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Sample records for types of concrete

  1. Effect of filler types on physical, mechanical and microstructure of self compacting concrete and Flow-able concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafez E. Elyamany

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of various filler types on the fresh and hardened properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC and Flow-able concrete. For this purpose, two groups of fillers were selected. The first group was pozzolanic fillers (silica fume and metakaolin while the second group was non-pozzolanic fillers (limestone powder, granite dust and marble dust. Cement contents of 400 kg/m3 and 500 kg/m3 were considered while the used filler material was 7.5%, 10% and 15%. Slump and slump flow, T50, sieve stability and bleeding tests were performed on fresh concrete. The studied hardened properties included unit weight, voids ratio, porosity, and water absorption and cube compressive strength. In addition, thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electronic microscope were performed. The test results showed that filler type and content have significant effect on fresh concrete properties where non-pozzolanic fillers improve segregation and bleeding resistance. Generally, filler type and content have significant effect on unit weight, water absorption and voids ratio. In addition, non-pozzolanic fillers have insignificant negative effect on concrete compressive strength. Finally, there was a good correlation between fresh concrete properties and hardened concrete properties for SCC and Flow-able concrete.

  2. Transient thermal creep of nuclear reactor pressure vessel type concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The immediate aim of the research was to study the transient thermal strain behaviour of four AGR type nuclear reactor concretes during first time heating in an unsealed condition to 600 deg. C. The work being also relevant to applications of fire exposed concrete structures. The programme was, however, expanded to serve a second more theoretical purpose, namely the further investigation of the strain development of unsealed concrete under constant, transient and cyclic thermal states in particular and the effect of elevated temperatures on concrete in general. The range of materials investigated included seven different concretes and three types of cement paste. Limestone, basalt, gravel and lightweight aggregates were employed as well as OPC and SRC cements. Cement replacements included pfa and slag. Test variables comprised two rates of heating (0.2 and 1 deg. C/minute), three initial moisture contents (moist as cast, air-dry and oven dry at 105 deg. C), two curing regimes (bulk of tests represented mass cured concrete), five stress levels (0, 10, 20, 30 and a few tests at 60% of the cold strength), two thermal cycles and levels of test temperature up to 720 deg. C. Supplementary, dilatometry, TGA and DTA tests were performed at CERL on individual samples of aggregate and cement paste which helped towards explaining the observed trends in the concretes. A simple formula was developed which relates the elastic thermal stresses generated from radial temperature gradients to the solution obtained from the transient heat conduction equation. Thermal stresses can, therefore, be minimized by reductions in the radius of the specimen and the rate of heating The results were confirmed by finite element analysis which indicate( tensile stresses in the central region and compressive stresses near the surf ace during heating which are reversed during cooling. It is shown that the temperature gradients, pore pressures and tensile thermal stresses during both heating and

  3. TYPES OF STEEL AND CONCRETE COMPOSITE CABLE SPACE FRAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Gasii

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Modern terms of the construction generate the need to find new structures, including roof systems that would meet modern requirements. An important aspect in finding constructive solutions for new structures is the use of reliable and advanced materials. Considering this, the decision to develop the new space structures to a wide implementation in practice of domestic and foreign construction are relevant and perspective direction of building structures development. Methodology. Given the results of previously conducted theoretical research of existing types of space roof structures find promising areas of improvement or creation of new structures that should be devoid of weaknesses and imperfections of analogs and they should have an economic effect through rational use of materials. Findings. Types of steel and concrete composite cable space frames and structural features of its elements are developed and considered. The steel and concrete composite cable space frame is a completely new kind of space structure system that has the original structural concept and it was designed to cover large-span industrial and public buildings. The basic elements of that structure system are modular element of the bottom chord and space steel and concrete composite module that consists of tubular rods and reinforced concrete slab. All modular elements are made in the factory. With bottom chord modular elements and space steel and concrete composite modules can be assembled three types of longitudinal elements. It is the beam element, arched element and hanging element. Also with the modules can be assembled various structure system and their combinations. Number of space steel and concrete composite modules and bottom chord modular elements, which is needed to collect steel and concrete composite cable space frames, is determined by calculation and optimal designing. Recommended dimensions of the modular elements of the steel and concrete composite

  4. Long-Term Behaviors of the OPC Concrete with Fly-ash and Type V Concrete Applied on Reactor Containment Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Eui Sik; Lee, Hee Taik; Paek, Yong Lak; Park, Young Soo

    2010-01-01

    The prestressed concrete has been used extensively in the construction of Reactor Containment Buildings (RCBs) in Korea in order to strengthen the RCBs and at the same time, prevent the release of radiation due to the Design Basis Accident and Design Basis Earthquake. It is well known that the prestressed concrete loses its prestressing force over the age, and the shrinkage and creep of the concrete significantly contributes to these long term prestressing losses. In this study, an evaluations of long term behaviors of the concrete such as creep and shrinkage have been performed for two types of concretes : Ordinary Portland Cement containing fly-ash used for the Shin- Kori 1 and 2 NPP and Type V cement used for the Ul- Chin 5 and 6 NPP

  5. Long-Term Behaviors of the OPC Concrete with Fly-ash and Type V Concrete Applied on Reactor Containment Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Eui Sik; Lee, Hee Taik; Paek, Yong Lak [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Soo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The prestressed concrete has been used extensively in the construction of Reactor Containment Buildings (RCBs) in Korea in order to strengthen the RCBs and at the same time, prevent the release of radiation due to the Design Basis Accident and Design Basis Earthquake. It is well known that the prestressed concrete loses its prestressing force over the age, and the shrinkage and creep of the concrete significantly contributes to these long term prestressing losses. In this study, an evaluations of long term behaviors of the concrete such as creep and shrinkage have been performed for two types of concretes : Ordinary Portland Cement containing fly-ash used for the Shin- Kori 1 and 2 NPP and Type V cement used for the Ul- Chin 5 and 6 NPP

  6. Surface treatment of reinforced cement concrete mixtures of hpcm type

    OpenAIRE

    Vyrozhemsky, V.; Krayushkina, K.

    2006-01-01

    One of the most perspective ways of pavement roughness and durability improvement is the arrangement of thin cement concrete layer surface treatment reinforced with different types of fiber. The name of this material is known abroad as HPCM (High Performance Cementious Materials) durable thin layer concrete pavement in a thickness of 1 cm, dispersion-like reinforced with metal or polymer fibers. To enhance bind properties the stone material grade 3 7mm is applied on the top of concrete surfac...

  7. Effect of the type of mineral aggregate on the high-temperature creep of HTR-concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederichs, U.; Becker, G.

    1989-01-01

    Within the scope of the research and development work for the prestressed concrete vessel of the HTR 500 High-Temperature Reactor mix design, manufacture as well as mechanical and thermal behavior of the concrete have been comprehensively studied. Of the concrete types analyzed, a basalt concrete showed extremely favorable high-temperature characteristics while a concrete with Rhine gravel was characterized by a good workability. These two types of concrete were subjected to numerous tests, whereby the testing procedures were strongly related to the anticipated combined stress, temperature and moisture conditions in the real structure

  8. Development of new type concrete for spent fuel storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, J.; Mantani, K.; Owaki, E.; Sugihara, Y.; Hata, A.; Shimono, M.; Taniuchi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Heat resistant concrete has been developed to make it possible to design a new type cask that has been designed on the same concept of metal cask technologies for use in high temperature conditions. The allowable temperature of conventional concrete is limited to less than 100 degrees Celsius because most of its moisture is free water and therefore hydrogen, which is effective for neutron shielding, can be easily lost. Our newly developed concrete uses chemically bonded water and as a result can be used under high temperatures

  9. Development of new type concrete for spent fuel storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, J.; Mantani, K. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Hyogo (Japan); Owaki, E.; Sugihara, Y.; Hata, A.; Shimono, M. [Taisei Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Taniuchi, H. [Transnuclear, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Heat resistant concrete has been developed to make it possible to design a new type cask that has been designed on the same concept of metal cask technologies for use in high temperature conditions. The allowable temperature of conventional concrete is limited to less than 100 degrees Celsius because most of its moisture is free water and therefore hydrogen, which is effective for neutron shielding, can be easily lost. Our newly developed concrete uses chemically bonded water and as a result can be used under high temperatures.

  10. Strain components of nuclear-reactor-type concretes during first heat cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    Strains of three advanced-gas-cooled-reactor-type nuclear reactor concretes were measured during the first heat cycle and their relative thermal stability determined. It was possible to isolate for the first time the shrinkage component for the period during heating. Predictions of the residual strains for the loaded specimens can be made by simple superposition of creep and shrinkage components up to a certain critical temperature, which for basalt concrete is about 500 C and for limestone concrete is about 200-300 C. Above the critical temperature, an expansive ''cracking'' strain component is present. It is shown that the strain behaviour of concrete provides a sensitive indication of its thermal stability during heating and subsequent cooling. (orig.)

  11. Types and Characteristics of Performing Concretes Used in the Constructions Processes Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Corobceanu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The light concrete industry has a great development at present, due to some technical characteristics that make them highly appreciated. These characteristics are: the reduced apparent density, the capacity of high thermal insulation and high resistance at fire, compared to heavy concretes. These features have a result a type concrete elements (simple, reinforced of prestressed with reduced weight, which are good thermo-insulators and easy to manufacture, etc.

  12. Statistical analysis of electrical resistivity as a tool for estimating cement type of 12-year-old concrete specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Morales-Napoles, O.; Pacheco, J.

    2012-01-01

    Statistical tests on values of concrete resistivity can be used as a fast tool for estimating the cement type of old concrete. Electrical resistivity of concrete is a material property that describes the electrical resistance of concrete in a unit cell. Influences of binder type, water-to-binder

  13. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

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    Mirjana Malešev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate (50% and 100% replacement of coarse recycled aggregate. Ninety-nine specimens were made for the testing of the basic properties of hardened concrete. Load testing of reinforced concrete beams made of the investigated concrete types is also presented in the paper. Regardless of the replacement ratio, recycled aggregate concrete (RAC had a satisfactory performance, which did not differ significantly from the performance of control concrete in this experimental research. However, for this to be fulfilled, it is necessary to use quality recycled concrete coarse aggregate and to follow the specific rules for design and production of this new concrete type.

  14. The influence of aggregates type on W/C ratio on the strength and other properties of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaiskiene, J.; Skripkiunas, G.; Vaiciene, M.; Karpova, E.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of different types of aggregates and W/C ratio on concrete properties is analysed. In order to achieve this aim, lightweight (with expanded clay aggregate) and normal concrete (with gravel aggregate) mixtures are prepared with different W/C ratios. Different W/C ratios are selected by reducing the amount of cement when the amount of water is constant. The following properties of concrete have been determined: density, compressive strength and water absorption. Additionally, the statistical data analysis is performed and influence of aggregate type and W/C ratio on concrete properties is determined. The empirical equations indicating dependence between concrete strength and W/C and strength of aggregate are obtained for normal concrete and light-weight concrete.

  15. Word type effects in false recall: concrete, abstract, and emotion word critical lures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Lisa M; Olheiser, Erik L; Altarriba, Jeanette; Landi, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that definable qualities of verbal stimuli have implications for memory. For example, the distinction between concrete and abstract words has led to the finding that concrete words have an advantage in memory tasks (i.e., the concreteness effect). However, other word types, such as words that label specific human emotions, may also affect memory processes. This study examined the effects of word type on the production of false memories by using a list-learning false memory paradigm. Participants heard lists of words that were highly associated to nonpresented concrete, abstract, or emotion words (i.e., the critical lures) and then engaged in list recall. Emotion word critical lures were falsely recalled at a significantly higher rate (with the effect carried by the positively valenced critical lures) than concrete and abstract critical lures. These findings suggest that the word type variable has implications for our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie recall and false recall.

  16. High-impact concrete for fill in US Department of Transportation type shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Cash, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the use of light-weight, high-impact concrete in U.S. Department of Transportation-type shipments. The formulations described are substantially lighter in weight (20 to 50 percent) than construction concrete, but product test specimens generally yield superior impact characteristics. The use of this specialty concrete for container fill, encapsulations, or liquid-waste solidification can be advantageous. Use of the material for container or cask construction has the advantage of lighter weight for easier handling, and the container consistently exhibits better performance on drop tests. High-impact concrete does have the disadvantage of less gamma radiation shielding per volume, but some formulation changes discussed in this report can be used to prepare better shielding concrete. Test characteristics of high-impact concrete are included. 3 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mirjana Malešev; Vlastimir Radonjanin; Snežana Marinković

    2010-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC) as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycle...

  18. Self-curing concrete types; water retention and durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda I. Mousa

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to compare among concretes without or with silica fume (SF along with chemical type of shrinkage reducing admixture, polyethylene-glycol (Ch, and leca as self-curing agents for water retention even at elevated temperature (50 °C and their durability. The cement content of 400 kg/m3, silica fume of 15% by weight of cement, polyethylene-glycol of 2% by weight of cement, pre-saturated lightweight aggregate (leca 15% by volume of sand and water with Ch/binder ratio of 0.4 were selected in this study. Some of the physical and mechanical properties were determined periodically up to 28 days in case of exposure to air curing in temperature of (25 °C and (50 °C while up to 6 months of exposure to 5% of carbon dioxide and wet/dry cycles in 8% of sodium chloride for durability study. The concrete mass loss and the volumetric water absorption were measured, to evaluate the water retention of the investigated concretes. Silica fume concrete either without or with Ch gave the best results under all curing regimes; significant water retention and good durability properties.

  19. Review on factors influencing thermal conductivity of concrete incorporating various type of waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misri, Z.; Ibrahim, M. H. W.; Awal, A. S. M. A.; Desa, M. S. M.; Ghadzali, N. S.

    2018-04-01

    Concrete is well-known as a construction material which is widely used in building and infrastructure around the world. However, its widespread use has affected the reduction of natural resources. Hence, many approached have been made by researchers to study the incorporation of waste materials in concrete as a substitution for natural resources besides reducing waste disposal problems. Concrete is basically verified by determining its properties; strengths, permeability, shrinkage, durability, thermal properties etc. In various thermal properties of concrete, thermal conductivity (TC) has received a large amount of attention because it is depend upon the composition of concrete. Thermal conductivity is important in building insulation to measure the ability of a material to transfer heat. The aim of this paper is to discuss the methods and influence factors of TC of concrete containing various type of waste materials.

  20. Development of low-activation design method for reduction of radioactive waste (3). Various types of low-activation concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinno, Masaharu; Kimura, Ken-ichi; Fujikura, Yusuke

    2008-01-01

    Manufacturing tests by mixing together with low-activation aggregates, low-activation cements, low-activation additives, low-activation admixtures and low-activation neutron absorbers have been performed to develop low-activation concrete. After that, we developed various types (1/10, 1/20, 1/30, 1/50, 1/100, 1/300, 1/1,000, 1/3,000 and 1/10,000) of low-activation concrete composed of low-activation raw materials as very useful shielding material in a nuclear facility. The term '1/10 of low-activation concrete' denotes that the activity reduction rate to ordinary concrete is designed to be 1/10. By adopting some suitable types of low-activation concrete, most of the shielding concrete around ABWR and APWR are classified below clearance level on decommissioning. (author)

  1. Determination of shielding parameters for different types of concretes by Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aminian, A.; Nematollahi, M. R.

    2007-01-01

    The chose of a suitable concrete composition for a biological reactor shield remain as a research target up to now. In the present study the attempts has been made to estimate the influence of the concrete aggregates on the shielding parameters for three type of ordinary, serpentine and steel magnetite concrete by Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP ) transport code. MCNP calculations have been performed in order to obtain the leakage of neutrons, photons and electrons from dry shield. Also the mass attenuation coefficients and the liner attenuation coefficient are estimated for neutron and photon in those energies in range of actual energy which exist out of pressure vessel of power reactor in the cavity for the investigated concretes. The concrete densities ranged from 2.3 to 5.11 g/cm 3 . These calculations were done in the condition of a typical commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The results show that Steel-magnetite concrete, with high density (5.11 g/cm 3 ) and constituents of relatively high atomic number, is an effective shield for both photons and neutrons

  2. Build-up Factor Calculation for Ordinary Concrete, Baryte Concrete and Blast-furnace Slugges Concrete as γ Radiation Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isman MT; Elisabeth Supriatni; Tochrul Binowo

    2002-01-01

    Calculation of build up factor ordinary concrete, baryte concrete and blast-furnace sludge concrete have been carried out. The calculations have been carried out by dose rate measurement of Cs 137 source before and after passing through shielding. The investigated variables were concrete type, thickness of concrete and relative possession of concrete. Concrete type variables are ordinary concrete, baryte concrete and blast sludge furnace concrete. The thickness variables were 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 cm. The relative position variables were dose to the source and close to detector. The result showed that concrete type and position did not have significant effect to build-up factor value, while the concrete thickness (r) and the attenuation coefficient (μ) were influenced to the build-up factor. The higher μr value the higher build-up factor value. (author)

  3. Behavior and strength of beams cast with ultra high strength concrete containing different types of fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Kamal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC is a special type of concrete with extraordinary potentials in terms of strength and durability performance. Its production and application implement the most up-to-date knowledge and technology of concrete manufacturing. Sophisticated structural designs in bridges and high-rise buildings, repair works and special structures like nuclear facilities are currently the main fields of applications of UHPC. This paper aimed to evaluate the behavior of ultra-high strength concrete beams. This paper also aimed to determine the effect of adding fibers and explore their effect upon the behavior and strength of the reinforced concrete beams. A total of twelve simple concrete beams with and without shear reinforcements were tested in flexure. The main variables taken into consideration in this research were the type of fibers and the percentage of longitudinal reinforcement as well as the existence or absence of the web reinforcement. Two types of fibers were used including steel and polypropylene fibers. The behavior of the tested beams was investigated with special attention to the deflection under different stages of loading, initial cracking, cracking pattern, and ultimate load. Increased number of cracks was observed at the end of loading due to the use of fibers, which led to the reduced width of cracks. This led to increased stiffness and higher values of maximum loads.

  4. Development of heat resistant concrete and its application to concrete casks. Improvement of neutron shielding performance of concrete in high temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owaki, Eiji; Hata, Akihito; Sugihara, Yutaka; Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Mantani, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Heat resistant concrete with hydrogen, which is able to shield neutron at more than 100degC, was developed. Using this new type concrete, a safety concrete cask having the same concept of metal casks was designed and produced. The new type cask omitted the inhalation and exhaust vent of the conventional type concrete casks. The new concrete consists of Portland cement added calcium hydroxide, iron powder and iron fiber. It showed 2.17 g/cm 3 density, 10.8 mass% water content, 1.4 W/(m·K) thermal conductivity at 150degC. Increasing of heat resistance made possible to produce the perfect sealing type structure, which had high shielding performance of radiation no consideration for streaming of radiation. Moreover, a monitor of sealing can be set. General view of concrete casks, outer view of 1/3 scaled model, cask storage system in the world, properties of new developed heat resistant concrete, results of shielding calculation are contained. (S.Y.)

  5. Strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with various types of non-metallic fiber and rods reinforcement under static loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskii, A. V.; Baldin, I. V.; Kudyakov, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of modern building materials based on non-metallic fibers and their application in concrete structures represent one of the important issues in construction industry. This paper presents results of investigation of several types of raw materials selected: basalt fiber, carbon fiber and composite fiber rods based on glass and carbon. Preliminary testing has shown the possibility of raw materials to be effectively used in compressed concrete elements. Experimental program to define strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with non-metallic fiber reinforcement and rod composite reinforcement included design, manufacture and testing of several types of concrete samples with different types of fiber and longitudinal rod reinforcement. The samples were tested under compressive static load. The results demonstrated that fiber reinforcement of concrete allows increasing carrying capacity of compressed concrete elements and reducing their deformability. Using composite longitudinal reinforcement instead of steel longitudinal reinforcement in compressed concrete elements insignificantly influences bearing capacity. Combined use of composite rod reinforcement and fiber reinforcement in compressed concrete elements enables to achieve maximum strength and minimum deformability.

  6. Maintenance and preservation of concrete structures. Report 3: Abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. C.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory test program on abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete, including the development of a new underwater abrasion-erosion test method. This program was designed to evaluate the relative abrasion-erosion resistance of various materials considered for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures. The test program encompassed three concrete types (conventional concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, and polymer concrete); seven aggregate types (limestone, chert, trap rock, quartzite, granite, siliceous gravel, and slag); three principal water-cement rations (0.72, 0.54, and 0.40); and six types of surface treatment (vacuum, polyurethane coating, acrylic mortar coating, epoxy mortar coating, furan resin mortar coating, and iron aggregate topping). A total of 114 specimens made from 41 batches of concrete was tested. Based on the test data obtained, a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of various parameters on the abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete was presented. Materials suitable for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures were recommended. Additional work to correlate the reported findings with field performance was formulated.

  7. Flexural and Shear Behavior of FRP Strengthened AASHTO Type Concrete Bridge Girders

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    Nur Yazdani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP are being increasingly used for the repair and strengthening of deteriorated or unsafe concrete structures, including structurally deficient concrete highway bridges. The behavior of FRP strengthened concrete bridge girders, including failure modes, failure loads, and deflections, can be determined using an analytical finite element modeling approach, as outlined in this paper. The differences in flexural versus shear FRP strengthening and comparison with available design guidelines are also beneficial to design professionals. In this paper, a common AASHTO type prestressed concrete bridge girder with FRP wrapping was analyzed using the ANSYS FEM software and the ACI analytical approach. Both flexural and shear FRP applications, including vertical and inclined shear strengthening, were examined. Results showed that FRP wrapping can significantly benefit concrete bridge girders in terms of flexure/shear capacity increase, deflection reduction, and crack control. The FRP strength was underutilized in the section selected herein, which could be addressed through decrease of the amount of FRP and prestressing steel used, thereby increasing the section ductility. The ACI approach produced comparable results to the FEM and can be effectively and conveniently used in design.

  8. Experimental Investigation into Pull-Out Strength of Foamed Concrete Using Different Types of Screw

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    Othuman Mydin M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the results of the comprehensive strength test to quantify the mechanical properties of the screw’s pullout strength on foamed concrete. Foamed concrete is classified as lightweight concrete that been produced by cement paste or mortar in which air-voids are entrapped in the mortar by a suitable foaming agent. These days, the use of foamed concrete has been recognized in the construction industry as wall blocks, wall panels and also material floor and roof screeds. Hence, the applications of this material should be maximized as it is multi-functional. As we know, the use of screws on the wall or ceiling is common in a building. The objective of this research is to examine and determine the pullout strength of various properties and types of screws in lightweight foamed concrete with various densities that may depict the best result of the pullout strength on foamed concrete. To visualize the different results of pullout strength, screws with and without wall plug will be used as well. The pullout strength will be tested using the Universal Testing Machine where it shall measure the ultimate load of the screws attached to the foamed concrete may resist.

  9. Effect of Coarse Aggregate and Slag Type on the Mechanical Behavior of High and Normal Weight Concrete Used at Barrage Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sanaullah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study is an effort to assess the composite effect of limestone aggregate and blast furnace slag on the mechanical characteristics of normal and high weight concrete at various structural units (barrage girders, main weir and block apron of New Khanki Barrage Project, Punjab. Mix designs for different concrete classes falling under the domain of high and normal weight concrete were prepared after aggregate quality testing. On attaining satisfactory results of quality testing nine concrete mixes were designed (three for each class: A1, A and B by absolute volume method (ACI- 211.1. The required compressive strength of normal and high strength was set at 6200, 5200 and 4200 Psi for the concrete types A1, A and B respectively after 28 days (ACI -318. For compressive strength assessment, a total 27 concrete cylinders were casted (9-cylinders for each mix and were water cured. The achieved average UCS of cylinder concrete specimens at 3, 7 and 28 days are 5170, 6338 and 7320 Psi for A1 – type, 3210, 4187 and 5602 Psi for A-type and 2650, 3360 and 4408 Psi for B- type mix. It has been found that all concrete mixes for suggested classes attained target strength at age of 7-days. The coarse aggregate (Margala Hill limestone and fine aggregates (from Lawrancepur /Qibla Bandi quarries used in all concrete mix designs have demonstrated a sound mechanical suitability for high and normal weight concrete.

  10. Evaluation of concrete recycling system efficiency for ready-mix concrete plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Luiz de Brito Prado; Figueiredo, Antonio Domingues de

    2016-10-01

    The volume of waste generated annually in concrete plants is quite large and has important environmental and economic consequences. The use of fresh concrete recyclers is an interesting way for the reuse of aggregates and water in new concrete production. This paper presents a study carried out for over one year by one of the largest ready-mix concrete producers in Brazil. This study focused on the evaluation of two recyclers with distinct material separation systems, herein referred to as drum-type and rotary sieve-type equipment. They were evaluated through characterization and monitoring test programs to verify the behaviour of recovered materials (aggregates, water, and slurry). The applicability of the recovered materials (water and aggregates) was also evaluated in the laboratory and at an industrial scale. The results obtained with the two types of recyclers used were equivalent and showed no significant differences. The only exception was in terms of workability. The drum-type recycler generated fewer cases that required increased pumping pressure. The analysis concluded that the use of untreated slurry is unfeasible because of its intense negative effects on the strength and workability of concrete. The reclaimed water, pre-treated to ensure that its density is less than 1.03g/cm(3), can be used on an industrial scale without causing any harm to the concrete. The use of recovered aggregates consequently induces an increase in water demand and cement consumption to ensure the workability conditions of concrete that is proportional to the concrete strength level. Therefore, the viability of their use is restricted to concretes with characteristic strengths lower than 25MPa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of fire-resistance of reinforced concrete slab of a new type

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    Kalmykov Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures with complex inner geometry under the effect of high temperatures considering void former materials were examined. The analysis of strain-stress state of new type of architectural and construction system ‘Monofant’ under the effect of high temperature heating in standard fire mode, considering the change of design pattern was carried out. Numerical study of concrete slab with given reinforcement and complex inner geometry was carried out with use of software packages based on finite element method. Temperature fields throughout the depth of cross section of the slab of new type of architectural and construction system ‘Monofant’ upon heating in standard fire mode for time interval 0-240 min. were obtained. The carrying capacity of sections exposed to high temperatures was determined by deformation method. Offered the algorithm that considers the transformation of design patterns depending on temperature values and excessive pressure in thermal insulation cavities taking into account influence of deformation fields on temperature distribution.

  12. TRANSPARENT CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Sharma*, Dr. O.P. Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Transparent concrete is the new type of concrete introduced in todays world which carries special property of light transmitting due to presence of light Optical fibres. Which is also known as translucent concrete or light transmitting concrete, it is achieved by replacing coarse aggregates with transparent alternate materials (Optical fibres). The binding material in transparent concrete may be able to transmit light by using clear resins the concrete mix. The concrete used in industry in pr...

  13. Self-healing of polymer modified concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd_Elmoaty M. Abd_Elmoaty

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Self healing phenomenon of concrete has been observed in traditional, fibrous, self compacting concrete. This phenomenon occurred mainly due to the presence of unhydrated cement particles in the presence of water. Mechanism of polymer in concrete depends on creating a layer and net of polymer around cement particles which enhances the properties of polymer modified concrete. This mechanism may affect the self healing of this type of concrete. This work aims to study the presence of the self healing phenomenon in polymer modified concrete and the related parameters. An experimental investigation on self healing of polymer modified concrete was undertaken. In this research work, effect of polymer type, polymer dose, cement content, cement type, w/cm ratio and age of damage were studied. The healing process extended up to 60 days. Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements were used to evaluate the healing process. Results indicated that, the self healing phenomenon existed in polymer modified concrete as in traditional concrete. The increase of polymer dose increases the healing degree at the same healing time. This increase depends on polymer type. Also, the decrease of w/cm ratio reduces the self healing degree while the use of Type V Portland cement improves the self healing process compared with Type I Portland cement. Cement content has an insignificant effect on healing process for both concrete with and without polymer. In addition, the increase of damage age decreases the efficiency of self healing process.

  14. A review on the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamir Senin, Mohamad; Shahidan, Shahiron; Radziah Abdullah, Siti; Anting Guntor, Nickholas; Syazani Leman, Alif

    2017-11-01

    Road authorities manage a large population of ageing bridges, a substantial number of which fail to meet the current requirements either due to deterioration and other structural deficiencies or as a result of the escalating demands imposed by increased traffic. This problem is related to the dynamic load from vehicles. This problem can be solved by producing a type of concrete that can reduce the amplitude of oscillation or vibration such as rubberized concrete. Green construction has been a very important aspect in concrete production field in the last decade. One of the most problematic waste materials is scrap tires. The use of scrap tires in civil engineering is increasing by producing rubberized concrete. Rubberized concrete is a type of concrete that is mixed with rubber. The purpose of this review is to justify the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks. Several parameters named physical, chemical and mechanical properties were measured to ensure the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks. Rubberized concrete has similar workability to normal concrete. The rubber reduced the density and compressive strength of the concrete while increased the flexural strength, water absorption and damping ratio. The used of rubber in concrete beyond 20% is not recommended due to decreasing in compressive strength. Rubberized concrete recommended to be used in circumstances where vibration damping was required such as in bridge construction as shock-wave absorber.

  15. Effect of Fibers and Filler Types on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed K. Rejeb* , Majid Kh . N. Ayad A. M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with studying the fresh and hardened properties of self-compacting concrete, by using three types of filler (silica fume, clinker powder & lime stone powder, and two types of fibers (steel & glass fibers with volume fractions of (0.5% and (0.1% respectively. For each type of fillers, the fresh properties are measured by using Slump test, J- ring and V- funnel, while hardened properties include the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength. The results show that adding fibers to the self-compacting concrete (SCC well reduces the workability and improves the hardened properties. Also, the study concluded that better workability is obtained by using (lime stone, silica fume and clinker powder as fillers, respectively. While the higher hardened properties are gained by using silica fume were rather than those of other types of fillers 

  16. Failure criterion of concrete type material and punching failure analysis of thick mortar plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, T.; Kuroiwa, M.; Irobe, M.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper falure surface of concrete type material is proposed and its validity to structural analysis is examined. The study is an introductory part of evaluation for ultimate strength of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures in reactor technology. The failure surface is expressed in a linear form in terms of octahedral normal and shear stresses. Coefficient of the latter stress is given by a trigonometric series in threefold angle of similarity. Hence, its meridians are multilinear and traces of its deviatoric sections are smooth curves having periodicity of 2π/3 around space diagonal in principal stress space. The mathematical expression of the surface has an arbitraty number of parameters so that material test results are well reflected. To confirm the effectiveness of proposed failure criterion, experiment and numerical analysis by the finite element method on punching failure of thick mortar plate in axial symmetry are compared. In the numerical procedure yield surface of the material is assumed to exist mainly in compression region, since a brittle cleavage or elastic fracture occurs in the concrete type material under stress state with tension, while a ductile or plastic fracture occurs under compressive stress state. (orig.)

  17. High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian Oneţ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the last studies and researches accomplished in Cluj-Napoca related to high performance concrete, high strength concrete and self compacting concrete. The purpose of this paper is to raid upon the advantages and inconveniences when a particular concrete type is used. Two concrete recipes are presented, namely for the concrete used in rigid pavement for roads and another one for self-compacting concrete.

  18. Effect of aggregate type, casting, thickness and curing condition on restrained strain of mass concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsak Choktaweekarn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element analysis is used for computing temperature and restrained strain inmass concrete. The model takes into account time, material properties, and mix proportion dependent behavior of concrete.The hydration heat and thermal properties used in the finite element analysis are obtained from our previously proposedadiabatic temperature rise model and are used as the input in the analysis. The analysis was done by varying size of massconcrete (especially thickness and the casting method in order to explain their effect on temperature and restrained strain inmass concrete. The casting methods used in the analysis are continuous and discontinuous casting. The discontinuouscasting consists of layer casting and block casting. Different types of aggregate were used in the analysis for studying theeffect of thermal properties of aggregate on temperature and restrained strain in mass concrete. Different conditions of curing(insulation and normal curing were also studied and compared. It was found from the analytical results that the maximumtemperature increases with the increase of the thickness of structure. The use of layer casting is more effective for thermalcracking control of mass concrete. The insulation curing method is preferable for mass concrete. Aggregate with low coefficientof thermal expansion is beneficial to reduce the restrained strain.

  19. Effect of Aggregate Mineralogy and Concrete Microstructure on Thermal Expansion and Strength Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwoo An

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate type and mineralogy are critical factors that influence the engineering properties of concrete. Temperature variations result in internal volume changes could potentially cause a network of micro-cracks leading to a reduction in the concrete’s compressive strength. The study specifically studied the effect of the type and mineralogy of fine and coarse aggregates in the normal strength concrete properties. As performance measures, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and compressive strength were tested with concrete specimens containing different types of fine aggregates (manufactured and natural sands and coarse aggregates (dolomite and granite. Petrographic examinations were then performed to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the aggregate and to examine the aggregate and concrete microstructure. The test results indicate the concrete CTE increases with the silicon (Si volume content in the aggregate. For the concrete specimens with higher CTE, the micro-crack density in the interfacial transition zone (ITZ tended to be higher. The width of ITZ in one of the concrete specimens with a high CTE displayed the widest core ITZ (approx. 11 µm while the concrete specimens with a low CTE showed the narrowest core ITZ (approx. 3.5 µm. This was attributed to early-age thermal cracking. Specimens with higher CTE are more susceptible to thermal stress.

  20. Effect Of Different Types Of Fibers To Concrete S Mechanical Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Sarı, Mertcan

    2013-01-01

    As a building material concrete has been used frequently. Because of this too many research has been made for years. 20-30 years before concrete’s maximum compressive strength was about 40 MPa but today high strength and high performance concretes are used in structural applications. High-performance concrete exceeds the properties and constructability of normal concrete. Normal and special materials are used to make these specially designed concretes that must meet a combination of performan...

  1. Study of technological features of tubular compressed concrete members in concreting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskobiinyk Olena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological features of core concreting were analyzed as the main factor in ensuring of strength and reliability of compressed concrete-filled steel tubular (CFST members. We have conducted the analysis of existing concreting methods of CFST members. In this respect, the most dangerous types of possible technological defects of concrete core of CFST members are inhomogeneity along the height, voids, caverns, and concrete “weak spots”. The authors considered the influence of such technological factors of concreting: placeability, time, concrete mixture compaction method, concreting height on the concrete core strength of CFST members. Based on the experimental studies conducted we suggested the regression correlations for determining the concrete strength of CFST members of different length depending on the movability of concrete mixture and a time for its compaction. The authors performed the correlation analysis of technological factors of concreting on the strength of the concrete core. We carried out the comparison of data on the concrete core strength of CFST members, that were determined by non-destructive methods (sclerometer test results, ultrasonic method and direct compression strength tests. We experimentally proved that using movable mixtures with the slump of about 4 – 9 cm the overall variation coefficient of concrete core strength of CFST members along the height reaches nearly 13%. Based on the experimental studies conducted we suggested the guidelines on optimal regimes of concrete compaction during manufacturing CFST members at a construction site environment.

  2. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, L.; West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  3. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  4. Hybrid structure in civil engineering construction. Composite types of steel and concrete; Doboku bun`ya ni okeru fukugo kozo. Kozai to concrete no ittai keishiki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, T. [JR Railway Technical Research Inst. Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-03-30

    In connection with hybrid structures in civil engineering construction, classification and application of composite types of steel and concrete are discussed. H steel embedded beam is a composite beam in which the H shape steel of the main beam is connected to rolled or welded H shape steel using cross beams. Composite structure columns are grouped into the composite column and the steel pipe concrete column. SRC piers are often adopted from the viewpoints of constraints for execution of works and vibration proof. Steel and concrete hybrid structure is a kind of structural system in which various kinds of materials such as steel, RC, or PC members are connected. The cable stayed bridge utilizes characteristics of steel and concrete effectively. For the piers of municipal expressway viaducts, there are executed cases of mixed structures which have RC, SRC columns for T shape piers and S structure for the bridges. SRC structure and composite columns are adopted often for structures of subway stations. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Analysis of internet advertisement type PPC (Pay-Per-Click) in concrete firm (Cedar home)

    OpenAIRE

    Krausová, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to present the features of internet advertising. The main type of advertisement in this thesis is called PPC (Pay-Per-Click). There are created and advertised advertising campaigns on concrete project.

  6. Assessment of mass fraction and melting temperature for the application of limestone concrete and siliceous concrete to nuclear reactor basemat considering molten core-concrete interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jae; Kim, Do Gyeum [Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Leon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Eui Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung Suk [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Severe accident scenarios in nuclear reactors, such as nuclear meltdown, reveal that an extremely hot molten core may fall into the nuclear reactor cavity and seriously affect the safety of the nuclear containment vessel due to the chain reaction caused by the reaction between the molten core and concrete. This paper reports on research focused on the type and amount of vapor produced during the reaction between a high-temperature molten core and concrete, as well as on the erosion rate of concrete and the heat transfer characteristics at its vicinity. This study identifies the mass fraction and melting temperature as the most influential properties of concrete necessary for a safety analysis conducted in relation to the thermal interaction between the molten core and the basemat concrete. The types of concrete that are actually used in nuclear reactor cavities were investigated. The H2O content in concrete required for the computation of the relative amount of gases generated by the chemical reaction of the vapor, the quantity of CO2 necessary for computing the cooling speed of the molten core, and the melting temperature of concrete are evaluated experimentally for the molten core-concrete interaction analysis.

  7. Life Cycle Assessment of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjunnesson, Jeannette

    2005-09-15

    This is an environmental study on concrete that follows the standard protocol of life cycle assessment (LCA). The study is done for two types of concrete, ordinary and frost-resistant concrete, and has an extra focus on the superplasticizers used as admixtures. The utilization phase is not included in this study since the type of construction for which the concrete is used is not defined and the concrete is assumed to be inert during this phase. The results show that it is the production of the raw material and the transports involved in the life cycle of concrete that are the main contributors to the total environmental load. The one single step in the raw material production that has the highest impact is the production of cement. Within the transportation operations the transportation of concrete is the largest contributor, followed by the transportation of the cement. The environmental impact of frost-resistant concrete is between 24-41 % higher than that of ordinary concrete due to its higher content of cement. Superplasticizers contribute with approximately 0.4-10.4 % of the total environmental impact of concrete, the least to the global warming potential (GWP) and the most to the photochemical ozone creation potential (POCP). Also the toxicity of the superplasticizers is investigated and the conclusion is that the low amount of leakage of superplasticizers from concrete leads to a low risk for the environment and for humans.

  8. Cement Type Influence on Alkali-Silica Reaction in Concrete with Crushed Gravel Aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, A.; Nagrockienė, D.; Skripkiūnas, G.

    2017-10-01

    Alkali-silica reaction is one of the chemical reactions which have a significant influence for durability of concrete. During alkali and silica reaction, silicon located in aggregates of the concrete, reacts with high alkali content. This way in the micropores of concrete is forming hygroscopic gel, which at wet environment, expanding and slowly but strongly destroying concrete structures. The goal of this paper- to determine the influence of cement type on alkali-silica reaction of mortars with crushed gravel. In the study crushed gravel with fraction 4/16 mm was used and four types of cements tested: CEM I 42.5 R; CEM I 42.5 SR; CEM II/A-S 42.5; CEM II/A-V 52.5. This study showed that crushed gravel is low contaminated on reactive particles containing of amorphous silica dioxide. The expansion after 14 days exceed 0.054 %, by RILEM AAR-2 research methodology (testing specimen dimension 40×40×160 mm). Continuing the investigation to 56 days for all specimens occurred alkaline corrosion features: microcracking and the surface plaque of gel. The results showed that the best resistance to alkaline corrosion after 14 days was obtained with cement CEM I 42.5 SR containing ash additive, and after 56 days with cement CEM II/A-V 52.5 containing low alkali content. The highest expansion after 14 and 56 days was obtained with cement CEM I 42.5 R without active mineral additives.

  9. Spatial fluxes and energy distributions of reactor fast neutrons in two types of heat resistant concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akki, T.S.; Benayad, S.A.; Megahid, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out to study the spatial fluxes and energy distributions of reactor fast neutrons transmitted through two types of heat resistant concretes, serpentine concrete and magnetic lemonite concrete. The physical, chemical and mechanical properties of these concretes were checked by well known techniques. In addition, the effect of heating at temperatures up to 500deg C on the crystaline water content was checked by the method of differential thermal analysis. Measurements were performed using a collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from a 10 MW research reactor. The neutron spectra transmitted through concrete barriers of different thickness were measured by a scintillation spectrometer with NE-213 liquid organic scintillator. Discrimination against undesired pulses due to gamma-rays was achieved by a method based on pulse shape discrimination technique. The operating principle of this technique is based on the comparison of two weighted time integrals of the detector signal. The measured pulse amplitude distribution was converted to neutron energy distribution by a computational code based on double differentiation technique. The spectrometer workability and the accuracy of the unfolding technique were checked by measuring the neutron spectra of neutrons from Pu-α-Be and 252 Cf neutron sources. The obtained neutron spectra for the two concretes were used to derive the total cross sections for neutrons of different energies. (orig.)

  10. Orientation factor and number of fibers at failure plane in ring-type steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.; Kim, H.

    2010-01-01

    Considering the probabilistic distributions of fibers in ring-type steel fiber reinforced concrete, the orientation factor and the number of ring-type steel fibers crossing the failure plane were theoretically derived as a function of fiber geometry, specimen dimensions, and fiber volume fraction. A total number of 24 specimens were tested incorporating different fiber types, specimen geometry, and fiber volume fractions of 0.2% and 0.4%: 5 beams and 5 panels containing straight steel fibers; and 6 beams and 8 panels containing ring-type steel fibers. Measurements were made to assess the number of fibers at fractured surfaces of steel fiber reinforced concrete. The developed theoretical expressions reasonably predicted the orientation factor and the number of ring-type steel fibers at failure plane: the average and the standard deviation for the ratios of the test to theory were 1.03 and 0.26, respectively. Theoretical investigations and comparisons were made for the values of orientation factor and the number of fibers at failure plane for straight steel fibers and ring-type steel fibers.

  11. Cracking in concrete-debonding length at the concrete/steel interface

    OpenAIRE

    Kjeldby, Liv Brox

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the debonding length at the concrete/steel interface have been investigated based on different types of cracks in concrete. Different methods for investigation have been used in the laboratory.

  12. Assessment of Mass Fraction and Melting Temperature for the Application of Limestone Concrete and Siliceous Concrete to Nuclear Reactor Basemat Considering Molten Core–Concrete Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojae Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe accident scenarios in nuclear reactors, such as nuclear meltdown, reveal that an extremely hot molten core may fall into the nuclear reactor cavity and seriously affect the safety of the nuclear containment vessel due to the chain reaction caused by the reaction between the molten core and concrete. This paper reports on research focused on the type and amount of vapor produced during the reaction between a high-temperature molten core and concrete, as well as on the erosion rate of concrete and the heat transfer characteristics at its vicinity. This study identifies the mass fraction and melting temperature as the most influential properties of concrete necessary for a safety analysis conducted in relation to the thermal interaction between the molten core and the basemat concrete. The types of concrete that are actually used in nuclear reactor cavities were investigated. The H2O content in concrete required for the computation of the relative amount of gases generated by the chemical reaction of the vapor, the quantity of CO2 necessary for computing the cooling speed of the molten core, and the melting temperature of concrete are evaluated experimentally for the molten core–concrete interaction analysis.

  13. Concrete Hinges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the 20th century concrete hinges developed by Freyssinet and Mesnager were widely tested and implemented in concrete structures. The concrete hinges were used a great deal in closed-spandrel arch bridges. Since such a bridge type has not been competitive for the past 40 years......, the research in concrete hinges has not evolved significantly in that period. But introducing a new state-of-the-art concrete arch bridge solution (Pearl-Chain arches invented at the Technical University of Denmark) creates a necessity of a concrete hinge research based on modern standards. Back when research...... in concrete hinges was more common different designs were proposed for the geometry and reinforcement. Previous research focused on fatigue, multi-axial stresses around the hinge throat, and the relation between rotation- and moment. But many different test-setups were proposed by different researchers...

  14. Achieving Mixtures of Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea POPA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC is a relatively new concrete. According to [11] UHPC is that concrete which features compressive strength over C100/115 class. Up to this point standards for this type of concrete were not adopted, although its characteristic strength exceeds those specified in [33]. Its main property is high compressive strength. This provides the possibility of reducing the section of elements (beams or columns made of this type of concrete, while the load capacity remains high. The study consists in blending mixtures of UHPC made of varying proportions of materials. The authors have obtained strengths of up to 160 MPa. The materials used are: Portland cement, silica fume, quartz powder, steel fibers, superplasticiser, sand and crushed aggregate for concrete - andesite.

  15. Periodic Safety Review of Tendon Pre-stress of Concrete Containment Building for a CA U-Type clear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Kwang Ho; Lim, Woo Sang [Korea Hydro and clear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Generally, as the tendon pre-stress of concrete containment buildings at nuclear power plants decreases as time passes due to the concrete creep, concrete shrinkage and the relaxation of tendon strands, the tendon pre-stress must secure the structural integrity of these buildings by maintaining its value higher than that of the designed pre-stress during the overall service life of the nuclear power plants. Moreover, if necessary, the degree of tendon pre-stress must also guarantee the structural integrity of concrete containment buildings over their lifetimes. This paper evaluated the changes in the tendon pre-stress of a concrete containment building subject to time-limited aging as an item in a periodic safety review (PSR) of Wolsong unit 1, a CANDU-type nuclear power plant to ensure that the structural integrity can be maintained until the next PSR period after the designed lifetime.

  16. Elastic Composite, Reinforced Lightweight Concrete as a Type of Resilient Composite Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeili, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    . A kind of "Elastic Composite, Reinforced Lightweight Concrete (ECRLC)" with the mentioned specifics is a type of "Resilient Composite Systems (RCS)" in which, contrary to the basic geometrical assumption of flexure theory in Solid Mechanics, "the strain changes in the beam height during bending" is typically "Non-linear". . Through employing this integrated structure, with significant high strain capability and modulus of resilience in bending, we could constructively achieve high bearing c...

  17. Probabilistic design of fibre concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukl, R.; Novák, D.; Sajdlová, T.; Lehký, D.; Červenka, J.; Červenka, V.

    2017-09-01

    Advanced computer simulation is recently well-established methodology for evaluation of resistance of concrete engineering structures. The nonlinear finite element analysis enables to realistically predict structural damage, peak load, failure, post-peak response, development of cracks in concrete, yielding of reinforcement, concrete crushing or shear failure. The nonlinear material models can cover various types of concrete and reinforced concrete: ordinary concrete, plain or reinforced, without or with prestressing, fibre concrete, (ultra) high performance concrete, lightweight concrete, etc. Advanced material models taking into account fibre concrete properties such as shape of tensile softening branch, high toughness and ductility are described in the paper. Since the variability of the fibre concrete material properties is rather high, the probabilistic analysis seems to be the most appropriate format for structural design and evaluation of structural performance, reliability and safety. The presented combination of the nonlinear analysis with advanced probabilistic methods allows evaluation of structural safety characterized by failure probability or by reliability index respectively. Authors offer a methodology and computer tools for realistic safety assessment of concrete structures; the utilized approach is based on randomization of the nonlinear finite element analysis of the structural model. Uncertainty of the material properties or their randomness obtained from material tests are accounted in the random distribution. Furthermore, degradation of the reinforced concrete materials such as carbonation of concrete, corrosion of reinforcement, etc. can be accounted in order to analyze life-cycle structural performance and to enable prediction of the structural reliability and safety in time development. The results can serve as a rational basis for design of fibre concrete engineering structures based on advanced nonlinear computer analysis. The presented

  18. Nuclear radiation and the properties of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1983-08-01

    Concrete is used for structures in which the concrete is exposed to nuclear radiation. Exposure to nuclear radiation may affect the properties of concrete. The report mentions the types of nuclear radiation while radiation damage in concrete is discussed. Attention is also given to the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on compressive and tensile strength of concrete. Finally radiation shielding, the attenuation of nuclear radiation and the value of concrete as a shielding material is discussed

  19. The Effect of Type and Volume Fraction (Vf) of Steel Fiber on the Mechanical Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghanbarpour, S.; Mazaheripour, H.; Mirmoradi, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    is to investigate the effects of type and volume fraction of steel fiber on the compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC). Design/methodology/approach – For this purpose, Micro wire and Wave type steel fibers......Purpose – Self-compacting concrete (SCC) offers several economic and technical benefits; the use of steel fibers extends its possibilities. Steel fibers bridge cracks, retard their propagation, and improve several characteristics and properties of the SCC. The purpose of this paper...... – It was found that, inclusion of steel fibers significantly affect the split tensile and flexural strength of SCC accordance with type and vf. Besides, mathematical expressions were developed to estimate the flexural, modulus of elasticity and split tensile strength of SFRSCCs regarding of compressive strength...

  20. Horizontal loading test by whole model specimen simulating inner concrete structure of PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Noriyuki; Sekine, Masataka; Kimura, Kozo; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Tsuneo; Takeda, Toshikazu

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center has performed a horizontal loading test by a whole model specimen simulating the inner concrete structure of a PWR type nuclear power plant in order to investigate restoring force characteristics of reactor buildings. This report describes the results of examination of applicability to the test results of analysis methods based on elastic theory. The analysis results of elastic stiffness, concrete cracking load, rebar yielding loads and ultimate strength were compared with the test results. According to this examination, it is recognized that even these analysis methods based on elastic theory are comparatively effective for analysis of an inner concrete structure of fairly complex configuration, although there are limits of the scope of applicability. (author)

  1. Concrete portable handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Woodson, R Dodge

    2011-01-01

    Whether or not, you are on the job site or back in the office, this book will help you to avoid mistakes, code violations, and wasted time and money. The book's four part treatment begins with constituent materials followed by self contained parts on Concrete Properties, Processes, and Concrete Repair and Rehabilitation. Designed to be an ""all in one"" reference, the author includes a wealth information for the most popular types of testing. This includes: Analysis of Fresh Concrete; Testing Machines; Accelerated Testing Methods; Analysis of Hardened Concrete and Mortar; Core Sampl

  2. Axial Compression Behavior of a New Type of Prefabricated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qun, Xie; Shuai, Wang; Chun, Liu

    2018-03-01

    A novel type of prefabricated concrete sandwich wall panel which could be used as a load-bearing structural element in buildings has been presented in this paper. Compared with the traditional sandwich panels, there are several typical characteristics for this wall system, including core columns confined by spiral stirrup along the cross-section of panel with 600mm spacing, precast foamed concrete block between two structural layers as internal insulation part, and a three-dimensional (3D) steel wire skeleton in each layer which is composed of two vertical steel wire meshes connected by horizontally short steel bar. All steel segments in the panel are automatically prefabricated in factory and then are assembled to form steel system in site. In order to investigate the structural behavior of this wall panel, two full-scale panels have been experimentally studied under axial compressive load. The test results show that the wall panel presents good load-bearing capacity and integral stiffness without out-of-plane flexural failure. Compared to the panel with planar steel wire mesh in concrete layer, the panel with 3D steel wire skeleton presents higher strength and better rigidity even in the condition of same steel ratio in panels which verifies that the 3D steel skeleton could greatly enhance the structural behavior of sandwich panel.

  3. Melting experiment on concrete waste using a hollow type plasma torch mounted on furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Y. P.; Kim, T. W.; Kim, H. S.; Shin, S. U.; Lee, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    A furnace coupled with a hollow type plasma torch was manufactured and installed in order to develop a volume reduction technology for non-combustible radioactive waste using plasma. A melting test with 10kg of concrete waste was carried out for the evaluation of melting characteristics in the non-transferred operation mode for 20 minutes with the melter. Feeded concrete was completely melted. However, the molten bath was not easily discharged because of its high viscosity. It was found that some molten slag spat from the molten bath was coated on the surface of torch which was mounted vertically inside furnace

  4. Biodecontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Benson, J.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technology for biologically decontaminating concrete is being jointly developed by scientists at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The technology exploits a naturally occurring phenomenon referred to as microbially influenced degradation (MID) in which bacteria produce acids that dissolve the cement matrix of concrete. Most radionuclide contamination of concrete is fixed in the outer few mm of the concrete surface. By capturing and controlling this natural process, a biological method of removing the surface of concrete to depths up to several mm is being developed. Three types of bacteria are known to be important in MID of concrete: nitrifying bacteria that produce nitric acid, sulfur oxidizing bacteria that produce sulfuric acid, and certain heterotrophic bacteria that produce organic acids. An investigation of natural environments demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy the presence of bacteria on concrete surfaces of a variety of structures, such as bridges and dams, where corrosion is evident. Enumeration of sulfur oxidizing and nitrifying bacteria revealed their presence and activity on structures to varying degrees in different environments. Under ideal conditions, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, a sulfur oxidizing bacteria, attached to and colonized the surface of concrete specimens. Over 1mm depth of material from a 10 cm x 10 cm square surface was removed in 68 days in the Thiobacillus treated specimen compared to a sterile control. Laboratory and field demonstrations are currently being conducted using experimental chambers designed to be mounted directly to concrete surfaces where radionuclide contamination exists. Data is being obtained in order to determine actual rates of surface removal and limitations to the system. This information will be used to develop a full scale decontamination technology

  5. EFFECT OF HCL CONCENTRATION ON NORMAL CONCRETE AND ADMIXTURED CONCRETE MADE WITH AND WITHOUT MANUFACTURED SAND

    OpenAIRE

    K. Pradeep*, K. Ramudu

    2017-01-01

    Concrete is considered to be the most widely used and versatile material of construction all over the world. One of the important ingredients of conventional concrete is natural sand or river sand, which is on the verge of exhausting due to abundant usage. In India, the conventional concrete is produced by using natural sand obtained from riverbeds as fine aggregate. However, due to the increased use of concrete in almost all types of construction works, the demand of natural or river sand ha...

  6. Shrinkage Reducing Admixture for Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Concrete shrinkage cracking is a common problem in all types of concrete structures, especially for structures and environments where the cracks are prevalent and the repercussions are most severe. A liquid shrinkage reducing admixture for concrete, developed by GRACE Construction Products and ARCO Chemical Company, that reduces significantly the shrinkage during concrete drying and potentially reduces overall cracking over time.

  7. Durability of hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Polder, R.B.; Borsje, H.

    1998-01-01

    The subject of this study was the performance of hydrophobic treatment to protect concrete against chloride penetration from de-icing salts. Hydrophobic treatment makes a concrete surface absorb less water and less chloride. Several types of tests were carried out to study the performance of

  8. Physical Characteristics of Laboratory Tested Concrete as a Substituion of Gravel on Normal Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butar-butar, Ronald; Suhairiani; Wijaya, Kinanti; Sebayang, Nono

    2018-03-01

    Concrete technology is highly potential in the field of construction for structural and non-structural construction. The amount uses of this concrete material raise the problem of solid waste in the form of concrete remaining test results in the laboratory. This waste is usually just discarded and not economically valuable. In solving the problem, this experiment was made new materials by using recycle material in the form of recycled aggregate which aims to find out the strength characteristics of the used concrete as a gravel substitution material on the normal concrete and obtain the value of the substitution composition of gravel and used concrete that can achieve the strength of concrete according to the standard. Testing of concrete characteristic is one of the requirements before starting the concrete mixture. This test using SNI method (Indonesian National Standard) with variation of comparison (used concrete : gravel) were 15: 85%, 25: 75%, 35:65%, 50:50 %, 75: 25%. The results of physical tests obtained the mud content value of the mixture gravel and used concrete is 0.03 larger than the standard of SNI 03-4142-1996 that is equal to 1.03%. so the need watering or soaking before use. The water content test results show an increase in the water content value if the composition of the used concrete increases. While the specific gravity value for variation 15: 85% until 35: 65% fulfilled the requirements of SNI 03-1969-1990. the other variasion show the specifics gravity value included on the type of light materials.

  9. Drying of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Geiker, Mette Rica; Nygaard, Peter Vagn

    2002-01-01

    Estimated and measured relative humidity (RH) change during drying are compared for two concretes, 1: w/c=0.46 and 2: w/(c+0.5fa+2sf)=0.50. The estimations were undertaken by means of the Swedish program TorkaS 1.0. Measurements were performed by RH-sensors type Humi-Guard. Drying of 150 mm thick...... samples from sides at 60% RH and 22 °C took place from 4 to 56 days after casting. At the end of the drying period the measured RH was about 4% lower than the estimated RH at 1/5th depth from the exposed surface for both concretes. In the middle of the samples, the measured RH of concretes 1 and 2 were 2...

  10. Evaluation of structural systems in precast concrete buildings by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In general, the precast concrete is the type of concrete that constructing, casting and curing in the standard factory conditions with high quality and then it will be transported with proper equipments and then it will be installed in the final position. In fact, the precast concrete buildings are the combined of several types of ...

  11. Structural Concrete, Science into Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeling, A.S.G.

    1987-01-01

    There is a need for a more rational and unified approach to all types of concrete structure, reinforced of prestressed. The first chapter explains in a historical review why the approach of reinforced concrete and that of prestressed concrete have hitherto been very different. In outlining the

  12. Numerical approach of the bond stress behavior of steel bars embedded in self-compacting concrete and in ordinary concrete using beam models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Almeida Filho

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the bond behavior between steel bars and concrete by means of a numerical analysis based on Finite Element Method. Results of a previously conducted experimental program on reinforced concrete beams subjected to monotonic loading are also presented. Two concrete types, self-compacting concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered in the study. Non-linear constitutive relations were used to represent concrete and steel in the proposed numerical model, aiming to reproduce the bond behavior observed in the tests. Experimental analysis showed similar results for the bond resistances of self-compacting and ordinary concrete, with self-compacting concrete presenting a better performance in some cases. The results given by the numerical modeling showed a good agreement with the tests for both types of concrete, especially in the pre-peak branch of the load vs. slip and load vs. displacement curves. As a consequence, the proposed numerical model could be used to estimate a reliable development length, allowing a possible reduction of the structure costs.

  13. Improving Fatigue Strength of polymer concrete using nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Polymer concrete (PC) is that type of concrete where the cement binder is replaced with polymer. PC is often used to improve friction and protect structural substrates in reinforced concrete and orthotropic steel bridges. However, its low fatigue per...

  14. Application of concrete filled steel bearing wall to inner concrete structure fro PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hisashi; Tanaka, Mamoru; Inoue, Kunio; Fukihara, Masaaki; Akiyama, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    'Concrete filled steel bearing wall', applied to the inner concrete structure for PWR nuclear power plant, was developed for rationalization of construction procedure at site. It was concluded through preliminary studies that this new type of wall, where concrete is placed between steel plates, is best suited for the strength members of the above structure, due to the high strength and ductility of surface steel plates and the confinement effect of filled concrete. To verify the behavior from the elastic range to the inelastic range, the ultimate strength and the failure mechanism, and to clarify experimentally the structural integrity of the inner concrete structure, which was composed of a concrete filled steel bearing wall, against seismic lateral loads, horizontal loading tests using a 1/10th scale model of the inner concrete structure for PWR nuclear power plant were conducted. As a result of the tests, the inner concrete structure composed of a concrete filled steel bearing wall appeared to have a larger load carrying capacity and a higher ductility as compared with that composed of a reinforced concrete wall. (author)

  15. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  16. Reviewing the Carbonation Resistance of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S P Singh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the studies on one of the important durability properties of concrete i.e. Carbonation. One of the main causes of deterioration of concrete is carbonation, which occurs when carbon dioxide (CO2 penetrates the concrete’s porous system to create an environment with lower pH around the reinforcement in which corrosion can proceed. Carbonation is a major cause of degradation of concrete structures leading to expensive maintenance and conservation operations. Herein, the importance, process and effect of various parameters such as water/cement ratio, water/binder ratio, curing conditions, concrete cover, super plasticizers, type of aggregates, grade of concrete, porosity, contaminants, compaction, gas permeability, supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs/ admixtures on the carbonation of concrete has been reviewed. Various methods for estimating the carbonation depth are also reported briefly

  17. Reuse of thermosetting plastic waste for lightweight concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakapo, Phaiboon; Panyakapo, Mallika

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the utilization of thermosetting plastic as an admixture in the mix proportion of lightweight concrete. Since this type of plastic cannot be melted in the recycling process, its waste is expected to be more valuable by using as an admixture for the production of non-structural lightweight concrete. Experimental tests for the variation of mix proportion were carried out to determine the suitable proportion to achieve the required properties of lightweight concrete, which are: low dry density and acceptable compressive strength. The mix design in this research is the proportion of plastic, sand, water-cement ratio, aluminum powder, and lignite fly ash. The experimental results show that the plastic not only leads to a low dry density concrete, but also a low strength. It was found that the ratio of cement, sand, fly ash, and plastic equal to 1.0:0.8:0.3:0.9 is an appropriate mix proportion. The results of compressive strength and dry density are 4.14N/mm2 and 1395 kg/m3, respectively. This type of concrete meets most of the requirements for non-load-bearing lightweight concrete according to ASTM C129 Type II standard.

  18. The mechanical characteristics of polymer concrete using polyester ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymer concretes depending on the type of used polymer have good mechanical characteristics like high compressive strength and strain- stress proper behavior and increase lifetime and strength against concrete environmental factors. Therefore, they can be used for strengthening and retrofitting reinforced concrete ...

  19. Collaboration of polymer composite reinforcement and cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozin, V. G.; Gizdatullin, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The results of experimental study of bond strength of cement concrete of different types with fiber reinforcing polymer (FRP) bars are reported. The reinforcing bars were manufactured of glass fibers and had a rebar with different types of the surface relief formed by winding a thin strip impregnated with a binder or by “sanding”. The pullout tests were carried out simultaneously for the steel reinforcing ribbed bars A400. The impact of friction, adhesion and mechanical bond on the strength of bonds between FRP and concrete was studied. The influence of the concrete strength and different operation factors on the bond strength of concrete was evaluated.

  20. Comparison on Heat of Hydration between Current Concrete for NPP and High Fluidity Concrete including Pozzolan Powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Jea Myoung; Cho, Myung Sug

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) concrete structures are exposed to many construction factors that lower the quality of concrete due to densely packed reinforcements and heat of hydration since they are mostly constructed with mass concrete. The concrete currently being used in Korean NPPs is mixed with Type I cement and fly ash. However, there is a demand to improve the performance of concrete with reduced heat of hydration and superior constructability. Many advantages such as improving workability and durability of concrete and decreasing heat of hydration are introduced by replacing cement with pozzolan binders. Therefore, the manufacturing possibility of high fluidity concrete should be investigated through applying multi-component powders blended with pozzolan binders to the concrete structure of NPPs, while the researches on properties, characteristic of hydration, durability and long-term behavior of high fluidity concrete using multi-component cement should be carried out. High fluidity concrete which is made using portland cement and pozzlonan powders such as fly ash and blast furnace slag has better properties on heat of hydration than the concrete currently in use for NPPs

  1. Measures against concrete cracking in underground type light oil tank pit construction work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Takeo; Kadowaki, Kazuhiko; Date, Masanao

    2017-01-01

    The underground type light oil tank pit set at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station is a tripartite underground pit structure made of reinforced concrete. This is a mass concrete made of deck slab / outer wall of 1.5 m in thickness and inner wall / top slab of 1.0 m in thickness. Since concrete placement season was July for the deck slab and October for the walls, the occurrence of thermal cracking was highly conceivable. As a result of investigating crack suppression measures based on the crack width of 0.2 mm or less as a guide, the application of fly ash cement and the addition of expansion material to the walls were judged effective and adopted. Thanks to these preliminary studies and careful construction control, it was possible to minimize the occurrence of cracks, but several through cracks of 0.2 mm or less were confirmed on part of the outer walls. As a countermeasure, repair by means of surface impregnation method was adopted, and quality and schedule could be secured. This paper outlines crack suppression measures and repair of the cracks that occurred after the implementation. (A.O.)

  2. Influence of Recycled Concrete Dust on the Properties of Self– Compacting Concrete (SCC)

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanauskas, Ernestas; Lazauskas, Mantas; Grigaliūnas, Paulius

    2017-01-01

    Concrete – composite material which economical effect mostly depends on the amount of binder material (usually cement), its type and fineness. Cement manufacturing generates great employment of energy resources. The demand for all kind of manufacturing natural resources are aimed to be reduced as much as possible. Alternative raw material resources are being introduced and tested together with increasing self-compacting concrete (SCC) popularity in Lithuania. Considering environmental require...

  3. Special concrete shield selection using the analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    Special types of concrete radiation shields that depend on locally available materials and have improved properties for both neutron and gamma-ray attenuation were developed by using plastic materials and heavy ores. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is implemented to evaluate these types for selecting the best biological radiation shield for nuclear reactors. Factors affecting the selection decision are degree of protection against neutrons, degree of protection against gamma rays, suitability of the concrete as building material, and economic considerations. The seven concrete alternatives are barite-polyethylene concrete, barite-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) concrete, barite-portland cement concrete, pyrite-polyethylene concrete, pyrite-PVC concrete, pyrite-portland cement concrete, and ordinary concrete. The AHP analysis shows the superiority of pyrite-polyethylene concrete over the others

  4. Effects of T-type Channel on Natural Convection Flows in Airflow-Path of Concrete Storage Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Gyeong Uk; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Cho, Chun Hyung [KORAD, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The natural convection flows occurring in airflow-path are not simple due to complex flow-path configurations such as horizontal ducts, bent tube and annular flow-path. In addition, 16 T type channels acting as the shroud are attached vertically and 16 channel supporting the canister are attached horizontally on the inner surface of over-pack. The existence and nonexistence of T type channels have influences on the flow fields in airflow- path. The concrete storage cask has to satisfy the requirements to secure the thermal integrity under the normal, off-normal, and accident conditions. The present work is aiming at investigating the effects of T type channels on the flows in airflow-path under the normal conditions using the FLUENT 16.1 code. In order to focus on the flows in airflow-path, fuel regions in the canister are regarded as a single cylinder with heat sources and other components are fully modeled. This study investigated the flow fields in airflow-path of concrete storage cask, numerically. It was found that excepting for the fuel regions, maximum temperatures on other components were evaluated below allowable values. The location of maximum velocities depended on support channels, T type channels and flow area. The flows through air inlets developed along annular flow- path with forming the hot plumes. According to the existence and nonexistence of T type channel, the plume behavior showed the different flow patterns.

  5. Test of workability of concrete for PCCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadayoshi; Nagase, Tetsuo; Yoshimori, Yoshinari

    1987-01-01

    The construction of the prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for Tsuruga No.2 plant of Japan Atomic Power Co. is the first case in Japan, and since the concrete having high strength and low slump is placed, the test of concrete placing by taking out a part of a full size test wall and the test of workability regarding the vibration compacting of concrete using a vibrator were carried out beforehand, and the results were reflected to the actual construction works. In this report, the workability test on the concrete is described. As difficulty is expected in the actual placing of the concrete having high strength and low slump, for the purpose of confirming the property of placing of the concrete in the cylindrical wall, and obtaining the basic data for the management of the actual concrete works and the quality control, the concrete placing test was carried out. At the time of concrete placing, the compacting of concrete is important, therefore, the basic data on the effect that the type, diameter, vibrating time and vibration propagation range of vibrators exert on the compacting of concrete were obtained, and reflected to the actual compacting. The purpose, testing method, results and the reflection to the actual works of these tests are reported. (Kako, I.)

  6. Early Property Development in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Gitte; Munch-Petersen, Christian

    The Freiesleben Maturity function is widely used for planning of execution. We tested if for concrete with and without fly ash. The test showed surprisingly that the maturity function in general is not valid. We found that curing at high temperature gave a significant decrease in strength. Fly ash...... appears to reduce this decrease somewhat. We also examined the resistance against chloride penetration for the different concrete types. The resistance was reduced at high temperatures for concrete without fly ash. For concrete with fly ash, it was the opposite; concrete with fly ash obtained higher...

  7. Activation experiment for concrete blocks using thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Koichi; Tanaka, Seiichiro

    2017-09-01

    Activation experiments for ordinary concrete, colemanite-peridotite concrete, B4C-loaded concrete, and limestone concrete are carried out using thermal neutrons. The results reveal that the effective dose for gamma rays from activated nuclides of colemanite-peridotite concrete is lower than that for the other types of concrete. Therefore, colemanite-peridotite concrete is useful for reducing radiation exposure for workers.

  8. The Effects of Different Types of Concrete on Population Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, A.; Iida, T.; Moriizumi, J.; Sakuma, Y.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the radionuclide concentrations of materials constituting concrete in Japan, measurements have been carried out on the components, namely steel, coarse aggregate, fine aggregate, cement, cement admixture and water. Since the radionuclide concentrations of steel, cement admixture and water are far less than those of other components, only coarse aggregate, fine aggregate and cement were measured. The mean concentrations of 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th in the concrete samples cover a wide range from 6.8 to 912.5 (average 505.2) Bq.kg -1 , 2.93 to 86.7 (average 32.3) Bq.kg -1 , and 1.59 to 61.6 (average 25.6) Bq.kg -1 , respectively. The average annual dose at 1 m above an infinite plane surface for the samples studied is calculated as 318 μSv.y -1 . These results show that the radionuclide concentrations of components in concrete in Japan are lower than those in other countries. The concentrations showed nearly the same distribution pattern as the intensity of γ rays from soil and tectonic lines in the various geographical regions. (author)

  9. Basic principles of concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xianglin; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the latest version of designing codes both for buildings and bridges (GB50010-2010 and JTG D62-2004), this book starts from steel and concrete materials, whose properties are very important to the mechanical behavior of concrete structural members. Step by step, analysis of reinforced and prestressed concrete members under basic loading types (tension, compression, flexure, shearing and torsion) and environmental actions are introduced. The characteristic of the book that distinguishes it from other textbooks on concrete structures is that more emphasis has been laid on the basic theories of reinforced concrete and the application of the basic theories in design of new structures and analysis of existing structures. Examples and problems in each chapter are carefully designed to cover every important knowledge point. As a basic course for undergraduates majoring in civil engineering, this course is different from either the previously learnt mechanics courses or the design courses to be learnt. Compa...

  10. Variable Geometry Casting of Concrete Elements Using Pin-Type Tooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Holm; Lenau, Torben Anker

    2010-01-01

    for aircrafts, trains and cranial prostheses. The present project focuses on VGM for free form concrete facade elements, which in contrast to previous VGM projects uses a liquid raw material and involves the use of only a small amount of force. Method of Approach: The present VGM process is based on the so...... interpolating layer. Castings with concrete and plaster are made on an elastic membrane that is sucked towards the pins using a vacuum. The shape of the cast elements and the mould surface have been measured and compared. Results: The RPT test mould can produce a large variety of free-form geometric shapes...... principle can be used for making scale models of a range of free-form cast concrete façade elements. It is possible almost to remove the imprints from the pins by using the right interpolators, but the dimples could also be a visually attractive characteristic of the process that could be valued...

  11. Development of Nano technology in High Performance Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nima Farzadnia; Abang Abdullah Abang Ali; Ramazan Demirboga; Demirboga, R.

    2011-01-01

    Concrete is the most widely used building material all around the world which has been undergoing many changes aligned with technological advancement. The most recent available type of concrete is high performance concrete which is produced by employing different admixtures both chemical and mineral to enhance mechanical properties and durability. Recently, technology has made it easy for scientist to study nano sized admixtures and their effect on microstructure of concrete. This paper reviews nano particles in cement composites and how they can improve different properties of concrete. (author)

  12. Development of high-performance concrete having high resistance to chloride penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Byung Hwan; Cha, Soo Won; Jang, Bong Seok; Jang, Seung Yup

    2002-01-01

    The resistance to chloride penetration is one of the simplest measures to determine the durability of concrete, e.g. resistance to freezing and thawing, corrosion of steel in concrete and other chemical attacks. Thus, high-performance concrete may be defined as the concrete having high resistance to chloride penetration as well as high strength. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the resistance to chloride penetration of different types of concrete and to develop high-performance concrete that has very high resistance to chloride penetration, and thus, can guarantee high durability. A large number of concrete specimens have been tested by the rapid chloride permeability test method as designated in AASHTO T 277 and ASTM C 1202. The major test variables include water-to-binder ratios, type of cement, type and amount of mineral admixtures (silica fume, fly ash and blast-furnace slag), maximum size of aggregates and air-entrainment. Test results show that concrete containing optimal amount of silica fume shows very high resistance to chloride penetration, and high-performance concrete developed in this study can be efficiently employed to enhance the durability of concrete structures in severe environments such as nuclear power plants, water-retaining structures and other offshore structures

  13. Effect of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Mohsin, S. M.; Baarimah, A. O.; Jokhio, G. A.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of kenaf fibers in reinforced concrete slab with different thickness is discusses and presented in this paper. Kenaf fiber is a type of natural fiber and is added in the reinforced concrete slab to improve the structure strength and ductility. For this study, three types of mixtures were prepared with fiber volume fraction of 0%, 1% and 2%, respectively. The design compressive strength considered was 20 MPa. Six cubes were prepared to be tested at 7th and 28th day. A total of six reinforced concrete slab with two variances of thickness were also prepared and tested under four-point bending test. The differences in the thickness is to study the potential of kenaf fiber to serve as part of shear reinforcement in reinforced concrete slab that was design to fail in shear. It was observed that, addition of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab improves the flexural strength and ductility of the reinforced concrete slab. In the slab with reduction in thickness, the mode of failure change from brittle to ductile with the inclusion of kenaf fiber.

  14. The assessment of bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M. Z. A. Mohd; Muhamad, K.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete (HPFRC). Firstly, this paper presents the various steps taken to prepare the HPFRC with self-compacting property. The minimum targeted slump flow is 600 mm and minimum targeted compressive strength is 80 MPa. The key mix variables considered are such as type of superplasticizer, water cement ratio and silica fume content. Then, the bond strength between the heat damaged concrete with HPFRC was examined. The experimental parameters are heating temperature, surface treatment technique and curing method and the results show that, all experimental parameters are significantly affected the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and HPFRC.

  15. FORMULATION OF MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM DESCRIBING PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES AT CONCRETE CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Fedosov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the relevance of new scientific research focused on modeling of physical and chemical processes occurring in the cement concrete at their exploitation. The basic types of concrete corrosion are described. The problem of mass transfer processes in a flat reinforced concrete wall at concrete corrosion of the first and the second types has been mathematically formulated.

  16. Study on Seismic Behavior of Recycled Concrete Energy-efficient Homes Structure Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main point is to study the seismic behavior of the lattice type recycled concrete energy saving wall under low-cyclic loading,to provide the basis for the seismic performance of application of recycled concrete lattice wall in energy-saving residential structure. Design two walls with the same structure measures, include Lattice type recycled concrete wall and natural concrete wall, they are tested under low-cycle repetitive loading, compared failure mode and seismic performance in different reinforcement conditions of side column. The bearing capacity and ductility of recycled aggregate concrete are better than natural aggregate concrete, The stiffness degradation curves and the skeleton curves of the walls are basically the same, both of them have better seismic energy dissipation capacity. Lattice type concrete wall is good at seismic performance, recycled aggregate concrete is good at plastic deformation ability, it is advantageous to seismic energy dissipation of wall, it can be applied in energy efficient residential structure wall.

  17. Experimental study and field application of calcium sulfoaluminate cement for rapid repair of concrete pavements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhua GUAN; Ying GAO; Renjuan SUN; Moon C.WON; Zhi GE

    2017-01-01

    The fast-track repair of deteriorated concrete pavement requires materials that can be placed,cured,and opened to the traffic in a short period.Type Ⅲ cement and Calcium Sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement are the most commonly used fast-setting hydraulic cement (FSHC).In this study,the properties of Type Ⅲ and CSA cement concrete,including compressive strength,coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and shrinkage were evaluated.The test results indicate that compressive strength of FSHC concrete increased rapidly at the early age.CSA cement concrete had higher early-age and long term strength.The shrinkage of CSA cement concrete was lower than that of Type Ⅲ cement concrete.Both CSA and Type Ⅲ cement concrete had similar CTE values.Based on the laboratory results,the CSA cement was selected as the partial-depth rapid repair material for a distressed continuously reinforced concrete pavement.The data collected during and after the repair show that the CSA cement concrete had good short-term and long-term performances and,therefore,was suitable for the rapid repair of concrete pavement.

  18. Usage of Crushed Concrete Fines in Decorative Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Anton; Bazhenova, Sofia

    2017-10-01

    The article is devoted to the questions of usage of crushed concrete fines from concrete scrap for the production of high-quality decorative composite materials based on mixed binder. The main problem in the application of crushed concrete in the manufacture of decorative concrete products is extremely low decorative properties of crushed concrete fines itself, as well as concrete products based on them. However, crushed concrete fines could have a positive impact on the structure of the concrete matrix and could improve the environmental and economic characteristics of the concrete products. Dust fraction of crushed concrete fines contains non-hydrated cement grains, which can be opened in screening process due to the low strength of the contact zone between the hydrated and non-hydrated cement. In addition, the screening process could increase activity of the crushed concrete fines, so it can be used as a fine aggregate and filler for concrete mixes. Previous studies have shown that the effect of the usage of the crushed concrete fines is small and does not allow to obtain concrete products with high strength. However, it is possible to improve the efficiency of the crushed concrete fines as a filler due to the complex of measures prior to mixing. Such measures may include a preliminary mechanochemical activation of the binder (cement binder, iron oxide pigment, silica fume and crushed concrete fines), as well as the usage of polycarboxylate superplasticizers. The development of specific surface area of activated crushed concrete fines ensures strong adhesion between grains of binder and filler during the formation of cement stone matrix. The particle size distribution of the crushed concrete fines could achieve the densest structure of cement stone matrix and improve its resistance to environmental effects. The authors examined the mechanisms of structure of concrete products with crushed concrete fines as a filler. The results of studies of the properties of

  19. Composite Behavior of a Novel Insulated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panel Reinforced with GFRP Shear Grids: Effects of Insulation Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JunHee; You, Young-Chan

    2015-03-03

    A full-scale experimental program was used in this study to investigate the structural behavior of novel insulated concrete sandwich wall panels (SWPs) reinforced with grid-type glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shear connectors. Two kinds of insulation-expanded polystyrene (EPS) and extruded polystyrene (XPS) with 100 mm thickness were incased between the two concrete wythes to meet the increasing demand for the insulation performance of building envelope. One to four GFRP shear grids were used to examine the degree of composite action of the two concrete wythes. Ten specimens of SWPs were tested under displacement control subjected to four-point concentrated loads. The test results showed that the SWPs reinforced with GFRP grids as shear connectors developed a high degree of composite action resulting in high flexural strength. The specimens with EPS foam exhibited an enhanced load-displacement behavior compared with the specimens with XPS because of the relatively stronger bond between insulation and concrete. In addition, the ultimate strength of the test results was compared to the analytical prediction with the mechanical properties of only GRFP grids. The specimens with EPS insulation presented higher strength-based composite action than the ones with XPS insulation.

  20. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yi., E-mail: zhaoyi091218@163.com [School of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Zhongyuan University of Technology,Zhengzhou 450000 (China); Xu, Li. Hua. [School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, No.8, Donghu Road, WuHan 430072 (China)

    2016-06-08

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  1. Effect of mixing methods and aggregate type on strength of hardened concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhadi, S.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the research contained in this paper is to study the effect on strength of concrete which can be caused by changing method of concrete mix with or without changing aggregate crushing value under hand or mechanical compaction, and to compare results obtained when nondestructive testing techniques are used. It has been found that all methods of mix design are nearly identical in predicting the strength under a known value of w/c ratio. Up to strength of about 30 N/mm 2 , hand and mechanical compaction seems to be identical in all methods of concrete mixing. Important results regarding destructive and non-destructive testing has been drawn from the study.(Author)

  2. The Effect of Corrosive Environment on Geopolymer Concrete Tensile Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayuaji Ridho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has the purpose to explore the potential of geopolymer concrete tensile strength in particular on the effects of corrosive environments. Geopolymer concrete, concrete technology used no OPC that has advantages, one of which is durability, especially for corrosive seawater environment. In addition, geopolymer concrete with polymerization mechanism does not require large energy consumption or an environmentally friendly concept. Geopolymer concrete in this study is using a type C fly ash from PT. International Power Mitsui Operation & Maintenence Indonesia (IPMOMI Paiton. The type of alkaline activator used NaOH (14 molar and Na2SiO3. Coarse and fine aggregate used are local aggregate. Geopolymer concrete molded test specimen with dimensions of (10 × 20 cm cylinder, further heating and without heating, then maintained at room temperature and seawater up to 28 days. Then to determine the mechanical properties, the tensile strength testing is done with reference. This result of study indicates the curing of geopolymer concrete at 60 ° C for 24 hours to raise the tensile strength of geopolymer concrete.

  3. Analazing the impact behavior of porous concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agar Ozbek, A.S.; Weerheijm, J.

    2014-01-01

    Porous concrete is a special type of cementitious material incorporating a high amount of meso-size air pores that makes its characteristics markedly different from normal concrete. Therefore, it is being investigated for various applications, aiming to benefit from the presence of the air voids in

  4. Creep of concrete under various temperature, moisture, and loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain information on the time-dependent deformation behavior of concrete in the presence of temperature, moisture, and loading conditions similar to those encountered in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Variables included concrete strength, aggregate types, curing history, temperature, and types of loading (uniaxial, hydrostatic, biaxial, and triaxial). There were 66 test conditions for creep tests and 12 test conditions for unloaded or control specimens. Experimental results are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made concerning the effect of the various test conditions on the behavior of concrete, and general conclusions are formulated

  5. Performance of self-consolidating concrete in prestressed girders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    A structural investigation of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) in AASHTO Type I precast, : prestressed girders was performed. Six test girders were subjected to transfer length and : flexural testing. Three separate concrete mixtures, two girders pe...

  6. Porous Structure of Road Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Пшембаев, М. К.; Гиринский, В. В.; Ковалев, Я. Н.; Яглов, В. Н.; Будниченко, С. С.

    2016-01-01

    Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such st...

  7. Time-dependent deformation of concrete under multiaxial stress conditions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.E.

    1975-10-01

    An investigation was made on the time-dependent deformation behavior of concrete in the presence of temperature, moisture, and loading conditions similar to those encountered in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). This investigation encompassed one concrete strength (6000 psi at 28 days), three aggregate types (chert, limestone, and graywacke), one cement (Type II), two types of specimens (as-cast and air-dried), two levels of temperature during test (73 and 150 0 F), and four types of loading (uniaxial, hydrostatic, biaxial, and triaxial). This effort was intended primarily as a data report; the experimental procedures and results are presented in detail. A comprehensive evaluation of the effects of various parameters and their interactions on the behavior of concrete is not included. However, a number of general comparisons were made concerning the effect of the various test conditions on concrete behavior. Based on this limited evaluation of the data, general conclusions and recommendations for additional work were formulated

  8. POROUS STRUCTURE OF ROAD CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such structural components as crystal intergrowth, tobermorite gel, incompletely hydrated cement grains and porous space. The most important technological factors that influence on formation of cement stone microstructure are chemical and mineralogical cement composition, its grinding fineness, water-cement ratio and curing condition. Specific cement stone microstructure is formed due to interrelation of these factors. Cement stone is a capillary-porous body that consists of various solid phases represented predominantly by sub-microcrystals of colloidal dispersion. The sub-microcrystals are able adsorptively, osmotically and structurally to withhold (to bind some amount of moisture. Protection of road concrete as a capillary-porous body is considered as one of the topical issues. The problem is solved with the help of primary and secondary protection methods. Methods of primary protection are used at the stage of designing, preparation and placing of concrete. Methods of secondary protection are applied at the operational stage of road concrete pavement. The paper considers structures of concrete solid phase and characteristics of its porous space. Causes of pore initiation, their shapes, dimensions and arrangement in the concrete are presented in the paper. The highest hazard for road concrete lies in penetration of aggressive liquid in it and moisture transfer in the cured concrete. Water permeability of concrete characterizes its filtration factor which

  9. Historic Concrete : From Concrete Repair to Concrete Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete like materials were already applied during the Roman Empire. After the decline of the Roman Empire, a wide scale application of concrete only reappeared in the 19th century. Here lies also the origin of modern (reinforced) concrete. Since then, both concrete application and composition have

  10. Offshore concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamas Pardo, M.; Carral Couce, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    proof that in certain cases the benefits to the steel tip the lance toward the concrete. concrete Gravity Baseplaforms type Con deep have been building since the first unit became operational in 1976, together with a few floating platforms, that in its geometry are similar to those made of steel (barges, semi-submersibles and TLP type platforms). Some of the concepts in concrete that are being emerging last years are floating and gravity base platforms for use as offshore LNG terminals and as offshore industrial plants. The life of these barges can be designed up to 200 years, as the floating Nkossabarge, so they con be a good alternative to the construction of these facilities an land, thus avoiding landfills on the coast that degrade the already punished coast in industrialized countries. the challenge is precisely to optimize their capital costs to complete for an offshore installation against a shore facility. The environment will undoubtedly benefit from this great challenge that lies ahead in the XXI century. (Author) 29 refs.

  11. Construction of concrete hot cells; requirements for shielding windows for concrete walls with different densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The shielding windows form part of the basic equipment of hot cells for remote handling, as defined in standard DIN 25 420 part 1. The draft standard in hand is intended to specify the design and manufacture requirements, especially with regard to main dimensions, sight quality, shielding effects, and radiation resistance. The standard refers to three types of shielding window with surface area design (product of density and wall thickness) corresponding to concrete walls of the densities 2.4, 3.4, and 4.0 g/cm 3 . The windows fit to three types of concrete of common usage, and the design is made for Co-60 radiation, with attenuation factors of about 10 4 , 10 6 , or 10 7 . For concrete walls with densities between these data, a shielding window suitable to the next higher density data is to be chosen. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  13. Concrete workability and fibre content

    OpenAIRE

    Vikan, Hedda

    2007-01-01

    Research report Parameters influencing the workability of fibre concrete and maximum fibre content are given in this state of the art report along with the range of fibre types available on today’s market. The study reveales that new placing techniques and production methods are crucial in order to increase fibre content and concrete strength. Achieving the same mechanical properties as traditionally reinforced concrete will probably also demand changes of the matrix. Finally, reco...

  14. Impact of Aggregate Gradation and Filler Type on Marshall Properties of Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saad I. Sarsam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As asphalt concrete wearing course (ACWC is the top layer in the pavement structure, the material should be able to sustain stresses caused by direct traffic loading. The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of aggregate gradation and mineral filler type on Marshall Properties. A detailed laboratory study is carried out by preparing asphalt mixtures specimens using locally available materials including asphalt binder (40-50 penetration grade, two types of aggregate gradation representing SCRB and ROAD NOTE 31 specifications and two types of mineral filler including limestone dust and coal fly ash. Four types of mixtures were prepared and tested. The first type included SCRB specification and limestone dust, the second type included SCRB specification and coal fly ash, the third types included ROAD NOTE 31 specification and limestone dust and the fourth type included ROAD NOTE 31 specification and coal fly ash. The optimum asphalt content of each type of mixtures was determined using Marshall Method of mix design. 60 specimen were prepared and tested with dimension of 10.16 cm in diameter and 6.35 cm in height. Results of this study indicated that aggregate gradation and filler type have a significant effect on optimum asphalt content and Marshall Properties. From the experimental data, it was observed that the value of Marshall Stability is comparatively higher when using fly ash as filler as compared to limestone dust.

  15. Prediction and control of the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegeldorf, S.; Kleiser, K.; Hilsdorf, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    Prediction and control of the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete. In this report various procedures for the prediction of the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete are summarized. The values predicted with these procedures are compared to experimental data. In the experimental investigation the coefficient of thermal expansion of various types of aggregates and types of concrete both in a dry and a moist state in the temperature range RT/180 0 C have been measured. The most significant result obtained is that for equal volume fractions the thermal properties of coarse aggregates have a more pronounced effect upon thermal expansion of concrete than those of fine aggregates. In the analysis an attempt has been made to estimate the thermal expansion of concrete from the properties of the concrete components by means of a finite element procedure. On the basis of the experimental data and of the analysis of internal temperature stresses in the concrete a simple relationship for the determination of the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete has been deduced. In this relationship different thermal properties of coarse and fine aggregates may be taken into account. Compared to other methods this relationship yields, both for dry and for moist concrete, values which are in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.) [de

  16. Calculation of the temperature of asphalt concrete at making the joints of multilane road pavement of non-rigid type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyasov Botir Iminzhonovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The construction quality of road surface of non-rigid type essentially depend on providing the temperature regimes in the process of laying and packing of hot asphalt concrete mixtures. In order to provide the required characteristics of asphalt concrete due to the surface width it is necessary to provide the temperature regimes of hot asphalt concrete mixture in the zones of lane connection. The hot mixture is promptly cooling right after laying within several minutes, which results, according to the construction technology and the specific conditions of work production, in temperature abuse of the mixture at joints of the lanes at packing. The authors present the analysis of the technology of arranging multilane road surface by one paver with the possibility of heating the surface lane edge with the temperature of the adjacent lane. The results of the studies of the production conditions effect on the temperature of edge heating of the previously laid lanes, and the time required to achieve the maximum heating temperature depending on the relative thickness of coating layers.

  17. Factors and mechanisms affecting corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehqanian, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic power plants possess reinforced concrete structures which are exposed to sea water or sea atmosphere. Sea water or its surrounding environment contain very corrosive species which cause corrosion of metal in concrete. It should be mentioned that corrosion of steel in concrete is a complex problem that is not completely understood. Some of the factors which influence the corrosion mechanism and can be related to the pore solution composition is discussed. Chloride ion caused problems are the main source of the corrosion damage seen on the reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion rate in concrete varies and depends on the way chloride ion diffuses into concrete. In addition, the associated cations can influence diffusion of chloride into concrete. The type of portland cement and also the concrete mix design all affect the corrosion behaviour of steel in concrete

  18. Use of SCC in Prefabricated Concrete Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm; Lauritsen, Ib

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents observations made on the use of self-compacting concrete for pre-cast elements at Byggebjerg Beton A/S during the last 3 years. The elements include L- and sandwich elements and are mainly produced for agriculture purposes. In general, the flow properties and air content...... of the concrete to achieve a good surface quality with a limited number of blowholes. For horizontal castings it is important to keep the concrete flowing to avoid casting joints. Blocking is avoided by using the right type of spacers and a maximum size aggregate of 8mm. However, if the concrete has to flow over...

  19. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  20. Environmental performance and mechanical analysis of concrete containing recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) and waste precast concrete as aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Savaş; Blankson, Marva Angela

    2014-01-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating 100% recycled aggregates, either waste precast concrete or waste asphalt planning, as replacements for virgin aggregates in structural concrete and to determine the mechanical and environmental performance of concrete containing these aggregates. Four different types of concrete mixtures were designed with the same total water cement ratio (w/c=0.74) either by using natural aggregate as reference or by totally replacing the natural aggregate with recycled material. Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) was used as a mineral addition (35%) in all mixtures. The test results showed that it is possible to obtain satisfactory performance for strength characteristics of concrete containing recycled aggregates, if these aggregates are sourced from old precast concrete. However, from the perspective of the mechanical properties, the test results indicated that concrete with RAP aggregate cannot be used for structural applications. In terms of leaching, the results also showed that the environmental behaviour of the recycled aggregate concrete is similar to that of the natural aggregate concrete. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies of detailed biofilm characterization on fly ash concrete in comparison with normal and superplasticizer concrete in seawater environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarmaa, Vinita; George, R P; Ramachandran, D; Anandkumar, B; Mudalib, U Kamachi

    2014-01-01

    In cooling water systems, many concrete structures in the form of tanks, pillars and reservoirs that come in contact with aggressive seawater are being deteriorated by chemical and biological factors. The nuclear industry has decided to partially replace the Portland cement with appropriate pozzolans such as fly ash, which could densify the matrix and make the concrete impermeable. Three types of concrete mixes, viz., normal concrete (NC), concrete with fly ash and superplasticizer (FA) and concrete with only superplasticizer (SP) were fabricated for short- and long-term exposure studies and for screening out the better concrete in seawater environments. Biofilm characterization studies and microscopic studies showed excellent performance of FA concrete compared to the other two. Laboratory exposure studies in pure cultures of Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Fusarium oxysporum were demonstrated for the inhibition of microbial growth on fly ash. Epifluorescence and scanning electron microscopic studies supported the better performance of the FA specimen. Thus, the present study clearly showed that FA concrete is less prone to biofilm formation and biodeterioration.

  2. Fracture behaviour of heat cured fly ash based geopolymer concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarker, Prabir K.; Haque, Rashedul; Ramgolam, Karamchand V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fly ash geopolymer (GPC) can help reduce carbon footprint of concrete. ► Fracture behaviour of GPC as compared to OPC concrete was studied. ► Fracture energy of GPC was similar to that of OPC concrete. ► GPC showed higher fracture toughness than OPC concrete. ► Higher bond strength resulted in higher crack resistance of GPC. -- Abstract: Use of fly ash based geopolymer as an alternative binder can help reduce CO 2 emission of concrete. The binder of geopolymer concrete (GPC) is different from that of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete. Thus, it is necessary to study the effects of the geopolymer binder on the behaviour of concrete. In this study, the effect of the geopolymer binder on fracture characteristics of concrete has been investigated by three point bending test of RILEM TC 50 – FMC type notched beam specimens. The peak load was generally higher in the GPC specimens than the OPC concrete specimens of similar compressive strength. The failure modes of the GPC specimens were found to be more brittle with relatively smooth fracture planes as compared to the OPC concrete specimens. The post-peak parts of the load–deflection curves of GPC specimens were steeper than that of OPC concrete specimens. Fracture energy calculated by the work of fracture method was found to be similar in both types of concrete. Available equations for fracture energy of OPC concrete yielded conservative estimations of fracture energy of GPC. The critical stress intensity factor of GPC was found to be higher than that of OPC concrete. The different fracture behaviour of GPC is mainly because of its higher tensile strength and bond strength than OPC concrete of the same compressive strength.

  3. Evaluation of the suitability for concrete using fly ash in N.P.P. structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M. S.; Song, Y. C.; Kim, S. W.; Ko, K. T.

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear power plant structures constructed in Korea has been generally used type V cement(sulfate-resisting Portland cement), but according to the study results reported recently, it shows that type V cement is superior the resistance of sulfate attack, but the resistance of salt damage is weaker than type I cement. It is increased the demands on the use of mineral admixtures such as fly ash, ground granulated blast-furnace slag instead of type V cement in order to improve the durability of concrete structures. But the study on concrete mixed with fly ash in Korea has been mainly performed on rheology and strength properties of the concrete. Therefore, this study is to improve the durability of concrete structures of N.P.P. as using fly ash cement instead of type V cement. As a results, the concrete containing fly ash is improved the resistance to salt attack, sulfate attack and freezing-thawing and is deteriorated the carbonation. But if it is used the concrete with high strength or low water-powder ratio, the concrete have not problem on the durability

  4. Investigation on Mie-Grüneisen type shock Hugoniot equation of state for concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Katayama

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper ascertains that the bilinear shock Hugoniot equation of state (EOS can model the plasticizing process of the porous media like concrete material for high-velocity impact problems successfully. The negative slope of the bilinear Hugoniot for low particle velocity regime can simulate the process that the porosity of concrete may be compressed to form shock wave in concrete, through a series of numerical analyses over the investigation on the physical phenomena. The results of particle velocity for the concrete material are also discussed to be compared with those of non-porous aluminum alloy for 100 and 1000 m/s impact velocities. All the numerical simulations were carried out by applying the bilinear shock Hugoniot EOS to concrete which was linked to the binary object of a hydrocode: ANSYS Autodyn®[1−3] through a user’s subroutine.

  5. Effects of prestressing on impact resistance of concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, H.; Kishi, N.; Matsuoka, K.G.; Mikami, T.; Nomachi, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of prestressing on impact resistance of concrete beams using two types of prestressed concrete (PC) tendons are discussed based on experimental results. Aramids Fiber Reinforced Plastic rods and PC steel strand were used as PC tendons. To clarify the effects of prestressing on concrete beam impact resistance, dynamic behavior of prestressed and/or non-prestressed concrete beams with different PC tendon arrangements were considered. Impact test were performed using a 200 kg f free falling steel weight on to the center of beam. (author). 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Time-Dependent Topology of Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-10-01

    The railway sleepers are very important component of railway track structure. The sleepers can be manufactured by using timber, concrete, steel or other engineered materials. Nowadays, prestressed concrete has become most commonly used type of sleepers. Prestressed concrete sleepers have longer life-cycle and lower maintenance cost than reinforced concrete sleepers. They are expected to withstand high dynamic loads and harsh environments. However, durability and long-term performance of prestressed concrete sleepers are largely dependent on creep and shrinkage responses. This study investigates the long-term behaviours of prestressed concrete sleepers and proposes the shortening and deflection diagrams. Comparison between design codes of Eurocode 2 and AS3600-2009 provides the insight into the time-dependent performance of prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this paper will improve the rail maintenance and inspection criteria in order to establish appropriate sensible remote track condition monitor network in practice.

  7. influence of severe conditions on the concrete employed in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, W.M.K.S.

    2006-01-01

    this thesis is mainly concentrating on honing the efficiency of heavy-weight high -performance (HWHP) concrete, developed from local aggregates together with additives that are waste products of other manufacturing processes, for the purpose of producing radiation shields, to attenuate gamma-rays in peaceful active-service facilitations . in other words, the thesis is in attempt to develop a special type of heavy concrete of various advantages that would enhance its performance in severe environment. such advantages may embrace concurrent improvements; such as high specific gravity, workability, high compressive strength, efficient attenuator for gamma radiation, and resistant to elevated temperature along with chemical attack.the named HWHP concrete was mainly prepared using two types of heavy aggregates, ilmenite (iron ore) and barite . in addition usual concrete (dolomite/sand) was also employed in this thesis to compare the obtained HWHP concrete. the practical facet of this thesis accounts for evaluating the influence of severe conditions, concomitantly and consecutively, on mechanical , morphological and attenuation characteristics for the three types of concrete

  8. Development of special radiation shielding concretes using natural local materials and evaluation of their shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Takeyeddin, M.; Al-Nassri, M.; Yousef, S.

    2008-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most important materials used for radiation shielding in facilities containing radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the composite of the concrete. Aggregates is the largest constituent (about 70-80% of the total weight of normal concrete). The aim of this work is to develop special concrete with good shielding properties for gamma and neutrons, using natural local materials. For this reason two types of typical concrete widely used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) and four other types of concrete, using aggregates from different regions, have been prepared. The shielding properties of these six types were studied for gamma ray (from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources)and for neutrons (from am-Be source). A reduction of about 10% in the HVL was obtained for the concrete from Damascus in comparison with that from Aleppo, for both neutrons and gammas. One of the other four types of concrete (from Rajo site, mostly Hematite), was found to further reduce the HVL by about 10% for both neutrons and gamma rays.(author)

  9. Corrosion initiation and service life of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung Hwan Oh; Bong Seok Jang

    2005-01-01

    The Corrosion of steel reinforcements in concrete is of great concern in the view of safety and durability of reinforced concrete structures. The reinforced concrete structures exposed to sea environments suffer from corrosion of steel bars due to chloride ingress. The chloride penetration into concrete is influenced by many parameters such as type of cement, mixture proportions and existence of rebars. The conventional diffusion analyses have neglected the existence of steel bar in concrete. The purpose of the present paper is, therefore, to explore the effects of reinforcement on the chloride diffusion in concrete structures by incorporating realistic diffusion models. To this end, the nonlinear binding isotherm which includes the effects of cement types and mixture proportion has been introduced in the chloride diffusion analysis. The effects of reinforcements on the chloride penetration have been analyzed through finite element analysis. The present study indicates that the chlorides are accumulated in front of a reinforcing bar and the accumulation of chlorides is much more pronounced for the case of larger-size bars. The higher accumulation of chlorides at bar location causes faster corrosion of reinforcing bars. The corrosion initiation time reduces by about 30-40 percent when the existence of rebar is considered in the chloride diffusion analysis. (authors)

  10. Improved technology for spun-cast concrete poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilger, W H; Ghali, A

    1984-07-01

    Different types of concrete were investigated with the goal of developing concrete suitable for the production of spun-cast concrete poles. A total of 65 different concrete mixes were investigated, with the suitability criteria defined as: compactability, no segregation of the mix components during the spinning operation, no shrinkage cracking, high strength, and durability. High strength normal weight concretes and semi-lightweight concretes, both with and without fly ash and/or silica fume and with different types of admixtures were used to produce spun-cast concrete pole segments. Of the 35 lightweight concretes only 3 were considered successful, as in all other specimens the inner layer of coarse aggregate was not well embedded in the mortar, and many mixes could not be compacted properly because they were too stiff, too wet, or started to set before spinning commenced. The three successful specimens contained fly ash and one contained silica fume, and had low water/cement ratios (0.26 to 0.29). Of the 23 normal weight concretes tested, only 5 were considered suitable, and all these had a sand/coarse aggregate ratio of 0.25 or smaller and a cement content between 350 and 400 kg/m{sup 3}. A theoretical study of the stresses in the end zones of pretensioned poles is presented. 10 refs., 53 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Concrete storage cask for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabemoto, Toyonobu; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Shunji; Shionaga, Ryosuke

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and analytical evaluation of the fabrication, non-destructive inspection and structural integrity of reinforced concrete body for storage casks were carried out to demonstrate the concrete storage cask for spent fuel generated from nuclear power plants. Analytical survey on the type of concrete material and fabrication method of the storage cask was performed and the most suitable fabrication method for the concrete body was identified to reduce concrete cracking. The structural integrity of the concrete body of the storage cask under load conditions during storage was confirmed and the long term integrity of concrete body against degradation dependent on environmental factors was evaluated. (author)

  12. Suitability of geopolymeric concretes for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipatti, A.; Kallio, L.

    1991-12-01

    Concrete barriers are in essential role in most of the disposal concepts for nuclear waste. As to the binders, the used high-quality, strong and dense concretes may be based both on the present types of cements and on new types of special cements. One feasible special cement discussed in this literature report is the geopolymeric cement, which is, at its cleanest, a completely lime-free binder composed mainly of aluminium silicates. However, in 1990 the lime-free aluminium silicate cement had not yet reached the stage of development required of a widely marketed factory product. On the other hand, as an applicable product the development work started as early as in the 70s in France and in the USA has reached a blended cement consisting both of geopolymeric and Portland cements. The main advantages of the geopolymeric concrete compared to the ordinary Portland cement concrete are based on richer and stronger chemical bonds of the cement stone. The strong three-dimensional networks of bonds make the geopolymeric concrete stronger, denser and, above all, more ductile. The geopolymeric concrete is particularly suitable for hazardous waste applications, since hazardous materials have been found to be locked inside the geopolymeric networks. The properties of the geopolymeric cements and concretes and the implemented applications seem to be highly promising, but as to the nuclear waste applications there is not sufficient amount of reliable experimental information available yet. The domestic cement and concrete industry will be in key position in accumulation of information and operating experiences. (orig.)

  13. High Early-Age Strength Concrete for Rapid Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, Matthew O.

    The aim of this research was to identify High Early-Age Strength (HES) concrete batch designs, and evaluate their suitability for use in the rapid repair of highways and bridge decks. To this end, two criteria needed to be met; a minimum compressive strength of 20.68 MPa (3000 psi) in no later than 12 hours, and a drying shrinkage of less than 0.06 % at 28 days after curing. The evaluations included both air-entrained, and non-air-entrained concretes. The cement types chosen for this study included Type III and Type V Portland cement and "Rapid Set"--a Calcium Sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement. In addition, two blended concretes containing different ratios of Type V Portland cement and CSA cement were investigated. The evaluation of the studied concretes included mechanical properties and transport properties. Additionally, dimensional stability and durability were investigated. Evaluations were conducted based on cement type and common cement factor. Fresh property tests showed that in order to provide a comparable workability, and still remain within manufactures guideline for plasticizer, the water-to-cement ratio was adjusted for each type of cement utilized. This resulted in the need to increase the water-to-cement ratio as the Blaine Fineness of the cement type increased (0.275 for Type V Portland cement, 0.35 for Type III Portland cement, and 0.4 for Rapid Set cement). It was also observed that negligible changes in setting time occurred with increasing cement content, whereas changes in cement type produced notable differences. The addition of air-entrainment had beneficial effect on workability for the lower cement factors. Increasing trends for peak hydration heat were seen with increases in cement factor, cement Blaine Fineness, and accelerator dosage. Evaluation of hardened properties revealed opening times as low as 5 hours for Type V Portland cement with 2.0 % accelerator per cement weight and further reduction in opening time by an hour when accelerator

  14. Development of refractory concrete for extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pundiene, I; Antonovich, V; Stonys, R; Demidova-Buiziniene, I

    2011-01-01

    Comparative analysis is provided for the properties of medium-cement refractory concrete with microsilica based on mullite filler in relation to different type of deflocculant. The effect of different deflocculants on refractory concrete structure formation, hydration, rheology, strength and heat resistance is discussed. Corrosion resistance test, determined that samples with hybrid deflocculant showed better resistance for slag penetration than samples with only the sodium tripolyphosphate or polycarboxylate ether deflocculant. Moreover, a composition of hybrid deflocculant let to control the rate of the hydration process and to get features of refractory refractory concrete.

  15. Seismic behavior of conxl connections in concrete filled steel Tube ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This connection consists of collar flange, collar corner, and collar web extension. In this paper, the seismic behavior of these types of connections is investigated using the numerical method. For this purpose, three samples of ConXL connections without concrete filler, with concrete filler and with concrete filler and stiffener ...

  16. Ground Glass Pozzolan in Conventional, High, and Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Tagnit-Hamou Arezki; Zidol Ablam; Soliman Nancy; Deschamps Joris; Omran Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Ground-glass pozzolan (G) obtained by grinding the mixed-waste glass to same fineness of cement can act as a supplementary-cementitious material (SCM), given that it is an amorphous and a pozzolanic material. The G showed promising performances in different concrete types such as conventional concrete (CC), high-performance concrete (HPC), and ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC). The current paper reports on the characteristics and performance of G in these concrete types. The use of G pro...

  17. Optimization of flowable concrete for structural design : Progress report of fib task group 8.8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunewald, S.; Ferrara, L.; Dehn, F.

    2014-01-01

    With the tendency to apply concrete with a higher workability and the use of new concrete components more options are available to design concrete. New concrete types like self-compacting concrete (SCC), ultra-high performance fibre reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) and high performance fibre reinforced

  18. Reaction products of densified silica fume agglomerates in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Sidney; Sahu, Sadananda; Thaulow, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Most silica fume currently used in concrete is in the dry densified form and consists of agglomerates of sizes between 10 μm and several millimeters. Many of these agglomerates may break down only partially in normal concrete mixing. Examination of various mature silica-fume-bearing concretes using backscatter mode scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis shows that such agglomerates have reacted in situ and given rise to recognizable types of reaction products filling the space within the original outline of the agglomerate. One type is 'quiescent', and usually shows no evidence of volume instability. EDX spectra indicate that the product formed within such grains is C-S-H of very low Ca/Si ratio, with modest alkali contents. Other silica fume agglomerates may undergo a distinct alkali-silica-type reaction (ASR), with the reaction product found within the original outline of the agglomerate having significantly less calcium and usually much higher alkali contents than the quiescent type. Such reacted agglomerates show evidence of local expansion, shrinkage cracking (on drying), and other features common to ASR. Both types may be found within the same concrete, sometimes in close proximity. It further appears that exposure to seawater may convert previously formed reaction products of silica fume agglomerates to magnesium silicate hydrates

  19. Application of nanotechnology in self-compacting concrete design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghsoudi, A. A.; Arabpour Dahooei, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, first, different mix design of four types of Self-Compacting Concrete, 1. Self-Compacting Concrete consisted of only nano silica, 2. Self-Compacting Concrete included only micro silica, 3. Self-Compacting Concrete consisted of both micro silica and nano silica and 4. Self-Compacting Concrete without micro silica and nano silica called as control mix, were casted and tested to find out the values of the Slump Flow, L-Box and 7 and 28 days compressive strength. Then, based on the results obtained and as yet there is no universally accepted standard for characterizing of Self-Compacting Concrete, the most suitable four concrete mixes were selected for further investigation of fresh and hardened concrete. For selected mixes, the fresh concrete properties such as values of the Slump Flow, L-Box, V-Funnel, J-Ring and hardened engineering properties such as compressive and flexural strength, shrinkage and swelling values were investigated for three curing conditions at short and long term. The results showed that the engineering properties of Self-Compacting Concrete mixes could not be improved by adding only nano silica. However, a satisfactory behavior can be achieved using micro silica in the Self-Compacting Concrete mixes. However, by adding both micro silica and nano silica to the Self-Compacting Concrete mixtures, the best effect on the engineering properties was reported while comparing to the control mixes.

  20. Analysis of Transparent Concrete as an Innovative Material Used in Civil Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Monika; Ciesielski, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Since the dawn of history concrete has been, right behind stone and brick, one of the oldest building materials. The ancient Romans took advantage of its opportunities. They constructed amazing architectural objects, which survived centuries as whole buildings or parts of them. Concrete is so ubiquitous, that when we are walking in a newer districts of cities we are virtually surrounded by concrete from everywhere. Sometimes we do not realize in how many cases and various ways concrete is used in towns and cities. As we know, human curiosity and quest for newer and newer solutions and capabilities does not leave such amazing material as concrete alone. There are many varieties of concrete, depending on what people want to achieve. By changing its chemical composition, technological process and adding various other materials, we receive various types of concrete. We use them to create durable supporting structures, a variety of concrete which is resistant to constant moisture or different chemical types. Additionally, some aspects of aesthetics in architecture are made with the help of concrete.

  1. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  2. Properties of ambient cured blended alkali activated cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha Junaid, M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents results of the development and strength properties of ambient-cured alkali activated geopolymer concrete (GPC). The study looks at the strength properties, such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and elastic modulus of such concretes and its dependency on various parameters. The parameters studied in this work are the type and proportions of pre-cursor materials, type of activator and their respective ratios and the curing time. Two types of pre-cursor material; low calcium fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) were activated using different proportions of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. The results indicate that ambient cured geopolymer concrete can be manufactured to match strength properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPC). The strength properties of GPC are dependent on the type and ratio of activator and the proportion of GGBFS used. Increasing the percentage of GGBFS increased the compressive and tensile strengths, while reducing the setting time of the mix. The effect of GGBFS on strength was more pronounced in mixes that contained sodium silicate as activator solution. Unlike OPC, ambient-cured GPC containing sodium silicate gain most of their strength in the first 7 days and there is no change in strength thereafter. However, GPC mixes not containing sodium silicate only achieve a fraction of their strength at 7 days and extended curing is required for such concretes to gain full strength. The results also indicate that the elastic modulus values of GPC mixes without sodium silicate are comparable to OPC while mixes with sodium silicate have elastic modulus values much lower than ordinary concrete.

  3. Characterization of fine aggregates in concrete by different experimental approaches

    OpenAIRE

    He, Huan; Courard, Luc; Pirard, Eric; Michel, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Being its major component, aggregate can occupy up to three-quarter of the volume of concrete. The structure of aggregate formed in hardened state impacts largely on mechanical and durability properties of concrete. On another hand, physical characteristics of aggregate are primarily assumed to be relevant to granular behavior of aggregate. Therefore, characterization of aggregate is of high relevance to concrete studies. In this study, different types of fine aggregate used in concrete, name...

  4. Damping characteristics of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisano, M.; Nagashima, I.; Kawamura, S.

    1987-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures in a nuclear power plant are not permitted to go far into the inelasticity generally, even when subjected to strong ground motion. Therefore it is important to evaluate the damping appropriately in linear and after cracking stage before yielding in the dynamic response analysis. Next three dampings are considered of reinforced concrete structures. 1) Internal damping in linear range material damping of concrete without cracks;2) Hysteretic damping in inelastic range material hysteretic damping of concrete due to cracking and yielding;3) Damping due to the energy dissipation into the ground. Among these damping material damping affects dynamic response of a nuclear power plant on hard rock site where damping due to energy dissipation into the ground is scarcely expected. However material damping in linear and slightly nonlinear range have only been assumed without enough experimental data. In this paper such damping is investigated experimentally by the shaking table tests of reinforced concrete box-walls which modeled roughly the outer wall structure of a P.W.R. type nuclear power plant

  5. Binary Effect of Fly Ash and Palm Oil Fuel Ash on Heat of Hydration Aerated Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin; Rafique Bhutta, Muhammad Aamer; Samadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    The binary effect of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on heat of hydration of aerated concrete was studied. Three aerated concrete mixes were prepared, namely, concrete containing 100% ordinary Portland cement (control sample or Type I), binary concrete made from 50% POFA (Type II), and ternary concrete containing 30% POFA and 20% PFA (Type III). It is found that the temperature increases due to heat of hydration through all the concrete specimens especially in the control sample. However, the total temperature rises caused by the heat of hydration through both of the new binary and ternary concrete were significantly lower than the control sample. The obtained results reveal that the replacement of Portland cement with binary and ternary materials is beneficial, particularly for mass concrete where thermal cracking due to extreme heat rise is of great concern. PMID:24696646

  6. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batayneh, Malek; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures

  7. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batayneh, Malek; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures.

  8. Study of the internal confinement of concrete reinforced (in civil engineering) with woven reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, M.; Goumairi, O.; El Malik, A.

    2017-10-01

    Concrete is generally the most used material in the field of construction. Despite its extensive use in structures, it represents some drawbacks related to its properties including its low tensile strength and low ductility. To solve this problem, the use of steel reinforcement in concrete structures is possible. Another possibility is the introduction of different types of continuous fibre / staple in the concrete, such as steel fibres or synthetic fibres, to obtain ″Concretes bundles″. Many types of fibre concrete, which have been developed and for many of them, the gain provided by the fibre was rather low and no significant improvement in tensile strength was really reaching. By cons, the ductility was higher than that of ordinary concrete. The objective of this study is to examine concrete reinforcement by inserting reinforcements woven polyester. These are either woven bidirectional (2D) or three-dimensional woven (3D). So we will report the properties of each type of reinforcement and the influence of the method of weaving on the strength reinforcements and on the strength of concrete in which they are incorporated. Such influence should contribute to improving the sustainability and enhancement of reinforcement

  9. Numerical analysis of pipe impact on reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, N.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and the results of numerical analyses carried out by using the computer code DYNA3D to analyse pipe impacts on a reinforced concrete slab, a floor beam and a column. Modelling techniques employed to represent various features of typical reinforced concrete (RC) structures and the details of a soil and crushable foam type of material model used to represent concrete material behaviour are described. The results show that a reasonable prediction of global behaviour of reinforced concrete structures under impact loading can be obtained by this numerical method. (author)

  10. Study of the Technical Feasibility of Increasing the Amount of Recycled Concrete Waste Used in Ready-Mix Concrete Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile-Garcia, Esteban; Ferreiro-Cabello, Javier; López-Ochoa, Luis M; López-González, Luis M

    2017-07-18

    The construction industry generates a considerable amount of waste. Faced with this undesirable situation, the ready-mix concrete sector, in particular, has invested energy and resources into reusing its own waste in its production process as it works towards the goal of more sustainable construction. This study examines the feasibility of incorporating two types of concrete waste, which currently end up in landfill, into the production process of ready-mix concrete: the waste generated during the initial production stage (ready-mix concrete waste), and waste created when demolition waste is treated to obtain artificial aggregate. The first phase of the study's methodology corroborates the suitability of the recycled aggregate through characterization tests. After this phase, the impact of incorporating different percentages of recycled coarse aggregate is evaluated by examining the performance of the produced concrete. The replacement rate varied between 15% and 50%. The results indicate that recycled aggregates are, indeed, suitable to be incorporated into ready-mix concrete production. The impact on the final product's performance is different for the two cases examined herein. Incorporating aggregates from generic concrete blocks led to a 20% decrease in the produced concrete's strength performance. On the other hand, using recycled aggregates made from the demolition waste led to a smaller decrease in the concrete's performance: about 8%. The results indicate that with adequate management and prior treatment, the waste from these plants can be re-incorporated into their production processes. If concrete waste is re-used, concrete production, in general, becomes more sustainable for two reasons: less waste ends up as landfill and the consumption of natural aggregates is also reduced.

  11. The environmental impacts of foamed concrete production and exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namsone, E.; Korjakins, A.; Sahmenko, G.; Sinka, M.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a study focusing on the environmental impacts of foamed concrete production and exploitation. CO2 emissions are very important factor for describing durability and sustainability of any building material and its life cycle. The building sector is one of the largest energy-consuming sectors in the world. In this study CO2 emissions are evaluated with regard to three types of energy resources (gas, coal and eco-friendly fuel). The related savings on raw materials are up to 120 t of water per 1000 t of traditionally mixed foamed concrete and up to 350 t of sand per 1000 t of foamed concrete produced with intensive mixing technology. In addition, total reduction of CO2 emissions (up to 60 t per 1000 m3 of material) and total energy saving from introduction of foamed concrete production (depending on the type of fuel) were calculated. In order to analyze the conditions of exploitation, both thermal conductivity and thickness of wall was determined. All obtained and calculated results were compared to those of the commercially produced autoclaved aerated concrete.

  12. Evaluation of the Strength Variation of Normal and Lightweight Self-Compacting Concrete in Full Scale Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinali, M.; Ranjbar, M. M.; Rezvani, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    -destructive testing. Self-compacting concrete (SCC) and lightweight self-compacting concrete (LWSCC) with different admixtures were tested and compared with normal concrete (NC). The results were also compared with results for standard cubic samples. The results demonstrate the effect of concrete type on the in situ......The strength of cast concrete along the height and length of large structural members might vary due to inadequate compaction, segregation, bleeding, head pressure, and material type. The distribution of strength within a series of full scale reinforced concrete walls was examined using non...

  13. Application of Fiber Reinforcement Concrete Technique in Civil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    modulus of elasticity, high tensile strength, improved fatigue and impact resistance. Reinforcing the concrete structures with fibers such as polyester is one of the possible ways to provide all the criteria of the durable repair material. This type of reinforcement is called Fiber Reinforcement of Concrete Structures. There is an ...

  14. Using natural local materials for developing special radiation shielding concretes, and deduction of its shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Takeyeddin, M.; Al-Nassar, M.; Yousef, S.

    2006-06-01

    Concrete is considered as the most important material to be used for radiation shielding in facilities contain radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the construction of the concrete, which is highly relative to the composing aggregates i.e. aggregates consist about 70 - 80% of the total weight of normal concrete. In this project tow types of concrete used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) had been studied and their shielding properties were defined for gamma ray from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources, and for neutrons from Am-Be source. About 10% reduction in HVL was found in the comparison between the tow concrete types for both neutrons and gammas. Some other types of concrete were studied using aggregates from different regions in Syria, to improve the shielding properties of concrete, and another 10% of reduction was achieved in comparison with Damascene concrete (20% in comparison with the concrete from Aleppo) for both neutrons and gamma rays. (author)

  15. Application of super workable concrete to main tower of cable-stayed prestressed concrete bridge. ; Kiba park grand bridge. PC shachokyo no shuto eno tekiyo. ; Kiba koen ohashi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Shindo, T.; Sakamoto, A. (Taisei Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    The Kiba Park Grand Bridge is a cable-stayed prestressed concrete (PC) bridge with a length of 186m. The main tower of this PC cable-stayed bridge consists of a pair of vertical columns with height of 60m and a beam connecting the columns. For the purpose of the advanced efficiency of construction without formwork and removal work and the improvement of durability, the precast buried formwork made of polymer impregnated concrete formwork was adopted. Approximate 650 cubic meter of super workable concrete was placed for the upper part ranging from 7th to 17th blocks of vertical columns and the beam. Blast furnace cement B and fly ash were used as binder. Naphthalenesulfonic acid type high performance water reducing agent and lignosulfonic acid type AE (air-entraining) water reducing agent were used as admixtures. Super workable concrete was mixed using forced double-axle mixers in the ready-mixed concrete plant. Satisfactory quality of the fresh concrete and strength of the hardened concrete were obtained. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Self-flowing underwater concrete mixtures for high rise structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousri, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    Placement of conventional concrete mixtures in underwater construction results in a high percentage of material loss due to washout of cement paste. This paper presents the influence of anti washout admixture (AWA) on various properties of concrete. Eleven self-flowing concrete (SFC) mixtures using type II cement were proportioned. A combination of low water cement (w/c), high cement contents, anti washout admixtures, fly ash, and silica fume were used to enhance the resistance of fresh concrete to washout. The concrete mixtures proportioned to be highly flow able, self-leveling and cohesive. The water-cementitious materials ratios ranged between 0.356 and 0.392 which correspond a typical underwater concrete mixture. The concrete mixtures were tested for slump, slump flow, washout resistance and compressive strength. The compressive strength of each concrete mixture cast underwater was determined at 3, 7, 28 days and compared with the compressive strength of the same concrete mixture cast in normal condition (in air). Test results indicated that the use of an AWA facilitates the production of flow able concrete mixtures with the added benefit of lower washout loss. Concrete mixture proportioned using Type II cement and fly ash at level of replacement of 15% was found to develop self flowing concrete with better fresh and hardened properties and more resistant to washout. The self-flowing underwater concretes developed a 28-day compressive strengths ranging from 20 to 28 MPa

  17. Characterization of High Density Concrete by Ultrasonic Goniometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhairy Sani; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    This paper described the results of ultrasonic goniometer measurements on concrete containing hematite. Local hematite stones were used as aggregates to produce high density concrete for application in X-and gamma shielding. Concrete cube samples (150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm) containing hematite as coarse aggregates were prepared by changing mix ratio, water to cement ratio (w/ c) and types of fine aggregate. All samples were cured in water for 7 days. After 28 days of casting, the concrete cubes were then cut into small size of about 10 mm x 20 mm x 30 mm so that it can be fitted into goniometer specimen holder. From this measurement, longitudinal, shear and surface Rayleigh waves in the concrete can be determined. The measurement results are explained and discussed. (author)

  18. Estimation of Critical Parameters in Concrete Production Using Multispectral Vision Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Edberg; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    2005-01-01

    We analyze multispectral reflectance images of concrete aggregate material, and design computational measures of the important and critical parameters used in concrete production. The features extracted from the images are exploited as explanatory variables in regression models and used to predict...... aggregate type, water content, and size distribution. We analyze and validate the methods on five representative aggregate types, commonly used in concrete production. Using cross validation, the generated models proves to have a high performance in predicting all of the critical parameters....

  19. Arch-Axis Coefficient Optimization of Long-Span Deck-Type Concrete-Filled Steel Tubular Arch Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. J.; Wan, S.; Liu, H. C.

    2017-11-01

    This paper is based on Nanpuxi super major bridge which is under construction and starts from Wencheng Zhejiang province to Taishun highway. A finite element model of the whole bridge is constructed using Midas Civil finite element software. The most adverse load combination in the specification is taken into consideration to determine the method of calculating the arch-axis coefficient of long-span deck-type concrete-filled steel tubular arch bridge. By doing this, this paper aims at providing references for similar engineering projects.

  20. Comparative environmental assessment of natural and recycled aggregate concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, S; Radonjanin, V; Malešev, M; Ignjatović, I

    2010-11-01

    Constant and rapid increase in construction and demolition (C&D) waste generation and consumption of natural aggregate for concrete production became one of the biggest environmental problems in the construction industry. Recycling of C&D waste represents one way to convert a waste product into a resource but the environment benefits through energy consumption, emissions and fallouts reductions are not certain. The main purpose of this study is to determine the potentials of recycled aggregate concrete (concrete made with recycled concrete aggregate) for structural applications and to compare the environmental impact of the production of two types of ready-mixed concrete: natural aggregate concrete (NAC) made entirely with river aggregate and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate. Based on the analysis of up-to-date experimental evidence, including own tests results, it is concluded that utilization of RAC for low-to-middle strength structural concrete and non-aggressive exposure conditions is technically feasible. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is performed for raw material extraction and material production part of the concrete life cycle including transport. Assessment is based on local LCI data and on typical conditions in Serbia. Results of this specific case study show that impacts of aggregate and cement production phases are slightly larger for RAC than for NAC but the total environmental impacts depend on the natural and recycled aggregates transport distances and on transport types. Limit natural aggregate transport distances above which the environmental impacts of RAC can be equal or even lower than the impacts of NAC are calculated for the specific case study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Basalt Fibres on Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Gelani A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental program carried out to investigate the effects of Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymers (BFRP on some fundamental mechanical properties of concrete. Basalt fibres are formed by heating crushed basalt rocks and funnelling the molten basalt through a spinneret to form basalt filaments. This type of fibres have not been widely used till recently. Two commercially available chopped basalt fibres products with different aspect ratios were investigated, which are dry basalt (GeoTech Fibre and basalt pre-soaked in an epoxy resin (GeoTech Matrix .The experimental work included compression tests on 96 cylinders made of multiple batches of concrete with varying amounts of basalt fibre additives of the two mentioned types, along with control batches containing no fibres. Furthermore, flexural tests on 24 prisms were carries out to measure the modulus of rupture, in addition to 30 prisms for average residual strength test. Results of the research indicated that use of basalt fibres has insignificant effects on compressive strength of plain concrete, where the increase in strength did not exceed about 5%. On the other hand, results suggest that the use of basalt fibres may increase the compressive strength of concrete containing fly as up top 40%. The rupture strength was increased also by 8% to 28% depending on mix and fibre types and contents. Finally, there was no clear correlation between the average residual strength and ratios of basalt fibres mixed with the different concrete batches.

  2. UO2/magnetite concrete interaction and penetration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    The concrete structure represents a line of defense in safety assessment of containment integrity and possible minimization of radiological releases following a reactor accident. The penetration study of hot UO 2 particles into limestone concrete and basalt concrete highlighted some major differences between the two concretes. These included penetration rate, melting and dissolution phenomena, released gases, pressurization of the UO 2 chamber, and characteristics of post-test concrete. The present study focuses on the phenomena associated with core debris interaction with and penetration into magnetite type concrete. The real material experiment was carried out with UO 2 particles and magnetite concrete in a test apparatus similar to the one utilized in the UO 2 /limestone experiment

  3. A type-driven approach to concrete meta programming.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractApplications that manipulate programs as data are called meta programs. Examples of meta programs are compilers, source-to-source translators and code generators. Meta programming can be supported by the ability to represent program fragments in concrete syntax instead of abstract

  4. Using of Porcelinite as Coarse Aggregate in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Saleh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research the ability of using porcelinite as coarse aggregate to produce light weight concrete was investigated.  The experimental program consists of preparing and testing a mixes to investigate mechanical properties of concrete, with a total of 15 cubes (100×100×100 mm, 30 cylinders (100×200 mm. The tests include compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, fresh and hardened density of  light weight concrete for different porcelinite percentages ranged between(0% to 100% of the coarse aggregate weight. The obtained results for tested specimens were compared to control one. Test results indicated that using of porcelinite in concrete mix reduces the strength of concrete Porcelinite aggregate represents a reduction in density ranging between (10%-36% of normal weight concrete, therefore there is an advantage  using this type of light weight aggregate in this country where soil bearing capacity is low in most construction sites.

  5. Leaching assessment of concrete made of recycled coarse aggregate: physical and environmental characterisation of aggregates and hardened concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvín, A P; Agrela, F; Ayuso, J; Beltrán, M G; Barbudo, A

    2014-09-01

    Each year, millions of tonnes of waste are generated worldwide, partially through the construction and demolition of buildings. Recycling the resulting waste could reduce the amount of materials that need to be manufactured. Accordingly, the present work has analysed the potential reuse of construction waste in concrete manufacturing by replacing the natural aggregate with recycled concrete coarse aggregate. However, incorporating alternative materials in concrete manufacturing may increase the pollutant potential of the product, presenting an environmental risk via ground water contamination. The present work has tested two types of concrete batches that were manufactured with different replacement percentages. The experimental procedure analyses not only the effect of the portion of recycled aggregate on the physical properties of concrete but also on the leaching behaviour as indicative of the contamination degree. Thus, parameters such as slump, density, porosity and absorption of hardened concrete, were studied. Leaching behaviour was evaluated based on the availability test performed to three aggregates (raw materials of the concrete batches) and on the diffusion test performed to all concrete. From an environmental point of view, the question of whether the cumulative amount of heavy metals that are released by diffusion reaches the availability threshold was answered. The analysis of concentration levels allowed the establishment of different groups of metals according to the observed behaviour, the analysis of the role of pH and the identification of the main release mechanisms. Finally, through a statistical analysis, physical parameters and diffusion data were interrelated. It allowed estimating the relevance of porosity, density and absorption of hardened concrete on diffusion release of the metals in study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Review of constitutive models and failure criteria for concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choun, Young Sun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The general behavior, constitutive models, and failure criteria of concrete are reviewed. The current constitutive models for concrete cannot satisfy all of mechanical behavior of concrete. Among several constitutive models, damage models are recommended to describe properly the structural behavior of concrete containment buildings, because failure modes and post-failure behavior are important in containment buildings. A constitutive model which can describe the concrete behavior in tension is required because the containment buildings will reach failure state due to ultimate internal pressure. Therefore, a thorough study on the behavior and models under tension stress state in concrete and reinforced concrete has to be performed. There are two types of failure criteria in containment buildings: structural failure criteria and leakage failure criteria. For reinforced or prestressed concrete containment buildings, concrete cracking does not mean the structural failure of containment building because the reinforcement or post-tensioning system is able to resist tensile stress up to yield stress. Therefore leakage failure criteria will be prior to structural failure criteria, and a strain failure criterion for concrete has to be established. 120 refs., 59 figs., 1 tabs. (Author)

  7. The feasibility and benefits of using high-strength concrete for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examining the studies on this type of concrete, this paper has deal with the feasibility and benefits of using HSC for construction purposes in earthquake prone areas. The results of this study show that in case of respecting the bylaw constrains and conformity of new bylaws with this type of concrete, it is hoped to use it as a ...

  8. Ultrafine particles in concrete: Influence of ultrafine particles on concrete properties and application to concrete mix design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Carsten

    2010-07-01

    In this work, the influence of ultrafine particles on concrete properties was investigated. In the context of this work, ultrafine particles (reactive and inert materials) are particles finer than cement. Due to the development of effective superplasticizers, the incorporation of ultrafine particles in concrete is nowadays possible. Different minerals, usually considered inert, were tested. These minerals were also used in combination with reactive silica fume. The modified Andreassen model was used to optimise the particle size distribution and thus the packing density of the complete mix composition. Heat of hydration, compressive strength, shrinkage, frost resistance and the microstructure were investigated.The influence of different ultrafine inert materials on the cement hydration was investigated. The results show that most of the minerals have an accelerating effect. They provide nucleation sites for hydration products and contribute in that way to a faster dissolution of cement grains. Minerals containing calcium were found to influence the early stage of hydration as well. These minerals shortened the dormant period of the cement hydration, the effect is known from limestone filler in self-compacting concrete. In a first test series on concrete, different ultrafine inert particles were used to replace cement. That was done in several ways; with constant water content or constant w/c. The results from this test series show that the best effect is achieved when cement is replaced by suitable ultrafines while the w/c is kept constant. In doing so, the compressive strength can be increased and shrinkage can be reduced. The microstructure is improved and becomes denser with improved packing at microlevel. Efficiency factors (k values) for the ultrafine inert materials were calculated from the compressive strength results. The k values are strongly dependent on the mode of cement replacement, fineness and type of the replacement material and curing time. Drying

  9. Modeling of concrete response at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Marchertas, A.

    1984-01-01

    A rate-type creep law is implemented into the computer code TEMP-STRESS for high temperature concrete analysis. The disposition of temperature, pore pressure and moisture for the particular structure in question is provided as input for the thermo-mechanical code. The loss of moisture from concrete also induces material shrinkage which is accounted for in the analytical model. Examples are given to illustrate the numerical results

  10. STRENGTH OF NANOMODIFIED HIGH-STRENGTH LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOZEMTСEV Alexandr Sergeevich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research aimed at development of nanomodified high-strength lightweight concrete for construction. The developed concretes are of low average density and high ultimate compressive strength. It is shown that to produce this type of concrete one need to use hollow glass and aluminosilicate microspheres. To increase the durability of adhesion between cement stone and fine filler the authors offer to use complex nanodimensinal modifier based on iron hydroxide sol and silica sol as a surface nanomodifier for hollow microspheres. It is hypothesized that the proposed modifier has complex effect on the activity of the cement hydration and, at the same time increases bond strength between filler and cement-mineral matrix. The compositions for energy-efficient nanomodified high-strength lightweight concrete which density is 1300…1500 kg/m³ and compressive strength is 40…65 MPa have been developed. The approaches to the design of high-strength lightweight concrete with density of less than 2000 kg/m³ are formulated. It is noted that the proposed concretes possess dense homogeneous structure and moderate mobility. Thus, they allow processing by vibration during production. The economic and practical implications for realization of high-strength lightweight concrete in industrial production have been justified.

  11. Significance of tests and properties of concrete and concrete-making materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pielert, James H

    2006-01-01

    Reflects a decade of technological changes in concrete industry! The newest edition of this popular ASTM publication reflects the latest technology in concrete and concrete-making materials. Six sections cover: (1) General information on the nature of concrete, sampling, variability, and testing laboratories. A new chapter deals with modeling cement and concrete properties. (2) Properties of freshly mixed concrete. (3) Properties of hardened concrete. (4) Concrete aggregates—this section has been revised and the chapters are presented in the order that most concerns concrete users: grading, density, soundness, degradation resistance, petrographic examination, reactivity, and thermal properties. (5) Materials other than aggregates—the chapter on curing materials now reflects the current technology of materials applied to new concrete surfaces. The chapter on mineral admixtures has been separated into two chapters: supplementary cementitious materials and ground slag. (6) Specialized concretes—contains a ...

  12. Advanced concrete structures for thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerna, W.

    1982-01-01

    The author begins with an overview on the various types of power plants depending on the fuel used in them and then in particular deals with the reinforced concrete structures. Especially for reactor buildings and prestressed concrete pressure vessels concrete is the appropriate material. The methods of construction are described as a function of load and operation. Safety requirements brought new load types for such structures as e.g. airplane crash, internal pressure caused by pipe rupture. Dimensioning is done by means of nonlinear dynamical methods of calculation accounting for plasticizing. These methods are explained. Further the constructional principles of high natural-draft cooling towers are mentioned. (orig.) [de

  13. Mechanical properties of high-strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarzadeh, Alireza

    This report summarizes an experimental program conducted to investigate production techniques and mechanical properties of high strength concrete in general and to provide recommendations for using these concretes in manufacturing precast/prestressed bridge girders. Test variables included total amount and composition of cementitious material (portland cement, fly ash, and silica fume), type and brand of cement, type of silica fume (dry densified and slurry), type and brand of high-range water-reducing admixture, type of aggregate, aggregate gradation, maximum aggregate size, and curing. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of these variables on changes in compressive strength and modulus of elasticity over time, splitting tensile strength, modulus of rupture, creep, shrinkage, and absorption potential (as an indirect indicator of permeability). Also investigated were the effects of test parameters such as mold size, mold material, and end condition. Over 6,300 specimens were cast from approximately 140 mixes over a period of 3 years.

  14. Lightweight concrete modification factor for shear friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the results of a study initiated to examine the influence of concrete unit weight on the direct shear transfer across an interface of concretes cast at different times. This type of interface is common with structural precast co...

  15. The behaviour of concrete under attack of liquid steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, U.; Ehm, C.; Diederichs, U.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to study the interaction between concrete and liquid steel. Different types and different forms of concrete were investigated at temperatures of liquid steel between 1.600 and 2.600 0 C. The liquid steel of 1.600 0 C was produced in an induction furnace, the liquid steel of 2.600 0 C was produced in concrete crucibles by metallothermic reactions. The reactions occuring during the interaction of concrete and liquid steel may be summarized as follows: - Concrete reacts violently upon sudden loading with high temperatures and high heat fluxes. Great quantities of steam and gases are generated. The mechanical strength decreases rapidly with increasing temperature. -At about 1.200 0 C concrete begins to melt. First the cement matrix melts, than the aggregates melt. The melts of different concretes consist of different constituents and their reactions with liquid steel vary. The temperature of the liquid steel significantly influences the intensity of the reactions and the erosion rates. - The erosion rates amounted to 30 mm/min, when liquid steel was produced in concrete crucibles. When cylindrical concrete specimens were immersed in molten steel the rate of melting off amounted up to 66 mm/min. - The dissipation of heat during the interaction brings about that the reactions between concrete and liquid steel vanish gradually, if no additional energy is fed into the system. (orig.)

  16. Early age damage quantification of actively restrained concrete using inverse analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Ali

    Early-age cracking can be a significant problem in concrete pavements, floors, and bridge decks. Cracking occurs when the volumetric changes associated with drying, hydration, and temperature reduction are prevented. Good knowledge about the characteristics of early age concrete is necessary to achieve reliable crack control. Volumetric changes due to shrinkage depend on the type of concrete and its components. It has been found that light weight aggregates can work as internal reservoir to supply the concrete matrix with water that is needed during the early age; this process is called internal curing. Also fibers can give more ductility to the concrete and produce less shrinkage. There is a need to better understand the effects of early age uniaxial restraint on long term concrete mechanical performance. In this study, two types of concrete were studied (high performance fiber reinforced concrete and ordinary concrete) under actively restrained loading conditions to assess the effect on the long term fracture toughness and energy. Single edge notched specimens having dimensions of 250 mm x 150 mm x 75 mm and a notch to depth ratio of 0.33 were caste and used in both direct tension and three point bending. The direct tension tests were carried out on a direct tension loading frame constructed in house that was supplied with two mechanical jacks and load cell.

  17. Freeze-thaw durability of air-entrained concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua

    2013-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles). The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss) and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity). The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to "the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete" GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results.

  18. Ground Glass Pozzolan in Conventional, High, and Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagnit-Hamou Arezki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground-glass pozzolan (G obtained by grinding the mixed-waste glass to same fineness of cement can act as a supplementary-cementitious material (SCM, given that it is an amorphous and a pozzolanic material. The G showed promising performances in different concrete types such as conventional concrete (CC, high-performance concrete (HPC, and ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC. The current paper reports on the characteristics and performance of G in these concrete types. The use of G provides several advantages (technological, economical, and environmental. It reduces the production cost of concrete and decrease the carbon footprint of a traditional concrete structures. The rheology of fresh concrete can be improved due to the replacement of cement by non-absorptive glass particles. Strength and rigidity improvements in the concrete containing G are due to the fact that glass particles act as inclusions having a very high strength and elastic modulus that have a strengthening effect on the overall hardened matrix.

  19. Study of radioactivity and radiation attenuation of a new heavy weight concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.B.; Fouda, S.; EL-Mongy, S.; Hodhod, O.; Yousef, M.

    2005-01-01

    The present study is concerned with studying the radioactivity levels and efficiency of proposed heavy weight concrete as a shielding material for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. Effect of elevated temperatures on radiation attenuation characteristics of proposed materials was also studied. Three types of local natural aggregates (iron ores) namely magnetite, limonite and hematite have been prepared, analyzed for their radioactivity and tested to determine their suitability for the manufacture of heavy weight concrete, which can be used for shielding. Hematite was excluded and two types of concrete have been prepared by using magnetite and limonite. The gamma spectrometry and neutron activation have been used to determine both uranium and thorium contents in the investigated materials. The results obtained by the two methods showed that uranium and thorium were within the acceptable low levels. It was observed that the two types of concrete have good attenuation properties

  20. Performance of shcc with bacteria for concrete patch repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierra Beltran, M.G.; Jonkers, H.M.; Schlangen, E.

    2014-01-01

    The overall performance of concrete patch repair systems depends on the durability of and compatibility between the concrete substrate and the repair material. This paper investigates the performance of a new type of SHCC material with embedded bacteria as a repair material. The bacteria are a

  1. Softening behaviour of concrete : experimental research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, van H.J.G.M.; Rutten, H.S.; Fijneman, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    Uniaxial compressive softening tests on two types of concrete have been carried out, varying the type of loading platen and specimen size. In total 37 specimens were tested, 18 with polished steel loading platens and 19 with teflon loading platens. Half of the specimens were made of normal strength

  2. Properties of high-workability concrete with recycled concrete aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Safiuddin,; Alengaram,Ubagaram Johnson; Salam,Abdus; Jumaat,Mohd Zamin; Jaafar,Fahrol Fadhli; Saad,Hawa Binti

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the effects of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) on the key fresh and hardened properties of concrete. RCA was used to produce high-workability concrete substituting 0-100% natural coarse aggregate (NCA) by weight. The slump and slump flow of fresh concretes were determined to ensure high workability. In addition, the compressive, flexural and splitting tensile strengths, modulus of elasticity, and permeable voids of hardened concretes were determined. The test results rev...

  3. Serviceability behavior of Reinforcement Concrete beams with polypropylene and steel fibers

    OpenAIRE

    NaserKabashi; Cenë Krasniqi

    2015-01-01

    Serviceability Limit States (SLS) may lead to the design of concrete elements internally reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP).In many types of concrete structure loss the serviceability due to wide cracks, number of cracks or large deflection is not uncommon behaviour in concrete structures or concrete beams.The flexural ductility affects the serviceability deflection of RC beams once flexural cracking take place.Imprvement will be focused on the use of polypropilene fib...

  4. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  5. Comparison of winter temperature profiles in asphalt and concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to 1) determine which pavement type, asphalt or concrete, has : higher surface temperatures in winter and 2) compare the subsurface temperatures under asphalt and : concrete pavements to determine the pavement typ...

  6. Monitoring of prestressed concrete pressure vessels. II. performance of selected concrete embedment strain meters under normal and extreme environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Hurtt, C.C.

    1978-10-01

    Unique types of instrumentation are used in prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) to measure strains, stresses, deflections, prestressing forces, moisture content, temperatures, and possibly cracking. Their primary purpose is to monitor these complex structures throughout their 20- to 30-year operating lifetime in order to provide continuing assurance of their reliability and safety. Numerous concrete embedment instrumentation systems are available commercially. Since this instrumentation is important in providing continuing assurance of satisfactory performance of PCPVs, the information provided must be reliable. Therefore, laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the reliability of these commercially available instrumentation systems. This report, the second in a series related to instrumentation embedded in concrete, presents performance-reliability data for 13 types of selected concrete embedment strain meters which were subjected to a variety of loading environments, including unloaded, thermally loaded, simulated PCPV, and extreme environments. Although only a limited number of meters of each type were tested in any one test series, the composite results of the investigation indicate that the majority of these meters would not be able to provide reliable data throughout the 20- to 30-year anticipated operating life of a PCPV. Specific conclusions drawn from the study are: (1) Improved corrosion-resistant materials and sealing techniques should be developed for meters that are to be used in PCPV environments. (2) There is a need for the development of meters that are capable of surviving in concretes where temperatures in excess of 66 0 C are present for extended periods of time. (3) Research should be conducted on other measurement techniques, such as inductance, capacitance, and fluidics

  7. Preliminary Study on Impact Resistances of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Applied Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Byeong Moo; Kim, Young Jin; Jeon, Se Jin

    2013-01-01

    Studies to improve the impact resistance depending upon design parameters for fiber reinforced concrete, such as type of fibers and application ratio, are in progress. Authors assessed first the impact resistance of concrete walls depending upon fiber types and missile impact velocities. The safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crashes have been accomplished for normal concrete and fiber reinforced concretes in this study. Studies on the safety assessments on the nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crashes are ongoing actively. As a step of evaluating the applicability of fiber reinforced concrete in means of ensuring more structural safety of the nuclear power plants against impact, the impact resistance for the 1% steel and 2% polyamide fiber reinforced concretes have been evaluated. For reactor containment building structures, it seem there is no impact resistance enhancement of fiber reinforced concrete applied to reactor containment building in the cases of impact velocity 150 m/sec considered in this study. However this results from the pre-stressing forces which introduce compressive stresses in concrete wall and dome section of reactor containment building. Nonetheless there may be benefits to apply fiber reinforced concrete to nuclear power plants. For double containment type reactor containment building, the outer structure is a reinforced concrete structure. The impact resistances for non pre-stressed cylindrical reactor containment buildings are enhanced by 23 to 47 % for 2 % polyamide fiber reinforced concretes and 1 % steel fiber reinforced concretes respectively. For other buildings such as auxiliary building, compound building and fuel storage building surrounding the reactor containment building, there are so many reinforced concrete walls which are anticipated some enhancements of impact resistance by using fiber reinforced concretes. And heavier or faster large civil aircraft impacts produce higher

  8. Preliminary Study on Impact Resistances of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Applied Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Byeong Moo; Kim, Young Jin; Jeon, Se Jin [Daewoo E and C Co. Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Studies to improve the impact resistance depending upon design parameters for fiber reinforced concrete, such as type of fibers and application ratio, are in progress. Authors assessed first the impact resistance of concrete walls depending upon fiber types and missile impact velocities. The safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crashes have been accomplished for normal concrete and fiber reinforced concretes in this study. Studies on the safety assessments on the nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crashes are ongoing actively. As a step of evaluating the applicability of fiber reinforced concrete in means of ensuring more structural safety of the nuclear power plants against impact, the impact resistance for the 1% steel and 2% polyamide fiber reinforced concretes have been evaluated. For reactor containment building structures, it seem there is no impact resistance enhancement of fiber reinforced concrete applied to reactor containment building in the cases of impact velocity 150 m/sec considered in this study. However this results from the pre-stressing forces which introduce compressive stresses in concrete wall and dome section of reactor containment building. Nonetheless there may be benefits to apply fiber reinforced concrete to nuclear power plants. For double containment type reactor containment building, the outer structure is a reinforced concrete structure. The impact resistances for non pre-stressed cylindrical reactor containment buildings are enhanced by 23 to 47 % for 2 % polyamide fiber reinforced concretes and 1 % steel fiber reinforced concretes respectively. For other buildings such as auxiliary building, compound building and fuel storage building surrounding the reactor containment building, there are so many reinforced concrete walls which are anticipated some enhancements of impact resistance by using fiber reinforced concretes. And heavier or faster large civil aircraft impacts produce higher

  9. Revision of Sustainable Criteria of Concrete Walls for Earthquake-Resistant Housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcocer S.M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The seismic performance of low-rise housing has been noticeably inadequate during the most recent earthquakes occurred in Latin American countries. Moreover, the literature review revealed that some traditional techniques do not contribute to building sustainable housing. In the last decade, construction of concrete walls housing has become a preferred choice because of the speed of construction and availability of materials in most of these countries. Aimed at improving seismic design methods for this type of construction, an extensive analytical and experimental program was carried out. The experimental program included quasi-static and shaking-table tests of 47 walls with different height-to-length ratios and walls with openings. Variables studied were type of concrete, web steel ratio and type of web reinforcement. The paper presents and discusses the main results of the research program and evaluates the technical and environmental feasibility for using concrete walls for sustainable and earthquake-resistant housing. Performance of concrete walls housing is assessed in terms of key environmental and earthquake-resistant requirements. It was found that concrete wall housing is not only safe under earthquakes and easily adaptable to climate, but also it stimulates environmental conservation and promotes reducing the costs of construction, operation and maintenance.

  10. Bacteria-based concrete: from concept to market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, V.; Jonkers, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of self-healing concrete—a concrete which can autonomously repair itself after crack formation, with no or limited human intervention—has received a lot of attention over the past 10 years as it could help structures to last longer and at a lower maintenance cost. This paper gives an overview on the key aspects and recent advances in the development of the bacteria-based self-healing concrete developed at the University of Technology of Delft (The Netherlands). Research started with the screening and selection of concrete compatible bacteria and nutrients. Several types of encapsulated bacteria and nutrients have been developed and tested. The functionality of these healing agents was demonstrated by showing metabolic activity of activated bacterial spores by oxygen consumption measurements and by regain of material functionality in form of regain of water tightness. Besides development of bacteria-based self-healing concrete, a bacteria-based repair mortar and liquid system were developed for the treatment of aged concrete structures. Field trials have been carried out with either type of bacteria-based systems and the promising results have led to a spinoff company Basilisk Self-Healing Concrete with the aim to further develop these systems and bring them to the market.

  11. Properties of concretes produced with waste concrete aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcu, Ilker Bekir; Sengel, Selim

    2004-01-01

    An environmentally friendly approach to the disposal of waste materials, a difficult issue to cope with in today's world, would only be possible through a useful recycling process. For this reason, we suggest that clearing the debris from destroyed buildings in such a way as to obtain waste concrete aggregates (WCA) to be reused in concrete production could well be a partial solution to environmental pollution. For this study, the physical and mechanical properties along with their freeze-thaw durability of concrete produced with WCAs were investigated and test results presented. While experimenting with fresh and hardened concrete, mixtures containing recycled concrete aggregates in amounts of 30%, 50%, 70%, and 100% were prepared. Afterward, these mixtures underwent freeze-thaw cycles. As a result, we found out that C16-quality concrete could be produced using less then 30% C14-quality WCA. Moreover, it was observed that the unit weight, workability, and durability of the concretes produced through WCA decreased in inverse proportion to their endurance for freeze-thaw cycle

  12. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GLASS FIBRE CONCRETE AND NORMAL CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Mr.Yogesh S.Lanjewar*

    2018-01-01

    Concrete is basically the most important material concerning with the construction and infrastructural procedures, for which it should be of good strength and durability. Many researches are being conducted to make concrete more sustainable and of more strength and durability. Therefore keeping this in mind i have chosen to do the comparative study regarding the strength of normal concrete with the glass fibre added concrete using mix design procedure as per IS 10262-2009 for concrete. As w...

  13. Long-term load–deformation behaviour of timber–concrete joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Kuilen, J.W.G.; Dias, A.M.P.G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the long-term mechanical behaviour of timber-to-concrete joints made with dowel-type fasteners. Despite the influence that the long-term behaviour of joints has on the mechanical behaviour of a timber–concrete structure and consequently on its design, there is still a lack of

  14. Workability enhancement of geopolymer concrete through the use of retarder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umniati, B. Sri; Risdanareni, Puput; Zein, Fahmi Tarmizi Zulfikar

    2017-09-01

    Geopolymer concrete is a type of concrete manufactured without the addition of cement. In geopolymer concrete, along with an activator, cement as the concrete binder can be replaced by the fly ash. This will reduce global demand on cement, and therefore will reduce CO2 emission due to cement production. Thus, geopolymer concrete is commonly known as an eco-friendly concrete. Geopolymer concrete also offers a solution concerning with the utilization of the fly ash waste. However, despite of its environmental advantages, geopolymer concrete has a drawback, namelygeopolymer concrete set quickly, thus reducing its workability. This research aimed to increase the workability of geopolymer concrete by using retarder admixture (Plastocrete RT6 Plus). Retarder used varies within 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6% of fly ash mass. As a control, geopolymer concrete without retarder (0%) were also made. Activator used in this research was Na2SiO3 mixed with NaOH 10 M solution, with ratio of 1:5. The results showed an optimum composition of geopolymer concrete with 0.6% retarder, where initial setting time occured after 6.75 hours, and the final setting time reached after 9.5 hours. Moreover, the slump of the geopolymer concrete was 8.8 cm, and the slump flow was 24 cm. The compressive strength of the geopolymer concrete at 28 days was 47.21 MPa. The experiment showed that the more retarder added, the setting time of the geopolymer concrete will be increased, thus increasing its workability.

  15. Study of the Technical Feasibility of Increasing the Amount of Recycled Concrete Waste Used in Ready-Mix Concrete Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro-Cabello, Javier; López-González, Luis M.

    2017-01-01

    The construction industry generates a considerable amount of waste. Faced with this undesirable situation, the ready-mix concrete sector, in particular, has invested energy and resources into reusing its own waste in its production process as it works towards the goal of more sustainable construction. This study examines the feasibility of incorporating two types of concrete waste, which currently end up in landfill, into the production process of ready-mix concrete: the waste generated during the initial production stage (ready-mix concrete waste), and waste created when demolition waste is treated to obtain artificial aggregate. The first phase of the study’s methodology corroborates the suitability of the recycled aggregate through characterization tests. After this phase, the impact of incorporating different percentages of recycled coarse aggregate is evaluated by examining the performance of the produced concrete. The replacement rate varied between 15% and 50%. The results indicate that recycled aggregates are, indeed, suitable to be incorporated into ready-mix concrete production. The impact on the final product’s performance is different for the two cases examined herein. Incorporating aggregates from generic concrete blocks led to a 20% decrease in the produced concrete’s strength performance. On the other hand, using recycled aggregates made from the demolition waste led to a smaller decrease in the concrete’s performance: about 8%. The results indicate that with adequate management and prior treatment, the waste from these plants can be re-incorporated into their production processes. If concrete waste is re-used, concrete production, in general, becomes more sustainable for two reasons: less waste ends up as landfill and the consumption of natural aggregates is also reduced. PMID:28773183

  16. Effect of high temperature or fire on heavy weight concrete properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakr, K.; EL-Hakim, E.

    2005-01-01

    Temperature plays an important role in the use of concrete for shielding nuclear reactors. In the present work, the effect of different durations (1, 2 and 3 h) of high temperatures (250, 500, 750 and 950 deg. C) on the physical, mechanical and radiation properties of heavy concrete was studied. The effect of fire fitting systems on concrete properties was investigated. Results showed that ilmenite concrete had the highest density, modulus of elasticity and lowest absorption percent, and it had also higher values of compressive, tensile, bending and bonding strengths than gravel or baryte concrete. Ilmenite concrete showed the highest attenuation of transmitted gamma rays. Firing (heating) exposure time was inversely proportional to mechanical properties of all types of concrete. Ilmenite concrete was more resistant to elevated temperature. Foam or air proved to be better than water as a cooling system in concrete structure exposed to high temperature because water leads to a big damage in concrete properties

  17. Development of polymer concrete radioactive waste management containers - Effect of ceramic fillers on the mechanical and physico-chemical properties of polymer concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Chun; Park, Min Jin; Shin, Hyun Ick; Choi, Yong Jin [Myongji University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    Particle size distribution of the ceramic filler is the primary factor to influence the composition of polymer concrete. The estimated optimum compositions of the polymer concretes prepared in the study are 62 {approx} 71wt% for fine aggregates, 6 {approx} 29wt% for ceramic fillers and 9 {approx}13wt% for polymer resin. Calcium Carbonate and silica are the ceramic fillers practically usable for manufacturing polymer concrete. Less polymer resin is required for the preparation of polymer concrete at lower relative packing volume of ceramic fillers. It has been found that depended on the type of fine aggregates, the effect of ceramic filler on the mechanical behavior of polymer concrete can be opposite. Strength and elastic modulus of polymer concrete are affected by gamma radiation. Crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin and epoxy resin are promoted by gamma radiation up to 00 MRad and 50 MRad, respectively. However, higher dose of radiation degrades the mechanical properties of polymer concrete. Hydrothermal treatment of polymer concrete at 80 deg. C and 1bar for 30 days causes about 25% reduction of bending strength and elastic modulus. The strength reduction arises from the hydrolysis of ester groups in unsaturated polyester catalyzed by hydrothermal condition. 13 refs., 37 figs., 15 tabs. (Author)

  18. Early age compressive strength, porosity, and sorptivity of concrete using peat water to produce and cure concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivia, Monita; Ismeddiyanto, Wibisono, Gunawan; Sitompul, Iskandar R.

    2017-09-01

    Construction in peatland has faced scarce water sources for mixing and curing concrete. It is known that peat water has high organic content and low pH that can be harmful to concrete in the environment. In some remote areas in Riau Province, contractors used peat water directly without sufficient treatments to comply with SKSNI requirements of concrete mixing water. This paper presents a study of compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and blended OPC-Palm Oil Fuel Ash (OPC-POFA) concrete. The specimens were mixed using natural water and peat water, then some of them were cured in fresh water and peat water. Six mixtures were investigated using a variation of cement, mixing water and curing water. Tap water is used as control mixing and curing water for all specimens. The compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity were calculated at seven and 28 days. Results indicate that the use of peat water will cause low compressive strength, high porosity and sorptivity for both OPC and OPC-POFA concrete. Using peat water and curing the specimens in tap water could improve the early strength, porosity and sorptivity of OPC concrete; however, it has an adverse effect on OPC-POFA specimens. The properties of early age concrete of both types (OPC and OPC-POFA) using peat water were as good as those with tap water. Therefore, it is suggested that peat water should be considered as mixing and curing water for concrete where tap water resources are scarce. Investigation of its long-term properties, as well as extending the observed age of concrete is recommended before any use of peat water.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON LIGHT TRANSMITTING CONCRETE BY USING OPTICAL FIBRE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Suganya; S. Minu Gopika

    2017-01-01

    Light transmitting concrete is one of the fibre reinforced concrete which is mainly used for aesthetic application by incorporating the optical fibres in concrete. Optical fibres help to transmit the light through the fibres and the end-light type of fibre is used to increase the aesthetic appearance of the concrete which is like a transparent concrete. Fibres are arranged in different layers, to increase the load carrying capacity and also the pattern can be created to make the concrete deco...

  20. Fresh and Hardened State of Polymer Modified Concrete and Mortars – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukimat Nurul Nadrah Aqilah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer modified concrete or mortar is an alternative to the advancement of long serving civil engineering material - mortar and concrete. The excellence and promising benefits of modified composites have led to numerous progressive studies of its application. This paper presented a critical review from previous research on the polymer modified concrete and mortar. Both fresh and hardened state behaviours were reviewed as they are important for the development of excellent engineering material. Most of the applications of polymer modified concrete and mortar can be seen in diverse types of polymer such as latex, epoxy and emulsion. The utilization of each type of polymers resulted in different characteristics of composite concrete or mortar. Such applications have contributed to the improvement in terms of workability and mechanical strength, especially at higher grade of composite strength of concrete material.

  1. Design of ultra-lightweight concrete: towards monolithic concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qing Liang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the development of ultra-lightweight concrete. A moderate strength and an excellent thermal conductivity of the lightweight concrete are set as the design targets. The designed lightweight aggregates concrete is targeted to be used in monolithic concrete façade structure, performing as both load bearing element and thermal insulator. The developed lightweight concrete shows excellent thermal properties, with a low thermal conductivity of about 0.12 W/(m·K; and moderate mechanical properties, with 28-day compressive strengths of about 10-12 N/mm . This combination of values exceeds, to the researchers’ knowledge, the performance of all other lightweight building materials. Furthermore, the developed lightweight concrete possesses excellent durability properties.

  2. An integral design concept for ecological self-compacting concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunger, M.

    2010-01-01

    This Thesis addresses an alternative design concept for Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC). SCC is a special type of concrete with superior workability, which flows and compacts in all corners of a formwork just by the influence of gravity. Introduced to the concrete world in the late 1980s, SCC has

  3. Data on optimum recycle aggregate content in production of new structural concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Suvash Chandra

    2017-12-01

    This data presented herein are the research summary of "mechanical behavior and durability performance of concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate" (Paul, 2011) [1]. The results reported in this article relate to an important parameter of optimum content of recycle concrete aggregate (RCA) in production of new concrete for both structural and non-structural applications. For the purpose of the research various types of physical, mechanical and durability tests are performed for concrete made with different percentages of RCA. Therefore, this data set can be a great help of the readers to understand the mechanism of RCA in relates to the concrete properties.

  4. Effect of mineral additives on structure and properties of concrete for pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Khrystyna; Markiv, Taras; Hunyak, Oleksii

    2017-12-01

    Concrete pavements is an attractive alternative to asphalt pavements because of its lower cost and higher durability. Major contribution to sustainable development can be made by partial replacement of cement in concrete pavement with supplementary cementitious materials of different nature and origin. In this paper, the effect of natural zeolite and perlite additives in complex with chemical admixtures on the structure and properties of concrete for pavement was studied. Compressive and flexural strength test was used to study the mechanical behavior of designed concrete under load. Generally, the compressive strength of both control concrete and concrete containing mineral additives levels at the later ages of hardening. The microstructure analysis of concrete with mineral additives of different nature activity showed the formation of additional amount of hydration products such as tobermorite type calcium hydrosilicate which provide self-reinforcement of hardening concrete system.

  5. Properties of concrete containing different type of waste materials as aggregate replacement exposed to elevated temperature – A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadzali, N. S.; Ibrahim, M. H. W.; Sani, M. S. H. Mohd; Jamaludin, N.; Desa, M. S. M.; Misri, Z.

    2018-04-01

    Concrete is the chief material of construction and it is non-combustible in nature. However, the exposure to the high temperature such as fire can lead to change in the concrete properties. Due to the higher temperature, several changes in terms of mechanical properties were observed in concrete such as compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and durability of concrete will decrease significantly at high temperature. The exceptional fire-proof achievement of concrete is might be due to the constituent materials of concrete such as its aggregates. The extensive use of aggregate in concrete will leads to depletion of natural resources. Hence, the use of waste and other recycled and by-product material as aggregates replacements becomes a leading research. This review has been made on the utilization of waste materials in concrete and critically evaluates its effects on the concrete performances during the fire exposure. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to review the previous search work regarding the concrete containing waste material as aggregates replacement when exposed to elevated temperature and come up with different design recommendations to improve the fire resistance of structures.

  6. GPR measurements of attenuation in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, Frank J.; Pavel, Brittney

    2015-03-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals from concrete structures are affected by several phenomenon, including: (1) transmission and reflection coefficients at interfaces; (2) the radiation patterns of the antenna(s) being used; and (3) the material properties of concrete and any embedded objects. In this paper we investigate different schemes for determining the electromagnetic (EM) attenuation of concrete from measured signals obtained using commercially-available GPR equipment. We adapt procedures commonly used in ultrasonic inspections where one compares the relative strengths of two or more signals having different travel paths through the material of interest. After correcting for beam spread (i.e., diffraction), interface phenomena, and equipment amplification settings, any remaining signal differences are assumed to be due to attenuation thus allowing the attenuation coefficient (say, in dB of loss per inch of travel) to be estimated. We begin with a brief overview of our approach, and then discuss how diffraction corrections were determined for our two 1.6 GHz GPR antennas. We then present results of attenuation measurements for two types of concrete using both pulse/echo and pitch/catch measurement setups.

  7. GPR measurements of attenuation in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, Frank J.; Pavel, Brittney

    2015-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals from concrete structures are affected by several phenomenon, including: (1) transmission and reflection coefficients at interfaces; (2) the radiation patterns of the antenna(s) being used; and (3) the material properties of concrete and any embedded objects. In this paper we investigate different schemes for determining the electromagnetic (EM) attenuation of concrete from measured signals obtained using commercially-available GPR equipment. We adapt procedures commonly used in ultrasonic inspections where one compares the relative strengths of two or more signals having different travel paths through the material of interest. After correcting for beam spread (i.e., diffraction), interface phenomena, and equipment amplification settings, any remaining signal differences are assumed to be due to attenuation thus allowing the attenuation coefficient (say, in dB of loss per inch of travel) to be estimated. We begin with a brief overview of our approach, and then discuss how diffraction corrections were determined for our two 1.6 GHz GPR antennas. We then present results of attenuation measurements for two types of concrete using both pulse/echo and pitch/catch measurement setups

  8. GPR measurements of attenuation in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmann, David, E-mail: djeisen@cnde.iastate.edu; Margetan, Frank J., E-mail: djeisen@cnde.iastate.edu; Pavel, Brittney, E-mail: djeisen@cnde.iastate.edu [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011-3042 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals from concrete structures are affected by several phenomenon, including: (1) transmission and reflection coefficients at interfaces; (2) the radiation patterns of the antenna(s) being used; and (3) the material properties of concrete and any embedded objects. In this paper we investigate different schemes for determining the electromagnetic (EM) attenuation of concrete from measured signals obtained using commercially-available GPR equipment. We adapt procedures commonly used in ultrasonic inspections where one compares the relative strengths of two or more signals having different travel paths through the material of interest. After correcting for beam spread (i.e., diffraction), interface phenomena, and equipment amplification settings, any remaining signal differences are assumed to be due to attenuation thus allowing the attenuation coefficient (say, in dB of loss per inch of travel) to be estimated. We begin with a brief overview of our approach, and then discuss how diffraction corrections were determined for our two 1.6 GHz GPR antennas. We then present results of attenuation measurements for two types of concrete using both pulse/echo and pitch/catch measurement setups.

  9. Dynamic Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks - 13638

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sang-Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is prevailingly used in US. A concrete cask usually consists of metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel and concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Missile impact against a concrete overpack involves two damage modes, local damage and global damage. Local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. In many cases, those two damage modes are evaluated separately. In this research, a series of numerical simulations are performed using finite element analysis to evaluate the global damage of concrete overpack as well as its local damage under high speed missile impact. We consider two types of concrete overpack, one with steel in-cased concrete without reinforcement and the other with partially-confined reinforced concrete. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results and it is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this analysis and the results are highly dependent on the choice of failure parameters. (authors)

  10. Dynamic Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks - 13638

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sang-Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog

    2013-01-01

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is prevailingly used in US. A concrete cask usually consists of metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel and concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Missile impact against a concrete overpack involves two damage modes, local damage and global damage. Local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. In many cases, those two damage modes are evaluated separately. In this research, a series of numerical simulations are performed using finite element analysis to evaluate the global damage of concrete overpack as well as its local damage under high speed missile impact. We consider two types of concrete overpack, one with steel in-cased concrete without reinforcement and the other with partially-confined reinforced concrete. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results and it is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this analysis and the results are highly dependent on the choice of failure parameters. (authors)

  11. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Iureş, Liana; Bob, Corneliu

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  12. HECLA experiments on interaction between metallic melt and hematite-containing concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevon, Tuomo, E-mail: tuomo.sevon@vtt.f [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kinnunen, Tuomo; Virta, Jouko; Holmstroem, Stefan; Kekki, Tommi; Lindholm, Ilona [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-10-15

    In a hypothetical severe accident in a nuclear power plant, molten materials may come into contact with concrete, causing concrete ablation. In five HECLA experiments the interaction between metallic melt and concrete was investigated by pouring molten stainless steel at almost 1800 {sup o}C into cylindrical concrete crucibles. The tests were transient, i.e. no decay heat simulation was used. The main objective was to test the behavior of the FeSi concrete, containing hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and siliceous aggregates. This special concrete type is used as a sacrificial layer in the Olkiluoto 3 EPR reactor pit, and very scarce experimental data is available about its behavior at high temperatures. It is concluded that no clear differences between the ablation of FeSi concrete and ordinary siliceous concrete were observed. The ablation depths were small, 25 mm at maximum. No dramatic effects, such as cracking of large pieces of concrete due to the thermal shock, took place. An important side result of the test series was gaining knowledge of the properties of the special concrete type. Chemical analyses were conducted and mechanical properties were measured.

  13. Influence of Selected Factors on the Relationship between the Dynamic Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowski, Krystian; Grzeszczyk, Stefania

    2018-03-22

    In this paper, the relationship between the static and dynamic elastic modulus of concrete and the relationship between the static elastic modulus and compressive strength of concrete have been formulated. These relationships are based on investigations of different types of concrete and take into account the type and amount of aggregate and binder used. The dynamic elastic modulus of concrete was tested using impulse excitation of vibration and the modal analysis method. This method could be used as a non-destructive way of estimating the compressive strength of concrete.

  14. Influence of Selected Factors on the Relationship between the Dynamic Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowski, Krystian; Grzeszczyk, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the static and dynamic elastic modulus of concrete and the relationship between the static elastic modulus and compressive strength of concrete have been formulated. These relationships are based on investigations of different types of concrete and take into account the type and amount of aggregate and binder used. The dynamic elastic modulus of concrete was tested using impulse excitation of vibration and the modal analysis method. This method could be used as a non-destructive way of estimating the compressive strength of concrete. PMID:29565830

  15. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiğit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-01-01

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated

  16. Effect of internal short fibers, steel reinforcement, and surface layer on impact and penetration resistance of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abd_Elhakam Aliabdo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental program to investigate the impact and penetration resistance of concrete. The research work is divided into two approaches. These approaches are effect of concrete constituents and effect of surface layer. Effect of concrete aggregate type, w/c ratio, fiber type, fiber shape, fiber volume fraction, and steel reinforcement is considered in the first approach. The second approach includes using fiber reinforced concrete and glass fiber reinforced polymer as surface layers. The evaluating tests include standard impact test according to ASTM D 1557 and suggested simulated penetration test to measure the impact and penetration resistance of concrete. The test results of plain and fibrous concrete from ASTM D 1557 method indicated that steel fiber with different configurations and using basalt have a great positive effect on impact resistance of concrete. Moreover, the simulated penetration test indicates that steel fibers are more effective than propylene fibers, type of coarse aggregate has negligible effect, and steel fiber volume fraction has a more significant influence than fiber shape for reinforced concrete test panels. Finally, as expectable, surface properties of tested concrete panels have a significant effect on impact and penetration resistance.

  17. Evaluation of concrete as a matrix for solidification of Savannah River Plant waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.A.

    1977-06-01

    The properties of concrete as a matrix for solidification of Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level radioactive wastes were studied. In an experimental, laboratory-scale program, concrete specimens were prepared and evaluated with both simulated and actual SRP waste sludges. Properties of concrete were found adequate for fixation of SRP wastes. Procedures were developed for preparation of simulated sludges and concrete-sludge castings. Effects of cement type, simulated sludge type, sludge loading, and water content on concrete formulations were tested in a factorial experiment. Compressive strength, leachability of strontium and plutonium, thermal stability, and radiation stability were measured for each formulation. From these studies, high-alumina cement and a portland-pozzolanic cement were selected for additional tests. Incorporation of cesium-loaded zeolite into cement-sludge mixtures had no adverse effects on mechanical or chemical properties of waste forms. Effects of heating concrete-sludge castings were investigated; thermal conductivity and DTA-TGA-EGA data are reported. Formulations of actual SRP waste sludges in concrete were prepared and tested for compressive strength; for leachability of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, and alpha emitters; and for long-term thermal stability. The radioactive sludges were generally similar in behavior to simulated sludges in concrete. 37 tables, 34 figures

  18. The repair and protection of reinforced concrete with migrating corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, D.

    2016-01-01

    The concrete is a very durable construction material and his use is based on the principle that concrete is an ideal environment for steel if properly proportioned and placed. In general, reinforced concrete has proved to be successful in terms of both structural performance and durability. However, there are instances of premature failure of reinforced concrete components due to corrosion of the reinforcement. Experience has shown that there are certain portions of exposed concrete structures more vulnerable than others. Methodology for concrete repair it addresses to suggestions of the types of repair methods and materials and a detailed description of the uses, limitations, materials, and procedures for Repair of Concrete. At same the time the methodology presents recommendation on materials, methods of mixing, application, curing and precautions to be exercised during placement. This work presents guidelines for managing reinforced concrete components and specifies the repair strategy with inhibitors incorporating. (authors)

  19. Investigating porous concrete with improved strength: Testing at different scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agar-Ozbek, A.S.; Weerheijm, J.; Schlangen, E.; Breugel, K. van

    2013-01-01

    Porous concrete incorporates a high percentage of meso-size air voids that makes its mechanical characteristics remarkably different from normal concrete. A research project was undertaken to design a special type of porous concrete, that fractures into small fragments when exposed to impact loading

  20. Recycled aggregates in concrete production: engineering properties and environmental impact

    OpenAIRE

    Seddik Meddah Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Recycled concrete aggregate is considered as the most abundant and used secondary aggregate in concrete production, other types of solid waste are also being used in concrete for specific purposes and to achieve some desired properties. Recycled aggregates and particularly, recycled concrete aggregate substantially affect the properties and mix design of concrete both at fresh and hardened states since it is known by high porosity due to the adhered layer of old mortar on the aggregate which ...

  1. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Iureş

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  2. Effect of mineral additives on structure and properties of concrete for pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobol Khrystyna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete pavements is an attractive alternative to asphalt pavements because of its lower cost and higher durability. Major contribution to sustainable development can be made by partial replacement of cement in concrete pavement with supplementary cementitious materials of different nature and origin. In this paper, the effect of natural zeolite and perlite additives in complex with chemical admixtures on the structure and properties of concrete for pavement was studied. Compressive and flexural strength test was used to study the mechanical behavior of designed concrete under load. Generally, the compressive strength of both control concrete and concrete containing mineral additives levels at the later ages of hardening. The microstructure analysis of concrete with mineral additives of different nature activity showed the formation of additional amount of hydration products such as tobermorite type calcium hydrosilicate which provide self-reinforcement of hardening concrete system.

  3. Mix Proportion Design of Asphalt Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianhu; Gao, Lingling; Du, Shoujun

    2017-12-01

    Based on the gradation of AC and SMA, this paper designs a new type of anti slide mixture with two types of advantages. Chapter introduces the material selection, ratio of ore mixture ratio design calculation, and determine the optimal asphalt content test and proportioning design of asphalt concrete mix. This paper introduces the new technology of mix proportion.

  4. Permeability, porosity and compressive strength of self-compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valcuende, M.O.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Most deterioration affecting the durability of self-compacting concrete structures is mediated by water penetration in the concrete, a condition related to its porous structure. The present study analyzes these two factors. To this end, two types of concrete were prepared, a self-compacting and a traditional vibrated concrete, with different W/C ratios and different types of cement. The results of low-pressure water testing to evaluate permeability and analyses to determine compressive strength and pore size distribution showed that self-compacting concrete has lower capillary porosity than traditional concrete, which would explain its greater resistance to water penetration. Such concrete likewise reached higher strength values, except where large proportions of lime powder with low sand equivalents were used in its manufacture, when lower strength was recorded. Lastly, the depth of water penetration and compressive strength were found to be linearly correlated. That correlation was seen to depend, in turn, on the type of concrete, since for any given strength level, self-compacting concrete was less permeable than the traditional material.

    En este trabajo experimental se estudia la penetración de agua en hormigones autocompactables, analizando al mismo tiempo su estructura porosa, pues gran parte de los procesos de deterioro que afectan a la durabilidad de las estructuras están condicionados por estos dos aspectos. Para ello se han fabricado dos tipos de hormigones, uno autocompactable y otro tradicional vibrado, con diferentes relaciones A/C y distintos tipos de cemento. Tras determinar la permeabilidad al agua bajo presión, la resistencia a compresión y las distribuciones de tamaño de poro, los resultados obtenidos ponen de manifiesto que los hormigones autocompactables presentan menor porosidad capilar que los tradicionales, lo que les confiere mejores prestaciones frente a la penetración de agua. Asimismo, dichos hormigones

  5. Durable concrete for a waste repository - Measurement of ionic ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, R.F.; Beaudoin, J.J.; Philipose, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    A waste repository for the below ground disposal of low level radioactive waste is planned at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. It relies greatly on the durability of concrete for the required 500 year service life. A research program to design durable concrete and predict its service life is in progress. The degradation of the concrete depends to a large extent on the rate of ingress of corrosive agents. Penetration of chloride and sulfate ions are particularly relevant. Twenty mix formulations were developed to create various types and qualities of concrete, and to study their behavior in different site environmental conditions. A total of 1,000 concrete specimens are being exposed at 20C and 45C to 25 different combinations of the corrosive agents including CO 2 . Procedures to measure the ionic profiles and to determine the factors controlling diffusion of the ions in the various concretes have been developed. Results of selected concrete systems exposed to chloride and sulfate solutions for 1 year are presented and discussed in terms of pore structure and permeability parameters of the concrete

  6. Earthquake Response of Reinforced Concrete Building Retrofitted with Geopolymer Concrete and X-shaped Metallic Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madheswaran, C. K.; Prakash vel, J.; Sathishkumar, K.; Rao, G. V. Rama

    2017-06-01

    A three-storey half scale reinforced concrete (RC) building is fixed with X-shaped metallic damper at the ground floor level, is designed and fabricated to study its seismic response characteristics. Experimental studies are carried out using the (4 m × 4 m) tri-axial shake-table facility to evaluate the seismic response of a retrofitted RC building with open ground storey (OGS) structure using yielding type X-shaped metallic dampers (also called as Added Damping and Stiffness-ADAS elements) and repairing the damaged ground storey columns using geopolymer concrete composites. This elasto-plastic device is normally incorporated within the frame structure between adjacent floors through chevron bracing, so that they efficiently enhance the overall energy dissipation ability of the seismically deficient frame structure under earthquake loading. Free vibration tests on RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper is carried out. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper are determined. The retrofitted reinforced concrete building is subjected to earthquake excitations and the response from the structure is recorded. This work discusses the preparation of test specimen, experimental set-up, instrumentation, method of testing of RC building and the response of the structure. The metallic damper reduces the time period of the structure and displacement demands on the OGS columns of the structure. Nonlinear time history analysis is performed using structural analysis package, SAP2000.

  7. Viscoelastic and thermal behavior of structural concrete with reference to containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    A method of numerical viscoelastic stress analysis is described suitable for concrete structures operating at elevated temperatures. The paper describes how approximate numerical methods of elastic analysis of the finite element type can be extended to incorporate the viscoelastic behavior of structural concrete of the quasi-static type. A new eight parameter viscoelastic model is proposed to represent concrete behavior in the loaded and unloaded stage. The deformational expressions for the proposed viscoelastic analogue are also developed. Finally, as a result of courve-fitting procedures, the evaluation of the creep law coefficients are obtained for creep laws appropriate to a test regime. The proposed method is of general application providing that the properties of concrete are assessed reasonably well. The analytical predictions are compared with experimental results obtained on concrete model specimens loaded for 3 1/2 months, at a temperature of 80 0 C. (author)

  8. Strength development of high-strength ductile concrete incorporating Metakaolin and PVA fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuruddin, Muhammad Fadhil; Khan, Sadaqat Ullah; Shafiq, Nasir; Ayub, Tehmina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC) have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK) as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27) mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers.

  9. Properties of Concrete Exposed to Running Fresh Water for 24 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2008-01-01

    A total of nine concretes, comprising three cement types, incorporation of fly ash, superplasticized high strength concrete and high performance concrete with microsilica, have been monitored during 24 years of exposure to running fresh water under Danish outdoor climatic conditions....... The compressive strength development has been measured, and durability aspects have been assessed after 6 and 21 years of exposure, with very positive results....

  10. Fatigue Performance and Multiscale Mechanisms of Concrete Toughened by Polymers and Waste Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For improving bending toughness and fatigue performance of brittle cement-based composites, two types of water-soluble polymers (such as dispersible latex powder and polyvinyl alcohol powder and waste tire-rubber powders are added to concrete as admixtures. Multiscale toughening mechanisms of these additions in concretes were comprehensively investigated. Four-point bending fatigue performance of four series concretes is conducted under a stress level of 0.70. The results show that the effects of dispersible latex powder on bending toughness and fatigue life of concrete are better than those of polyvinyl alcohol powder. Furthermore, the bending fatigue lives of concrete simultaneously containing polymers and waste rubber powders are larger than those of concrete with only one type of admixtures. The multiscale physics-chemical mechanisms show that high bonding effect and high elastic modulus of polymer films as well as good elastic property and crack-resistance of waste tire-rubber powders are beneficial for improving bending toughness and fatigue life of cementitious composites.

  11. Concrete Types for TypeScript

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Gregor; Zappa Nardelli, Francesco; Vitek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Typescript extends JavaScript with optional type annotations that are, by design, unsound and, that the Typescript compiler discards as it emits code. This design point preserves programming idioms developers are familiar with, and allows them to leave their legacy code unchanged, while offering a measure of static error checking in parts of the program that have type annotations. We present an alternative design for TypeScript, one where it is possible to support the same degree of dynamism,...

  12. Properties of concrete containing foamed concrete block waste as fine aggregate replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, K.; Budiea, A. M. A.; Zaidan, A. L. F.; Rasid, M. H.; Hazimmah, D. S.

    2017-11-01

    Environmental degradation due to excessive sand mining dumping at certain places and disposal of foamed concrete block waste from lightweight concrete producing industry are issues that should be resolved for a better and cleaner environment of the community. Thus, the main intention of this study is to investigate the potential of foamed concrete block waste as partial sand replacement in concrete production. The foamed concrete waste (FCW) used in this research that were supplied by a local lightweight concrete producing industry. The workability and compressive strength of concrete containing various percentage of foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement has been investigated. Prior to the use, the foamed concrete waste were crushed to produce finer particles. Six concrete mixes containing various content of crushed foamed concrete waste that are 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% were used in this experimental work. Then the prepared specimens were placed in water curing until the testing age. Compressive strength test and flexural strength tests were conducted at 7, 14 and 28 days. The result shows that integration of crushed foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement in concrete reduces the mix workability. It is interesting to note that both compressive strength and flexural strength of concrete improves when 30% crushed foamed concrete waste is added as partial sand replacement.

  13. Carbonation and CO2 uptake of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Seo, Eun-A; Tae, Sung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This study developed a reliable procedure to assess the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) uptake of concrete by carbonation during the service life of a structure and by the recycling of concrete after demolition. To generalize the amount of absorbable CO 2 per unit volume of concrete, the molar concentration of carbonatable constituents in hardened cement paste was simplified as a function of the unit content of cement, and the degree of hydration of the cement paste was formulated as a function of the water-to-cement ratio. The contribution of the relative humidity, type of finishing material for the concrete surface, and the substitution level of supplementary cementitious materials to the CO 2 diffusion coefficient in concrete was reflected using various correction factors. The following parameters varying with the recycling scenario were also considered: the carbonatable surface area of concrete crusher-runs and underground phenomena of the decreased CO 2 diffusion coefficient and increased CO 2 concentration. Based on the developed procedure, a case study was conducted for an apartment building with a principal wall system and an office building with a Rahmen system, with the aim of examining the CO 2 uptake of each structural element under different exposure environments during the service life and recycling of the building. As input data necessary for the case study, data collected from actual surveys conducted in 2012 in South Korea were used, which included data on the surrounding environments, lifecycle inventory database, life expectancy of structures, and recycling activity scenario. Ultimately, the CO 2 uptake of concrete during a 100-year lifecycle (life expectancy of 40 years and recycling span of 60 years) was estimated to be 15.5%–17% of the CO 2 emissions from concrete production, which roughly corresponds to 18%–21% of the CO 2 emissions from the production of ordinary Portland cement. - Highlights: • CO 2 uptake assessment approach owing to the

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE WASTE RECYCLING SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Truptimala Patanaik*; Niharika Patel; Shilpika Panda; Subhasmita Prusty

    2016-01-01

    Construction solid waste has caused serious environmental problems. Reuse, recycling and reduction of construction materials have been advocated for many years, and various methods have been investigated. There may be six type of building materials: plastic, paper, timber, metal, glass and concrete which can be reused and recycled. This paper examines the rate of reusable & recyclable concrete waste. On the other hand, the reuse of construction waste is highly essential ...

  15. Concrete Production Using Technogenical, Constructional and Domestic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Vaičienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes investigations carried out by the scientists from various countries in order to improve the physical and mechanical properties of concrete. The grained rubber of tyres, modified sawdust, crushed ceramic bricks, plastic waste and remains of glass are utilised to produce concrete mixtures. The results of research conducted by the scientists show that in the process of producing concrete we can use different types of waste to change natural aggregates and to get concrete with specific properties. Currently, waste handling and utilization are burning ecological problems. Therefore, intensive investigations are carried out in order to utilise technogenical, constructional and domestic waste for concrete mixtures. Article in Lithuanian

  16. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON STRENGTH AND PERMEABILITY PROPERTIES OF HIGH STRENGTH CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Yedla Venkatesh * & G. Kalyan

    2017-01-01

    Concrete is the most important engineering material and the addition of some other materials may change the properties of concrete. Mineral additions which are also known as mineral admixtures have been used with cements for many years. There are two types of materials crystalline and non crystalline. High performance concrete (HPC) exceeds the properties and constructability of normal concrete. Micro silica or silica fume is very fine non crystalline material. Silica fume is produced in elec...

  17. Non destructive Testing (NDT) of concrete containing hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Suhairy Sani; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    This paper described the results of Non-destructive ultrasonic and rebound hammer measurements on concrete containing hematite. Local hematite stones were used as aggregates to produce high density concrete for application in X-and gamma shielding. Concrete cube samples (150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm) containing hematite as coarse aggregates were prepared by changing mix ratio, water to cement ratio (w/c) and types of fine aggregate. All samples were cured in water for 7 days and then tested after 28 days. Density, rebound number(N) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of the samples were taken before compressed to failure. The measurement results are explained and discussed. (author)

  18. Survey of the future concrete structures lifetime measuring the water content: 4 types of embedded sensor under checking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, G.; Salin, J.; Masson, B.; Dubois, J.P.; Agostini, F.; Skoczylas, F.

    2011-01-01

    Today thermal and mechanical properties are well-measured with common sensors like respectively PT100 sensors and vibrating wire sensors or new sensors like optical fiber sensors. On the other hand there is no reference sensor for the measurement of the concrete moisture. In this paper, we present our laboratory evaluation's protocol and first result for four different technologies of concrete moisture sensor based on our owner requirement. Specimens of porous mortar (E/C ∼ 0.8) with embedded sensor are placed into a temperature and humidity controlled climatic chamber. Then, different air relative humidity steps are enforced. Before each relative humidity change, stabilization of the mass of specimens is expected. The four technologies are based on: 1) capacity between two electrodes. The sensor is embedded in a porous Teflon cap. The sensor measures the humidity of air at equilibrium with concrete. Today it is the most common moisture sensor; 2) Elongation measurement of a calibrated nano porous material with a vibrating wire sensor. The sensor measures the hygroscopic volume change related to the humidity of the surrounding concrete. This sensor called Hydravib has been developed by Cementys S.A.S.; 3) Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). The sensor measures an Electro Magnetic Wave time propagation in the concrete and this one is a function of the concrete permittivity; 4) gas permeability measurement of the ambient concrete. The sensor measures a pressure drop through a porous stainless filter. This study evaluates the capacities of four sensor technologies to indirectly measure one key parameter of concrete structure: the moisture concrete. Capacitive sensor does not seem to fulfill our requirements. Hydravib presents sensitivity to the moisture concrete evolution but it needs more development and a nano porous material calibration. Finally TDR and Pulse sensors present very promising results

  19. Development of prestressed concrete containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuji, Hideo; Kuniyoshi, Mutsumu; Nagata, Kaoru

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of evaluations for the selection of the structural and prestressing system type to be employed for the first domestic Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel (PCCV) in Japan. This paper also discusses characteristic features in the design of the liner plate system provided on the PCCV inner surface to assure its leak-tight integrity. Prestressed concrete containment vessels so far constructed in foreign countries are to a considerable extent of different structural types, depending on differences in dome shapes, prestressing systems and number of buttresses. These differences are caused not only by differences in design philosophy and construction practices, but also by difference in the level of technology of the times when the individual containment vessels are being constructed. In the investigation reported herein, the most suitable types of PCCV and Prestressing Systems were determined as the results of an overall comparative evaluation of data and information obtained from PCCV's so far constructed from the design, construction and cost aspects, taking into consideration the seismic criteria, available technology, construction practices, regulations and technical standards in Japan. The function of the liner plate system requires the liner to have enough deformability so that the liner deformation can be consistent with the PCCV concrete deformation. Therefore, in the design of the liner plate system a method for evaluating liner deformability was employed, instead of the stress evaluation method which is widely used in the design of ordinary structures. (author)

  20. High-performance heavy concrete as a multi-purpose shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Roshan-Shomal, P.; Raadpey, N.; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Concrete has long been used as a shield against high-energy photons and neutrons. In this study, colemanite and galena minerals (CoGa) were used for the production of an economical high-performance heavy concrete. To measure the gamma radiation attenuation of the CoGa concrete samples, they were exposed to a narrow beam of gamma rays emitted from a 60 Co radiotherapy unit. An Am-Be neutron source was used for assessing the shielding properties of the samples against neutrons. The compression strengths of both types of concrete mixes (CoGa and reference concrete) were investigated. The range of the densities of the heavy concrete samples was 4100-4650 kg m -3 , whereas it was 2300-2600 kg m -3 in the ordinary concrete reference samples. The half-value layer of the CoGa concrete samples for 60 Co gamma rays was 2.49 cm; much less than that of ordinary concrete (6.0 cm). Moreover, CoGa concrete samples had a 10% greater neutron absorption compared with reference concrete. (authors)

  1. Strength Development of High-Strength Ductile Concrete Incorporating Metakaolin and PVA Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Fadhil Nuruddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27 mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers.

  2. Towards Better Understanding of Concrete Containing Recycled Concrete Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Qasrawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of using recycled concrete aggregates (RCA on the basic properties of normal concrete is studied. First, recycled aggregate properties have been determined and compared to those of normal aggregates. Except for absorption, there was not a significant difference between the two. Later, recycled aggregates were introduced in concrete mixes. In these mixes, natural coarse aggregate was partly or totally replaced by recycled aggregates. Results show that the use of recycled aggregates has an adverse effect on the workability and air content of fresh concrete. Depending on the water/cement ratio and on the percent of the normal aggregate replaced by RCA, the concrete strength is reduced by 5% to 25%, while the tensile strength is reduced by 4% to 14%. All results are compared with previous research. As new in this research, the paper introduces a simple formula for the prediction of the modulus of elasticity of RCA concrete. Furthermore, the paper shows the variation of the air content of RAC.

  3. Comparison of different forms of gravel as aggregate in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikiru ORITOLA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gradation plays an important role in the workability, segregation, and pump ability of concrete. Uniformly distributed aggregates require less paste which will also decrease bleeding, creep and shrinkage while producing better workability, more durable concrete and higher packing. This attempt looks at the effect of particle size distribution pattern for five types of gravel aggregate forms, angular, elongated, smooth rounded, irregular and flaky as related to the strength of concrete produced. Different forms of naturally existing gravel aggregate were collected from a particular location and tests were carried out on them to determine their gradation. Based on the gradation the aggregates were used to prepare different samples of grade 20 concrete with water-cement ratio of 0.5. The particle size distribution resulted in coefficients of uniformity ranging from 1.24 to 1.44. The granite aggregate, which serves as a reference, had a coefficient of uniformity of 1.47. Tests were conducted on fresh and hardened concrete cube samples. The concrete sample CT5 recorded a slump of 32mm and highest compressive strength value of 21.7 N/mm2, among the concrete produced from different forms of gravel.

  4. Production and quality control of concrete for the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station - [Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Roy, P.K.; Sukhtankar, K.D.; Prasad, K.

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of the production and quality control of concrete and concrete materials used in the construction of twin-reactor Rajasthan Atomic Power Station are discussed : (1) relationship between strength of cubes and cylinders made of concrete used for the prestressed dome (2) temperature control during pouring of concrete (3) thermal conductivity of heavy concrete (4) various types of grouting procedures used for different structures forming part of reactors (5) quality control of normal and heavy concrete and (6) leakage through form ties. Typical concrete mixes used for grouts are also given. (M.G.B.)

  5. Evaluation of the shrinkage and creep of medium strength self compacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, C. J.; Ramos, G.; Hurtado, W. A.

    2017-02-01

    The difference between self compacting concrete (SCC) and conventional concrete (CC) is in fresh state, is the high fluidity at first and the need for vibration at second, but in hardened state, both concretes must comply with the resistance specified, in addition to securing the safety and functionality for which it was designed. This article describes the tests and results for shrinkage and creep at some medium strength Self Compacting Concrete with added sand (SCC-MSs) and two types of cement. The research was conducted at the Laboratorio de Tecnología de Estructuras (LTE) of the Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC), in dosages of 200 liters; with the idea of evaluating the effectiveness of implementation of these new concretes at elements designed with conventional concrete (CCs).

  6. How Concrete is Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics

  7. Evaluation of microbially-influenced degradation of massive concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Zolynski, M.; Veeh, R.

    1996-01-01

    Many low level waste disposal vaults, both above and below ground, are constructed of concrete. One potential contributing agent to the destruction of concrete structures is microbially-influenced degradation (MID). Three groups of bacteria are known to create conditions that are conducive to destroying concrete integrity. They are sulfur oxidizing bacteria, nitrifying bacteria, and heterotrophic bacteria. Research is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assess the extent of naturally occurring microbially influenced degradation (MID) and its contribution to the deterioration of massive concrete structures. The preliminary steps to understanding the extent of MID, require assessing the microbial communities present on degrading concrete surfaces. Ultimately such information can be used to develop guidelines for preventive or corrective treatments for MID and aid in formulation of new materials to resist corrosion. An environmental study was conducted to determine the presence and activity of potential MID bacteria on degrading concrete surfaces of massive concrete structures. Scanning electron microscopy detected bacteria on the surfaces of concrete structures such as bridges and dams, where corrosion was evident. Enumeration of sulfur oxidizing thiobacilli and nitrogen oxidizing Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from surface samples was conducted. Bacterial community composition varied between sampling locations, and generally the presence of either sulfur oxidizers or nitrifiers dominated, although instances of both types of bacteria occurring together were encountered. No clear correlation between bacterial numbers and degree of degradation was exhibited

  8. Degradation of normal portland and slag cement concrete under load, due to reinforcement corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.; Beaudoin, J.J.; Feldman, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    The corrosion of reinforcement is one of the major degradation mechanisms of reinforced concrete elements. The majority of studies published on concrete-steel corrosion have been conducted on unstressed specimens. Structural concrete, however, is subjected to substantial strain near the steel reinforcing bars that resist tensile loads, which results in a system of microcracks. This report presents the initial results of an investigation to determine the effect of applied load and microcracking on the rate of ingress of chloride ion and corrosion of steel in concrete. Simply-supported concrete beam specimens were loaded to give a maximum strain of about 600 με on the tension face. Chloride ion ingress on cores taken from loaded specimens was monitored using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis techniques. Corrosion current and rate measurements using linear polarization electrochemical techniques were also obtained on the same loaded specimens. Variables investigated included two concrete types, two steel cover-depths, three applied load levels, bonded and unbonded rebars and the exposure of tension and compression beam faces to chloride solution. One concrete mixture was made with type 10 Portland cement, the other with 75% blast furnace slag, 22% type 50 cement and 3% silica fume. The rate of chloride ion ingress into reinforced concrete, and hence the time for chloride ion to reach the reinforcing steel, is shown to be dependent on applied load and the concrete quality. The dependence of corrosion process descriptors - passive layer formation, initiation period and propagation period - on the level of applied load is discussed. (Author) (6 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs.)

  9. Properties of concrete for use in near surface low-level waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.; Shuman, R.; Nielson, K.; Conner, J.

    1989-01-01

    The majority of alternative low-level waste disposal technologies strive to isolate the radioactive waste from the environment through the implementation of engineered man-made barriers. Of the materials used in the construction of these barriers, concrete is, by far, the most prevalent. As alternative facility designs are developed, it will be necessary to assess the features and long-term performance of the technologies. Reliable assessments will depend, in part, on an accurate understanding of the engineered barriers used in construction. Towards these ends an investigation into the properties and behavior of two types of concrete was conducted. Results are presented. Two concrete mix designs were used in the investigation. The first of these employs a Type II cement with a microsilica (silica fume) admixture. The second concrete mix uses a Type V cement with a pozzolan admixture and has approximately four percent entrained air

  10. Method for Bubbledeck Concrete Slab with Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Călin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite slabs are made of BubbleDeck type slab elements with spherical gaps, poured in place on transversal and longitudinal directions. By introducing the gaps leads to a 30...50\\% lighter slab which reduces the loads on the columns, walls and foundations, and of course of the entire building. BubbleDeck slab elements are plates with ribs on two directions made of reinforced concrete or precast concrete with spherical shaped bubbles. These slab elements have a bottom and an upper concrete part connected with vertical ribs that go around the gaps.

  11. Dynamics of layered reinforced concrete beam on visco-elastic foundation with different resistances of concrete and reinforcement to tension and compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Y. V.; Tikhonov, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Originally, fundamentals of the theory of limit equilibrium and dynamic deformation of building metal and reinforced concrete structures were created by A. A. Gvozdev [1] and developed by his followers [4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12]. Forming the basis for the calculation, the model of an ideal rigid-plastic material has enabled to determine in many cases the ultimate load bearing capacity and upper (kinematically possible) or lower (statically valid) values for a wide class of different structures with quite simple methods. At the same time, applied to concrete structures the most important property of concrete to significantly differently resist tension and compression was not taken into account [10]. This circumstance was considered in [3] for reinforced concrete beams under conditions of quasistatic loading. The deformation is often accompanied by resistance of the environment in construction practice [8, 9]. In [2], the dynamics of multi-layered concrete beams on visco-elastic foundation under the loadings of explosive type is considered. In this work we consider the case which is often encountered in practical applications when the loadings weakly change in time.

  12. Evaluation of ilmenite serpentine concrete and ordinary concrete as nuclear reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Kamal, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present study involves adapting a formal decision methodology to the selection of alternative nuclear reactor concrete shielding. Multiattribute utility theory is selected to accommodate decision maker's preferences. Multiattribute utility theory (MAU) is here employed to evaluate two appropriate nuclear reactor shielding concretes in terms of effectiveness to determine the optimal choice in order to meet the radiation protection regulations. These concretes are Ordinary concrete (O.C.) and Illmenite Serpentile concrete (I.S.C.). These are normal weight concrete and heavy weight heat resistive concrete, respectively. The effectiveness objective of the nuclear reactor shielding is defined and structured into definite attributes and subattributes to evaluate the best alternative. Factors affecting the decision are dose received by reactor's workers, the material properties as well as cost of concrete shield. A computer program is employed to assist in performing utility analysis. Based upon data, the result shows the superiority of Ordinary concrete over Illmenite Serpentine concrete. (Author)

  13. How Concrete is Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two diff...

  14. Effect of a mechanical damage on permeability and moisture diffusivity of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picandet, V.

    2001-12-01

    The effect of a mechanical damage on transfer parameters of concrete is an original point of view on the coupling between damage and durability. The studied transfer parameters, permeability and moisture diffusivity, allow to characterize the transport ability of a porous media to convey gases or water (liquid and vapour). The theoretical framework of the measurement of these parameters and its applications to concrete is pointed out. The experimental studies are carried on three types of concrete: ordinary concrete, high performance concrete, and high performance steel fiber reinforced concrete. Two kinds of damage are considered and generated in samples: - A continuous damage of the medium, obtained by cyclic uniaxial loading. It is characterized by a loss of stiffness and results in a diffuse microcracking.- A discrete or localised damage, obtained by a diametrical compression of cylindrical specimens. It is characterized by the presence of identifiable and measurable cracks. Measurements of gas permeability are taken using a constant head, Cembureau type, permeameter. For cracked samples, the procedure and analysis of the results are changed in order to make the evaluation of their gas and water permeability. The simple imbibition and positive head imbibition are the disturbances of the moisture equilibrium, which allow the evaluation of the material diffusivity. The local moisture contents of the specimen are measured using a gamma-ray attenuation method. The analysis of profiles using Boltzmann's transformation leads to the moisture diffusivity and then to the water permeability coefficients. Measurements of gas and water permeability are compared in both cases of considered damage. In the first case, a damage - permeability relationship dependent on the fluid of percolation but valid for all concrete types studied could be worked out. (author)

  15. Nondestructive estimation of depth of surface opening cracks in concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arne, Kevin; In, Chiwon; Kurtis, Kimberly; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials and thus assessment of damage in concrete structures is of the utmost importance from both a safety point of view and a financial point of view. Of particular interest are surface opening cracks that extend through the concrete cover, as this can expose the steel reinforcement bars underneath and induce corrosion in them. This corrosion can lead to significant subsequent damage in concrete such as cracking and delamination of the cover concrete as well as rust staining on the surface of concrete. Concrete beams are designed and constructed in such a way to provide crack depths up to around 13 cm. Two different types of measurements are made in-situ to estimate depths of real surface cracks (as opposed to saw-cut notches) after unloading: one based on the impact-echo method and the other one based on the diffuse ultrasonic method. These measurements are compared to the crack depth visually observed on the sides of the beams. Discussions are given as to the advantages and disadvantages of each method

  16. Effect of floor type (dirt or concrete on litter quality, house environmental conditions, and performance of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VMN Abreu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with the objective of evaluating the use of concrete or hard-packed dirt floor in broiler houses. This experiment was carried out in two different phases. The following performance parameters were studied: live weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, and mortality. Litter moisture, pH and temperature were measured. Litter residual contamination after cleaning and disinfection was also evaluated. A dry bulb thermometer, a wet bulb thermometer, and a black bulb thermometer were placed inside each broiler house at bird height and outside the broiler house for data collection. Environmental data were collected at 3h intervals from 00:00 to 24:00 hours during weeks 4, 5, and 6 of the grow-out. Based on the collected data, air relative humidity (RH was determined, after which wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT and Radiant Heat Load (RHL were calculated. There were no differences in live performance parameters. However, total mortality and sudden death were higher in birds raised on dirt floor. On days 0, 14 and 35, litter pH was higher in the dirt floor as compared to the concrete floor, but at the end of the grow-out, this difference disappeared. There was a cubic effect of bird age on litter moisture, which increased up to day 28, and then stabilized or decreased. Litter coliform contamination was higher at the end of the grow-out as compared to that found at housing, but it was not influenced by floor type. The general thermal comfort of broiler raised on dirt floor was similar to that of broilers raised on concrete floor.

  17. Freeze-Thaw Durability of Air-Entrained Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Shuai Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles. The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity. The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to “the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete” GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results.

  18. Evaluation of recycled concrete as aggregate in new concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the use of recycled concrete as coarse aggregate in new concrete pavements. : Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) produced from demolished pavements in three geographically dispersed locations in Washington state were used to perfo...

  19. Self-Placing Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Certain concrete pours have areas where the congestion of reinforcing bars make placement of concrete almost impossible. Using conventional placing and vibration techniques, the resulting concrete can have considerable honeycombing due to the development of voids. Self-placing concrete is a possible solution to the problem. Also known as self-compactable concrete, self-consolidating concrete, flowable concrete, and non-vibration concrete. These concretes eliminate the need for vibration in a ...

  20. Inelastic analysis of prestressed concrete secondary containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.W.; Chitnuyanondh, L.; Wong, C.; Rijub-Agha, K.Y.

    1978-07-01

    An elastic-plastic constitutive model for the simulation of stress-strain response of concrete under any biaxial combination of compressive and/or tensile stresses is developed. An effective tensile stress-strain curve is obtained indirectly from experimental results of a test on a large scale prestressed concrete wall segment. These concrete properties are then utilized in predicting the response of a second test and the results compared with the experiment. Modificications to the BOSOR5 program, in order to incorporate the new constitutive relation into it, are described. Techniques of modelling structures in order to perform inelastic analysis of thin shell axisymmetric prestressed concrete secondary containments are investigated. The results of inelastic BOSOR5 analyses of two different models of the University of Alberta Test Structure are presented. The predicted deterioration of the structure and the limit states associated with its behaviour are determined and discussed. It is concluded that the technique is a practical one which can be used for the inelastic analysis of Gentilly-type containment structures. (author)

  1. Physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete containing superplasticizer and metakaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidan, Shahiron; Tayeh, Bassam A.; Jamaludin, A. A.; Bahari, N. A. A. S.; Mohd, S. S.; Zuki Ali, N.; Khalid, F. S.

    2017-11-01

    The development of concrete technology shows a variety of admixtures in concrete to produce special concrete. This includes the production of self-compacting concrete which is able to fill up all spaces, take formwork shapes and pass through congested reinforcement bars without vibrating or needing any external energy. In this study, the main objective is to compare the physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete containing metakaolin with normal concrete. Four types of samples were produced to study the effect of metakaolin towards the physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete where 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% of metakaolin were used as cement replacement. The physical properties were investigated using slump test for normal concrete and slump flow test for self-compacting concrete. The mechanical properties were tested for compressive strength and tensile strength. The findings of this study show that the inclusion of metakaolin as cement replacement can increase both compressive and tensile strength compared to normal concrete. The highest compressive strength was found in self-compacting concrete with 15% metakaolin replacement at 53.3 MPa while self-compacting concrete with 10% metakaolin replacement showed the highest tensile strength at 3.6 MPa. On top of that, the finishing or concrete surface of both cube and cylinder samples made of self-compacting concrete produced a smooth surface with the appearance of less honeycombs compared to normal concrete.

  2. Ageing management of CANDUtm concrete containment buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.; Gregor, F.E.

    2009-01-01

    The containment system in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) provides the final physical barrier against release of radioactive materials to the external environment. Even though there are different physical configurations to meet this fundamental safety function in various reactor types, a common feature is the use of a thick-walled concrete structure as part of the containment system commonly referred to as 'Concrete Containment Building'. In order for the concrete containment buildings to continue to provide the required safety function, it has to maintain its structural integrity. As well, its leak rates under test pressures must be maintained below acceptable limits. As some of the containment buildings of the CANDU nuclear power plants are approaching their fourth decade of successful operation, questions regarding the impact of ageing on their ultimate useful service life emerge. Ageing Management has become the tool for addressing those questions. In this paper, the ageing and ageing management of the CANDU concrete containments are discussed, including the specific programs being implemented to monitor and trend the ageing conditions. Specifically, the usefulness of the embedded strain gauges as a tool for the assessment of the condition of the containment concrete structure is discussed. Some of the operational and test data accumulated over the last 30 years have been evaluated and trended to provide some results and conclusions regarding the satisfactory long-term behaviour of the concrete containment buildings. (authors)

  3. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Lightweight and Normal Weight Concretes Reinforced with Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ali

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Compared to conventional concrete, lightweight concrete is more brittle in nature however, in many situations its application is advantageous due to its lower weight. The associated brittleness issue can be, to some extent, addressed by incorporation of discrete fibers. It is now established that fibers modify some fresh and hardened concrete properties. However, evaluation of those properties for lightweight fiber-reinforced concrete (LWFC against conventional/normal weight concrete of similar strength class has not been done before. Current study not only discusses the change in these properties for lightweight concrete after the addition of steel fibers, but also presents a comparison of these properties with conventional concrete with and without fibers. Both the lightweight and conventional concrete were reinforced with similar types and quantity of fibers. Hooked end steel fibers were added in the quantities of 0, 20, 40 and 60kg/m3. For similar compressive strength class, results indicate that compared to normal weight fiber-reinforced concrete (NWFC, lightweight fiber-reinforced concrete (LWFC has better fresh concrete properties, but performs poorly when tested for hardened concrete properties.

  4. Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities. Through tangible experiments the project...... specific for this to happen. And the knowledge and intention behind the drawing becomes specialised through the understanding of the fabrication processes and their affect on the materials.The structure Concrete is a result of a multi-angled kerf series in ash wood and a concrete base. The ash wood is cut...... using a 5-axis CNC router with a thin saw blade attached. The programming of the machining results in variations of kerfs that lets the ash wood twist into unique shapes.The shapes of the revolving ash ribbons continue into the concrete creating a cohesive shape. The form for the concrete itself is made...

  5. Analysis of Possibilities for Using Recycled Concrete Aggregate in Concrete Pavement

    OpenAIRE

    R. Pernicova; D. Dobias

    2016-01-01

    The present article describes the limits of using recycled concrete aggregate (denoted as RCA) in the top layer of concrete roads. The main aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of reuse of recycled aggregates obtained by crushing the old concrete roads as a building material in the new top layers of concrete pavements. The paper is based on gathering the current knowledge about how to use recycled concrete aggregate, suitability, and modification of the properties and its standa...

  6. The influence of recycled concrete aggregates in pervious concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. TAVARES

    Full Text Available The expansion of urban areas under constant changes in the hydrological cycle directly affects the drainage of rainwater. The problems of urban drainage become major engineering problems to be solved in order to avoid negative consequences for local populations. Another urban problem is the excessive production of construction and demolition waste (CDW, in which , even with a increasingly policy of waste management , have been an end up being thrown in inappropriate disposal sites. Alternatively aiming to a minimization of the problems presented, we propose the study of permeable concrete using recycled concrete aggregate. In this study, there were evaluated the performance of concrete by means of permeability, consistency, strength, and interface conditions of the materials . Satisfactory relationships of resistance/permeability of concrete with recycled aggregate in relation to the concrete with natural aggregates was obtained, showing their best potential.

  7. Use of fiber reinforced concrete for concrete pavement slab replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Unlike ordinary concrete pavement, replacement concrete slabs need to be open to traffic within 24 hours (sooner in : some cases). Thus, high early-strength concrete is used; however, it frequently cracks prematurely as a result of high : heat of hyd...

  8. Shear Capacity of Steel and Polymer Fibre Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh-Poulsen, Jens C.; Hoang, Cao Linh; Goltermann, Per

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of a plasticity model for shear strength estimation of fibre reinforced concrete beams without stirrups. When using plastic theory to shear problems in structural concrete, the so-called effective strengths are introduced, usually determined by calibrating...... the plastic solutions with tests. This approach is, however, problematic when dealing with fibre reinforced concrete (FRC), as the effective strengths depend also on the type and the amount of fibres. In this paper, it is suggested that the effective tensile strength of FRC can be determined on the basis...

  9. Thermo-mechanical simulations of early-age concrete cracking with durability predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlásek, Petr; Šmilauer, Vít; Hájková, Karolina; Baquerizo, Luis

    2017-09-01

    Concrete performance is strongly affected by mix design, thermal boundary conditions, its evolving mechanical properties, and internal/external restraints with consequences to possible cracking with impaired durability. Thermo-mechanical simulations are able to capture those relevant phenomena and boundary conditions for predicting temperature, strains, stresses or cracking in reinforced concrete structures. In this paper, we propose a weakly coupled thermo-mechanical model for early age concrete with an affinity-based hydration model for thermal part, taking into account concrete mix design, cement type and thermal boundary conditions. The mechanical part uses B3/B4 model for concrete creep and shrinkage with isotropic damage model for cracking, able to predict a crack width. All models have been implemented in an open-source OOFEM software package. Validations of thermo-mechanical simulations will be presented on several massive concrete structures, showing excellent temperature predictions. Likewise, strain validation demonstrates good predictions on a restrained reinforced concrete wall and concrete beam. Durability predictions stem from induction time of reinforcement corrosion, caused by carbonation and/or chloride ingress influenced by crack width. Reinforcement corrosion in concrete struts of a bridge will serve for validation.

  10. Behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete using steel slag coarse aggregate produced in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnahhal Wael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of Qatar suffers from the shortage of natural resources needed for concrete production. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the feasibility of using by-product recycled materials as aggregates to maintain the concrete construction industry. Several types of recyclable materials are currently used in concrete. One of the potential resources of recycled concrete is steel slag. Knowing that Steel slag is the most significant solid waste generated by Qatar Steel Company in Qatar, replacing of natural coarse aggregate with steel slag aggregate will have a significant environmental and economic impact to the state of Qatar. This paper presents the compression and flexural test results of different concrete mixes made of steel slag coarse aggregate combined with a newly developed basalt chopped fibres. The parameters investigated included the volume fraction of the fibre used and the type of coarse aggregates (natural aggregates “Gabbro” and steel slag aggregates. Plain concrete specimens containing natural coarse aggregates and steel slag aggregates with no fibres added were also tested to serve as control. Test results showed that adding the basalt chopped fibres to the concrete mixes enhanced their flexural tensile strengths at different percentages. In addition, the compressive strength of concrete made with steel slag aggregate was higher than that made with natural gabbro aggregate. Test results clearly showed that steel slag aggregates can be used as sustainable and eco-friendly alternative materials in concrete structures.

  11. NANOMODIFIED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main directions in construction material science is the development of  next generation concrete that is ultra-dense, high-strength, ultra-porous, high heat efficient, extra corrosion-resistant. Selection of such direction is caused by extreme operational impacts on the concrete, namely: continuously increasing load on the concrete and various dynamics of such loads; the necessity in operation of concrete products in a wide temperature range and their exposure to various chemical and physical effects.The next generation concrete represents high-tech concrete mixtures with additives that takes on and retain the required properties when hardening and being used under any operational conditions. A differential characteristic of the next generation concrete is its complexity that presumes usage of various mineral dispersed components, two- and three fractional fine and coarse aggregates, complex chemical additives, combinations of polymer and iron reinforcement.Design strength and performance properties level of the next generation concrete is achieved by high-quality selection of the composition, proper selection of manufacturing techniques, concrete curing, bringing the quality of concrete items to the required level of technical condition during the operational phase. However, directed formation of its structure is necessary in order to obtain high-tech concrete.Along with the traditional methods for regulation of the next generation concrete structure, modification of concrete while using silica nanoparticles is also considered as a perspective one because the concrete patterning occurs due to introduction of a binder in a mineral matrix. Due to this it is possible to obtain nano-modified materials with completely new properties.The main problem with the creation of nano-modified concrete is a uniform distribution of nano-materials in the volume of the cement matrix which is particularly important in the cases of adding a modifier in

  12. Effects of syntactic structure in the memory of concrete and abstract Chinese sentences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C S; Chen, H C

    1993-09-01

    Smith (1981) found that concrete English sentences were better recognized than abstract sentences and that this concreteness effect was potent only when the concrete sentence was also affirmative but the effect switched to an opposite end when the concrete sentence was negative. These results were partially replicated in Experiment 1 by using materials from a very different language (i.e., Chinese): concrete-affirmative sentences were better remembered than concrete-negative and abstract sentences, but no reliable difference was found between the latter two types. In Experiment 2, the task was modified by using a visual presentation instead of an oral one as in Experiment 1. Both concrete-affirmative and concrete-negative sentences were better memorized then abstract ones in Experiment 2. The findings in the two experiments are explained by a combination of the dual-coding model and Marschark's (1985) item-specific and relational processing. The differential effects of experience with different language systems on processing verbal materials in memory are also discussed.

  13. Use of recycled fine aggregate in concretes with durable requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zega, Claudio Javier; Di Maio, Angel Antonio

    2011-11-01

    The use of construction waste materials as aggregates for concrete production is highly attractive compared to the use of non-renewable natural resources, promoting environmental protection and allowing the development of a new raw material. Several countries have recommendations for the use of recycled coarse aggregate in structural concrete, whereas the use of the fine fraction is limited because it may produce significant changes in some properties of concrete. However, during the last decade the use of recycled fine aggregates (RFA) has achieved a great international interest, mainly because of economic implications related to the shortage of natural sands suitable for the production of concrete, besides to allow an integral use of this type of waste. In this study, the durable behaviour of structural concretes made with different percentage of RFA (0%, 20%, and 30%) is evaluated. Different properties related to the durability of concretes such as absorption, sorptivity, water penetration under pressure, and carbonation are determined. In addition, the results of compressive strength, static modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage are presented. The obtained results indicate that the recycled concretes have a suitable resistant and durable behaviour, according to the limits indicated by different international codes for structural concrete. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Review of concrete properties for prestressed concrete pressure vesssels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.

    1976-10-01

    The desire for increasing power output along with safety requirements has resulted in consideration of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel (PCPV) for most current nuclear reactor systems, as well as for the very-high-temperature reactor for process heat and as primary pressure vessels for coal conversion systems. Results are presented of a literature review to ascertain current knowledge regarding plain concrete properties under conditions imposed by a mass concrete structure such as PCRV. The effects of high temperature on such properties as strength, elasticity, and creep are discussed, as well as changes in thermal properties, multiaxial behavior, and the mechanisms thought to be responsible for the observed behavior. In addition, the effects of radiation and moisture migration are discussed. It is concluded that testing results found in the technical literature show much disagreement as to the effects of temperature on concrete properties. The variations in concrete mixtures, curing and testing procedures, age at loading, and moisture conditions during exposure and testing are some of the reasons for such disagreement. Test results must be limited, in most cases, to the materials and conditions of a given test rather than applied to such a general class of materials such as concrete. It is also concluded that sustained exposure of normal concretes to current PCRV operating conditions will not result in any significant loss of properties. However, lack of knowledge regarding effects of temperatures exceeding 100 0 C (212 0 F), moisture migration, and multiaxial behavior precludes a statement advocating operation beyond current design limits. The report includes recommendations for future research on concrete for PCPVs

  15. High-velocity Penetration of Concrete Targets with Three Types of Projectiles: Experiments and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhang

    Full Text Available Abstract This study conducted high-velocity penetration experiments using conventional ogive-nose, double-ogive-nose, and grooved-tapered projectiles of approximately 2.5 kg and initial velocities between 1000 and 1360 m/s to penetrate or perforate concrete targets with unconfined compressive strengths of nominally 40MPa. The penetration performance data of these three types of projectiles with two different types of materials (i.e., AerMet100 and DT300 were obtained. The crater depth model considering both the projectile mass and the initial velocity was proposed based on the test results and a theoretical analysis. The penetration ability and the trajectory stability of these three projectile types were compared and analyzed accordingly. The results showed that, under these experimental conditions, the effects of these two different kinds of projectile materials on the penetration depth and mass erosion rate of projectile were not obvious. The existing models could not reflect the crater depths for projectiles of greater weights or higher velocities, whereas the new model established in this study was reliable. The double-ogive-nose has a certain effect of drag reduction. Thus, the double-ogive-nose projectile has a higher penetration ability than the conventional ogive-nose projectile. Meanwhile, the grooved-tapered projectile has a better trajectory stability, because the convex parts of tapered shank generated the restoring moment to stabilize the trajectory.

  16. The alkali-aggregate reaction - concrete microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regourd, M.; Hornain, H.; Poitevin, P.

    1981-01-01

    The alkali-aggregate reaction has been studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction in concretes containing glass aggregates or hornfels and greywacke aggregates. The surface reaction of the natural aggregates in alkaline solutions has been analysed by X-ray photo-electron spectrometry. The study of concretes with glass aggregates stored at 20 degrees Celcius and 100 percent relative humidity has revealed, irrespective of alkali content and type of cement, the formation of a gel containing SiO 2 , Na 2 O, CaO, MgO and Al 2 O 3 . Under heat and pressure (210 degrees Celcius at MPa for 48 hours), the gel crystallizes and yields silicates not very different from tobermorite found in autoclaved normal concretes but cotaining Na and K in solid solutions. The alkali reaction in two natural aggregate concretes, is also shown by the formation of gels and silicate crystals. The progressive structuring of the gels in silicate crystals is promoted by an increase in temperature. Ettringite and Ca(OH) 2 reinforce the alkali-aggregate reaction which may be looked upon as a hydration reaction, partially of the pozzolanic type

  17. Experimental analysis of reinforced concrete columns strengthened with Self-Compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. M. Omar

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of reinforced concrete columns strengthened by addition of a self-compacting concrete overlay at the compressed and at the tensioned face of the member, with and without addition of longitudinal steel bars. Eight columns were submit- ted to loading with an initial eccentricity of 60 mm . These columns had 120 mm x 250 mm of rectangular cross section, 2000 mm in length and four longitudinal reinforcement steel bars with 10 mm in diameter. Reference columns P1 and P2 were tested to failure without any type of rehabilitation. Columns P3 to P8 were loaded to a predefined load (close to the initial yield point of tension reinforce- ment, then unloaded and strengthened for a subsequent test until failure. Results showed that the method of rehabilitation used was effective, increasing the loading capacity of the strengthened pieces by 2 to 5 times the ultimate load of the reference column.

  18. Structural and mechanical study of concrete made from cementitious materials of low environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A. K.; Montaño, A. M.; González, C. P.; Santos, A.

    2017-12-01

    This work shows the results obtained by replacing Type I Portland®, by cementitious geopolymers materials, derived from minerals, in concrete mixtures. Synthesis of both geopolymers through alkaline activation of two alluminosilicates: Bentonite and Pumice with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3). XRD, SEM and XRDE are used to structural study of new geopolymers. Concrete mixtures with replacement of Portland have 10% and 30% of geopolymer. Finally, concrete mortars formed were mechanically analysed according to ICONTEC 220 at 7, 14, 28, 41, 90 and 120 days of cure. Results shows that compressive strength of concrete from Bentonite and Pumice are almost the same for the standard concrete at 28 days of cure. At 90 days of cure, compression resistance of concrete from Pumice at 10% is even higher than those that standard concrete shows.

  19. Determination of test methods for the prediction of the behavior of mass concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Christopher C.

    Hydration at early ages results from chemical and physical processes that take place between Portland cement and water, and is an exothermic process. The resultant heat evolution and temperature rise for massive concrete placements can be so great that the temperature differentials between the internal concrete core and outer concrete stratum can cause cracking due to thermal gradients. Accurate prediction of temperature distribution and stresses in mass concrete is needed to determine if a given concrete mixture design may have problems in the field, so that adjustments to the design can be made prior to its use. This research examines calorimetric, strength, and physical testing methods in an effort to predict the thermal and physical behavior of mass concrete. Four groups of concrete mixture types containing different cementitious materials are examined. One group contains Portland cement, while the other three groups incorporate large replacements of supplementary cementitious materials: granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash, and a ternary blend (combining Portland cement, fly ash, and slag).

  20. Influence of Concrete Properties on Molten Core-Concrete Interaction: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-yang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a severe nuclear power plant accident, the molten core can be released into the reactor pit and interact with sacrificial concrete. In this paper, a simulation study is presented that aims to address the influence of sacrificial concrete properties on molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI. In particular, based on the MELCOR Code, the ferrosiliceous concrete used in European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR is taken into account with respect to the different ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. Results indicate that the concrete ablation rate as well as the hydrogen generation rate depends much on the concrete ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. In practice, the ablation enthalpy of sacrificial concrete is the higher the better, while the Fe2O3 and H2O content of sacrificial concrete is the lower the better.

  1. Polyester polymer concrete overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Polyester polymer concrete (PPC) was used in a trial application on a section of pavement that suffers from extensive studded tire wear. The purpose of the trial section is to determine if PPC is a possible repair strategy for this type of pavement d...

  2. Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) vitrification of radwaste concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemer, D.D.; Scheetz, B.; Gougar, M.L.D.

    1995-01-01

    Properly formulated and properly ''canned'' radwaste concretes can be readily hot-isostatically-pressed (HIPed) into materials that exhibit performance equivalent to typical radwaste-type glasses. The HIPing conditions (temperature/pressure) required to turn a concrete waste form into a ''vitrified'' waste form are quite mild and therefore consistent with both safety and high productivity. This paper describes the process and its products with reference to its potential application to Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) reprocessing wastes

  3. High performance concrete with blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, P.P.; Saraswati, S.; Basu, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Principal objectives of the proposed project are two folds. Firstly, to develop the HPC mix suitable to NPP structures with blended cement, and secondly to study its durability necessary for desired long-term performance. Three grades of concrete to b considered in the proposed projects are M35, M50 and M60 with two types of blended cements, i.e. Portland slag cement (PSC) and Portland pozzolana cement (PPC). Three types of mineral admixtures - silica fume, fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag will be used. Concrete mixes with OPc and without any mineral admixture will be considered as reference case. Durability study of these mixes will be carried out

  4. Influence of recycled aggregate quality and proportioning criteria on recycled concrete properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gayarre, F; Serna, P; Domingo-Cabo, A; Serrano-López, M A; López-Colina, C

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental research using concrete produced by substituting part of the natural coarse aggregates with recycled aggregates from concrete demolition. The influence of the quality of the recycled aggregate (amount of declassified and source of aggregate), the percentage of replacement on the targeted quality of the concrete to be produced (strength and workability) has been evaluated. The granular structure of concrete and replacement criteria were analyzed in this study, factors which have not been analyzed in other studies. The following properties of recycled concretes were analyzed: density, absorption, compressive strength, elastic modulus, amount of occluded air, penetration of water under pressure and splitting tensile strength. A simplified test program was designed to control the costs of the testing while still producing sufficient data to develop reliable conclusions in order to make the number of tests viable whilst guaranteeing the reliability of the conclusions. Several factors were analyzed including the type of aggregate, the percentage of replacement, the type of sieve curve, the declassified content, the strength of concrete and workability of concrete and the replacement criteria. The type of aggregate and the percentage of replacement were the only factors that showed a clear influence on most of the properties. Compressive strength is clearly affected by the quality of recycled aggregates. If the water-cement ratio is kept constant and the loss of workability due to the effect of using recycled aggregate is compensated for with additives, the percentage of replacement of the recycled aggregate will not affect the compressive strength. The elastic modulus is affected by the percentage of replacement. If the percentage of replacement does not exceed 50%, the elastic modulus will only change slightly.

  5. Analysis of inner structure changes of concretes exposed to high temperatures using micro X-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Sitek, L. (Libor); Bodnárová, L.; Souček, K. (Kamil); Staš, L. (Lubomír); Gurková, L. (Lucie)

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Computed Tomography (X-ray CT) repr esents a progressive non-destructive metho d of analysing the inner structure of materials. The method was used for monitoring changes in inner structure of concrete samples of different composition before and after their exposure to various thermal loads. Eight types of concrete samples were prepared which differed by cement and aggregate types. We intentionally used such composition of concrete mixtures which increased their resist...

  6. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  7. Improvement of Concrete Paving Blocks Properties by Mineral Additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqeel Hatem Chkheiwer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research presents the results of experimental work on the various properties concrete paving blocks (CPB made with concrete containing different mineral additions.in this study, three types of mineral additions;Fly Ash (FA,Metakaolin (MK and Silica Fume (SF were used. Thirteen concretes mixes were cast at a water/binder ratio of 0.45 with 0, 5, 10,15and 20% cement replaced by either Fly ash,Metakaolin or Silica Fume. Theconcrete mixes were tested for slump, compressive strength, water absorption, and abrasion resistance.Metakaolin-contained concrete showed a better workability than fly ash and silica fume concrete. As the replacement level wasincreased, the 28-days compressive strength of the CPB containing MK increased similarly to that of the silica fume-containedCPB up to 20% replacement ratio. The replacement ratio of MK and SF from 5 to 20 % reduced water absorptionof CPB from5 to 19 than that of control mix. The increase in replacement ratio of MK andSF from 5 to 20 % leads to increasing abrasion resistance from 8 to 18% that of control mix

  8. Resistance to radiation and concretes thermal cycles for conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez N, M.; Monroy G, F.; Gonzalez D, R. C.; Corona P, I. J.; Ortiz A, G.

    2014-10-01

    In order to know the concrete type most suitable for use as a matrix of conditioning of spent radioactive sources, concrete test tubes using 4 different types of cement were prepared: CPC 30-Rs Extra, CPC 30-R Impercem, CPC 30-R Rs and CPC 30-R with two gravel sizes >30 mm and <10 mm. The concrete test tubes were subjected to testing compressive strength after 28 days of hardening and after being irradiated and subjected to thermal cycles. Subsequently they were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, in order to evaluate whether these concretes accredited the tests set by the NOM-019-Nucl-1995. The results show that the compressive strength of the hardened concretes to 28 days presents values between 36 and 25 MPa; applying irradiation the resistance may decrease to 30% of its original strength; and if subjected to high and low temperatures the ettringite formation also causes a decrease in resistance. The results show that concretes made from cement Impercem, Cruz Azul with gravel <10 mm comply with the provisions of standard and they can be used for conditioning of spent radioactive sources. (Author)

  9. Mechanical Properties of Fiber Reinforced Lightweight Concrete Containing Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Jae Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced aerated lightweight concrete (FALC was developed to reduce concrete's density and to improve its fire resistance, thermal conductivity, and energy absorption. Compression tests were performed to determine basic properties of FALC. The primary independent variables were the types and volume fraction of fibers, and the amount of air in the concrete. Polypropylene and carbon fibers were investigated at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4% volume ratios. The lightweight aggregate used was made of expanded clay. A self-compaction agent was used to reduce the water-cement ratio and keep good workability. A surfactant was also added to introduce air into the concrete. This study provides basic information regarding the mechanical properties of FALC and compares FALC with fiber reinforced lightweight concrete. The properties investigated include the unit weight, uniaxial compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and toughness index. Based on the properties, a stress-strain prediction model was proposed. It was demonstrated that the proposed model accurately predicts the stress-strain behavior of FALC.

  10. CONCRETE REACTOR CONTAINMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumb, Ralph F.; Hall, William F.; Fruchtbaum, Jacob

    1963-06-15

    The results of various leak-rate tests demonstrate the practicality of concrete as primary containment for the maximum credible accident for a research reactor employing plate-type fuel and having a power in excess of one megawatt. Leak-test time was shortened substantially by measuring the relaxation time for overpressure decay, which is a function of leak rate. (auth)

  11. Strain measurements of temperatures up to 3000C in a concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schittenhelm, Ch.

    1975-10-01

    Strain measurements in a concrete structure representing a cylindrical section of a Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel with hot liner, were made. In order to interpret these values in terms of strain and stress in a three dimensional structure, the gauge characteristics as well as the material date of the concrete have to be known in great detail. The paper deals with the performance of different gauges embedded in small concrete blocks and others of the same type embedded in the test ring. Temperature resistance, long-time performance, electrical drift and hysteresis of the gauges were investigated. (author)

  12. Seismic Material Properties of Reinforced Concrete and Steel Casing Composite Concrete in Elevated Pile-Group Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Mi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the material mechanics properties of reinforced concrete and steel casing composite concrete under pseudo-static loads and their application in structure. Although elevated pile-group foundation is widely used in bridge, port and ocean engineering, the seismic performance of this type of foundation still need further study. Four scale-specimens of the elevated pile-group foundation were manufactured by these two kinds of concrete and seismic performance characteristic of each specimen were compared. Meanwhile, the special soil box was designed and built to consider soil-pile-superstructure interaction. According to the test result, the peak strength of strengthening specimens is about 1.77 times of the others and the ultimate displacement is 1.66 times of the RC specimens. Additionally, the dissipated hysteric energy capability of strengthening specimens is more than 2.15 times of the others as the equivalent viscous damping ratio is reduced by 50%. The pinching effect of first two specimens is more obvious than latter two specimens and the hysteretic loops of reinforced specimens are more plumpness. The pseudo-static tests also provided the data to quantitatively assessment the positive effect of steel casing composite concrete in aseismatic design of bridge.

  13. How Concrete is Concrete?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics.Key words:  Conceret Learning Materials, School Math, Common Sense, Scaffolding, Communication DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.2.1.780.1-14

  14. New Trends for Reinforced Concrete Structures: Some Results of Exploratory Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo N. F. Carmo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Today, the concrete sector is being pushed to innovate in order to better address current challenges with higher competitiveness and more sustainable solutions. Different research studies have been conducted all over the world in which novel approaches and paths were proposed. It is important to spread information to define new strategies for the future of this industry. The enhancement of concrete properties and the impact of these changes in structural design are some of the topics analysed in those studies. This paper presents four experimental studies conducted by the authors where different types of concrete and structural members were tested. The common goal of these studies was to develop innovative solutions with high performance and low environmental impact. The scope of the first study was the structural behaviour of members produced with lightweight aggregate concrete (LWAC. Results of several beams, ties, and slabs are herein presented and analysed. The advantage of using glass fibre–reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars was addressed in a second study, and main results obtained with this type of rebar are also herein presented. Recent advances in nanotechnology led to the development of concretes incorporating nanoparticles into the binder matrix. Typically, these nanoparticles have a diameter of 10–300 nanometers and are added to the mixture to reduce the porosity and increase the density of the binder matrix, improving the mechanical properties and durability. To analyse their influence on steel-to-concrete bonding and on the shear and flexural behaviour of the beams was the main goal of the third study herein described. Finally, a new concept to produce reinforced concrete members with high durability using a special concrete cover, which was the goal of the fourth study, is also herein presented.

  15. Comparative analysis of the influence of creep of concrete composite beams of steel - concrete model based on Volterra integral equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partov Doncho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents analysis of the stress-strain behaviour and deflection changes due to creep in statically determinate composite steel-concrete beam according to EUROCODE 2, ACI209R-92 and Gardner&Lockman models. The mathematical model involves the equation of equilibrium, compatibility and constitutive relationship, i.e. an elastic law for the steel part and an integral-type creep law of Boltzmann - Volterra for the concrete part considering the above mentioned models. On the basis of the theory of viscoelastic body of Maslov-Arutyunian-Trost-Zerna-Bažant for determining the redistribution of stresses in beam section between concrete plate and steel beam with respect to time 't', two independent Volterra integral equations of the second kind have been derived. Numerical method based on linear approximation of the singular kernel function in the integral equation is presented. Example with the model proposed is investigated.

  16. Optimization of concrete composition in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Peric, A.

    1995-01-01

    Low and intermediate level waste represents 95% of the total wastes that is conditioned into special concrete containers. Since these containers are to protect radioactive waste safely for about 300 years, the selection and precise control of physical and mechanical characteristics of materials is very important. After volume reduction and valuable components recovery, waste materials have to be conditioned for transport, storage and disposal. Conditioning is the waste management step in which radioactive wastes are immobilized and packed. The immobilization processes involve conversation of the wastes to solid forms that reduce the potential for migration or dispersion of radionuclides from the wastes by natural processes during storage, transport and disposal. The immobilization processes involve the use of various matrices of nonradioactive materials, such as concrete, to fix the wastes as monoliths, usually directly in the waste containers used for subsequent handling. In this paper an optimization of concrete container composition, used for storing radioactive waste from nuclear power plants, is presented. Optimization was performed on the composition of the concrete that is used in the container production. In experiments, the authors tried to obtain the best mechanical characteristics of the concrete, varying the weight percentage of the granulate due to its diameter, water-to-cement ratios and type of the cements that were used in preparing the concrete container formulation. Concrete containers, that were optimized in the manner described in this paper, will be in used for the radioactive waste materials final disposal, using the concept of the engineer trench system facilities

  17. Properties of concrete containing coconut shell powder (CSP) as a filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, A. S.; Shahidan, S.; Nasir, A. J.; Senin, M. S.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd; Ibrahim, M. H. Wan; Deraman, R.; Khalid, F. S.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2017-11-01

    Coconut shellsare a type of agricultural waste which can be converted into useful material. Therefore,this study was conducted to investigate the properties of concrete which uses coconut shell powder (CSP) filler material and to define the optimum percentage of CSP which can be used asfiller material in concrete. Comparisons have been made between normal concrete mixes andconcrete containing CSP. In this study, CSP was added into concrete mixes invaryingpercentages (0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10%). The coconut shell was grounded into afine powder before use. Experimental tests which have been conducted in this study include theslump test, compressive test and splitting tensile strength test. CSP have the potential to be used as a concrete filler and thus the findings of this study may be applied to the construction industry. The use of CSP as a filler in concrete can help make the earth a more sustainable and greener place to live in.

  18. Structural Precast Concrete Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly.......Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly....

  19. Biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response for concrete of containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. K.; Woo, S. K.; Song, Y. C.; Kweon, Y. K.; Cho, C. H.

    2001-01-01

    Biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response for plain concrete of containment structure on nuclear power plants are studied under uniaxial and biaxial stress(compression-compression, compression-tension, and tension-tension combined stress). The concrete specimens of a square plate type are used for uniaxial and biaxial loading. The experimental data indicate that the strength of concrete under biaxial compression, f 2 /f 1 =-1/-1, is 17 percent larger than under uniaxial compression and the poisson's ratio of concrete is 0.1745. On the base of the results, a biaxial failure envelope for plain concrete that the uniaxial strength is 5660 psi are provided, and the biaxial failure behaviors for three biaxial loading areas are plotted respectively. And, various analytical equations having the reliability are proposed for representations of the biaxial failure criteria and stress-strain response curves of concrete

  20. Diffusion of radionuclides in concrete/bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albinsson, Y.; Boerjesson, S.; Andersson, K.; Allard, B.

    1993-02-01

    In a repository for nuclear waste, different construction materials will be used. Two important materials among these are concrete and bentonite clay. These will act as mechanical barriers, preventing convective water flow and also retard transport due to diffusion of dissolved radionuclides by a combination of mechanical constraints and chemical interactions with the solid. An important issue is the possible change of the initial sodium bentonite into the calcium form due to ion exchange with calcium from the cement. The initial leaching of the concrete has been studied using radioactive spiked concrete in contact with compacted bentonite. The diffusion of Cs, Am and Pu into 5 different types of concrete in contact with porewater have been measured. The measured diffusivity for Cs agrees reasonable well with data found in literature. For Am and Pu no movement could be measured (less than 0.2 mm) even though the contact times were extremely long (2.5 y and 5 y, respectively). This report gives also a summary of the previously published results about sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in cement performed in Prav/KBS/SKB projects 1980-1990. 25 refs

  1. Lightweight Concrete Using Oil Palm Boiler Clinker (OPBC – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartono Herry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight concrete can be effectively produced by replacing normal aggregates (60% to 75% of concrete volume with a lighter alternative. With depleting natural resources, utilising waste materials, such as oil palm boiler clinker (OPBC, in concrete for structural use is one way to mitigate environmental concerns raised by the construction industry. This paper presents a review of the mechanical properties, structural behaviour and performance of OPBC concrete. Lightweight concrete using OPBC can be designed to achieve different compressive strengths with different mixes. The different OPBC concrete mixes result in different densities and workability. The degree of content and the type of OPBC substitutes used affect the flexural strength and 28-day splitting tensile strength of OPBC concrete. A different effect was observed in the modulus of elasticity as the drying shrinkage and water absorption of OPBC concrete are also impacted. This review study also compares the structural performance of OPBC concrete to that of conventional concrete.

  2. The surrounding concrete structure of the containment as a safety component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, H.; Kuntze, W.M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper will briefly discuss the containments of the various types of reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany and will try to show the importance of the surrounding concrete structures with respect to safety. It will be seen that the surrounding concrete structures serve in any case - as protection against external events - as secondary shielding and must therefore be considered as a passive safety feature. The design requirements for the surrounding concrete structures with respect to protection against external events and to physical protection generally supplement each other. Reference will be made to possible alternatives, which might result from studies of underground siting of nuclear power plants. Whether or not this type of construction can lead to additional safety can only be judged when the results of all these studies - some of which are still under way - are evaluated. The concluding part of this paper will deal with the responsibilities of the civil engineering supervisory authorities and the nuclear licensing authorities with respect to the surrounding concrete structures. (orig.) [de

  3. Mechanical Properties of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete Reinforced with Hybrid Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooban Chakravarthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash substitution to cement is a well-recognized approach to reduce CO2 emissions. Although fly ash concrete is prone to brittle behavior, researchers have shown that addition of fibers could reduce brittle behavior. Previous research efforts seem to have utlised a single type of fiber or two types of fibers. In this research, three types of fibers, steel, polypropylene, and basalt as 0%, 0.50%, 0.75%, and 1% by volume of concrete, were mixed in varying proportions with concrete specimens substituted with 50% fly ash (class F. All specimens were tested for compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, and flexural strength over a period of 3 to 56 days of curing. Test results showed that significant improvement in mechanical properties could be obtained by a particular hybrid fiber reinforcement combination (1% steel fiber, 0.75% polypropylene fiber, and 0.75% basalt fiber. The strength values were observed to exceed previous research results. Workability of concrete was affected when the fiber combination exceeded 3%. Thus a limiting value for adding fibers and the combination to achieve maximum strengths have been identified in this research.

  4. Self-Compacting Concrete in Precast Elements Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Bob

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present information about the Self-Compacting Concrete and experimental results regarding the use of them into precast element industry. This type of concrete does not require vibration for placing and compaction; it is able to flow under its own weight, completely filling formwork and achieving full compaction, even in the presence of congested reinforcement. The experimental programme has take into account two prestressed beams which were prefabricated and tested on a special stands. The beams of Self-Compacting Concrete with the length of 24 m were prepared at „Beton-Star” Kft, Kecsekenet, Hungary, and used at the CASCO, Satu-Mare.

  5. Structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures under monotonous and cyclic loadings: numerical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepretre, C.; Millard, A.; Nahas, G.

    1989-01-01

    The structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures is usually performed either by means of simplified methods of strength of materials type i.e. global methods, or by means of detailed methods of continuum mechanics type, i.e. local methods. For this second type, some constitutive models are available for concrete and rebars in a certain number of finite element systems. These models are often validated on simple homogeneous tests. Therefore, it is important to appraise the validity of the results when applying them to the analysis of a reinforced concrete structure, in order to be able to make correct predictions of the actual behaviour, under normal and faulty conditions. For this purpose, some tests have been performed at I.N.S.A. de Lyon on reinforced concrete beams, subjected to monotonous and cyclic loadings, in order to generate reference solutions to be compared with the numerical predictions given by two finite element systems: - CASTEM, developed by C.E.A./.D.E.M.T. - ELEFINI, developed by I.N.S.A. de Lyon

  6. Diffusion Decay Coefficient for Chloride Ions of Concrete Containing Mineral Admixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Im Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion coefficient for chloride ions and the diffusion decay coefficient for chloride ions are essential variables for a service life evaluation of concrete structures. They are influenced by water-binder ratio, exposure condition, curing temperature, cement type, and the type and use of mineral admixture. Mineral admixtures such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash, and silica fume have been increasingly used to improve resistance against chloride ions penetration in concrete structures built in an offshore environment. However, there is not enough measured data to identify the statistical properties of diffusion decay coefficient for chloride ions in concrete using mineral admixtures. This paper is aimed at evaluating the diffusion decay coefficient for chloride ions of concrete using ordinary Portland cement or blended cement. NT BUILD 492 method, an electrophoresis experiment, was used to measure the diffusion coefficient for chloride ions with ages. It was revealed from the test results that the diffusion decay coefficient for chloride ions was significantly influenced by W/B and the replacement ratio of mineral admixtures.

  7. Effect of Temperature and Age of Concrete on Strength – Porosity Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zadražil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The compressive strengths of unsealed samples of concrete at the age of 180 days and have been measured at temperatures 20 °C, 300 °C, 600 °C and 900 °C. All of tests were performed for cold material. We compared our results with those obtained in [10] for the same type of concrete (age 28, resp. 90 days and measured at temperature ranging from 20 °C to 280 °C. Dependencies of compressive strength and porosity were correlated together and compared for the samples of age 28, 90 and 180 days. Behaviour of concrete of the age 90, resp. 180 days confirms generally accepted hypothesis that with increasing porosity strength of the concrete decreases. It has to be stressed out, howerer, that concrete samples of the age 28 days exhibit totally opposite dependency. 

  8. Fracture properties of high-strength concrete obtained by direct modification of structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solodkyy Serhiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-strength concrete is effectively used worldwide in the last three decades, but it is more brittle in comparison with normal strength concretes. Partial substitution of cement in concrete by active mineral additives and usage of chemical admixture of plasticizing and air-entraining action can considerably change their fracture properties. The obtained results show that the increase of the fracture properties is observed in concretes modified with chemical admixtures incorporating mineral additives such as zeolite and limestone due to consolidation of the concrete microstructure. Densification takes place as a result of limiting the amount of calcium hydroxide (CH due to its reaction with active silica included in the zeolite and the formation of larger amounts of hydrated calcium silicates of tobermorite type as well as calcium hydroaluminate and hydrocarboaluminate with the simultaneous adsorption modification of hydrated products by chemical admixtures.

  9. Investigation on Compressive Strength of Special Concrete made with Crushed Waste Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sani Mohd Syahrul Hisyam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Special concrete is the type of concrete that produced by using waste material or using unusual techniques/method of preparation. Special concrete made with waste material is becoming popular in a construction site. This is because the special concrete is selected due to quality, integrity, economic factor and environmental factor. The waste glass is selected as an additional material to provide a good in compressive strength value. The compressive strength is the importance of mechanical properties of concrete and typically the concrete is sustained and stiffed in compression load. The significant issue to utilize the waste glass from the automotive windscreen is to improve the strength of concrete. The waste glass is crushed to become 5 mm size and recognised as crushed waste glass that be used in concrete as additional material. The main objective of the study is to determine the appropriate percentage of crushed waste glass in concrete grade, 30 in order to enhance the compressive strength. There are four mixes of concrete that contained of crushed waste glass with percentage of 2 %, 4 %, 6 % and 8 % and one control mix with 0 % of crushed waste glass. As the result, crushed waste glass with an additional 4 % in concrete is reported having a higher value of compressive strength in early and mature stage. In addition, if the percentage of crushed glass wastes in concrete increases and it leads to a reduction in the workability of concrete.

  10. The use of a concrete additive to eliminate returned concrete waste volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bester Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effects of the use of a recently developed two-component powdered product made from polymers and inorganic compounds that can be mechanically mixed into returned fresh ready-mix concrete to allow for the separation of the concrete into fine and coarse aggregates. This allows for the re-use of the returned concrete as aggregates in the manufacturing of new concrete. The returned concrete waste can therefore be eliminated, thus reducing virgin aggregate usage, as well as reducing the environmental impact of returned concrete. In this study, the treated recycled fresh concrete was separated into fine and coarse aggregates, and then used at replacement levels of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The effect of the product on the material classification, and on important fresh and hardened properties of the concrete for the above-mentioned replacement values was tested. For the fine aggregate, the results indicate minimal changes in both the fresh and hardened properties. For the coarse aggregate, the results show a marked improvement of flexural strength with an increase in replacement value when coarse aggregates are used. Very high replacement levels may be used with very little effect on the quality of the new concrete.

  11. Effects of the air–steam mixture on the permeability of damaged concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medjigbodo, Sonagnon [LUNAM Université, Institut de Recherche en Génie Civil et Mécanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France); Darquennes, Aveline [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR 8535/UPMC/PRES Université Sud Paris, Cachan (France); Aubernon, Corentin [LUNAM Université, Institut de Recherche en Génie Civil et Mécanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France); Khelidj, Abdelhafid [LUNAM Université, Institut de Recherche en Génie Civil et Mécanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), IUT de Saint Nazaire, 58 rue Michel Ange, BP 420 Heinlex, F-44600 Saint-Nazaire (France); Loukili, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.loukili@ec-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Institut de Recherche en Génie Civil et Mécanique (GeM UMR CNRS 6183), Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noe, BP 92101, F-44321 CEDEX 3 Nantes (France)

    2013-12-15

    Massive concrete structures such as the containments of nuclear power plant must maintain their tightness at any circumstances to prevent the escape of radioactive fission products into the environment. In the event of an accident like a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the concrete wall is submitted to both hydric and mechanical loadings. A new experimental device reproducing these extreme conditions (water vapor transfer, 140 °C and 5 bars) is developed in the GeM Laboratory to determine the effect of the saturation degree, the mechanical loading and the flowing fluid type on the concrete transfer properties. The experimental tests show that the previous parameters significantly affect the concrete permeability and the gas leakage rate. Their evolution as a function of the mechanical loading is characterized by two phases that are directly related to concrete microstructure and crack development.

  12. Radiological assessment of the utilization of fly ash in concrete for building construction and the parameters affecting radon-222 emanation from fly ash concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, the Rn-222 area exhalation rates and the maximum area exhalations for concrete containing fly ash or Ra-226 water were measured. Various concrete samples were fabricated with fly ash of known radium content as a cement substitute. Other samples were prepared with one of three concentrations of Ra-226 water solution added into the concrete mix. A newly designed Indoor/Outdoor Emanation Chamber. The Ra-225 concentrations for the fly ash used ranged from 3.42 pCi/g to 7.55 pCi/g depending upon the source of the ash and the particle size. Doses were calculated for occupants of a hypothetical house built with concrete of the type studied. Doses to the basal cells of the bronchial epithelium and the mean dose to the lung were 2.10 rad/yr and 0.37 rad/yr for standard concrete, up to 4.28 rad/yr and 0.76 rad/yr for fly ash concrete, and 3.26 rad/yr and 0.58 rad/yr for the concrete made with 25 pCI/L radium-226 water. The risk associated with utilization of standard concrete in an unventilated house was estimated to range from 560 to 1316 fatal cancers in million population. Utilization of fly ash as a cement substitute could increase the number of fatal lung cancers up to 2680. Introducing 25 pCi/L Ra-226 water into concrete will increase the fatal cancer rate up to 2042 in a million population

  13. Impact Resistance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete with Single and Hybrid Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Sallehan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a recycled aggregate concrete (RAC mix that has been modified by adding treated recycled concrete aggregate (RCA and various types of fiber-reinforced systems. The effectiveness of these modifications in terms of energy absorption and impact resistance was evaluated and compared with that of the corresponding regular concrete, as well as with unmodified RAC specimens. Results clearly indicate that although modification of the RAC mix with treated RCA significantly enhances the impact resistance of RAC, further diversification with additional fiber, particularly those in hybrid form, can optimize the results.

  14. Acoustic Emission Behavior of Early Age Concrete Monitored by Embedded Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Ren, Hong-Wei; Dong, Bi-Qin; Xing, Feng

    2014-10-02

    Acoustic emission (AE) is capable of monitoring the cracking activities inside materials. In this study, embedded sensors were employed to monitor the AE behavior of early age concrete. Type 1-3 cement-based piezoelectric composites, which had lower mechanical quality factor and acoustic impedance, were fabricated and used to make sensors. Sensors made of the composites illustrated broadband frequency response. In a laboratory, the cracking of early age concrete was monitored to recognize different hydration stages. The sensors were also embedded in a mass concrete foundation to localize the temperature gradient cracks.

  15. Effective atomic number and electron density of marble concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; El-Khayatt, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and effective electron density (N e ) of different type concrete have been measured and the results were compared with the calculation obtained using the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) obtained via XCOM in the photon energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV. Six different concrete in where marble has been used in the rate of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 %, has been used in the study. (author)

  16. Concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Setareh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    This revised, fully updated second edition covers the analysis, design, and construction of reinforced concrete structures from a real-world perspective. It examines different reinforced concrete elements such as slabs, beams, columns, foundations, basement and retaining walls and pre-stressed concrete incorporating the most up-to-date edition of the American Concrete Institute Code (ACI 318-14) requirements for the design of concrete structures. It includes a chapter on metric system in reinforced concrete design and construction. A new chapter on the design of formworks has been added which is of great value to students in the construction engineering programs along with practicing engineers and architects. This second edition also includes a new appendix with color images illustrating various concrete construction practices, and well-designed buildings. The ACI 318-14 constitutes the most extensive reorganization of the code in the past 40 years. References to the various sections of the ACI 318-14 are pro...

  17. Behaviour of fiber reinforced concrete slabs under impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huelsewig, M.; Stilp, A.; Pahl, H.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of steel fiber reinforced concrete slabs under impact loads has been investigated. The results obtained show that fracturing and spallation effects are reduced to a large extend due to the high energy absorption and the increased yield strength of this material. Crater depths are comparable to those obtained using normal concrete targets. Systematic tests using different fiber types and dimensions show that the terminal ballistic behaviour is strongly dependent on these parameters. (orig.) [de

  18. Low-shrink airfield cement concrete with respect to thermal resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linek Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents theoretical background to the occurrence and propagation of imposed thermal load deep inside the structure of airfield pavement. The standard composition of low-shrink cement concrete intended for airfield pavements was presented. The influence of recurring temperature changes on the extent of shrinkage deformations was assessed. The obtained lab test results, combined with observations and analysis of changes of the hardened concrete microstructure, allowed the authors to draw conclusions. It was proven that the suggested concrete mix composition makes it possible to obtain the concrete type of better developed internal microstructure. More micro air voids and reduced distance between the voids were proven, which provides increased frost resistance of concrete. The change of size, structure and quantity of the hydration products in the cement matrix and better developed contact sections resulted in the improvement of the mechanical parameters of hardened concrete. Low-shrink concrete in all analysed cases proved to have increased resistance to the variable environmental conditions. Increased concrete resistance is identified through reduced registered shrinkage deformations and growth of mechanical parameters of concrete. Low-shrink concrete used for airfield structure guarantees extended time of reliable pavement operation.

  19. Numerical Study Of The Effects Of Preloading, Axial Loading And Concrete Shrinkage On Reinforced Concrete Elements Strengthened By Concrete Layers And Jackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampropoulos, A. P.; Dritsos, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the technique of seismic strengthening existing reinforced concrete columns and beams using additional concrete layers and jackets is examined. The finite element method and the finite element program ATENA is used in this investigation. When a reinforced jacket or layer is being constructed around a column it is already preloaded due to existing service loads. This effect has been examined for different values of the axial load normalized to the strengthened column. The techniques of strengthening with a concrete jacket or a reinforced concrete layer on the compressive side of the column are examined. Another phenomenon that is examined in this study is the shrinkage of the new concrete of an additional layer used to strengthen an existing member. For this investigation, a simply supported beam with an additional reinforced concrete layer on the tensile side is examined. The results demonstrate that the effect of preloading is important when a reinforced concrete layer is being used with shear connectors between the old and the new reinforcement. It was also found that the shrinkage of the new concrete reduces the strength of the strengthened beam and induces an initial sliding between the old and the new concrete

  20. Applicability of recycled aggregates in concrete piles for soft soil improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Junior, Ronaldo A; Balestra, Carlos Et; Lima, Maryangela G

    2017-01-01

    The expressive generation of construction and demolition waste is stimulating several studies for reusing this material. The improvement of soft soils by concrete compaction piles has been widely applied for 40 years in some Brazilian cities. This technique is used to improve the bearing capacity of soft soils, allowing executing shallow foundations instead of deep foundations. The compaction piles use a high volume of material. This article explored the possibility of using recycled aggregates from construction waste to replace the natural aggregates in order to improve the bearing capacity of the soft soil, regarding its compressive strength. Construction wastes from different stages of a construction were used in order to make samples of concrete with recycled aggregates. The strength of concretes with natural aggregates was compared with the strength of concretes with recycled (fine and coarse) aggregates. Results show that all samples met the minimum compressive strength specified for compaction piles used to improve the bearing capacity of soft soils. The concrete with recycled aggregate from the structural stage had even higher resistances than the concrete with natural aggregates. This behaviour was attributed to the large amount of cementitious materials in the composition of this type of concrete. It was also observed that concrete with recycled fine aggregate has a superior resistance to concrete with recycled coarse aggregate.

  1. Behaviour of concrete beams reinforced withFRP prestressed concrete prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svecova, Dagmar

    The use of fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) to reinforce concrete is gaining acceptance. However, due to the relatively low modulus of FRP, in comparison to steel, such structures may, if sufficient amount of reinforcement is not used, suffer from large deformations and wide cracks. FRP is generally more suited for prestressing. Since it is not feasible to prestress all concrete structures to eliminate the large deflections of FRP reinforced concrete flexural members, researchers are focusing on other strategies. A simple method for avoiding excessive deflections is to provide sufficiently high amount of FRP reinforcement to limit its stress (strain) to acceptable levels under service loads. This approach will not be able to take advantage of the high strength of FRP and will be generally uneconomical. The current investigation focuses on the feasibility of an alternative strategy. This thesis deals with the flexural and shear behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with FRP prestressed concrete prisms. FRP prestressed concrete prisms (PCP) are new reinforcing bars, made by pretensioning FRP and embedding it in high strength grout/concrete. The purpose of the research is to investigate the feasibility of using such pretensioned rebars, and their effect on the flexural and shear behaviour of reinforced concrete beams over the entire loading range. Due to the prestress in the prisms, deflection of concrete beams reinforced with this product is substantially reduced, and is comparable to similarly steel reinforced beams. The thesis comprises both theoretical and experimental investigations. In the experimental part, nine beams reinforced with FRP prestressed concrete prisms, and two companion beams, one steel and one FRP reinforced were tested. All the beams were designed to carry the same ultimate moment. Excellent flexural and shear behaviour of beams reinforced with higher prestressed prisms is reported. When comparing deflections of three beams designed to have the

  2. Comparison of physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Hyginus E.; Eziefula, Uchechi G.; Eziefula, Bennett I.

    2018-03-01

    This study compared the physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete. The constituent materials were batched by weight. The water-cement ratio and mix ratio selected for the experimental investigation were 0.55 and 1:2:4, respectively. The specimens were cured for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Slump, density and compressive strength tests were carried out. The results showed that river sand concrete had greater density and compressive strength than quarry dust concrete for all curing ages. At 28 days of curing, river sand concrete exceeded the target compressive strength by 36%, whereas quarry dust concrete was less than the target compressive strength by 12%. Both river sand concrete and quarry dust concrete for the selected water/cement ratio and mix ratio are suitable for non-structural applications and lightly-loaded members where high strength is not a prerequisite.

  3. Monomaterial ecological buildings, with Mopatel® and Ecopierra® concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Miron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study performed on a pilot building from Gainesti, Suceava county. The constructive system used is unique in that it employs a monomaterial, namely ecological concrete of type MOPATEL® or ECOPIERRA®. These types of concrete, created by eng. Petrache Teleman, possess international patents and have received awards in Brussels, but they are not yet used in Romania. These materials can be used integrally to make all the constructive elements of a building – load-bearing elements (floors, beams, pillars, walls as well as the secondary elements of a partly finished building, such as screeds or non-load-bearing masonry. The constructive system also uses ecological mortars which integrally ensure the interior and exterior finishing. The final result is a building practically made from a single type of material, in which the effect of thermal bridges is reduced to a maximum. The MOPATEL and ECOPIERRA types of concrete have a mechanical resistance similar to regular concrete, but they also have superior thermal insulation qualities (between 0.09 and 0.28 W/mK, they are permeable to the transfer of water vapours from the interior to the exterior of the building, and, in certain compositions, they can also be considered waterproof.

  4. A historical examination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, L.G.; Li Davies, I.

    1987-01-01

    The requirement that concrete in radioactive waste repositories be stable physically and chemically for very long times has initiated studies of ancient and old concretes. This report is a contribution to this effort. After a description of the history of cement and concrete, the published literature relating to the analysis of old and ancient concrete is reviewed. A series of samples spanning the history of concrete has been obtained; a variety of physical and chemical techniques have been employed to characterize these samples. Reasons for survival of ancient concretes, and for durability of early, reinforced concretes are identified. Recommendations for further studies are given. 132 refs

  5. Recycling the construction and demolition waste to produce polymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Mohammad T.; Hameed, Awham M., Dr.

    2018-05-01

    The sustainable management for solid wastes of the construction and demolition waste stimulates searching for safety applications for these wastes. The aim of this research is recycling of construction and demolition waste with some different types of polymeric resins to be used in manufacturing process of polymer mortar or polymer concrete, and studying their mechanical and physical properties, and also Specify how the values of compressive strength and the density are affected via the different parameters. In this research two types of construction and demolition waste were used as aggregates replacement (i.e. waste cement/concrete debris, and the waste blocks) while the two types of polymer resins (i.e. Unsaturated polyester and Epoxy) as cement replacements. The used weight percentages of the resins were changed within (1°, 20, 25 and 30) % to manufacture this polymer concrete.

  6. SIMULATION MODELS OF RESISTANCE TO CONCRETE MOVEMENT IN THE CONCRETE CONVEYING PIPE OF THE AUTOCONCRETE PUMP

    OpenAIRE

    Anofriev, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. In modern construction the placing of concrete is often performed using distribution equipment of concrete pumps. Increase of productivity and quality of this construction work requires improvement of both concrete pumps and their tooling. The concrete pumps tooling consists of standardized concrete conveying pipes and connector bends radius of up to 2 m. A promising direction of tooling improvement is the reduce of resistance to movement of the concrete in the concrete conveying pip...

  7. High Density Radiation Shielding Concretes for Hot Cells of 99mTc Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakr, K.

    2006-01-01

    High density concrete [more than 3.6 ton/m 3 (3.6x10 3 kg/m 3 )] was prepared to be used as a radiation shielding concrete (RSC) for hot-cells in gel technetium project at inshas to attenuate gamma radiation emitted from radioactive sources. different types of concrete were prepared by mixing local mineral aggregates mainly gravel and ilmenite . iron shots were added to the concrete mixture proportion as partial replacement of heavy aggregates to increase its density. the physical properties of prepared concrete in both plastic and hardened phases were investigated. compressive strength and radiation attenuation of gamma rays were determined. Results showed that ilmenite concrete mixed with iron shots had the highest density suitable to be use as RSC according to the chinese hot cell design requirements. Recommendations to avoid some technical problems of manufacturing radiation shielding concrete were maintained

  8. An historical examination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The requirement that concrete in nuclear waste repositories be stable physically and chemically for hundreds, if not thousands, of years has initiated studies of ancient and old concretes. The history of cement and concrete is described. The oldest know concrete, from Yugoslavia, is ca. 7,500 years old. Concrete was used in many ancient civilisations, including those of Egypt, Greece and Rome. Ancient concretes were usually based upon lime, but sometimes gypsum was used. Pure lime concretes hardened by atomospheric carbonation but the Ancients, in particular the Romans, also employed hydraulic limes and discovered pozzolanas to make superior concretes which, upon hardening, contained complex cementitious hydrates including calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), the principal binding element in Portland cement concrete. Portland cement was not invented until 1824 or later and consists principally of calcium silicates formed by clinkerisation of a mixture of limestone and clay in carefully measured proportions. The cement sets hydraulically to form, principally, calcium hydroxide and CSH, the latter being an amorphous or semi-amorphous substance of variable composition. The published literature relating to the analysis of old and ancient cements and concretes is reviewed. A suite of samples spanning the history of concrete has been obtained. A variety of physical and chemical techniques have been employed to characterise these samples. (author)

  9. Interaction of low pH cementitious concretes with groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Calvo, Jose Luis; Alonso, Maria Cruz; Hidalgo, Ana; Fernandez Luco, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Some engineering construction concepts for high level radioactive waste underground repositories consider the use of a bentonite barrier in contact with cementitious materials with a pore fluid pH value inferior or equal to 11 (based on low-pH cements) to maintain the bentonite stability. The research on low-pH cementitious materials is mainly addressed from two different approaches, one with Calcium Silicate Cements (OPC, Ordinary Portland Cement based), the other with Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC based). The use of these both types of cements (OPC based or CAC based) implies the use of high mineral additions contents in the binder that should significantly modify most of the concrete 'standard' properties. Taking into account the long life expected in this type of repositories, parameters related to the durability of the low-pH concretes must be analyzed. This work shows some recent studies that deal with the evaluation of the resistance of low-pH concretes to long term groundwater aggression. After a presentation of the accelerated leaching test (based on a percolation method), results are given for the characterization of the leaching solution evolution and the evaluation of the modifications generated in the solid phases. Results show that the low-pH concretes evaluated have good resistance against groundwater interaction, although an altered front can be observed from the surface in all the tested samples

  10. Effect of High Temperature or fire on heavy weight concrete properties used in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakr, K.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work the effect of different duration (1, 2 and 3 hours) of high temperatures (250 degree C, 500 degree C, 750 degree C and 950 degree C) on the physical and mechanical properties of heavy concrete shields were studied. The effect of fire fitting systems on ordinary concrete was investigated. The work was extended to determine the effect of high temperature or accidental fire on the radiation properties of heavy weight concrete. Results showed that ilmenite concrete had the highest density, absorption, and modulus of elasticity when compared to the other types of studied concrete and it had also higher values of compressive, tensile, bending and bonding strength than ordinary or baryte concrete. Ilmenite concrete had the highest attenuation of transmitted gamma rays in comparing to gravel concrete and baryte concrete. Ilmenite concrete was more resistant to elevated temperature than gravel concrete and baryte concrete. Foam or air as a fire fitting system in concrete structure that exposed to high temperature or accidental fire proved that better than water

  11. Natural radioactivity levels and danger ratio in cements, concretes and mortars used in construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, J.; Pacheco, C.; Avila, J. M.; Miro, C.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the natural radiation level in three types of adhesive cements, five types of concrete and two types of mortars of different strength normally used in the construction field. Of these materials, both concrete and mortars were prepared in our laboratories, cements the contrary were of a commercial nature.

  12. Improving the Bond Strength of Rice Husk Ash Concrete by Incorporating Polymer: A New Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bangwar, Daddan Khan; Ali Soomro, Mohsin; Ali Laghari, Nasir; Ali Soomro, Mukhtiar; Ali Buriro, Ahsan

    2018-01-01

    This paper gives an insight of how to improve the bond strength of cement in which concrete is replaced with rice husk ash. A concrete mix was prepared and was used in different types of mixes i.e. Control Mix, 10% cement substituted concrete with rice husk ash and polymer modified concrete by incorporation different dosages of polymer in the 10% cement substituted concrete. A bar of 12mm diameter, 300mm in length was placed in the center of the cylindrical specimens for pull out test. It was...

  13. Design of Normal Concrete Mixtures Using Workability-Dispersion-Cohesion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Qasrawi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The workability-dispersion-cohesion method is a new proposed method for the design of normal concrete mixes. The method uses special coefficients called workability-dispersion and workability-cohesion factors. These coefficients relate workability to mobility and stability of the concrete mix. The coefficients are obtained from special charts depending on mix requirements and aggregate properties. The method is practical because it covers various types of aggregates that may not be within standard specifications, different water to cement ratios, and various degrees of workability. Simple linear relationships were developed for variables encountered in the mix design and were presented in graphical forms. The method can be used in countries where the grading or fineness of the available materials is different from the common international specifications (such as ASTM or BS. Results were compared to the ACI and British methods of mix design. The method can be extended to cover all types of concrete.

  14. Effect of water absorption by the aggregate on properties of high-strength lightweight concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punkki, J

    1996-12-31

    Recently, high-strength lightweight concrete has become an interesting building material for the offshore oil industry. This doctoral thesis presents an experimental investigation of the effect of water absorption by three different types of lightweight aggregates. One type did not show any water absorption ability at all and so represented no problem to the concrete production. For the two other high-strength aggregates, which were of more conventional types, the water absorption depended not only on the properties of the aggregates, but also on the concrete mixing procedure and the properties of the fresh cement paste. When water absorbing lightweight aggregate was used in a dry condition, the workability of the concrete was significantly reduced by the water absorption of the aggregate. This effect was not present when prewetted aggregate was used. The water absorption by the lightweight aggregate also affected the early compressive strength of concrete. After one day, dry aggregate gave on the average 10 MPa higher compressive strength than did prewetted aggregate. The strength-density ratio was affected by the moisture condition of the aggregate. Dry lightweight aggregate gave 9 MPa higher compressive strength at a density of 2000 kg/m{sup 3} compared to that of prewetted aggregate. The water absorption by the lightweight also affected the microstructure of the hardened concrete. Dry lightweight aggregate gave a slightly better microstructure than normal weight aggregate. The results indicate that the use of prewetted aggregate adversely affected the transition zone between the aggregate and the cement paste. 69 refs., 58 figs., 42 tabs.

  15. Effect of water absorption by the aggregate on properties of high-strength lightweight concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punkki, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, high-strength lightweight concrete has become an interesting building material for the offshore oil industry. This doctoral thesis presents an experimental investigation of the effect of water absorption by three different types of lightweight aggregates. One type did not show any water absorption ability at all and so represented no problem to the concrete production. For the two other high-strength aggregates, which were of more conventional types, the water absorption depended not only on the properties of the aggregates, but also on the concrete mixing procedure and the properties of the fresh cement paste. When water absorbing lightweight aggregate was used in a dry condition, the workability of the concrete was significantly reduced by the water absorption of the aggregate. This effect was not present when prewetted aggregate was used. The water absorption by the lightweight aggregate also affected the early compressive strength of concrete. After one day, dry aggregate gave on the average 10 MPa higher compressive strength than did prewetted aggregate. The strength-density ratio was affected by the moisture condition of the aggregate. Dry lightweight aggregate gave 9 MPa higher compressive strength at a density of 2000 kg/m{sup 3} compared to that of prewetted aggregate. The water absorption by the lightweight also affected the microstructure of the hardened concrete. Dry lightweight aggregate gave a slightly better microstructure than normal weight aggregate. The results indicate that the use of prewetted aggregate adversely affected the transition zone between the aggregate and the cement paste. 69 refs., 58 figs., 42 tabs.

  16. Feasibility study of a concrete plug made of low pH concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlstroem, Lars-Olof; Magnusson, Jonas (NCC Engineering (Sweden)); Gueorguiev, Ginko; Johansson, Morgan (Reinertsen Sverige AB, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    In this report a concrete plug, used as a barrier between the deposition tunnels and the access tunnel, is investigated. The objectives of the work is to see whether it is possible to use low pH concrete for the plug and whether it can be designed without using reinforcement. The requirements set on the plug are that the water leakage through it should be small enough and that the concrete stresses are limited to a value valid for the concrete used. A modified geometry of the plug is proposed, which makes it possible to use it as a general solution in all deposition tunnels. Material properties of a low pH concrete (B200) determined by CBI have been used. Loads considered in the study is the pressure from water and swelling, the temperature change in the rock and plug due to heat development from nuclear fuel stored in nearby copper canisters, pre-stressing in the plug due to cooling during construction and the shrinkage of concrete in the plug. Two-dimensional, axis-symmetric finite element analyses, assuming linear elastic material behaviour in rock and concrete where contact friction between concrete and rock is taken into consideration, have been used to study the structural response of the plug. A total of 48 main load combinations, consisting of 8 different load scenarios and 6 material combinations, have been used. It is found that the concrete plug will not remain uncracked when subjected to the loads studied but that it, nevertheless, is possible to achieve an unreinforced concrete plug that satisfies the requirements set up. The minimum size of the concrete compressed zone will be 0.5 m, resulting in a water leakage through the plug determined to be lower than the requirement of 0.01 l/min set up in this study. Further, the maximum compressive stresses of interest are 33 MPa and the maximum displacement in the plug is about 3 mm, which are deemed to be satisfactorily. Consequently, it is concluded that it seems possible to use low pH concrete for the plug

  17. Experimental Studies on the Behavior of a Newly-Developed Type of Self-Insulating Concrete Masonry Shear Wall under in-Plane Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Bakre Abdelmoneim Elamin Mohamad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the inelastic behavior of a newly-developed type of self-insulating concrete masonry shear wall (SCMSW under in-plane cyclic loading. The new masonry system was made from concrete blocks with special configurations to provide a stronger bond between units than ordinary concrete masonry units. A total of six fully-grouted SCMSWs were prepared with different heights (1.59 to 5.78 m and different vertical steel configurations. The developed masonry walls were tested under in-plane cyclic loading and different constant axial load ratios. In addition, the relationship between the amount of axial loading, the amount of the flexural reinforcement and the wall aspect ratios and the nonlinear hysteretic response of the SCMSW was evaluated. The results showed that the lateral load capacity of SCMSW increases with the amount of applied axial load and the amount of vertical reinforcement. However, the lateral load capacity decreases as the wall aspect ratio increases. The existence of the boundary elements at the SCMSW ends increases the ductility and the lateral load capacity. Generally, the SCMSW exhibited predominantly flexural behavior. These results agreed with those reported in previous research for walls constructed with ordinary units.

  18. A study on the effects of seawater on the durable life of concrete structures(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan; Jang, Bong Suk; Jang, Seung Yeop; Jeon, Se Jin; Yu, Yeong; Park, Dae Gyun; Hyeong, Sang Soo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-15

    Recently, large scale concrete structures such as nuclear power plants and offshore structures are actively being built in this country. These structures are subject to heavy attack due to seawater environment. A reasonable consideration for corrosion has not been paid to the structures in the past decades due to insufficient research data and guidelines. The durability is emerging as one of the most important factors. In the design and construction of concrete structures. The purpose of the present study is, therefore, to explore the corrosion mechanism and penetration mechanism of chloride ion, and to establish the evaluation procedure of durability life of concrete structures. In this study, the chloride ion concentration of seawater around our country have been analyzed and the deterioration mechanism of concrete structures have been also analyzed. The penetration mechanism of seawater into the concrete has been also studied. To this end, a comprehensive experimental program has been setup. The major test variables include the type of cement and the type of mineral admixture. The strength test as well as corrosion test have been conducted to explore the effects of chloride ion penetration on the properties of concrete. The corrosion mechanism and the penetration of chloride ion into concrete structures have been studied. These results will allow the estimation of durable life of concrete structures in nuclear power plants. The experimental results and the developed theory in the present study can be efficiently used to analyze the chloride ion penetration and to estimate the durability of concrete structures In nuclear power plants. The present study may also provide strong basis to evaluate the remaining service life of concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  19. Fibre Concrete 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    9th international conference on fibre reinforced concretes (FRC), textile reinforced concretes (TRC) and ultra-high performance concretes (UHPC) Preface The Fibre Concrete Conference series is held biennially to provide a platform to share knowledge on fibre reinforced concretes, textile concretes and ultra-high performance concretes regarding material properties and behaviour, technology procedures, topics of long-term behaviour, creep, durability; sustainable aspects of concrete including utilisation of waste materials in concrete production and recycling of concrete. The tradition of Fibre Concrete Conferences started in eighties of the last century. Nowadays the conference is organized by the Department of Concrete and Masonry Structures of the Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Civil Engineering. The 9th International Conference Fibre Concrete 2017 had 109 participants from 27 countries all over the world. 55 papers were presented including keynote lectures of Professor Bažant, Professor Bartoš and Dr. Broukalová. The conference program covered wide range of topics from scientific research to practical applications. The presented contributions related to performance and behaviour of cement based composites, their long-term behaviour and durability, sustainable aspects, advanced analyses of structures from these composites and successful applications. This conference was organized also to honour Professor Zděnek P. Bažant on the occasion of his jubilee and to appreciate his merits and discoveries in the field of fibre reinforced composites, structural mechanics and engineering.

  20. Concrete laying laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastlova, K.

    1986-01-01

    The task of the concrete laying laboratory established within a special department for quality control and assurance at the Dukovany nuclear power plant, is to check the composition of concrete mixes produced by the central concrete production plant on the site, and the shipment, laying and processing of concrete. The composition is given of special barite and serpentinite concretes designed for biological shields. The system of checks and of filing the results is briefly described. Esperience is summed up from the operation of the concrete laying laboratory, and conclusions are formulated which should be observed on similar large construction sites. They include the precise definition of the designer's requirements for the quality of concrete, the surface finish of concrete surfaces, the method of concreting specific structures around bushings, increased density reinforcements and various technological elements, and requirements for shipment to poorly accessible or remote places. As for the equipment of the laboratory, it should be completed with an instrument for the analysis of fresh concrete mixes, a large capacity drying kiln, etc. (Z.M.)

  1. 49 CFR 393.124 - What are the rules for securing concrete pipe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? 393... Specific Securement Requirements by Commodity Type § 393.124 What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? (a) Applicability. (1) The rules in this section apply to the transportation of concrete pipe on...

  2. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomasney, H.L.; SenGupta, A.K.; Yachmenev, V.

    1996-01-01

    ELECTROSORB Electrokinetic Extraction Technology, developed by ISOTRON Corp., offers a cost-effective approach to treating contaminated concrete. Heavy metals/radionuclides trapped in concrete can be extracted using this process if they are chemically solubilized; solubilizers used are citric acid alone and a mixture of citric and nitric acids. A DC electric field is applied across the contaminated concrete to electrokinetically transport the solubilized contaminants from the concrete pores to a collector on the concrete surface. The collector is an extraction pad laid on the surface. The pad provides confinement for a planar electrode and solubilizer solution; it is operated under a vacuum to hold the pad against the concrete surface. Operation requires little attendance, reducing the workers' health hazards. The process incorporates a mechanism for recycling the solubilizer solution. A field demonstration of the process took place in Building 21 of DOE's Mound facility in Miamisburg, OH, over 12 days in June 1996. The thorium species present in this building's concrete floors included ThO 2 and thorium oxalate. The nitric acid was found to facilitate Th extraction

  3. Glazed Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Anja Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    Why glazed concrete? Concrete hardens and finds its strength at room temperature whereas clay products must first be fired before they achieve this strength. They are stronger and three times as durable as clay products, which is a weighty reason for choosing concrete.5 Another reason, which....... If this succeeds, it will be possible to manufacture thin, large-scale glazed concrete panels comparable in size to concrete sandwich construction and larger which, with or without back-casting, can work as load-bearing construction elements....

  4. Analysis and discussion on several problems when testing the thickness of reinforcement cover of concrete component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanhua, Zhang; Guiling, Ji; Lijie; Zhaobo, Zhang; Na, Han; Jing, Zhao; Tan, Li; Zhaorui, Liu

    2018-03-01

    Reinforcement cover of concrete component plays a very important role to ensure the durability of various types of structures and the effective anchorage between steel reinforcement and concrete. This paper discusses and analyzes the problems occurred when testing the thickness of reinforcement cover of concrete component, so as to provide reference and help for related work.

  5. Study on some factors affecting the results in the use of MIP method in concrete research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhattacharjee, B.

    2003-01-01

    Effects of rate of pressure application and forms and type of sample on porosity and pore size distribution of concrete estimated through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) are presented in this experimental work. Two different forms of concrete sample, namely, crushed chunks of concrete and small core drilled out from the concrete beam specimens, were used for this study. The results exhibit that the rate of pressure application in mercury porosimetry has little effect on porosity and pore size distribution of concrete. It is also demonstrated that small cores drilled out from large concrete specimens are preferable as samples for performing porosimetry test on concrete

  6. Shrinkage Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Recycled Tyre Polymer Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of fibres are often used in concrete to prevent microcracking due to shrinkage, and polypropylene fibres are among the most often used ones. If not prevented, microcracks can lead to the development of larger cracks as drying shrinkage occurs, enabling penetration of aggressive substances from the environment and reducing durability of concrete structures. The hypothesis of the present research is that polypropylene fibres, used in concrete for controlling formation of microcracks due to shrinkage, can be replaced with recycled polymer fibres obtained from end-of-life tyres. To test the hypothesis, concrete mixtures containing polypropylene fibres and recycled tyre polymer fibres were prepared and tested. Experimental programme focused on autogenous, free, and restrained shrinkage. It was shown that PP fibres can be substituted with higher amount of recycled tyre polymer fibres obtaining concrete with similar shrinkage behaviour. The results indicate promising possibilities of using recycled tyre polymer fibres in concrete products. At the same time, such applications would contribute to solving the problem of waste tyre disposal.

  7. Identification of the sources of organic compounds that decalcify cement concrete and generate alcohols and ammonia gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomoto, Takashi [Technical Research Institute, Obayashi Road Corporation, 4-640 Shimokiyoto, Kiyose, Tokyo, 204-0011 (Japan); Moriyoshi, Akihiro [Material Science Laboratory, Hokkaido University, 2-1-9-10 Kiyota, Kiyota-ku, Sapporo, 004-0842 (Japan); Sakai, Kiyoshi [Department of Environmental Health, Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute, 1-11 Hagiyama-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8615 (Japan); Shibata, Eiji [Department of Health and Psychosocial Medicine, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute-cho, Aichi, 480-1195 (Japan); Kamijima, Michihiro [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8550 (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    This study identifies the emission sources of various types of airborne organic compounds, which deteriorate cement concrete by penetrating into the concrete together with moisture. The study used high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatograph mass spectrometry. The results show that the types of organic compounds contained in decalcified cement concrete were very similar to those found in the total suspended compounds in the air, and that the source of the emissions was particles of exhaust from diesel vehicles and radial tires used in summer. Such organic compounds include substances suspected of having endocrine disrupting properties. Hydrolysis occurs when these substances penetrate into highly alkaline cement concrete, and leads to deterioration of the cement concrete and the release of alcohols and ammonia gases which pollute indoor air and may be a cause of the sick building syndrome. (author)

  8. AN OPTIMAL MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT MODEL FOR AIRPORT CONCRETE PAVEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Taizo; Fujimori, Yuji; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Obama, Kengo; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi

    In this paper, an optimal management model is formulated for the performance-based rehabilitation/maintenance contract for airport concrete pavement, whereby two types of life cycle cost risks, i.e., ground consolidation risk and concrete depreciation risk, are explicitly considered. The non-homogenous Markov chain model is formulated to represent the deterioration processes of concrete pavement which are conditional upon the ground consolidation processes. The optimal non-homogenous Markov decision model with multiple types of risk is presented to design the optimal rehabilitation/maintenance plans. And the methodology to revise the optimal rehabilitation/maintenance plans based upon the monitoring data by the Bayesian up-to-dating rules. The validity of the methodology presented in this paper is examined based upon the case studies carried out for the H airport.

  9. Smart Crack Control in Concrete through Use of Phase Change Materials (PCMs): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šavija, Branko

    2018-04-24

    Cracks in concrete structures present a threat to their durability. Therefore, numerous research studies have been devoted to reducing concrete cracking. In recent years, a new approach has been proposed for controlling temperature related cracking—utilization of phase change materials (PCMs) in concrete. Through their ability to capture heat, PCMs can offset temperature changes and reduce gradients in concrete structures. Nevertheless, they can also influence concrete properties. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the literature devoted to using PCMs to control temperature related cracking in concrete. First, types of PCMs and ways of incorporation in concrete are discussed. Then, possible uses of PCMs in concrete technology are discussed. Further, the influences of PCMs on concrete properties (fresh, hardened, durability) are discussed in detail. This is followed by a discussion of modelling techniques for PCM-concrete composites and their performance. Finally, a summary and the possible research directions for future work are given. This overview aims to assure the researchers and asset owners of the potential of this maturing technology and bring it one step closer to practical application.

  10. Concrete with onyx waste aggregate as aesthetically valued structural concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati E., W.; Soehardjono, A.; Wisnumurti

    2017-09-01

    The utillization of Tulungagung onyx stone waste as an aggregate of concrete mixture will improve the economic value of the concrete due to the brighter color and high aesthetic level of the products. We conducted the research of 75 samples as a test objects to measure the compression stress, splits tensile stress, flexural tensile stress, elasticity modulus, porosity modulus and also studied 15 test objects to identify the concrete micro structures using XRD test, EDAX test and SEM test. The test objects were made from mix designed concrete, having ratio cement : fine aggregate : coarse aggregate ratio = 1 : 1.5 : 2.1, and W/C ratio = 0.4. The 28 days examination results showed that the micro structure of Tulungagung onyx waste concrete is similar with normal concrete. Moreover, the mechanical test results proved that Tulungagung onyx waste concretes also have a qualified level of strength to be used as a structural concrete with higher aesthetic level.

  11. Modeling of molten core-concrete interactions and fission-product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norkus, J.K.; Corradini, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The study of molten core-concrete interaction is important in estimating the possible consequences of a severe nuclear reactor accident. CORCON-Mod2 is a computer program which models the thermal, chemical, and physical phenomena associated with molten core-concrete interactions. Models have been added to extend and improve the modeling of these phenomena. An ideal solution chemical equilibrium methodology is presented to predict the fission-product vaporization release. Additional chemical species have been added, and the calculation of chemical equilibrium has been expanded to the oxidic layer and to the mixed layer configuration. Recent experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory are compared to CORCON predictions of melt temperature, erosion depth, and release fraction of fission products. The results consistently underpredicted the melt temperatures and erosion rates. However, the predictions of release of Te, Ba, Sr, and U were good. A sensitivity study of the effects of initial temperature, concrete type, use of the mixing option, degree of zirconium oxidation, cavity size, and amount of control material on erosion, gas production, and release of radioactive materials was performed for a PWR and a BWR. The initial melt temperature had the greatest effect on the results of interest. Concrete type and cavity size also had important effects. 78 refs., 35 figs., 40 tabs

  12. Sustainable Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern over global warming and significant ecological changes requires sustainable development in all fields of science and technology. Concrete not only consumes huge amount of energy and natural sources, but also emits large amount of CO2, mainly due to the production of cement. It is evident that such large amount of concrete production has put significant impact on the energy, resource, environment, and ecology of the society. Hence, how to develop the concrete technology in a sustainable way has become a significant issue. In this paper, some of Korean researches for sustainable development of concrete are presented. These are sustainable strengthening for deteriorated concrete structure, sustainable reinforcement of new concrete structure, sustainable concrete using recycled aggregate and supplementary cementing materials and finally application of each technique to precast concrete.

  13. Quality control of concretes for conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez N, M.

    2015-01-01

    The spent sealed radioactive sources are considered as a specific type of radioactive wastes and should be properly stored to ensure their integrity and prevent or limit the release of radionuclides in the geosphere. For this, these sources can be put up in concrete matrices. This research presents the evaluation and characterization of five concretes prepared with 4 brands of commercial cements: CPC Extra RS, CPC 30R Impercem of Cemex, Cruz Azul CPC 30R and CPC 30R of Apasco; three sizes of coarse aggregate (<30 mm, 29-11 mm and <10 mm) and fine aggregate (0.0797 mm) used as matrices for conditioning of spent sealed radioactive sources, in order to verify if these specific concretes accredit the standard NOM-019-Nucl-1995. After hardening for 28 days the concrete specimens were subjected to the tests: compressive strength; thermal cycles, irradiation, leaching and permeability, later to be characterized by: 1) X-ray diffraction in order to meet their crystalline phases; 2) scanning electron microscopy, to determine changes in morphology; 3) infrared spectroscopy, to determine the structural changes of concrete from its functional groups; 4) Raman spectroscopy to determine their structural changes and 5) Moessbauer spectroscopy, which determines changes in the oxidation state of iron in the concrete. According to the results and the changes presented by each concrete after applying the tests set by NOM-019-Nucl-1995, is concluded that the concrete made with cement Cemex brand (CPC 30-RS Extra), gravel of particle size 11-29 mm and sieved sand (0.0797 mm) can be used as matrices of spent sealed sources conditioning. Is remarkable a morphological and structural change of the concrete due to gamma irradiation and heat treatment. (Author)

  14. Pervious Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Torsvik, Øyvind André Hoff

    2012-01-01

    Pervious concrete is a material with a high degree of permeability but generally low strength. The material is primarily used for paving applications but has shown promise in many other areas of usage. This thesis investigates the properties of pervious concrete using normal Norwegian aggregates and practices. An overview of important factors when it comes to designing and producing pervious concrete is the result of this investigation. Several experiments have been performed in the concrete ...

  15. Economic viability of ultra high-performance fiber reinforced concrete in prestressed concrete wind towers to support a 5 MW turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. C. N. GAMA

    Full Text Available Abstract The Ultra-High Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete is a material with remarkable mechanical properties and durability when compared to conventional and high performance concrete, which allows its use even without the reinforcement. This paper proposes the design of prestressed towers for a 5 MW turbine, through regulatory provisions and the limit states method, with UHPFRC and the concrete class C50, comparing the differences obtained in the design by parametric analysis, giving the advantages and disadvantages of using this new type of concrete. Important considerations, simplifications and notes are made to the calculation process, as well as in obtaining the prestressing and passive longitudinal and passive transverse reinforcement, highlighting the shear strength of annular sections comparing a model proposed here with recent experimental results present in the literature, which was obtained good agreement. In the end, it is estimated a first value within the constraints here made to ensure the economic viability of the use of UHPFRC in a 100 m prestressed wind tower with a 5 MW turbine.

  16. Increased Durability of Concrete Made with Fine Recycled Concrete Aggregates Using Superplasticizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartuxo, Francisco; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luis; Jiménez, José Ramón; Ledesma, Enrique F

    2016-02-08

    This paper evaluates the influence of two superplasticizers (SP) on the durability properties of concrete made with fine recycled concrete aggregate (FRCA). For this purpose, three families of concrete were tested: concrete without SP, concrete made with a regular superplasticizer and concrete made with a high-performance superplasticizer. Five volumetric replacement ratios of natural sand by FRCA were tested: 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 100%. Two natural gravels were used as coarse aggregates. All mixes had the same particle size distribution, cement content and amount of superplasticizer. The w/c ratio was calibrated to obtain similar slump. The results showed that the incorporation of FRCA increased the water absorption by immersion, the water absorption by capillary action, the carbonation depth and the chloride migration coefficient, while the use of superplasticizers highly improved these properties. The incorporation of FRCA jeopardized the SP's effectiveness. This research demonstrated that, from a durability point of view, the simultaneous incorporation of FRCA and high-performance SP is a viable sustainable solution for structural concrete production.

  17. Efficiency of fiber reinforced concrete application in structures subjected to dynamic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov Valeriy Ivanovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced concretes possess high strength under dynamic loadings, which include impact loads, thanks to their high structural viscosity. This is the reason for using them in difficult operating conditions, where increasing the performance characteristics and the structure durability is of prime importance, and the issues of the cost become less significant. Applying methods of disperse reinforcement is most challenging in case of subtle high-porous materials on mineral binders, for example foamed concrete. At the same time, the experiments conducted in Russia and abroad show, that also in other cases the concrete strength resistance several times increases as a result of disperse reinforcement. This doesn't depend on average density of the concrete and type of fiber used. In the article the fibre reinforced concrete impact resistance is analysed. Recommendations are given in regard to fibre concrete application in manufacture of monolithic floor units for industrial buildings and precast piles.

  18. Moisture transfer in a concrete slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.L.D.; Siang, H.H.; Kirmser, P.G.

    1979-01-01

    A diffusion theory with a linear or a nonlinear coefficient of diffusivity is insufficient for the characterization of the drying behaviour of hydrated concrete slabs. A general mathematical model, based on nonequilibrium, irreversible flows of heat and mass, yields a set of nonlinear partial differential equations of parabolic type. Implicit finite difference calculations for a concrete slab yield moisture, temperature, and pressure histories as well as global average drying rates. Graphs show that during the pendular state of dessication, diffusion, capillary, and evaporation-condensation processes are the governing mechanisms in drying. (orig.)

  19. Structural performance evaluation on aging underground reinforced concrete structures. Part 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Takuro; Matsuo, Toyofumi; Miyagawa, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    When we evaluate the soundness of reinforced concrete structures, it is important to assess the chloride induced deterioration. We conducted the reinforcing steel corrosion tests of reinforced concrete specimens under simulated tidal environment of sea. Parameters of the tests were water cement ratio, cement type and crack width of concrete. Periods of the tests were eighty month. The obtained results were summarized at follows: (a) The chloride ion concentration at the initiation of reinforcing steel corrosion was about 3.0 kg/m 3 in case of reinforcing steel in non-crack concrete used ordinary cement. (b) The corrosion rate of reinforcing steels was almost constant at any cement type specimens after causing crack by reinforcing steel corrosion. (c) The corrosion rate of reinforcing steels in specimens, which caused cracks by bending load, increased as crack width. In the same type specimens, the corrosion rate of reinforcing steels in fly ash cement specimens was larger than that of ordinary cement specimens. In this case, the corrosion rate of reinforcing steels was evaluated about 0.18 mm/year. (author)

  20. A Review of the Mechanical Properties of Concrete Containing Biofillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezdiani Mohamad, Mazizah; Mahmood, Ali A.; Min, Alicia Yik Yee; Khalid, Nur Hafizah A.

    2016-11-01

    Sustainable construction is a rapidly increasing research area. Investigators of all backgrounds are using industrial and agro wastes to replace Portland cement in concrete to reduce greenhouse emissions and the corresponding decline in general health. Many types of wastes have been used as cement replacements in concrete including: fly ash, slag and rice husk ash in addition to others. This study investigates the possibility of producing a sustainable approach to construction through the partial replacement of concrete using biofillers. This will be achieved by studying the physical and mechanical properties of two widely available biological wastes in Malaysia; eggshell and palm oil fuel ash (POFA). The mechanical properties tests that were studied and compared are the compression, tensile and flexural tests.

  1. Deterioration of Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Chloride ingress is a common cause of deterioration of reinforced concrete bridges. Concrete may be exposed to chloride by seawater or de-icing salts. The chloride initiates corrosion of the reinforcement, which through expansion disrupts the concrete. In addition, the corrosion reduces the cross...

  2. Proverb comprehension in youth: the role of concreteness and familiarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippold, M A; Haq, F S

    1996-02-01

    This study examined factors that were posited to play an important role in the development of proverb comprehension in school-age children and adolescents, namely, the concreteness and the familiarity of the expressions. Normally achieving students enrolled in Grades 5, 8, and 11 (n = 180) were administered a written forced-choice task that contained eight instances of four different types of proverbs: concrete-familiar ("A rolling stone gathers no moss"); concrete-unfamiliar ("A caged bird longs for the clouds"); abstract-familiar ("Two wrongs don't make a right"); and abstract-unfamiliar ("Of idleness comes no goodness"). Performance on the task steadily improved as a function of increasing grade level and, as predicted, the expressions proved to be differentially challenging: Concrete proverbs were easier to understand than abstract proverbs, and familiar proverbs were easier to understand than unfamiliar proverbs. The results concerning concreteness support the "metasemantic" hypothesis, the view that comprehension develops through active analysis of the words contained in proverbs. The results concerning familiarity support the "language experience" hypothesis, the view that comprehension develops through meaningful exposure to proverbs.

  3. Effect of Chopped Basalt Fibers on the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehmina Ayub

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the mechanical properties and the microstructure of the high performance fiber reinforced concrete (HPFRC containing up to 3% volume fraction of chopped Basalt fibers. Three types of the concrete were prepared, out of which, the first type was prepared by utilizing 100% cement content. The other two types of the concrete were prepared by replacing 10% cement content with silica fume and the locally produced metakaolin. Using each concrete type, four mixes were prepared in which Basalt fibers were added in the range of 0–3%; that is, total twelve mixes of the HPFRC concrete were prepared. From each of the twelve concrete mixes, total twelve specimens were cast to determine the mechanical properties of the HPFRC including compressive strength (cube and cylinder, splitting tensile strength, and the flexural strength. In this way, a total of 108 specimens were cast and tested in this study. Test results showed that the addition of the Basalt fibers significantly increased the tensile splitting strength and the flexural strength of the HPFRC, while there was slight improvement in the compressive strength with the addition of Basalt fibers. The microstructure of HPFRC was examined to determine the interfacial transition zone (ITZ between the aggregates and the paste by using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, which showed the improvement of the ITZ due to the addition of the Basalt fibers.

  4. Recycled construction and demolition concrete waste as aggregate for structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Wagih

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In major Egyptian cities there is a surge in construction and demolition waste (CDW quantities causing an adverse effect on the environment. The use of such waste as recycled aggregate in concrete can be useful for both environmental and economical aspects in the construction industry. This study discusses the possibility to replace natural coarse aggregate (NA with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA in structural concrete. An investigation into the properties of RCA is made using crushing and grading of concrete rubble collected from different demolition sites and landfill locations around Cairo. Aggregates used in the study were: natural sand, dolomite and crushed concretes obtained from different sources. A total of 50 concrete mixes forming eight groups were cast. Groups were designed to study the effect of recycled coarse aggregates quality/content, cement dosage, use of superplasticizer and silica fume. Tests were carried out for: compressive strength, splitting strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the concrete rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate and used in concrete production with properties suitable for most structural concrete applications in Egypt. A significant reduction in the properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC made of 100% RCA was seen when compared to natural aggregate concrete (NAC, while the properties of RAC made of a blend of 75% NA and 25% RCA showed no significant change in concrete properties.

  5. Preliminary Study on Evaluation of Impact Resistance Performance of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Byeong Moo; Lee, Yun Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Jeon, Se Jin

    2012-01-01

    As the safety assessments of nuclear power plants for the hypothetical large civil aircraft crash should be made mandatory, studies on large aircraft-nuclear power plant impact analyses and assessments studies are actively in progress. For the safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash, it is practically impossible to conduct full-scale experiments. Therefore, analysis using general purpose numerical analysis program accompanied by scale model experiments and element experiments has been adopted for the safety assessment. The safety of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash is able to be accomplished by enhancement of the impact resistance performance, such as increasing the wall thickness, increasing the strength of concrete and using the fiber reinforced concrete which is able to be acquired by relatively simple process of adding fibers to a concrete mix without significant change of design and construction. A research for the enhancement of impact resistance performance depending upon design parameters for fiber reinforced concrete, such as type of fibers and application rate, is in progress. In this study, before the safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash, we assess the impact resistance performance of concrete wall depending upon type of fibers and impact velocity of objects

  6. Preliminary Study on Evaluation of Impact Resistance Performance of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Byeong Moo; Lee, Yun Seok; Kim, Young Jin [Daewoo E and C Co. Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Se Jin [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    As the safety assessments of nuclear power plants for the hypothetical large civil aircraft crash should be made mandatory, studies on large aircraft-nuclear power plant impact analyses and assessments studies are actively in progress. For the safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash, it is practically impossible to conduct full-scale experiments. Therefore, analysis using general purpose numerical analysis program accompanied by scale model experiments and element experiments has been adopted for the safety assessment. The safety of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash is able to be accomplished by enhancement of the impact resistance performance, such as increasing the wall thickness, increasing the strength of concrete and using the fiber reinforced concrete which is able to be acquired by relatively simple process of adding fibers to a concrete mix without significant change of design and construction. A research for the enhancement of impact resistance performance depending upon design parameters for fiber reinforced concrete, such as type of fibers and application rate, is in progress. In this study, before the safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash, we assess the impact resistance performance of concrete wall depending upon type of fibers and impact velocity of objects

  7. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  8. Special protective concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouniol, P.

    2001-01-01

    Concrete is the most convenient material when large-scale radiation protection is needed. Thus, special concretes for nuclear purposes are used in various facilities like reactors, reprocessing centers, storage sites, accelerators, hospitals with nuclear medicine equipment, food ionization centers etc.. The recent advances made in civil engineering for the improvement of concrete durability and compactness are for a large part transposable to protection concretes. This article presents the basic knowledge about protection concretes with the associated typological and technological aspects. A large part is devoted to the intrinsic properties of concretes and to their behaviour in irradiation and temperature conditions: 1 - definition and field of application of special protective concretes; 2 - evolution of concepts and technologies (durability of structures, techniques of formulation, new additives, market evolution); 3 - design of protective structures (preliminary study, radiation characteristics, thermal constraints, damping and dimensioning, mechanical criteria); 4 - formulation of special concretes (general principles, granulates, hydraulic binders, pulverulent additives, water/cement ratio, reference composition of some special concretes); 5 - properties of special concretes (damping and thermo-mechanical properties); 6 - induced-irradiation and temperature phenomena (activation, radiolysis, mineralogical transformations, drying, shrinking, creep, corrosion of reinforcement). (J.S.)

  9. Flexural Behaviour of Reinforced Fibrous Concrete Beams: Experiments and Analytical Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, R.; Sellier, A.; Turatsinze, A.; Duprat, F.

    2013-01-01

    Flexural behaviour of reinforced fibrous concrete beams was investigated in this research study. Two types of metallic fibers were studied: amorphous metallic fibers (FibraFlex fibers), and carbon steel hooked-end fibers (Dramix fibers). Four types of reinforced concretes were made: one control (without fibers) and three fibrous. Among three reinforced fibrous concretes, two contained fibers in mono form and one contained fibers in hybrid form. The total quantity of fibers in mono and hybrid forms was 20 kg/m3 and 40 kg/m3, respectively. Three point bending tests were performed according to European standards NF EN 14651 on beams of 150 x 150 mm cross section and length of 550 mm. The results showed that due to positive synergetic interaction between the two metallic fibers used, reinforced fibrous concret (RFC) beams containing fibers in hybrid form exhibited better response at all loading stages. Analytical model to predict ultimate moment capacity of the RFC beam of rectangular section was developed and is presented in this paper. Analytical results for ultimate moment were found to be in good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  10. The Effect of superficial cracks of the concrete on the behavior and corrosion rate of steel rebars in Persian Golf (Booshehr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar, A.; Rajabi, A.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of superficial cracks in concrete increases the diffusion of destructive agents into concrete and the corrosion of rebars will take place. In the present work, the effects of cracks width on the behavior and corrosion rate of steel rebars in the concrete containing cements type I and II at Persian Gulf water have been studied. The results show that the corrosion rate of steel rebars in the concrete with cracks width less than 0.4 mm is negligible, but with increasing the cracks width to 0.7 mm, the corrosion rate increase rapidly. Also, the corrosion gate of gebars in the concrete containing cement type I is more than that of cement type II. The visual inspection of the surface area of gebars shows that the corroded area is 6-7 times of the crack width and length

  11. Impact of recycled gravel obtained from low or medium concrete grade on concrete properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Abdelghany Fawzy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of recycled gravel obtained from low (Gl or medium (Gm concrete grade on fresh property of concrete (slump, mechanical properties (compressive-splitting tensile strength and mass transport properties (ISAT-sorptivity of concrete containing dolomite as a natural coarse aggregate. Concrete specimens were prepared with cement, water, sand and dolomite admixed with recycled gravel. The percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite was 0:100, 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at w/c = 0.50, 0.55 and 0.60. The effect of silica fume and bonding admixture at w/c = 0.55 on concrete properties were also considered. The results indicated that, increasing the percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite led to decreasing the slump. All mechanical properties of concrete discussed were inversely affected by increasing percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite from low and medium concrete. Adding 10% SF or bonding admixture increased the mechanical properties of concrete. Mass transport properties of concrete (ISAT-sorptivity were enhanced by decreasing the percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite. The optimum percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite = 25%. Keywords: Recycled gravel, Concrete, Silica fume, Compressive strength, Mass transport

  12. Design of Normal Concrete Mixtures Using Workability-Dispersion-Cohesion Method

    OpenAIRE

    Qasrawi, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    The workability-dispersion-cohesion method is a new proposed method for the design of normal concrete mixes. The method uses special coefficients called workability-dispersion and workability-cohesion factors. These coefficients relate workability to mobility and stability of the concrete mix. The coefficients are obtained from special charts depending on mix requirements and aggregate properties. The method is practical because it covers various types of aggregates that may not be within sta...

  13. Effect of concrete strength gradation to the compressive strength of graded concrete, a numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, M. Mirza Abdillah; Aylie, Han; Gan, Buntara Sthenly; Umniati, B. Sri; Risdanareni, Puput; Fauziyah, Shifa

    2017-09-01

    Concrete casting, compacting method, and characteristic of the concrete material determine the performance of concrete as building element due to the material uniformity issue. Previous studies show that gradation in strength exists on building member by nature and negatively influence the load carrying capacity of the member. A pilot research had modeled the concrete gradation in strength with controllable variable and observed that the weakest material determines the strength of graded concrete through uniaxial compressive loading test. This research intends to confirm the recent finding by a numerical approach with extensive variables of strength disparity. The finite element analysis was conducted using the Strand7 nonlinear program. The results displayed that the increase of strength disparity in graded concrete models leads to the slight reduction of models strength. A substantial difference in displacement response is encountered on the models for the small disparity of concrete strength. However, the higher strength of concrete mix in the graded concrete models contributes to the rise of material stiffness that provides a beneficial purpose for serviceability of building members.

  14. Properties of dune sand concrete containing coffee waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Guendouz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, an increase of coffee beverages consumption has been observed all over the world; and its consumption increases the waste coffee grounds which will become an environmental problems. Recycling of this waste to produce new materials like sand concrete appears as one of the best solutions for reduces the problem of pollution. This work aims to study the possibility of recycling waste coffee grounds (Spent Coffee Grounds (SCG as a fine aggregate by replacing the sand in the manufacturing of dune sand concrete. For this; sand concrete mixes were prepared with substitution of sand with the spent coffee grounds waste at different percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% by volume of the sand in order to study the influence of this wastes on physical (Workability, bulk density and porosity, mechanical (compressive and flexural strength and Thermal (Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity properties of dune sand concrete. The results showed that the use of spent coffee grounds waste as partial replacement of natural sand contributes to reduce workability, bulk density and mechanical strength of sand concrete mixes with an increase on its porosity. However, the thermal characteristics are improved and especially for a level of 15% and 20% of substitution. So, it is possible to obtain an insulating material which can be used in the various types of structural components. This study ensures that reusing of waste coffee grounds in dune sand concrete gives a positive approach to reduce the cost of materials and solve some environmental problems.

  15. Durability of lightweight concrete : Phase I : concrete temperature study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-08-01

    This report describes a study conducted to determine the temperature gradient throughout the depth of a six inch concrete bridge deck. The bridge deck selected for study was constructed using lightweight concrete for the center spans and sand and gra...

  16. Monomaterial ecological buildings, with Mopatel® and Ecopierra® concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Livia Miron; Constantin Miron; Petrache Teleman

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a case study performed on a pilot building from Gainesti, Suceava county. The constructive system used is unique in that it employs a monomaterial, namely ecological concrete of type MOPATEL® or ECOPIERRA®. These types of concrete, created by eng. Petrache Teleman, possess international patents and have received awards in Brussels, but they are not yet used in Romania. These materials can be used integrally to make all the constructive elements of a building – load-bearin...

  17. Experimental study of a foam concrete based on local Tunisian materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellouze Dorra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The building sector in Tunisia is very energy-intensive, the largest share of energy consumption comes from factories of building materials namely brick and cement plants. This work is part of the reduction of the energy bill in the building envelope. Indeed, the foam concrete can be walls in single or double wall with better insulating power. This paper presents an experimental study on the technical problems related to the formulation and manufacture of a new cellular concrete in Tunisia, called "foam" concrete, from Tunisian local materials. Indeed, six varieties of sand of different provenance and grain size will be analyzed, the "good" sand is the one that is best suited for the manufacture of foam concrete. Two clean, fine-grained (0/2mm rolled grain sands were retained. Then four foam concretes were formulated using each time a single type of sand and varying the density namely 0.8 and 1. These four formulations were tested mechanically and thermally. The results found showed that compressive strengths do not exceed 1.5 MPa at 28 days. Thus, the foam concrete can be used only as a filling concrete in non-load bearing elements such as partition walls. The guarded hot plate method was used to determine the thermal conductivities of the four foamed concretes studied. A low thermal conductivity was found of the order of 0.22 W/m°K which prove the insulating power of foam concrete.

  18. Utilization of construction and agricultural waste in Malaysia for development of Green Concrete: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambichik, M. A.; Mohamad, N.; Samad, A. A. A.; Bosro, M. Z. M.; Iman, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    Green Concrete (GC) is defined as a concrete that utilize a waste material for at least one of its component. The production of GC has been increasing due to the drawback of conventional concrete that create many environmental problems. In Malaysia, the amount of waste generates from agricultural and construction industries were increasing every year. Hence, one of the solutions to reduce the impact of conventional concrete and limited landfill spaces due to excessive waste is by utilizing it in concrete. This paper reviews the possible use of construction waste (Recycle Concrete Aggregate) and agricultural waste (Palm Oil Fuel Ash, Rice Husk Ash and Palm Oil Fibre) as partial replacement for the basic material in a concrete to produce an innovative Green Concrete. The optimum replacement level for each type of waste was also been review. Green Concrete also has the potential to reduce environmental pollution and solve the depletion of natural sources. The result from this review shows that the addition of agricultural waste or construction waste in concrete indicate positive and satisfactory strength when compared to normal concrete. Finally, a mass production of Green Concrete can fulfil the Construction Industry Transformation Plan (CITP) 2016-2020 made by CIDB that emphasizes on a construction system which is environmentally sustainable.

  19. Behavior of Hollow Thin Welded Tubes Filled with Sand Slag Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Ferhoune

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the axial bearing capacity of thin welded rectangular steel stubs filled with concrete sand. A series of tests was conducted to study the behavior of short composite columns under axial compressive load; the cross section dimensions were 100 × 70 × 2 mm. A total of 20 stubs have been tested, as follows: 4 hollow thin welded tubes were tested to axial and eccentric load compression, 4 were filled with ordinary concrete appointed by BO columns, 6 were filled with concrete whose natural sand was completely substituted by a crystallized sand slag designated in this paper by BSI, and 6 were tucked in concrete whose natural sand was partially replaced by a crystallized sand slag called BSII. The main parameters studied are the height of the specimen (300 mm–500 mm, eccentricity of load and type of filling concrete. Based on test results obtained, it is confirmed that the length of the tubes has a considerable effect on the bearing capacity and the failure mode. In all test tubes, fracture occurred by the convex local buckling of steel section due to the outward thrust of the concrete; it was observed that the sand concrete improves the bearing capacity of tubes compounds compared to those filled with ordinary concrete.

  20. Experiment Observations of the Effects of Fiber Types on the Post-peak Behaviors of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concretes under Tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Moon, Jae Heum; Lee, Jang Hwa; Kang, Su Tae

    2012-01-01

    Concrete is one of the major construction materials that are used to form the containing structures with the function as a radiation barrier for nuclear power plants. While current (steel reinforced) concrete structures for nuclear power plants provide reliable serviceability regarding the requirements of design codes, further safety requirement has been issued with the considerations of the impact of a large, commercial aircraft. U.S. NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) announced the new regulatory code, 10CFR50.150 related to an aircraft impact assessment (AIA). The goal of AIA is to enhance the safety and robustness of new reactor designs at the design stage. To enhance the safety against aircraft impact, two approaches can be simply suggested, increase of barrier wall thickness and/or application of double containment structures. However, these two approaches expect much higher construction costs and much longer building period. Even also, when the thickness of concrete structure is increased, special cares will be expected during the process of concrete placement because of the cracking behavior of mass concrete due to hydration heat. To avoid the pre-described problems and difficulties, strengthening of the concrete properties could be an alternative and the increase of fracture toughness of concrete itself will be the practical approach to enhance the impact resistivity. With this consideration, this research observed the effects of steel fiber reinforcement on the enhancement of fracture toughness for possible future application to nuclear power plant structures

  1. Experiment Observations of the Effects of Fiber Types on the Post-peak Behaviors of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concretes under Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Moon, Jae Heum; Lee, Jang Hwa [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Su Tae [Daegu University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Concrete is one of the major construction materials that are used to form the containing structures with the function as a radiation barrier for nuclear power plants. While current (steel reinforced) concrete structures for nuclear power plants provide reliable serviceability regarding the requirements of design codes, further safety requirement has been issued with the considerations of the impact of a large, commercial aircraft. U.S. NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) announced the new regulatory code, 10CFR50.150 related to an aircraft impact assessment (AIA). The goal of AIA is to enhance the safety and robustness of new reactor designs at the design stage. To enhance the safety against aircraft impact, two approaches can be simply suggested, increase of barrier wall thickness and/or application of double containment structures. However, these two approaches expect much higher construction costs and much longer building period. Even also, when the thickness of concrete structure is increased, special cares will be expected during the process of concrete placement because of the cracking behavior of mass concrete due to hydration heat. To avoid the pre-described problems and difficulties, strengthening of the concrete properties could be an alternative and the increase of fracture toughness of concrete itself will be the practical approach to enhance the impact resistivity. With this consideration, this research observed the effects of steel fiber reinforcement on the enhancement of fracture toughness for possible future application to nuclear power plant structures

  2. The Neural Correlates of Abstract and Concrete Words: Evidence from Brain-Damaged Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Papagno, Costanza; Martello, Giorgia; Mattavelli, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychological and activation studies on the neural correlates of abstract and concrete words have produced contrasting results. The present study explores the anatomical substrates of abstract/concrete words in 22 brain-damaged patients with a single vascular lesion either in the right or left hemisphere. One hundred and twenty (60 concrete and 60 abstract) noun triplets were used for a semantic similarity judgment task. We found a significant interaction in word type × group since left ...

  3. Prediction of Corrosion Resistance of Concrete Containing Natural Pozzolan from Compressive Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Swaidani, A. M.; Ismat, R.; Diyab, M. E.; Aliyan, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    A lot of Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures in Syria have suffered from reinforcement corrosion which shortened significantly their service lives. Probably, one of the most effective approaches to make concrete structures more durable and concrete industry on the whole - more sustainable is to substitute pozzolan for a portion of Portland cement (PC). Syria is relatively rich in natural pozzolan. In the study, in order to predict the corrosion resistance from compressive strength, concrete specimens were produced with seven cement types: one plain Portland cement (control) and six natural pozzolan-based cements with replacement levels ranging from 10 to 35%. The development of the compressive strengths of concrete cube specimens with curing time has been investigated. Chloride penetrability has also been evaluated for all concrete mixes after three curing times of 7, 28 and 90 days. The effect on resistance of concrete against damage caused by corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel has been investigated using an accelerated corrosion test by impressing a constant anodic potential for 7, 28 and 90 days curing. Test results have been statistically analysed and correlation equations relating compressive strength and corrosion performance have been developed. Significant correlations have been noted between the compressive strength and both rapid chloride penetrability and corrosion initiation times. So, this prediction could be reliable in concrete mix design when using natural pozzolan as cement replacement.

  4. Evaluation of ternary blended cements for use in transportation concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Amanda Louise

    designing ternary blended cements more acceptable by eliminating arbitrary limitations for supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) use and changing to performance-based standards. Performance-based standards require trial batching of concrete mixture designs, which can be used to optimize ternary combinations of portland cement and SCMs. States should be aware of various SCMs that are appropriate for the project type and its environment.

  5. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB`s) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing.

  6. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB's) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing

  7. Flow simulation of fiber reinforced self compacting concrete using Lattice Boltzmann method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Stang, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) is a promising material in the civil engineering industry. One of the benefits of the SCC is a fast and simplified casting followed by decreased labor costs. The SCC as any other type of concrete has a significantly lower tensile and shear strength in comparison to ....... A relatively new group of models - Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) - is presented in this paper. The conventional LBM is modified to include fiber and particle suspensions and non-Newtonian rheology and is used to model the fiber reinforced self compacting concrete flow....

  8. Health monitoring and rehabilitation of a concrete structure using intelligent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G.; Mo, Y. L.; Otero, K.; Gu, H.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents the concept of an intelligent reinforced concrete structure (IRCS) and its application in structural health monitoring and rehabilitation. The IRCS has multiple functions which include self-rehabilitation, self-vibration damping, and self-structural health monitoring. These functions are enabled by two types of intelligent (smart) materials: shape memory alloys (SMAs) and piezoceramics. In this research, Nitinol type SMA and PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type piezoceramics are used. The proposed concrete structure is reinforced by martensite Nitinol cables using the method of post-tensioning. The martensite SMA significantly increases the concrete's damping property and its ability to handle large impact. In the presence of cracks due to explosions or earthquakes, by electrically heating the SMA cables, the SMA cables contract and close up the cracks. In this research, PZT patches are embedded in the concrete structure to detect possible cracks inside the concrete structure. The wavelet packet analysis method is then applied as a signal-processing tool to analyze the sensor signals. A damage index is defined to describe the damage severity for health monitoring purposes. In addition, by monitoring the electric resistance change of the SMA cables, the crack width can be estimated. To demonstrate this concept, a concrete beam specimen with reinforced SMA cables and with embedded PZT patches is fabricated. Experiments demonstrate that the IRC has the ability of self-sensing and self-rehabilitation. Three-point bending tests were conducted. During the loading process, a crack opens up to 0.47 inches. Upon removal of the load and heating the SMA cables, the crack closes up. The damage index formed by wavelet packet analysis of the PZT sensor data predicts and confirms the onset and severity of the crack during the loading. Also during the loading, the electrical resistance value of the SMA cable changes by up to 27% and this phenomenon is used to

  9. Oxide-metal corium-concrete interaction test in the Vulcano facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journeau, Ch.; Piluso, P.; Haquet, J.F.; Saretta, S.; Boccaccio, E.; Bonnet, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Corium is likely to melt through the vessel and interact with the reactor pit concrete. Corium is made of a UO 2 -rich oxidic part, in which most of the decay heat is dissipated, and of a metallic part, mainly molten steel. An experiment has been set up in the Vulcano facility in which oxidic and metallic mixtures are molten in separate furnaces and poured in a concrete cavity. Induction heating is provided to the pool upper part thanks to shielding coils, so that, in case of stratification, the lighter oxidic corium-concrete mixture receives most of the power. Pre-calculations with the TOLBIAC-ICB corium-concrete interaction code based on the phase segregation model have provided valuable information for the dimensioning of this test: a thick metallic layer (>10 kg or 4 cm) has been chosen in order to obtain significant cavity ablation profiles depending on the selected heat transfer and stratification models. Stratification of the two liquid phases is predicted to occur in less than 10 minutes. In September 2006, the experiment was performed in the Vulcano facility. The corium was made of about 15 kg of steel at 1700 C and 30 kg of oxides (70% UO 2 , 16 % ZrO 2 and 14% concrete load) above 2000 C. It was poured in a limestone-rich concrete. This concrete type was selected for the first test, since the ablation is isotropic except for the initial transient, during oxidic corium-concrete interaction tests. 32 kW of induction power have been provided to the pool during the 4-hour test. The destruction of in-concrete thermocouples indicates that ablation was first mainly radial then became isotropic. This is quite similar to the ablation progression observed during previous tests with oxidic corium interacting with this type of concrete. Important 'volcanic activity' has been observed at the corium pool surface, compared to the previous oxidic corium experiments at Vulcano. (authors)

  10. Oxide-metal corium-concrete interaction test in the Vulcano facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Journeau, Ch.; Piluso, P.; Haquet, J.F.; Saretta, S.; Boccaccio, E.; Bonnet, J.M. [CEA Cadarache, Severe Accident Mastery experimental Lab. (DEN/DTN/STRI/LMA), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2007-07-01

    Corium is likely to melt through the vessel and interact with the reactor pit concrete. Corium is made of a UO{sub 2}-rich oxidic part, in which most of the decay heat is dissipated, and of a metallic part, mainly molten steel. An experiment has been set up in the Vulcano facility in which oxidic and metallic mixtures are molten in separate furnaces and poured in a concrete cavity. Induction heating is provided to the pool upper part thanks to shielding coils, so that, in case of stratification, the lighter oxidic corium-concrete mixture receives most of the power. Pre-calculations with the TOLBIAC-ICB corium-concrete interaction code based on the phase segregation model have provided valuable information for the dimensioning of this test: a thick metallic layer (>10 kg or 4 cm) has been chosen in order to obtain significant cavity ablation profiles depending on the selected heat transfer and stratification models. Stratification of the two liquid phases is predicted to occur in less than 10 minutes. In September 2006, the experiment was performed in the Vulcano facility. The corium was made of about 15 kg of steel at 1700 C and 30 kg of oxides (70% UO{sub 2}, 16 % ZrO{sub 2} and 14% concrete load) above 2000 C. It was poured in a limestone-rich concrete. This concrete type was selected for the first test, since the ablation is isotropic except for the initial transient, during oxidic corium-concrete interaction tests. 32 kW of induction power have been provided to the pool during the 4-hour test. The destruction of in-concrete thermocouples indicates that ablation was first mainly radial then became isotropic. This is quite similar to the ablation progression observed during previous tests with oxidic corium interacting with this type of concrete. Important 'volcanic activity' has been observed at the corium pool surface, compared to the previous oxidic corium experiments at Vulcano. (authors)

  11. Application of smart BFRP bars with distributed fiber optic sensors into concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen; Yang, Caiqian; Wu, Gang; Zhao, Lihua; Song, Shiwei

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the self-sensing and mechanical properties of concrete structures strengthened with a novel type of smart basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) bars were experimentally studied, wherein the sensing element is Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber sensing technique. First, one of the smart bars was applied to strengthen a 2m concrete beam under a 4-points static loading manner in the laboratory. During the experiment, the bar can measure the inner strain changes and monitor the randomly distributed cracks well. With the distributed strain information along the bar, the distributed deformation of the beam can be calculated, and the structural health can be monitored and evaluated as well. Then, two smart bars with a length of about 70m were embedded into a concrete airfield pavement reinforced by long BFRP bars. In the field test, all the optical fiber sensors in the smart bars survived the whole concrete casting process and worked well. From the measured data, the concrete cracks along the pavement length can be easily monitored. The experimental results also confirmed that the bars can strengthen the structures especially after the yielding of steel bars. All the results confirm that this new type of smart BFRP bars show not only good sensing performance but also mechanical performance in the concrete structures.

  12. Model - including thermal creep effects - for the analysis of three-dimensional concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.; Rebora, B.; Favrod, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    This article presents the most recent developments and results of research carried out by IPEN to establish a mathematical model for the non-linear rheological three-dimensional analysis of massive prestressed concrete structures. The main point of these latest developments is the simulation of the creep of concrete submitted to high temperatures over a long period of time. This research, financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation, has taken an increased importance with the advent of nuclear reactor vessels of the HHT type and new conceptions concerning the cooling of their concrete (replacement of the thermal insulation by a zone of hot concrete). (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of corrosion resistance of various concrete reinforcing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Vermont Agency of Transportation undertook a simple experiment to determine the corrosion : resistance ability of various reinforcing steels (rebar) that may be used in bridges and other concrete : structures. Eight types of rebar were used in th...

  14. Mechanical properties of recycled concrete with demolished waste concrete aggregate and clay brick aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocan; Lou, Cong; Du, Geng; Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Zhiwu; Li, Liqin

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the effect of the replacement of natural coarse aggregate (NCA) with either recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) or recycled clay brick aggregate (RBA) on the compressive strengths of the hardened concrete. Two grades (C25 and C50) of concrete were investigated, which were achieved by using different water-to-cement ratios. In each grade concrete five different replacement rates, 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% were considered. In order to improve the performance of the recycled aggregates in the concrete mixes, the RCA and RBA were carefully sieved by using the optimal degradation. In this way the largest reduction in the 28-day compressive strength was found to be only 7.2% and 9.6% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RCA, and 11% and 13% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RBA. In general, the concrete with RCA has better performance than the concrete with RBA. The comparison of the present experimental results with those reported in literature for hardened concrete with either RCA or RBA demonstrates the effectiveness in improving the compressive strength by using the optimal gradation of recycled aggregates.

  15. Evolution of sorption properties in large-scale concrete structures accounting for long-term physical-chemical concrete degradation - 59297

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perko, Janez; Jacques, Diederik; Mallants, Dirk; Seetharam, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    , Belgium: (i) The procedure begins by the selection of sorption and solubility values pertinent to the type of concrete used for the Dessel near-surface facility. The selection procedure is transparently documented and published in two NIRAS/ONDRAF reports . These reports define sorption values for four distinct chemical degradation states of concrete used in the safety assessments. Most of the selected data is based on experimental sorption data at laboratory scale with benchmark cements. (ii) Cement, however, occupies only a fraction of the total volume of concrete and rescaling of cement sorption values to concrete is an important issue. Though very obvious, this rescaling could be a source of wrong interpretation and, to authors' knowledge, has never been addressed in long-term safety assessments. (iii) Long term evolution of concrete is modelled by the use of a geochemical model supported by a state-of-the-art thermodynamic database. The long-term evolution of the cementitious near field SSCs at the Dessel facility is based on leaching of the reactive phases from the concrete. Evolution of sorption parameters follows the evolution of these cement phases. Distinct sorption values for specific chemical degradation states are linked to the evolution of the calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H phases) in the cement because they were judged to offer the most robust and unique behaviour applicable to all radionuclides. (iv) Final use of sorption values in safety assessment depends on the conceptual model and purpose of the model. Few examples are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  16. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were...

  17. Behavior of Reinforced Hybrid Concrete Corbel-Column Connection with Vertical Construction Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Yasir Ali

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, shear behavior of reinforced hybrid concrete connection of corbel-column is experimentally investigated. Nine homogenous and hybrid concrete corbel-column connections subjected to vertical applied loads were constructed and tested within two test groups (A, B. The experimental program included the effect of several variables such as type of hybrid concrete;high strength concrete (HSC or steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC, monolithic casting of hybrid concrete connection, and presence of construction joint at the interface of corbel-column. Experimental results showed significant effects of concrete hybridization on the structural behavior of connection specimens such as: ultimate strength, cracking loads, cracking patterns, and failure modes. Hybridization process in group (A included hybrid connection of corbel-column with HSC or SFRC corbel instated of NSC. This process led to increase the capacity of connection by (26%, 38% and shear cracking loads by (20%, 120% respectively. Moreover, connections of hybrid concrete corbels cast monolithically improved the shear capacity of corbels by (19%, 42% for HSC or SFRC respectively. In group (B, presence of construction joint at connection region reduced the shear capacity of connectionsby (10% to 22% and cracking loads by (23%-62% compared with connections cast monolithically.

  18. Investigation of compressive strength of concrete with slag and silica fu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostofinejad, D.; Mirtalee, K.; Sadeghi, M.

    2002-01-01

    Without doubt, concrete has special place in construction of different types of structures, and used as one of the most important materials in construction industry. Today, with development and modernization of human knowledge in construction industry, it is possible to reach h igh performance concrete . Mechanical properties and durability of high performance concrete is quite better than that of conventional concrete. In present, the use of supplementary cementitious materials, mainly silica fume, fly ash and blast furnace slag has become increasingly common for reasons of economy and technical benefits imparted by these materials. The aim of present research is investigation and comparison compressive strength of concrete specimens due to variation of water to cementitious materials ratio (W/C M), silica fume and slag percent and their proportions as cement replacement. Furthermore, it is intended to determine best combination of these materials with cement in concrete (optimum percent) to reach to maximum compressive strength. In the current study, specimens were made in 0.5,0.4 and 0.3 W/C M ratio contained 0,20,35 and 50 percent of slag as cement replacement, where in each slag replacement percent, 0, 5, 10 and 15 percent of of silica fume were used as cement replacement. Results of the current study show that the combination effect of slag and silica fume replacement in concrete leads to the maximum compressive strength in concrete; also there are some optimum percents for replacement of slag and silica fume to cement to get the best results

  19. Experimental investigation of photocatalytic effects of concrete in air purification adopting entire concrete waste reuse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yidong; Chen, Wei; Jin, Ruoyu; Shen, Jiansheng; Smallbone, Kirsty; Yan, Chunyang; Hu, Lei

    2018-07-05

    This research investigated the capacities of recycled aggregate concrete adopting entire concrete waste reuse model in degrading NO 2. Two major issues within environmental sustainability were addressed: concrete waste reuse rate and mitigation of hazards substances in the polluted air. The study consisted of two stages: identification of proper replacement rates of recycled concrete wastes in new concrete mixture design, and the evaluation of photocatalytic performance of recycled aggregate concrete in degrading NO 2 . It was found that replacement rates up to 3%, 30%, and 50% for recycled power, recycled fine aggregate, and recycled coarse aggregate respectively could be applied in concrete mixture design without deteriorating concrete strength. Recycled aggregates contained both positive attributes ("internal curing") and negative effects (e.g., lower hardness) to concrete properties. It was found that 30%-50% of natural coarse aggregate replaced by recycled coarse aggregates coated with TiO 2 would significantly improve the photocatalytic performance of concrete measured by degradation rate of NO 2 . Micro-structures of recycled aggregates observed under microscope indicated that soaking recycled aggregates in TiO 2 solution resulted in whiskers that filled the porosity within recycled aggregates which enhanced concrete strength. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental study of sodium fires on concrete based on the sodium-concrete reaction and its consequences: study of the behavior of various concretes under metallic sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin; Colome, J.; Malet, J.C.

    The problem created by the violent reaction between hot sodium and concrete has only recently been recognized. Its importance was evidenced during experiments in which the sodium-barium oxide concrete reactions led to violent explosions. SESR approached this question during its experimental programs Cassandre and Lucifer. The Cassandre 01 experiment demonstrated the sodium-ordinary concrete reaction, where sodium was burned directly in a concrete vat. The consequences of this fire, pulverization of sodium particles, explosions and deterioration of the concrete led to consideration of protecting the concrete. Among possible shieldings sheath metal appeared to be the safest solution. The Cassandre 08, Lucifer 01 and Lucifer 04 experiments were used to study the behavior of various qualities of concrete protected from fire by a metal wall. The results show that a metal cladding efficiently protects concrete from sodium leaks

  1. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  2. Electrokinetic Strength Enhancement of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  3. Radiometric assessment of quality of concrete mix with respect to hardened concrete strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czechowski, J.

    1983-01-01

    The experiments have confirmed the relationship between the intensity of backscattered gamma radiation and the density of fresh concrete, and also between the flow of backscattered fast neutrons and the water content. From the said two parameters it is possible to derive the compression strength of concrete over the determined period of mix hardening, e.g., after 28 days. For a certain composition of concrete it is possible to derive empirical relations between the intensity of backscattered gamma radiation and neutrons and concrete strength after hardening and to construct suitable nomograms. (Ha)

  4. Non destructive measurement for the penetration of contamination inside concrete walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rottner, B.

    1998-01-01

    The scope of this work is to determine the penetration depth of the contamination inside materials like concrete, only using external measurements, avoiding for instance to drill holes in the concrete wall. When dismantling NPP, concrete represents a significant part of the amount of waste. It is then interesting to segregate concrete into different types of waste: ordinary waste, very low level active waste,... This method makes it possible to generate a three dimensional map of the contamination in a concrete wall; this map car be used to adapt the dismantling scenario, and the tools, in order to: - first: decontaminate the wall by scraping the identified contaminated parts, which generates a small quantity of active waste; - second: break down the wall using non nuclear specific methods, generating a large quantity of ordinary waste. The method is based on spectrometric measurements, using two types of information: - the peak to peak ratios for a single radio-nuclide; - the ratio of the peak surface to the baseline enhancement under the peak. Both ratios vary with the penetration depth of the contamination, but rot in the same way. Therefore, the information which is used, will preferably depends on the depth. The correlation of the two ratios to the penetration depth is computed, using two specific calculation codes. One computes the sensitivity of the detector to the direct rays and the other computes the spectrum shape. (author)

  5. A study of the long-term properties of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y-C.; Lee, D-S.; Cho, M-S.; Lee, J-H.

    1995-01-01

    Creep, drying, shrinkage, modulus of elasticity and Poisson's ratio of concrete are influenced by a number of factors, such as mix type, member thickness, curing condition and loading cases. Particularly, creep and, shrinkage in concrete have yet to be studied due to its complicated time-dependent properties. Also they are not clearly differentiated quantitatively. In this paper, the concrete tests of creep, modulus of elasticity and Poisson's ratio were carried out at various ages of loading -7, 28, 90, 180 and 365 days in order to investigate and quantify its long-term properties. The test procedures and analysis of the test results were also described herein. The results of this study will make it possible to calculate effective prestressing forces considering time-dependent prestressing loss and evaluate the structural integrity of the prestressing system using the representative values derived from this property test. (author). 5 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  6. Probabilistic concept to describe the influence of rate of loading on strength of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihashi, H.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Any reliability assessment of concrete structures is dependent on realistic assumptions on strength distribution. By means of experimental test series the most appropriate distribution function cannot be determined. In this contribution a theoretical concept to describe variability of strength of concrete will be presented. This approach is based on the characteristic composite structure. The structure of concrete is composed of aggregates and a binding agent i.e. porous hardened cement paste. Under formal conditions there are already big pores and cracks in the matrix as well as in the interface before a specimen is loaded. All structural defects can be assumed to be statistically distributed all over the specimen. If a load is applied cracks start to grow form the most critical structural defects. For a realistic estimation of the reliability of a secondary containment under impact loading conditions the influence of rate of loading on mean value and variability of strength is of major interest. The presented theory predicts that the mean strength increases with a power law as the rate of loading increases, while the coefficient of variation remains constant. A number of test series have been carried out to verify the theoretical concept. Different types of mortar (model concrete) and concrete have been included in the test program. Within the range of accuracy experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions. It can be concluded that the variability of macroscopic properties of concrete can be linked with the distribution of structural defects. Strength of concrete is best represented by a Weibull-type distribution function. The influence of rate of loading on strength can be experessed by means of a general rate process. (orig.)

  7. Mechanical properties of concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) and ceramic waste as coarse aggregate replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Faisal Sheikh; Azmi, Nurul Bazilah; Sumandi, Khairul Azwa Syafiq Mohd; Mazenan, Puteri Natasya

    2017-10-01

    Many construction and development activities today consume large amounts of concrete. The amount of construction waste is also increasing because of the demolition process. Much of this waste can be recycled to produce new products and increase the sustainability of construction projects. As recyclable construction wastes, concrete and ceramic can replace the natural aggregate in concrete because of their hard and strong physical properties. This research used 25%, 35%, and 45% recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) and ceramic waste as coarse aggregate in producing concrete. Several tests, such as concrete cube compression and splitting tensile tests, were also performed to determine and compare the mechanical properties of the recycled concrete with those of the normal concrete that contains 100% natural aggregate. The concrete containing 35% RCA and 35% ceramic waste showed the best properties compared with the normal concrete.

  8. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-12-08

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete's compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength.

  9. Recycled aggregates in concrete production: engineering properties and environmental impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seddik Meddah Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycled concrete aggregate is considered as the most abundant and used secondary aggregate in concrete production, other types of solid waste are also being used in concrete for specific purposes and to achieve some desired properties. Recycled aggregates and particularly, recycled concrete aggregate substantially affect the properties and mix design of concrete both at fresh and hardened states since it is known by high porosity due to the adhered layer of old mortar on the aggregate which results in a high water absorption of the recycled secondary aggregate. This leads to lower density and strength, and other durability related properties. The use of most recycled aggregate in concrete structures is still limited to low strength and non-structural applications due to important drop in strength and durability performances generated. Embedding recycled aggregates in concrete is now a current practice in many countries to enhance sustainability of concrete industry and reduce its environmental impacts. The present paper discusses the various possible recycled aggregates used in concrete production, their effect on both fresh and hardened properties as well as durability performances. The economic and environmental impacts of partially or fully substituting natural aggregates by secondary recycled aggregates are also discussed.

  10. Estimating Durability of Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamov, A. A.; Shapovalov, E. L.; Gavrilov, V. B.

    2017-11-01

    In this article we propose to use the methods of fracture mechanics to evaluate concrete durability. To evaluate concrete crack resistance characteristics of concrete directly in the structure in order to implement the methods of fracture mechanics, we have developed special methods. Various experimental studies have been carried out to determine the crack resistance characteristics and the concrete modulus of elasticity during its operating. A comparison was carried out for the results obtained with the use of the proposed methods and those obtained with the standard methods for determining the concrete crack resistance characteristics.

  11. Improving the Bond Strength of Rice Husk Ash Concrete by Incorporating Polymer: A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Bangwar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an insight of how to improve the bond strength of cement in which concrete is replaced with rice husk ash. A concrete mix was prepared and was used in different types of mixes i.e. Control Mix, 10% cement substituted concrete with rice husk ash and polymer modified concrete by incorporation different dosages of polymer in the 10% cement substituted concrete. A bar of 12mm diameter, 300mm in length was placed in the center of the cylindrical specimens for pull out test. It was observed that the bond strength between concrete and steel decreases with the replacement of cement with ash, conversely the bond strength improves with the addition of polymer dosages.

  12. Behaviour of normal reinforced concrete columns exposed to different soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheed Laith

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete resistance to sulfate attack is one of the most important characteristics for maintaining the durability of concrete. In this study, the effect of the attack of sulfate salts on normal reinforced concrete column was investigated by burying these columns in two types of soils (sandy and clayey in two pits at a depth of 3 m in one of the agricultural areas in the holy city of Karbala, one containing sandy soil (SO3 = 10.609% and the other containing clayey soil with (SO3 = 2.61%. The tests were used (pure axial compression test of reinforced concrete columns, compressive strength test, and splitting tensile strength test, absorption, voids ratio and finally density. It`s found that the strength of RC columns decreasing by (12.51% for age (240 days, for columns buried in clayey soil, where the strength increased by (11.71% for the same period, for columns buried in sandy soils, with respect to the reference column.

  13. Dynamic Impact Analysis and Test of Concrete Overpack Segment Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ki Young; Jeon, Je Eon; Seo, Ki Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is used mainly in US. The concrete overpack of the cask provides radiation shielding as well as physical protection for inner canister against external mechanical shock. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by tornado or aircraft crash, it should sustain minimal level of structural integrity so that the radiation shielding and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Empirical formulas have been developed for the evaluation of concrete damage but those formulas can be used only for local damage evaluation and not for global damage evaluation. In this research, a series of numerical simulations and tests have been performed to evaluate the damage of two types of concrete overpack segment models under high speed missile impact. It is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this kind of analyses and finding the correct failure parameters may not be straightforward

  14. Use of blast-furnace slag in making durable concrete for waste management repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, R.F.; Beaudoin, J.J.; Philipose, K.E.

    1991-02-01

    Waste repositories for the belowground disposal of low-level radioactive waste rely greatly on the durability of concrete for their required 500-year service life. A research program is in progress based on laboratory testing of concretes containing either Type 1 cement or cements containing 65 and 75 percent of blast-furnace slag, each at 4 water-cement ratios. It has been established that the degradation of the concrete will depend on the rate of ingress of corrosive agents - chlorides, sulphate ions and CO 2 . The ionic profiles and the kinetics of diffusion of these ions in the concretes have been measured by Secondary Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) techniques, and the results plotted according to a mathematical model. Predictions for service life of the concrete have been made from this model. These predictions have been correlated with properties of the concrete obtained from micro-structural, thermochemical and permeability measurements. The improvements in concrete durability due to blast-furnace slag additions are illustrated and discussed

  15. Use of blast-furnace slag in making durable concrete for waste management repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, R. F.; Beaudoin, J. J. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Philipose, K. E.

    1991-02-15

    Waste repositories for the belowground disposal of low-level radioactive waste rely greatly on the durability of concrete for their required 500-year service life. A research program is in progress based on laboratory testing of concretes containing either Type 1 cement or cements containing 65 and 75 percent of blast-furnace slag, each at 4 water-cement ratios. It has been established that the degradation of the concrete will depend on the rate of ingress of corrosive agents - chlorides, sulphate ions and CO{sub 2}. The ionic profiles and the kinetics of diffusion of these ions in the concretes have been measured by Secondary Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) techniques, and the results plotted according to a mathematical model. Predictions for service life of the concrete have been made from this model. These predictions have been correlated with properties of the concrete obtained from micro-structural, thermochemical and permeability measurements. The improvements in concrete durability due to blast-furnace slag additions are illustrated and discussed.

  16. Activation of the concrete in the bio shield of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.

    2005-02-01

    Calculations of neutron spectra in different parts of the tokamak building of ITER are performed. A computational geometry model of the tokamak building is prepared using MCNP-4C. The model includes adequate material composition and geometry description of the main parts of the tokamak for PPCS plant model A: toroidal field coils, vacuum vessel, shield, blanket structure, first wall, divertor, 14.1 MeV neutron source. The design and the dimensions of the bio shield are taken from the current ITER design. MCNP calculations of the neutron spectra in the bio shield (concrete) of ITER are performed, using the neutron spectra in TF coils calculated at UKAEA as external neutron source. The neutron spectra in the concrete calculated by MCNP are used as input data in the code EASY99 for estimations of the activation of the concrete in the bio shield around the tokamak. The time evolutions of the maximum (in the bio shield floor) and minimum (in the bio shield side walls) specific activity (Bq/kg) and dose rate (Sv/h.) of the main dominant nuclides in the concrete are evaluated and compared for 3 different concrete types, used as biological shield in the PWR and BR3 reactors. (author)

  17. Placement of mass concrete for cast-in-place concrete piling : the effects of heat of hydration of mass concrete for cast-in-place piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    This report describes models, ABAQUS and Schmidt, to predict the peak temperature in the center of cast-in-place concrete piling. Five concrete piles with varying diameters and made up of concrete mixes with different percentage of fly ash are used. ...

  18. Promoting the use of crumb rubber concrete in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batayneh, Malek K; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2008-11-01

    The use of accumulated waste materials in third world countries is still in its early phases. It will take courage for contractors and others in the construction industry to recycle selected types of waste materials in the concrete mixes. This paper addresses the recycling of rubber tires accumulated every year in Jordan to be used in concrete mixes. The main objectives of this research were to provide more scientific evidence to support the use of legislation or incentive-based schemes to promote the reuse of accumulated waste tires. This research focused on using crumb tires as a replacement for a percentage of the local fine aggregates used in the concrete mixes in Jordan. Different concrete specimens were prepared and tested in terms of uniaxial compression and splitting tension. The main variable in the mixture was the volumetric percentage of crumb tires used in the mix. The test results showed that even though the compressive strength is reduced when using the crumb tires, it can meet the strength requirements of light weight concrete. In addition, test results and observations indicated that the addition of crumb rubber to the mix has a limited effect toward reducing the workability of the mixtures. The mechanical test results demonstrated that the tested specimens of the crumb rubber concrete remained relatively intact after failure compared to the conventional concrete specimens. It is also concluded that modified concrete would contribute to the disposal of the non-decaying scrap tires, since the amount being accumulated in third world countries is creating a challenge for proper disposal. Thus, obliging authorities to invest in facilitating the use of waste tires in concrete, a fundamental material to the booming construction industry in theses countries, serves two purposes.

  19. Retrofitting of Reinforced Concrete Beams using Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, S.; Sundaravadivelu, Karthik

    2017-07-01

    Strengthening of existing damaged structures is one of the leading studies in civil engineering. The purpose of retrofitting is to structurally treat the member with an aim to restore the structure to its original strength. The focus of this project is to study the behaviour of damaged Reinforced Concrete beam retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC) Overlay. Reinforced concrete beams of length 1200 mm, width 100 mm and depth 200 mm were casted with M30 grade of concrete in the laboratory and cured for 28 days. One beam is taken as control and are tested under two point loading to find out ultimate load. Remaining beams are subjected to 90 % ultimate load of control beams. The partially damaged beams are retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete Overlay at the full tension face of the beam and side overlay depends upon the respectable retrofitting techniques with 10 mm and 20 mm thick layer to find optimum. Materials like steel fibres are added to enhance the ductility by eliminating coarse particle for homogeneity of the structure. Finally, the modes of failure for retrofitted beams are analysed experimentally under two point loading & compared the results with Control beam.

  20. Surface treatment systems for concrete in marine environment: Effect of concrete cover thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique Farias de Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract There are some ways to extend the service life of a reinforced concrete structure. This paper focuses on the extension of the service life by treating the surface of reinforced concrete, specifically on the effect of the concrete cover thickness on the surface treatment system efficacy. Thus, chloride migration tests were performed and diffusion chloride coefficients were calculated. The service life of each case (treated or non-treated concrete was estimated using these data and Fick's second law of diffusion. Results indicated that the thicker the concrete cover is, the greater the efficacy of the concrete surface treatment system will be. The dissemination of this information is important, since it is almost intuitive to think that the effect of a surface treatment system depends only on itself and this study shows the opposite.

  1. Structural behavior of lightweight bamboo reinforced concrete slab with EPS infill panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Ari; Wijatmiko, Indradi; Nainggolan, Christin Remayanti

    2017-09-01

    Eco-friendly, green, and natural materials have become increasingly important issues in supporting sustainable development, for the substitution of nonrenewable materials such as steel. Bamboo has been considered in many studies to replace steel in reinforced concrete elements. Further investigation has been carried out to obtain lightweight and eco-friendly reinforced concrete slabs by using bamboo bars as reinforcement and recycled materials such as EPS (expanded polystyrene) as infill panel. The flexural loading test on full scale one-way slabs test has been conducted. The results showed that the flexural strength of specimens decreased marginally of about 6% but with the weight advantage of 27% less compared with those of steel rebar reinforced concrete slab with the same dimension. Two type shear-connectors comprising of concrete and bamboo studs were also investigated which showed that the bamboo stud provided better ductility compared to that of slab with concrete as shear connector. Overall, the reinforced concrete slab with bamboo reinforcement and EPS infill panel showed reasonably good performance compared to slabs with steel rebar.

  2. Testing of plain and fibrous concrete single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) models were fabricated and tested to failure to demonstrate the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of models cast from high-strength concretes. Concretes with design compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa (10,000 psi) were developed for this investigation. One model was cast from plain concrete and failed in shear at the head region. The second model was cast from fiber reinforced concrete and failed by rupturing the circumferential prestressing at the sidewall of the structure. The tests also demonstrated the capabilities of the liner system to maintain a leak-tight pressure boundary. 3 refs., 4 figs

  3. Flexural strengthening of reinforced lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete beams with near-surface mounted GFRP bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.C.; Balendran, R.V.; Nadeem, A.; Leung, H.Y. [City University of Hong Kong (China). Department of Building and Construction

    2006-10-15

    Application of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is emerging as a promising technology for increasing flexural and shear strength of deficient reinforced concrete (RC) members. In order for this technique to perform effectively, the structural behaviour of RC elements strengthened with NSM FRP bars needs to be fully characterized. This paper focuses on the characterization of flexural behaviour of RC members strengthened with NSM glass-FRP bars. Totally, 10 beams were tested using symmetrical two-point loads test. The parameters examined under the beam tests were type of concretes (lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete and normal concrete), type of reinforcing bars (GFRP and steel), and type of adhesives. Flexural performance of the tested beams including modes of failure, moment-deflection response and ultimate moment capacity are presented and discussed in this paper. Results of this investigation showed that beams with NSM GFRP bars showed a reduction in ultimate deflection and an improvement in flexural stiffness and bending capacity, depending on the PA content of the beams. In general, beams strengthened with NSM GFRP bars overall showed a significant increase in ultimate moment ranging from 23% to 53% over the corresponding beams without NSM GFRP bars. The influence of epoxy type was found conspicuously dominated the moment-deflection response up to the peak moment. Besides, the ultimate moment of concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars could be predicted satisfactorily using the equation provided in ACI 318-95 Building Code. (author)

  4. Steel-concrete bond model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Chetra

    2015-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structure behavior can be extremely complex in the case of exceeding the cracking threshold. The composite characteristics of reinforced concrete structure should be finely presented especially in the distribution stress zone between steel-concrete at their interface. In order to compute the industrial structures, a perfect relation hypothesis between steel and concrete is supposed in which the complex phenomenon of the two-material relation is not taken into account. On the other hand, this perfect relation is unable to predict the significant disorders, the repartition, and the distribution of the cracks, which is directly linked to the steel. In literature, several numerical methods are proposed in order to finely study the concrete-steel bond behavior, but these methods give many difficulties in computing complex structures in 3D. With the results obtained in the thesis framework of Torre-Casanova (2012), the new concrete-steel bond model has been developed to improve performances (iteration numbers and computational time) and the representation (cyclic behavior) of the initial one. The new model has been verified with analytical solution of steel-concrete tie and validated with the experimental results. The new model is equally tested with the structural scale to compute the shear wall behavior in the French national project (CEOS.fr) under monotonic load. Because of the numerical difficulty in post-processing the crack opening in the complex crack formation, a new crack opening method is also developed. This method consists of using the discontinuity of relative displacement to detect the crack position or using the slip sign change between concrete-steel. The simulation-experiment comparison gives validation of not only the new concrete-steel bond model but also the new crack post-processing method. Finally, the cyclic behavior of the bond law with the non-reduced envelope is adopted and integrated in the new bond model in order to take

  5. Crack growth and fracture in fiber reinforced concrete beams under static and fatigue loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanfreau, J.; Arockiasamy, M.; Reddy, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a two-phase experimental investigation on the fatigue and fracture of six different types of concrete: plain, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% steel fibers and 0.5% kevlar fibers. In the first phase the J-integral was evaluated for different types of concrete from load-displacement curves. The value shows a marked increase in the energy required to fracture concrete when fibers are added. The values did not vary substantially for different notch depths. In the second phase concrete beams were subjected to fatigue by applying a pure bending on the notch. The effect of fiber addition was examined with emphasis on the crack propagation and the increase in the fatigue strength. The crack pattern was mainly influenced by the presence, amount, and the distribution of the fibers in the concrete. (orig./HP)

  6. SHAPE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONCRETE AGGREGATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As a composite material, the performance of concrete materials can be expected to depend on the properties of the interfaces between its two major components, aggregate and cement paste. The microstructure at the interfacial transition zone (ITZ is assumed to be different from the bulk material. In general, properties of conventional concrete have been found favoured by optimum packing density of the aggregate. Particle size is a common denominator in such studies. Size segregation in the ITZ among the binder particles in the fresh state, observed in simulation studies by concurrent algorithm-based SPACE system, additionally governs density as well as physical bonding capacity inside these shell-like zones around aggregate particles. These characteristics have been demonstrated qualitatively pertaining also after maturation of the concrete. Such properties of the ITZs have direct impact on composite properties. Despite experimental approaches revealed effects of aggregate grain shape on different features of material structure (among which density, and as a consequence on mechanical properties, it is still an underrated factor in laboratory studies, probably due to the general feeling that a suitable methodology for shape characterization is not available. A scientific argument hindering progress is the interconnected nature of size and shape. Presently, a practical problem preventing shape effects to be emphasized is the limitation of most computer simulation systems in concrete technology to spherical particles. New developments at Delft University of Technology will make it possible in the near future to generate jammed states, or other high-density fresh particle mixtures of non-spherical particles, which thereupon can be subjected to hydration algorithms. This paper will sketch the outlines of a methodological approach for shape assessment of loose (non-embedded aggregate grains, and demonstrate its use for two types of aggregate, allowing

  7. Evaluation of mechanical properties of construction joint between new and old concrete under combined tensile and shear stresses; Shinkyu concrete no uchitsugime no incho sendan oryokuka no kyodo tokusei no hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujiike, I. [Ehime University, Ehime (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yoshida, N. [Shikoku Railway Company, Kagawa (Japan); Morishita, S. [Oriental Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-01-15

    The objective of this study is to examine the mechanical properties of construction joints between existing and newly placed concrete under combined tensile and shear stresses. Loading tests are conducted by using push off type specimens. The joint surface of existing concrete is roughened by shot blast and a half of the specimen is reconstructed by new concrete using ultra rapid hardening cement. The insufficient treatment of joint surface of the old concrete causes the lowering of tensile rigidity, while shearing rigidity is almost the same as that of the other specimen. The shearing and tensile rigidities of non jointed concrete and concrete shot blasted properly are not dependent on the combination of shearing and tensile forces. For the jointed concrete shot blasted insufficiently, the shearing rigidity decreases with the increase of tensile force and the tensile digidity also becomes lower by the action of shearing force. Both the tensile strength and shearing strength of jointed concrete become small compared to those of non jointed concrete. The ratio of reduction in tensile strength is larger than that in shearing strength. The strength of jointed concrete under combined tensile and shear stresses can be evaluated by Mohr`s failure envelope expressed by parabola tangent to both tensile strength circle and compressive strength circle. 7 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  9. Moisture Transfer in Concrete: Numerical Determination of the Capillary Conductivity Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo Elie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We numerically investigated moisture transfer in buildings made of concrete. We considered three types of concrete: normal concrete, pumice concrete and cellular concrete. We present the results of a 1-D liquid water flow in such materials. We evaluated the moisture distribution in building materials using the Runge-Kutta fourth-and-fifth-order method. The DOPRI5 code was used as an integrator. The model calculated the resulting moisture content and other moisture-dependent physical parameters. The moisture curves were plotted. The dampness data obtained was utilized for the numerical computation of the coefficient of the capillary conductivity of moisture. Different profiles of this coefficient are represented. Calculations were performed for four different values of the outdoor temperature: -5°C, 0°C, 5°C and 10°C. We determined that the curves corresponding to small time intervals of wetting are associated with great amplitudes of the capillary conductivity . The amplitudes of the coefficient of the capillary conductivity decrease as the time interval increases. High outdoor temperatures induce high amplitudes of the coefficient of the capillary conductivity.

  10. The construction features of the deformation and force model of concrete and reinforced concrete resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romashko Vasyl

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of the deformation and force model of deformation of reinforced concrete elements and structures based on generalized diagrams of their state are considered in the article. Particular attention is focused on the basic methodological problems and shortcomings of modern "deformation" models. It is shown that in the most cases these problems can be solved by the generalized diagrams of reinforced concrete elements and structures real state. Thanks to these diagrams, the developed method: provides a single methodological approach to the calculation of reinforced concrete elements and structures normal sections for limit states; allows to reveal the internal static indeterminacy of heterogeneously deformable elements and structures in their ultimate limit state calculation; justifies the application of the basic and derived criteria of reinforced concrete elements and structures bearing capacity exhaustion; retains the essence of the physical processes of concrete and reinforced concrete structures deformation. The defining positions of the generalized (universal methodology for calculating reinforced concrete elements and structures are stated.

  11. 77 FR 54652 - Draft Program Comment for Common Post-1945 Concrete and Steel Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... constructed by State transportation agencies after 1945, using reinforced concrete or steel beams and designs... proposed Program Comment: Program Comment for Common Post-1945 Concrete and Steel Bridges I. Introduction... reinforced concrete or steel beams and designs that quickly became standardized. These common bridge types...

  12. Automatic dam concrete placing system; Dam concrete dasetsu sagyo no jidoka system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Y; Hori, Y; Nakayama, T; Yoshihara, K; Hironaka, T [Okumura Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-11-15

    An automatic concrete placing system was developed for concrete dam construction. This system consists of the following five subsystems: a wireless data transmission system, an automatic dam concrete mixing system, a consistency determination system, an automatic dam concrete loading and transporting system, and a remote concrete bucket opening and closing system. The system includes the following features: mixing amount by mixing ratio and mixing intervals can be instructed from a concrete placing site by using a wireless handy terminal; concrete is mixed automatically in a batcher plant; a transfer car is started, and concrete is charged into a bucket automatically; the mixed concrete is determined of its properties automatically; labor cost can be reduced, the work efficiency improved, and the safety enhanced; and the system introduction has resulted in unattended operation from the aggregate draw-out to a bunker line, manpower saving of five persons, and reduction in cycle time by 10%. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Effect of Different Concrete Grade on Radiation Linear Attenuation Coefficient (μ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor Azreen Masenwat; Mohammad Shahrizan Samsu; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Suhairy Sani; Ismail Mustapha; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    In calculating the quantity of absorption of radiation and its relationship with the thickness of a material, linear attenuation coefficient (μ) of the material is one of the parameters to be taken into account. For normal concrete, the (μ) varies depending on the type of radiation used, 0.105 cm -1 for Co-60 and 0.123 cm -1 for Cs-137. Value (μ) is used in the calculation of the radiation absorption for concrete material does not take into account factors such concrete grades. In this research, concrete with different grades (Grade 15, Grade 20, Grade 25, Grade 30, Grade 35, Grade 40) are designed and manufactured with reference to the mixing method described in British Standard. Then, the linear attenuation (μ) for each grade are measured using the radiation from the source Co-60 and Cs-137 sources. This paper describes and discusses the impact of differences in concrete grade of linear attenuation (μ) for Co-60 source/ source Cs-137 and its relationship with the compressive strength. (author)

  14. Influence of bagasse ash and recycled concrete aggregate on hardened properties of high-strength concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rattanachu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to use of bagasse ash as a cement replacement in high-strength recycled aggregate concrete (HS-RAC. Crushed limestone was replaced with 100% recycled concrete aggregate (RCA and the ground bagasse ash (GBA was used to partially replace ordinary Portland cement (OPC at 20, 35 and 50%wt of binder to cast HS-RAC. The results indicated that the replacing of crushed limestone with RCA had a negative impact on the properties of the concrete. Increasing the amount of GBA in HS-RAC resulted in a decrease in density and an increase in the volume of permeable pore space. The concrete mixtures prepared with 20%wt GBA replacement of OPC promoted greater the compressive strength than the conventional concrete (CT concrete at 90 days or more. HS-RAC with GBA (up to 50% was more durable in terms of chloride ion penetration resistance, although it had lower compressive strength than the CT concrete.

  15. Smart aggregates: multi-functional sensors for concrete structures—a tutorial and a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Gangbing; Gu Haichang; Mo Yilung

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' recent pioneering research work in piezoceramic-based smart aggregates and their innovative applications in concrete civil structures. The basic operating principle of smart aggregates is first introduced. The proposed smart aggregate is formed by embedding a waterproof piezoelectric patch with lead wires into a small concrete block. The proposed smart aggregates are multi-functional and can perform three major tasks: early-age concrete strength monitoring, impact detection and structural health monitoring. The proposed smart aggregates are embedded into the desired location before the casting of the concrete structure. The concrete strength development is monitored by observing the high frequency harmonic wave response of the smart aggregate. Impact on the concrete structure is detected by observing the open-circuit voltage of the piezoceramic patch in the smart aggregate. For structural health monitoring purposes, a smart aggregate-based active sensing system is designed for the concrete structure. Wavelet packet analysis is used as a signal-processing tool to analyze the sensor signal. A damage index based on the wavelet packet analysis is used to determine the structural health status. To better describe the time-history and location information of damage, two types of damage index matrices are proposed: a sensor-history damage index matrix and an actuator–sensor damage index matrix. To demonstrate the multi-functionality of the proposed smart aggregates, different types of concrete structures have been used as test objects, including concrete bridge bent-caps, concrete cylinders and a concrete frame. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness and the multi-functionality of the proposed smart aggregates. The multi-functional smart aggregates have the potential to be applied to the comprehensive monitoring of concrete structures from their earliest stages and throughout their lifetime. (topical review)

  16. Evaluation of Impact Resistance of Concrete Overpack of Storage Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The concrete overpack of the cask provides radiation shielding as well as physical protection for inner canister against external mechanical shock. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by tornado or aircraft crash, it should sustain minimal level of structural integrity so that the radiation shielding and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Empirical formulas have been developed for the evaluation of concrete damage but those formulas can be used only for local damage evaluation and not for global damage evaluation. In this research, a series of numerical simulations and tests have been performed to evaluate the damage of two types of concrete overpack segment models under high speed missile impact. It is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this kind of analyses and finding the correct failure parameters may not be straightforward. When comparing the simulation results with the test results, it is shown that neither setting, case 1 and 2 provides results with consistent agreement with test results. That is, case 1 setting is more close to reality in Type 1 model analysis, but for Type 2, case 2 setting provides more close results to the reality. In both the case, not enough deformation is predicted by simulation compared to the tests. Weak failure and eroding criteria give larger penetration depth with insufficient overall damage due to energy loss with element erosion.

  17. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, Jens Peder

    Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high-strength......Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high......-strength concrete. Chapter 2 A description of the factors which influence the strength and cracking of concrete and high strength concrete is made. Then basic linear fracture mechanics is outlined followed by a description and evaluation of the models used to describe concrete fracture in tension. The chapter ends...... and the goveming equations are explicit and simple. These properties of the model make it a very powerful tool, which is applicable for the designing engineer. The method is also extended to reinforced concrete, where the results look very promising. The large experimental investigation on high-strength concrete...

  18. The study on the mechanical characteristics of concrete of nuclear reactor containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, W. S.; Kwon, K. J.; Cho, M. S.; Song, Y. C.

    2000-01-01

    Reactor containment structure of nuclear power plant designed by prestressed concrete causes time-dependent prestress loss due to the mechanical characteristics of concrete. Prestress loss strongly affects to the safety factor of structure under the circumstances of designing, construction and inspection. Thus, this study is to investigate the mechanical characteristics of reactor containment concrete structure of Yonggwang No. 5 and 6. In this study, the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, poisson's ratio and creep test followed by ASTM code are performed to investigate the mechanical characteristics of concrete made by V type cement. Additionally, since creep causes more time-dependent prestress loss than the other, the measurement value from the creep test is compared with the results from the creep prediction equations by KSCE, JSCE, Hansen, ACI and CEB-FIP model for the effective application. Hereafter, the results of this study may enable to assist the calculation effective stress considering time-dependent prestress loss of the prestressed concrete structures

  19. Combined Non-destructive Testing (NDT) methods for evaluating concrete quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Suhairy Sani; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    This paper described the results of combining Non-destructive measurements on concrete. Local crushed granite and hematite were used as coarse aggregates; mining sand and river sand were used as fine aggregates to produce various density and strength of concrete. Concrete samples (150 mm cubes and interlocked blocks) were prepared by changing mix ratio, water to cement ratio (w/c) and types of aggregates. Density, rebound number(N) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of the samples were taken before compressed to failure. The measurement results are explained and discussed. (author)

  20. The Effect of Adding Different Types of Natural Fibers on Mechanical Properties and Impact Resistance of Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Sarmed Fadhil; Mohanad Yaseen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of natural fibers: sisal and palm fibers on the different properties of concrete have been investigated through a number of tests. The properties investigated include compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting tensile strength and impact resistance of concrete. Sisal fiber has been used at three percentages of total mixture volume (0.6, 1.20 and 1.8%, respectively), while the palm fiber has been added in (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5%, respectiv...

  1. Alkali aggregate reactivity in concrete structures in western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, D.R.; Empey, D.

    1989-01-01

    In several regions of Canada, particularly parts of Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime Provinces, research, testing and evaluation of aged concrete structures in the field has shown that alkali aggregate reactivity can give rise to pronounced concrete deterioration, particularly in hydraulic structures subjected to saturation or alternate wetting and drying such as locks, dams, canals, etc. Concrete deterioration is mainly caused by alkali-silica reactions and alkali-carbonate reactions, but a third type of deterioration involves slow/late expanding alkali-silicate/silica reactivity. The alkalies NaOH and KOH in the concrete pore solutions are mainly responsible for attack on expansive rocks and minerals in concrete. Methods for evaluating alkali-aggregate reaction potential in aggregates, and field and laboratory methods for detecting deterioration are discussed. Examples of alkali-aggregate reactions in structures is western Canada are detailed, including a water reservoir at Canadian Forces Base Chilliwack in British Columbia, the Oldman River diversion and flume, the Lundbreck Falls Bridge, and the St Mary's Reservoir spillway, all in southern Alberta. Mitigative measures include avoidance of use of suspect aggregates, but if this cannot be avoided it is recommended to keep the total alkalies in the concrete as low as possible and minimize opportunities for saturation of concrete by moisture. 16 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  2. Radiation shielding and effective atomic number studies in different types of shielding concretes, lead base and non-lead base glass systems for total electron interaction: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiation shielding calculations for concretes and glass systems. • Assigning effective atomic number for the given materials for total electron interaction. • Glass systems generally have better shielding ability than concretes. - Abstract: Concrete has been widely used as a radiation shielding material due to its extremely low cost. On the other hand, glass systems, which make everything inside visible to observers, are considered as promising shielding materials as well. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers, Z eff of some concretes and glass systems (industrial waste containing glass, Pb base glass and non-Pb base glass) have been calculated for total electron interaction in the energy region of 10 keV–1 GeV. Also, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) ranges for the given materials have been calculated in the wide energy region to show the shielding effectiveness of the given materials. The glass systems are not only compared to different types of concretes but also compared to the lead base glass systems in terms of shielding. Moreover, the obtained results for total electron interaction have been compared to the results for total photon interaction wherever possible. In general, it has been observed that the glass systems have superior properties than most of the concretes over the high-energy region with respect to the electron interaction. Also, glass systems without lead show better electron stopping than lead base glasses at some energy regions as well. Along with the photon attenuation capability, it is seen that Fly Ash base glass systems have not only greater electron stopping capability but also have greater photon attenuation especially in high energy region when compared with standard shielding concretes

  3. Radiation shielding and effective atomic number studies in different types of shielding concretes, lead base and non-lead base glass systems for total electron interaction: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.com

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Radiation shielding calculations for concretes and glass systems. • Assigning effective atomic number for the given materials for total electron interaction. • Glass systems generally have better shielding ability than concretes. - Abstract: Concrete has been widely used as a radiation shielding material due to its extremely low cost. On the other hand, glass systems, which make everything inside visible to observers, are considered as promising shielding materials as well. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers, Z{sub eff} of some concretes and glass systems (industrial waste containing glass, Pb base glass and non-Pb base glass) have been calculated for total electron interaction in the energy region of 10 keV–1 GeV. Also, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) ranges for the given materials have been calculated in the wide energy region to show the shielding effectiveness of the given materials. The glass systems are not only compared to different types of concretes but also compared to the lead base glass systems in terms of shielding. Moreover, the obtained results for total electron interaction have been compared to the results for total photon interaction wherever possible. In general, it has been observed that the glass systems have superior properties than most of the concretes over the high-energy region with respect to the electron interaction. Also, glass systems without lead show better electron stopping than lead base glasses at some energy regions as well. Along with the photon attenuation capability, it is seen that Fly Ash base glass systems have not only greater electron stopping capability but also have greater photon attenuation especially in high energy region when compared with standard shielding concretes.

  4. Isolation and identification of bacteria to improve the strength of concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnapriya, S; Venkatesh Babu, D L; G, Prince Arulraj

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this research work is to isolate and identify calcite precipitating bacteria and to check the suitability of these bacteria for use in concrete to improve its strength. Bacteria to be incorporated in concrete should be alkali resistant to endure the high pH of concrete and endospore forming to withstand the mechanical stresses induced in concrete during mixing. They must exhibit high urease activity to precipitate calcium carbonate in the form of calcite. Bacterial strains were isolated from alkaline soil samples of a cement factory and were tested for urease activity, potential to form endospores and precipitation of calcium carbonate. Based on these results, three isolates were selected and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. They were identified as Bacillus megaterium BSKAU, Bacillus licheniformis BSKNAU and Bacillus flexus BSKNAU. The results were compared with B. megaterium MTCC 1684 obtained from Microbial Type Culture Collection and Gene Bank, Chandigarh, India. Experimental work was carried out to assess the influence of bacteria on the compressive strength and tests revealed that bacterial concrete specimens showed enhancement in compressive strength. The efficiency of bacteria toward crack healing was also tested. Substantial increase in strength and complete healing of cracks was observed in concrete specimens cast with B. megaterium BSKAU, B. licheniformis BSKNAU and B. megaterium MTCC 1684. This indicates the suitability of these bacterial strains for use in concrete. The enhancement of strength and healing of cracks can be attributed to the filling of cracks in concrete by calcite which was visualized by scanning electron microscope. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of loading on the corrosion of steel in cracked ordinary Portland cement and high performance concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Shahzma Jafferali

    Most studies that have examined chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete have focused on sound concrete. However, reinforced concrete is seldom uncracked and very few studies have investigated the influence of cracked concrete on rebar corrosion. Furthermore, the studies that have examined the relationship between cracks and corrosion have focused on unloaded or statically loaded cracks. However, in practice, reinforced concrete structures (e.g. bridges) are often dynamically loaded. Hence, the cracks in such structures open and close which could influence the corrosion of the reinforcing steel. Consequently, the objectives of this project were (i) to examine the effect of different types of loading on the corrosion of reinforcing steel, (ii) the influence of concrete mixture design on the corrosion behaviour and (iii) to provide data that can be used in service-life modelling of cracked reinforced concretes. In this project, cracked reinforced concrete beams made with ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPCC) and high performance concrete (HPC) were subjected to no load, static loading and dynamic loading. They were immersed in salt solution to just above the crack level at their mid-point for two weeks out of every four (wet cycle) and, for the remaining two weeks, were left in ambient laboratory conditions to dry (dry cycle). The wet cycle led to three conditions of exposure for each beam: (i) the non-submerged region, (ii) the sound, submerged region and (iii) the cracked mid-section, which was also immersed in the solution. Linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse techniques were used to monitor the corrosion in the three regions. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical current noise and concrete electrical resistance measurements were also performed. These measurements illustrated that (i) rebar corroded faster at cracks than in sound concrete, (ii) HPC was more protective towards the rebar than OPCC even at cracks and (iii) there

  6. Design of the First Italian Roundabout with Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Mascio

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of the overall design of the first Italian roundabout with jointed plain concrete pavement. The examined case study complies with current international standards and practices for geometry of roundabouts and road pavements. The construction of a concrete pavement in an urban roundabout will better manage and slow down fast vehicular flows, and increase traffic fluidity in an important junction, trafficked by heavy vehicles, where maintenance works should be reduced to avoid queues. The design of the roundabout involved several competences for: defining the geometry of the four-arm junction, designing the thickness of the jointed plain concrete pavement both on the circular crown and the arms, studying the mix design of a high resistance concrete. As regard to the pavement, the result of the study was an un-dowelled concrete pavement composed of square slabs laid on a cement concrete subbase and a granular layer. The shape of the slabs has been designed to optimize the structural performance of their material, which is a high strength concrete mix derived from an extensive laboratory test work. In general, the results summarized approaches typical of different design conditions: urban ones for traffic flow and safety needs; high-traffic ones for the chosen pavement type; airport ones for the absence of dowel and tie bars at the joints. Indeed, the article has highlighted that the design process of a concrete roundabout requires multiple analyses to consider various features and correctly re-design an existing urban junction. Its geometrical design, the structural design of the concrete pavement and the theoretical and experimental design of the concrete mix were the main phases of this process and they needed different competences to conduct comprehensive and appropriate analyses.

  7. A study of the long-term properties of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y-C; Lee, D-S; Cho, M-S [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J-H [Korea Inst. of Construction Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Creep, drying, shrinkage, modulus of elasticity and Poisson`s ratio of concrete are influenced by a number of factors, such as mix type, member thickness, curing condition and loading cases. Particularly, creep and, shrinkage in concrete have yet to be studied due to its complicated time-dependent properties. Also they are not clearly differentiated quantitatively. In this paper, the concrete tests of creep, modulus of elasticity and Poisson`s ratio were carried out at various ages of loading -7, 28, 90, 180 and 365 days in order to investigate and quantify its long-term properties. The test procedures and analysis of the test results were also described herein. The results of this study will make it possible to calculate effective prestressing forces considering time-dependent prestressing loss and evaluate the structural integrity of the prestressing system using the representative values derived from this property test. (author). 5 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  8. Physico-mechanical properties of high performance concrete using different aggregates in presence of silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah A. Abo-El-Enein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy weight high performance concrete (HPC can be used when particular properties, such as high strength and good radiation shielding are required. Such concrete, using ilmenite and hematite coarse aggregates can significantly have higher specific gravities than those of concrete made with dolomite and air-cooled slag aggregates. Four different concrete mixes with the same cement content and different w/c ratios were designed using normal dolomite aggregate, air-cooled slag by-product and two different types of iron ore aggregates. High performance concrete (grade-M60 can be achieved using superplasticizer to reduce the water/cement ratio; the effect of SF on the performance of concrete was studied by addition of 10% silica fume to the total cement content. The physico-mechanical properties of coarse aggregates and hardened concrete were studied. The results show that, Ilmenite coarse aggregate gives higher physical and mechanical properties than the other aggregates. Also, addition of 10% silica fume developed a stronger and a denser interfacial transition zone (ITZ between concrete particles and the cement matrix. Crushed air-cooled slag can be used to produce a high-strength concrete with better mechanical properties than corresponding concrete made with crushed hematite and ilmenite. Heavy density concrete made with fine aggregates of ilmenite and air-cooled slag are expected to be suitable as shielding materials to attenuate gamma rays.

  9. Research on working property and early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete used in steel-concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongguang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-compacting concrete that has good working property is the prerequisite of steel-concrete structure. The early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete is the important parameter when design steel-concrete structure. Purpose: This paper attempts to research the working property and early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete. Methods: Test is used to research the working property and early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete. Results: Self-compacting concrete that could meet the requirement of steel-concrete structure has been mixed and parameters of early age mechanical property of self-compacting concrete which is necessary for design of steel-concrete structure have been presented. Conclusions: Base on the results, this paper can guide the construction of self-compacting concrete in steel-concrete structure and the design and construction of steel-concrete structure. (author)

  10. Probabilistic Fatigue Model for Reinforced Concrete Onshore Wind Turbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquez-Dominguez, Sergio; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2013-01-01

    Reinforced Concrete Slab Foundation (RCSF) is the most common onshore wind turbine foundation type installed by the wind industry around the world. Fatigue cracks in a RCSF are an important issue to be considered by the designers. Causes and consequences of the cracks due to fatigue damage in RCSFs...... are discussed in this paper. A probabilistic fatigue model for a RCSF is established which makes a rational treatment of the uncertainties involved in the complex interaction between fatigue cyclic loads and reinforced concrete. Design and limit state equations are established considering concrete shear...

  11. Finite element modelling of concrete beams reinforced with hybrid fiber reinforced bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smring, Santa binti; Salleh, Norhafizah; Hamid, NoorAzlina Abdul; Majid, Masni A.

    2017-11-01

    Concrete is a heterogeneous composite material made up of cement, sand, coarse aggregate and water mixed in a desired proportion to obtain the required strength. Plain concrete does not with stand tension as compared to compression. In order to compensate this drawback steel reinforcement are provided in concrete. Now a day, for improving the properties of concrete and also to take up tension combination of steel and glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars promises favourable strength, serviceability, and durability. To verify its promise and support design concrete structures with hybrid type of reinforcement, this study have investigated the load-deflection behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with hybrid GFRP and steel bars by using ATENA software. Fourteen beams, including six control beams reinforced with only steel or only GFRP bars, were analysed. The ratio and the ordinate of GFRP to steel were the main parameters investigated. The behaviour of these beams was investigated via the load-deflection characteristics, cracking behaviour and mode of failure. Hybrid GFRP-Steel reinforced concrete beam showed the improvement in both ultimate capacity and deflection concomitant to the steel reinforced concrete beam. On the other hand, finite element (FE) modelling which is ATENA were validated with previous experiment and promising the good result to be used for further analyses and development in the field of present study.

  12. The suitability of concrete using recycled aggregates (RAs) for high-performance concrete (HPC)

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Ding, Y.; Miraldo, Sérgio; Abdollahnejad, Zahra; Labrincha, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Most studies related to concrete made with recycled aggregates (RA) use uncontaminated aggregates produced in the laboratory, revealing the potential to re-use as much as 100%. However, industrially produced RA contain a certain level of impurities that can be deleterious for Portland cement concrete, thus making it difficult for the concrete industry to use such investigations unless uncontaminated RA are used. This chapter reviews current knowledge on concrete made with RA, with a focus on ...

  13. Durability of Self Compacting Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmarce, A.; Boudjehem, H.; Bendjhaiche, R.

    2011-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) seem to be a very promising materials for construction thanks to their properties in a fresh state. Studying of the influence of the parameters of specific designed mixes to their mechanical, physical and chemical characteristics in a state hardened is an important stage so that it can be useful for new-to-the-field researchers and designers (worldwide) beginning studies and work involving self compacting concrete. The objective of this research is to study the durability of self compacting concrete. The durability of concrete depends very much on the porosity; the latter determines the intensity of interactions with aggressive agents. The pores inside of concrete facilitate the process of damage, which began generally on the surface. We are interested to measure the porosity of concrete on five SCC with different compositions (w/c, additives) and vibrated concrete to highlight the influence of the latter on the porosity, thereafter on the compressive strength and the transfer properties (oxygen permeability, chloride ion diffusion, capillary absorption). (author)

  14. Models for estimation of service life of concrete barriers in low-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.C.; Plansky, L.E.; Smith, R.W.

    1990-09-01

    Concrete barriers will be used as intimate parts of systems for isolation of low level radioactive wastes subsequent to disposal. This work reviews mathematical models for estimating the degradation rate of concrete in typical service environments. The models considered cover sulfate attack, reinforcement corrosion, calcium hydroxide leaching, carbonation, freeze/thaw, and cracking. Additionally, fluid flow, mass transport, and geochemical properties of concrete are briefly reviewed. Example calculations included illustrate the types of predictions expected of the models. 79 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Models for estimation of service life of concrete barriers in low-level radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, J.C.; Plansky, L.E.; Smith, R.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Concrete barriers will be used as intimate parts of systems for isolation of low level radioactive wastes subsequent to disposal. This work reviews mathematical models for estimating the degradation rate of concrete in typical service environments. The models considered cover sulfate attack, reinforcement corrosion, calcium hydroxide leaching, carbonation, freeze/thaw, and cracking. Additionally, fluid flow, mass transport, and geochemical properties of concrete are briefly reviewed. Example calculations included illustrate the types of predictions expected of the models. 79 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete’s compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength. PMID:28788279

  17. Impact properties of geopolymeric concrete: a state-of-the-art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chi; Xie, Jianhe; Zhang, Bingxue; Yuan, Bing; Wang, Chonghao

    2018-01-01

    The application of geopolymer instead of cement in construction engineering provides an effective way to achieve sustainable development. A large number of studies have shown that geopolymeric concrete (GC) has excellent static performance. However, there are relatively few studies on the dynamic performance of GC which is of dominate importance in cases such as explosion, earthquake and other impact loads. This paper presents a brief review of recent research on the impact properties of GC, in order to facilitate the research development in this field. The effects of strain rate, fiber type, alkali type, elevated temperature, water environment and flow state on the impact resistance performance of GC were analysed. Research findings revealed that GC exhibited better impact properties than ordinary Portland concrete (OPC).

  18. A multifunctional design approach for sustainable concrete : with application to concrete mass products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hüsken, G.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis provides a multifunctional design approach for sustainable concrete, particularly earth-moist concrete (EMC), with application to concrete mass products. EMC is a concrete with low water content and stiff consistency that is used for the production of concrete mass products, such as

  19. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  20. Radiological impact of cement, concrete and admixtures in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinchon-Paya, S.; Piedecausa, B.; Hurtado, S.; Sanjuan, M.A.; Chinchon, S.

    2011-01-01

    I