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Sample records for ultrasound prostate image

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  5. Transrectal ultrasound imaging and prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, Tjerk; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most important causes of death from cancer in men. Ultrasound imaging is frequently used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. This paper presents an overview of currently available ultrasound imaging techniques. The underlying principles and methods are discussed

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  11. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  12. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-01-01

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment ... caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies , in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ... to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  18. Poster - 10: QA of Ultrasound Images for Prostate Brachytherapy

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    Szpala, Stanislaw; Kohli, Kirpal S. [BCCA-Fraser Valley Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The current QA protocol of ultrasound systems used in prostate brachytherapy (TG128) addresses geometrical verifications, but the scope of evaluation of image quality is limited. We recognized importance of the latter in routine practice, and designed a protocol for QA of the images. Methods: Images of an ultrasound prostate phantom (CIRS053) were collected with BK Flex Focus 400. The images were saved as bmp after adjusting the gain to 50% for consistent results. Mean pixel values and signal to noise ratio were inspected in the representative sections of the phantom, including the mock prostate and the unechoic medium. Constancy of these numbers over a one year period was looked at. Results: The typical intensity in the mock prostate region in the transverse images ranged between 95 and 118 (out of 256), and the signal to noise was about 10. The intensity in the urethra region was about 170±40, and the unechoic medium was 2±2. The mean and the signal to noise ratio remained almost unchanged after a year, while the signal in the unechoic medium increased to about 7±4. Similar values were obtained in the sagittal images. Conclusions: The image analysis discussed above allows quick evaluation of constancy of the image quality. This may be also useful in troubleshooting image-quality problems during routine exams, which might not be due to deterioration of the US system, but other reasons, e.g. variations in tissue properties or air being trapped between the probe and the anatomy.

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate ... physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... less than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. Rarely, a small ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ... abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends the sound waves into ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top ... here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the rectum. The images are obtained from different angles to get the best view of the prostate ... RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions or for ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ... well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule found during ... difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  12. Towards 3D ultrasound image based soft tissue tracking: a transrectal ultrasound prostate image alignment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael; Mozer, Pierre; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of real-time 3D ultrasound (US) makes it possible to consider image-based tracking of subcutaneous soft tissue targets for computer guided diagnosis and therapy. We propose a 3D transrectal US based tracking system for precise prostate biopsy sample localisation. The aim is to improve sample distribution, to enable targeting of unsampled regions for repeated biopsies, and to make post-interventional quality controls possible. Since the patient is not immobilized, since the prostate is mobile and due to the fact that probe movements are only constrained by the rectum during biopsy acquisition, the tracking system must be able to estimate rigid transformations that are beyond the capture range of common image similarity measures. We propose a fast and robust multi-resolution attribute-vector registration approach that combines global and local optimization methods to solve this problem. Global optimization is performed on a probe movement model that reduces the dimensionality of the search space and thus renders optimization efficient. The method was tested on 237 prostate volumes acquired from 14 different patients for 3D to 3D and 3D to orthogonal 2D slices registration. The 3D-3D version of the algorithm converged correctly in 96.7% of all cases in 6.5s with an accuracy of 1.41mm (r.m.s.) and 3.84mm (max). The 3D to slices method yielded a success rate of 88.9% in 2.3s with an accuracy of 1.37mm (r.m.s.) and 4.3mm (max).

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the prostate gland for later laboratory testing. ... Do you have a personal ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  15. Prostate ultrasound: back in business!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Nicolae; Andras, Iulia; Radu, Corina; Andras, David; Coman, Radu-Tudor; Tucan, Paul; Pisla, Doina; Crisan, Dana; Coman, Ioan

    2017-11-29

    The use of grey scale prostate ultrasound decreased after the implementation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and evaluation of prostate cancer. The new developments, such as multiparametric ultrasound and MRI-ultrasound fusion technology, renewed the interest for this imaging method in the assessment of prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper was to review the current role of prostate ultrasound in the setting of these new applications. A thorough reevaluation of the selection criteria of the patients is required to assess which patients would benefit from multiparametric ultrasound, who wouldbenefit from multiparametric MRI or the combination of both to assist prostate biopsy in order to ensure the balance between overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis of prostate cancer.

  16. Ultrasound and PET-CT image fusion for prostate brachytherapy image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasford, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of medical images between different cross-sectional modalities is widely used, mostly where functional images are fused with anatomical data. Ultrasound has for some time now been the standard imaging technique used for treatment planning of prostate cancer cases. While this approach is laudable and has yielded some positive results, latest developments have been the integration of images from ultrasound and other modalities such as PET-CT to compliment missing properties of ultrasound images. This study has sought to enhance diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancers by developing MATLAB algorithms to fuse ultrasound and PET-CT images. The fused ultrasound-PET-CT image has shown to contain improved quality of information than the individual input images. The fused image has the property of reduced uncertainty, increased reliability, robust system performance, and compact representation of information. The objective of co-registering the ultrasound and PET-CT images was achieved by conducting performance evaluation of the ultrasound and PET-CT imaging systems, developing image contrast enhancement algorithm, developing MATLAB image fusion algorithm, and assessing accuracy of the fusion algorithm. Performance evaluation of the ultrasound brachytherapy system produced satisfactory results in accordance with set tolerances as recommended by AAPM TG 128. Using an ultrasound brachytherapy quality assurance phantom, average axial distance measurement of 10.11 ± 0.11 mm was estimated. Average lateral distance measurements of 10.08 ± 0.07 mm, 20.01 ± 0.06 mm, 29.89 ± 0.03 mm and 39.84 ± 0.37 mm were estimated for the inter-target distances corresponding to 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm and 40 mm respectively. Volume accuracy assessment produced measurements of 3.97 cm 3 , 8.86 cm 3 and 20.11 cm 3 for known standard volumes of 4 cm 3 , 9 cm 3 and 20 cm 3 respectively. Depth of penetration assessment of the ultrasound system produced an estimate of 5.37 ± 0.02 cm

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is used to guide the biopsy to specific regions of the prostate gland. When the examination is ... is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time ...

  19. Detection of prostate cancer by contrast-ultrasound dispersion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuenen, M.P.J.; Saidov, T.A.; Heneweer, C.; Wijkstra, H.; Mischi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the development of several efficient focal therapies for prostate cancer, treatment options are often restricted to radical treatments, such as a radical prostatectomy. One of the main obstacles preventing a wider application of focal therapies is the lack of reliable imaging methods for

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer ... in the sperm or urine following the procedure. After an ultrasound examination, you should be able to ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... an example of a transrectal transducer (probe). A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, which measures the amount of PSA in the blood, may be administered to determine if a patient is at high risk for ... of the prostate gland. When the examination is complete, you may ...

  3. Clinically low-risk prostate cancer: evaluation with transrectal doppler ultrasound and functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Novis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate transrectal ultrasound, amplitude Doppler ultrasound, conventional T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in localizing and locally staging low-risk prostate cancer. INTRODUCTION: Prostate cancer has been diagnosed at earlier stages and the most accepted classification for low-risk prostate cancer is based on clinical stage T1c or T2a, Gleason score <6, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA <10 ng/ml. METHODS: From 2005 to 2006, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 42 patients, and transrectal ultrasound in 26 of these patients. Seven patients were excluded from the study. Mean patient age was 64.94 years and mean serum PSA was 6.05 ng/ml. The examinations were analyzed for tumor identification and location in prostate sextants, detection of extracapsular extension, and seminal vesicle invasion, using surgical pathology findings as the gold standard. RESULTS: Sixteen patients (45.7% had pathologically proven organ-confined disease, 11 (31.4% had positive surgical margin, 8 (28.9% had extracapsular extension, and 3 (8.6% presented with extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy values for localizing low-risk prostate cancer were 53.1%, 48.3%, 63.4%, 37.8% and 51.3% for transrectal ultrasound; 70.4%, 36.2%, 65.1%, 42.0% and 57.7% for amplitude Doppler ultrasound; 71.5%, 58.9%, 76.6%, 52.4% and 67.1% for magnetic resonance imaging; 70.4%, 58.7%, 78.4%, 48.2% and 66.7% for magnetic resonance spectroscopy; 67.2%, 65.7%, 79.3%, 50.6% and 66.7% for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy values for detecting extracapsular extension were 33.3%, 92%, 14.3%, 97.2% and 89.7% for transrectal ultrasound and 50.0%, 77.6%, 13.7%, 95.6% and 75.7% for magnetic resonance imaging

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... This procedure requires little to no special preparation. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... phased array) receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the prostate ... needle insertion) is usually minimal because the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... if a patient is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum into the prostate gland which is situated right in front of the rectum. top of page ... creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more frames of the moving pictures are ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... probe sends and receives sound waves through the wall of the rectum into the prostate gland which ... needle insertion) is usually minimal because the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning may be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is located directly in front of the rectum, so the ultrasound exam is performed transrectally in order ... A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and an ultrasound probe ... will share the results with you. In some cases, the radiologist may discuss results with you at ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Prostate ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  4. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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  11. A Comparison of daily megavoltage CT and ultrasound image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Cheng; Kainz, Kristofer; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2008-01-01

    In order to quantify the differences between ultrasound-imaging and megavoltage-CT (MVCT) daily prostate localization in prostate-cancer radiotherapy and their dosimetric impacts, daily shifts were analyzed for a total of 140 prostate cancer patients; 106 positioned using ultrasound-based imaging [B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT)], and 34 using the MVCT from a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit. The shifts indicated by the two systems were compared statistically along the right/left (R/L), superior/inferior (S/I), and anterior/posterior (A/P) directions. The systematic and random variations among the daily alignments were calculated. Margins to account for these shifts were estimated. The mean shifts and standard deviations along the R/L, S/I, and A/P directions were -0.11±3.80, 0.67±4.67, and 2.71±6.31 mm for BAT localizations and -0.98±5.13, 0.27±3.35, and 1.00±4.22 mm for MVCT localizations, respectively. The systematic and random variations in daily shifts based on MVCT were generally smaller than those based on BAT, especially along the A/P direction. A t-test showed this difference to be statistically significant. The planning target volume margins in the A/P direction estimated to account for daily variations were 8.81 and 14.66 mm based on MVCT and BAT data, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily prostate movement pattern between the first few fractions and the remaining fractions. Dosimetric comparison of MVCT and BAT prostate alignments was performed for seven fractions from a patient. The degradation from the plan caused by the MVCT alignment is trivial, while that by BAT is substantial. The MVCT technique results in smaller variations in daily shifts than ultrasound imaging, indicating that MVCT is more reliable and precise for prostate localization. Ultrasound-based localization may overestimate the daily prostate motion, particularly in the A/P direction, negatively impacting prostate dose coverage and rectal

  12. A Comparison of daily megavoltage CT and ultrasound image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Cheng; Kainz, Kristofer; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    In order to quantify the differences between ultrasound-imaging and megavoltage-CT (MVCT) daily prostate localization in prostate-cancer radiotherapy and their dosimetric impacts, daily shifts were analyzed for a total of 140 prostate cancer patients; 106 positioned using ultrasound-based imaging [B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT)], and 34 using the MVCT from a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit. The shifts indicated by the two systems were compared statistically along the right/left (R/L), superior/inferior (S/I), and anterior/posterior (A/P) directions. The systematic and random variations among the daily alignments were calculated. Margins to account for these shifts were estimated. The mean shifts and standard deviations along the R/L, S/I, and A/P directions were -0.11{+-}3.80, 0.67{+-}4.67, and 2.71{+-}6.31 mm for BAT localizations and -0.98{+-}5.13, 0.27{+-}3.35, and 1.00{+-}4.22 mm for MVCT localizations, respectively. The systematic and random variations in daily shifts based on MVCT were generally smaller than those based on BAT, especially along the A/P direction. A t-test showed this difference to be statistically significant. The planning target volume margins in the A/P direction estimated to account for daily variations were 8.81 and 14.66 mm based on MVCT and BAT data, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily prostate movement pattern between the first few fractions and the remaining fractions. Dosimetric comparison of MVCT and BAT prostate alignments was performed for seven fractions from a patient. The degradation from the plan caused by the MVCT alignment is trivial, while that by BAT is substantial. The MVCT technique results in smaller variations in daily shifts than ultrasound imaging, indicating that MVCT is more reliable and precise for prostate localization. Ultrasound-based localization may overestimate the daily prostate motion, particularly in the A/P direction, negatively impacting prostate dose coverage

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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  14. Prostate ultrasound imaging: evaluation of a two-step scoring system in the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong; Liao, Xin-Hong; Ma, Yan; Lu, Lu; Wei, Li-Yan; Yan, Xue

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility and performance of a two-step scoring system of ultrasound imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. 75 patients with 888 consecutive histopathologically verified lesions were included in this study. Step 1, an initial 5-point scoring system was developed based on conventional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). Step 2, a final scoring system was evaluated according to contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound (CE-TRUS). Each lesion was evaluated using the two-step scoring system (step 1 + step 2) and compared with only using conventional TRUS (step 1). 888 lesions were histologically verified: 315 of them were prostate cancer from 46 patients and 573 were benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) from 29 patients. According to the two-step scoring system, 284 lesions were upgraded and 130 lesions were downgraded from step 1 to step 2 (this means using step 2 to assess the results by step 1). However, 96 cases were improperly upgraded after step 2 and 48 malignant lesions were still missed after step 2 as score-1. For the two-step scoring system, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 84.7%, 83.2%, and 83.7%, respectively, versus 22.8%, 96.6%, and 70.4%, respectively, for conventional TRUS. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for lesion diagnosis was 0.799-0.952 for the two-step scoring system, versus 0.479-0.712 for conventional TRUS. The difference in the diagnostic accuracy of the two-step scoring system and conventional TRUS was statistically significant (Pstep scoring system was straightforward to use and achieved a considerably accurate diagnostic performance for prostate cancer. The application of the two-step scoring system for prostate cancer is promising.

  15. Multi-atlas-based automatic 3D segmentation for prostate brachytherapy in transrectal ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouranian, Saman; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, S. E.; Abolmaesumi, P.

    2013-03-01

    One of the commonly used treatment methods for early-stage prostate cancer is brachytherapy. The standard of care for planning this procedure is segmentation of contours from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which closely follow the prostate boundary. This process is currently performed either manually or using semi-automatic techniques. This paper introduces a fully automatic segmentation algorithm which uses a priori knowledge of contours in a reference data set of TRUS volumes. A non-parametric deformable registration method is employed to transform the atlas prostate contours to a target image coordinates. All atlas images are sorted based on their registration results and the highest ranked registration results are selected for decision fusion. A Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation algorithm is utilized to fuse labels from registered atlases and produce a segmented target volume. In this experiment, 50 patient TRUS volumes are obtained and a leave-one-out study on TRUS volumes is reported. We also compare our results with a state-of-the-art semi-automatic prostate segmentation method that has been clinically used for planning prostate brachytherapy procedures and we show comparable accuracy and precision within clinically acceptable runtime.

  16. Identification of threshold prostate specific antigen levels to optimize the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer by magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound fusion guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A; George, Arvin K; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Prostate cancer upgrading with targeted biopsy increases

  17. BrachyView: Combining LDR seed positions with transrectal ultrasound imaging in a prostate gel phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaghy, S; Cutajar, D L; Bucci, J A; Enari, K; Safavi-Naeini, M; Favoino, M; Tartaglia, M; Carriero, F; Jakubek, J; Pospisil, S; Lerch, M; Rosenfeld, A B; Petasecca, M

    2017-02-01

    BrachyView is a novel in-body imaging system which aims to provide LDR brachytherapy seeds position reconstruction within the prostate in real-time. The first prototype is presented in this study: the probe consists of a gamma camera featuring three single cone pinhole collimators embedded in a tungsten tube, above three, high resolution pixelated detectors (Timepix). The prostate was imaged with a TRUS system using a sagittal crystal with a 2.5mm slice thickness. Eleven needles containing a total of thirty 0.508U 125 I seeds were implanted under ultrasound guidance. A CT scan was used to localise the seed positions, as well as provide a reference when performing the image co-registration between the BrachyView coordinate system and the TRUS coordinate system. An in-house visualisation software interface was developed to provide a quantitative 3D reconstructed prostate based on the TRUS images and co-registered with the LDR seeds in situ. A rigid body image registration was performed between the BrachyView and TRUS systems, with the BrachyView and CT-derived source locations compared. The reconstructed seed positions determined by the BrachyView probe showed a maximum discrepancy of 1.78mm, with 75% of the seeds reconstructed within 1mm of their nominal location. An accurate co-registration between the BrachyView and TRUS coordinate system was established. The BrachyView system has shown its ability to reconstruct all implanted LDR seeds within a tissue equivalent prostate gel phantom, providing both anatomical and seed position information in a single interface. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of volumes of prostate, rectum, and bladder on treatment planning CT on interfraction prostate shifts during ultrasound image-guided IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Nandanuri M. S.; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Sartin, William; Maiorano, Samuel; Modena, Jennifer; Mazur, Andrej; Osian, Adrian; Sood, Brijmohan; Ravi, Akkamma; Sampath, Seshadri; Lange, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between prostate, bladder, and rectum volumes on treatment planning CT day and prostate shifts in the XYZ directions on treatment days. Methods: Prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder, and rectum were contoured on CT images obtained in supine position. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans was prepared. Contours were exported to BAT-ultrasound imaging system. Patients were positioned on the couch using skin marks. An ultrasound probe was used to obtain ultrasound images of prostate, bladder, and rectum, which were aligned with CT images. Couch shifts in the XYZ directions as recommended by BAT system were made and recorded. 4698 couch shifts for 42 patients were analyzed to study the correlations between interfraction prostate shifts vs bladder, rectum, and prostate volumes on planning CT. Results: Mean and range of volumes (cc): Bladder: 179 (42-582), rectum: 108 (28-223), and prostate: 55 (21-154). Mean systematic prostate shifts were (cm, ±SD) right and left lateral: -0.047±0.16 (-0.361-0.251), anterior and posterior: 0.14±0.3 (-0.466-0.669), and superior and inferior: 0.19±0.26 (-0.342-0.633). Bladder volume was not correlated with lateral, anterior/posterior, and superior/inferior prostate shifts (P>0.2). Rectal volume was correlated with anterior/posterior (P 0.2). The smaller the rectal volume or cross sectional area, the larger was the prostate shift anteriorly and vice versa (P 0.2). The smaller the prostate volume, the larger was prostate shift superiorly and vice versa (P<0.05). Conclusions: Prostate and rectal volumes, but not bladder volumes, on treatment planning CT influenced prostate position on treatment fractions. Daily image-guided adoptive radiotherapy would be required for patients with distended or empty rectum on planning CT to reduce rectal toxicity in the case of empty rectum and to minimize geometric miss of prostate.

  19. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  20. Effect of Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion-guided Biopsy on Radiation Treatment Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Aaron; Valle, Luca F.; Shankavaram, Uma; Krauze, Andra; Kaushal, Aradhana; Schott, Erica; Cooley-Zgela, Theresa [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wood, Bradford [Center for Interventional Oncology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Pinto, Peter [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Choyke, Peter; Turkbey, Baris [Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Citrin, Deborah E., E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy (MRI-Bx) has recently been compared with the standard of care extended sextant ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (SOC-Bx), with the former associated with an increased rate of detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. The present study sought to determine the influence of MRI-Bx on radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) recommendations. Methods and Materials: All patients who had received radiation treatment and had undergone SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx at our institution were included. Using the clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score, patients were categorized into National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk groups and radiation treatment or ADT recommendations assigned. Intensification of the recommended treatment after multiparametric MRI, SOC-Bx, and MRI-Bx was evaluated. Results: From January 2008 to January 2016, 73 patients received radiation therapy at our institution after undergoing a simultaneous SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx (n=47 with previous SOC-Bx). Repeat SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx resulted in frequent upgrading compared with previous SOC-Bx (Gleason score 7, 6.7% vs 44.6%; P<.001; Gleason score 8-10, 2.1% vs 38%; P<.001). MRI-Bx increased the proportion of patients classified as very high risk from 24.7% to 41.1% (P=.027). Compared with SOC-Bx alone, including the MRI-Bx findings resulted in a greater percentage of pathologically positive cores (mean 37% vs 44%). Incorporation of multiparametric MRI and MRI-Bx results increased the recommended use and duration of ADT (duration increased in 28 of 73 patients and ADT was added for 8 of 73 patients). Conclusions: In patients referred for radiation treatment, MRI-Bx resulted in an increase in the percentage of positive cores, Gleason score, and risk grouping. The benefit of treatment intensification in accordance with the MRI-Bx findings is unknown.

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart ... Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview ...

  2. Method comparison of ultrasound and kilovoltage x-ray fiducial marker imaging for prostate radiotherapy targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Clifton David; Jr, Charles R Thomas; Schwartz, Scott; Golden, Nanalei; Ting, Joe; Wong, Adrian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Scarbrough, Todd J

    2006-01-01

    Several measurement techniques have been developed to address the capability for target volume reduction via target localization in image-guided radiotherapy; among these have been ultrasound (US) and fiducial marker (FM) software-assisted localization. In order to assess interchangeability between methods, US and FM localization were compared using established techniques for determination of agreement between measurement methods when a 'gold-standard' comparator does not exist, after performing both techniques daily on a sequential series of patients. At least 3 days prior to CT simulation, four gold seeds were placed within the prostate. FM software-assisted localization utilized the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLab AG, Germany) kVp x-ray image acquisition system to determine prostate position; US prostate targeting was performed on each patient using the SonArray (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Patients were aligned daily using laser alignment of skin marks. Directional shifts were then calculated by each respective system in the X, Y and Z dimensions before each daily treatment fraction, previous to any treatment or couch adjustment, as well as a composite vector of displacement. Directional shift agreement in each axis was compared using Altman-Bland limits of agreement, Lin's concordance coefficient with Partik's grading schema, and Deming orthogonal bias-weighted correlation methodology. 1019 software-assisted shifts were suggested by US and FM in 39 patients. The 95% limits of agreement in X, Y and Z axes were ±9.4 mm, ±11.3 mm and ±13.4, respectively. Three-dimensionally, measurements agreed within 13.4 mm in 95% of all paired measures. In all axes, concordance was graded as 'poor' or 'unacceptable'. Deming regression detected proportional bias in both directional axes and three-dimensional vectors. Our data suggest substantial differences between US and FM image-guided measures and subsequent suggested directional shifts. Analysis reveals that the vast majority of

  3. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.N.T.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasound is a form of energy which consists of mechanical vibrations the frequencies of which are so high that they are above the range of human hearing. The lower frequency limit of the ultrasonic spectrum may generally be taken to be about 20 kHz. Most biomedical applications of ultrasound employ frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz. At these frequencies, the wavelength is in the range 1.5 - 0.1 mm in soft tissues, and narrow beams of ultrasound can be generated which propagate through such tissues without excessive attenuation. This chapter begins with brief reviews of the physics of diagnostic ultrasound pulse-echo imaging methods and Doppler imaging methods. The remainder of the chapter is a resume of the applications of ultrasonic imaging to physiological measurement

  4. Prostate imaging. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franiel, T.; Teichgraeber, U.; Asbach, P.; Hamm, B.; Foller, S.

    2015-01-01

    New technical and clinical developments of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging include improved detection, localization and staging as well as active surveillance of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI can best answer these typical clinical questions. However, ultrasound elastography seems to be suitable for the detection of significant prostate cancer as well. The structured reporting system for multiparametric MRI of the prostate according to PI-RADS Version 1 led to improved and reproducible diagnosis of prostate cancer. The new PI-RADS Version 2 aims to minimize the limitations of Version 1 and make PI-RADS standardization more globally acceptable.

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and ...

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Imaging-Guided Prostate Biopsy Techniques: Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound, Direct In-Bore MRI, and Image Fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venderink, W.; Govers, T.M.; Rooij, M. de; Futterer, J.J.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Three commonly used prostate biopsy approaches are systematic transrectal ultrasound guided, direct in-bore MRI guided, and image fusion guided. The aim of this study was to calculate which strategy is most cost-effective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A decision tree and Markov model were

  7. Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound Image Fusion Supported Transperineal Prostate Biopsy Using the Ginsburg Protocol: Technique, Learning Points, and Biopsy Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Nienke; Patruno, Giulio; Wadhwa, Karan; Gaziev, Gabriele; Miano, Roberto; Barrett, Tristan; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Doble, Andrew; Warren, Anne; Bratt, Ola; Kastner, Christof

    2016-08-01

    Prostate biopsy supported by transperineal image fusion has recently been developed as a new method to the improve accuracy of prostate cancer detection. To describe the Ginsburg protocol for transperineal prostate biopsy supported by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) image fusion, provide learning points for its application, and report biopsy results. The article is supplemented by a Surgery in Motion video. This single-centre retrospective outcome study included 534 patients from March 2012 to October 2015. A total of 107 had no previous prostate biopsy, 295 had benign TRUS-guided biopsies, and 159 were on active surveillance for low-risk cancer. A Likert scale reported mpMRI for suspicion of cancer from 1 (no suspicion) to 5 (cancer highly likely). Transperineal biopsies were obtained under general anaesthesia using BiopSee fusion software (Medcom, Darmstadt, Germany). All patients had systematic biopsies, two cores from each of 12 anatomic sectors. Likert 3-5 lesions were targeted with a further two cores per lesion. Any cancer and Gleason score 7-10 cancer on biopsy were noted. Descriptive statistics and positive predictive values (PPVs) and negative predictive values (NPVs) were calculated. The detection rate of Gleason score 7-10 cancer was similar across clinical groups. Likert scale 3-5 MRI lesions were reported in 378 (71%) of the patients. Cancer was detected in 249 (66%) and Gleason score 7-10 cancer was noted in 157 (42%) of these patients. PPV for detecting 7-10 cancer was 0.15 for Likert score 3, 0.43 for score 4, and 0.63 for score 5. NPV of Likert 1-2 findings was 0.87 for Gleason score 7-10 and 0.97 for Gleason score ≥4+3=7 cancer. Limitations include lack of data on complications. Transperineal prostate biopsy supported by MRI/TRUS image fusion using the Ginsburg protocol yielded high detection rates of Gleason score 7-10 cancer. Because the NPV for excluding Gleason score 7-10 cancer was very

  8. Method comparison of ultrasound and kilovoltage x-ray fiducial marker imaging for prostate radiotherapy targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Clifton David; Thomas, Charles R., Jr.; Schwartz, Scott; Golden, Nanalei; Ting, Joe; Wong, Adrian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Scarbrough, Todd J.

    2006-10-01

    Several measurement techniques have been developed to address the capability for target volume reduction via target localization in image-guided radiotherapy; among these have been ultrasound (US) and fiducial marker (FM) software-assisted localization. In order to assess interchangeability between methods, US and FM localization were compared using established techniques for determination of agreement between measurement methods when a 'gold-standard' comparator does not exist, after performing both techniques daily on a sequential series of patients. At least 3 days prior to CT simulation, four gold seeds were placed within the prostate. FM software-assisted localization utilized the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLab AG, Germany) kVp x-ray image acquisition system to determine prostate position; US prostate targeting was performed on each patient using the SonArray (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Patients were aligned daily using laser alignment of skin marks. Directional shifts were then calculated by each respective system in the X, Y and Z dimensions before each daily treatment fraction, previous to any treatment or couch adjustment, as well as a composite vector of displacement. Directional shift agreement in each axis was compared using Altman-Bland limits of agreement, Lin's concordance coefficient with Partik's grading schema, and Deming orthogonal bias-weighted correlation methodology. 1019 software-assisted shifts were suggested by US and FM in 39 patients. The 95% limits of agreement in X, Y and Z axes were ±9.4 mm, ±11.3 mm and ±13.4, respectively. Three-dimensionally, measurements agreed within 13.4 mm in 95% of all paired measures. In all axes, concordance was graded as 'poor' or 'unacceptable'. Deming regression detected proportional bias in both directional axes and three-dimensional vectors. Our data suggest substantial differences between US and FM image-guided measures and subsequent suggested directional shifts. Analysis reveals that the vast majority of

  9. Prostate cancer multi-feature analysis using trans-rectal ultrasound images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, S S; Salama, M M A; Kamel, M; El-Saadany, E F; Rizkalla, K; Chin, J

    2005-01-01

    This note focuses on extracting and analysing prostate texture features from trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for tissue characterization. One of the principal contributions of this investigation is the use of the information of the images' frequency domain features and spatial domain features to attain a more accurate diagnosis. Each image is divided into regions of interest (ROIs) by the Gabor multi-resolution analysis, a crucial stage, in which segmentation is achieved according to the frequency response of the image pixels. The pixels with a similar response to the same filter are grouped to form one ROI. Next, from each ROI two different statistical feature sets are constructed; the first set includes four grey level dependence matrix (GLDM) features and the second set consists of five grey level difference vector (GLDV) features. These constructed feature sets are then ranked by the mutual information feature selection (MIFS) algorithm. Here, the features that provide the maximum mutual information of each feature and class (cancerous and non-cancerous) and the minimum mutual information of the selected features are chosen, yeilding a reduced feature subset. The two constructed feature sets, GLDM and GLDV, as well as the reduced feature subset, are examined in terms of three different classifiers: the condensed k-nearest neighbour (CNN), the decision tree (DT) and the support vector machine (SVM). The accuracy classification results range from 87.5% to 93.75%, where the performance of the SVM and that of the DT are significantly better than the performance of the CNN. (note)

  10. First-in-Human Ultrasound Molecular Imaging With a VEGFR2-Specific Ultrasound Molecular Contrast Agent (BR55) in Prostate Cancer: A Safety and Feasibility Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenge, Martijn; Tranquart, François; Mannaerts, Christophe K; de Reijke, Theo M; van de Vijver, Marc J; Laguna, M Pilar; Pochon, Sibylle; de la Rosette, Jean J M C H; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2017-07-01

    BR55, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-specific ultrasound molecular contrast agent (MCA), has shown promising results in multiple preclinical models regarding cancer imaging. In this first-in-human, phase 0, exploratory study, we investigated the feasibility and safety of the MCA for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) in men using clinical standard technology. Imaging with the MCA was performed in 24 patients with biopsy-proven PCa scheduled for radical prostatectomy using a clinical ultrasound scanner at low acoustic power. Safety monitoring was done by physical examination, blood pressure and heart rate measurements, electrocardiogram, and blood sampling. As first-in-human study, MCA dosing and imaging protocol were necessarily fine-tuned along the enrollment to improve visualization. Imaging data were correlated with radical prostatectomy histopathology to analyze the detection rate of ultrasound molecular imaging with the MCA. Imaging with MCA doses of 0.03 and 0.05 mL/kg was adequate to obtain contrast enhancement images up to 30 minutes after administration. No serious adverse events or clinically meaningful changes in safety monitoring data were identified during or after administration. BR55 dosing and imaging were fine-tuned in the first 12 patients leading to 12 subsequent patients with an improved MCA dosing and imaging protocol. Twenty-three patients underwent radical prostatectomy. A total of 52 lesions were determined to be malignant by histopathology with 26 (50%) of them seen during BR55 imaging. In the 11 patients that were scanned with the improved protocol and underwent radical prostatectomy, a total of 28 malignant lesions were determined: 19 (68%) were seen during BR55 ultrasound molecular imaging, whereas 9 (32%) were not identified. Ultrasound molecular imaging with BR55 is feasible with clinical standard technology and demonstrated a good safety profile. Detectable levels of the MCA can be reached in patients

  11. Real-time registration of 3D to 2D ultrasound images for image-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Derek J; Gardi, Lori; De Silva, Tharindu; Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-09-01

    During image-guided prostate biopsy, needles are targeted at tissues that are suspicious of cancer to obtain specimen for histological examination. Unfortunately, patient motion causes targeting errors when using an MR-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion approach to augment the conventional biopsy procedure. This study aims to develop an automatic motion correction algorithm approaching the frame rate of an ultrasound system to be used in fusion-based prostate biopsy systems. Two modes of operation have been investigated for the clinical implementation of the algorithm: motion compensation using a single user initiated correction performed prior to biopsy, and real-time continuous motion compensation performed automatically as a background process. Retrospective 2D and 3D TRUS patient images acquired prior to biopsy gun firing were registered using an intensity-based algorithm utilizing normalized cross-correlation and Powell's method for optimization. 2D and 3D images were downsampled and cropped to estimate the optimal amount of image information that would perform registrations quickly and accurately. The optimal search order during optimization was also analyzed to avoid local optima in the search space. Error in the algorithm was computed using target registration errors (TREs) from manually identified homologous fiducials in a clinical patient dataset. The algorithm was evaluated for real-time performance using the two different modes of clinical implementations by way of user initiated and continuous motion compensation methods on a tissue mimicking prostate phantom. After implementation in a TRUS-guided system with an image downsampling factor of 4, the proposed approach resulted in a mean ± std TRE and computation time of 1.6 ± 0.6 mm and 57 ± 20 ms respectively. The user initiated mode performed registrations with in-plane, out-of-plane, and roll motions computation times of 108 ± 38 ms, 60 ± 23 ms, and 89 ± 27 ms, respectively, and corresponding

  12. Imaging of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The main role of imaging in prostatic diseases is for prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging tools used for the diagnosis of the diseases of the prostate gland. The main indications for TRUS is the evaluation for prostate cancer and guidance for prostate biopsy. On TRUS, the transition zone with a hypoechoic appearance can be differentiated from the peripheral zone, which appears relatively echogenic and homogenous in echotexture. Prostate cancer mainly involves the peripheral zone, though one fifth of the disease can be detected in the transition zone, which is the major site for hyperplastic changes in older men. Color Doppler ultrasound may be helpful for the differentiation of low-risk, hypovascular tumors from high-risk, hypervascular tumors, as the latter group is associated with higher Gleason tumor grades consistent with higher risk for extraprostatic spread. Nevertheless, targeted prostate biopsy solely based on high-frequency color or power Doppler imaging is not recommended, as the technique has inherent risk of missing a significant number of cancers. Although power Doppler ultrasound can enable the operator to perform more accurate sampling of the prostate by determining sites of focal hypervascularity, it has not been found to be superior to color Doppler ultrasound. It has been reported to be useful only for targeted biopsies with limited number of biopsy cores. Microbubble contrast agents may enable better visualization of prostatic microvasculature and cancerous prostate tissue. By means of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), the number of cores may be decreased by performing targeted biopsies. Importantly, the detection of the signals reflected by the microbubbles can be enhanced by the phase inversion (pulse-inversion) technology. Prostate cancer appears as a dark zone on elastography representing limited elasticity or compressibility. By means of the

  13. Photo-Acoustic Ultrasound Imaging to Distinguish Benign from Malignant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    tissue phantoms and animal models of disease . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Photoacoustic, Ultrasound imaging, transurethral probe 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...visible, ultrasound images are unable to discriminate between benign or malignant cancers. In photoacoustic imaging, laser energy is transmitted ...40 g/L concentration of sea plaque agarose into DI water heated to approximately 80°C. A 10 g/L concentration of silica powder was then added to

  14. A quantitative analysis of two-dimensional manually segmented transrectal ultrasound axial images in planning high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabić-Stanković Kata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Prostate delineation, pre-planning and catheter implantation procedures, in high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT, are commonly based on the prostate manually segmented transrectal ultrasound (TRUS images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the consistency of prostate capsule delineation, done by a single therapist, prior to each HDR-BT fraction and the changes in the shape of the prostate capsule during HDR-BT, using two dimensional (2D TRUS axial image. Methods. A group of 16 patients were treated at the Medical System Belgrade Brachytherapy Department with definitive HDRBT. The total applied median dose of 52 Gy was divided into four individual fractions, each fraction being delivered 2– 3 weeks apart. Real time prostate axial visualization and the manual segmentation prior to each fraction were performed using B-K Medical ultrasound. Quantitative analyses, analysis of an area and shape were applied on 2D-TRUS axial images of the prostate. Area analyses were used to calculate the average value of the cross-sectional area of the prostate image. The parameters of the prostate shape, the fractal dimension and the circularity ratio of the prostate capsule contour were estimated at the maximum axial cross section of the prostate image. Results. The sample group consisted of four phases, each phase being performed prior to the first, second, third and fourth HDR-BT fraction, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that during HDR-BT fractions there were no significant differences in the average value of area, as well as in the maximum shape of prostate capsule. Conclusions. Quantitative analysis of TRUS axial prostate segmented images shows a successful capsule delineation in the series of manually segmented TRUS images, and the prostate maximum shape remaining unchanged during HDR-BT fractions.

  15. MR imaging of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbach, P.; Haas, M.; Hamm, B.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Germany; however, there is a distinct difference between incidence and mortality. The detection of prostate cancer is based on clinical and laboratory testing using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and transrectal ultrasound with randomized biopsy. Multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate can provide valuable diagnostic information for detection of prostate cancer, especially after negative results of a biopsy prior to repeat biopsy. In addition the use of MR ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy has gained in diagnostic importance and has increased the prostate cancer detection rate. The prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) classification has standardized the reporting of prostate MRI which has positively influenced the acceptance by urologists. (orig.) [de

  16. Imaging and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    1996-01-01

    The use of imaging in evaluating patients with prostate cancer is highly dependent upon the purpose of the evaluation. Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, TC-99m Bone Scanning, and Positron Emission Tomography may all be utilized for imaging in prostate cancer. The utility of each of these modalities depends upon the intended purpose: for instance, screening, staging, or evaluating for progression of disease in patients with prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound is performed by placing a 5MHz to 7.5 MHz transducer in the rectum and imaging the prostate in the coronal and sagittal planes. Prostate cancer generally appears as an area of diminished echogenocity in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland. However, up to 24% of prostate cancers are isoechoic and cannot be well distinguished from the remainder of the peripheral zone. In addition, the incidence of malignancy in a lesion judged to be suspicious on ultrasound is between 20% and 25%. Therefore, while ultrasound is the least expensive of the three cross sectional imaging modalities, its relatively low specificity precludes it from being used as a screening examination. Investigators have also looked at the ability of ultrasound to evaluate the presence and extent of extracapsular spread of prostate cancer. The RDOG (Radiology Diagnostic Oncology Group) multi-institutional cooperative trial reported a disappointing overall accuracy of ultrasound of 58% for staging prostate cancer. The accuracy was somewhat higher 63%, for patients with advanced disease. The other cross-sectional imaging modalities available for imaging the prostate include Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Computed Tomography is useful as an 'anatomic' imaging technique to detect lymph node enlargement. It is not sensitive in detecting microscopic nodal involvement with tumor, or tumor in non-enlarged pelvic lymph nodes. The primary prostate neoplasm is generally the same attenuation as the normal

  17. Imaging of implant needles for real-time HDR-brachytherapy prostate treatment using biplane ultrasound transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Frank-André; Hirt, Markus; Niehoff, Peter; Kovács, György

    2009-08-01

    Ultrasound imaging is becoming increasingly important in prostate brachytherapy. In high-dose-rate (HDR) real-time planning procedures the definition of the implant needles is often performed by transrectal ultrasound. This article describes absolute measurements of the visibility and accuracy of manual detection of implant needle tips and compares measurement results of different biplane ultrasound systems in transversal and longitudinal (i.e., sagittal) ultrasound modes. To obtain a fixed coordinate system and stable conditions the measurements were carried out in a water tank using a dedicated marker system. Needles were manually placed in the phantom until the observer decided by the real-time ultrasound image that the zero position was reached. A comparison of three different ultrasound systems yielded an offset between 0.8 and 3.1 mm for manual detection of the needle tip in ultrasound images by one observer. The direction of the offset was discovered to be in the proximal direction, i.e., the actual needle position was located more distally compared to the ultrasound-based definition. In the second part of the study, the ultrasound anisotropy of trocar implant needles is reported. It was shown that the integrated optical density in a region of interest around the needle tip changes with needle rotation. Three peaks were observed with a phase angle of 120 degrees. Peaks appear not only in transversal but also in longitudinal ultrasound images, with a phase shift of 60 degrees. The third section of this study shows results of observer dependent influences on needle tip detection in sagittal ultrasound images considering needle rotation. These experiments were carried out using the marker system in a water tank. The needle tip was placed exactly at the position z=0 mm. It was found that different users tend to differently interpret the same ultrasound images. The needle tip was manually detected five times in the ultrasound images by three experienced observers

  18. Magnitude of speed of sound aberration corrections for ultrasound image guided radiotherapy for prostate and other anatomical sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Stroian, Gabriela; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of speed of sound (SOS) aberrations in three-dimensional ultrasound (US) imaging systems in image guided radiotherapy. The discrepancy between the fixed SOS value of 1540 m/s assumed by US systems in human soft tissues and its actual nonhomogeneous distribution in patients produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. Methods: A correction, provided by a previously published density-based algorithm, was applied to a set of five prostate, five liver, and five breast cancer patients. The shifts of the centroids of target structures and the change in shape were evaluated. Results: After the correction the prostate cases showed shifts up to 3.6 mm toward the US probe, which may explain largely the reported positioning discrepancies in the literature on US systems versus other imaging modalities. Liver cases showed the largest changes in volume of the organ, up to almost 9%, and shifts of the centroids up to more than 6 mm either away or toward the US probe. Breast images showed systematic small shifts of the centroids toward the US probe with a maximum magnitude of 1.3 mm. Conclusions: The applied correction in prostate and liver cancer patients shows positioning errors of several mm due to SOS aberration; the errors are smaller in breast cancer cases, but possibly becoming more important when breast tissue thickness increases.

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... be heard with every heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound ...

  1. Quality control of system of imaging for rectal ultrasound for implants seed prostate low rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luquero Llopis, N.; Ferrer Gracia, C.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Serrada Hierro, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the objective is the evaluation of the image system used in implants of prostate of low rate held at our hospital, for maximum control on the placement of the seeds in the patient and therefore carried out dosimetry. (Author)

  2. WE-EF-210-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): 3D Prostate Segmentation in Ultrasound Images Using Patch-Based Anatomical Feature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Jani, A; Ogunleye, T; Curran, W; Liu, T [Emory Univ, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is the standard imaging modality for the image-guided prostate-cancer interventions (e.g., biopsy and brachytherapy) due to its versatility and real-time capability. Accurate segmentation of the prostate plays a key role in biopsy needle placement, treatment planning, and motion monitoring. As ultrasound images have a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), automatic segmentation of the prostate is difficult. However, manual segmentation during biopsy or radiation therapy can be time consuming. We are developing an automated method to address this technical challenge. Methods: The proposed segmentation method consists of two major stages: the training stage and the segmentation stage. During the training stage, patch-based anatomical features are extracted from the registered training images with patient-specific information, because these training images have been mapped to the new patient’ images, and the more informative anatomical features are selected to train the kernel support vector machine (KSVM). During the segmentation stage, the selected anatomical features are extracted from newly acquired image as the input of the well-trained KSVM and the output of this trained KSVM is the segmented prostate of this patient. Results: This segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 10 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentation. The mean volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 89.7±2.3%, and the average surface distance was 1.52 ± 0.57 mm between our and manual segmentation, which indicate that the automatic segmentation method works well and could be used for 3D ultrasound-guided prostate intervention. Conclusion: We have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with manual segmentation (gold standard). This segmentation technique could be a useful

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ... ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is ...

  6. A comparison of prostate tumor targeting strategies using magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter R; Cool, Derek W; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy aims to reduce the 21-47% false-negative rate of clinical two-dimensional (2D) TRUS-guided systematic biopsy, but continues to yield false-negative results. This may be improved via needle target optimization, accounting for guidance system errors and image registration errors. As an initial step toward the goal of optimized prostate biopsy targeting, we investigated how needle delivery error impacts tumor sampling probability for two targeting strategies. We obtained MRI and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident assessed these MR images and contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding tumor surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. The biopsy system's root-mean-squared needle delivery error (RMSE) and systematic error were modeled using an isotropic 3D Gaussian distribution. We investigated two different prostate tumor-targeting strategies using (a) the tumor's centroid and (b) a ring in the lateral-elevational plane. For each simulation, targets were spaced at equal arc lengths on a ring with radius equal to the systematic error magnitude. A total of 1000 biopsy simulations were conducted for each tumor, with RMSE and systematic error magnitudes ranging from 1 to 6 mm. The difference in median tumor sampling probability and probability of obtaining a 50% core involvement was determined for ring vs centroid targeting. Our simulation results indicate that ring targeting outperformed centroid targeting in situations where systematic error exceeds RMSE. In these instances, we observed statistically significant differences showing 1-32% improvement in sampling probability due to ring targeting. Likewise, we observed statistically significant differences showing 1-39% improvement in 50% core involvement probability due to ring targeting. Our results suggest that the optimal targeting scheme for prostate biopsy depends on

  7. The future perspectives in transrectal prostate ultrasound guided biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Il Hwang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasms in men. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided systematic biopsy has a crucial role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, it shows limited value with gray-scale ultrasound alone because only a small number of malignancies are visible on TRUS. Recently, new emerging technologies in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were introduced and showed high potential in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. High echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agent reflect the increased status of angiogenesis in tumor. Molecular imaging for targeting specific biomarker can be also used using ultrasound contrast agent for detecting angiogenesis or surface biomarker of prostate cancer. The combination of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and ultrasound contrast agents can increase the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis. Elastography is an emerging ultrasound technique that can provide the information regarding tissue elasticity and stiffness. Tumors are usually stiffer than the surrounding soft tissue. In two types of elastography techniques, shearwave elastography has many potential in that it can provide quantitative information on tissue elasticity. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI from high resolution morphologic and functional magnetic resonance (MR technique enables to detect more prostate cancers. The combination of functional techniques including apparent diffusion coefficient map from diffusion weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and MR spectroscopy are helpful in the localization of the prostate cancer. MR-ultrasound (US fusion image can enhance the advantages of both two modalities. With MR-US fusion image, targeted biopsy of suspicious areas on MRI is possible and fusion image guided biopsy can provide improved detection rate. In conclusion, with recent advances in multiparametric-MRI, and introduction of new US techniques such as contrast-enhanced US and elastography, TRUS-guided biopsy

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  9. SU-E-J-135: An Investigation of Ultrasound Imaging for 3D Intra-Fraction Prostate Motion Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, T; Harris, E; Bamber, J [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Greater London (United Kingdom); Evans, P [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the use of a mechanically swept 3D ultrasound (US) probe to estimate intra-fraction motion of the prostate during radiation therapy using an US phantom and simulated transperineal imaging. Methods: A 3D motion platform was used to translate an US speckle phantom while simulating transperineal US imaging. Motion patterns for five representative types of prostate motion, generated from patient data previously acquired with a Calypso system, were using to move the phantom in 3D. The phantom was also implanted with fiducial markers and subsequently tracked using the CyberKnife kV x-ray system for comparison. A normalised cross correlation block matching algorithm was used to track speckle patterns in 3D and 2D US data. Motion estimation results were compared with known phantom translations. Results: Transperineal 3D US could track superior-inferior (axial) and anterior-posterior (lateral) motion to better than 0.8 mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) at a volume rate of 1.7 Hz (comparable with kV x-ray tracking RMSE). Motion estimation accuracy was poorest along the US probe's swept axis (right-left; RL; RMSE < 4.2 mm) but simple regularisation methods could be used to improve RMSE (< 2 mm). 2D US was found to be feasible for slowly varying motion (RMSE < 0.5 mm). 3D US could also allow accurate radiation beam gating with displacement thresholds of 2 mm and 5 mm exhibiting a RMSE of less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: 2D and 3D US speckle tracking is feasible for prostate motion estimation during radiation delivery. Since RL prostate motion is small in magnitude and frequency, 2D or a hybrid (2D/3D) US imaging approach which also accounts for potential prostate rotations could be used. Regularisation methods could be used to ensure the accuracy of tracking data, making US a feasible approach for gating or tracking in standard or hypo-fractionated prostate treatments.

  10. Where Do Transrectal Ultrasound- and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided Biopsies Miss Significant Prostate Cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    -guided biopsy (reTRUSbx) and targeted mpMRIbx (image fusion) of any suspicious lesion. Biopsy results were compared and the locations of missed sPCa lesions were registered. Cancer significance was defined as (1) any core with a Gleason score of >6, (2) cancer core involvement of ≥50% and for re......TRUSbx on patient level, and (3) the presence of ≥3 positive cores. RESULTS: Of the 289 patients, prostate cancer was detected in 128 (44%) with 88 (30%) having sPCa. Overall, 165 separate prostate cancer lesions were detected with 100 being sPCa. Of these, mpMRIbx and reTRUSbx detected 90% (90/100) and 68% (68...... TRUSbx and mpMRIbx missed sPCa lesions in specific segments of the prostate. Missed sPCa lesions at repeat biopsy were primarily located anteriorly for TRUSbx and posterolateral midprostatic for mpMRIbx. Localization of these segments may improve biopsy techniques in men undergoing repeat biopsies....

  11. Comparison of daily megavoltage electronic portal imaging or kilovoltage imaging with marker seeds to ultrasound imaging or skin marks for prostate localization and treatment positioning in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serago, Christopher F.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Igel, Todd C.; Gale, Ashley A.; Serago, Nicole E.; Earle, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of imaging modalities, immobilization, localization, and positioning techniques in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer had gold marker seeds implanted transrectally and were treated with fractionated radiotherapy. Twenty of the 35 patients had limited immobilization; the remaining had a vacuum-based immobilization. Patient positioning consisted of alignment with lasers to skin marks, ultrasound or kilovoltage X-ray imaging, optical guidance using infrared reflectors, and megavoltage electronic portal imaging (EPI). The variance of each positioning technique was compared to the patient position determined from the pretreatment EPI. Results: With limited immobilization, the average difference between the skin marks' laser position and EPI pretreatment position is 9.1 ± 5.3 mm, the average difference between the skin marks' infrared position and EPI pretreatment position is 11.8 ± 7.2 mm, the average difference between the ultrasound position and EPI pretreatment position is 7.0 ± 4.6 mm, the average difference between kV imaging and EPI pretreatment position is 3.5 ± 3.1 mm, and the average intrafraction movement during treatment is 3.4 ± 2.7 mm. For the patients with the vacuum-style immobilization, the average difference between the skin marks' laser position and EPI pretreatment position is 10.7 ± 4.6 mm, the average difference between kV imaging and EPI pretreatment position is 1.9 ± 1.5 mm, and the average intrafraction movement during treatment is 2.1 ± 1.5 mm. Conclusions: Compared with use of skin marks, ultrasound imaging for positioning provides an increased degree of agreement to EPI-based positioning, though not as favorable as kV imaging fiducial seeds. Intrafraction movement during treatment decreases with improved immobilization

  12. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  13. [Ultrasound physiotherapy treatment of prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talberg, P I; Andryukhin, M I; Mazina, S E; Nikolaev, A L

    2016-12-01

    Develop a method of treatment of prostatitis based on the use of a standard antibiotic, immunomodulatory therapy, and transrectal ultrasound physiotherapy. The dynamics of the accumulation of the antibiotic was investigated in male rats. Sonication was performed immediately before the administration of the antibiotic and its accumulation in the process at 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 min after dosing. The clinical study included 138 patients with chronic prostatitis. Patients of the experimental group, in addition to standard therapy, 10 sessions of transrectal ultrasound physical therapy was performed. The efficacy of treatment was assessed after 14 and 28 days after initiation. and its discussion. Experiments on laboratory animals have shown that the highest concentration and the residence time of antibiotic in the prostate tissue is noted ultrasonic treatment in the period of maximum blood concentration of the test drug. The data obtained allow to determine that the ultrasonic treatment must be performed considering the pharmacokinetics of the antibiotic. In conducting clinical trials on day 14 of treatment and clinical manifestations of prostatitis bacterial microflora in prostatic secretions were no patients in both groups. In 15% of patients of the experimental group the number of leukocytes decreased to the normal range. After 28 days the amount of leukocytes was normal in 51% of patients in the control and 85% in the experimental group. In animal experiments defined the optimal time interval separating the moment of injection of the antibiotic from the beginning of sonication. Clinical studies have shown that the transrectal ultrasound exposure during the period of maximum concentration of the antibiotic in the blood, improves patient outcomes by 33.8%.

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3- ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called ... terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. It can ...

  18. Elastic Versus Rigid Image Registration in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Prostate Biopsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venderink, Wulphert; de Rooij, Maarten; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Huisman, Henkjan J; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2016-07-29

    The main difference between the available magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion platforms for prostate biopsy is the method of image registration being either rigid or elastic. As elastic registration compensates for possible deformation caused by the introduction of an ultrasound probe for example, it is expected that it would perform better than rigid registration. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare rigid with elastic registration by calculating the detection odds ratio (OR) for both subgroups. The detection OR is defined as the ratio of the odds of detecting clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) by MRI-TRUS fusion biopsy compared with systematic TRUS biopsy. Secondary objectives were the OR for any PCa and the OR after pooling both registration techniques. The electronic databases PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were systematically searched for relevant studies according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Statement. Studies comparing MRI-TRUS fusion and systematic TRUS-guided biopsies in the same patient were included. The quality assessment of included studies was performed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies version 2. Eleven papers describing elastic and 10 describing rigid registration were included. Meta-analysis showed an OR of csPCa for elastic and rigid registration of 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.73, pimaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion systems which vary in their method of compensating for prostate deformation. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The value of dynamic contrast enhanced power Doppler ultrasound imaging in the localization of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, Tjerk E. B.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A.; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to define enhancement characteristics that correlate to the presence of prostate cancer (PCa) and to evaluate the value of these characteristics in the localization of prostate cancer. METHODS: 29 patients with proven prostate malignancy, scheduled for

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  1. MO-B-BRC-02: Ultrasound Based Prostate HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions

  2. MO-B-BRC-02: Ultrasound Based Prostate HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Z. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound ... computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time ...

  5. Granulomatous prostatitis: a pitfall in MR imaging of prostatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevenois, P.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Stallenberg, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Sintzoff, S.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Salmon, I. [Dept. of Pathology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Regemorter, G. van [Dept. of Urology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Struyven, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium)

    1992-08-01

    Granulomatous prostatitis is an uncommon disease that can mimic prostatic carcinoma on both digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound. Four patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate had a histological diagnosis of granulomatous prostatitis; three of them had recent urinary tract infections. The other patient had an associated midline prostatic cyst and a focus of malignancy. T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained in all cases. Peripheral zone lesions of decreased signal intensity, suggestive of carcinoma, were found in all four patients on T2-weighted images. Granulomatous prostatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of low signal intensity areas with prostatic magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  6. Comparing Three Different Techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-targeted Prostate Biopsies : A Systematic Review of In-bore versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging-transrectal Ultrasound fusion versus Cognitive Registration. Is There a Preferred Technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegelin, Olivier; Melick, H.H.E.; Hooft, Lotty; Bosch, J L H Ruud; Reitsma, Hans B; Barentsz, Jelle O; Somford, Diederik M

    CONTEXT: The introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsies (MRI-GB) has changed the paradigm concerning prostate biopsies. Three techniques of MRI-GB are available: (1) in-bore MRI target biopsy (MRI-TB), (2) MRI-transrectal ultrasound fusion (FUS-TB), and (3) cognitive registration

  7. Fusion of Ultrasound Tissue-Typing Images with Multiparametric MRI for Image-guided Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    otherwise. Statement of Authorship Category 1 (a) Conception and Design Yuefeng Wang; Tian Liu; Peter J. Rossi; Deborah Watkins-Bruner; Wayland Hsiao...Group (N = 18) Age 62.3 (7.7) 60.7 (7.3) Gender Female 2 (12.5) 4 (22.2) Male 14 (87.5) 14 (77.8) Primary tumor site Head (orbit) 0 (0) 1 (5.6) Larynx 1... gender , primary tumor site, histol- ogy, stage, and chemotherapy—are summarized in Table 1 for both acute- and late-toxicity groups. Ultrasound Images and

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can ... ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ... structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... more extensive exams may take up to an hour. When the examination is complete, you may be ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  1. Endorectal coil MRI and MR-spectroscopic imaging in patients with elevated serum prostate specific antigen with negative trus transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Ahmad Ganie

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Prostatic biopsy directed with endorectal coil MRI and MR-spectroscopic imaging findings in patients with elevated serum PSA and prior negative biopsy, improves the early diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma and accurate localization of prostate cancer within the gland.

  2. SU-G-JeP1-09: Evaluation of Transperineal Ultrasound Imaging as a Potential Solution for Target Tracking During Ablative Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, M; Han, B; Hancock, S; Hristov, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Cooper, D [Elekta Inc., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Prostate SABR is emerging as a clinically viable, potentially cost effective alternative to prostate IMRT but its adoption is contingent on providing solutions for accurate tracking during beam delivery. Our goal is to evaluate the performance of the Clarity Autoscan ultrasound monitoring system for inter-fractional prostate motion tracking in both phantoms and in-vivo. Methods: In-vivo evaluation was performed under IRB protocol to allow data collection in prostate patients treated with VMAT whereby prostate was imaged through the acoustic window of the perineum. The probe was placed before KV imaging and real-time tracking was started and continued until the end of treatment. Initial absolute 3D positions of fiducials were estimated from KV images. Fiducial positions in MV images subsequently acquired during beam delivery were compared with predicted positions based on Clarity estimated motion. Results: Phantom studies with motion amplitudes of ±1.5, ±3, ±6 mm in lateral direction and ±2 mm in longitudinal direction resulted in tracking errors of −0.03 ± 0.3, −0.04 ± 0.6, −0.2 ± 0.9 mm, respectively, in lateral direction and −0.05 ± 0.30 mm in longitudinal direction. In phantom, measured and predicted fiducial positions in MV images were within 0.1 ± 0.6 mm. Four patients consented to participate in the study and data was acquired over a total of 140 fractions. MV imaging tracking was possible in about 75% of the time (due to occlusion of fiducials) compared to 100% with Clarity. Overall range of estimated motion by Clarity was 0 to 4.0 mm. In-vivo fiducial localization error was 1.2 ± 1.0 mm compared to 1.8 ± 1.9 mm if not taking Clarity estimated motion into account. Conclusion: Real-time transperineal ultrasound tracking reduces uncertainty in prostate position due to intrafractional motion. Research was supported by Elekta.

  3. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  5. Early experience with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-targeted biopsies under visual transrectal ultrasound guidance in patients suspicious for prostate cancer undergoing repeated biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Noergaard, Nis; Chabanova, Elizaveta

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-targeted biopsies (mp-MRI-bx) in patients with prior negative transrectal ultrasound biopsy (TRUS-bx) sessions without previous experience of this......-RADS) and Likert classification. All underwent repeated TRUS-bx (10 cores) and mp-MRI-bx under visual TRUS guidance of any mp-MRI-suspicious lesion not targeted by systematic TRUS-bx. RESULTS: PCa was found in 39 out of 83 patients (47%) and mp-MRI identified at least one lesion with some degree of suspicion...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  9. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  10. Piezoelectric Composite Micromachined Multifrequency Transducers for High-Resolution, High-Contrast Ultrasound Imaging for Improved Prostate Cancer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    imaging system ( Verasonics Vantage , Kirkland, WA) was used to drive the array and acquire echoes. For this work, 19 TX elements were fired as a group...imaging was conducted with the Verasonics programmable ultrasound system ( Verasonics Vantage , Redmond, WA). The Verasonics sampling frequency...multi-channel research imaging system ( Verasonics Vantage , Kirkland, WA) was used to drive the array and acquire echoes. For this work, 19 TX elements

  11. Initial Australian experience with daily ultrasound localisation for prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneebone, A.; Fuller, M.W.; Williams, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Variability in prostate position is a major problem in the delivery of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Daily ultrasound localisation prior to radiotherapy has become popular in the United States but to date has not been used clinically in Australia or New Zealand. Daily transabdominal ultrasound images through the prostate were acquired using the BAT ultrasound system. Contour data from the planning system is reconstructed at the same locations/angles as the BAT images. By overlaying the planned contours with the newly acquired images, the isocentre is adjusted to ensure that the prostate will be within the irradiated volume. After commissioning by Medical Physics, an initial pre-clinical trial period was adopted. This involved performing BAT alignments daily but treating to the planned isocentre in 30 patients. Eighty three percent of patients (25/30) had images judged to be of good or excellent quality by the reviewing radiation oncologist. It was noted that for each operator there was a period needed to build confidence/competence in both imaging and interpreting the images for the moves. The median scan time in addition to the normal patient set-up was 3.2 minutes (range=1.5-12.0 mins) with the second 15 patients scanned quicker than the first 15 (2.9 minutes versus 3.8 minutes). A summary of the movements recommended by the BAT system is contained in the table. We feel that daily prostate ultrasound localization offers a significant advance in delivering EBRT for prostate cancer. The incorporation of the system into clinical use, however, was not without difficulty and requires significant time and effort from therapists, physicists and medical staff. Further clinical evaluation of the unit is ongoing

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to image by ultrasound because greater amounts of tissue attenuate (weaken) the sound waves as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see the outer surface ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  16. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate ...

  17. Reduced rectal toxicity with ultrasound-based image guided radiotherapy using BAT trademark (B-mode acquisition and targeting system) for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohrer, Markus; Schroeder, Peter; Welzel, Grit; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Mai, Sabine Kathrin

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound BAT (B-mode acquisition and targeting system) on rectal toxicity in conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Patients and Methods 42 sequential patients with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy before and after the introduction of BAT were included. Planning computed tomography (CT) was performed with empty rectum and moderately filled bladder. The planning target volume (PTV) included the prostate and seminal vesicles with a safety margin of 1.5 cm in anterior and lateral direction. In posterior direction the anterior 1/3 of the rectum circumference were included. Total dose was 66 Gy and a boost of 4 Gy excluding the seminal vesicles. 22 patients (BAT group) were treated with daily stereotactic ultrasound positioning, for the other 20 patients (NoBAT group) an EPID (electronic portal imaging device) was performed once a week. Acute and late genito-urinary (GU) and rectal toxicity and PSA values were evaluated after 1.5, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The total median follow up of toxicity was 3 years in the BAT group and 4 years in the NoBAT group. Results In the NoBAT group significant more rectal toxicity occurred, while in GU toxicity no difference was seen. Two patients in the NoBAT group showed late rectal toxicity grade 3, no toxicity > grade 2 occurred in the BAT group. There was no significant difference in PSA reduction between the groups. Conclusion Without BAT significant more acute and a trend to more late rectal toxicity was found. With regard to dose escalation this aspect is currently evaluated with a larger number of patients using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). (orig.)

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... General ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see the outer surface ... children or adults). For visualizing internal structure of bones or certain joints, other imaging modalities such as ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. It can ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... time, rather than as a color picture. It can also convert blood flow information into a distinctive ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is General Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and ... of organs, tissues, and vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  15. Transrectal ultrasound and needle biopsy of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Smrkolj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last 25 years widespread use of prostatic specific antigen caused a stage migration of prostate cancer towards localized disease at diagnosis, which resulted in transrectal ultrasound biopsy to become standard in clinical practice. Transrectal ultrasound examination of the prostate is used to diagnose benign prostatic diseases, e.g. benign prostatic enlargement, prostatitis, prostatic and seminal vesicle cysts. It is also important in detection of obstructive causes of male infertility. Transrectal ultrasound examination is performed most often in needle biopsy for prostate cancer diagnosis. Besides guiding systematic tissue core biopsy, characteristic ultrasound changes enables target biopsies of suspect areas. The article describes indications, contraindications, antibiotic prophylaxis, various biopsy templates and complications of the needle biopsy. Experience with transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy at Department of urology at University medical center in Ljubljana is presented.

  16. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  17. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  19. Portable Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso

    This PhD project investigates hardware strategies and imaging methods for hand-held ultrasound systems. The overall idea is to use a wireless ultrasound probe linked to general-purpose mobile devices for the processing and visualization. The approach has the potential to reduce the upfront costs...... beamforming strategies are simulated from a system-level perspective. The quality of the B-mode image is evaluated and the minimum specifications are derived for the design of a portable probe with integrated electronics in-handle. The system is based on a synthetic aperture sequential beamforming approach...... that allows to significantly reduce the data rate between the probe and processing unit. The second part investigates the feasibility of vector flow imaging in a hand-held ultrasound system. Vector flow imaging overcomes the limitations of conventional imaging methods in terms of flow angle compensation...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  4. Towards clinical prostate ultrasound elastography using full inversion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J; Samani, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Various types of cancers including prostate cancer are known to be associated with biological changes that lead to tissue stiffening. Digital rectal examination is based on manually palpating the prostate tissue via the rectum. This test lacks sufficient accuracy required for early diagnosis which is necessary for effective management of prostate cancer. To develop an effective prostate cancer diagnostic technique, the authors propose an imaging technique that maps the distribution of the relative prostate tissue's elasticity modulus. Unlike digital rectal examination, this technique is quantitative, capable of accurately detecting small prostate lesions that cannot be sensed by manual palpation, and its accuracy is independent of the physician's experience. The proposed technique is a quasistatic elastography technique which uses ultrasound imaging to acquire tissue displacements resulting from transrectal ultrasound mechanical stimulation. The system involves a standard ultrasound imaging unit with accessibility to its radiofrequency data. The displacements are used as data for the tissue elasticity reconstruction. This reconstruction does not require tissue segmentation and is based on physics governing tissue mechanics. It is formulated using an inverse problem framework where elastic tissue deformation equations are fully inverted using an iterative scheme where each iteration involves stress calculation followed by elastic modulus updating until convergence is achieved.In silico and tissue mimicking phantom studies were conducted to validate the proposed technique, followed by a clinical pilot study involving two prostate cancer patients with whole-mount histopathology analysis on prostatectomy specimens to confirm a cancer location. The phantom studies demonstrated robustness and reasonably high accuracy of the proposed method. Obtained Young's modulus ratios indicated reconstruction errors of less than 12%. Reconstructed elastic modulus images of the two

  5. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 ± 1.5% error, 4.4 ± 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 ± 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  6. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring...... a sufficient amount of data for high precision flow estimation. These constrictions can be lifted by employing SA imaging. Here data is acquired simultaneously from all directions over a number of emissions, and the full image can be reconstructed from this data. The talk will demonstrate the many benefits...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) ... uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. ...

  10. Prostatic carcinoma. Diagnostic and stating: MR imaging. Cancer de la prostate Diagnostic et bilan: role de l'imagerie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, C; Spittler, G; Jacqmin, D [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 67 - Strasbourg (FR); Morel, M [Clinique Saint-Francois, 67 Haguenau (FR)

    1991-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is the second most commun cause of cancer death over 60 years. It is suspected by digital examination and prostatic specific antigen dosage. Transrectal ultrasound shows the tumor as an hypoechoic lesion. Sensitivity is good but specificity is low. Transrectal biopsy of prostate guided by transrectal ultrasound made the diagnosis. At present, MR Imaging is the most accurate diagnostic modality for loco-regional staging of prostatic carcinoma.

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more frames ...

  12. Ultrasound Imaging Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    texture mapping hardware," IEEE Tranactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Submitted. [14] C.R. Castro Pareja , J.M. Jagadeesh and R. Shekhar...modulation in real-time three-dimensional sparse synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging systems "* Carlos R. Castro Pareja , Masters of Science, The Ohio...C.R. Castro Pareja , "An architecture for real-time image registration," M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, March 2002. 14. C.R. Castro Pareja , R

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Peter R., E-mail: pmarti46@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cool, Derek W. [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada and Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Romagnoli, Cesare [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Ward, Aaron D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter R; Cool, Derek W; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm(3) or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each tumor was consistently greater when using

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm 3 or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each tumor was

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound images can help ... tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear picture of the ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ... structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... imaging produces pictures of the internal organs and blood vessels located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  6. A comparison of CT- and ultrasound-based imaging to localize the prostate for external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, Helen A.; Mangar, Stephen A.; Coffey, Jerome; Shoulders, Beverley; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Norman, Andrew; Staffurth, John; Sohaib, S. Aslam; Warrington, Alan P.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of NOMOS B-mode acquisition and targeting system (BAT) compared with computed tomography (CT) in localizing the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were CT scanned, and the prostate was localized by 3 observers using the BAT system. The BAT couch shift measurements were compared with the CT localization. Six of the patients had gold markers present in the prostate, and the prostate movement determined by BAT was compared with the movement determined by the gold markers. Results: Using the BAT system, the 3 observers determined the prostate position to be a mean of 1-5 mm over all directions with respect to the CT. The proportion of readings with a difference >3 mm between the observers was in the range of 25% to 44%. The prostate movement based on gold markers was an average of 3-5 mm different from that measured by BAT. The literature assessing the accuracy and reproducibility on BAT is summarized and compared with our findings. Conclusions: We have found that there are systematic differences between the BAT-defined prostate position compared with that estimated on CT using gold grain marker seeds

  7. Histoscanning and shear wave ultrasound elastography for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Amosov

    2016-01-01

    morphological verification of postoperative material was made. In the 63 patients of the first and the second groups the contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the pelvic organs was made. In the health men’s group, besides the ultrasound shear wave elastography, only the routine diagnosis methods of the prostate cancer (PSA level, TRUS and DRE were used.Results. According to the results of our study, the threshold values for the normal prostate tissue stiffness due to the ultrasound shear wave elastography were from 0 to 23 kPa, for the hyperplastic prostate – from 23.4 to 50 kPa, for the prostate cancer – from 50.5 kPa. The data analysis of the 212 patients with the verified prostate cancer showed the increase of the mean degree of tissue stiffness due to the clinical stage and tumor differentiation (Gleason scale total score. All the patients were divided into the subgroups with the certain correlation values. In patients with the Gleason scale total score < 7, the mean degree of tissue stiffness was 72 kPa (n = 63. In 57 patients with the Gleason scale total score 7, the mean degree of tissue stiffness was 69 kPa. In 48 patients with the Gleason scale total score from 8 to 10, the tissue stiffness was averagely 119 kPa. The locally advanced stage Т3–4 was determined in 44 examined patients. The tissue stiffness value correlated with the tumor differentiation rate: the index variations were from 120 to 295 kPa. On the results of this method analysis, its resistance was 90,8 % and specificity was 94,6 %. According to the comparative assessment with the other examination technics, the informative value of the ultrasound shear wave elastography is far above the DRE, the doppler TRUS and the histoscanning, but is lower than the contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.Conclusion. In view of the above, the ultrasound shear wave elastography is a very informative method of the prostate cancer detection and it has a high rate of the agreement

  8. Deconvolution of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1992-01-01

    Based on physical models, it is indicated that the received pressure field in ultrasound B-mode images can be described by a convolution between a tissue reflection signal and the emitted pressure field. This result is used in a description of current image formation and in formulating a new...... processing scheme. The suggested estimator can take into account the dispersive attenuation, the temporal and spatial variation of the pulse, and the change in reflection strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Details of the algorithm and the estimation of parameters to be used are given. The performance...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. An ultrasound examination is usually ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should we prepare for an ultrasound exam? What does the ultrasound equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ... Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most patients. Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  15. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... assistance of a nurse and an MR imaging technologist. As with the ultrasound procedure, you may receive antibiotics, sedatives and pain medication before the biopsy. The MRI-guided procedure may use contrast ... A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter into a ...

  16. Ultrasound image features of intravesical prostatic protrusion indicated failure of medication therapy of finasteride and doxazosin in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhu, Yunkai; Liu, Jianping; Qi, Jun; Kang, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP) is a type of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) adenoma, and it plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction in patients with lower urinary tract syndromes (LUTS/BPH). The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of a combination therapy with finasteride and doxazosin on IPP in BPU/LUTS patients. A total of 322 BPH patients with enlarged prostatic volume as well as moderate to severe symptom scores were enrolled and divided into four groups according to the degree of IPP (IPP > 10 mm, 5-10 mm,  0.05). Failure rates of the medication differed significantly among the four groups. The study indicated that the combination therapy using finasteride and doxazosin could not reduce the degree of IPP. LUTS/BPH patients with IPP which contributes to the failure of medication tend to have a higher risk of progression.

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer ...

  18. A Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong Woo

    1999-01-01

    The ability to see the internal organs of the human body in a noninvasive way is a powerful diagnostic tool of modern medicine. Among these imaging modalities such as X-ray, MRI, and ultrasound. MRI and ultrasound are presenting much less risk of undesirable damage of both patient and examiner. In fact, no deleterious effects have been reported as a result of clinical examination by using MRI and ultrasound diagnostic equipment. As a result, their market volume has been rapidly increased. MRI has a good resolution. but there are a few disadvantages such as high price. non-real-time imaging capability. and expensive diagnostic cost. On the other hand, the ultrasound imaging system has inherently poor resolution as compared with X-ray and MRI. In spite of its poor resolution, the ultrasound diagnostic equipment is lower in price and has an ability of real-time imaging as compared with the others. As a result, the ultrasound imaging system has become general and essential modality for imaging the internal organs of human body. In this review various researches and developments to enhance the resolution of the ultrasound images are explained and future trends of the ultrasound imaging technology are described

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such ... abdomen help determine causes of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - ... computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time ...

  3. Ultrasound Imaging. Chapter 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacefield, J. C. [University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    In the conventional method of ultrasonography, images are acquired in reflection, or pulse echo, mode. An array of small piezoelectric elements transmits a focused pulse along a specified line of sight known as a scan line. Echoes returning from the tissue are received by the same array, focused via the delay-and-sum beam forming process reviewed in Section 13.2, and demodulated to obtain the magnitude, or envelope, of the echo signal. The scanner measures the arrival time of the echoes relative to the time the pulse was transmitted and maps the arrival time to the distance from the array, using an assumed speed of sound. The earliest ultrasound systems would display the result of a single pulse acquisition in 1-D A-mode (amplitude mode) format by plotting echo magnitude as a function of distance. A 2-D or 3-D B-mode (brightness mode) image is acquired by performing a large number of pulse echo acquisitions, incrementally increasing the scan line direction between each pulse echo operation, to sweep out a 2-D or 3-D field of view (FOV). The term B-mode imaging reflects the fact that the echo magnitude from each point in the FOV is mapped to the grey level, or brightness, of the corresponding pixel in the image.

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a variety of conditions and to assess organ damage following ... the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart conditions, including valve problems and congestive ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in infections With knowledge about the speed and volume of blood flow gained from a Doppler ultrasound ... the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top of page ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... color picture. It can also convert blood flow information into a distinctive sound that can be heard ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... sonography is performed using the same transducer. Rarely, young children may need to be sedated in order ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... may produce minimal discomfort. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, you may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured. Most ultrasound examinations ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise ...

  16. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  17. A review of transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies: Is there ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We compared our institution's initial experience with transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) prostate biopsies in a single arm prospective study to a historical cohort of finger guided (FG) biopsies. The primary outcome measure was prostate cancer detection. We documented our findings on TRUS including the ...

  18. Recursive ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for recursive ultrasound imaging is presented. The method uses a Synthetic Transmit Aperture, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created at every pulse emission. In receive, parallel beam forming is implemented. The beam formed RF data is added to the previously...... created RF lines. To keep the level of the signal, the RF data obtained previously, when emitting with the same element is subtracted from the RF lines. Up to 5000 frames/sec can be achieved for a tissue depth of 15 cm with a speed of sound of c = 1540 m/s. The high frame rate makes continuous imaging...... data possible, which can significantly enhance flow imaging. A point spread function 2° wide at -6 dB and grating lobes of $m(F) -50 dB is obtained with a 64 elements phased array with a central frequency ƒ¿0? = 3 MHz using a sparse transmit aperture using only 10 elements (N¿xmt? = 10) during pulse...

  19. Transrectal ultrasound applicator for prostate heating monitored using MRI thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Nadine Barrie; Buchanan, Mark T.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: For potential localized hyperthermia treatment of tumors within the prostate, an ultrasound applicator consisting entirely of nonmagnetic materials for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed and tested on muscle tissue ex vivo and in vivo. Methods and Materials: A partial-cylindrical intracavitary transducer consisting of 16 elements in a 4 x 4 pattern was constructed. It produced a radially propagating acoustic pressure field. Each element of this array (1.5 x 0.75 cm), operating at 1.5 MHz, could be separately powered to produce a desired energy deposition pattern within a target volume. Spatial and temporal temperature elevations were determined using the temperature-dependent proton resonant frequency (PRF) shift and phase subtraction of MR images acquired during ultrasonic heating. Four rabbits were exposed to the ultrasound to raise the local tissue temperature to 45 deg. C for 25 minutes. Six experiments compared thermocouple temperature results to PRF shift temperature results. Results: The tests showed that the multi-element ultrasound applicator was MRI-compatible and allowed imaging during sonication. The induced temperature distribution could be controlled by monitoring the RF power to each transducer element. Therapeutic temperature elevations were easily achieved in vivo at power levels that were about 16% of the maximum system power. From the six thermocouple experiments, comparison between the thermocouple temperature and the PRF temperature yielded an average error of 0.34 ± 0.36 deg. C. Conclusions: The MRI-compatible intracavitary applicator and driving system was able to control the ultrasound field and temperature pattern in vivo. MRI thermometry using the PRF shift can provide adequate temperature accuracy and stability for controlling the temperature distribution

  20. Determination of prostate gland volume by transrectal ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myschetzky, P S; Suburu, R E; Kelly, B S

    1991-01-01

    Seventy six patients underwent transrectal ultrasound examination of the prostate prior to radical prostatectomy. All radical specimens were weighed and measured when freshly excised. Corresponding measurements calculated using transrectal ultrasound dimensions were retrospectively compared with ...... was shown. A modified prolate ellipse formula, using the factor of 0.70, appears to be a more reliable means of estimating gland volume with transrectal ultrasound than the original formula [Width x Height x Length) x 0.523)....

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  2. MR imaging of the prostate; MRT der Prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbach, P.; Haas, M.; Hamm, B. [Charite Campus Benjamin Franklin, Klinik fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Germany; however, there is a distinct difference between incidence and mortality. The detection of prostate cancer is based on clinical and laboratory testing using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and transrectal ultrasound with randomized biopsy. Multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate can provide valuable diagnostic information for detection of prostate cancer, especially after negative results of a biopsy prior to repeat biopsy. In addition the use of MR ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy has gained in diagnostic importance and has increased the prostate cancer detection rate. The prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) classification has standardized the reporting of prostate MRI which has positively influenced the acceptance by urologists. (orig.) [German] Das Prostatakarzinom ist in Deutschland die haeufigste Krebserkrankung des Mannes, wobei ein deutlicher Unterschied zwischen Inzidenz und Mortalitaet besteht. Die Detektion des Prostatakarzinoms basiert auf klinischer und laborchemischer Untersuchung (prostataspezifisches-Antigen[PSA]-Wert) sowie der transrektalen Ultraschalluntersuchung mit randomisierter Biopsie. Die multiparametrische MR-Tomographie kann zur Detektion des Prostatakarzinoms, insbesondere bei negativer Biopsie vor einer erneuten Biopsie wertvolle diagnostische Informationen liefern. Zudem wird zunehmend die MRT-Ultraschall-Fusionsbiopsie in der Diagnostik eingesetzt, wodurch die Detektionsrate des Prostatakarzinoms deutlich gesteigert werden kann. Mit Einfuehrung der PI-RADS-Klassifikation (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) konnte zudem eine Standardisierung der Befundung erreicht werden, was die Akzeptanz der MRT der Prostata in der Urologie erhoeht hat. (orig.)

  3. Prostate imaging. An update; Bildgebung der Prostata. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franiel, T.; Teichgraeber, U. [University Hospital Jena (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Asbach, P.; Hamm, B. [University Medicine Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Foller, S. [University Hospital Jena (Germany). Dept. of Urology

    2015-09-15

    New technical and clinical developments of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging include improved detection, localization and staging as well as active surveillance of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI can best answer these typical clinical questions. However, ultrasound elastography seems to be suitable for the detection of significant prostate cancer as well. The structured reporting system for multiparametric MRI of the prostate according to PI-RADS Version 1 led to improved and reproducible diagnosis of prostate cancer. The new PI-RADS Version 2 aims to minimize the limitations of Version 1 and make PI-RADS standardization more globally acceptable.

  4. Ultrasound Imaging and its modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    Modern medical ultrasound scanners are used for imaging nearly all soft tissue structures in the body. The anatomy can be studied from gray-scale B-mode images, where the reflectivity and scattering strength of the tissues are displayed. The imaging is performed in real time with 20 to 100 images...

  5. A comparison of complications between ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy and open prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Ronald M.; Naslund, Michael J.; Cohen, Jeffrey K.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy has reemerged during the 1990s as a treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. The renewed popularity of prostate brachytherapy is largely due to the use of transrectal ultrasound of the prostate, which allows for more accurate isotope placement within the prostate when compared to the open approach. The present study investigates whether this improved cancer control is at the expense of increased morbidity by comparing the morbidity after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy to the morbidity after prostate brachytherapy performed via an open approach. Methods and Materials: All men in the Medicare population who underwent prostate brachytherapy in the year 1991 were identified. These men were further stratified into those men who underwent prostate brachytherapy via an open approach and the men who underwent prostate brachytherapy with ultrasound guidance. All subsequent inpatient, outpatient, and physician (Part B) Medicare claims for these men from the years 1991-1993 were then analyzed to determine outcomes. Results: In the year 1991, 2124 men in the Medicare population underwent prostate brachytherapy. An open approach was used in 715 men (33.7%), and ultrasound guidance was used in 1409 men (66.3%). Mean age for both cohorts was 73.7 years with a range of 50.7-92.8 years for the ultrasound group and 60.6-92.1 years for the open group. A surgical procedure for the relief of bladder outlet obstruction was performed in 122 men (8.6%) in the ultrasound group and in 54 men (7.6%) in the open group. An artificial urinary sphincter was placed in 2 men (0.14%) in the ultrasound group and in 2 men (0.28%) in the open group. A penile prosthesis was implanted in 10 men (0.71%) in the ultrasound group and in 4 men (0.56%) in the open group. A diagnosis code for urinary incontinence was carried by 95 men (6.7%) in the ultrasound group and by 45 men (6.3%) in the open group. A diagnosis code for erectile dysfunction

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... video display screen and a transducer that is used to do the scanning. The transducer is a ... the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for ... is no radiation exposure to the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. top of page This page was reviewed on ... using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... children. Preparation will depend on the type of examination. Ask your doctor if there are specific instructions ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses ... appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  16. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durmus, T.; Baur, A.; Hamm, B.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men, but only about 10 % of patients die from that cancer. Recent studies suggest that not all patients benefit from a radical therapeutic approach. When prostate cancer is suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can make an important contribution to cancer localization within the prostate. Many studies show that T2-weighted morphologic imaging should be supplemented by multiparametric MRI techniques including diffusion-weighted imaging, contrast-enhanced sequences, and MR spectroscopy. This approach detects aggressive prostate cancer with high sensitivity and specificity. The findings of multiparametric MRI additionally contribute information to the assessment of cancer aggressiveness. The use of these multiparametric MRI techniques will gain an increasing role in the clinical management of prostate cancer patients. They can help in establishing a definitive diagnosis with a minimum of invasiveness and may also contribute to optimal individualized treatment. This review article presents the different techniques of multiparametric MRI and discusses their contribution to the detection of prostate cancer. Moreover, this review outlines an objective approach to image interpretation and structured reporting of MRI findings using the PI-RADS criteria. The review concludes with an outline of approaches to prostate biopsy on the basis of MRI (transrectal ultrasound, direct MRI guidance of tissue sampling, and MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy) and emerging future uses of MRI in the planning of focal treatment options and in the active surveillance of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. (orig.)

  17. Short-lag spatial coherence beamforming of photoacoustic images for enhanced visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy, administered by implanting tiny radioactive seeds to treat prostate cancer, currently relies on transrectal ultrasound imaging for intraoperative visualization of the metallic seeds. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been suggested as a feasible alternative to ultrasound imaging due to its superior sensitivity to metal surrounded by tissue. However, PA images suffer from poor contrast when seeds are distant from the light source. We propose a transperineal light delivery ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding ... questions or for a referral to a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  19. Toward a real-time system for temporal enhanced ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Shekoofeh; Van Woudenberg, Nathan; Sojoudi, Samira; Li, Ming; Xu, Sheng; Abu Anas, Emran M; Yan, Pingkun; Tahmasebi, Amir; Kwak, Jin Tae; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford; Mousavi, Parvin; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2018-03-27

    We have previously proposed temporal enhanced ultrasound (TeUS) as a new paradigm for tissue characterization. TeUS is based on analyzing a sequence of ultrasound data with deep learning and has been demonstrated to be successful for detection of cancer in ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Our aim is to enable the dissemination of this technology to the community for large-scale clinical validation. In this paper, we present a unified software framework demonstrating near-real-time analysis of ultrasound data stream using a deep learning solution. The system integrates ultrasound imaging hardware, visualization and a deep learning back-end to build an accessible, flexible and robust platform. A client-server approach is used in order to run computationally expensive algorithms in parallel. We demonstrate the efficacy of the framework using two applications as case studies. First, we show that prostate cancer detection using near-real-time analysis of RF and B-mode TeUS data and deep learning is feasible. Second, we present real-time segmentation of ultrasound prostate data using an integrated deep learning solution. The system is evaluated for cancer detection accuracy on ultrasound data obtained from a large clinical study with 255 biopsy cores from 157 subjects. It is further assessed with an independent dataset with 21 biopsy targets from six subjects. In the first study, we achieve area under the curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.94, 0.77, 0.94 and 0.92, respectively, for the detection of prostate cancer. In the second study, we achieve an AUC of 0.85. Our results suggest that TeUS-guided biopsy can be potentially effective for the detection of prostate cancer.

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is used to help diagnose the causes of pain, swelling and infection in the body’s internal organs ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ovaries , and unborn child ( fetus ) in pregnant patients eyes thyroid and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in ... Any portions that are not wiped off will dry quickly. The ultrasound gel does not usually stain ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Any portions that are not wiped off will dry quickly. The ultrasound gel does not usually stain ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s also used to help guide ... and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in infants hips in infants spine in infants Ultrasound is also ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in infections With knowledge about the speed and volume of blood flow gained from a Doppler ultrasound ... Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... spleen pancreas kidneys bladder uterus , ovaries , and unborn child ( fetus ) in pregnant patients eyes thyroid and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in infants hips in infants spine in infants Ultrasound is also used to: guide ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spleen pancreas kidneys bladder uterus , ovaries , and unborn child ( fetus ) in pregnant patients eyes thyroid and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in infants hips in infants spine in infants Ultrasound is also used to: guide ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior to sedation. Once ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Videos related to General Ultrasound Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type your comment or suggestion ... General ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of colors to show the speed and direction of blood ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to remove all clothing and jewelry in the ... using the same transducer. Rarely, young children may need to be sedated in order to hold still ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color ... and its major branches liver gallbladder spleen pancreas kidneys bladder uterus , ovaries , and unborn child ( fetus ) in ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a woman's vagina to view the uterus and ovaries. top ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  8. Image processing in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    This Ph.D project addresses image processing in medical ultrasound and seeks to achieve two major scientific goals: First to develop an understanding of the most significant factors influencing image quality in medical ultrasound, and secondly to use this knowledge to develop image processing...... multiple imaging setups. This makes the system well suited for development of new processing methods and for clinical evaluations, where acquisition of the exact same scan location for multiple methods is important. The second project addressed implementation, development and evaluation of SASB using...... methods for enhancing the diagnostic value of medical ultrasound. The project is an industrial Ph.D project co-sponsored by BK Medical ApS., with the commercial goal to improve the image quality of BK Medicals scanners. Currently BK Medical employ a simple conventional delay-and-sum beamformer to generate...

  9. OSPACS: Ultrasound image management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessant Conrad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound scanning uses the medical imaging format, DICOM, for electronically storing the images and data associated with a particular scan. Large health care facilities typically use a picture archiving and communication system (PACS for storing and retrieving such images. However, these systems are usually not suitable for managing large collections of anonymized ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. Results We have developed a system enabling the accurate archiving and management of ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. It is based upon a Windows application utilizing an open-source DICOM image viewer and a relational database. The system automates the bulk import of DICOM files from removable media by cross-validating the patient information against an external database, anonymizing the data as well as the image, and then storing the contents of the file as a field in a database record. These image records may then be retrieved from the database and presented in a tree-view control so that the user can select particular images for display in a DICOM viewer or export them to external media. Conclusion This system provides error-free automation of ultrasound image archiving and management, suitable for use in a clinical trial. An open-source project has been established to promote continued development of the system.

  10. A deep learning approach for real time prostate segmentation in freehand ultrasound guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Mousavi, Parvin; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2018-06-01

    Targeted prostate biopsy, incorporating multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and its registration with ultrasound, is currently the state-of-the-art in prostate cancer diagnosis. The registration process in most targeted biopsy systems today relies heavily on accurate segmentation of ultrasound images. Automatic or semi-automatic segmentation is typically performed offline prior to the start of the biopsy procedure. In this paper, we present a deep neural network based real-time prostate segmentation technique during the biopsy procedure, hence paving the way for dynamic registration of mp-MRI and ultrasound data. In addition to using convolutional networks for extracting spatial features, the proposed approach employs recurrent networks to exploit the temporal information among a series of ultrasound images. One of the key contributions in the architecture is to use residual convolution in the recurrent networks to improve optimization. We also exploit recurrent connections within and across different layers of the deep networks to maximize the utilization of the temporal information. Furthermore, we perform dense and sparse sampling of the input ultrasound sequence to make the network robust to ultrasound artifacts. Our architecture is trained on 2,238 labeled transrectal ultrasound images, with an additional 637 and 1,017 unseen images used for validation and testing, respectively. We obtain a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 93%, a mean surface distance error of 1.10 mm and a mean Hausdorff distance error of 3.0 mm. A comparison of the reported results with those of a state-of-the-art technique indicates statistically significant improvement achieved by the proposed approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it ...

  12. Time-dependent change of blood flow in the prostate treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Sunao; Tonooka, Akiko; Hashimoto, Akio; Nakamoto, Masahiko; Tomonaga, Tetsuro; Nakano, Mayura; Sato, Haruhiro; Terachi, Toshiro; Koike, Junki; Uchida, Toyoaki

    2014-09-01

    Avascular areas on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have been considered to be areas of localized prostate cancer successfully treated by high-intensity focused ultrasound. However, the optimal timing of magnetic resonance imaging has not been discussed. The thermal effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound is degraded by regional prostatic blood flow. Conversely, the mechanical effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (cavitation) is not affected by blood flow, and can induce vessel damage. In this series, the longitudinal change of blood flow on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was observed from postoperative day 1 to postoperative day 14 in 10 patients treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound. The median rates of increase in the non-enhanced volume of the whole gland, transition zone and peripheral zone from postoperative day 1 to postoperative day 14 were 36%, 39%, and 34%, respectively. In another pathological analysis of the prostate tissue of 17 patients immediately after high-intensity focused ultrasound without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, we observed diffuse coagulative degeneration and partial non-coagulative prostate tissue around arteries with vascular endothelial cell detachment. These observations on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging support a time-dependent change of the blood flow in the prostate treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound. Additionally, our pathological findings support the longitudinal changes of these magnetic resonance imaging findings. Further large-scale studies will investigate the most appropriate timing of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of the effectiveness of high-intensity focused ultrasound for localized prostate cancer. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Ultrasound imaging using coded signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Athanasios

    Modulated (or coded) excitation signals can potentially improve the quality and increase the frame rate in medical ultrasound scanners. The aim of this dissertation is to investigate systematically the applicability of modulated signals in medical ultrasound imaging and to suggest appropriate...... methods for coded imaging, with the goal of making better anatomic and flow images and three-dimensional images. On the first stage, it investigates techniques for doing high-resolution coded imaging with improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to conventional imaging. Subsequently it investigates how...... coded excitation can be used for increasing the frame rate. The work includes both simulated results using Field II, and experimental results based on measurements on phantoms as well as clinical images. Initially a mathematical foundation of signal modulation is given. Pulse compression based...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is ... with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to General Ultrasound Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of colors to show the speed and direction of blood flow through a blood vessel. Power Doppler is a newer technique that is more ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of examining many of the body's internal organs, including but not limited to the: heart and blood vessels, including the abdominal aorta and its major branches liver gallbladder spleen ...

  1. Stereotactic ultrasound for target volume definition in a patient with prostate cancer and bilateral total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Haneder, Stefan; Ehmann, Michael; Sihono, Dwi Seno Kuncoro; Wertz, Hansjörg; Mai, Sabine; Kegel, Stefan; Heitmann, Sigrun; von Swietochowski, Sandra; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Target-volume definition for prostate cancer in patients with bilateral metal total hip replacements (THRs) is a challenge because of metal artifacts in the planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used for matching and prostate delineation; however, at a spatial and temporal distance from the planning CT, identical rectal and vesical filling is difficult to achieve. In addition, MRI may also be impaired by metal artifacts, even resulting in spatial image distortion. Here, we present a method to define prostate target volumes based on ultrasound images acquired during CT simulation and online-matched to the CT data set directly at the planning CT. A 78-year-old patient with cT2cNxM0 prostate cancer with bilateral metal THRs was referred to external beam radiation therapy. T2-weighted MRI was performed on the day of the planning CT with preparation according to a protocol for reproducible bladder and rectal filling. The planning CT was obtained with the immediate acquisition of a 3-dimensional ultrasound data set with a dedicated stereotactic ultrasound system for online intermodality image matching referenced to the isocenter by ceiling-mounted infrared cameras. MRI (offline) and ultrasound images (online) were thus both matched to the CT images for planning. Daily image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was performed with transabdominal ultrasound and compared with cone beam CT. Because of variations in bladder and rectal filling and metal-induced image distortion in MRI, soft-tissue-based matching of the MRI to CT was not sufficient for unequivocal prostate target definition. Ultrasound-based images could be matched, and prostate, seminal vesicles, and target volumes were reliably defined. Daily IGRT could be successfully completed with transabdominal ultrasound with good accordance between cone beam CT and ultrasound. For prostate cancer patients with bilateral THRs causing artifacts in planning CTs, ultrasound referenced to

  2. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has...... been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...... a channel limited 2-D transducer array and the conventional 3-D beamforming technique, Parallel Beamforming. The first part of the scientific contributions demonstrate that 3-D synthetic aperture imaging achieves a better image quality than the Parallel Beamforming technique. Data were obtained using both...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  4. WE-EF-210-07: Development of a Minimally Invasive Photo Acoustic Imaging System for Early Prostate Cancer Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, M; Yousefi, S; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to design, implement and characterize a catheter-based ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging probe for early-diagnosis of prostate cancer and to aid in image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: The need to image across 6–10cm of tissue to image the whole prostate gland limits the resolution achievable with a transrectal ultrasound approach. In contrast, the urethra bisects the prostate gland, providing a minimally invasive pathway for deploying a high resolution ultrasound transducer. Utilizing a high-frequency (20MHz) ultrasound/photoacoustic probe, high-resolution structural and molecular imaging of the prostate tissue is possible. A custom 3D printed probe containing a high-frequency single-element ultrasound transducer is utilized. The diameter of the probe is designed to fit inside a Foley catheter and the probe is rotated around the central axis to achieve a circular B-scan. A custom ultrasound amplifier and receiver was set up to trigger the ultrasound pulse transmission and record the reflected signal. The reconstructed images were compared to images generated by traditional 5 MHz ultrasound transducers. Results: The preliminary results using the high-frequency ultrasound probe show that it is possible to resolve finely detailed information in a prostate tissue phantom that was not achievable with previous low-frequency ultrasound systems. Preliminary ultrasound imaging was performed on tissue mimicking phantom and sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio of the catheter was measured. Conclusion: In order to achieve non-invasive, high-resolution, structural and molecular imaging for early-diagnosis and image-guided radiation therapy of the prostate tissue, a transurethral catheter was designed. Structural/molecular imaging using ultrasound/photoacoustic of the prostate tissue will allow for localization of hyper vascularized areas for early-stage prostate cancer diagnosis.

  5. Reproducibility of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound of the prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedelaar, J. P.; Goossen, T. E.; Wijkstra, H.; de la Rosette, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Transrectal three-dimensional (3-D) contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (US) is a novel technique for studying possible prostate malignancy. Before studies can be performed to investigate the clinical validity of the technique, reproducibility of the contrast US studies must be proven.

  6. Adaptive Beamforming for Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund

    This dissertation investigates the application of adaptive beamforming for medical ultrasound imaging. The investigations have been concentrated primarily on the Minimum Variance (MV) beamformer. A broadband implementation of theMV beamformer is described, and simulated data have been used...... to demonstrate the performance. The MV beamformer has been applied to different sets of ultrasound imaging sequences; synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and plane wave ultrasound imaging. And an approach for applying MV optimized apodization weights on both the transmitting and the receiving apertures...

  7. Complementary method of analyzing the quality of the implant I-125 seeds for prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound imaging post-implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Dominguez, M.; Carrasco Herrera, M.; Baeza Trujillo, M.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a complementary method based on Longitudinal mode ultrasound images acquired the same day of surgery, at the end of the implant. This option will allow us to evaluate the dosimetry end of treatment with the patient in the same position he was planning and to the rectum and bladder just as full. This will permit the identification of bodies and the seeds of interest more easily and will have a reference with which to compare one month later, when the CT images can also detect whether there has been some migration.

  8. Patient repositioning in prostate conformal radiotherapy by image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betrouni, Nacim

    2004-01-01

    This research thesis first proposes an overview of imaging modalities which are generally used in radiotherapy, and briefly presents operation principles for ultrasound scans, scanners and MRI. The issue of patient repositioning in radiotherapy is then introduced, and already proposed solutions are presented. In the next part, the author addresses space location and ultrasound-based location, with a brief overview of methods used to track the displacements of a mobile object, in this case an ultrasound probe, and calibration. Then, after a presentation of the adopted method, and a discussion of published works related to contour extraction and to filtering and noise reduction methods in ultrasound imagery, the author addresses the issue of prostate segmentation based on ultrasound images. The next part deals with image registration with an overview of available methods and tools. A method of registration of pre-operation images obtained by MRI or scanner, and of intra-operation ultrasound images is proposed for a real-time registration. This method is aimed at supporting patient repositioning during prostate conformal radiotherapy

  9. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for diagnosis of prostate cancer and kidney lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitterberger, Michael; Pelzer, Alexandre; Colleselli, Daniela; Bartsch, Georg; Strasser, Hannes; Pallwein, Leo; Aigner, Friedrich; Gradl, Johann; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review: Conventional ultrasonography of both, kidney and prostate, is limited due to the poor contrast of B-mode imaging for parenchymal disease and limited sensitivity of colour Doppler for the detection of capillaries and deep pedicular vessels. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) overcomes these limitations. Recent findings: CEUS investigates the blood flow of the prostate, allows for prostate cancer visualization and for targeted biopsies. Comparisons between systematic and CEUS-targeted biopsies have shown that the targeted approach detects more cancers with a lower number of biopsy cores and with higher Gleason scores compared with the systematic approach. Also the kidney offers promising applications as CEUS improves the detection of abnormal microvascular and macrovascular disorders. Summary: In recent literature CEUS has shown its value for diagnosis of both, prostate cancer and kidney lesions. This paper describes recent improvements and future perspectives of CEUS

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... an area of tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured. Once the imaging ...

  13. Biomechanical modeling constrained surface-based image registration for prostate MR guided TRUS biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, W.J.M. van de; Hu, Y.; Barentsz, J.O.; Karssemeijer, N.; Barratt, D.; Huisman, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Adding magnetic resonance (MR)-derived information to standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for guiding prostate biopsy is of substantial clinical interest. A tumor visible on MR images can be projected on ultrasound (US) by using MR-US registration. A common approach is to use surface-based

  14. A review of the recommendations governing quality assurance of ultrasound systems used for guidance in prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Andrea Jane; King, Deirdre M; Browne, Jacinta E

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasound guided brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer has become a routine treatment option, due to many benefits including patient recovery and dose localisation [1]; however it is not clear whether the standards which govern the image quality for these systems are adequate. Upon review of the recommended standards for ultrasound systems used in prostate brachytherapy procedures, the recommended tests do not appear to be specific to the clinical application of ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy. Rather they are generic and similar to those recommended for other clinical applications such as general abdominal scanning [2]. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that these tests should be specific to the clinical application [3,4] in order to gain meaningful data about the performance of the system for the application, and also to detect clinically relevant changes in quality control results. An additional problem is that there are no clinically relevant test phantom recommended for the quality assurance of ultrasound systems used in prostate brachytherapy. The image quality for this application of ultrasound needs to be monitored to ensure consistent levels of confidence in the procedure. This paper reviews the currently recommended test guidelines and test phantoms for ultrasound systems used in prostate brachytherapy from the different standard bodies and professional organisations. A critical analysis of those tests which are most reflective of the imaging and guidance tasks undertaken in an ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy procedure will also be presented to inform the design of a TRUS quality assurance protocol. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  17. Diagnostic performance of power doppler and ultrasound contrast agents in early imaging-based diagnosis of organ-confined prostate cancer: Is it possible to spare cores with contrast-guided biopsy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Oliva, F., E-mail: frandelgol@hotmail.com; Arlandis Guzman, S.; Bonillo García, M.; Broseta Rico, E.; Boronat Tormo, F.

    2016-10-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of gray scale transrectal ultrasound-B-mode US (BMUS), power Doppler (PDUS), and sonographic contrast (CEUS) in early imaging-based diagnosis of localized prostate cancer (PCa) and to compare the diagnostic profitability of randomized biopsy (RB), US-targeted prostate biopsy by means of PDUS and CEUS. Material and methods: A single-center, prospective, transversal, epidemiological study was conducted from January 2010 to January 2014. We consecutively included patients who an imaging study of the prostate with BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS was performed, followed by prostate biopsy due to clinical suspicion of prostate cancer (PSA 4–20 ng/mL and/or rectal exam suggestive of malignancy). The diagnostic performance of BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS was determined by calculating the Sensitivity (S), Specificity (Sp), Predictive values (PV), and diagnostic odds ratio (OR) of the diagnosis tests and, for these variables, in the population general and based on their clinical stage according to rectal exam (cT1 and cT2). PCa detection rates determined by means of a randomized 10-core biopsy scheme were compared with detection rates of CEUS-targeted (SonoVue) 2-core biopsies. Results: Of the initial 984 patients, US contrast SonoVue was administered to 179 (18.2%). The PCa detection rate by organ of BMUS/PDUS in the global population was 38% versus 43% in the subpopulation with CEUS. The mean age of the patients was 64.3 ± 7.01 years (95% CI, 63.75–64.70); mean total PSA was 8.9 ± 3.61 ng/mL (95% CI, 8.67–9.13) and the mean prostate volume was 56.2 ± 29 cc (95% CI, 54.2–58.1). The detection rate by organ of targeted biopsy with BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS were as follows: Global population (10.6, 8.2, 24.5%), stage cT1 (5.6, 4.2, 16.4%), and stage cT2 (32.4, 22.3, 43.5%). Comparing the detection rates of the CEUS-targeted biopsy and randomized biopsy, the following results were obtained: Global population (24.5% vs. 41.8%), stage cT1 (16

  18. Diagnostic performance of power doppler and ultrasound contrast agents in early imaging-based diagnosis of organ-confined prostate cancer: Is it possible to spare cores with contrast-guided biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Oliva, F; Arlandis Guzman, S; Bonillo García, M; Broseta Rico, E; Boronat Tormo, F

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of gray scale transrectal ultrasound-B-mode US (BMUS), power Doppler (PDUS), and sonographic contrast (CEUS) in early imaging-based diagnosis of localized prostate cancer (PCa) and to compare the diagnostic profitability of randomized biopsy (RB), US-targeted prostate biopsy by means of PDUS and CEUS. A single-center, prospective, transversal, epidemiological study was conducted from January 2010 to January 2014. We consecutively included patients who an imaging study of the prostate with BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS was performed, followed by prostate biopsy due to clinical suspicion of prostate cancer (PSA 4-20ng/mL and/or rectal exam suggestive of malignancy). The diagnostic performance of BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS was determined by calculating the Sensitivity (S), Specificity (Sp), Predictive values (PV), and diagnostic odds ratio (OR) of the diagnosis tests and, for these variables, in the population general and based on their clinical stage according to rectal exam (cT1 and cT2). PCa detection rates determined by means of a randomized 10-core biopsy scheme were compared with detection rates of CEUS-targeted (SonoVue) 2-core biopsies. Of the initial 984 patients, US contrast SonoVue was administered to 179 (18.2%). The PCa detection rate by organ of BMUS/PDUS in the global population was 38% versus 43% in the subpopulation with CEUS. The mean age of the patients was 64.3±7.01years (95% CI, 63.75-64.70); mean total PSA was 8.9±3.61ng/mL (95% CI, 8.67-9.13) and the mean prostate volume was 56.2±29cc (95% CI, 54.2-58.1). The detection rate by organ of targeted biopsy with BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS were as follows: Global population (10.6, 8.2, 24.5%), stage cT1 (5.6, 4.2, 16.4%), and stage cT2 (32.4, 22.3, 43.5%). Comparing the detection rates of the CEUS-targeted biopsy and randomized biopsy, the following results were obtained: Global population (24.5% vs. 41.8%), stage cT1 (16% vs. 35%), and stage cT2 (43.5% vs. 66.6%), with a p value0

  19. Diagnostic performance of power doppler and ultrasound contrast agents in early imaging-based diagnosis of organ-confined prostate cancer: Is it possible to spare cores with contrast-guided biopsy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado Oliva, F.; Arlandis Guzman, S.; Bonillo García, M.; Broseta Rico, E.; Boronat Tormo, F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of gray scale transrectal ultrasound-B-mode US (BMUS), power Doppler (PDUS), and sonographic contrast (CEUS) in early imaging-based diagnosis of localized prostate cancer (PCa) and to compare the diagnostic profitability of randomized biopsy (RB), US-targeted prostate biopsy by means of PDUS and CEUS. Material and methods: A single-center, prospective, transversal, epidemiological study was conducted from January 2010 to January 2014. We consecutively included patients who an imaging study of the prostate with BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS was performed, followed by prostate biopsy due to clinical suspicion of prostate cancer (PSA 4–20 ng/mL and/or rectal exam suggestive of malignancy). The diagnostic performance of BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS was determined by calculating the Sensitivity (S), Specificity (Sp), Predictive values (PV), and diagnostic odds ratio (OR) of the diagnosis tests and, for these variables, in the population general and based on their clinical stage according to rectal exam (cT1 and cT2). PCa detection rates determined by means of a randomized 10-core biopsy scheme were compared with detection rates of CEUS-targeted (SonoVue) 2-core biopsies. Results: Of the initial 984 patients, US contrast SonoVue was administered to 179 (18.2%). The PCa detection rate by organ of BMUS/PDUS in the global population was 38% versus 43% in the subpopulation with CEUS. The mean age of the patients was 64.3 ± 7.01 years (95% CI, 63.75–64.70); mean total PSA was 8.9 ± 3.61 ng/mL (95% CI, 8.67–9.13) and the mean prostate volume was 56.2 ± 29 cc (95% CI, 54.2–58.1). The detection rate by organ of targeted biopsy with BMUS, PDUS, and CEUS were as follows: Global population (10.6, 8.2, 24.5%), stage cT1 (5.6, 4.2, 16.4%), and stage cT2 (32.4, 22.3, 43.5%). Comparing the detection rates of the CEUS-targeted biopsy and randomized biopsy, the following results were obtained: Global population (24.5% vs. 41.8%), stage cT1 (16

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare ... information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures ... Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... Patients may be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), ... imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  5. Characterization of ultrasound elevation beamwidth artifacts for prostate brachytherapy needle insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peikari, Mohammad; Chen, Thomas Kuriran; Lasso, Anras; Heffter, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor; Burdette, Everette C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound elevation beamwidth leads to image artifacts and uncertainties in localizing objects (such as a surgical needle) in ultrasound images. The authors examined the clinical significance of errors caused by elevation beamwidth artifacts and imaging parameters in needle insertion procedures. Methods: Beveled prostate brachytherapy needles were inserted through all holes of a grid template under real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The needle tip position as indicated by the TRUS image was compared to their observed physical location. A new device was developed to measure the ultrasound elevation beamwidth. Results: Imaging parameters of the TRUS scanner have direct impact on the localization error ranging from 0.5 up to 4 mm. The smallest localization error was observed laterally close to the center of the grid template and axially within the beam's focal zone. Largest localization error occurs laterally around both sides of the grid template and axially within the beam's far field. The authors also found that the localization errors vary with both lateral and elevation offsets. Conclusions: The authors found properly adjusting the TRUS imaging settings to lower the ultrasound gain and power effectively minimized the appearance of elevation beamwidth artifacts and in turn reduced the localization errors of the needle tip.

  6. Recursive Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new imaging method, applicable for both 2D and 3D imaging. It is based on Synthetic Transmit Aperture Focusing, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created after every pulse emission. The elements from a linear transducer array emit pulses one after another. The same...... transducer element is used after N-xmt emissions. For each emission the signals from the individual elements are beam-formed in parallel for all directions in the image. A new frame is created by adding the new RF lines to the RF lines from the previous frame. The RF data recorded at the previous emission...... with the same element are subtracted. This yields a new image after each pulse emission and can give a frame rate of e.g. 5000 images/sec. The paper gives a derivation of the recursive imaging technique and compares simulations for fast B-mode imaging with measurements. A low value of N-xmt is necessary...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... graphically, in terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude ( ... turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more frames of the moving pictures ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index ...

  15. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

  18. Highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational control for MRI-guided prostatic thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Anthony B [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Diederich, Chris J [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nau, William H [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gill, Harcharan [Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Bouley, Donna M [Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Daniel, Bruce [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Rieke, Viola [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Butts, R Kim [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sommer, Graham [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-21

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators with highly directional energy deposition and rotational control were investigated for precise treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP). Two types of catheter-based applicators were fabricated, using either sectored tubular (3.5 mm OD x 10 mm) or planar transducers (3.5 mm x 10 mm). They were constructed to be MRI compatible, minimally invasive and allow for manual rotation of the transducer array within a 10 mm cooling balloon. In vivo evaluations of the applicators were performed in canine prostates (n 3) using MRI guidance (0.5 T interventional magnet). MR temperature imaging (MRTI) utilizing the proton resonance frequency shift method was used to acquire multiple-slice temperature overlays in real time for monitoring and guiding the thermal treatments. Post-treatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained tissue sections were used to define regions of tissue coagulation. Single sonications with the tubular applicator ) produced coagulated zones covering a wedge of the prostate extending from 1-2 mm outside the urethra to the outer boundary of the gland (16 mm radial coagulation). Single sonications with the planar applicator (15-20 W, 10 min, {approx}8 MHz) generated thermal lesions of {approx}30 extending to the prostate boundary. Multiple sequential sonications (sweeping) of a planar applicator (12 W with eight rotations of 30 each) demonstrated controllable coagulation of a 270 contiguous section of the prostate extending to the capsule boundary. The feasibility of using highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational capabilities to selectively coagulate regions of the prostate while monitoring and controlling the treatments with MRTI was demonstrated in this study.

  19. Prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasound: how accurate are they in determining prostate carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, John Anthony M.; Pagdanganan, Ernest Jerome A.; Caedo, Florencio Gerardo O.; Magsino, Benjamin C.; Rivera, Eduardo Ll.; Songco, Jaime S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Prostate cancer is an increasing problem. It is the most frequent malignancy in men past the age of 65 years. In the Philippines, 10-20% of males operated for prostatic obstruction had prostate cancer. The potential for cure is optimized by early detection and treatment of organ confined disease. Digital rectal examination, serum prostatic specific antigen and transrectal ultrasound of the prostate have been advocated individually and collectively to determine prostatic cancer. Our study involved forty-nine males who underwent all three screening modalities. Results of the study showed a statistically significant association between the presence of a nodule and occurrence of prostate cancer, a statistically significant association between hardness in consistency and cancer, a statistically significant difference in mean weight between those with Ca and BPH; a statistically significant difference in mean PSA levels between those with Ca and with BPH; statistically significant association between abnormal PSA levels and Ca; and a statistically significant association between a composite positive result and cancer. On the other hand, there was no statistically significant difference in mean age between those with cancer and those with BPH; there is no statistically significant association between the presence of prostatism and whether the patient has Ca or BPH; and there is no statistically significant difference in the mean duration between those with cancer and those with BPH. The study advocates the use of DRE, serum PSA in determining prostatic Ca as well as TRUS for determining occult carcinoma. (Author)

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... they move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler ... Do you have a personal ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on the examination table, the radiologist (a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations) or sonographer will apply a warm water-based gel to the area of the body ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... It’s also used to help guide biopsies, diagnose heart conditions, and assess damage after a heart attack. ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... and unborn child ( fetus ) in pregnant patients eyes thyroid and parathyroid glands scrotum (testicles) brain in infants ...

  4. Poster — Thur Eve — 77: Implanted Brachythearpy Seed Movement due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds upon transrectal US probe removal, providing insight into the underlying prostate deformation and an estimate of the impact on prostate dosimetry. Implanted seed distributions, one obtained with the prostate under probe compression and another with the probe removed, were reconstructed using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate, delineated on ultrasound images, was registered to the fluoroscopy images using seeds and needle tracks identified on ultrasound. A deformation tensor and shearing model was developed to correlate probe-induced seed movement with position. Changes in prostate TG-43 dosimetry were calculated. The model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to estimate the location of the prostate surface in the absence of probe compression. Seed movement patterns upon probe removal reflected elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending. Elastic decompression was characterized by expansion in the anterior-posterior direction and contraction in the superior-inferior and lateral directions. Lateral shearing resulted in large anterior movement for extra-prostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. Whole prostate D90 increased up to 8 Gy, mainly due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing movement increased prostate D90 by 4 Gy, due to increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect of shearing movement on whole prostate D90 was small compared to elastic decompression due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but is expected to have greater consequences for local dose coverage

  5. Prostate resonance imaging: morphology and metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocantos, Jorge A.; Pietrani, Marcelo A.; Paganini, Lisandro

    2007-01-01

    The cancer of prostate is the most frequent neoplasms and the third cause of death in men, although the average of survival of patients it improved, the cancer of prostate is an important problem in health. The majority of these tumors are of slow growth and the early detection allows high probabilities of definitive treatment. The neoplasms of prostate detected at present are smaller than the detected ones 20 years ago behind, nevertheless exist big differences in the aggressiveness of these tumors. The images are very important in the management of prostate cancer, and the magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate is a new tool in the evaluation of prostate cancer [es

  6. Interstitially implanted I125 for prostate cancer using transrectal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenburg, S.; Petersen, J.; Hansen-Peters, I.; Baylinson, W.

    1990-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer among men in the United States. Traditional treatments for prostate cancer are prostatectomy, external beam irradiation, and interstitial implantation of Iodine125 (I125) via laparotomy. These treatments are associated with significant morbidity and limitations. Based on experience with I125 interstitial implantation by transrectal ultrasound guidance for early-stage prostate cancer, it seems that this newer method of treatment has greater accuracy of placement and distribution of the isotope and has had few reported complications. The need for a surgical incision has been eliminated. Hospitalization time also has been decreased, creating the need for ambulatory and inpatient nurses to understand the importance of their respective roles in providing coordinated quality care for these patients. Nurses in these departments must have knowledge of the procedure, radiation safety, and common side effects related to the implant

  7. Non-linear Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang

    .3% relative to the measurement from a 1 inch diameter transducer. A preliminary study for harmonic imaging using synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) has been demonstrated. A wire phantom underwater measurement is made by an experimental synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS......) with a linear array transducer. The second harmonic imaging is obtained by a pulse inversion technique. The received data is beamformed by the SASB using a Beamformation Toolbox. In the measurements the lateral resolution at -6 dB is improved by 66% compared to the conventional imaging algorithm. There is also...... a 35% improvement for the lateral resolution at -6 dB compared with the sole harmonic imaging and a 46% improvement compared with merely using the SASB....

  8. [Prostate cancer detection by assessing stiffness of different tissues using shear wave ultrasound elastog- raphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glybochko, P V; Alyaev, Yu G; Amosov, A V; Krupinov, G E; Ganzha, T M; Vorobev, A V; Lumpov, I S; Semendyaev, R I

    2016-08-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer (PCa) remains a challenging issue. There are studies underway aimed to develop and implement new methods for prostate cancer screening by tumor imaging and obtaining tissue samples from suspicious areas for morphological examination. One of these new methods is shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWUE). The current literature is lacking sufficient coverage of informativeness and specificity of SWUE in the prostate cancer detection, there is no clear criteria for assessing tissue stiffness at different values of PSA and tumor grade, and in prostate hyperplasia and prostatitis. To evaluate the informativeness and specificity of SWUE compared with other diagnostic methods. SWUE has been used in the Clinic of Urology of Sechenov First MSMU since October 2015. During this period, 302 patients were examined using SWUE. SWUE was performed with Aixplorer ultrasound system (Super Sonic Imagine), which provides a single-stage SWUE imaging with both B-mode and real-time mode. The first group (prospective study) included 134 men aged 47 to 81 years with suspected prostate cancer scheduled to either initial or repeat prostate biopsy. PSA levels ranged from 4 to 24 ng/ml. The second group (retrospective study) comprised 120 men with confirmed prostate cancer and PSA levels between 4 and 90 ng/ml. The third group (the control group), comprised 48 healthy men whose PSA level did not exceed 3 ng/ml. All patients of the groups 1 and 2 underwent a standard comprehensive examination. Patients in group 1 were subsequently subjected to transrectal prostate biopsy guided by localization of areas with abnormal tissue stiffness. PCa was detected in 100 of 134 patients. 217 patients of groups 1 and 2 underwent radical prostatectomy. In 28 of them, the match between the cancer location and differentiation in the removed prostate and SWUE findings before surgery was examined. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic organs was performed in 63

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  10. Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Christopher; Barkley, Joel; Smith, Barbara S.

    2018-04-01

    Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging are probe-based imaging modalities with translational potential for use in detecting endometrial diseases. This deep-tissue imaging probe design allows for the retrofitting of commercially available endometrial sampling curettes. The imaging probe presented here has a 2.92-mm diameter and approximate length of 26 cm, which allows for entry into the human endometrial cavity, making it possible to use photoacoustic imaging and high-resolution ultrasound to characterize the uterus. We demonstrate the imaging probes' ability to provide structural information of an excised pig uterus using ultrasound imaging and detect photoacoustic signals at a radial depth of 1 cm.

  11. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions

  12. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  13. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Kay, I [Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior and posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset

  14. Results of vardenafil mediated power Doppler ultrasound, contrast enhanced ultrasound and systematic random biopsies to detect prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Girolamo; Pagni, Riccardo; Mariani, Chiara; Minervini, Riccardo; Morelli, Andrea; Gori, Francesco; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria; Paterni, Marco; Mauro, Eva; Guidi, Elisa; Armillotta, Nicola; Canale, Domenico; Vitti, Paolo; Caramella, Davide; Minervini, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the ability of the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor vardenafil to increase prostate microcirculation during power Doppler ultrasound. We also evaluated the results of contrast and vardenafil enhanced targeted biopsies compared to those of standard 12-core random biopsies to detect cancer. Between May 2008 and January 2010, 150 consecutive patients with prostate specific antigen more than 4 ng/ml at first diagnosis with negative digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound, and no clinical history of prostatitis underwent contrast enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (bolus injection of 2.4 ml SonoVue® contrast agent), followed by vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (1 hour after oral administration of vardenafil 20 mg). All patients underwent standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound guided random prostate biopsy plus 1 further sampling from each suspected hypervascular lesion detected by contrast and vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound. Prostate cancer was detected in 44 patients (29.3%). Contrast and vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound detected suspicious, contrast enhanced and vardenafil enhanced areas in 112 (74.6%) and 110 patients (73.3%), and was diagnostic for cancer in 32 (28.5%) and 42 (38%), respectively. Analysis of standard technique, and contrast and vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound findings by biopsy core showed significantly higher detection using vardenafil vs contrast enhanced power Doppler ultrasound and standard technique (41.2% vs 22.7% and 8.1%, p power Doppler ultrasound was 10% and 11.7% (p not significant). Vardenafil enhanced power Doppler ultrasound enables excellent visualization of the microvasculature associated with cancer and can improve the detection rate compared to contrast enhanced power Doppler ultrasound and the random technique. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MR imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Scheidler, J.; Sommer, B.; Graser, A.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Massmann, J.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer (PC) is developing into an important health care issue in light of the high incidence of PC and the improvements in stage-adapted therapy. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the current role of MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis and staging of PC.Material and methods Pertinent literature was searched and evaluated to collect information on current clinical indications, study techniques, diagnostic value, and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Major indications for MR imaging of patients with supected PC are to define tumor location before biopsy when clinical or TRUS findings are inconclusive, and to provide accurate staging of histologically proven PC to ascertain effective therapy. Current MR imaging techniques for the evaluation of PC include multiplanar high-resolution T2-weighted FSE and T1-weighted SE sequences using combined endorectal and phased-array coils. Using these techniques, the reported accuracy of MR imaging for the diagnosis of extracapsular tumor extension ranges between 82 and 88% with sensitivities between 80 and 95%, and specificities between 82 and 93%. Typical MR findings of PC in different stages of disease, as well as diagnostic problems, such as chronic prostatitis, biopsy-related hemorrhage and therapy-related changes of prostatic tissue are discussed. In addition, the current perspectives and limitations of MR spectroscopy in PC are summarized. Current MR imaging techniques provide important diagnostic information in the pretherapeutic workup of PC including a high staging accuracy, and is superior to TRUS. (orig.) [de

  16. Micromachined Integrated Transducers for Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Mette Funding

    The purpose of this project is to develop capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) for medical imaging. Medical ultrasound transducers used today are fabricated using piezoelectric materials and bulk processing. To fabricate transducers capable of delivering a higher imaging...

  17. Theragnostic ultrasound using microbubbles in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Yoon, Young Il; Bae, Yun Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The use of gas-filled microbubbles in perfusion monitoring as intravascular ultrasound contrast agents has recently become more common. Additionally, microbubbles are employed as carriers of pharmaceutical substances or genes. Microbubbles have great potential to improve the delivery of therapeutic materials into cells and to modify vascular permeability, causing increased extravasation of drugs and drug carriers. Prostate cancer is the most common neoplasm in Europe and America, with an incidence twice to three times that of lung and colorectal cancer. Its incidence is still rising in Asian countries, including Japan and Korea. In this review, we present current strategies regarding the synthesis of microbubbles with targeted ligands on their surfaces, with a focus on prostate cancer.

  18. A compact mechatronic system for 3D ultrasound guided prostate interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Smith, David; Bartha, Laura; Montreuil, Jacques; Sherebrin, Shi; Gardi, Lori; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Fenster, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound imaging has improved the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly higher quality images and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. However, it is critical that the needles be placed accurately within the prostate to deliver the therapy to the planned location and avoid complications of damaging surrounding tissues. Methods: The authors have developed a compact mechatronic system, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This system has been designed to allow guidance of a needle obliquely in 3D space into the prostate, thereby reducing pubic arch interference. The choice of needle trajectory and location in the prostate can be adjusted manually or with computer control. Results: To validate the system, a series of experiments were performed on phantoms. The 3D scan of the string phantom produced minimal geometric error, which was less than 0.4 mm. Needle guidance accuracy tests in agar prostate phantoms showed that the mean error of bead placement was less then 1.6 mm along parallel needle paths that were within 1.2 mm of the intended target and 1 deg. from the preplanned trajectory. At oblique angles of up to 15 deg. relative to the probe axis, beads were placed to within 3.0 mm along a trajectory that were within 2.0 mm of the target with an angular error less than 2 deg. Conclusions: By combining 3D TRUS imaging system to a needle tracking linkage, this system should improve the physician's ability to target and accurately guide a needle to selected targets without the need for the computer to directly manipulate and insert the needle. This would be beneficial as the physician has complete control of the system and can safely maneuver the needle guide around obstacles such as previously placed needles.

  19. Update on ultrasound elastography: Miscellanea. Prostate, testicle, musculo-skeletal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correas, J.M.; Drakonakis, E.; Isidori, A.M.; Hélénon, O.; Pozza, C.; Cantisani, V.; Di Leo, N.; Maghella, F.; Rubini, A.; Drudi, F.M.; D’ambrosio, F.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays ultrasound elastosonography is an established technique, although with limited clinical application, used to assess tissue stiffness, which is a parameter that in most cases is associated with malignancy. However, although a consistent number of articles have been published about several applications of elastosonography, its use in certain human body districts is still not well defined. In this paper we write on the use of elastosonography in prostate, testicle and musculo-skeletal apparatus. We report and compare the work of several authors, different type of elastosonography (shear wave, strain elastography, etc.) and instrumental data obtained in the study of both benign and malignant lesions

  20. Update on ultrasound elastography: Miscellanea. Prostate, testicle, musculo-skeletal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correas, J.M. [Descartes University and Necker University Hospital, Department of Adult Radiology, Paris (France); Drakonakis, E. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom); Isidori, A.M. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); Hélénon, O. [Descartes University and Necker University Hospital, Department of Adult Radiology, Paris (France); Pozza, C. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); Cantisani, V., E-mail: vito.cantisani@uniroma1.it [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Di Leo, N.; Maghella, F.; Rubini, A.; Drudi, F.M.; D’ambrosio, F. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays ultrasound elastosonography is an established technique, although with limited clinical application, used to assess tissue stiffness, which is a parameter that in most cases is associated with malignancy. However, although a consistent number of articles have been published about several applications of elastosonography, its use in certain human body districts is still not well defined. In this paper we write on the use of elastosonography in prostate, testicle and musculo-skeletal apparatus. We report and compare the work of several authors, different type of elastosonography (shear wave, strain elastography, etc.) and instrumental data obtained in the study of both benign and malignant lesions.

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are reviewed. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? For ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. If a Doppler ...

  2. Fused-data transrectal EIT for prostate cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ethan K; Wu, Xiaotian; Halter, Ryan J

    2018-05-25

    Prostate cancer is a significant problem affecting 1 in 7 men. Unfortunately, the diagnostic gold-standard of ultrasound-guided biopsy misses 10%-30% of all cancers. The objective of this study was to develop an electrical impedance tomography (EIT) approach that has the potential to image the entire prostate using multiple impedance measurements recorded between electrodes integrated onto an end-fired transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) device and a biopsy probe (BP). Simulations and sensitivity analyses were used to investigate the best combination of electrodes, and measured tank experiments were used to evaluate a fused-data transrectal EIT (fd-TREIT) and BP approach. Simulations and sensitivity analysis revealed that (1) TREIT measurements are not sufficiently sensitive to image the whole prostate, (2) the combination of TREIT  +  BP measurements increases the sensitive region of TREIT-only measurements by 12×, and (3) the fusion of multiple TREIT  +  BP measurements collected during a routine or customized 12-core biopsy procedure can cover up to 76.1% or 94.1% of a nominal 50 cm 3 prostate, respectively. Three measured tank experiments of the fd-TREIT  +  BP approach successfully and accurately recovered the positions of 2-3 metal or plastic inclusions. The measured tank experiments represent important steps in the development of an algorithm that can combine EIT from multiple locations and from multiple probes-data that could be collected during a routine TRUS-guided 12-core biopsy. Overall, this result is a step towards a clinically deployable impedance imaging approach to scanning the entire prostate, which could significantly help to improve prostate cancer diagnosis.

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound ... joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  8. Ultrasound Imaging of Cystic Nephroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Greco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic nephroma is a rare, benign multicystic lesion of the kidney. This tumor occurs both in children and in adults. In children, it is highly prevalent in males; in adults, it is more frequent in women. The term “cystic nephroma” represents two apparently different entities: pediatric cystic nephroma, a benign form thought to originate from metanephric tissue, and adult cystic nephroma, considered as a lesion of mixed epithelial stromal tumor. The clinical presentation may be a palpable mass or nonspecific symptoms such as abdominal pain, hematuria, and urinary tract infections. In this review, we summarize the ultrasound imaging features of cystic nephroma and describe the characteristics of the most common renal cystic lesions and the differential diagnosis of cystic nephroma with other renal cystic lesions.

  9. Multidisciplinary Functional MR Imaging for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Jang, Yun Jin; Cho, Gyung Goo

    2009-01-01

    Various functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used for evaluating prostate cancer including diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast- enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy. These techniques provide unique information that is helpful to differentiate prostate cancer from non-cancerous tissue and have been proven to improve the diagnostic performance of MRI not only for cancer detection, but also for staging, post-treatment monitoring, and guiding prostate biopsies. However, each functional MR imaging technique also has inherent challenges. Therefore, in order to make accurate diagnoses, it is important to comprehensively understand their advantages and limitations, histologic background related with image findings, and their clinical relevance for evaluating prostate cancer. This article will review the basic principles and clinical significance of functional MR imaging for evaluating prostate cancer

  10. Poster - 09: A MATLAB-based Program for Automated Quality Assurance of a Prostate Brachytherapy Ultrasound System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, Justin; Sabondjian, Eric; Sankreacha, Raxa [University of British Columbia, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Trillium Health Partners – Credit Valley Hospital, Peel Regional Cancer Centre, Mississauga, ON, Trillium Health Partners – Credit Valley Hospital, Peel Regional Cancer Centre, Mississauga, ON, Trillium Health Partners – Credit Valley Hospital, Peel Regional Cancer Centre, Mississauga, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A robust Quality Assurance (QA) program is essential for prostate brachytherapy ultrasound systems due to the importance of imaging accuracy during treatment and planning. Task Group 128 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has recommended a set of QA tests covering grayscale visibility, depth of penetration, axial and lateral resolution, distance measurement, area measurement, volume measurement, and template/electronic grid alignment. Making manual measurements on the ultrasound system can be slow and inaccurate, so a MATLAB program was developed for automation of the described tests. Methods: Test images were acquired using a BK Medical Flex Focus 400 ultrasound scanner and 8848 transducer with the CIRS Brachytherapy QA Phantom – Model 045A. For each test, the program automatically segments the inputted image(s), makes the appropriate measurements, and indicates if the test passed or failed. The program was tested by analyzing two sets of images, where the measurements from the first set were used as baseline values. Results: The program successfully analyzed the images for each test and determined if any action limits were exceeded. All tests passed – the measurements made by the program were consistent and met the requirements outlined by Task Group 128. Conclusions: The MATLAB program we have developed can be used for automated QA of an ultrasound system for prostate brachytherapy. The GUI provides a user-friendly way to analyze images without the need for any manual measurement, potentially removing intra- and inter-user variability for more consistent results.

  11. Poster - 09: A MATLAB-based Program for Automated Quality Assurance of a Prostate Brachytherapy Ultrasound System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, Justin; Sabondjian, Eric; Sankreacha, Raxa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A robust Quality Assurance (QA) program is essential for prostate brachytherapy ultrasound systems due to the importance of imaging accuracy during treatment and planning. Task Group 128 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has recommended a set of QA tests covering grayscale visibility, depth of penetration, axial and lateral resolution, distance measurement, area measurement, volume measurement, and template/electronic grid alignment. Making manual measurements on the ultrasound system can be slow and inaccurate, so a MATLAB program was developed for automation of the described tests. Methods: Test images were acquired using a BK Medical Flex Focus 400 ultrasound scanner and 8848 transducer with the CIRS Brachytherapy QA Phantom – Model 045A. For each test, the program automatically segments the inputted image(s), makes the appropriate measurements, and indicates if the test passed or failed. The program was tested by analyzing two sets of images, where the measurements from the first set were used as baseline values. Results: The program successfully analyzed the images for each test and determined if any action limits were exceeded. All tests passed – the measurements made by the program were consistent and met the requirements outlined by Task Group 128. Conclusions: The MATLAB program we have developed can be used for automated QA of an ultrasound system for prostate brachytherapy. The GUI provides a user-friendly way to analyze images without the need for any manual measurement, potentially removing intra- and inter-user variability for more consistent results.

  12. Stokes polarimetry imaging of dog prostate tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihoon; Johnston, William K., III; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States in 2009. Radical prostatectomy (complete removal of the prostate) is the most common treatment for prostate cancer, however, differentiating prostate tissue from adjacent bladder, nerves, and muscle is difficult. Improved visualization could improve oncologic outcomes and decrease damage to adjacent nerves and muscle important for preservation of potency and continence. A novel Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system was developed and evaluated using a dog prostate specimen in order to examine the feasibility of the system to differentiate prostate from bladder. The degree of linear polarization (DOLP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination at different visible wavelengths (475, 510, and 650 nm) were constructed. The SPI system used the polarization property of the prostate tissue. The DOLP images allowed advanced differentiation by distinguishing glandular tissue of prostate from the muscular-stromal tissue in the bladder. The DOLP image at 650 nm effectively differentiated prostate and bladder by strong DOLP in bladder. SPI system has the potential to improve surgical outcomes in open or robotic-assisted laparoscopic removal of the prostate. Further in vivo testing is warranted.

  13. High-intensity interstitial ultrasound for thermal ablation of focal cancer targets in prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena; Kurhanewicz, John; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in image based techniques such as multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) can provide precise targeting of focal disease in the prostate. Thermal ablation of such cancer targets while avoiding rectum, urethra, neurovascular bundles (NVB) and sphincter is clinically challenging. The approach described here employs multi-element ultrasound linear arrays designed for transperineal placement within prostate. They consist of independently powered sectored tubular transducers (6.5 - 8.0 MHz) that provide spatial control of energy deposition in angle and length. Volumetric ablation strategies were investigated through patient-specific biothermal models based on Pennes bioheat transfer equation. The acoustic and heat transfer models used here have been validated in several previous simulation and experimental studies. Focal disease sites in prostate were identified through multi-parametric MR images of representative patient cases (n=3). Focal cancer lesions and critical anatomy (prostate, urethra, rectum, bladder, seminal vesicles) were manually segmented (Mimics, Materialise) and converted to 3D finite element meshes (3-Matic, Materialise). The chosen test cases consisted of patients with medium and large sized glands and models of bulk tissue ablation covered volumes in a single quadrant in posterior prostate, hemi-gland targets and "hockey-stick" targets (lesions in three quadrants). Ultrasound applicator placement was determined such that devices were positioned along the prostate periphery while avoiding surrounding anatomy. Transducer sector angles were chosen based on applicator location within limits of fabrication practicability. Thermal models were numerically solved using finite element methods (FEM) in COMSOL Multiphysics. Temperature and thermal dose distributions were calculated to determine treated volumes (> 240 CEM43C, >52 °C) and safety profiles (<10 CEM43C, <45 °C) for nerve, rectal and urethral sparing. Modeling studies indicated that focal

  14. Synthetic Aperture Imaging in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Pedersen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    with high precision, and the imaging is easily extended to real-time 3D scanning. This paper presents the work done at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging in the area of SA imaging. Three areas that benefit from SA imaging are described. Firstly a preliminary in-vivo evaluation comparing conventional B...

  15. Protocol for the realization of transrectal prostatic biopsy guided by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arce Montero, Jairo

    2013-01-01

    A general protocol is proposed for the realization of the ultrasound-guided prostatic biopsy in patients with positive screening. The screening should be performed taking into account risk antecedents, rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in the patients. However, patients that have presented without alteration in the PSA and suspect rectal examination, should be considered for biopsy endorectal with ultrasound guidance even more with positive risk factors. The generalities of prostate cancer are described. The general prostatic anatomy and echographic are reviewed. The echographic technique is analyzed in the exploration endorectal. The echographic findings suspects of prostate cancer are characterized. The different biopsy sampling techniques are described; and based on appropriate knowledge of prostatic echographic anatomy, could increase the effectiveness in the early detection of prostate cancer in patients with positive screening. The complications derived from the process are enumerated. The final recommendations are noted on the protocol described [es

  16. Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Christopher; Barkley, Joel; Smith, Barbara

    2018-04-01

    Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging are probe-based imaging modalities with translational potential for use in detecting endometrial diseases. This deep-tissue imaging probe design allows for the retrofitting of commercially available endometrial sampling curettes. The imaging probe presented here has a 2.92-mm diameter and approximate length of 26 cm, which allows for entry into the human endometrial cavity, making it possible to use photoacoustic imaging and high-resolution ultrasound to characterize the uterus. We demonstrate the imaging probes' ability to provide structural information of an excised pig uterus using ultrasound imaging and detect photoacoustic signals at a radial depth of 1 cm. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  17. Ultrasound imaging with a micromotor; Micromotor ni yoru choonpa imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshiro, O.; Salimuzzaman, M.; Matani, A.; Chihara, K. [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Nara (Japan); Asao, M. [Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes a new ultrasound intravascular imaging system. In this system, an ultrasound probe consists of a micromotor, an ultrasound reflecting mirror attached with the micromotor and an ultrasound transducer. Ultrasound is scanned radially by a micromotor instead of a rotation transmitting wire and the rotation of the micromotor is performed and controlled by an external magnetic field. This ultrasound imaging system with a micromotor was applied to observe the inside of blood vessels through in vitro experiments. The preliminary results suggest that this system has the sufficient ability to define the blood vessel morphology and that the simple image processing enhances signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed image. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  18. A Review of Imaging Methods for Prostate Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saradwata Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging is playing an increasingly important role in the detection of prostate cancer (PCa. This review summarizes the key imaging modalities–multiparametric ultrasound (US, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, MRI-US fusion imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET imaging–-used in the diagnosis and localization of PCa. Emphasis is laid on the biological and functional characteristics of tumors that rationalize the use of a specific imaging technique. Changes to anatomical architecture of tissue can be detected by anatomical grayscale US and T2-weighted MRI. Tumors are known to progress through angiogenesis–-a fact exploited by Doppler and contrast-enhanced US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The increased cellular density of tumors is targeted by elastography and diffusion-weighted MRI. PET imaging employs several different radionuclides to target the metabolic and cellular activities during tumor growth. Results from studies using these various imaging techniques are discussed and compared.

  19. Ultrasound and MR imaging of diabetic mastopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.T.; Tse, G.M.K.; Yang, W.T.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To review the imaging findings of diabetic mastopathy, and document the colour flow ultrasound and MR imaging features in this benign condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Diabetic mastopathy was clinically and histologically diagnosed in eight lesions in six women. All six women underwent conventional mammography and high frequency grey-scale ultrasound. Colour flow ultrasound was performed additionally in six lesions in four women and MR imaging in four lesions in three women before biopsy. The imaging findings were reviewed and correlated with final histological diagnosis. RESULTS: Mammography showed regional asymmetric increased opacity with ill-defined margins in all lesions. A heterogeneously hypoechoic mass with ill-defined margins was identified on high frequency grey-scale ultrasound in all lesions. Marked posterior acoustic shadowing was present in seven of eight (88%) lesions. Six lesions interrogated with colour flow ultrasound showed absence of Doppler signal. MR imaging in three women revealed non-specific stromal enhancement. CONCLUSION: Diabetic mastopathy shows absence of Doppler signal on colour flow ultrasound and non-specific stromal enhancement on MR imaging. Wong K.T. et al. (2002)

  20. In vivo optoacoustic temperature imaging for image-guided cryotherapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, E. V.; Brecht, H. P.; Motamedi, M.; Oraevsky, A. A.; Ermilov, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate in vivo the feasibility of optoacoustic temperature imaging during cryotherapy of prostate cancer. We developed a preclinical prototype optoacoustic temperature imager that included pulsed optical excitation at a wavelength of 805 nm, a modified clinical transrectal ultrasound probe, a parallel data acquisition system, image processing and visualization software. Cryotherapy of a canine prostate was performed in vivo using a commercial clinical system, Cryocare® CS, with an integrated ultrasound imaging. The universal temperature-dependent optoacoustic response of blood was employed to convert reconstructed optoacoustic images to temperature maps. Optoacoustic imaging of temperature during prostate cryotherapy was performed in the longitudinal view over a region of 30 mm (long)  ×  10 mm (deep) that covered the rectum, the Denonvilliers fascia, and the posterior portion of the treated gland. The transrectal optoacoustic images showed high-contrast vascularized regions, which were used for quantitative estimation of local temperature profiles. The constructed temperature maps and their temporal dynamics were consistent with the arrangement of the cryoprobe and readouts of the thermal needle sensors. The temporal profiles of the readouts from the thermal needle sensors and the temporal profile estimated from the normalized optoacoustic intensity of the selected vascularized region showed significant resemblance, except for the initial overshoot, that may be explained as a result of the physiological thermoregulatory compensation. The temperature was mapped with errors not exceeding  ±2 °C (standard deviation) consistent with the clinical requirements for monitoring cryotherapy of the prostate. In vivo results showed that the optoacoustic temperature imaging is a promising non-invasive technique for real-time imaging of tissue temperature during cryotherapy of prostate cancer, which can be combined

  1. Ultrasound and MR imaging of acute myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedel, H.; Reimers, C.D.; Vogl, T.; Lissner, J.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrasound and MR imaging are both methods suitable for imaging neuromuscular diseases; however, contrast media like Gd-DTPA are, to our knowledge, not used so far. In this article we report about our experience of the use of Gd-DTPA in imaging myositis. (orig.)

  2. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanter, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  3. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanter, M. [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique (France)

    2015-06-15

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  4. Prostate cancer prediction using the random forest algorithm that takes into account transrectal ultrasound findings, age, and serum levels of prostate-specific antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hong Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of the random forest algorithm that combines data on transrectal ultrasound findings, age, and serum levels of prostate-specific antigen to predict prostate carcinoma. Clinico-demographic data were analyzed for 941 patients with prostate diseases treated at our hospital, including age, serum prostate-specific antigen levels, transrectal ultrasound findings, and pathology diagnosis based on ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of the prostate. These data were compared between patients with and without prostate cancer using the Chi-square test, and then entered into the random forest model to predict diagnosis. Patients with and without prostate cancer differed significantly in age and serum prostate-specific antigen levels (P < 0.001, as well as in all transrectal ultrasound characteristics (P < 0.05 except uneven echo (P = 0.609. The random forest model based on age, prostate-specific antigen and ultrasound predicted prostate cancer with an accuracy of 83.10%, sensitivity of 65.64%, and specificity of 93.83%. Positive predictive value was 86.72%, and negative predictive value was 81.64%. By integrating age, prostate-specific antigen levels and transrectal ultrasound findings, the random forest algorithm shows better diagnostic performance for prostate cancer than either diagnostic indicator on its own. This algorithm may help improve diagnosis of the disease by identifying patients at high risk for biopsy.

  5. The standards of an ultrasound examination of the prostate gland. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz F. Tyloch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the rules of the proper performing of the ultrasound examination of the prostate gland. It has been divided into two parts: the general part and the detailed part. The first part presents the necessary requirements related to the ultrasound equipment needed for performing transabdominal and transrectal examinations of the prostate gland. The second part presents the application of the ultrasound examination in benign prostatic hyperplasia, in cases of prostate inflammation and in prostate cancer. Ultrasound examinations applied in the diagnostics of benign prostatic hyperplasia accelerated the diagnosis, facilitated the qualification to surgery and the selection of the treatment method. The assessment of the size of the prostate gland performed using the endorectal ultrasound examination is helpful in making the choice between transurethral electroresection and adenomectomy. In prostate inflammation this examination should be performed with particular gentleness due to pain ailments. The indication for performing the examination in acute inflammation is the suspicion of prostate abscess. In chronic, exacerbating prostatitis it is possible to perform an intraprostatic antibiotic injection. In the recent years increased morbidity and detectability of prostate gland cancer is observed among men. In Poland it ranks second (13% among diseases occurring in men. The indication for an endorectal examination is the necessity to assess the size of the prostate gland, its configuration, the echostructure in classical ultrasonography, the vascularization in an ultrasound examination performed with power doppler and, if possible, the differences in the gland tissue firmness (consistency in elastography. The ultrasound examination is used for performing the mapping biopsy of the prostate gland – from routine, strictly defined locations, the targeted biopsy – from locations suspected of neoplastic proliferation and the staging biopsy

  6. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect ... biopsies, in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of ... extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine causes of ... are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  18. Virtual ultrasound sources in high-resolution ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    beamforming procedure for 3D ultrasound imaging. The position of the virtual source, and the created waveform are investigated with simulation, and with pulse-echo measurements. There is good agreement between the estimated wavefront and the theoretically tted one. Several examples of the use of virtual...... source elements are considered. Using SAF on data acquired for a conventional linear array imaging improves the penetration depth for the particular imaging situation from 80 to 110 mm. The independent use of virtual source elements in the elevation plane decreases the respective size of the point spread...

  19. Transrectal ultrasound of the prostate bed after collagen injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomon, C.G.; Dudiak, C.M.; Pyle, J.M.; Wheeler, J.S.; Waters, W.B.; Flanigan, R.C. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Transurethral injection of collagen (TCI) may be used to treat urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) findings after TCI are described in this report. TRUS exams of four postprostatectomy patients who had undergone TCI were reviewed. Findings were correlated with pathologic specimens obtained at TRUS-guided core biopsy. These histologic specimens were compared with others from postprostatectomy patients who had not undergone TCI. Well defined bladder apex masses of uniform echogenicity, hypoechoic to adjacent fat and muscle, were identified sonographically in all TCI patients. Masses from which positive biopsies were obtained were similar in appearance to those with no malignant. Hypocellular fibrous tissue and foci of acellular loose connective tissue were identified in the biopsies of those patients who had undergone TCI No acellular areas were identified in specimens from patients who had not had TCI. Sequelae of to should be included in the differential diagnosis of perianastomotic masses in postprostatectomy patients. However, the need for biopsy is not obviated as residual or recurrent prostate carcinoma may coexist. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Transrectal ultrasound in detecting prostate cancer compared with serum total prostate-specific antigen levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamsel, S.; Killi, R.; Demirpolat, G.; Hekimgil, M.; Soydan, S.; Altay, B.

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study to review the efficiency of grey-scale transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) in detecting prostate cancer compared with the data in recent published work, including alternative imaging methods of the prostate gland. Our study group consisted of 830 patients who underwent TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate between May 2000 and June 2004. The relation between abnormal TRUS findings and serum total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) levels was evaluated in patients with prostate cancer who were divided into three different groups according to serum tPSA levels. Group I included patients with tPSA levels of 4-9.9 ng/mL, group II included tPSA levels of 10-19.9 ng/mL and group III included patients with tPSA levels of 20 ng/mL or more. In general, TRUS detected 185 (64%) of 291 cancers with a specificity of 89%, a PPV of 76% and an accuracy of 80%. TRUS findings enabled the correct identification of 22 (56%) of the 39 cancers in group I, 28 (30%) of the 93 cancers in group II and 135 (85%) of the 159 cancers in group III. In conclusion, TRUS alone has a limited potential to identify prostate cancer, especially in patients with tPSA levels lower than 20 ng/mL. Therefore, increased numbers of systematically placed biopsy cores must be taken or alternative imaging methods are required to direct TRUS-guided biopsy for improving prostate cancer detection.

  1. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound biopsy of the prostate in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, L G

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid cancer affecting men in Ireland. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies of the prostate are routinely performed to diagnose prostate cancer. They are, in general, a safe procedure but are associated with a significant risk of infective complications ranging from fever, urinary tract infection to severe urosepsis. At present, there are no recommended national guidelines on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to minimise the risk of infective complications post-TRUS biopsy.

  2. Fast prostate segmentation for brachytherapy based on joint fusion of images and labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy as one of the treatment methods for prostate cancer takes place by implantation of radioactive seeds inside the gland. The standard of care for this treatment procedure is to acquire transrectal ultrasound images of the prostate which are segmented in order to plan the appropriate seed placement. The segmentation process is usually performed either manually or semi-automatically and is associated with subjective errors because the prostate visibility is limited in ultrasound images. The current segmentation process also limits the possibility of intra-operative delineation of the prostate to perform real-time dosimetry. In this paper, we propose a computationally inexpensive and fully automatic segmentation approach that takes advantage of previously segmented images to form a joint space of images and their segmentations. We utilize joint Independent Component Analysis method to generate a model which is further employed to produce a probability map of the target segmentation. We evaluate this approach on the transrectal ultrasound volume images of 60 patients using a leave-one-out cross-validation approach. The results are compared with the manually segmented prostate contours that were used by clinicians to plan brachytherapy procedures. We show that the proposed approach is fast with comparable accuracy and precision to those found in previous studies on TRUS segmentation.

  3. Computer model for harmonic ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Zagzebski, J A

    2000-01-01

    Harmonic ultrasound imaging has received great attention from ultrasound scanner manufacturers and researchers. In this paper, we present a computer model that can generate realistic harmonic images. In this model, the incident ultrasound is modeled after the "KZK" equation, and the echo signal is modeled using linear propagation theory because the echo signal is much weaker than the incident pulse. Both time domain and frequency domain numerical solutions to the "KZK" equation were studied. Realistic harmonic images of spherical lesion phantoms were generated for scans by a circular transducer. This model can be a very useful tool for studying the harmonic buildup and dissipation processes in a nonlinear medium, and it can be used to investigate a wide variety of topics related to B-mode harmonic imaging.

  4. Prostate cancer prediction using the random forest algorithm that takes into account transrectal ultrasound findings, age, and serum levels of prostate-specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li-Hong; Chen, Pei-Ran; Gou, Zhong-Ping; Li, Yong-Zhong; Li, Mei; Xiang, Liang-Cheng; Feng, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of the random forest algorithm that combines data on transrectal ultrasound findings, age, and serum levels of prostate-specific antigen to predict prostate carcinoma. Clinico-demographic data were analyzed for 941 patients with prostate diseases treated at our hospital, including age, serum prostate-specific antigen levels, transrectal ultrasound findings, and pathology diagnosis based on ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of the prostate. These data were compared between patients with and without prostate cancer using the Chi-square test, and then entered into the random forest model to predict diagnosis. Patients with and without prostate cancer differed significantly in age and serum prostate-specific antigen levels (P prostate-specific antigen and ultrasound predicted prostate cancer with an accuracy of 83.10%, sensitivity of 65.64%, and specificity of 93.83%. Positive predictive value was 86.72%, and negative predictive value was 81.64%. By integrating age, prostate-specific antigen levels and transrectal ultrasound findings, the random forest algorithm shows better diagnostic performance for prostate cancer than either diagnostic indicator on its own. This algorithm may help improve diagnosis of the disease by identifying patients at high risk for biopsy.

  5. Online Image-based Monitoring of Soft-tissue Displacements for Radiation Therapy of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Emerging prolonged, hypofractionated radiotherapy regimens rely on high-dose conformality to minimize toxicity and thus can benefit from image guidance systems that continuously monitor target position during beam delivery. To address this need we previously developed, as a potential add-on device for existing linear accelerators, a novel telerobotic ultrasound system capable of real-time, soft-tissue imaging. Expanding on this capability, the aim of this work was to develop and characterize an image-based technique for real-time detection of prostate displacements. Methods and Materials: Image processing techniques were implemented on spatially localized ultrasound images to generate two parameters representing prostate displacements in real time. In a phantom and five volunteers, soft-tissue targets were continuously imaged with a customized robotic manipulator while recording the two tissue displacement parameters (TDPs). Variations of the TDPs in the absence of tissue displacements were evaluated, as was the sensitivity of the TDPs to prostate translations and rotations. Robustness of the approach to probe force was also investigated. Results: With 95% confidence, the proposed method detected in vivo prostate displacements before they exceeded 2.3, 2.5, and 2.8 mm in anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mediolateral directions. Prostate pitch was detected before exceeding 4.7° at 95% confidence. Total system time lag averaged 173 ms, mostly limited by ultrasound acquisition rate. False positives (FPs) (FP) in the absence of displacements did not exceed 1.5 FP events per 10 min of continuous in vivo imaging time. Conclusions: The feasibility of using telerobotic ultrasound for real-time, soft-tissue–based monitoring of target displacements was confirmed in vivo. Such monitoring has the potential to detect small clinically relevant intrafractional variations of the prostate position during beam delivery.

  6. Quality control of system of imaging for rectal ultrasound for implants seed prostate low rate; Control de calidad del sistem de imagen por ecografia rectal para implantes de semillas de prostata de baja tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luquero Llopis, N.; Ferrer Gracia, C.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Serrada Hierro, A.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the objective is the evaluation of the image system used in implants of prostate of low rate held at our hospital, for maximum control on the placement of the seeds in the patient and therefore carried out dosimetry. (Author)

  7. Urinary morbidity following ultrasound-guided transperineal prostate seed implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Potters, Louis; Ashley, Richard; Waldbaum, Robert; Wang Xiaohong; Leibel, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the urinary morbidity experienced by patients undergoing ultrasound-guided, permanent transperineal seed implantation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and September 1997, 693 consecutive patients presented with a diagnosis of clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and were treated with ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent brachytherapy (TPIPB). Ninety-three patients are excluded from this review, having received neoadjuvant antiandrogen therapy. TPIPB was performed with 125 I in 165 patients and with 103 Pd in 435 patients. Patients treated with implant alone received 160 Gy with 125 I (pre TG43) or 120 Gy with 103 Pd. One hundred two patients received preimplant, pelvic external beam radiation (XRT) to a dose of either 41.4 or 45 Gy because of high-risk features including PSA ≥ 10 and/or Gleason score ≥ 7. Combined modality patients received 120 Gy and 90 Gy, respectively for 125 I or 103 Pd. All patients underwent postimplant cystoscopy and placement of an indwelling Foley catheter for 24-48 h. Follow-up was at 5 weeks after implant, every 3 months for the first 2 years, and then every 6 months for subsequent years. Patients completed AUA urinary symptom scoring questionnaires at initial consultation and at each follow-up visit. Urinary toxicity was classified by the RTOG toxicity scale with the following adaptations; grade 1 urinary toxicity was symptomatic nocturia or frequency requiring none or minimal medical intervention such as phenazopyridine; grade 2 urinary toxicity was early obstructive symptomatology requiring alpha-blocker therapy; and grade 3 toxicity was considered that requiring indwelling catheters or posttreatment transurethral resection of the prostate for symptom relief. Log-rank analysis and Chi-square testing was performed to assess AUA score, prostate size, isotope selection, and the addition of XRT as possible prognosticators of

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is ... with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  14. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fis to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fis species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments...... is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fis converted......, a cod (Gadus morhua) was scanned with both a BK Medical ProFocus 2202 ultrasound scanner and a Toshiba Aquilion ONE computed tomography (CT) scanner. The US images of the fis were compared with US images created using the ultrasound simulation program Field II. The center frequency of the transducer...

  15. Automated analysis and interpretation of transrectal ultrasonography images in patients with prostatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Rosette, J. J.; Giesen, R. J.; Huynen, A. L.; Aarnink, R. G.; van Iersel, M. P.; Debruyne, F. M.; Wijkstra, H.

    1995-01-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) offers a valuable complement to digital rectal examination (DRE) in diagnosing prostate diseases. However, in case of prostatitis syndromes, contradictions are found with regard to characteristic ultrasound features in these patients. Therefore we sought for better

  16. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  17. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve the

  18. Assessment of the feasibility of using transrectal ultrasound for postimplant dosimetry in low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Rhian Siân, E-mail: rhian.s.davies@wales.nhs.uk; Perrett, Teresa; Powell, Jane; Barber, Jim; Tanguay, Jacob; Button, Michael; Cochlin, Dennis; Smith, Christian; Lester, Jason Francis

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed to establish whether transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-based postimplant dosimetry (PID) is both practically feasible and comparable to computed tomography (CT)-based PID, recommended in current published guidelines. In total, 22 patients treated consecutively at a single cancer center with low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer had a transrectal ultrasound performed immediately after implant (d0-TRUS) and computed tomography scan 30 days after implant (d30-CT). Postimplant dosimetry planning was performed on both image sets and the results were compared. The interobserver reproducibility of the transrectal ultrasound postimplant dosimetry planning technique was also assessed. It was noticed that there was no significant difference in mean prostate D{sub 90} (136.5 Gy and 144.4 Gy, p = 0.2197), V{sub 100} (86.4% and 89.1%, p = 0.1480) and V{sub 150} (52.0% and 47.8%, p = 0.1657) for d30-CT and d0-TRUS, respectively. Rectal doses were significantly higher for d0-TRUS than d30-CT. Urethral doses were available with d0-TRUS only. We have shown that d0-TRUS PID is a useful tool for assessing the quality of an implant after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy and is comparable to d30-CT PID. There are clear advantages to its use in terms of resource and time efficiency both for the clinical team and the patient.

  19. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue har- monic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a compar- ative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined...... with THI improves the image qual- ity compared to DRF-THI. The major benet of SASB is a reduced bandwidth between the probe and processing unit. A BK Medical 2202 Ultraview ultrasound scanner was used to acquire beamformed RF data for oine evaluation. The acquisition was made interleaved between methods......, and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technol- ogy 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and pen- etration. In-vivo scans were also...

  20. Limited evidence for the use of imaging to detect prostate cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, L.; Carlsson, S.; Gjertsson, P.; Heintz, E.; Hultcrantz, M.; Mejare, I.; Andrén, O.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer, ultrasound guided systematic biopsies is the golden standard for diagnosis. • Diagnostic imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, is being used in trials to aid detection of prostate cancer. • To date, there is insufficient scientific evidence for the use of imaging techniques to detect prostate cancer. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting prostate cancer in patients with elevated PSA-values or suspected findings on clinical examination. Methods: The databases Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, CRD HTA/DARE/NHS EED and EconLit were searched until June 2013. Pre-determined inclusion criteria were used to select full text articles. Risk of bias in individual studies was rated according to QUADAS or AMSTAR. Abstracts and full text articles were assessed independently by two reviewers. The performance of diagnostic imaging was compared with systematic biopsies (reference standard) and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: The literature search yielded 5141 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Of these 4852 were excluded since they did not meet the inclusion criteria. 288 articles were reviewed in full text for quality assessment. Six studies, three using MRI and three using transrectal ultrasound were included. All were rated as high risk of bias. Relevant studies on PET/CT were not identified. Conclusion: Despite clinical use, there is insufficient evidence regarding the accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting cancer in patients with suspected prostate cancer using TRUS guided systematic biopsies as reference standard

  1. Limited evidence for the use of imaging to detect prostate cancer: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, L., E-mail: lennart.k.blomqvist@ki.se [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Carlsson, S. [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna (Sweden); Gjertsson, P. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Heintz, E.; Hultcrantz, M.; Mejare, I. [The Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment, Stockholm (Sweden); Andrén, O. [School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro (Sweden); Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • In men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer, ultrasound guided systematic biopsies is the golden standard for diagnosis. • Diagnostic imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, is being used in trials to aid detection of prostate cancer. • To date, there is insufficient scientific evidence for the use of imaging techniques to detect prostate cancer. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting prostate cancer in patients with elevated PSA-values or suspected findings on clinical examination. Methods: The databases Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, CRD HTA/DARE/NHS EED and EconLit were searched until June 2013. Pre-determined inclusion criteria were used to select full text articles. Risk of bias in individual studies was rated according to QUADAS or AMSTAR. Abstracts and full text articles were assessed independently by two reviewers. The performance of diagnostic imaging was compared with systematic biopsies (reference standard) and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: The literature search yielded 5141 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Of these 4852 were excluded since they did not meet the inclusion criteria. 288 articles were reviewed in full text for quality assessment. Six studies, three using MRI and three using transrectal ultrasound were included. All were rated as high risk of bias. Relevant studies on PET/CT were not identified. Conclusion: Despite clinical use, there is insufficient evidence regarding the accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting cancer in patients with suspected prostate cancer using TRUS guided systematic biopsies as reference standard.

  2. Fast simulation of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2000-01-01

    , and a whole image can take a full day. Simulating 3D images and 3D flow takes even more time. A 3D image of 64 by 64 lines can take 21 days, which is not practical for iterative work. This paper presents a new fast simulation method based on the Field II program. In imaging the same spatial impulse response...

  3. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in liver imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Bang, Nanna

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents were originally introduced to enhance the Doppler signals when detecting vessels with low velocity flow or when imaging conditions were sub-optimal. Contrast agents showed additional properties, it was discovered that a parenchymal enhancement phase in the liver followed the enhancement of the blood pool. Contrast agents have made ultrasound scanning more accurate in detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions and the sensitivity is now comparable with CT and MRI scanning. Further, analysis of the transit time of contrast agent through the liver seems to give information on possible hepatic involvement, not only from focal lesions but also from diffuse benign parenchymal disease. The first ultrasound contrast agents were easily destroyed by the energy from the sound waves but newer agents have proved to last for longer time and hereby enable real-time scanning and make contrast enhancement suitable for interventional procedures such as biopsies and tissue ablation. Also, in monitoring the effect of tumour treatment contrast agents have been useful. A brief overview is given on some possible applications and on different techniques using ultrasound contrast agents in liver imaging. At present, the use of an ultrasound contrast agent that allows real-time scanning with low mechanical index is to be preferred

  4. [Interest using 3D ultrasound and MRI fusion biopsy for prostate cancer detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marien, A; De Castro Abreu, A; Gill, I; Villers, A; Ukimura, O

    2017-09-01

    The strategic therapy for prostate cancer depends on histo-pronostics data, which could be upgraded by obtaining targeted biopsies (TB) with MRI (magnetic resonance imagery) fusion 3D ultrasound. To compare diagnostic yield of image fusion guided prostate biopsy using image fusion of multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) with 3D-TRUS. Between January 2010 and April 2013, 179 consecutive patients underwent outpatient TRUS biopsy using the real-time 3D TRUS tracking system (Urostation™). These patients underwent MRI-TRUS fusion targeted biopsies (TB) with 3D volume data of the MRI elastically fused with 3D TRUS at the time of biopsy. A hundred and seventy-three patients had TBs with fusion. Mean biopsy core per patient were 11.1 (6-14) for SB and 2.4 (1-6) for TB. SBs were positive in 11% compared to 56% for TB (Pperform the higher level of MR/US fusion and should be use for active surveillance. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Prefraction displacement and intrafraction drift of the prostate due to perineal ultrasound probe pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minglun; Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Manapov, Farkhad; Kolberg, Anne; Thum, Patrick Dominik; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Ballhausen, Hendrik [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); University Hospital of LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    In image-guided EBRT of the prostate, transperineal ultrasound (US) probes exert pressure on the perineum both during planning and treatment. Through tissue deformation and relaxation, this causes target and risk organ displacement and drift. In this study, prefraction shift and intrafraction drift of the prostate are quantified during robotic transperineal 4DUS. The position of the prostate was recorded for different positions of the probe before treatment in 10 patients (16 series of measurements). During treatment (15 patients, 273 fractions), intrafraction motion of the prostate was tracked (total of 27 h and 24 min) with the transperineal probe in place. Per 1 mm shift of the US probe in the cranial direction, a displacement of the prostate by 0.42 ± 0.09 mm in the cranial direction was detected. The relationship was found to be linear (R{sup 2} = 0.97) and highly significant (p < 0.0001). After initial contact of the probe and the perineum (no pressure), a shift of the probe of about 5-10 mm was typically necessary to achieve good image quality, corresponding to a shift of the prostate of about 2-4 mm in the cranial direction. Tissue compression and prostate displacement were well visible. During treatment, the prostate drifted at an average rate of 0.075 mm/min in the cranial direction (p = 0.0014). The pressure applied by a perineal US probe has a quantitatively similar impact on prostate displacement as transabdominal pressure. Shifts are predominantly in the cranial direction (typically 2-4 mm) with some component in the anterior direction (typically <1 mm). Slight probe pressure can improve image quality, but excessive probe pressure can distort the surrounding anatomy and potentially move risk organs closer to the high-dose area. (orig.) [German] In der bildgefuehrten Strahlentherapie der Prostata ueben perineale Ultraschallkoepfe waehrend Planung und Behandlung Druck auf das Perineum aus. Durch Gewebedeformation verursacht dies Verschiebungen von

  6. Ultrasound Imaging Methods for Breast Cancer Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozmen, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on modeling acoustic wavefield propagation and implementing imaging algorithms for breast cancer detection using ultrasound. As a starting point, we use an integral equation formulation, which can be used to solve both the forward and inverse problems. This thesis

  7. Lesion Contrast Enhancement in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.; Macovski, A.

    1997-01-01

    Methods for improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of low-contrast lesions in medical ultrasound imaging are described. Differences in the frequency spectra and amplitude distributions of the lesion and its surroundings can be used to increase the CNR of the lesion relative to the background...

  8. High definition ultrasound imaging for battlefield medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, K.S.; Morimoto, A.K.; Kozlowski, D.M.; Krumm, J.C.; Dickey, F.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rogers, B; Walsh, N. [Texas Univ. Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-06-23

    A team has developed an improved resolution ultrasound system for low cost diagnostics. This paper describes the development of an ultrasound based imaging system capable of generating 3D images showing surface and subsurface tissue and bone structures. We include results of a comparative study between images obtained from X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and ultrasound. We found that the quality of ultrasound images compares favorably with those from CT. Volumetric and surface data extracted from these images were within 7% of the range between ultrasound and CT scans. We also include images of porcine abdominal scans from two different sets of animal trials.

  9. Spondylolisthesis Identified Using Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneck, George J; Gard, Andrea N; Fodran, Kimberly A

    2017-12-01

    57-year-old woman was recruited for a research study of muscle activation in persons with low back pain. She described a progressive worsening of left lower lumbar pain, which began 5 years prior without any precipitating incident, and intermittent pain at the left gluteal fold (diagnosed as a proximal hamstring tear 2 years prior). Ultrasound revealed marked anterior displacement of the L3-4 and L4-5 facet joints. The subject was recommended for a radiograph using a lateral recumbent view, which demonstrated a grade II spondylolisthesis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):970. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7363.

  10. Multiparametric MR imaging in diagnosis of chronic prostatitis and its differentiation from prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Sah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic prostatitis is a heterogeneous condition with high prevalence rate. Chronic prostatitis has overlap in clinical presentation with other prostate disorders and is one of the causes of high serum prostate specific antigen (PSA level. Chronic prostatitis, unlike acute prostatitis, is difficult to diagnose reliably and accurately on the clinical grounds alone. Not only this, it is also challenging to differentiate chronic prostatitis from prostate cancer with imaging modalities like TRUS and conventional MR Imaging, as the findings can mimic those of prostate cancer. Even biopsy doesn't play promising role in the diagnosis of chronic prostatitis as it has limited sensitivity and specificity. As a result of this, chronic prostatitis may be misdiagnosed as a malignant condition and end up in aggressive surgical management resulting in increased morbidity. This warrants the need of reliable diagnostic tool which has ability not only to diagnose it reliably but also to differentiate it from the prostate cancer. Recently, it is suggested that multiparametric MR Imaging of the prostate could improve the diagnostic accuracy of the prostate cancer. This review is based on the critically published literature and aims to provide an overview of multiparamateric MRI techniques in the diagnosis of chronic prostatitis and its differentiation from prostate cancer.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also can be used to guide procedures such ... of a testicle limiting proper blood flow into it. top of page How should we prepare for ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  14. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petronek, M; Purysko, A; Balik, S; Ciezki, J; Klein, E; Wilkinson, D [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is utilized intra-operatively for LDR permanent prostate seed implant treatment planning. Prostate contouring with TRUS can be challenging at the apex and base. This study attempts to improve accuracy of prostate contouring with MRI-TRUS fusion to prevent over- or under-estimation of the prostate volume. Methods: 14 patients with previous MRI guided prostate biopsy and undergone an LDR permanent prostate seed implant have been selected. The prostate was contoured on the MRI images (1 mm slice thickness) by a radiologist. The prostate was also contoured on TRUS images (5 mm slice thickness) during LDR procedure by a urologist. MRI and TRUS images were rigidly fused manually and the prostate contours from MRI and TRUS were compared using Dice similarity coefficient, percentage volume difference and length, height and width differences. Results: The prostate volume was overestimated by 8 ± 18% (range: 34% to −25%) in TRUS images compared to MRI. The mean Dice was 0.77 ± 0.09 (range: 0.53 to 0.88). The mean difference (TRUS-MRI) in the prostate width was 0 ± 4 mm (range: −11 to 5 mm), height was −3 ± 6 mm (range: −13 to 6 mm) and length was 6 ± 6 (range: −10 to 16 mm). Prostate was overestimated with TRUS imaging at the base for 6 cases (mean: 8 ± 4 mm and range: 5 to 14 mm), at the apex for 6 cases (mean: 11 ± 3 mm and range: 5 to 15 mm) and 1 case was underestimated at both base and apex by 4 mm. Conclusion: Use of intra-operative TRUS and MRI image fusion can help to improve the accuracy of prostate contouring by accurately accounting for prostate over- or under-estimations, especially at the base and apex. The mean amount of discrepancy is within a range that is significant for LDR sources.

  16. SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petronek, M; Purysko, A; Balik, S; Ciezki, J; Klein, E; Wilkinson, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is utilized intra-operatively for LDR permanent prostate seed implant treatment planning. Prostate contouring with TRUS can be challenging at the apex and base. This study attempts to improve accuracy of prostate contouring with MRI-TRUS fusion to prevent over- or under-estimation of the prostate volume. Methods: 14 patients with previous MRI guided prostate biopsy and undergone an LDR permanent prostate seed implant have been selected. The prostate was contoured on the MRI images (1 mm slice thickness) by a radiologist. The prostate was also contoured on TRUS images (5 mm slice thickness) during LDR procedure by a urologist. MRI and TRUS images were rigidly fused manually and the prostate contours from MRI and TRUS were compared using Dice similarity coefficient, percentage volume difference and length, height and width differences. Results: The prostate volume was overestimated by 8 ± 18% (range: 34% to −25%) in TRUS images compared to MRI. The mean Dice was 0.77 ± 0.09 (range: 0.53 to 0.88). The mean difference (TRUS-MRI) in the prostate width was 0 ± 4 mm (range: −11 to 5 mm), height was −3 ± 6 mm (range: −13 to 6 mm) and length was 6 ± 6 (range: −10 to 16 mm). Prostate was overestimated with TRUS imaging at the base for 6 cases (mean: 8 ± 4 mm and range: 5 to 14 mm), at the apex for 6 cases (mean: 11 ± 3 mm and range: 5 to 15 mm) and 1 case was underestimated at both base and apex by 4 mm. Conclusion: Use of intra-operative TRUS and MRI image fusion can help to improve the accuracy of prostate contouring by accurately accounting for prostate over- or under-estimations, especially at the base and apex. The mean amount of discrepancy is within a range that is significant for LDR sources.

  17. Effect of using different U/S probe Standoff materials in image geometry for interventional procedures: the example of prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Dimos Baltas; George Sakas; Pawel Zogal; Vasiliki Kefala; Zaira Katsilieri; Saeed Butt; Natasa Milickovic; Stefanos Diamantopoulos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study investigates the distortion of geometry of catheters and anatomy in acquired U/S images, caused by utilizing various stand-off materials for covering a transrectal bi-planar ultrasound probe in HDR and LDR prostate brachytherapy, biopsy and other interventional procedures. Furthermore, an evaluation of currently established water-bath based quality assurance (QA) procedures is presented. Material and methods Image acquisitions of an ultrasound QA setup were carried out at 5...

  18. Sampling system for in vivo ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Mathorne, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Newly developed algorithms for processing medical ultrasound images use the high frequency sampled transducer signal. This paper describes demands imposed on a sampling system suitable for acquiring such data and gives details about a prototype constructed. It acquires full clinical images...... at a sampling frequency of 20 MHz with a resolution of 12 bits. The prototype can be used for real time image processing. An example of a clinical in vivo image is shown and various aspects of the data acquisition process are discussed....

  19. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth using doxorubicin assisted by ultrasound-targeted nanobubble destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan X

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaozhou Fan,1,* Luofu Wang,2,* Yanli Guo,1 Xingyu Xiong,1 Lianhua Zhu,1 Kejing Fang1 1Department of Ultrasound, Southwest Hospital, 2Department of Urology, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Ultrasound (US-targeted microbubble destruction has been widely used as an effective drug-delivery system. However, nanobubbles (NBs have better stability and stronger penetration than microbubbles, and drug delivery assisted by US-targeted NB destruction (UTND still needs to be investigated. Our aim was to investigate the effect of doxorubicin (DOX on the inhibition of prostate cancer growth under UTND. Contrast-enhanced US imaging of transplanted PC3 prostate cancer in mice showed that under a combination of 1 W/cm2 US power and a 100 Hz intermittent pulse with a “5 seconds on, 5 seconds off” mode, NBs with an average size of (485.7±33 nm were effectively destroyed within 15 minutes in the tumor location. PC3 cells and 20 tumor-bearing mice were divided into four groups: a DOX group, a DOX + NB group, a DOX + US group, and a DOX + NB + US group. The cell growth-inhibition rate and DOX concentration of xenografts in the DOX + NB + US group were highest. Based on another control group and these four groups, another 25 tumor-bearing mice were used to observe the treatment effect of nine DOX injections under UTND. The xenografts in the DOX + NB + US group decreased more obviously and had more cellular apoptosis than other groups. Finally, electron microscopy was used to estimate the cavitation effect of NBs under US irradiation in the control group, NB group, US group, and NB + US group. The results of scanning electron microscopy showed that PC3 cells in the DOX + NB + US group had more holes and significantly increased cell-surface folds. Meanwhile, transmission electric microscopy confirmed that more lanthanum nitrate particles entered

  20. The effect of androgen deprivation on the early changes in prostate volume following transperineal ultrasound guided interstitial therapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Richard; Broderick, Gregory A; Arger, Peter; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Epperson, Robert D; Arjomandy, Bijan; Kassaee, Alireza

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the change in volume of the prostate as a result of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation prior to prostate implant and in the early postimplant period following transperineal ultrasound guided palladium-103 brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine men received 3 to 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy followed by treatment planning ultrasound followed 4 to 8 weeks later by palladium-103 implant of the prostate. All patients had clinical and radiographic stage T1c-T2b adenocarcinoma of the prostate. A second ultrasound study was carried out 11 to 13 days following the implant to determine the change in volume of the prostate as a result of the implant. The prehormonal and preimplant volumes were compared to the postimplant volume to determine the effect of hormones and brachytherapy on prostate volume. Results: The median decrease in prostate volume as a result of androgen deprivation was 33% among the 54 patients with prostate volume determinations prior to hormonal therapy. The reduction in volume was greatest in the quartile of men with the largest initial gland volume (59%) and least in the quartile of men with smallest glands (10%). The median reduction in prostate volume between the treatment planning ultrasound and the follow-up study after implant was 3%, but 23 (33%) patients had an increase in prostate volume, including 16 (23%) who had an increase in volume >20%; 11 of these patients (16%) had an increase in volume >30%. The time course of development and resolution of this edema is not known. The severity of the edema was not related to initial or preimplant prostate volume or duration of hormonal therapy. Conclusions: Prostate edema may significantly affect the dose delivered to the prostate following transperineal ultrasound guided brachytherapy. The effect on the actual delivered dose will be greater when shorter lived isotopes are used. It remains to be observed whether this edema will

  1. Giant prostatic utricle (utriculus masculinis): diagnostic imaging and surgical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatina, O.A.; Berry, T.T.; Spottswood, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    The prostatic utricle is an embryological remnant of the Mullerian duct system. It is often revealed incidentally on voiding cystourethrography in young males undergoing evaluation for possible vesicoureteral reflux. We present the case of a very large prostatic utricle found incidentally on ultrasound evaluation in a 4-year-old boy with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections. (orig.)

  2. Why and Where do We Miss Significant Prostate Cancer with Multi-parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging followed by Magnetic Resonance-guided and Transrectal Ultrasound-guided Biopsy in Biopsy-naïve Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Martijn G; van der Leest, Marloes; Pokorny, Morgan; Hoogenboom, Martijn; Barentsz, Jelle O; Thompson, Les C; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of significant prostate (sPCa) locations being missed with magnetic resonance (MR)- and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy (Bx) may help to improve these techniques. To identify the location of sPCa lesions being missed with MR- and TRUS-Bx. In a referral center, 223 consecutive Bx-naive men with elevated prostate specific antigen level and/or abnormal digital rectal examination were included. Histopathologically-proven cancer locations, Gleason score, and tumor length were determined. All patients underwent multi-parametric MRI and 12-core systematic TRUS-Bx. MR-Bx was performed in all patients with suspicion of PCa on multi-parametric MRI (n=142). Cancer locations were compared between MR- and TRUS-Bx. Proportions were expressed as percentages, and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. In total, 191 lesions were found in 108 patients with sPCa. From these lesion 74% (141/191) were defined as sPCa on either MR- or TRUS-Bx. MR-Bx detected 74% (105/141) of these lesions and 61% (86/141) with TRUS-Bx. TRUS-Bx detected more lesions compared with MR-Bx (140 vs 109). However, these lesions were often low risk (39%). Significant lesions missed with MR-Bx most often had involvement of dorsolateral (58%) and apical (37%) segments and missed segments with TRUS-Bx were located anteriorly (79%), anterior midprostate (50%), and anterior apex (23%). Both techniques have difficulties in detecting apical lesions. MR-Bx most often missed cancer with involvement of the dorsolateral part (58%) and TRUS-Bx with involvement of the anterior part (79%). Both biopsy techniques miss cancer in specific locations within the prostate. Identification of these lesions may help to improve these techniques. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Inter- and Intra-Observer Variability in Prostate Definition With Tissue Harmonic and Brightness Mode Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur; Dunscombe, Peter; Meyer, Tyler; Pavamani, Simon; Khan, Rao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. Results: A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p < 0.001) in prostate volumes and areas. Inter- and intraobserver consistency was quantified as the standard deviation of mean volumes and areas, and concordance indices. It was found that for small glands (≤35 cc) H mode provided greater interobserver consistency; however, for large glands (≥35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. Conclusions: H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates.

  4. Ultrasound strain imaging using Barker code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Tie, Juhong; Guo, Dequan

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound strain imaging is showing promise as a new way of imaging soft tissue elasticity in order to help clinicians detect lesions or cancers in tissues. In this paper, Barker code is applied to strain imaging to improve its quality. Barker code as a coded excitation signal can be used to improve the echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR) in ultrasound imaging system. For the Baker code of length 13, the sidelobe level of the matched filter output is -22dB, which is unacceptable for ultrasound strain imaging, because high sidelobe level will cause high decorrelation noise. Instead of using the conventional matched filter, we use the Wiener filter to decode the Barker-coded echo signal to suppress the range sidelobes. We also compare the performance of Barker code and the conventional short pulse in simulation method. The simulation results demonstrate that the performance of the Wiener filter is much better than the matched filter, and Baker code achieves higher elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe) than the short pulse in low eSNR or great depth conditions due to the increased eSNR with it.

  5. [Intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgesner, T; Danse, E; Tombal, B

    2013-09-01

    Hematuria is one of the most frequent minor complications after prostatic biopsy. We would like to report the case of a 68-year-old patient with massive hematuria after prostatic biopsy and intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasonography. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare ... information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures ... Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... Patients may be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water- ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... imaging of the abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear ...

  9. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis; Vitry, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level >0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir+2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future. (orig.)

  10. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Nord (France); Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); INSERM U 556, Lyon (France); Vitry, Thierry [Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France)

    2010-05-15

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level >0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir+2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future. (orig.)

  11. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  12. Synthetic aperture tissue and flow ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav

    imaging applied to medical ultrasound. It is divided into two major parts: tissue and blood flow imaging. Tissue imaging using synthetic aperture algorithms has been investigated for about two decades, but has not been implemented in medical scanners yet. Among the other reasons, the conventional scanning...... and beamformation methods are adequate for the imaging modalities in clinical use - the B-mode imaging of tissue structures, and the color mapping of blood flow. The acquisition time, however, is too long, and these methods fail to perform real-time three-dimensional scans. The synthetic transmit aperture......, on the other hand, can create a Bmode image with as little as 2 emissions, thus significantly speeding-up the scan procedure. The first part of the dissertation describes the synthetic aperture tissue imaging. It starts with an overview of the efforts previously made by other research groups. A classification...

  13. Molecular ultrasound imaging: current status and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.; Needles, A.; Willmann, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionising irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound systems, the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic.

  14. Deconvolution of in vivo ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1990-01-01

    In an ultrasound image, the influence of the pulse and attenuation should be removed from the picture in order to display a more consistent and uniform image. The author describes an algorithm to remove the influence of the attenuated pulse on the image. The algorithm takes into account the varying...... pulse, noise in the acquired signal, and the changing reflectivity in the tissue. Both one- and two-dimensional processing can be implemented. The algorithm relies on prior knowledge of the pulse and of the covariance of the noise and the reflections. Algorithms to estimate these factors are given...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's ( ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your child's ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to have your child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's size, two hours prior ... improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's size, two hours prior to the exam and ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), ...

  5. Real-time virtual sonography for navigation during targeted prostate biopsy using magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Kimura, Tomokazu; Suetomi, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Irie, Toshiyuki; Kondoh, Masanao; Mitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the medical navigation technique, namely, Real-time Virtual Sonography (RVS), for targeted prostate biopsy. Eighty-five patients with suspected prostate cancer lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. All selected patients had at least one negative result on the previous transrectal biopsies. The acquired MRI volume data were loaded onto a personal computer installed with RVS software, which registers the volumes between MRI and real-time ultrasound data for real-time display. The registered MRI images were displayed adjacent to the ultrasonographic sagittal image on the same computer monitor. The suspected lesions on T2-weighted images were marked with a red circle. At first suspected lesions were biopsied transperineally under real-time navigation with RVS and then followed by the conventional transrectal and transperineal biopsy under spinal anesthesia. The median age of the patients was 69 years (56-84 years), and the prostate-specific antigen level and prostate volume were 9.9 ng/mL (4.0-34.2) and 37.2 mL (18-141), respectively. Prostate cancer was detected in 52 patients (61%). The biopsy specimens obtained using RVS revealed 45/52 patients (87%) positive for prostate cancer. A total of 192 biopsy cores were obtained using RVS. Sixty-two of these (32%) were positive for prostate cancer, whereas conventional random biopsy revealed cancer only in 75/833 (9%) cores (P<0.01). Targeted prostate biopsy with RVS is very effective to diagnose lesions detected with MRI. This technique only requires additional computer and RVS software and thus is cost-effective. Therefore, RVS-guided prostate biopsy has great potential for better management of prostate cancer patients. (author)

  6. Imaging and intervention in prostate cancer: Current perspectives and future trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the commonest malignancy in men that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Screening by digital rectal examination (DRE and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA is used despite its limitations. Gray-scale transrectal ultrasound (TRUS, used to guide multiple random prostatic biopsies, misses up to 20% cancers and frequently underestimates the grade of malignancy. Increasing the number of biopsy cores marginally increases the yield. Evolving techniques of real-time ultrasound elastography (RTE and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS are being investigated to better detect and improve the yield by allowing "targeted" biopsies. Last decade has witnessed rapid developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for improved management of prostate cancer. In addition to the anatomical information, it is capable of providing functional information through diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI. Multi-parametric MRI has the potential to exclude a significant cancer in majority of cases. Inclusion of MRI before prostatic biopsy can reduce the invasiveness of the procedure by limiting the number of cores needed to make a diagnosis and support watchful waiting in others. It is made possible by targeted biopsies as opposed to random. With the availability of minimally invasive therapeutic modalities like high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU and interstitial laser therapy, detecting early cancer is even more relevant today. [18F]--fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 FDG PET/CT has no role in the initial evaluation of prostate cancer. Choline PET has been recently found to be more useful. Fluoride-PET has a higher sensitivity and resolution than a conventional radionuclide bone scan in detecting skeletal metastases.

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Fusion Guided Targeted Biopsy Evaluated by Transperineal Template Saturation Prostate Biopsy for the Detection and Characterization of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Ashkan; Märzendorfer, Olivia; Donati, Olivio F; Rizzi, Gianluca; Rupp, Niels J; Wettstein, Marian S; Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Hermanns, Thomas; Eberli, Daniel

    2018-02-21

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging/transrectal ultrasound fusion guided targeted biopsy against that of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy to detect prostate cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 415 men who consecutively presented for prostate biopsy between November 2014 and September 2016 at our tertiary care center. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 3 Tesla device without an endorectal coil, followed by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy with the BiopSee® fusion system. Additional fusion guided targeted biopsy was done in men with a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, defined as Likert score 3 to 5. Any Gleason pattern 4 was defined as clinically significant prostate cancer. The detection rates of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and fusion guided targeted biopsy were compared with the detection rate of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy using the McNemar test. We obtained a median of 40 (range 30 to 55) and 3 (range 2 to 4) transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and fusion guided targeted biopsy cores, respectively. Of the 124 patients (29.9%) without a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging 32 (25.8%) were found to have clinically significant prostate cancer on transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy. Of the 291 patients (70.1%) with a Likert score of 3 to 5 clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 129 (44.3%) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging fusion guided targeted biopsy, in 176 (60.5%) by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and in 187 (64.3%) by the combined approach. Overall 58 cases (19.9%) of clinically significant prostate cancer would have been missed if fusion guided targeted biopsy had been performed exclusively. The sensitivity of

  9. The Lunula: An ultrasound imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Ahn, Joong Mo

    2001-01-01

    The lunula is the white, half-moon-shaped area seen on some, but not all nails. Usually the lunula is the topographic marker of the distal part of the nail matrix, and known to have the ability of nail production. Ultrasonographic imaging of the lunula has not been reported before. This study was undertaken to demonstrate normal ultrasonographic features of the lunula. Ultrasonographic examination of the lunula was performed in the right thumb of 20 healthy volunteers (10M, 10F, mean age 30, range 26-36 years) with a real-time, high-resolution ultrasound unit (Sequoia 512, Acuson, Mountain view, CA, USA) with 8-15 MHz linear transducers. Gray scale color, and special Doppler imagings were performed with longitudinal scanning. The lunula was not seen inspection in three of the 20 volunteers. The mean size of the lunula in the other 17 volumteen was 3.31 ± 1.24 mm (range 2-6.2 mm). Gray scale ultrasound imaging showed the lunula; ovoid shaped hypo-echoic zone in proximal fingernail in 18 of 20 volunteers (mean size, 6.74 ± 0.98 mm, range 5-8.8 mm). In two of 20 volunteers, the lunula was indistinct on gray scale ultrasound examination. However, all lunula were identifiable on color Doppler imaging by detecting vascularity within the lunula. Spectral wave pattern of the lunula was a bi-directional pulsatile wave. Peak velocity was within 5-15 m/sec (mean 8 m/sec). The lunula is identifiable on ultrasound examination as a hyper-vascular, ovoid shaped, hypo-echoic zone in proximal fingernail. This normal structure should not be misinterpreted as an abnormal sub-ungual lesion.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... they move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). ... Do you have a personal ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an examination table that can be tilted or moved. Patients may be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsies may improve diagnosis in biopsy-naive men with suspicion of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Mads Dochedahl; Balslev, Ingegerd; Boesen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate whether a short prostate biparametric magnetic resonance imaging (bp-MRI) protocol provides a valuable diagnostic addition for biopsy guidance in biopsy-naive men with a suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: A total of 62...... biopsy-naive patients referred to a systematic transrectal ultrasound biopsy (TRUS-bx) due to suspicion of PCa were prospectively enrolled. Bp-MRI was performed before biopsy. All lesions were scored according to the modified Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2. All patients...

  14. Implementation and utility of a daily ultrasound-based localization system with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morr, Jody; DiPetrillo, Thomas; Tsai, J.-S.; Engler, Mark; Wazer, David E. MD.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of daily computer-assisted transabdominal ultrasonography for target position verification in the setting of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated using a sequential tomotherapy IMRT technique (Peacock) and daily computer-assisted transabdominal ultrasonography (BAT) for target localization. Patients were instructed to maintain a full bladder and were placed in the supine position using triangulation tattoos and a leg immobilizer to minimize pelvic rotation. The BAT ultrasound system is docked to the treatment collimator and electronically imports the CT simulation target contours and isocenter. The system is able to use the machine isocenter as a reference point to overlay the corresponding CT contours onto the ultrasound images captured in the transverse and sagittal planes. A touch screen menu is used to maneuver the CT contours in three dimensions such that they match the ultrasound images. The system then displays the three-dimensional couch shifts required to produce field alignment. Data were prospectively collected to measure the frequency by which useful ultrasound images were obtained, the amount of time required for localization/setup, and the direction/magnitude of the positional adjustments. Results: Of the 23 patients, the BAT ultrasound system produced images of sufficient quality to perform the overlay of the CT contours in 19 patients such that positional verification could be reliably performed. Poor image quality was associated with patient inability to maintain a full bladder, large body habitus, or other anatomic constraints. Of the 19 assessable patients, a total of 185 treatment alignments were performed (mean 8.8/patient). For all cases, the average time required for the daily ultrasound imaging and positional adjustments was 11.9 min. After the initial 5 cases, the user

  15. Inter- and intra-observer variability in prostate definition with tissue harmonic and brightness mode imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur; Dunscombe, Peter; Meyer, Tyler; Pavamani, Simon; Khan, Rao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p standard deviation of mean volumes and areas, and concordance indices. It was found that for small glands (≤35 cc) H mode provided greater interobserver consistency; however, for large glands (≥35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Contrast-enhanced versus systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate cancer detection: An overview of techniques and a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijmink, Stijn W.T.P.J.; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of the current conventional and contrast-specific transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) techniques for prostate imaging that may be used for guiding biopsy. Subsequently, a systematic literature search resulted in inclusion of four studies that directly compared systematic and contrast-enhanced-targeted TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. All four studies revealed that contrast-enhanced-targeted TRUS-guided biopsy significantly improved the positive biopsy core rate. In the largest study, the mean Gleason score of the contrast-enhanced-targeted TRUS-guided biopsies was significantly higher than that of the systematic biopsies. Future randomized clinical trials, preferably in a non-academic multi-institutional set-up, will have to be performed to confirm the value of contrast-enhanced-targeted TRUS-guided biopsy in regular clinical practice

  17. Spatial filters for focusing ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, Paola

    2001-01-01

    , but the approach always yields point spread functions better or equal to a traditional dynamically focused image. Finally, the process was applied to in-vivo clinical images of the liver and right kidney from a 28 years old male. The data was obtained with a single element transducer focused at 100 mm....... A new method for making spatial matched filter focusing of RF ultrasound data is proposed based on the spatial impulse response description of the imaging. The response from a scatterer at any given point in space relative to the transducer can be calculated, and this gives the spatial matched filter...... for synthetic aperture imaging for single element transducers. It is evaluated using the Field II program. Data from a single 3 MHz transducer focused at a distance of 80 mm is processed. Far from the transducer focal region, the processing greatly improves the image resolution: the lateral slice...

  18. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-04: Evaluation of Changes in Quantitative Ultrasound Parameters During Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, M; El Kaffas, A; Han, B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Cooper, D [Elekta Inc., Montreal, QC (Canada); Hancock, S; Hristov, D

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Clarity Autoscan ultrasound monitoring system allows acquisition of raw radiofrequency (RF) ultrasound data prior and during radiotherapy. This enables the computation of 3D Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) tissue parametric maps from. We aim to evaluate whether QUS parameters undergo changes with radiotherapy and thus potentially be used as early predictors and/or markers of treatment response in prostate cancer patients. Methods: In-vivo evaluation was performed under IRB protocol to allow data collection in prostate patients treated with VMAT whereby prostate was imaged through the acoustic window of the perineum. QUS spectroscopy analysis was carried out by computing a tissue power spectrum normalized to the power spectrum obtained from a quartz to remove system transfer function effects. A ROI was selected within the 3D image volume of the prostate. Because longitudinal registration was optimal, the same features could be used to select ROIs at roughly the same location in images acquired on different days. Parametric maps were generated within the rectangular ROIs with window sizes that were approximately 8 times the wavelength of the ultrasound. The mid-band fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS) and spectral intercept (SI) QUS parameters were computed for each window within the ROI and displayed as parametric maps. Quantitative parameters were obtained by averaging each of the spectral parameters over the whole ROI. Results: Data was acquired for over 21 treatment fractions. Preliminary results show changes in the parametric maps. MBF values decreased from −33.9 dB to −38.7 dB from pre-treatment to the last day of treatment. The spectral slope increased from −1.1 a.u. to −0.5 a.u., and spectral intercept decreased from −28.2 dB to −36.3 dB over the 21 treatment regimen. Conclusion: QUS parametric maps change over the course of treatment which warrants further investigation in their potential use for treatment planning and predicting treatment

  19. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-04: Evaluation of Changes in Quantitative Ultrasound Parameters During Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, M; El Kaffas, A; Han, B; Cooper, D; Hancock, S; Hristov, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Clarity Autoscan ultrasound monitoring system allows acquisition of raw radiofrequency (RF) ultrasound data prior and during radiotherapy. This enables the computation of 3D Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) tissue parametric maps from. We aim to evaluate whether QUS parameters undergo changes with radiotherapy and thus potentially be used as early predictors and/or markers of treatment response in prostate cancer patients. Methods: In-vivo evaluation was performed under IRB protocol to allow data collection in prostate patients treated with VMAT whereby prostate was imaged through the acoustic window of the perineum. QUS spectroscopy analysis was carried out by computing a tissue power spectrum normalized to the power spectrum obtained from a quartz to remove system transfer function effects. A ROI was selected within the 3D image volume of the prostate. Because longitudinal registration was optimal, the same features could be used to select ROIs at roughly the same location in images acquired on different days. Parametric maps were generated within the rectangular ROIs with window sizes that were approximately 8 times the wavelength of the ultrasound. The mid-band fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS) and spectral intercept (SI) QUS parameters were computed for each window within the ROI and displayed as parametric maps. Quantitative parameters were obtained by averaging each of the spectral parameters over the whole ROI. Results: Data was acquired for over 21 treatment fractions. Preliminary results show changes in the parametric maps. MBF values decreased from −33.9 dB to −38.7 dB from pre-treatment to the last day of treatment. The spectral slope increased from −1.1 a.u. to −0.5 a.u., and spectral intercept decreased from −28.2 dB to −36.3 dB over the 21 treatment regimen. Conclusion: QUS parametric maps change over the course of treatment which warrants further investigation in their potential use for treatment planning and predicting treatment

  20. Prebiopsy magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Jagannathan, N.R.; Thulkar, S.; Kumar, R.

    2012-01-01

    Existing screening investigations for the diagnosis of early prostate cancer lack specificity, resulting in a high negative biopsy rate. There is increasing interest in the use of various magnetic resonance methods for improving the yield of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies of the prostate in men suspected to have prostate cancer. We review the existing status of such investigations. A literature search was carried out using the Pubmed database to identify articles related to magnetic resonance methods for diagnosing prostate cancer. References from these articles were also extracted and reviewed. Recent studies have focused on prebiopsy magnetic resonance investigations using conventional magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, magnetization transfer imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the prostate. This marks a shift from the earlier strategy of carrying out postbiopsy magnetic resonance investigations. Prebiopsy magnetic resonance investigations has been useful in identifying patients who are more likely to have a biopsy positive for malignancy. Prebiopsy magnetic resonance investigations has a potential role in increasing specificity of screening for early prostate cancer. It has a role in the targeting of biopsy sites, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and predicting the outcome of biopsies. (author)