in isolated contracting skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    and after 15 min of intermittent electrical muscle stimulation. Before stimulation, glycogen was higher in rats that swam on the preceding day (supercompensated rats) compared with controls. During muscle contractions, glycogen breakdown in fast-twitch red and white fibers was larger in supercompensated...

  4. Assessment of neutron skyshine near unmodified Accumulator Debuncher storage rings under Mu2e operational conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossairt, J.Donald; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    Preliminary plans for providing the proton beam needed by the proposed Mu2e experiment at Fermilab will require the transport of 8 GeV protons to the Accumulator/Debuncher where they be processed into an intensity and time structure useful for the experiment. The intensities involved are far greater that those encountered with antiprotons of the same kinetic energy in the same beam enclosures under Tevatron Collider operational conditions, the operating parameters for which the physical facilities of the Antiproton Source were designed. This note explores some important ramifications of the proposed operation for radiation safety and demonstrates the need for extensive modifications of significant portions of the shielding of the Accumulator Debuncher storage rings; notably that underneath the AP Service Buildings AP10, AP30, and AP50. While existing shielding is adequate for the current operating mode of the Accumulator/Debuncher as part of the Antiproton Source used in the Tevatron Collider program, without significant modifications of the shielding configuration in the Accumulator/Debuncher region and/or beam loss control systems far more effective than seen in most applications at Fermilab, the proposed operational mode for Mu2e is not viable for the following reasons: 1. Due to skyshine alone, under normal operational conditions large areas of the Fermilab site would be exposed to unacceptable levels of radiation where most of the Laboratory workforce and some members of the general public who regularly visit Fermilab would receive measurable doses annually, contrary to workforce, public, and DOE expectations concerning the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle. 2. Under normal operational conditions, a sizeable region of the Fermilab site would also require fencing due to skyshine. The size of the areas involved would likely invite public inquiry about the significant and visible enlargement of Fermilab's posted radiological areas. 3. There

  5. The role of glycogen synthase in the development of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes - 'To store or not to store glucose, that's the question'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2012-01-01

    This review deals with the role of glycogen storage in skeletal muscle for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Specifically, the role of the enzyme glycogen synthase, which seems to be locked in its hyperphosphorylated and inactivated state, is discussed. This defect seems...... to be secondary to ectopic lipid disposition in the muscle cells. These molecular defects are discussed in the context of the overall pathophysiology of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic subjects. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  6. No effect of glycogen level on glycogen metabolism during high intensity exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Katleen; Hespel, P.; Eynde, Bart Vanden

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effect of glycogen supercompensation on glycogen breakdown, muscle and blood lactate accumulation, blood-pH, and performance during short-term high-intensity exercise. Young healthy volunteers performed two supramaximal (125% of VO2max) exercise tests on a bicycle ergometer......, either for 1 min 45 s (protocol 1; N = 18) or to exhaustion (protocol 2; N = 14). The exercise tests were preceded by either 5 d on a controlled normal (N) diet, or by 2 d of glycogen-depleting exercise accompanied by the normal diet followed by 3 d on a carbohydrate-rich (CHR) diet. In protocol 1......, preexercise muscle glycogen concentrations were 364 +/- 23 and 568 +/- 35 mumol.g-1 d.w. in the N and CHR condition, respectively (P glycogen concentration in the M. quadriceps decreased to the same extent in both groups. Accordingly, the exercise-induced increases in muscle...

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography for early vadose leak detection under single shell storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narbutovshih, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    This document describes planned testing with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). It is prepared in support of TTP RL46WT51 Rev. 1, funded by the Tank Focus Area through the Office of Technology Integration. The primary goal of the testing for fiscal year 1996 (FY96) is to develop and demonstrate the ability to place vertical electrode arrays (VEA) with the cone penetrometer technology (CPT) to depths below existing single shell tanks (SST) at the DOE Hanford Site. It is desirable to have the capability to use CPT for this application for obvious reasons. First, current methods of emplacement, drilled boreholes, are expensive with respect to the rest of the ERT operation. Cone penetrometer VEA emplacements offer the opportunity to significantly reduce installation costs. Second, use of CPT will reduce emplacement time from weeks or months to just several days depending on the number of VEAs and the depth of placement. ERT is preferable to other monitoring methods since operation costs and turn around time are less than the current baselines of either groundwater sampling networks or borehole logging techniques. ERT cost savings can be substantial and will continue into the future. ERT can also provide complete coverage under a tank or other facility which is an important supplement to existing monitoring methods. Groundwater sampling provides one data point per well and borehole logging provides data along a line in the ground. Neither provide information from beneath a facility and thus, are not able to locate release points. These electrode arrays are used to acquire subsurface electrical resistance data in a manner appropriate for tomographic inversion. The resulting tomograms can then be used to detect, monitor and track contaminated moisture plumes leaking from underground storage tanks during waste retrieval operations

  8. Eggs viability of Aedes aegypti Linnaeus (Diptera, Culicidae) under different environmental and storage conditions in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Pinheiro, V C; Dasso-Pinheiro, W; Trindade-Bezerra, J M; Tadei, W P

    2017-01-01

    The viability of Aedes aegypti eggs was assessed in the Amazon region. The eggs were maintained under different conditions: indoors (insectarium) and outdoors (natural environment), as well as in different storage types (plastic cup, paper envelope, plastic bag) for different days. Egg viability was measured as the mean of hatchings observed from egg-bearing sheets of filter paper immersed in water, using three sheets randomly selected from each storage type and at both sites. There were significant differences in the viability of Ae. aegypti eggs with respect to the location (F=30.40; DF=1; P<0.0001), storage type (F=17.66; DF=2; P<0.0001), and time of storage (F=49.56; DF=9; P<0.0001). The interaction between storage site versus storage type was also significant (F=15.96; DF=2; P<0.0001). A higher hatching mean was observed for the eggs kept in the insectarium than for those outdoors (32.38 versus 7.46). Hatching rates of egg batches stored for 12 to 61 days ranged between 84 and 90%. A reduction was observed between 89 and 118 days, with values of 63 and 48%, respectively. With respect to type of storage, mean egg hatching was higher for the eggs in plastic cups (44.46). It was concluded that the viability of the eggs of Ae. aegypti in the Amazon region remains high up to 4 months, after which it declines drastically, although in this study hatching occurred for up to 8 months in very low percentages.

  9. Neuronal glycogen synthesis contributes to physiological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinadinos, Christopher; Valles-Ortega, Jordi; Boulan, Laura; Solsona, Estel; Tevy, Maria F; Marquez, Mercedes; Duran, Jordi; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Calbó, Joaquim; Blasco, Ester; Pumarola, Marti; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-10-01

    Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose and the carbohydrate energy store for animal cells. In the brain, it is essentially found in glial cells, although it is also present in minute amounts in neurons. In humans, loss-of-function mutations in laforin and malin, proteins involved in suppressing glycogen synthesis, induce the presence of high numbers of insoluble polyglucosan bodies in neuronal cells. Known as Lafora bodies (LBs), these deposits result in the aggressive neurodegeneration seen in Lafora's disease. Polysaccharide-based aggregates, called corpora amylacea (CA), are also present in the neurons of aged human brains. Despite the similarity of CA to LBs, the mechanisms and functional consequences of CA formation are yet unknown. Here, we show that wild-type laboratory mice also accumulate glycogen-based aggregates in the brain as they age. These structures are immunopositive for an array of metabolic and stress-response proteins, some of which were previously shown to aggregate in correlation with age in the human brain and are also present in LBs. Remarkably, these structures and their associated protein aggregates are not present in the aged mouse brain upon genetic ablation of glycogen synthase. Similar genetic intervention in Drosophila prevents the accumulation of glycogen clusters in the neuronal processes of aged flies. Most interestingly, targeted reduction of Drosophila glycogen synthase in neurons improves neurological function with age and extends lifespan. These results demonstrate that neuronal glycogen accumulation contributes to physiological aging and may therefore constitute a key factor regulating age-related neurological decline in humans. © 2014 The Authors. Aging cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Feasibility of radiation processing for post-harvest storage of potatoes under tropical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Srirangarajan, A.N.; Padwal-Desai, S.R.; Ghanekar, A.S.; Shirsat, S.G.; Pendharkar, M.B.; Nair, P.M.; Nadkarni, G.B.

    1978-01-01

    Storage changes after gamma irradiation (10krad) of five commercial varieties of potatoes, Kufri Chandramukhi, K. Kuber, K. Alankar, K. Sheetman and K. Sinduri, grown in India were ascertained to arrive at optimal storage conditions. The radiation treatment could completely inhibit sprouting in all the varieties, irrespective of storage temperature, in addition to eliminating the tuber moth Pthorimaea operculella (Zeller). The temperature-dependent total losses could be attributed to microbial rotting and dehydration. The organisms causing soft rot at temperatures above 15 0 C belonged to Erwinia spp., while the rot caused below 10 0 C was essentially due to Micrococcus spp. Irradiation followed by storage at cool temperatures (10-15 0 C) offers an alternative method, comparable with conventional refrigerated (2-4 0 C) storage. The irradiated potatoes were not amenable to the attack of toxigenic fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus during storage. This could be attributed to phenolic compounds present in the tubers. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), involved in the metabolism of phenolic compounds, showed enhancement in the irradiated potatoes. The extent of radiation-induced activation of PAL is suggested as a biochemical parameter for identifying irradiated tubers. (author)

  11. Quality changes of anchovy (Stolephorus heterolobus) under refrigerated storage of different practical industrial methods in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotimarkorn, Chatchawan

    2014-02-01

    Quality changes of anchovy (Stolephorus heterolobus) muscle during 7 days of refrigerated storage with ice and without ice were studied using several indicators: changes of ATP degradation products, K-value, TVB-N, TMA-N, Lactic acid, biogenic amines, sensory and microbiological analysis. During 7-day of refrigerated storage with ice and without ice, K-value, TVB-N, TMA-N and D, L-lactic acids contents increased with longer storage time (p ≤ 0.05). Major biogenic amines found in anchovy muscle during refrigerated storage were cadaverine, agmatine and tyramine, followed by putrescine and histamine. Skin and external odour by sensory evaluation, progressive decreases were observed as refrigeration time progressed. Storage of anchovy with ice resulted in a better maintenance of sensory quality, better control microbial activity, and the slowing down of biochemical degradation mechanisms. This result introduces the use of refrigerated storage with ice as a practical preliminary chilling for anchovy during industrial processing.

  12. Antioxidant activity of various plant extracts under ambient and accelerated storage of sunflower oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh, Munir A.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the antioxidant potential of 11 medicinally or economically important plant materials indigenous to Pakistan. The materials were extracted with 80% methanol and examined  for their antioxidant activity under different storage conditions using sunflower and soybean oils as oxidation substrates. Preliminary antioxidant activity assessment among the extracts was conducted with the TLC-test and by measuring percent inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation. The rhizome of Iris germanica, leaves of Lawsonia alba, and M. oleifera, coffee (Coffee arabica beans, rice (Oryza sativa bran, wheat bran and oats (Avenis sativa groats and hull, which showed higher antioxidant activity among the extracts, were further evaluated using soybean and sunflower oils as oxidation substrates. The vegetable oils were stabilized with extracts at a dosage of 0.12% (w/w, and individually subjected to accelerated (65 oC, 15 days and ambient (6 months storage. The oxidative deterioration level was monitored for the measurement of antioxidant activity index (AI, peroxide value (PV, conjugated dienes and trienes contents. Overall, the extracts of coffee beans, oat groats and hull, Iris germanica and M. oleifera leaves were found to be the most effective in extending oxidative stability, and retarding PV, primary and secondary oxidation products of soybean and sunflower oils. The order of efficiency of the plant extracts for stabilization of the subject oils was as follows: oat groats and hull > coffee beans > M. oleifera leaves > Lawsonia alba > Iris germanica > rice bran > wheat bran. Significant differences in the antioxidant potential of some of the extracts for stabilization of substrate oils were observed under ambient and accelerated storage conditions and thus demonstrated a variable antioxidant prospective of the extracts under different analytical protocols.El presente trabajo se ha realizado para investigar la capacidad

  13. Identification of binding sites on protein targeting to glycogen for enzymes of glycogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, N M; Jensen, T C; Shah, A S; Parekh, N N; Saltiel, A R; Brady, M J

    2000-11-10

    The activation of protein phosphastase-1 (PP1) by insulin plays a critical role in the regulation of glycogen metabolism. PTG is a PP1 glycogen-targeting protein, which also binds the PP1 substrates glycogen synthase, glycogen phosphorylase, and phosphorylase kinase (Printen, J. A., Brady, M. J., and Saltiel, A. R. (1997) Science 275, 1475-1478). Through a combination of deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis, the regions on PTG responsible for binding PP1 and its substrates have been delineated. Mutagenesis of Val-62 and Phe-64 in the highly conserved (K/R)VXF PP1-binding motif to alanine was sufficient to ablate PP1 binding to PTG. Phosphorylase kinase, glycogen synthase, and phosphorylase binding all mapped to the same C-terminal region of PTG. Mutagenesis of Asp-225 and Glu-228 to alanine completely blocked the interaction between PTG and these three enzymes, without affecting PP1 binding. Disruption of either PP1 or substrate binding to PTG blocked the stimulation of PP1 activity in vitro against phosphorylase, indicating that both binding sites may be important in PTG action. Transient overexpression of wild-type PTG in Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the insulin receptor caused a 50-fold increase in glycogen levels. Expression of PTG mutants that do not bind PP1 had no effect on glycogen accumulation, indicating that PP1 targeting is essential for PTG function. Likewise, expression of the PTG mutants that do not bind PP1 substrates did not increase glycogen levels, indicating that PP1 targeting glycogen is not sufficient for the metabolic effects of PTG. These results cumulatively demonstrate that PTG serves as a molecular scaffold, allowing PP1 to recognize its substrates at the glycogen particle.

  14. Increases in the annual range of soil water storage at northern middle and high latitudes under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Ying; Lan, Chia-Wei; Lo, Min-Hui; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2015-05-01

    Soil water storage is a fundamental signal in the land hydrological cycle and changes in soil moisture can affect regional climate. In this study, we used simulations from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 archives to investigate changes in the annual range of soil water storage under global warming at northern middle and high latitudes. Results show that future warming could lead to significant declines in snowfall, and a corresponding lack of snowmelt water recharge to the soil, which makes soil water less available during spring and summer. Conversely, more precipitation as rainfall results in higher recharge to soil water during its accumulating season. Thus, the wettest month of soil water gets wetter, and the driest month gets drier, resulting in an increase of the annual range and suggesting that stronger heterogeneity in global water distribution (changing extremes) could occur under global warming; this has implications for water management and water security under a changing climate.

  15. Development of a threshold model to predict germination of Populus tomentosa seeds after harvest and storage under ambient condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Song, Song-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Effects of temperature, storage time and their combination on germination of aspen (Populus tomentosa) seeds were investigated. Aspen seeds were germinated at 5 to 30°C at 5°C intervals after storage for a period of time under 28°C and 75% relative humidity. The effect of temperature on aspen seed germination could not be effectively described by the thermal time (TT) model, which underestimated the germination rate at 5°C and poorly predicted the time courses of germination at 10, 20, 25 and 30°C. A modified TT model (MTT) which assumed a two-phased linear relationship between germination rate and temperature was more accurate in predicting the germination rate and percentage and had a higher likelihood of being correct than the TT model. The maximum lifetime threshold (MLT) model accurately described the effect of storage time on seed germination across all the germination temperatures. An aging thermal time (ATT) model combining both the TT and MLT models was developed to describe the effect of both temperature and storage time on seed germination. When the ATT model was applied to germination data across all the temperatures and storage times, it produced a relatively poor fit. Adjusting the ATT model to separately fit germination data at low and high temperatures in the suboptimal range increased the models accuracy for predicting seed germination. Both the MLT and ATT models indicate that germination of aspen seeds have distinct physiological responses to temperature within a suboptimal range.

  16. Irisin inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis and increases glycogen synthesis via the PI3K/Akt pathway in type 2 diabetic mice and hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-Yan; Shi, Chang-Xiang; Gao, Run; Sun, Hai-Jian; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Ding, Lei; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Wang, Jue-Jin; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Increased glucose production and reduced hepatic glycogen storage contribute to metabolic abnormalities in diabetes. Irisin, a newly identified myokine, induces the browning of white adipose tissue, but its effects on gluconeogenesis and glycogenesis are unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects and underlying mechanisms of irisin on gluconeogenesis and glycogenesis in hepatocytes with insulin resistance, and its therapeutic role in type 2 diabetic mice. Insulin resistance was induced by glucosamine (GlcN) or palmitate in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/high-fat diet (STZ/HFD) in mice. In HepG2 cells, irisin ameliorated the GlcN-induced increases in glucose production, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) expression, and glycogen synthase (GS) phosphorylation; it prevented GlcN-induced decreases in glycogen content and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) p110α subunit level, and the phosphorylation of Akt/protein kinase B, forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FOXO1) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). These effects of irisin were abolished by the inhibition of PI3K or Akt. The effects of irisin were confirmed in mouse primary hepatocytes with GlcN-induced insulin resistance and in human HepG2 cells with palmitate-induced insulin resistance. In diabetic mice, persistent subcutaneous perfusion of irisin improved the insulin sensitivity, reduced fasting blood glucose, increased GSK3 and Akt phosphorylation, glycogen content and irisin level, and suppressed GS phosphorylation and PEPCK and G6Pase expression in the liver. Irisin improves glucose homoeostasis by reducing gluconeogenesis via PI3K/Akt/FOXO1-mediated PEPCK and G6Pase down-regulation and increasing glycogenesis via PI3K/Akt/GSK3-mediated GS activation. Irisin may be regarded as a novel therapeutic strategy for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. © 2015

  17. Muscle glycogen resynthesis, signalling and metabolic responses following acute exercise in exercise-trained pigs carrying the PRKAG3 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essén-Gustavsson, Birgitta; Granlund, Anna; Benziane, Boubacar; Jensen-Waern, Marianne; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2011-09-01

    Hampshire pigs carrying the PRKAG3 mutation in the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) γ3 subunit exhibit excessive skeletal muscle glycogen storage and an altered glycogen synthesis signalling response following exercise. AMPK plays an important role as a regulator of carbohydrate and fat metabolism in mammalian cells. Exercise-trained muscles are repeatedly exposed to glycogen degradation and resynthesis, to which the signalling pathways adapt. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of acute exercise on glycogen synthesis signalling pathways, and the levels of insulin and other substrates in blood in exercise-trained pigs with and without the PRKAG3 mutation. After 5 weeks of training, pigs performed two standardized treadmill exercise tests, and skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained immediately after exercise and 3 h postexercise in the first test, and 6 h postexercise in the second test. The PRKAG3 mutation carriers had higher glycogen storage, and resynthesis of glycogen was faster after 3 h but not after 6 h of recovery. Alterations in the concentrations of insulin, glucose, lactate and free fatty acids after exercise did not differ between the genotypes. The carriers showed a lower expression of AMPK and increased phosphorylation of Akt Ser(473) after exercise, compared with non-carriers. Acute exercise stimulated the phosphorylation of AS160 in both genotypes, and the phosphorylation of GSK3α Ser(21) and ACC Ser(79) in the non-carriers. In conclusion, exercise-trained pigs carrying the PRKAG3 mutation show an altered Akt and AMPK signalling response to acute exercise, indicating that glucose metabolism is associated with faster resynthesis of muscle glycogen in this group.

  18. Lowering Temperature is the Trigger for Glycogen Build-Up and Winter Fasting in Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varis, Joonas; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal changes in physiology of vertebrate animals are triggered by environmental cues including temperature, day-length and oxygen availability. Crucian carp (Carassius carassius) tolerate prolonged anoxia in winter by using several physiological adaptations that are seasonally activated. This study examines which environmental cues are required to trigger physiological adjustments for winter dormancy in crucian carp. To this end, crucian carp were exposed to changing environmental factors under laboratory conditions: effects of declining water temperature, shortening day-length and reduced oxygen availability, separately and in different combinations, were examined on glycogen content and enzyme activities involved in feeding (alkaline phosphatase, AP) and glycogen metabolism (glycogen synthase, GyS; glycogen phosphorylase, GP). Lowering temperature induced a fall in activity of AP and a rise in glycogen content and rate of glycogen synthesis. Relative mass of the liver, and glycogen concentration of liver, muscle and brain increased with lowering temperature. Similarly activity of GyS in muscle and expression of GyS transcripts in brain were up-regulated by lowering temperature. Shortened day-length and oxygen availability had practically no effects on measured variables. We conclude that lowering temperature is the main trigger in preparation for winter anoxia in crucian carp.

  19. Effects of diabetes on brain metabolism - is brain glycogen a significant player?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Waagepetersen, Helle S.

    2015-01-01

    Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose to the br...... understanding of how brain energy and neurotransmitter metabolism is affected in diabetes. There will be a particular focus on the role of brain glycogen to support glycolytic and TCA cycle activity as well as glutamate-glutamine cycle in type 1 and type 2 diabetes....

  20. Homeostasis and the glycogen shunt explains aerobic ethanol production in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Robert G; Rothman, Douglas L

    2015-09-01

    Aerobic glycolysis in yeast and cancer cells produces pyruvate beyond oxidative needs, a paradox noted by Warburg almost a century ago. To address this question, we reanalyzed extensive measurements from (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of yeast glycolysis and the coupled pathways of futile cycling and glycogen and trehalose synthesis (which we refer to as the glycogen shunt). When yeast are given a large glucose load under aerobic conditions, the fluxes of these pathways adapt to maintain homeostasis of glycolytic intermediates and ATP. The glycogen shunt uses glycolytic ATP to store glycolytic intermediates as glycogen and trehalose, generating pyruvate and ethanol as byproducts. This conclusion is supported by studies of yeast with a partial block in the glycogen shunt due to the cif mutation, which found that when challenged with glucose, the yeast cells accumulate glycolytic intermediates and ATP, which ultimately leads to cell death. The control of the relative fluxes, which is critical to maintain homeostasis, is most likely exerted by the enzymes pyruvate kinase and fructose bisphosphatase. The kinetic properties of yeast PK and mammalian PKM2, the isoform found in cancer, are similar, suggesting that the same mechanism may exist in cancer cells, which, under these conditions, could explain their excess lactate generation. The general principle that homeostasis of metabolite and ATP concentrations is a critical requirement for metabolic function suggests that enzymes and pathways that perform this critical role could be effective drug targets in cancer and other diseases.

  1. Bacterial community dynamics during cold storage of minced meat packaged under modified atmosphere and supplemented with different preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoops, J; Ruyters, S; Busschaert, P; Spaepen, R; Verreth, C; Claes, J; Lievens, B; Van Campenhout, L

    2015-06-01

    Since minced meat is very susceptible for microbial growth, characterisation of the bacterial community dynamics during storage is important to optimise preservation strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different production batches and the use of different preservatives on the composition of the bacterial community in minced meat during 9 days of cold storage under modified atmosphere (66% O2, 25% CO2 and 9% N2). To this end, both culture-dependent (viable aerobic and anaerobic counts) and culture-independent (454 pyrosequencing) analyses were performed. Initially, microbial counts of fresh minced meat showed microbial loads between 3.5 and 5.0 log cfu/g. The observed microbial diversity was relatively high, and the most abundant bacteria differed among the samples. During storage an increase of microbial counts coincided with a dramatic decrease in bacterial diversity. At the end of the storage period, most samples showed microbial counts above the spoilage level of 7 log cfu/g. A relatively similar bacterial community was obtained regardless of the manufacturing batch and the preservative used, with Lactobacillus algidus and Leuconostoc sp. as the most dominant microorganisms. This suggests that both bacteria played an important role in the spoilage of minced meat packaged under modified atmosphere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Food matrices and cell conditions influence survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG under heat stresses and during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akihito; Teräsjärvi, Johanna; Salminen, Seppo

    2014-03-17

    The present study evaluated impact of moisture content and cell conditions on survival of probiotic strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, under lethal heat stresses and during long-term storage using freeze-dried cells and oils as matrices. Viable cell counts of freeze-dried L. rhamnosus GG cells suspended in oils had only 1-log-reduction after 5min at 80°C and approximately 3-log-reduction after 20min, while no or very few viable cells were recorded for freeze dried cells suspended in buffer and cultured cells in oils. Surprisingly, freeze-dried cells suspended in oils still contained 4.3 to 6.7logCFU/ml after 5min at 95°C. Long-term storage study indicated that freeze-dried cells suspended in oils kept viable conditions for 4months, and a loss of the viability was only 0.3 to 0.6logCFU/ml. Viable cell counts of cultured cells suspended in oils were not present after 3days to 3months. These results clearly indicate that moisture and cell conditions have a great impact on survival of probiotics under severe heat stress in processing and during long-term storage. Combination of freeze-dried cells and oils as carrier provides beneficial options to preserve viability of probiotics in food processes and storage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Shelf Life Extension of Tomato Paste Through Organoleptically Acceptable Concentration of Betel Leaf Essential Oil Under Accelerated Storage Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Suradeep

    2018-04-16

    This study was attempted with two objectives: (1) to find an acceptable concentration of betel leaf essential oil (BLEO) based on sensory evaluation that can be employed in tomato paste; (2) to evaluate the effect of the acceptable concentration of BLEO in the paste during accelerated storage under 89 ± 1.2% RH at 39 ± 1 °C. Linguistic data obtained from sensory evaluation of tomato paste treated with 4 different concentrations of BLEO were analyzed using fuzzy logic approach. The organoleptically acceptable concentration was determined to be 0.25 mg/g of BLEO in tomato paste. The effect of the selected concentration of BLEO on different physicochemical and microbial attributes of tomato paste during accelerated storage was studied. Untreated tomato paste was found to have 12% less total antioxidant capacity than treated paste at the end of storage. Based on a * /b * value in CIELAB color space, the BLEO treated paste efficiently extended the shelf life by 14 days with respect to untreated paste samples under accelerated storage conditions. BLEO comes with a tag contributing to green consumerism, and its application as food preservative is no less than a value addition to the product. Essential oil is considered to have promising potential as an alternative food preservative, and its use is practically possible if they could overcome the sensory barrier, while retaining the preservative potency. The importance of identifying the sensory attributes for commercial success of essential oil treated food product was considered in this study. It contributes to the potency of organoleptically acceptable concentration of BLEO in shelf life extension of tomato paste under accelerated storage conditions. At industrial level, the estimated shelf life of treated tomato paste can be increased by incorporating more hurdles alongside BLEO. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Preservation of different fig cultivars (Ficus carica L.) under modified atmosphere packaging during cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, María del Carmen; Serradilla, Manuel Joaquín; Martín, Alberto; López Corrales, Margarita; Pereira, Cristina; Córdoba, María de Guía

    2016-04-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the stability of 'Cuello Dama Blanco' (CDB), 'Cuello Dama Negro' (CDN) and 'San Antonio' (SA) figs during post-harvest cold storage was evaluated by using three different films with a diverse number of microperforations (diameter, ø = 100 µm): M10 (16 holes), M30 (five holes) and M50 (three holes). A macroperforated film was used as control (five holes, ø = 9 mm). Gas composition, weight loss, percentage disorder, microbial counts and physico-chemical parameters were monitored during cold storage for 21 days. Furthermore, sensory quality was also evaluated. MAP has allowed the extension of cold storage and distribution time for the three different cultivars of figs, minimising weight loss and delaying pathological disorders related to endosepsis, smut, and souring. Of the three cultivars, the M50 batch (one hole per 50 mm) showed the best efficiency in terms of physico-chemical quality and delay of post-harvest decay, although the M30 batch was also found to be suitable for delaying the post-harvest decay, especially for the CDB cultivar. MAP is a useful tool to extend the storability with optimal quality properties for CDN and SA during 21 days of cold storage and 14-17 days of cold storage for CDB. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Measuring gravity change caused by water storage variations: Performance assessment under controlled conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Lund, Sanne; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface water content is an important state variable in hydrological systems. Established methods to measure subsurface water content have a small support scale which causes scaling problems in many applications. Time-lapse relative gravimetry can give an integrated measure of soil water storage...... or alluvial aquifer storage change along intermittent rivers, so that the results can be applied to field experiments. The use of a 20m by 30m rectangular basin with a known water volume resulted in complete control over the instrument accuracy. Precisions of 3μGal and accuracies of...

  6. Sealing behavior of Container Closure Systems under Frozen Storage Conditions: Nonlinear Finite Element Simulation of Serum Rubber Stoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger

    2018-03-15

    There has been a growing interest in recent years in the assessment of suitable vial/stopper combinations for storage and shipment of frozen drug products. Considering that the glass transition temperature (Tg) of butyl rubber stoppers used in Container Closure Systems (CCS) is between -55°C to -65°C, a storage or shipment temperature of a frozen product below the Tg of the rubber stopper, may require special attention, since below the Tg the rubber becomes more plastic-like and loses its elastic (sealing) characteristics. Thus they risk maintaining Container Closure Integrity (CCI). Given that the rubber regains its elastic properties and reseals after rewarming to ambient temperature, leaks during frozen temperature storage and transportation are transient and the CCI methods used at room temperature conditions are unable to confirm CCI in the frozen state. Hence, several experimental methods have been developed in recent years in order to evaluate CCI at low temperatures. Finite Element (FE) simulations were applied in order to investigate the sealing behaviour of rubber stoppers for the drug product CCS under frozen storage conditions. FE analysis can help reducing the experimental design space and thus number of measurements needed, as they can be used as an ad-on to experimental testing. Several scenarios have been simulated including the effect of therm