WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-level random effects

  1. Memory Effects in the Two-Level Model for Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Allahverdyan, Armen; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2008-07-01

    We study an ensemble of two-level systems interacting with a thermal bath. This is a well-known model for glasses. The origin of memory effects in this model is a quasistationary but nonequilibrium state of a single two-level system, which is realized due to a finite-rate cooling and slow thermally activated relaxation. We show that single-particle memory effects, such as negativity of the specific heat under reheating, vanish for a sufficiently disordered ensemble. In contrast, a disordered ensemble displays a collective memory effect [similar to the Kovacs effect], where nonequilibrium features of the ensemble are monitored via a macroscopic observable. An experimental realization of the effect can be used to further assess the consistency of the model.

  2. Random model of two-level atoms interacting with electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kireev, A.N.; Meleshko, A.N.

    1983-12-01

    A phase transition has been studied in a random system of two-level atoms interacting with an electromagnetic field. It is shown that superradiation can arise when there is short-range order in a spin-subsystem. The existence of long-range order is irrelevant for this phase transition

  3. Two levels ARIMAX and regression models for forecasting time series data with calendar variation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartono, Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Prastyo, Dedy Dwi

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a calendar variation model for forecasting retail sales data with the Eid ul-Fitr effect. The proposed model is based on two methods, namely two levels ARIMAX and regression methods. Two levels ARIMAX and regression models are built by using ARIMAX for the first level and regression for the second level. Monthly men's jeans and women's trousers sales in a retail company for the period January 2002 to September 2009 are used as case study. In general, two levels of calendar variation model yields two models, namely the first model to reconstruct the sales pattern that already occurred, and the second model to forecast the effect of increasing sales due to Eid ul-Fitr that affected sales at the same and the previous months. The results show that the proposed two level calendar variation model based on ARIMAX and regression methods yields better forecast compared to the seasonal ARIMA model and Neural Networks.

  4. Two-Level Designs to Estimate All Main Effects and Two-Factor Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eendebak, P.T.; Schoen, E.D.

    2017-01-01

    We study the design of two-level experiments with N runs and n factors large enough to estimate the interaction model, which contains all the main effects and all the two-factor interactions. Yet, an effect hierarchy assumption suggests that main effect estimation should be given more prominence

  5. Effective Hamiltonians, two level systems, and generalized Maxwell-Bloch equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sczaniecki, L.

    1981-02-01

    A new method is proposed involving a canonical transformation leading to the non-secular part of time-independent perturbation calculus. The method is used to derive expressions for effective Shen-Walls Hamiltonians which, taken in the two-level approximation and on the inclusion of non-Hamiltonian terms into the dynamics of the system, lead to generalized Maxwell-Bloch equations. The rotating wave approximation is written anew within the framework of our formalism. (author)

  6. Statistical Analysis of the Figure of Merit of a Two-Level Thermoelectric System: A Random Matrix Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Abbout, Adel

    2016-08-05

    Using the tools of random matrix theory we develop a statistical analysis of the transport properties of thermoelectric low-dimensional systems made of two electron reservoirs set at different temperatures and chemical potentials, and connected through a low-density-of-states two-level quantum dot that acts as a conducting chaotic cavity. Our exact treatment of the chaotic behavior in such devices lies on the scattering matrix formalism and yields analytical expressions for the joint probability distribution functions of the Seebeck coefficient and the transmission profile, as well as the marginal distributions, at arbitrary Fermi energy. The scattering matrices belong to circular ensembles which we sample to numerically compute the transmission function, the Seebeck coefficient, and their relationship. The exact transport coefficients probability distributions are found to be highly non-Gaussian for small numbers of conduction modes, and the analytical and numerical results are in excellent agreement. The system performance is also studied, and we find that the optimum performance is obtained for half-transparent quantum dots; further, this optimum may be enhanced for systems with few conduction modes.

  7. Statistical Analysis of the Figure of Merit of a Two-Level Thermoelectric System: A Random Matrix Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Abbout, Adel; Ouerdane, Henni; Goupil, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Using the tools of random matrix theory we develop a statistical analysis of the transport properties of thermoelectric low-dimensional systems made of two electron reservoirs set at different temperatures and chemical potentials, and connected through a low-density-of-states two-level quantum dot that acts as a conducting chaotic cavity. Our exact treatment of the chaotic behavior in such devices lies on the scattering matrix formalism and yields analytical expressions for the joint probability distribution functions of the Seebeck coefficient and the transmission profile, as well as the marginal distributions, at arbitrary Fermi energy. The scattering matrices belong to circular ensembles which we sample to numerically compute the transmission function, the Seebeck coefficient, and their relationship. The exact transport coefficients probability distributions are found to be highly non-Gaussian for small numbers of conduction modes, and the analytical and numerical results are in excellent agreement. The system performance is also studied, and we find that the optimum performance is obtained for half-transparent quantum dots; further, this optimum may be enhanced for systems with few conduction modes.

  8. Dynamical Evolution of an Effective Two-Level System with {\\mathscr{P}}{\\mathscr{T}} Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Xu, Zhihao; Yin, Chuanhao; Guo, Liping

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of parity- and time-reversal (PT ) symmetric two-energy-level atoms in the presence of two optical and a radio-frequency (rf) fields. The strength and relative phase of fields can drive the system from unbroken to broken PT symmetric regions. Compared with the Hermitian model, Rabi-type oscillation is still observed, and the oscillation characteristics are also adjusted by the strength and relative phase in the region of unbroken PT symmetry. At exception point (EP), the oscillation breaks down. To better understand the underlying properties we study the effective Bloch dynamics and find the emergence of the z components of the fixed points is the feature of the PT symmetry breaking and the projections in x-y plane can be controlled with high flexibility compared with the standard two-level system with PT symmetry. It helps to study the dynamic behavior of the complex PT symmetric model.

  9. Optimization of Emulsifying Effectiveness of Phytosterol in Milk Using Two-Level Fractional Factorial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yunxia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper emulsifying effects of seven emulsifiers including Tween 80, Span 80, tripolyglycerol monostearate, sodium stearoyl lactylate, sucrose ester, soy lecithin and monoglyceride on phytosterol in milk were investigated using single factor test and fractional factorial design. The addition for seven emulsifiers were in the following concentrations: 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4%, 0.5% and 0.6%. The results revealed that tripolyglycerol monostearate, sucrose ester and monoglyceride had a significant emulsifying effect on phytosterol in milk, Tripolyglycerol monostearate showed a positive emulsifying effect on phytosterol in milk, while sucrose ester and monoglyceride exhibited a negative emulsifying effect on phytosterol in milk.

  10. Two-Level Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for a Sequence of Problems with Slowly Varying Random Coefficients [Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for Sequence of Problems with Slowly Varying Random Coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalchev, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ketelsen, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vassilevski, P. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-11-07

    Our paper proposes an adaptive strategy for reusing a previously constructed coarse space by algebraic multigrid to construct a two-level solver for a problem with nearby characteristics. Furthermore, a main target application is the solution of the linear problems that appear throughout a sequence of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of subsurface flow with uncertain permeability field. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method with extensive set of numerical experiments.

  11. Coherent effects on two-photon correlation and directional emission of two two-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2007-01-01

    Sub- and superradiant dynamics of spontaneously decaying atoms are manifestations of collective many-body systems. We study the internal dynamics and the radiation properties of two atoms in free space. Interesting results are obtained when the atoms are separated by less than half a wavelength of the atomic transition, where the dipole-dipole interaction gives rise to new coherent effects, such as (a) coherence between two intermediate collective states, (b) oscillations in the two-photon correlation G (2) , (c) emission of two photons by one atom, and (d) the loss of directional correlation. We compare the population dynamics during the two-photon emission process with the dynamics of single-photon emission in the cases of a Λ and a V scheme. We compute the temporal correlation and angular correlation of two successively emitted photons using the G (2) for different values of atomic separation. We find antibunching when the atomic separation is a quarter wavelength λ/4. Oscillations in the temporal correlation provide a useful feature for measuring subwavelength atomic separation. Strong directional correlation between two emitted photons is found for atomic separation larger than a wavelength. We also compare the directionality of a photon spontaneously emitted by the two atoms prepared in phased-symmetric and phased-antisymmetric entangled states vertical bar ±> k 0 =e ik 0 ·r 1 vertical bar a 1 ,b 2 >±e ik 0 ·r 2 vertical bar b 1 ,a 2 > by a laser pulse with wave vector k 0 . Photon emission is directionally suppressed along k 0 for the phased-antisymmetric state. The directionality ceases for interatomic distances less than λ/2

  12. Transverse magnetic field effect on the giant Goos–Hänchen shifts based on a degenerate two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasehi, R.

    2018-06-01

    We study the effect of the Goos–Hänchen (GH) shifts through a cavity with degenerate two-level systems in the line of . For this purpose, we focus on the transverse magnetic field (TMF) in a Floquet frame to obtain the giant GH shifts. Physically, the collisional effects of TMF lead to increasing the population trapping in the ground state. However, we demonstrate that the population trapping generates the large negative or positive GH shifts and simultaneously switches from superluminal to subluminal (or vice versa). Also, we investigate the other optical properties such as the longitudinal magnetic field (LMF), which plays an important role in the control of the GH shifts and leads to the generation of new subsystems. In the next step, we evaluate the GH shifts beyond the multi-photon resonance condition by the control of TMF. Moreover, we compute the appearance of negative and positive GH shifts by setting the width of the incident Gaussian beams in the presence of a multi-photon resonance condition. Our results show that superluminal or subluminal light propagation can be simultaneously controlled by adjusting the rates of the TMF and LMF. The significant effects of these factors on the degenerate two-level systems provide different applications such as slow light, optical switches and quantum information storage.

  13. Experimental study of magnetocaloric effect in the two-level quantum system KTm(MoO4)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, R.; Tkáč, V.; Orendáčová, A.; Orendáč, M.; Valenta, J.; Sechovský, V.; Feher, A.

    2018-05-01

    KTm(MoO4)2 belongs to the family of binary alkaline rare-earth molybdates. This compound can be considered to be an almost ideal quantum two-level system at low temperatures. Magnetocaloric properties of KTm(MoO4)2 single crystals were investigated using specific heat and magnetization measurement in the magnetic field applied along the easy axis. Large conventional magnetocaloric effect (-ΔSM ≈ 10.3 J/(kg K)) was observed in the magnetic field of 5 T in a relatively wide temperature interval. The isothermal magnetic entropy change of about 8 J/(kgK) has been achieved already for the magnetic field of 2 T. Temperature dependence of the isothermal entropy change under different magnetic fields is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a quantum two-level system with Δ ≈ 2.82 cm-1. Investigation of magnetocaloric properties of KTm(MoO4)2 suggests that the studied system can be considered as a good material for magnetic cooling at low temperatures.

  14. Effects of phase memory in spectroscopy of test field of two level system at small frequencies of collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomenko, A.I.; Shalagin, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    One studied theoretically spectrum of absorption (intensification) of a weak sounding field by two-level atoms moving in a strong resonance laser field and colliding with buffer gas atoms. The analysis was performed for the case of small frequencies of collisions in contrast to the Doppler width of absorption line (gas low pressure) with regard to the arbitrary variation of a radiation induced dipole moment phase at elastic collisions of gas particles. The effects of phase memory are found to result in very strong quantitative and qualitative transformation of a test field spectrum even in case of infrequent collisions when the well-known Dike mechanism of manifestation of phase memory effects (elimination of the Doppler widening due to limitation of spatial motion of particles by collisions) does not work. Strong influence of phase memory effects on spectral resonances at gas low pressure results from the fact that phase retaining collisions change dependence on velocity of the partial index of refraction n(v) (index of refraction for particles moving with v velocity) [ru

  15. Comparison of the effects of growth hormone on acylated ghrelin and following acute intermittent exercise in two levels of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Gholipour

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of obesity has risen enormously over the past few decad-es. Both food intake (Appetite and energy expenditure can influence body weight. Acylated ghrelin enhances appetite, and its plasma level is suppressed by growth horm-one. The present study, examines the effects of an intermittent exercise with progress-ive intensities on acylated ghrelin, appetite, and growth hormone in inactive male students with two levels of obesity.Methods: Eleven inactive males were allocated into two groups on the basis of their body mass index (BMI. Six subjects in group one, BMI= 31.18±0.92 kg/m2, and five subjects in group two, BMI= 36.94±2.25 kg/m2, ran on the treadmill with progressive intensities of 50, 60, 70 and 80% of VO2max for 10, 10, 5, and 2 min respectively. Blood samples were collected before the exercise (as the resting values, after each workload (during the exercise, and at 30, 60, and 120 min (during recovery.Results: Plasma acylated ghrelin concentrations and hunger ratings in two groups were decreased and remained significantly lower than resting values (P=0.008 and P=0.002 respectively at the end of the trial and there was no significant differences between groups. Growth hormone levels in two groups were increased and remained significant-ly higher than resting values (groups one P=0.012, group two P=0.005 at the end of the trial and there was no significant differences between groups. In addition, there were no significant differences between area under the curves (AUC values over total periods for acylated ghrelin, hunger ratings, and growth hormone in two groups.Conclusion: These findings indicate that individuals with two levels of obesity have the same response to the different intensities of treadmill running and two hours thereafter during recovery period, which can be considered for designing a more effective weighting loss training program.

  16. Effects of apple branch biochar on soil C mineralization and nutrient cycling under two levels of N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuailin; Liang, Chutao; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2017-12-31

    The incorporation of biochar into soil has been proposed as a strategy for enhancing soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited information regarding the responses of soil respiration and the C, N and P cycles to the addition of apple branch biochar at different rates to soil with different levels of N. A 108-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of the rate of biochar addition (0, 1, 2 and 4% by mass) on soil respiration and nutrients and the activities of enzymes involved in C, N and P cycling under two levels of N. Our results showed that the application of apple branch biochar at rates of 2% and 4% increased the C-mineralization rate, while biochar amendment at 1% decreased the C-mineralization rate, regardless of the N level. The soil organic C and microbial biomass C and P contents increased as the rate of biochar addition was increased to 2%. The biochar had negative effects on β-glucosidase, N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase and urease activity in N-poor soil but exerted a positive effect on all of these factors in N-rich soil. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased with an increase in the rate of biochar addition, but the available P contents after all biochar addition treatments were lower than those obtained in the treatments without biochar. Biochar application at rates of 2% and 4% reduced the soil nitrate content, particularly in N-rich soil. Thus, apple branch biochar has the potential to sequester C and improve soil fertility, but the responses of soil C mineralization and nutrient cycling depend on the rate of addition and soil N levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of joystick handle size and gain at two levels of required precision on performance and physical load on crane operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M.A.; Looze, M.P. de; Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Beek, A.J. van der; Dieën, J.H. van

    2006-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the effect of joystick handle size and (display-control) gain at two levels of required task precision on performance and physical load on crane operators. Eight experienced crane operators performed a simulated crane operation task on a computer by use of a

  18. The 5-year cost-effectiveness of two-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion or cervical disc replacement: a Markov analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overley, Samuel C; McAnany, Steven J; Brochin, Robert L; Kim, Jun S; Merrill, Robert K; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2018-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc replacement (CDR) are both acceptable surgical options for the treatment of cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy. To date, there are limited economic analyses assessing the relative cost-effectiveness of two-level ACDF versus CDR. The purpose of this study was to determine the 5-year cost-effectiveness of two-level ACDF versus CDR. The study design is a secondary analysis of prospectively collected data. Patients in the Prestige cervical disc investigational device exemption (IDE) study who underwent either a two-level CDR or a two-level ACDF were included in the study. The outcome measures were cost and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). A Markov state-transition model was used to evaluate data from the two-level Prestige cervical disc IDE study. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey were converted into utilities using the short form (SF)-6D algorithm. Costs were calculated from the payer perspective. QALYs were used to represent effectiveness. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation. The base-case analysis, assuming a 40-year-old person who failed appropriate conservative care, generated a 5-year cost of $130,417 for CDR and $116,717 for ACDF. Cervical disc replacement and ACDF generated 3.45 and 3.23 QALYs, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated to be $62,337/QALY for CDR. The Monte Carlo simulation validated the base-case scenario. Cervical disc replacement had an average cost of $130,445 (confidence interval [CI]: $108,395-$152,761) with an average effectiveness of 3.46 (CI: 3.05-3.83). Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion had an average cost of $116,595 (CI: $95,439-$137,937) and an average effectiveness of 3.23 (CI: 2.84-3.59). The ICER was calculated at $62,133/QALY with respect to CDR. Using a $100,000/QALY willingness to pay (WTP), CDR is the more cost-effective strategy and would be selected

  19. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO LEVELS OF SUCTION PRESSURE ON OXYGEN SATURATION IN PATIENTS WITH ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhaji

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endotracheal suctioning is one of the common supportive measures in intensive care units (ICU, which may be related to complications such as hypoxia. However, a questionable efficacy is still identified to choose suctioning pressure between 130 mmHg and 140 mmHg that is effective for patients with endotracheal tube. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of 130 mmHg and 140 mmHg suctioning pressure on oxygen saturation in patients with endotracheal tube. Methods: This research used a quasy experimental design with pretest and posttest group. The study was conducted from 31 January to 1 March 2017 in the Hospital of Panti Wilasa Citarum and Hospital of Roemani Muhammadiyah Semarang. There were 30 samples recruited using consecutive sampling, with 15 assigned in the 130 mmHg and 140 mmHg suctioning pressure group. Pulse oximetry was used to measure oxygen saturation. Paired t-test and Independent t-test were used for data analysis. Results: Findings showed that there was a statistically significant effect of 130 and 140 mmHg suctioning pressure on oxygen saturation in patients with ETT with p-value <0.05. There was a significant mean difference of oxygen saturation between 130 mmHg and 140 mmHg suctioning pressure group with p-value 0.004 (<0.05. The mean difference of oxygen saturation between both groups was 13.157. Conclusion: The 140 mmHg suctioning pressure is more effective compared with 130 mmHg suctioning pressure in increasing oxygen saturation in patients with ETT.

  20. Effects of quasiparticle tunnelling in a circuit-QED realization of a strongly driven two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppäkangas, J; De Graaf, S E; Adamyan, A; Fogelström, M; Danilov, A V; Kubatkin, S E; Johansson, G; Lindström, T

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically study the frequency shift of a driven cavity coupled to a superconducting charge qubit. In addition to previous studies, here we also consider drive strengths large enough to energetically allow for quasiparticle creation. Quasiparticle tunnelling leads to the inclusion of more than two charge states in the dynamics. To explain the observed effects, we develop a master equation for the microwave dressed charge states, including quasiparticle tunnelling. A bimodal behaviour of the frequency shift as a function of gate voltage can be used for sensitive charge detection. However, at weak drives, the charge sensitivity is significantly reduced by nonequilibrium quasiparticles, which induce transitions to a non-sensitive state. Unexpectedly, at high-enough drives, the quasiparticle tunnelling enables a very fast relaxation channel to the sensitive state. In this regime, the charge sensitivity is thus robust against externally injected quasiparticles and the desired dynamics prevail over a broad range of temperatures. We find very good agreement between the theory and experiment over a wide range of drive strengths and temperatures. (paper)

  1. Comparison of the therapeutic effect between a transforminal along with a caudal epidural injection, as well as two-level transforaminal epidural injections ina radiculopathy patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jung Han; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keun Won; Kim, Young Joong; Seo, Jae Young; Lim, Seong Joo; Kang, Byeong Seong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) along with a caudal epidural steroid injection (ESI), compared to two-level TFESIs in a multi-level radiculopathy patient. A total of 895 lumbar ESIs were performed in 492 patients with multi-level radiculopathy from January 2012 to January 2015. Before injections were performed, the initial Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score was assessed in all patients, categorized into no pain (excellent), mild (good, NRS: 1-3), moderate (fair, NRS: 4-6), and severe pain (poor, NRS: 7-10). Therapeutic effects were examined for two groups: one-level TFESI along with caudal and ESI two-level TFESIs. Patient outcomes were assessed by NRS in a serial follow-up at one, three, and six months. One TFESI along with caudal ESI was performed in 274 patients and two TFESIs for 218. For the former group with one TFESI along with caudal ESI, excellent results were shown: 219 (79.9%) patients after one month, 200 (72.9%) after three, and 193 (70.4%) after six months. In the patient group with two TFESIs (n = 218) the outcomes were also very good: 152 (69.7%) after one month, 131 (60.0%) after three months, and 123 (56.4%) patients after six months. The therapeutic effect of one TFESI along with caudal ESI was better than two TFESIs in for one, threes, and six months (p < 0.01). Transforaminal epidural steroid with caudal epidural injection is a more effective tool for lumbosacral radiculopathy than two level transforaminal injections in multi-level radiculopathy patients

  2. Comparison of the therapeutic effect between a transforminal along with a caudal epidural injection, as well as two-level transforaminal epidural injections ina radiculopathy patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jung Han; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keun Won; Kim, Young Joong; Seo, Jae Young; Lim, Seong Joo [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byeong Seong [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) along with a caudal epidural steroid injection (ESI), compared to two-level TFESIs in a multi-level radiculopathy patient. A total of 895 lumbar ESIs were performed in 492 patients with multi-level radiculopathy from January 2012 to January 2015. Before injections were performed, the initial Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score was assessed in all patients, categorized into no pain (excellent), mild (good, NRS: 1-3), moderate (fair, NRS: 4-6), and severe pain (poor, NRS: 7-10). Therapeutic effects were examined for two groups: one-level TFESI along with caudal and ESI two-level TFESIs. Patient outcomes were assessed by NRS in a serial follow-up at one, three, and six months. One TFESI along with caudal ESI was performed in 274 patients and two TFESIs for 218. For the former group with one TFESI along with caudal ESI, excellent results were shown: 219 (79.9%) patients after one month, 200 (72.9%) after three, and 193 (70.4%) after six months. In the patient group with two TFESIs (n = 218) the outcomes were also very good: 152 (69.7%) after one month, 131 (60.0%) after three months, and 123 (56.4%) patients after six months. The therapeutic effect of one TFESI along with caudal ESI was better than two TFESIs in for one, threes, and six months (p < 0.01). Transforaminal epidural steroid with caudal epidural injection is a more effective tool for lumbosacral radiculopathy than two level transforaminal injections in multi-level radiculopathy patients.

  3. Effects of an applied low frequency field on the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a single-mode field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xun-Wei, Xu; Nian-Hua, Liu

    2010-01-01

    The effects of an applied low frequency field on the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a single-mode field are investigated. It is shown that the time evolution of the atomic population is mainly controlled by the coupling constants and the frequency of the low frequency field, which leads to a low frequency modulation function for the time evolution of the upper state population. The amplitude of the modulation function becomes larger as the coupling constants increase. The frequency of the modulation function is proportional to the frequency of the low frequency field, and decreases with increasing coupling constant. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  4. New Aspects of Field Entropy Squeezing as an Indicator for Mixed State Entanglement in an Effective Two-Level System with Stark Shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Abdel-Khalek; M.M.A.Ahmed; A-S F.Obada

    2011-01-01

    We present an effective two-level system in interaction through two-photon processes with a single mode quantized electromagnetic field,initially prepared in a coherent state.Field entropy squeezing as an indicator of the entanglement in a mixed state system is suggested.The temporal evolution of the negativity,Wehrl entropy,Wehrl phase distribution and field entropy squeezing are investigated.The results highlight the important roles played by both the Stark shift parameters and the mixed state setting in the dynamics of the Wehrl entropy,Wehrl phase distribution and field entropy squeezing.%We present an effective two-level system in interaction through two-photon processes with a single mode quantized electromagnetic Reid, initially prepared in a coherent state. Field entropy squeezing as an indicator of the entanglement in a mixed state system is suggested. The temporal evolution of the negativity, Wehrl entropy, Wehrl phase distribution and field entropy squeezing are investigated. The results highlight the important roles played by both the Stark shift parameters and the mixed state setting in the dynamics of the Wehrl entropy, Wehrl phase distribution and field entropy squeezing.

  5. Effects of increased CO[sub 2] concentration and temperature on growth and yield of winter wheat at two levels of nitrogen application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.A.C.; Mitchell, V.J.; Driscoll, S.P.; Franklin, J.; Lawlor, D.W. (Institute of Arable Crops Research, Harpenden (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry and Physiology)

    1993-06-01

    Winter wheat was grown in chambers under light and temperature conditions similar to the UK field environment for the 1990/1991 growing season at two levels each of atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration (seasonal means: 361 nd 692 [mu]mol mol[sup -1]), temperature (tracking ambient and ambient +4[degree]C) and nitrogen application (equivalent to 87 and 489 kg ha[sub -1] total N applied). Total dry matter productivity through the season, the maximum number of shoots and final ear number were stimulated by CO[sub 2] enrichment at both levels of the temperature and N treatments. At high N, there was a CO[sub 2]-induced stimulation of grain yield (+15%) similar to that for total crop dry mass (+12%), and there was no significant interaction with temperature. Temperature had a direct, negative effect on yield at both levels of the N and CO[sub 2] treatments. This could be explained by the temperature-dependent shortening of the phenological stages, and therefore, the time available for accumulating resources for grain formation. At high N, there was also a reduction in grain set at ambient +4[degree]C temperature, but the overall negative effect of warmer temperature was greater on the number of grains (-37%) than on yield (-18%), due to a compensating increase in average grain mass. At low N, despite increasing total crop dry mass and the number of ears, elevated CO[sub 2] did not increase grain yield and caused a significant decrease under ambient temperature conditions. This can be explained in terms of a stimulation of early vegetative growth by CO[sub 2] enrichment leading to a reduction in the amount of N available later for the formation and filling of grain.

  6. Production inventory model for two-level trade credit financing under the effect of preservation technology and learning in supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the inventory model for a retailer under two levels of trade credit to reflect the supply chain management. Supplier offers trade credit period of M to the retailer while in turn retailer provides a trade credit period of N to his/her customers. The supplier is willing to provide the retailer a full trade credit period for payments and the retailer offers the partial trade credit period to his/her customers. Here, selling items are considered as perishable items such as fruits, fresh fishes, gasoline, photographic films, etc. so that its potential worth decreases. It is assumed that decay in potential worth of items can be increased by using preservation technology. The demand is considered as the function of selling price and trade credit. Ordering cost can be reducing due to learning by doing phenomenon. By applying convex fractional programming results, we obtain necessary and sufficient conditions of an optimal solution. Some theorems are developed to determine retailer’s optimal ordering policies and numerical examples are given to illustrate these theorems. In addition, some managerial insights from the numerical examples are also concluded.

  7. A comparison of the effects of propofol and midazolam on memory during two levels of sedation by using target-controlled infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roode, A; van Gerven, J M; Schoemaker, R C; Engbers, F H; Olieman, W; Kroon, J R; Cohen, A F; Bovill, J G

    2000-11-01

    We examined memory during sedation with target-controlled infusions of propofol and midazolam in a double-blinded five-way, cross-over study in 10 volunteers. Each active drug infusion was targeted to sedation level 1 (asleep) and level 4 (lethargic) as determined with the Observer Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale. At the target level of sedation, drug concentration was clamped for 30 min, during which time neutral words were presented. After 2 h, explicit memory was assessed by recall, and implicit memory by using a wordstem completion test. Venous drug concentrations (mean +/- SD) were 1350 ng/mL (+/-332 ng/mL) for propofol and 208 ng/mL (+/-112 ng/mL) for midazolam during Observer Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale level 4; and 1620 ng/mL (+/-357 ng/mL) and 249 ng/mL (+/-82 ng/mL) respectively during level 1. The wordstem completion test frequencies at low level sedation were significantly higher than spontaneous frequencies (8.7% + 2.4%; P: sedation were accompanied by small differences in venous propofol or midazolam concentrations. This indicates steep concentration-effect relationships. Neutral information is still memorized during low-level sedation with both drugs. The memory effect of propofol and midazolam did not differ significantly. Implicit memory can occur during different states of consciousness and might lead to psychological damage. In 10 volunteers, implicit memory was investigated during sedation with propofol and midazolam in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. To compare the effects of both drugs, they were titrated using a computer-controlled infusion system to produce similar high and low levels of sedation.

  8. Darboux transformation for two-level system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.; Baldiotti, M.; Gitman, D.; Shamshutdinova, V. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318-CEP, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil)

    2005-06-01

    We develop the Darboux procedure for the case of the two-level system. In particular, it is demonstrated that one can construct the Darboux intertwining operator that does not violate the specific structure of the equations of the two-level system, transforming only one real potential into another real potential. We apply the obtained Darboux transformation to known exact solutions of the two-level system. Thus, we find three classes of new solutions for the two-level system and the corresponding new potentials that allow such solutions. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Two-Level Semantics and Code Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    1988-01-01

    A two-level denotational metalanguage that is suitable for defining the semantics of Pascal-like languages is presented. The two levels allow for an explicit distinction between computations taking place at compile-time and computations taking place at run-time. While this distinction is perhaps...... not absolutely necessary for describing the input-output semantics of programming languages, it is necessary when issues such as data flow analysis and code generation are considered. For an example stack-machine, the authors show how to generate code for the run-time computations and still perform the compile...

  10. Moderation analysis using a two-level regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Cheng, Ying; Maxwell, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Moderation analysis is widely used in social and behavioral research. The most commonly used model for moderation analysis is moderated multiple regression (MMR) in which the explanatory variables of the regression model include product terms, and the model is typically estimated by least squares (LS). This paper argues for a two-level regression model in which the regression coefficients of a criterion variable on predictors are further regressed on moderator variables. An algorithm for estimating the parameters of the two-level model by normal-distribution-based maximum likelihood (NML) is developed. Formulas for the standard errors (SEs) of the parameter estimates are provided and studied. Results indicate that, when heteroscedasticity exists, NML with the two-level model gives more efficient and more accurate parameter estimates than the LS analysis of the MMR model. When error variances are homoscedastic, NML with the two-level model leads to essentially the same results as LS with the MMR model. Most importantly, the two-level regression model permits estimating the percentage of variance of each regression coefficient that is due to moderator variables. When applied to data from General Social Surveys 1991, NML with the two-level model identified a significant moderation effect of race on the regression of job prestige on years of education while LS with the MMR model did not. An R package is also developed and documented to facilitate the application of the two-level model.

  11. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Boqiang

    1990-05-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions.

  12. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Boqiang

    1990-01-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions

  13. Contrasting effects of elevated CO2 on Cu and Cd uptake by different rice varieties grown on contaminated soils with two levels of metals: Implication for phytoextraction and food safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhongyang; Tang Shirong; Deng Xiaofang; Wang Ruigang; Song Zhengguo

    2010-01-01

    A pot experiment in six open-top chambers with two levels of CO 2 and two multi-metal contaminated soils was conducted to investigate combined effects of elevated CO 2 levels and metals (Cu and Cd) on rice. Elevated CO 2 significantly increased the total dry weight biomass of six Chinese rice by 20-108 and 32-142% for low and high levels of contaminated soils, respectively. We observed dilution/little varied phenomena in grain Cu concentration in six rice varieties grown on both contaminated soils under elevated CO 2 . We found significantly higher Cd concentrations in the parts of three rice varieties under elevated CO 2 , but lower levels for the others. Two major conclusions can be drawn from our study: (1) rice varieties with significantly increased biomass and metal uptake under elevated CO 2 exhibit greater potential for phytoextraction and (2) given expected global increases in CO 2 concentration, CO 2 -induced accumulation of metals in rice might be a component contributing to the potential health risk in the future, with Cd being a more important threat to human health than Cu.

  14. Contrasting effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on Cu and Cd uptake by different rice varieties grown on contaminated soils with two levels of metals: Implication for phytoextraction and food safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhongyang [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Open Key Laboratory of Agro-environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Tang Shirong, E-mail: tangshir@hotmail.com [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Open Key Laboratory of Agro-environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Deng Xiaofang; Wang Ruigang; Song Zhengguo [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Open Key Laboratory of Agro-environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China)

    2010-05-15

    A pot experiment in six open-top chambers with two levels of CO{sub 2} and two multi-metal contaminated soils was conducted to investigate combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} levels and metals (Cu and Cd) on rice. Elevated CO{sub 2} significantly increased the total dry weight biomass of six Chinese rice by 20-108 and 32-142% for low and high levels of contaminated soils, respectively. We observed dilution/little varied phenomena in grain Cu concentration in six rice varieties grown on both contaminated soils under elevated CO{sub 2}. We found significantly higher Cd concentrations in the parts of three rice varieties under elevated CO{sub 2}, but lower levels for the others. Two major conclusions can be drawn from our study: (1) rice varieties with significantly increased biomass and metal uptake under elevated CO{sub 2} exhibit greater potential for phytoextraction and (2) given expected global increases in CO{sub 2} concentration, CO{sub 2}-induced accumulation of metals in rice might be a component contributing to the potential health risk in the future, with Cd being a more important threat to human health than Cu.

  15. Effects of the type of dietary fat at two levels of vitamin E in Wistar male rats during development and aging. III. Biochemical and morphometric parameters of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, E A; Keopuhiwa, L; Joun, N S; Nitta, R T

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore in rats the possible influence of the type of dietary fat at two extreme levels of vitamin E on several biochemically determined hepatic changes and on a number of quantitatively analyzed structural and ultrastructural variations with age in hepatic cells. Six groups of weanling Wistar male rats were fed ad libitum isoenergetic diets containing similar amounts (15 g per 100 g diet) of saturated fat (coconut oil), unsaturated fat (safflower oil) or a combination of both at two levels of dl-alpha-tocopherol (2 or 200 mg per 100 g of diet). Determinations were performed in rats killed at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Although in relation to age and irrespective of the type of diet, several of the biochemical parameters fluctuated with time, comparisons of the results between the youngest and oldest rats showed no changes in the levels of hepatic RNA, phospholipids, cholesterol, total tocopherols and total collagens, significant increases in DNA and triglycerides and a significant decrease in total protein. While the type of diet did not have in general significant influences on the levels of DNA, RNA, total protein and collagens, either the type of dietary fat and/or the levels of vitamin E had some definite effects on the levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids and total tocopherols, as well as on the in vitro formation of malonaldehyde and on the eventual occurrence of in vivo lipoperoxidation (diene conjugation). These effects, however, varied in relation to the duration of the diverse dietary treatments. The morphologic studies indicated that all the livers had variable but generally moderate degrees of fatty changes (mainly due to triglyceride accumulation) which were attributed to the moderate obesity found in the rats. The mean nuclear and cell dimensions of hepatocytes, the number of binucleated hepatocytes, surface density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, numerical density of mitochondria and the fractional

  16. Interpreting parameters in the logistic regression model with random effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Klaus; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2000-01-01

    interpretation, interval odds ratio, logistic regression, median odds ratio, normally distributed random effects......interpretation, interval odds ratio, logistic regression, median odds ratio, normally distributed random effects...

  17. Random effect selection in generalised linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denwood, Matt; Houe, Hans; Forkman, Björn

    We analysed abattoir recordings of meat inspection codes with possible relevance to onfarm animal welfare in cattle. Random effects logistic regression models were used to describe individual-level data obtained from 461,406 cattle slaughtered in Denmark. Our results demonstrate that the largest...

  18. Efeito de dois níveis de proteína para machos reprodutores de corte com e sem retirada da crista Effect of two levels of protein for broiler breeders males with and without retreat of the crest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lucca

    2009-02-01

    , two comb conditions (with or without and two levels of crude protein (12 and 16%. Semen was collected using the American methods and number of spermatic cells was determined by counting in Neubauer chamber. At 42, 43 and 44 weeks of age, six females were artificially inseminated by treatment, twice a week, with dosage of 0.05ml of fresh semen. The eggs were collected four times a day, identified, disinfected and incubated in similar conditions. After 21 day of incubation they were broken and examined macroscopically to analyze the fertility. The level of 12% of crude protein was enough to assist the reproductive demands and the permanence of males. Combed males had body weight higher than without combed males.

  19. two-level inventory optimization under probability event chain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Modeling, Design and Management of Engineering Systems ... The paper introduces the concept of effective inventory level, which is used to evaluate the impact of upstream shortage on downstream inventory, models the inventory at warehouse and retailer under random lead time and demand, and makes the ...

  20. Experimental Hamiltonian identification for controlled two-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmer, S.G.; Kolli, A.; Oi, D.K.L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a strategy to empirically determine the internal and control Hamiltonians for an unknown two-level system (black box) subject to various (piecewise constant) control fields when direct readout by measurement is limited to a single, fixed observable

  1. Performance and meat quality traits of beef heifers fed with two levels of concentrate and ruminally undegradable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Marcio de Souza; Paulino, Pedro Veiga Rodrigues; Valadares Filho, Sebastião de Campos; Paulino, Mario Fonseca; Detmann, Edenio; Zervoudakis, Joanis Tilemahos; Monnerat, João Paulo Ismerio dos Santos; Viana, Gabriel da Silva; Silva, Luiz Henrique P; Serão, Nicola Vergara Lopes

    2011-04-01

    The effects of two levels of concentrate and ruminally undegradable protein (RUP) on performance, intake, digestibility, carcass characteristics, meat quality traits, and commercial cuts yield were assessed. Twenty crossbred heifers (240 kg average body weight) were used. At the beginning of the trial, four animals were slaughtered as reference group and the 16 remaining animals were randomly assigned to four treatments, in a 2 × 2 factorial design: two levels of concentrate (40% and 80%, dry matter (DM) basis) and two levels of RUP (48.79% and 27.19% of CP). At the end of the trial, all the animals were slaughtered. There was no interaction (P > 0.05) between concentrate and RUP levels. Dry matter intake and nutrients digestibility was not affected (P > 0.05) by RUP level. Heifers fed the highest RUP level had greater (P  0.05) DMI and ADG. Heifers fed diets with 80% concentrate had greater intake of TDN and EE, and lower intake of NDF (P RUP levels did not affect (P > 0.05) the carcass characteristics and carcass gain composition. Heifers fed 80% concentrate diets had larger (P  0.05) the composition of carcass gain. There was no effect (P > 0.05) of RUP and concentrate levels on meat quality traits and commercial cut yields.

  2. Simulation of a directed random-walk model: the effect of pseudo-random-number correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Shchur, L. N.; Heringa, J. R.; Blöte, H. W. J.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the mechanism that leads to systematic deviations in cluster Monte Carlo simulations when correlated pseudo-random numbers are used. We present a simple model, which enables an analysis of the effects due to correlations in several types of pseudo-random-number sequences. This model provides qualitative understanding of the bias mechanism in a class of cluster Monte Carlo algorithms.

  3. The geometric phase in two-level atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Mingzhen; Barber, Zeb W.; Fischer, Joe A.; Randall Babbitt, Wm.

    2004-01-01

    We report the observation of the geometric phase in a closed two-level atomic system using stimulated photon echoes. The two-level system studied consists of the two-electronic energy levels ( 3 H 4 and 3 H 6 ) of Tm 3+ doped in YAG crystal. When a two-level atom at an arbitrary superposition state is excited by a pair of specially designed laser pulses, the excited state component gains a relative phase with respect to the ground state component. We identified the phase shift to be of pure geometric nature. The dynamic phase associated to the driving Hamiltonian is unchanged. The experiment results of the phase change agree with the theory to the extent of the measurement limit

  4. Effect of random edge failure on the average path length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Dongchao; Liang Mangui; Li Dandan; Jiang Zhongyuan, E-mail: mgliang58@gmail.com, E-mail: 08112070@bjtu.edu.cn [Institute of Information Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, 100044, Beijing (China)

    2011-10-14

    We study the effect of random removal of edges on the average path length (APL) in a large class of uncorrelated random networks in which vertices are characterized by hidden variables controlling the attachment of edges between pairs of vertices. A formula for approximating the APL of networks suffering random edge removal is derived first. Then, the formula is confirmed by simulations for classical ER (Erdoes and Renyi) random graphs, BA (Barabasi and Albert) networks, networks with exponential degree distributions as well as random networks with asymptotic power-law degree distributions with exponent {alpha} > 2. (paper)

  5. Two level undercut-profile substrate for filamentary YBa2Cu3O7 coated conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Anders Christian; Solovyov, M.; Gömöry, Fedor

    2015-01-01

    A novel substrate design is presented for scalable industrial production of filamentary coated conductors (CCs). The new substrate, called ‘two level undercut-profile substrate (2LUPS)’, has two levels of plateaus connected by walls with an undercut profile. The undercuts are made to produce...... a shading effect during subsequent deposition of layers, thereby creating gaps in the superconducting layer deposited on the curved walls between the two levels. It is demonstrated that such 2LUPS-based CCs can be produced in a large-scale production system using standard deposition processes...

  6. Stationary states of two-level open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardas, Bartlomiej; Puchala, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    A problem of finding stationary states of open quantum systems is addressed. We focus our attention on a generic type of open system: a qubit coupled to its environment. We apply the theory of block operator matrices and find stationary states of two-level open quantum systems under certain conditions applied on both the qubit and the surrounding.

  7. Two-level method with coarse space size independent convergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanek, P.; Brezina, M. [Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Tezaur, R.; Krizkova, J. [UWB, Plzen (Czech Republic)

    1996-12-31

    The basic disadvantage of the standard two-level method is the strong dependence of its convergence rate on the size of the coarse-level problem. In order to obtain the optimal convergence result, one is limited to using a coarse space which is only a few times smaller than the size of the fine-level one. Consequently, the asymptotic cost of the resulting method is the same as in the case of using a coarse-level solver for the original problem. Today`s two-level domain decomposition methods typically offer an improvement by yielding a rate of convergence which depends on the ratio of fine and coarse level only polylogarithmically. However, these methods require the use of local subdomain solvers for which straightforward application of iterative methods is problematic, while the usual application of direct solvers is expensive. We suggest a method diminishing significantly these difficulties.

  8. Franson Interference Generated by a Two-Level System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, M.; Konthasinghe, K.; Muller, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report a Franson interferometry experiment based on correlated photon pairs generated via frequency-filtered scattered light from a near-resonantly driven two-level semiconductor quantum dot. In contrast to spontaneous parametric down-conversion and four-wave mixing, this approach can produce single pairs of correlated photons. We have measured a Franson visibility as high as 66%, which goes beyond the classical limit of 50% and approaches the limit of violation of Bell's inequalities (70.7%).

  9. Mixing phases of unstable two-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.V.; Brentano, P. von.

    1993-01-01

    An unstable two-level system decaying into an arbitrary number of channels is considered. It is shown that the mixing phases of the two overlapping resonances can be expressed in the terms of their partial widths and one additional universal mixing parameter. Some applications to a doublet of 2 + resonances in 8 Be and to the ρ-ω systems are considered. 18 refs

  10. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, F.; Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition, (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems. S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, A.M. Zagoskin, F. Nori, Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields, Phys. Rev. A 75, 063414 (2007). S. Ashhab et al, unpublished.

  11. Effect of disorder correlation in random mers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezini, A.; Sebbani, M.; Depollier, C.; Belbachir, M.

    1995-12-01

    A widely held view in solid-state physics is that disorder precludes the presence of long-range transport in one-dimension. Recently a series of models has been proposed that do not conform to this view such as the well known Random Dimer Model (RDM). In the following paper, we must present a generalization of the RDM. In particular, the nature of the eigenstates of a non-interacting electron is investigated by means of a popular one-dimensional Kronig-Penney Hamiltonian in which n-mers have been placed at random on a regular lattice. Mainly in each allowed energy band of the spectrum, it is found that n-mers exhibits n - 1 resonances associated to extended states. Moreover these resonances appear to be narrower if the potential is attractive against repulsive, i.e. constituted of wells instead barriers, which discriminates the ability in localizing the eigenstates. Attention has been paid to the energy transition as one approaches the two resonances of the random trimer within the first allowed band. The transition exhibits a smooth behaviour for the lower energy when compared to the higher one with respect to the first resonance and shows quite a similar behaviour for both sides close to the second resonance. The discrepancy is attributed to the typical nature of the eigenstates for each resonance. Correspondingly, the wave functions associated to the first resonance are not like Bloch-waves while for the second one they look like the crystal wave functions displaying only minor distortions. (author). 44 refs, 6 figs

  12. Excitation transfer in two two-level systems coupled to an oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelstein, P L; Chaudhary, I U

    2008-01-01

    We consider a generalization of the spin-boson model in which two different two-level systems are coupled to an oscillator, under conditions where the oscillator energy is much less than the two-level system energies, and where the oscillator is highly excited. We find that the two-level system transition energy is shifted, producing a Bloch-Siegert shift in each two-level system similar to what would be obtained if the other were absent. At resonances associated with energy exchange between a two-level system and the oscillator, the level splitting is about the same as would be obtained in the spin-boson model at a Bloch-Siegert resonance. However, there occur resonances associated with the transfer of excitation between one two-level system and the other, an effect not present in the spin-boson model. We use a unitary transformation leading to a rotated system in which terms responsible for the shift and splittings can be identified. The level splittings at the anticrossings associated with both energy exchange and excitation transfer resonances are accounted for with simple two-state models and degenerate perturbation theory using operators that appear in the rotated Hamiltonian

  13. Perturbation Theory for Open Two-Level Nonlinear Quantum Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhijie; Jiang Dongguang; Wang Wei

    2011-01-01

    Perturbation theory is an important tool in quantum mechanics. In this paper, we extend the traditional perturbation theory to open nonlinear two-level systems, treating decoherence parameter γ as a perturbation. By this virtue, we give a perturbative solution to the master equation, which describes a nonlinear open quantum system. The results show that for small decoherence rate γ, the ratio of the nonlinear rate C to the tunneling coefficient V (i.e., r = C/V) determines the validity of the perturbation theory. For small ratio r, the perturbation theory is valid, otherwise it yields wrong results. (general)

  14. Modal intersection types, two-level languages, and staged synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henglein, Fritz; Rehof, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    -linguistic framework for staged program synthesis, where metaprograms are automatically synthesized which, when executed, generate code in a target language. We survey the basic theory of staged synthesis and illustrate by example how a two-level language theory specialized from λ∩ ⎕ can be used to understand......A typed λ-calculus, λ∩ ⎕, is introduced, combining intersection types and modal types. We develop the metatheory of λ∩ ⎕, with particular emphasis on the theory of subtyping and distributivity of the modal and intersection type operators. We describe how a stratification of λ∩ ⎕ leads to a multi...... the process of staged synthesis....

  15. Optimal control of quantum gates and suppression of decoherence in a system of interacting two-level particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, Matthew; Brif, Constantin; Rabitz, Herschel; Walmsley, Ian A; Kosut, Robert L; Lidar, Daniel A

    2007-01-01

    Methods of optimal control are applied to a model system of interacting two-level particles (e.g., spin-half atomic nuclei or electrons or two-level atoms) to produce high-fidelity quantum gates while simultaneously negating the detrimental effect of decoherence. One set of particles functions as the quantum information processor, whose evolution is controlled by a time-dependent external field. The other particles are not directly controlled and serve as an effective environment, coupling to which is the source of decoherence. The control objective is to generate target one- and two-qubit unitary gates in the presence of strong environmentally-induced decoherence and under physically motivated restrictions on the control field. The quantum-gate fidelity, expressed in terms of a novel state-independent distance measure, is maximized with respect to the control field using combined genetic and gradient algorithms. The resulting high-fidelity gates demonstrate the feasibility of precisely guiding the quantum evolution via optimal control, even when the system complexity is exacerbated by environmental coupling. It is found that the gate duration has an important effect on the control mechanism and resulting fidelity. An analysis of the sensitivity of the gate performance to random variations in the system parameters reveals a significant degree of robustness attained by the optimal control solutions

  16. Random diffusion and leverage effect in financial markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelló, Josep; Masoliver, Jaume

    2003-03-01

    We prove that Brownian market models with random diffusion coefficients provide an exact measure of the leverage effect [J-P. Bouchaud et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 228701 (2001)]. This empirical fact asserts that past returns are anticorrelated with future diffusion coefficient. Several models with random diffusion have been suggested but without a quantitative study of the leverage effect. Our analysis lets us to fully estimate all parameters involved and allows a deeper study of correlated random diffusion models that may have practical implications for many aspects of financial markets.

  17. Two-level schemes for the advection equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabishchevich, Petr N.

    2018-06-01

    The advection equation is the basis for mathematical models of continuum mechanics. In the approximate solution of nonstationary problems it is necessary to inherit main properties of the conservatism and monotonicity of the solution. In this paper, the advection equation is written in the symmetric form, where the advection operator is the half-sum of advection operators in conservative (divergent) and non-conservative (characteristic) forms. The advection operator is skew-symmetric. Standard finite element approximations in space are used. The standard explicit two-level scheme for the advection equation is absolutely unstable. New conditionally stable regularized schemes are constructed, on the basis of the general theory of stability (well-posedness) of operator-difference schemes, the stability conditions of the explicit Lax-Wendroff scheme are established. Unconditionally stable and conservative schemes are implicit schemes of the second (Crank-Nicolson scheme) and fourth order. The conditionally stable implicit Lax-Wendroff scheme is constructed. The accuracy of the investigated explicit and implicit two-level schemes for an approximate solution of the advection equation is illustrated by the numerical results of a model two-dimensional problem.

  18. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.; Nori, Franco

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems

  19. Random effects models in clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleophas, T. J.; Zwinderman, A. H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In clinical trials a fixed effects research model assumes that the patients selected for a specific treatment have the same true quantitative effect and that the differences observed are residual error. If, however, we have reasons to believe that certain patients respond differently

  20. Atomistic study of two-level systems in amorphous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damart, T.; Rodney, D.

    2018-01-01

    Internal friction is analyzed in an atomic-scale model of amorphous silica. The potential energy landscape of more than 100 glasses is explored to identify a sample of about 700 two-level systems (TLSs). We discuss the properties of TLSs, particularly their energy asymmetry and barrier as well as their deformation potential, computed as longitudinal and transverse averages of the full deformation potential tensors. The discrete sampling is used to predict dissipation in the classical regime. Comparison with experimental data shows a better agreement with poorly relaxed thin films than well relaxed vitreous silica, as expected from the large quench rates used to produce numerical glasses. The TLSs are categorized in three types that are shown to affect dissipation in different temperature ranges. The sampling is also used to discuss critically the usual approximations employed in the literature to represent the statistical properties of TLSs.

  1. Two-level modelling of real estate taxtation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gall, Jaroslav; Stubkjær, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Real estate taxes recurrently attract attention, because they are a source of potentially increased revenue for local and national government. Most experts agree that it is necessary to switch from using normative values for taxation to a market-value-based taxation of real property with computer......-assisted mass valuation, witch benefit from use of value maps. In Czech Republic, efforts have been made to adopt current tax policy goals, but improvements are still needed. The paper aims at supporting the current improvement process towards a market based system. It presents models, which describe aspects...... of the present Czech property tax system. A proposal for the future system focuses on the value map component. The described change depends on political involvement. This political activity is modelled as well. The hypothesis is that the two-level modelling effort enhances the change process by providing...

  2. Analog model for quantum gravity effects: phonons in random fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, G; Menezes, G; Svaiter, N F

    2010-09-24

    We describe an analog model for quantum gravity effects in condensed matter physics. The situation discussed is that of phonons propagating in a fluid with a random velocity wave equation. We consider that there are random fluctuations in the reciprocal of the bulk modulus of the system and study free phonons in the presence of Gaussian colored noise with zero mean. We show that, in this model, after performing the random averages over the noise function a free conventional scalar quantum field theory describing free phonons becomes a self-interacting model.

  3. Effect of the Temperature, External Magnetic Field, and Transport Current on Electrical Properties, Vortex Structure Evolution Processes, and Phase Transitions in Subsystems of Superconducting Grains and "Weak Links" of Granular Two-Level High-Temperature Superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevyanko, V. V.; Sukhareva, T. V.; Finkel', V. A.

    2018-03-01

    The temperature dependences of the resistivity of granular high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ ρ( T) are measured at various transverse external magnetic fields 0 ≤ H ext ≤ 100 Oe in the temperature range from the resistivity onset temperature T ρ = 0 to the superconducting transition critical temperature T c at the transport current density from 50 to 2000 mA/cm2. The effect of the external magnetic field and transport current density on the kinetics of phase transitions in both subsystems of granular two-level HTSC ( T = T c2J, T c1g, T c ) is determined. The feasibility of the topological phase transition, i.e., the Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, in the Josephson medium at T c2J < T BKT < T c1g "in transport current" is established, and its feasibility conditions are studied.

  4. Dynamics of a Landau-Zener transitions in a two-level system driven by a dissipative environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateuafack, M. E.; Diffo, J. T.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-02-01

    The paper investigates the effects of a two-level quantum system coupled to transversal and longitudinal dissipative environment. The time-dependent phase accumulation, LZ transition probability and entropy in the presence of fast-ohmic, sub-ohmic and super-ohmic quantum noise are derived. Analytical results are obtained in terms of temperature, dissipation strength, LZ parameter and bath cutoff frequency. The bath is observed to modify the standard occupation difference by a decaying random phase factor and also produces dephasing during the transfer of population. The dephasing characteristics or the initial non-zero decoherence rate are observed to increase in time with the bath temperature and depend on the system-bath coupling strength and cutoff frequency. These parameters are found to strongly affect the memory and thus tailor the coherence process of the system.

  5. Dynamics of a Landau–Zener transitions in a two-level system driven by a dissipative environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ateuafack, M.E., E-mail: esouamath@yahoo.fr [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon); Diffo, J.T., E-mail: diffojaures@yahoo.com [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon); Department of Physics, Higher Teachers' Training College, The University of Maroua, PO Box 55 Maroua (Cameroon); Fai, L.C., E-mail: corneliusfai@yahoo.fr [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon)

    2016-02-15

    The paper investigates the effects of a two-level quantum system coupled to transversal and longitudinal dissipative environment. The time-dependent phase accumulation, LZ transition probability and entropy in the presence of fast-ohmic, sub-ohmic and super-ohmic quantum noise are derived. Analytical results are obtained in terms of temperature, dissipation strength, LZ parameter and bath cutoff frequency. The bath is observed to modify the standard occupation difference by a decaying random phase factor and also produces dephasing during the transfer of population. The dephasing characteristics or the initial non-zero decoherence rate are observed to increase in time with the bath temperature and depend on the system-bath coupling strength and cutoff frequency. These parameters are found to strongly affect the memory and thus tailor the coherence process of the system.

  6. Two-level tunneling systems in amorphous alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Irina V.; Paz, Alejandro P.; Tokatly, Ilya V.; Rubio, Angel

    2014-03-01

    The decades of research on thermal properties of amorphous solids at temperatures below 1 K suggest that their anomalous behaviour can be related to quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms between two nearly equivalent states that can be described as a two-level system (TLS). This theory is also supported by recent studies on microwave spectroscopy of superconducting qubits. However, the microscopic nature of the TLS remains unknown. To identify structural motifs for TLSs in amorphous alumina we have performed extensive classical molecular dynamics simulations. Several bistable motifs with only one or two atoms jumping by considerable distance ~ 0.5 Å were found at T=25 K. Accounting for the surrounding environment relaxation was shown to be important up to distances ~ 7 Å. The energy asymmetry and barrier for the detected motifs lied in the ranges 0.5 - 2 meV and 4 - 15 meV, respectively, while their density was about 1 motif per 10 000 atoms. Tuning of motif asymmetry by strain was demonstrated with the coupling coefficient below 1 eV. The tunnel splitting for the symmetrized motifs was estimated on the order of 0.1 meV. The discovered motifs are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The financial support from the Marie Curie Fellowship PIIF-GA-2012-326435 (RespSpatDisp) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Random forests of interaction trees for estimating individualized treatment effects in randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaogang; Peña, Annette T; Liu, Lei; Levine, Richard A

    2018-04-29

    Assessing heterogeneous treatment effects is a growing interest in advancing precision medicine. Individualized treatment effects (ITEs) play a critical role in such an endeavor. Concerning experimental data collected from randomized trials, we put forward a method, termed random forests of interaction trees (RFIT), for estimating ITE on the basis of interaction trees. To this end, we propose a smooth sigmoid surrogate method, as an alternative to greedy search, to speed up tree construction. The RFIT outperforms the "separate regression" approach in estimating ITE. Furthermore, standard errors for the estimated ITE via RFIT are obtained with the infinitesimal jackknife method. We assess and illustrate the use of RFIT via both simulation and the analysis of data from an acupuncture headache trial. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The blocked-random effect in pictures and words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toglia, M P; Hinman, P J; Dayton, B S; Catalano, J F

    1997-06-01

    Picture and word recall was examined in conjunction with list organization. 60 subjects studied a list of 30 items, either words or their pictorial equivalents. The 30 words/pictures, members of five conceptual categories, each represented by six exemplars, were presented either blocked by category or in a random order. While pictures were recalled better than words and a standard blocked-random effect was observed, the interaction indicated that the recall advantage of a blocked presentation was restricted to the word lists. A similar pattern emerged for clustering. These findings are discussed in terms of limitations upon the pictorial superiority effect.

  9. Pixel detector readout electronics with two-level discriminator scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pengg, F.

    1998-01-01

    In preparation for a silicon pixel detector with more than 3,000 readout channels per chip for operation at the future large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN the analog front end of the readout electronics has been designed and measured on several test-arrays with 16 by 4 cells. They are implemented in the HP 0.8 microm process but compatible with the design rules of the radiation hard Honeywell 0.8 microm bulk process. Each cell contains bump bonding pad, preamplifier, discriminator and control logic for masking and testing within a layout area of only 50 microm by 140 microm. A new two-level discriminator scheme has been implemented to cope with the problems of time-walk and interpixel cross-coupling. The measured gain of the preamplifier is 900 mV for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP, about 24,000 e - for a 300 microm thick Si-detector) with a return to baseline within 750 ns for a 1 MIP input signal. The full readout chain (without detector) shows an equivalent noise charge to 60e - r.m.s. The time-walk, a function of the separation between the two threshold levels, is measured to be 22 ns at a separation of 1,500 e - , which is adequate for the 40 MHz beam-crossing frequency at the LHC. The interpixel cross-coupling, measured with a 40fF coupling capacitance, is less than 3%. A single cell consumes 35 microW at 3.5 V supply voltage

  10. Neighborhood Effects in a Behavioral Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Leonard, Tammy; Murdoch, James; Hughes, Amy; McQueen, Amy; Gupta, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions intended to modify health behaviors may be influenced by neighborhood effects which can impede unbiased estimation of intervention effects. Examining a RCT designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (N=5,628), we found statistically significant neighborhood effects: average CRC test use among neighboring study participants was significantly and positively associated with individual patient’s CRC test use. This potentially import...

  11. Effective temperature in driven vortex lattices with random pinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolton, Alejandro B.; Dominguez, Daniel; Exartier, Raphael; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Groenbech-Jensen, N.

    2003-09-01

    We study numerically correlation and response functions in non-equilibrium driven vortex lattices with random pinning. From a generalized fluctuation-dissipation relation we calculate an effective transverse temperature in the fluid moving phase. We find that the effective temperature decreases with increasing driving force and becomes equal to the equilibrium melting temperature when the dynamic transverse freezing occurs. We also discuss how the effective temperature can be measured experimentally from a generalized Kubo formula. (author)

  12. An effective Hamiltonian approach to quantum random walk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... Abstract. In this article we present an effective Hamiltonian approach for discrete time quantum random walk. A form of the Hamiltonian for one-dimensional quantum walk has been prescribed, utilizing the fact that Hamil- tonians are generators of time translations. Then an attempt has been made to ...

  13. Experimental Research into the Two-Level Cylindrical Cyclone with a Different Number of Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidijus Baliukas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The multichannel two-level cyclone has been designed for separating solid particles from airflow and built at the Laboratory of Environmental Protection Technologies of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University. The conducted research is aimed at determining air flow distribution at two levels and channels of the multichannel cyclone. The multifunctional meter Testo-400 and the dynamic Pitot tube have been used form easuring air flow rates in the channels. The obtained results show that the equal volume of air gets into two levels installed inside the cyclone, and rates are distributed equally in the channels of these levels. The maximum air flow rate is recorded in the first channel and occurs when half-rings are set in such positions so that 75% of air flow returns to the previous channel. The biggest aerodynamic resistance is 1660 Pa and has been recorded in the cyclone having eight channels under air flow distribution ratio 75/25. The highest air purification efficiency has been observed in the two-level six-channel cyclone under air flow distribution ratio 75/25. The effectiveness of separating granite particles is 92.1% and that of wood particles – 91.1 when the particles are up to 20 μm in diameter.

  14. Quantum random number generator based on quantum tunneling effect

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Haihan; Li, Junlin; Pan, Dong; Zhang, Weixing; Long, Guilu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed an experimental implementation of quantum random number generator(QRNG) with inherent randomness of quantum tunneling effect of electrons. We exploited InGaAs/InP diodes, whose valance band and conduction band shared a quasi-constant energy barrier. We applied a bias voltage on the InGaAs/InP avalanche diode, which made the diode works under Geiger mode, and triggered the tunneling events with a periodic pulse. Finally, after data collection and post-processing, our...

  15. Application of Poisson random effect models for highway network screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ximiao; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Alamili, Samer

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, Bayesian random effect models that account for the temporal and spatial correlations of crash data became popular in traffic safety research. This study employs random effect Poisson Log-Normal models for crash risk hotspot identification. Both the temporal and spatial correlations of crash data were considered. Potential for Safety Improvement (PSI) were adopted as a measure of the crash risk. Using the fatal and injury crashes that occurred on urban 4-lane divided arterials from 2006 to 2009 in the Central Florida area, the random effect approaches were compared to the traditional Empirical Bayesian (EB) method and the conventional Bayesian Poisson Log-Normal model. A series of method examination tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of different approaches. These tests include the previously developed site consistence test, method consistence test, total rank difference test, and the modified total score test, as well as the newly proposed total safety performance measure difference test. Results show that the Bayesian Poisson model accounting for both temporal and spatial random effects (PTSRE) outperforms the model that with only temporal random effect, and both are superior to the conventional Poisson Log-Normal model (PLN) and the EB model in the fitting of crash data. Additionally, the method evaluation tests indicate that the PTSRE model is significantly superior to the PLN model and the EB model in consistently identifying hotspots during successive time periods. The results suggest that the PTSRE model is a superior alternative for road site crash risk hotspot identification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Processing and Prolonged 500 C Testing of 4H-SiC JFET Integrated Circuits with Two Levels of Metal Interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, David J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liangyu; Lukco, Dorothy; Chang, Carl W.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2015-01-01

    Complex integrated circuit (IC) chips rely on more than one level of interconnect metallization for routing of electrical power and signals. This work reports the processing and testing of 4H-SiC junction field effect transistor (JFET) prototype IC's with two levels of metal interconnect capable of prolonged operation at 500 C. Packaged functional circuits including 3- and 11-stage ring oscillators, a 4-bit digital to analog converter, and a 4-bit address decoder and random access memory cell have been demonstrated at 500 C. A 3-stage oscillator functioned for over 3000 hours at 500 C in air ambient. Improved reproducibility remains to be accomplished.

  17. Understanding of phase modulation in two-level systems through inverse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfeld, A.; Hammes, S.L.; Warren, W.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical and numerical calculations describe the effects of shaped radiation pulses on two-level systems in terms of quantum-mechanical scattering. Previous results obtained in the reduced case of amplitude modulation are extended to the general case of simultaneous amplitude and phase modulation. We show that an infinite family of phase- and amplitude-modulated pulses all generate rectangular inversion profiles. Experimental measurements also verify the theoretical analysis

  18. The simulation of the non-Markovian behaviour of a two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semina, I.; Petruccione, F.

    2016-05-01

    Non-Markovian relaxation dynamics of a two-level system is studied with the help of the non-linear stochastic Schrödinger equation with coloured Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise. This stochastic Schrödinger equation is investigated numerically with an adapted Platen scheme. It is shown, that the memory effects have a significant impact to the dynamics of the system.

  19. CONFOUNDING STRUCTURE OF TWO-LEVEL NONREGULAR FACTORIAL DESIGNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Junbai

    2012-01-01

    In design theory,the alias structure of regular fractional factorial designs is elegantly described with group theory.However,this approach cannot be applied to nonregular designs directly. For an arbitrary nonregular design,a natural question is how to describe the confounding relations between its effects,is there any inner structure similar to regular designs? The aim of this article is to answer this basic question.Using coefficients of indicator function,confounding structure of nonregular fractional factorial designs is obtained as linear constrains on the values of effects.A method to estimate the sparse significant effects in an arbitrary nonregular design is given through an example.

  20. Parallel Mitogenome Sequencing Alleviates Random Rooting Effect in Phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Shotaro; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Nishida, Mutsumi; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-04-28

    Reliably rooted phylogenetic trees play irreplaceable roles in clarifying diversification in the patterns of species and populations. However, such trees are often unavailable in phylogeographic studies, particularly when the focus is on rapidly expanded populations that exhibit star-like trees. A fundamental bottleneck is known as the random rooting effect, where a distant outgroup tends to root an unrooted tree "randomly." We investigated whether parallel mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequencing alleviates this effect in phylogeography using a case study on the Sea of Japan lineage of the intertidal goby Chaenogobius annularis Eighty-three C. annularis individuals were collected and their mitogenomes were determined by high-throughput and low-cost parallel sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of these mitogenome sequences was conducted to root the Sea of Japan lineage, which has a star-like phylogeny and had not been reliably rooted. The topologies of the bootstrap trees were investigated to determine whether the use of mitogenomes alleviated the random rooting effect. The mitogenome data successfully rooted the Sea of Japan lineage by alleviating the effect, which hindered phylogenetic analysis that used specific gene sequences. The reliable rooting of the lineage led to the discovery of a novel, northern lineage that expanded during an interglacial period with high bootstrap support. Furthermore, the finding of this lineage suggested the existence of additional glacial refugia and provided a new recent calibration point that revised the divergence time estimation between the Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean lineages. This study illustrates the effectiveness of parallel mitogenome sequencing for solving the random rooting problem in phylogeographic studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Ingestive Behaviour of Grazing Ewes Given Two Levels of Concentrate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was expected that concentrate supplementation would reflect directly on forage intake owing to the substitution effect, which causes sheep where the supplement supplied a small proportion of net energy requirement, to have a greater grazing intensity. The two breeds differed in the time spent ruminating or lying, with the ...

  2. The Mobi-C cervical disc for one-level and two-level cervical disc replacement: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Matthew D Alvin,1,2 Thomas E Mroz1,3,41Cleveland Clinic Center for Spine Health, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Department of Neurological Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA is a novel motion-preserving procedure that is an alternative to fusion. The Mobi-C disc prosthesis, one of many Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved devices for CDA, is the only FDA-approved prosthesis for two-level CDA. Hence, it may allow for improved outcomes compared with multilevel fusion procedures.Purpose: To critically assess the available literature on CDA with the Mobi-C prosthesis, with a focus on two-level CDA.Methods: All clinical articles involving the Mobi-C disc prosthesis for CDA through September 1, 2014 were identified on Medline. Any paper that presented Mobi-C CDA clinical results was included. Study design, sample size, length of follow-up, use of statistical analysis, quality of life outcome scores, conflict of interest, and complications were recorded.Results: Fifteen studies were included that investigated Mobi-C CDA, only one of which was a level Ib randomized control trial. All studies included showed non-inferiority of one-level Mobi-C CDA to one-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF. Only one study analyzed outcomes of one-level versus two-level Mobi-C CDA, and only one study analyzed two-level Mobi-C CDA versus two-level ACDF. In comparison with other cervical disc prostheses, the Mobi-C prosthesis is associated with higher rates of heterotopic ossification (HO. Studies with conflicts of interest reported lower rates of HO. Adjacent segment degeneration or disease, along with other complications, were not assessed in most studies.Conclusion: One-level Mobi-C CDA is non-inferior, but not superior, to one-level ACDF for patients

  3. Effects of random noise in a dynamical model of love

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yong, E-mail: hsux3@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Gu Rencai; Zhang Huiqing [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > We model the complexity and unpredictability of psychology as Gaussian white noise. > The stochastic system of love is considered including bifurcation and chaos. > We show that noise can both suppress and induce chaos in dynamical models of love. - Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the stochastic model of love and the effects of random noise. We first revisit the deterministic model of love and some basic properties are presented such as: symmetry, dissipation, fixed points (equilibrium), chaotic behaviors and chaotic attractors. Then we construct a stochastic love-triangle model with parametric random excitation due to the complexity and unpredictability of the psychological system, where the randomness is modeled as the standard Gaussian noise. Stochastic dynamics under different three cases of 'Romeo's romantic style', are examined and two kinds of bifurcations versus the noise intensity parameter are observed by the criteria of changes of top Lyapunov exponent and shape of stationary probability density function (PDF) respectively. The phase portraits and time history are carried out to verify the proposed results, and the good agreement can be found. And also the dual roles of the random noise, namely suppressing and inducing chaos are revealed.

  4. Effects of random noise in a dynamical model of love

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yong; Gu Rencai; Zhang Huiqing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We model the complexity and unpredictability of psychology as Gaussian white noise. → The stochastic system of love is considered including bifurcation and chaos. → We show that noise can both suppress and induce chaos in dynamical models of love. - Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the stochastic model of love and the effects of random noise. We first revisit the deterministic model of love and some basic properties are presented such as: symmetry, dissipation, fixed points (equilibrium), chaotic behaviors and chaotic attractors. Then we construct a stochastic love-triangle model with parametric random excitation due to the complexity and unpredictability of the psychological system, where the randomness is modeled as the standard Gaussian noise. Stochastic dynamics under different three cases of 'Romeo's romantic style', are examined and two kinds of bifurcations versus the noise intensity parameter are observed by the criteria of changes of top Lyapunov exponent and shape of stationary probability density function (PDF) respectively. The phase portraits and time history are carried out to verify the proposed results, and the good agreement can be found. And also the dual roles of the random noise, namely suppressing and inducing chaos are revealed.

  5. Dynamics of quantum Fisher information in a two-level system coupled to multiple bosonic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-You; Guo, You-Neng; Zeng, Ke

    2015-11-01

    We consider the optimal parameter estimation for a two-level system coupled to multiple bosonic reservoirs. By using quantum Fisher information (QFI), we investigate the effect of the Markovian reservoirs’ number N on QFI in both weak and strong coupling regimes for a two-level system surrounded by N zero-temperature reservoirs of field modes initially in the vacua. The results show that the dynamics of QFI non-monotonically decays to zero with revival oscillations at some time in the weak coupling regime depending on the reservoirs’ parameters. Furthermore, we also present the relations between the QFI flow, the flows of energy and information, and the sign of the decay rate to gain insight into the physical processes characterizing the dynamics. Project supported by the Hunan Provincial Innovation Foundation for Postgraduate, China (Grant No. CX2014B194) and the Scientific Research Foundation of Hunan Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 13C039).

  6. Estimating overall exposure effects for the clustered and censored outcome using random effect Tobit regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Griswold, Michael E

    2016-11-30

    The random effect Tobit model is a regression model that accommodates both left- and/or right-censoring and within-cluster dependence of the outcome variable. Regression coefficients of random effect Tobit models have conditional interpretations on a constructed latent dependent variable and do not provide inference of overall exposure effects on the original outcome scale. Marginalized random effects model (MREM) permits likelihood-based estimation of marginal mean parameters for the clustered data. For random effect Tobit models, we extend the MREM to marginalize over both the random effects and the normal space and boundary components of the censored response to estimate overall exposure effects at population level. We also extend the 'Average Predicted Value' method to estimate the model-predicted marginal means for each person under different exposure status in a designated reference group by integrating over the random effects and then use the calculated difference to assess the overall exposure effect. The maximum likelihood estimation is proposed utilizing a quasi-Newton optimization algorithm with Gauss-Hermite quadrature to approximate the integration of the random effects. We use these methods to carefully analyze two real datasets. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Processor farming in two-level analysis of historical bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejčí, T.; Kruis, J.; Koudelka, T.; Šejnoha, M.

    2017-11-01

    This contribution presents a processor farming method in connection with a multi-scale analysis. In this method, each macro-scopic integration point or each finite element is connected with a certain meso-scopic problem represented by an appropriate representative volume element (RVE). The solution of a meso-scale problem provides then effective parameters needed on the macro-scale. Such an analysis is suitable for parallel computing because the meso-scale problems can be distributed among many processors. The application of the processor farming method to a real world masonry structure is illustrated by an analysis of Charles bridge in Prague. The three-dimensional numerical model simulates the coupled heat and moisture transfer of one half of arch No. 3. and it is a part of a complex hygro-thermo-mechanical analysis which has been developed to determine the influence of climatic loading on the current state of the bridge.

  8. Bistable perception modeled as competing stochastic integrations at two levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Guido; Mattia, Maurizio; Braun, Jochen; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2009-07-01

    We propose a novel explanation for bistable perception, namely, the collective dynamics of multiple neural populations that are individually meta-stable. Distributed representations of sensory input and of perceptual state build gradually through noise-driven transitions in these populations, until the competition between alternative representations is resolved by a threshold mechanism. The perpetual repetition of this collective race to threshold renders perception bistable. This collective dynamics - which is largely uncoupled from the time-scales that govern individual populations or neurons - explains many hitherto puzzling observations about bistable perception: the wide range of mean alternation rates exhibited by bistable phenomena, the consistent variability of successive dominance periods, and the stabilizing effect of past perceptual states. It also predicts a number of previously unsuspected relationships between observable quantities characterizing bistable perception. We conclude that bistable perception reflects the collective nature of neural decision making rather than properties of individual populations or neurons.

  9. Repairable system analysis in presence of covariates and random effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgio, M.; Guida, M.; Pulcini, G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to model the failure pattern of repairable systems in presence of explained and unexplained heterogeneity. The failure pattern of each system is described by a Power Law Process. Part of the heterogeneity among the patterns is explained through the use of a covariate, and the residual unexplained heterogeneity (random effects) is modeled via a joint probability distribution on the PLP parameters. The proposed approach is applied to a real set of failure time data of powertrain systems mounted on 33 buses employed in urban and suburban routes. Moreover, the joint probability distribution on the PLP parameters estimated from the data is used as an informative prior to make Bayesian inference on the future failure process of a generic system belonging to the same population and employed in an urban or suburban route under randomly chosen working conditions. - Highlights: • We describe the failure process of buses powertrain system subject to heterogeneity. • Heterogeneity due to different service types is explained by a covariate. • Random effect is modeled through a joint pdf on failure process parameters. • The powertrain reliability under new future operating conditions is estimated

  10. Effective Perron-Frobenius eigenvalue for a correlated random map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Roman R.; Cáceres, Manuel O.

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the evolution of random positive linear maps with various type of disorder by analytic perturbation and direct simulation. Our theoretical result indicates that the statistics of a random linear map can be successfully described for long time by the mean-value vector state. The growth rate can be characterized by an effective Perron-Frobenius eigenvalue that strongly depends on the type of correlation between the elements of the projection matrix. We apply this approach to an age-structured population dynamics model. We show that the asymptotic mean-value vector state characterizes the population growth rate when the age-structured model has random vital parameters. In this case our approach reveals the nontrivial dependence of the effective growth rate with cross correlations. The problem was reduced to the calculation of the smallest positive root of a secular polynomial, which can be obtained by perturbations in terms of Green’s function diagrammatic technique built with noncommutative cumulants for arbitrary n -point correlations.

  11. Correlation effects in a discrete quantum random walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stang, J B; Rezakhani, A T; Sanders, B C

    2009-01-01

    We introduce memory-dependent discrete-time quantum random walk models by adding uncorrelated memory terms and also by modifying the Hamiltonian of the walker to include couplings with memory-keeping agents. We next study numerically the correlation effects in these models. We also propose a correlation exponent as a relevant and promising tool for investigation of correlation or memory (hence non-Markovian) effects. Our analysis can easily be applied to more realistic models in which different regimes may emerge because of competition between different underlying physical mechanisms

  12. Nonparametric Estimation of Distributions in Random Effects Models

    KAUST Repository

    Hart, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We propose using minimum distance to obtain nonparametric estimates of the distributions of components in random effects models. A main setting considered is equivalent to having a large number of small datasets whose locations, and perhaps scales, vary randomly, but which otherwise have a common distribution. Interest focuses on estimating the distribution that is common to all datasets, knowledge of which is crucial in multiple testing problems where a location/scale invariant test is applied to every small dataset. A detailed algorithm for computing minimum distance estimates is proposed, and the usefulness of our methodology is illustrated by a simulation study and an analysis of microarray data. Supplemental materials for the article, including R-code and a dataset, are available online. © 2011 American Statistical Association.

  13. Probe transparency in a two-level medium embedded by a squeezed vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, S.; Zhou, P.

    1994-08-01

    Effect of the detuning on the probe absorption spectra of a two-level system with and without a classically driven field in a squeezed vacuum is investigated. For a strong squeezing, there is a threshold which determines the positions and widths of the absorption peaks, for the squeezed parameter M. In a large detuning, the spectra exhibit some resemblance to the Fano spectrum. The squeezing-induced transparency occurs at the frequency 2ω L - ω A in the minimum-uncertainty squeezed vacuum. This effect is not phase-sensitive. (author). 15 refs, 8 figs

  14. Twice random, once mixed: applying mixed models to simultaneously analyze random effects of language and participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Dirk P

    2012-03-01

    Psychologists, psycholinguists, and other researchers using language stimuli have been struggling for more than 30 years with the problem of how to analyze experimental data that contain two crossed random effects (items and participants). The classical analysis of variance does not apply; alternatives have been proposed but have failed to catch on, and a statistically unsatisfactory procedure of using two approximations (known as F(1) and F(2)) has become the standard. A simple and elegant solution using mixed model analysis has been available for 15 years, and recent improvements in statistical software have made mixed models analysis widely available. The aim of this article is to increase the use of mixed models by giving a concise practical introduction and by giving clear directions for undertaking the analysis in the most popular statistical packages. The article also introduces the DJMIXED: add-on package for SPSS, which makes entering the models and reporting their results as straightforward as possible.

  15. Neighborhood effects in a behavioral randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Sandi L; Leonard, Tammy; Murdoch, James; Hughes, Amy; McQueen, Amy; Gupta, Samir

    2014-11-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions intended to modify health behaviors may be influenced by neighborhood effects which can impede unbiased estimation of intervention effects. Examining a RCT designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (N=5628), we found statistically significant neighborhood effects: average CRC test use among neighboring study participants was significantly and positively associated with individual patient's CRC test use. This potentially important spatially-varying covariate has not previously been considered in a RCT. Our results suggest that future RCTs of health behavior interventions should assess potential social interactions between participants, which may cause intervention arm contamination and may bias effect size estimation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Fay-Herriot Model with Different Random Effect Variances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Tomáš; Morales, D.; Herrador, M.; Esteban, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2011), s. 785-797 ISSN 0361-0926 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : small area estimation * Fay-Herriot model * Linear mixed model * Labor Force Survey Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.274, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/SI/hobza-a%20fay-herriot%20model%20with%20different%20random%20effect%20variances.pdf

  17. SCREENING OF MEDIUM COMPOUNDS USING A TWO-LEVEL FACTORIAL DESIGN FOR SACCHAROMYCES BOULARDII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUOWEI SHU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Even if the probiotic effect of Saccharomyces boulardii is has been reported, this yeast is rarely used in medium composition. Based on single factor experiment, two-level factorial design was employed to evaluate the effect of carbon sources (sucrose, glucose, nitrogen sources (soy peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, calf serum, malt extract and salts (K2HPO4, KH2PO4, MgSO4, Na2HPO4, NaH2PO4, CaCl2, sodium citrate, sodium glutamate on the growth of S. boulardii. At the same time, the optical density (OD in the medium was measured at 560 nm after 36 h of incubation. The result of two-level factorial design experiment showed that calf serum (p = 0.0214 and sodium citrate (p = 0.0045 are the significant growth factors of S. boulardii, sucrose (p = 0.0861 and malt extract (p = 0.0763 are important factors. In addition, sucrose and sodium citrate showed positive effect on the growth of S. boulardii. However, calf serum and malt extract showed negative effect on the growth. And we determined that the optimum medium composition for S. boulardii was as follow: 37.5 g·L-1 sucrose, 6 g·L-1 calf serum, 6 g·L-1 malt extract, 5 g·L-1 sodium citrate.

  18. Quantum averaging and resonances: two-level atom in a one-mode classical laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amniat-Talab

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available   We use a nonperturbative method based on quantum averaging and an adapted from of resonant transformations to treat the resonances of the Hamiltonian of a two-level atom interacting with a one-mode classical field in Floquet formalism. We illustrate this method by extraction of effective Hamiltonians of the system in two regimes of weak and strong coupling. The results obtained in the strong-coupling regime, are valid in the whole range of the coupling constant for the one-photon zero-field resonance.

  19. Elimination of two level fluctuators in superconducting quantum bits by an epitaxial tunnel barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seongshik; Cicak, Katarina; Kline, Jeffrey S.; Sillanpaeae, Mika A.; Osborn, Kevin D.; Whittaker, Jed D.; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Pappas, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum computing based on Josephson junction technology is considered promising due to its scalable architecture. However, decoherence is a major obstacle. Here, we report evidence for improved Josephson quantum bits (qubits) using a single-crystal Al 2 O 3 tunnel barrier. We have found an ∼80% reduction in the density of the spectral splittings that indicate the existence of two-level fluctators (TLFs) in amorphous tunnel barriers. The residual ∼20% TLFs can be attributed to interfacial effects that may be further reduced by different electrode materials. These results show that decoherence sources in the tunnel barrier of Josephson qubits can be identified and eliminated

  20. Oscillations of Doppler-Raby of two level atom moving in resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovskij, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of the two-level atom with the quantum mode of the high-quality resonator uniformly moving by the classic trajectory, is considered. The recurrent formula for the probability of the atom transition with the photon radiation is determined through the dressed states method. It is shown, that the ratio between the Doppler shift value of the atom transition and the Raby frequency value of the atom-field system qualitatively effects the dependence of the moving atom transition probability on its position in the resonator, as well as on its value [ru

  1. Estimation of Missing Observations in Two-Level Split-Plot Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almimi, Ashraf A.; Kulahci, Murat; Montgomery, Douglas C.

    2008-01-01

    Inserting estimates for the missing observations from split-plot designs restores their balanced or orthogonal structure and alleviates the difficulties in the statistical analysis. In this article, we extend a method due to Draper and Stoneman to estimate the missing observations from unreplicated...... two-level factorial and fractional factorial split-plot (FSP and FFSP) designs. The missing observations, which can either be from the same whole plot, from different whole plots, or comprise entire whole plots, are estimated by equating to zero a number of specific contrast columns equal...... to the number of the missing observations. These estimates are inserted into the design table and the estimates for the remaining effects (or alias chains of effects as the case with FFSP designs) are plotted on two half-normal plots: one for the whole-plot effects and the other for the subplot effects...

  2. Effect of Playful Balancing Training - A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Jessen, Jari Due

    2013-01-01

    We used the modular playware in the form of modular interactive tiles for playful training of community-dwelling elderly with balancing problem. During short-term play on the modular interactive tiles, the elderly were playing physical, interactive games that were challenging their dynamic balance...... increase in balancing performance (DGI score: 21.3) after short-term playful training with the modular interactive tiles, whereas the control group remained with a score indicating balancing problems and risk of falling (DGI score: 16.6). The small pilot randomized controlled trial suggests...... that the playful interaction with the modular interactive tiles has a significant effect even after a very short time of play. The average total training time to obtain the statistical significant effect amounted to just 2h45m....

  3. Generated effect modifiers (GEM's) in randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Eva; Tarpey, Thaddeus; Su, Zhe; Ogden, R Todd

    2017-01-01

    In a randomized clinical trial (RCT), it is often of interest not only to estimate the effect of various treatments on the outcome, but also to determine whether any patient characteristic has a different relationship with the outcome, depending on treatment. In regression models for the outcome, if there is a non-zero interaction between treatment and a predictor, that predictor is called an "effect modifier". Identification of such effect modifiers is crucial as we move towards precision medicine, that is, optimizing individual treatment assignment based on patient measurements assessed when presenting for treatment. In most settings, there will be several baseline predictor variables that could potentially modify the treatment effects. This article proposes optimal methods of constructing a composite variable (defined as a linear combination of pre-treatment patient characteristics) in order to generate an effect modifier in an RCT setting. Several criteria are considered for generating effect modifiers and their performance is studied via simulations. An example from a RCT is provided for illustration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Generated effect modifiers (GEM’s) in randomized clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Eva; Tarpey, Thaddeus; Su, Zhe; Ogden, R. Todd

    2017-01-01

    In a randomized clinical trial (RCT), it is often of interest not only to estimate the effect of various treatments on the outcome, but also to determine whether any patient characteristic has a different relationship with the outcome, depending on treatment. In regression models for the outcome, if there is a non-zero interaction between treatment and a predictor, that predictor is called an “effect modifier”. Identification of such effect modifiers is crucial as we move towards precision medicine, that is, optimizing individual treatment assignment based on patient measurements assessed when presenting for treatment. In most settings, there will be several baseline predictor variables that could potentially modify the treatment effects. This article proposes optimal methods of constructing a composite variable (defined as a linear combination of pre-treatment patient characteristics) in order to generate an effect modifier in an RCT setting. Several criteria are considered for generating effect modifiers and their performance is studied via simulations. An example from a RCT is provided for illustration. PMID:27465235

  5. Dynamical model of coherent circularly polarized optical pulse interactions with two-level quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavcheva, G.; Hess, O.

    2005-01-01

    We propose and develop a method for theoretical description of circularly (elliptically) polarized optical pulse resonant coherent interactions with two-level atoms. The method is based on the time-evolution equations of a two-level quantum system in the presence of a time-dependent dipole perturbation for electric dipole transitions between states with total angular-momentum projection difference (ΔJ z =±1) excited by a circularly polarized electromagnetic field [Feynman et al., J. Appl. Phys. 28, 49 (1957)]. The adopted real-vector representation approach allows for coupling with the vectorial Maxwell's equations for the optical wave propagation and thus the resulting Maxwell pseudospin equations can be numerically solved in the time domain without any approximations. The model permits a more exact study of the ultrafast coherent pulse propagation effects taking into account the vector nature of the electromagnetic field and hence the polarization state of the optical excitation. We demonstrate self-induced transparency effects and formation of polarized solitons. The model represents a qualitative extension of the well-known optical Maxwell-Bloch equations valid for linearly polarized light and a tool for studying coherent quantum control mechanisms

  6. Effects of professional oral health care on elderly: randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, T; Ookawa, K; Haruta, N; Hagiwara, Y; Seki, M

    2014-11-01

    To better understand the role of the professional oral health care for elderly in improving geriatric oral health, the effects of short-term professional oral health care (once per week for 1 month) on oral microbiological parameters were assessed. Parallel, open-labelled, randomize-controlled trial was undertaken in a nursing home for elderly in Shizuoka, Japan. Thirty-four dentate elderly over 74 years were randomly assigned from ID number to the intervention (17/34) and control (17/34) groups. The outcomes were changes in oral microbiological parameters (number of bacteria in unstimulated saliva; whole bacteria, Streptococcus, Fusobacterium and Prevotella: opportunistic pathogens detection: and index of oral hygiene evaluation [Dental Plaque Index, DPI]) within the intervention period. Each parameter was evaluated at before and after intervention period. Four elderly were lost from mortality (1), bone fracture (1), refused to participate (1) and multi-antibiotics usage (1). Finally, 30 elderly were analysed (14/intervention and 16/control). At baseline, no difference was found between the control and intervention groups. After the intervention period, the percentage of Streptococcus species increased significantly in the intervention group (Intervention, 86% [12/14]; Control, 50% [8/16]: Fisher's, right-tailed, P oral health care can improve oral conditions in the elderly. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The effectiveness of propolis on gingivitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Walter A; Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days -14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13-22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period.

  8. Entanglement for a Bimodal Cavity Field Interacting with a Two-Level Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jia; Chen Ziyu; Bu Shenping; Zhang Guofeng

    2009-01-01

    Negativity has been adopted to investigate the entanglement in a system composed of a two-level atom and a two-mode cavity field. Effects of Kerr-like medium and the number of photon inside the cavity on the entanglement are studied. Our results show that atomic initial state must be superposed, so that the two cavity field modes can be entangled. Moreover, we also conclude that the number of photon in the two cavity mode should be equal. The interaction between modes, namely, the Kerr effect, has a significant negative contribution. Note that the atom frequency and the cavity frequency have an indistinguishable effect, so a corresponding approximation has been made in this article. These results may be useful for quantum information in optics systems.

  9. Effects of changing the random number stride in Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a common practice in Monte Carlo radiation transport codes which is to start each random walk a specified number of steps up the random number sequence from the previous one. This is called the stride in the random number sequence between source particles. It is used for correlated sampling or to provide tree-structured random numbers. A new random number generator algorithm for the major Monte Carlo code MCNP has been written to allow adjustment of the random number stride. This random number generator is machine portable. The effects of varying the stride for several sample problems are examined

  10. Effects of nattokinase on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Gum, Si Nae; Paik, Jean Kyung; Lim, Hyo Hee; Kim, Kyong-Chol; Ogasawara, Kazuya; Inoue, Kenichi; Park, Sungha; Jang, Yangsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of nattokinase supplementation on blood pressure in subjects with pre-hypertension or stage 1 hypertension. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 86 participants ranging from 20 to 80 years of age with an initial untreated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 130 to 159 mmHg received nattokinase (2,000 FU/capsule) or a placebo capsule for 8 weeks. Seventy-three subjects completed the protocol. Compared with the control group, the net changes in SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were -5.55 mmHg (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -0.57 mmHg; pnattokinase group compared with the control group (pnattokinase supplementation resulted in a reduction in SBP and DBP. These findings suggest that increased intake of nattokinase may play an important role in preventing and treating hypertension.

  11. The Population Inversion and the Entropy of a Moving Two-Level Atom in Interaction with a Quantized Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Kahla, D. A. M.; Abdel-Aty, M.; Farouk, A.

    2018-05-01

    An atom with only two energy eigenvalues is described by a two-dimensional state space spanned by the two energy eigenstates is called a two-level atom. We consider the interaction between a two-level atom system with a constant velocity. An analytic solution of the systems which interacts with a quantized field is provided. Furthermore, the significant effect of the temperature on the atomic inversion, the purity and the information entropy are discussed in case of the initial state either an exited state or a maximally mixed state. Additionally, the effect of the half wavelengths number of the field-mode is investigated.

  12. Improved Genetic Algorithm with Two-Level Approximation for Truss Optimization by Using Discrete Shape Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-yan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Improved Genetic Algorithm with Two-Level Approximation (IGATA to minimize truss weight by simultaneously optimizing size, shape, and topology variables. On the basis of a previously presented truss sizing/topology optimization method based on two-level approximation and genetic algorithm (GA, a new method for adding shape variables is presented, in which the nodal positions are corresponding to a set of coordinate lists. A uniform optimization model including size/shape/topology variables is established. First, a first-level approximate problem is constructed to transform the original implicit problem to an explicit problem. To solve this explicit problem which involves size/shape/topology variables, GA is used to optimize individuals which include discrete topology variables and shape variables. When calculating the fitness value of each member in the current generation, a second-level approximation method is used to optimize the continuous size variables. With the introduction of shape variables, the original optimization algorithm was improved in individual coding strategy as well as GA execution techniques. Meanwhile, the update strategy of the first-level approximation problem was also improved. The results of numerical examples show that the proposed method is effective in dealing with the three kinds of design variables simultaneously, and the required computational cost for structural analysis is quite small.

  13. Development and evaluation of a two-level functional structure for the thin film encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Wung; Sharma, Jaibir; Singh, Navab; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a two level capping structure for encapsulating micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) devices. The two level capping solves the main issue of the longer release time as well as safe sealing in thin film encapsulation (TFE). In this technique, the first cap layer has many etch holes, which were uniformly distributed on it to enhance the removal of the sacrificial layer. The second cap layer forms a cap on every etch hole in the first cap layer to protect the mass loading on MEMS devices. This technique was found to be very effective in reducing the release time of the TFE. For the 1200 µm × 1200 µm sized cavity encapsulation, this technique decreases the release time of the TFE by a factor of 24 in comparison to the sidewall located channel scheme. The presented technique also helps in reducing the size of TFE as the etch holes are uniformly distributed on the TFE itself. Wide seal rings were not required to accommodate sidewall channels. (paper)

  14. Two-level Robust Measurement Fusion Kalman Filter for Clustering Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; QI Wen-Juan; DENG Zi-Li

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the distributed fusion Kalman filtering over clustering sensor networks. The sensor network is partitioned as clusters by the nearest neighbor rule and each cluster consists of sensing nodes and cluster-head. Using the minimax robust estimation principle, based on the worst-case conservative system with the conservative upper bounds of noise variances, two-level robust measurement fusion Kalman filter is presented for the clustering sensor network systems with uncertain noise variances. It can significantly reduce the communication load and save energy when the number of sensors is very large. A Lyapunov equation approach for the robustness analysis is presented, by which the robustness of the local and fused Kalman filters is proved. The concept of the robust accuracy is presented, and the robust accuracy relations among the local and fused robust Kalman filters are proved. It is proved that the robust accuracy of the two-level weighted measurement fuser is equal to that of the global centralized robust fuser and is higher than those of each local robust filter and each local weighted measurement fuser. A simulation example shows the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  15. Domain decomposition method of stochastic PDEs: a two-level scalable preconditioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subber, Waad; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2012-01-01

    For uncertainty quantification in many practical engineering problems, the stochastic finite element method (SFEM) may be computationally challenging. In SFEM, the size of the algebraic linear system grows rapidly with the spatial mesh resolution and the order of the stochastic dimension. In this paper, we describe a non-overlapping domain decomposition method, namely the iterative substructuring method to tackle the large-scale linear system arising in the SFEM. The SFEM is based on domain decomposition in the geometric space and a polynomial chaos expansion in the probabilistic space. In particular, a two-level scalable preconditioner is proposed for the iterative solver of the interface problem for the stochastic systems. The preconditioner is equipped with a coarse problem which globally connects the subdomains both in the geometric and probabilistic spaces via their corner nodes. This coarse problem propagates the information quickly across the subdomains leading to a scalable preconditioner. For numerical illustrations, a two-dimensional stochastic elliptic partial differential equation (SPDE) with spatially varying non-Gaussian random coefficients is considered. The numerical scalability of the the preconditioner is investigated with respect to the mesh size, subdomain size, fixed problem size per subdomain and order of polynomial chaos expansion. The numerical experiments are performed on a Linux cluster using MPI and PETSc parallel libraries.

  16. Two-level image authentication by two-step phase-shifting interferometry and compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Meng, Xiangfeng; Yin, Yongkai; Yang, Xiulun; Wang, Yurong; Li, Xianye; Peng, Xiang; He, Wenqi; Dong, Guoyan; Chen, Hongyi

    2018-01-01

    A two-level image authentication method is proposed; the method is based on two-step phase-shifting interferometry, double random phase encoding, and compressive sensing (CS) theory, by which the certification image can be encoded into two interferograms. Through discrete wavelet transform (DWT), sparseness processing, Arnold transform, and data compression, two compressed signals can be generated and delivered to two different participants of the authentication system. Only the participant who possesses the first compressed signal attempts to pass the low-level authentication. The application of Orthogonal Match Pursuit CS algorithm reconstruction, inverse Arnold transform, inverse DWT, two-step phase-shifting wavefront reconstruction, and inverse Fresnel transform can result in the output of a remarkable peak in the central location of the nonlinear correlation coefficient distributions of the recovered image and the standard certification image. Then, the other participant, who possesses the second compressed signal, is authorized to carry out the high-level authentication. Therefore, both compressed signals are collected to reconstruct the original meaningful certification image with a high correlation coefficient. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations verify the feasibility of the proposed method.

  17. Effects of an Interactive School-Based Program for Preventing Adolescent Sexual Harassment: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lijster, Gaby P A; Felten, Hanneke; Kok, Gerjo; Kocken, Paul L

    2016-05-01

    Many adolescents experience sexual harassment and victims of sexual harassment have higher risks regarding well-being and health behaviors such as higher risks of suicidal thoughts, suicidal ideation and feeling unsafe at school. A peer-performed play and school lessons on preventing sexual harassment behavior were presented to secondary school students. We evaluated its effectiveness, using a cluster-randomized controlled design to assign schools to an experimental condition [n = 14 schools; 431 students (51 % female)] and a control condition [n = 11 schools; 384 students (51 % female)]. To measure the effects of the intervention at first post-test and 6-month follow-up, our multilevel analyses used a two-level random intercept model. Outcome measures were sexual harassment behaviors, behavioral determinants and distal factors influencing these behaviors. At post-test, students in the experimental group reported a reduced intention to commit sexual harassment behavior and higher self-efficacy in rejecting it. At post-test and follow-up there was a significant positive effect on social norms for rejecting sexual harassment behavior. At follow-up, sexual self-esteem was higher in students in the experimental group than in the control group. Effects on these determinants will benefit adolescents' future sexual behaviors. In combination, the play and lessons, possibly together with continued sexual health education and skills programs on social-emotional learning in subsequent school years, have potential for preventing sexual harassment behavior.

  18. Transmission-line resonators for the study of individual two-level tunneling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Jan David; Bilmes, Alexander; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Lisenfeld, Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    Parasitic two-level tunneling systems (TLS) emerge in amorphous dielectrics and constitute a serious nuisance for various microfabricated devices, where they act as a source of noise and decoherence. Here, we demonstrate a new test bed for the study of TLS in various materials which provides access to properties of individual TLS as well as their ensemble response. We terminate a superconducting transmission-line resonator with a capacitor that hosts TLS in its dielectric. By tuning TLS via applied mechanical strain, we observe the signatures of individual TLS strongly coupled to the resonator in its transmission characteristics and extract the coupling components of their dipole moments and energy relaxation rates. The strong and well-defined coupling to the TLS bath results in pronounced resonator frequency fluctuations and excess phase noise, through which we can study TLS ensemble effects such as spectral diffusion, and probe theoretical models of TLS interactions.

  19. Nonlinear Jaynes–Cummings model for two interacting two-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Sánchez, O de los; González-Gutiérrez, C; Récamier, J

    2016-01-01

    In this work we examine a nonlinear version of the Jaynes–Cummings model for two identical two-level atoms allowing for Ising-like and dipole–dipole interplays between them. The model is said to be nonlinear in the sense that it can incorporate both a general intensity-dependent interaction between the atomic system and the cavity field and/or the presence of a nonlinear medium inside the cavity. As an example, we consider a particular type of atom-field coupling based upon the so-called Buck–Sukumar model and a lossless Kerr-like cavity. We describe the possible effects of such features on the evolution of some quantities of current interest, such as atomic excitation, purity, concurrence, the entropy of the field and the evolution of the latter in phase space. (paper)

  20. Faithful state transfer between two-level systems via an actively cooled finite-temperature cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárkány, Lőrinc; Fortágh, József; Petrosyan, David

    2018-03-01

    We consider state transfer between two qubits—effective two-level systems represented by Rydberg atoms—via a common mode of a microwave cavity at finite temperature. We find that when both qubits have the same coupling strength to the cavity field, at large enough detuning from the cavity mode frequency, quantum interference between the transition paths makes the swap of the excitation between the qubits largely insensitive to the number of thermal photons in the cavity. When, however, the coupling strengths are different, the photon-number-dependent differential Stark shift of the transition frequencies precludes efficient transfer. Nevertheless, using an auxiliary cooling system to continuously extract the cavity photons, we can still achieve a high-fidelity state transfer between the qubits.

  1. Assessing robustness of designs for random effects parameters for nonlinear mixed-effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffull, Stephen B; Hooker, Andrew C

    2017-12-01

    Optimal designs for nonlinear models are dependent on the choice of parameter values. Various methods have been proposed to provide designs that are robust to uncertainty in the prior choice of parameter values. These methods are generally based on estimating the expectation of the determinant (or a transformation of the determinant) of the information matrix over the prior distribution of the parameter values. For high dimensional models this can be computationally challenging. For nonlinear mixed-effects models the question arises as to the importance of accounting for uncertainty in the prior value of the variances of the random effects parameters. In this work we explore the influence of the variance of the random effects parameters on the optimal design. We find that the method for approximating the expectation and variance of the likelihood is of potential importance for considering the influence of random effects. The most common approximation to the likelihood, based on a first-order Taylor series approximation, yields designs that are relatively insensitive to the prior value of the variance of the random effects parameters and under these conditions it appears to be sufficient to consider uncertainty on the fixed-effects parameters only.

  2. Computer simulation of two-level pedicle subtraction osteotomy for severe thoracolumbar kyphosis in ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2017-01-01

    significantly from 6.1 ± 1.9 to 2.0 ± 1.1 (P < 0.001. In terms of clinical outcome, 10 cases were graded “excellent” and 4 cases were graded “good.” Conclusion: Two-level PSO using a preoperative computer simulation is a feasible, safe, and effective technique for the treatment of severe thoracolumbar kyphosis in AS patients with normal cervical motion.

  3. Effects of Topological Randomness on Cooperation in a Deterministic Prisoner's Dilemma Game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mei; Yang Junzhong

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we consider an evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game on a homogeneous random network with the richest-following strategy adoption rule. By constructing homogeneous random networks from a regular ring graph, we investigate the effects of topological randomness on cooperation. In contrast to the ordinary view that the presence of small amount of shortcuts in ring graphs favors cooperation, we find the cooperation inhibition by weak topological randomness. The explanations on the observations are presented. (general)

  4. Bayesian Hierarchical Random Effects Models in Forensic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin G. G. Aitken

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Statistical modeling of the evaluation of evidence with the use of the likelihood ratio has a long history. It dates from the Dreyfus case at the end of the nineteenth century through the work at Bletchley Park in the Second World War to the present day. The development received a significant boost in 1977 with a seminal work by Dennis Lindley which introduced a Bayesian hierarchical random effects model for the evaluation of evidence with an example of refractive index measurements on fragments of glass. Many models have been developed since then. The methods have now been sufficiently well-developed and have become so widespread that it is timely to try and provide a software package to assist in their implementation. With that in mind, a project (SAILR: Software for the Analysis and Implementation of Likelihood Ratios was funded by the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes through their Monopoly programme to develop a software package for use by forensic scientists world-wide that would assist in the statistical analysis and implementation of the approach based on likelihood ratios. It is the purpose of this document to provide a short review of a small part of this history. The review also provides a background, or landscape, for the development of some of the models within the SAILR package and references to SAILR as made as appropriate.

  5. Bayesian Hierarchical Random Effects Models in Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Colin G G

    2018-01-01

    Statistical modeling of the evaluation of evidence with the use of the likelihood ratio has a long history. It dates from the Dreyfus case at the end of the nineteenth century through the work at Bletchley Park in the Second World War to the present day. The development received a significant boost in 1977 with a seminal work by Dennis Lindley which introduced a Bayesian hierarchical random effects model for the evaluation of evidence with an example of refractive index measurements on fragments of glass. Many models have been developed since then. The methods have now been sufficiently well-developed and have become so widespread that it is timely to try and provide a software package to assist in their implementation. With that in mind, a project (SAILR: Software for the Analysis and Implementation of Likelihood Ratios) was funded by the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes through their Monopoly programme to develop a software package for use by forensic scientists world-wide that would assist in the statistical analysis and implementation of the approach based on likelihood ratios. It is the purpose of this document to provide a short review of a small part of this history. The review also provides a background, or landscape, for the development of some of the models within the SAILR package and references to SAILR as made as appropriate.

  6. Two-step values for games with two-level communication structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Béal, Silvain; Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna; Solal, Philippe

    TU games with two-level communication structure, in which a two-level communication structure relates fundamentally to the given coalition structure and consists of a communication graph on the collection of the a priori unions in the coalition structure, as well as a collection of communication

  7. Effects of auriculotherapy on labour pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafetoni, Reginaldo Roque; Shimo, Antonieta Keiko Kakuda

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the effects of auriculotherapy in pain control and its outcomes on the duration of labour. This is a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial with preliminary data. Thirty pregnant women with gestational age ≥ 37 weeks, cervical dilatation ≥ 4 cm and two or more contractions in 10 minutes were selected and randomly divided into three groups: auriculotherapy, placebo and control. Auriculotherapy was applied using crystal beads on four strategic points. No statistical significance was found between the groups with regard to pain; however, the women from the auriculotherapy group had lower intensity and less perception of pain at 30, 60 and 120 minutes of treatment. The average duration of labour was shorter in the auriculotherapy group (248.7 versus placebo 414.8 versus control 296.3 minutes); caesarean section rates were higher in the placebo group (50%) and the same in the other groups (10%). Mothers who received auriculotherapy presented a tendency for greater pain control and shorter labour duration; however, caesarean section rates in this group were similar to the control group. This trial precedes a larger study in progress. Registration of Brazilian Clinical Trials: RBR-47hhbj. Avaliar os efeitos da auriculoterapia no controle da dor e seus desfechos na duração do trabalho de parto. Trata-se de um ensaio controlado, randomizado e duplo-cego, com dados preliminares. Foram selecionadas 30 parturientes com idade gestacional ≥ 37 semanas, dilatação cervical ≥ 4 cm e duas ou mais contrações em 10 minutos, divididas aleatoriamente em três grupos: auriculoterapia, placebo ou controle. A auriculoterapia foi aplicada com microesferas de cristais em quatro pontos estratégicos. Não houve significância estatística entre os grupos com relação à dor; no entanto, as mulheres do grupo de auriculoterapia, apresentaram menor intensidade e menor percepção da dor aos 30, 60 e 120 minutos do tratamento. A média de duração do trabalho de

  8. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Randomized Effectiveness Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Angela; Buscemi, Joanna; Stolley, Melinda R.; Schiffer, Linda A.; Kim, Yoonsang; Braunschweig, Carol L.; Gomez-Perez, Sandra L.; Blumstein, Lara B.; Van Horn, Linda; Dyer, Alan R.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The preschool years provide a unique window of opportunity to intervene on obesity-related lifestyle risk factors during the formative years of a child’s life. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a preschool-based obesity prevention effectiveness trial at 1-year follow-up. Design RCT. Settings/participants Primarily African American children (aged 3–5 years, N=618) attending Head Start preschool programs administered by Chicago Public Schools. Methods Eighteen preschools were randomly assigned in 2007–2008 to receive either: (1) a 14-week teacher-delivered intervention focused on healthy lifestyle behaviors; or (2) a 14-week teacher-delivered general health curriculum (control group). Main outcome measures The primary outcome, BMI, was measured at baseline, post-intervention, and 1-year follow-up. Diet and screen time behaviors were also assessed at these time points. Multilevel mixed effects models were used to test for between-group differences. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Significant between-group differences were observed in diet, but not in BMI z-score or screen time at 1-year follow-up. Diet differences favored the intervention arm over controls in overall diet quality (p=0.02) and in subcomponents of diet quality, as measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005, and in fruit intake (servings/day, excludes juice) (p=0.02). Diet quality worsened more among controls than the intervention group at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions The adaptation of Hip-Hop to Health Jr. produced modest benefits in diet quality, but did not significantly impact weight gain trajectory. Not unlike other effectiveness trials, this real-world version delivered by Head Start teachers produced fewer benefits than the more rigorous efficacy trial. It is important to understand and build upon the lessons learned from these types of trials so that we can design, implement, and disseminate successful evidence-based programs more widely and effectively

  9. Effect of etanercept in polymyalgia rheumatica: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Frederik; Galbo, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-α receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR.......To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-α receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR....

  10. Examples of mixed-effects modeling with crossed random effects and with binomial data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quené, H.; van den Bergh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Psycholinguistic data are often analyzed with repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVA), but this paper argues that mixed-effects (multilevel) models provide a better alternative method. First, models are discussed in which the two random factors of participants and items are crossed, and not

  11. Random effects coefficient of determination for mixed and meta-analysis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidenko, Eugene; Sargent, James; Onega, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of a mixed model is the presence of random effects. We have developed a coefficient, called the random effects coefficient of determination, [Formula: see text], that estimates the proportion of the conditional variance of the dependent variable explained by random effects. This coefficient takes values from 0 to 1 and indicates how strong the random effects are. The difference from the earlier suggested fixed effects coefficient of determination is emphasized. If [Formula: see text] is close to 0, there is weak support for random effects in the model because the reduction of the variance of the dependent variable due to random effects is small; consequently, random effects may be ignored and the model simplifies to standard linear regression. The value of [Formula: see text] apart from 0 indicates the evidence of the variance reduction in support of the mixed model. If random effects coefficient of determination is close to 1 the variance of random effects is very large and random effects turn into free fixed effects-the model can be estimated using the dummy variable approach. We derive explicit formulas for [Formula: see text] in three special cases: the random intercept model, the growth curve model, and meta-analysis model. Theoretical results are illustrated with three mixed model examples: (1) travel time to the nearest cancer center for women with breast cancer in the U.S., (2) cumulative time watching alcohol related scenes in movies among young U.S. teens, as a risk factor for early drinking onset, and (3) the classic example of the meta-analysis model for combination of 13 studies on tuberculosis vaccine.

  12. Effects of Random Values for Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Ping Dai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm is generally improved by adaptively adjusting the inertia weight or combining with other evolution algorithms. However, in most modified PSO algorithms, the random values are always generated by uniform distribution in the range of [0, 1]. In this study, the random values, which are generated by uniform distribution in the ranges of [0, 1] and [−1, 1], and Gauss distribution with mean 0 and variance 1 ( U [ 0 , 1 ] , U [ − 1 , 1 ] and G ( 0 , 1 , are respectively used in the standard PSO and linear decreasing inertia weight (LDIW PSO algorithms. For comparison, the deterministic PSO algorithm, in which the random values are set as 0.5, is also investigated in this study. Some benchmark functions and the pressure vessel design problem are selected to test these algorithms with different types of random values in three space dimensions (10, 30, and 100. The experimental results show that the standard PSO and LDIW-PSO algorithms with random values generated by U [ − 1 , 1 ] or G ( 0 , 1 are more likely to avoid falling into local optima and quickly obtain the global optima. This is because the large-scale random values can expand the range of particle velocity to make the particle more likely to escape from local optima and obtain the global optima. Although the random values generated by U [ − 1 , 1 ] or G ( 0 , 1 are beneficial to improve the global searching ability, the local searching ability for a low dimensional practical optimization problem may be decreased due to the finite particles.

  13. Indoor Semantic Modelling for Routing: The Two-Level Routing Approach for Indoor Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Liu

    2017-11-01

    that a small increase of user size can largely change the accessible path; the second case shows different path segments for distinct sizes can be combined into one geometric path; the third case demonstrates a geometric network can be created ’on the fly’ for any specified spaces of a building. Therefore, the generation and routing of geometric networks are very flexible and fit to given users. To demonstrate the proposed two-level routing approach, this thesis designs five cases. The five cases are distinguished according to the method of model creation (pre-computed or ’on-the-fly’ and model storage (on the client or server. Two of them are realized in this thesis: 1 Case 1 just in the client pre-computes the logical network and derives geometric networks ’on the fly’; 2 Case 2 just in the client pre-computes and stores the logical and geometric networks for certain user sizes. Case 1 is implemented in a desktop application for building managers, and Case 2 is realized as a mobile mock-up for mobile users without an internet connection. As this thesis shows, two-level routing is powerful enough to effectively provide indicative logical paths and/or comprehensive geometric paths, according to different user requirements on path details. In the desktop application, three of the proposed routing options for two-level routing are tested for the simple OTB building and the complex Schiphol Airport building. These use cases demonstrate that the two-level routing approach includes the following merits: • It supports routing in different abstraction forms of a building. The INSM model can describe different subdivision results of a building, and it allows two types of routing network to be derived – pure logical and geometric ones. The logical network contains the topology and semantics of indoor spaces, and the geometric network provides accurate geometry for paths. A consistent navigation model is formed with the two networks, i.e., the conceptual and

  14. Acoustic interactions between inversion symmetric and asymmetric two-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churkin, A; Schechter, M; Barash, D

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous solids, as well as many disordered lattices, display remarkable universality in their low temperature acoustic properties. This universality is attributed to the attenuation of phonons by tunneling two-level systems (TLSs), facilitated by the interaction of the TLSs with the phonon field. TLS-phonon interaction also mediates effective TLS–TLS interactions, which dictates the existence of a glassy phase and its low energy properties. Here we consider KBr:CN, the archetypal disordered lattice showing universality. We calculate numerically, using conjugate gradients method, the effective TLS–TLS interactions for inversion symmetric (CN flips) and asymmetric (CN rotations) TLSs, in the absence and presence of disorder, in two and three dimensions. The observed dependence of the magnitude and spatial power law of the interaction on TLS symmetry, and its change with disorder, characterizes TLS–TLS interactions in disordered lattices in both extreme and moderate dilutions. Our results are in good agreement with the two-TLS model, recently introduced to explain long-standing questions regarding the quantitative universality of phonon attenuation and the energy scale of ≈1–3 K below which universality is observed. (paper)

  15. Dynamics of a quantum two-level system under the action of phase-diffusion field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobakinskaya, E.A. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pankratov, A.L., E-mail: alp@ipm.sci-nnov.ru [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Vaks, V.L. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-09

    We study a behavior of quantum two-level system, interacting with noisy phase-diffusion field. The dynamics is shown to split into two regimes, determined by the coherence time of the phase-diffusion field. For both regimes we present a model of quantum system behavior and discuss possible applications of the obtained effect for spectroscopy. In particular, the obtained analytical formula for the macroscopic polarization demonstrates that the phase-diffusion field does not affect the absorption line shape, which opens up an intriguing possibility of noisy spectroscopy, based on broadband sources with Lorentzian line shape. -- Highlights: ► We study dynamics of quantum system interacting with noisy phase-diffusion field. ► At short times the phase-diffusion field induces polarization in the quantum system. ► At long times the noise leads to polarization decay and heating of a quantum system. ► Simple model of interaction is derived. ► Application of the described effects for spectroscopy is discussed.

  16. Dynamical properties of a two-level system with arbitrary nonlinearities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nication, information processing and quantum computing, such as in the investigation of quantum teleportation ... They con- sidered a two-level atom interacting with an undamped cavity initially in a coherent state. ... Because concurrence pro-.

  17. Efficiency analysis on a two-level three-phase quasi-soft-switching inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Pan; Wu, Weimin; Huang, Min

    2013-01-01

    When designing an inverter, an engineer often needs to select and predict the efficiency beforehand. For the standard inverters, plenty of researches are analyzing the power losses and also many software tools are being used for efficiency calculation. In this paper, the efficiency calculation...... for non-conventional inverters with special shoot-through state is introduced and illustrated through the analysis on a special two-level three-phase quasi-soft-switching inverter. Efficiency comparison between the classical two-stage two-level three-phase inverter and the two-level three-phase quasi......-soft-switching inverter is carried out. A 10 kW/380 V prototype is constructed to verify the analysis. The experimental results show that the efficiency of the new inverter is higher than that of the traditional two-stage two- level three-phase inverter....

  18. 93-106, 2015 93 Multilevel random effect and marginal models

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multilevel random effect and marginal models for longitudinal data ... and random effect models that take the correlation among measurements of the same subject ... comparing the level of redness, pain and irritability ... clinical trial evaluating the safety profile of a new .... likelihood-based methods to compare models and.

  19. Controlling the optical bistability and multistability in a two-level pumped-probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Sahrai, Mostafa; Masoumeh Mousavi, Seyede

    2010-01-01

    We study the behavior of the optical bistability (OB) and multistability (OM) in a two-level pumped-probe atomic system by means of a unidirectional ring cavity. We show that the optical bistability in a two-level atomic system can be controlled by adjusting the intensity of the pump field and the detuning between two fields. We find that applying the pumping field decreases the threshold of the optical bistability.

  20. Color effects from scattering on random surface structures in dielectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jeppe; Christiansen, Alexander B; Garnæs, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    We show that cheap large area color filters, based on surface scattering, can be fabricated in dielectric materials by replication of random structures in silicon. The specular transmittance of three different types of structures, corresponding to three different colors, have been characterized...

  1. Spectral density of Cooper pairs in two level quantum dot–superconductors Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhyani, A., E-mail: archana.d2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India); Rawat, P.S. [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India); Tewari, B.S., E-mail: bstewari@ddn.upes.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • The present work deals with the study of the electronic spectral density of electron pairs and its effect in charge transport in superconductor-quantum dot-superconductor junctions. • The charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by changing the positions of the dot level. • The Josephson supercurrent can also be tuned by controlling the position of quantum dot energy levels. - Abstract: In the present paper, we report the role of quantum dot energy levels on the electronic spectral density for a two level quantum dot coupled to s-wave superconducting leads. The theoretical arguments in this work are based on the Anderson model so that it necessarily includes dot energies, single particle tunneling and superconducting order parameter for BCS superconductors. The expression for single particle spectral function is obtained by using the Green's function equation of motion technique. On the basis of numerical computation of spectral function of superconducting leads, it has been found that the charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by the positions and availability of the dot levels.

  2. A distributed monitoring system for photovoltaic arrays based on a two-level wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, F. P.; Chen, Z. C.; Zhou, H. F.; Wu, L. J.; Lin, P. J.; Cheng, S. Y.; Li, Y. F.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a distributed on-line monitoring system based on a two-level wireless sensor network (WSN) is proposed for real time status monitoring of photovoltaic (PV) arrays to support the fine management and maintenance of PV power plants. The system includes the sensing nodes installed on PV modules (PVM), sensing and routing nodes installed on combiner boxes of PV sub-arrays (PVA), a sink node and a data management centre (DMC) running on a host computer. The first level WSN is implemented by the low-cost wireless transceiver nRF24L01, and it is used to achieve single hop communication between the PVM nodes and their corresponding PVA nodes. The second level WSN is realized by the CC2530 based ZigBee network for multi-hop communication among PVA nodes and the sink node. The PVM nodes are used to monitor the PVM working voltage and backplane temperature, and they send the acquired data to their PVA node via the nRF24L01 based first level WSN. The PVA nodes are used to monitor the array voltage, PV string current and environment irradiance, and they send the acquired and received data to the DMC via the ZigBee based second level WSN. The DMC is designed using the MATLAB GUIDE and MySQL database. Laboratory experiment results show that the system can effectively acquire, display, store and manage the operating and environment parameters of PVA in real time.

  3. Entanglement Criteria of Two Two-Level Atoms Interacting with Two Coupled Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghshahi, Hamid Reza; Tavassoly, Mohammad Kazem; Faghihi, Mohammad Javad

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction between two two-level atoms and two coupled modes of a quantized radiation field in the form of parametric frequency converter injecting within an optical cavity enclosed by a medium with Kerr nonlinearity. It is demonstrated that, by applying the Bogoliubov-Valatin canonical transformation, the introduced model is reduced to a well-known form of the generalized Jaynes-Cummings model. Then, under particular initial conditions for the atoms (in a coherent superposition of its ground and upper states) and the fields (in a standard coherent state) which may be prepared, the time evolution of state vector of the entire system is analytically evaluated. In order to understand the degree of entanglement between subsystems (atom-field and atom-atom), the dynamics of entanglement through different measures, namely, von Neumann reduced entropy, concurrence and negativity is evaluated. In each case, the effects of Kerr nonlinearity and detuning parameter on the above measures are numerically analyzed, in detail. It is illustrated that the amount of entanglement can be tuned by choosing the evolved parameters, appropriately.

  4. Two-Level Evaluation on Sensor Interoperability of Features in Fingerprint Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Shuo Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Features used in fingerprint segmentation significantly affect the segmentation performance. Various features exhibit different discriminating abilities on fingerprint images derived from different sensors. One feature which has better discriminating ability on images derived from a certain sensor may not adapt to segment images derived from other sensors. This degrades the segmentation performance. This paper empirically analyzes the sensor interoperability problem of segmentation feature, which refers to the feature’s ability to adapt to the raw fingerprints captured by different sensors. To address this issue, this paper presents a two-level feature evaluation method, including the first level feature evaluation based on segmentation error rate and the second level feature evaluation based on decision tree. The proposed method is performed on a number of fingerprint databases which are obtained from various sensors. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively evaluate the sensor interoperability of features, and the features with good evaluation results acquire better segmentation accuracies of images originating from different sensors.

  5. The Damage Effects in Steel Bridges under Highway Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Nielsen, Jette Andkjær

    1996-01-01

    In the present investigation, fatigue damage accumulation in steel bridges under highway random loading is studied. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series on welded plate test specimens have been carried through. The fatigue tests have been carried out using load histo...... indicate that the linear fatigue damage accumulation formula, which is normally used in the design against fatigue in steel bridges, may give results, which are unconservative.......In the present investigation, fatigue damage accumulation in steel bridges under highway random loading is studied. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series on welded plate test specimens have been carried through. The fatigue tests have been carried out using load...

  6. The Incentive Effect of Scores: Randomized Evidence from Credit Committees

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Paravisini; Antoinette Schoar

    2013-01-01

    We design a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the adoption of credit scoring with a bank that uses soft information in small businesses lending. We find that credit scores improve the productivity of credit committees, reduce managerial involvement in the loan approval process, and increase the profitability of lending. Credit committee members' effort and output also increase when they anticipate the score becoming available, indicating that scores improve incentives to use existing in...

  7. Performance of a Two-Level Call Admission Control Scheme for DS-CDMA Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fapojuwo Abraham O

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a two-level call admission control (CAC scheme for direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA wireless networks supporting multimedia traffic and evaluate its performance. The first-level admission control assigns higher priority to real-time calls (also referred to as class 0 calls in gaining access to the system resources. The second level admits nonreal-time calls (or class 1 calls based on the resources remaining after meeting the resource needs for real-time calls. However, to ensure some minimum level of performance for nonreal-time calls, the scheme reserves some resources for such calls. The proposed two-level CAC scheme utilizes the delay-tolerant characteristic of non-real-time calls by incorporating a queue to temporarily store those that cannot be assigned resources at the time of initial access. We analyze and evaluate the call blocking, outage probability, throughput, and average queuing delay performance of the proposed two-level CAC scheme using Markov chain theory. The analytic results are validated by simulation results. The numerical results show that the proposed two-level CAC scheme provides better performance than the single-level CAC scheme. Based on these results, it is concluded that the proposed two-level CAC scheme serves as a good solution for supporting multimedia applications in DS-CDMA wireless communication systems.

  8. Performance of a Two-Level Call Admission Control Scheme for DS-CDMA Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham O. Fapojuwo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a two-level call admission control (CAC scheme for direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA wireless networks supporting multimedia traffic and evaluate its performance. The first-level admission control assigns higher priority to real-time calls (also referred to as class 0 calls in gaining access to the system resources. The second level admits nonreal-time calls (or class 1 calls based on the resources remaining after meeting the resource needs for real-time calls. However, to ensure some minimum level of performance for nonreal-time calls, the scheme reserves some resources for such calls. The proposed two-level CAC scheme utilizes the delay-tolerant characteristic of non-real-time calls by incorporating a queue to temporarily store those that cannot be assigned resources at the time of initial access. We analyze and evaluate the call blocking, outage probability, throughput, and average queuing delay performance of the proposed two-level CAC scheme using Markov chain theory. The analytic results are validated by simulation results. The numerical results show that the proposed two-level CAC scheme provides better performance than the single-level CAC scheme. Based on these results, it is concluded that the proposed two-level CAC scheme serves as a good solution for supporting multimedia applications in DS-CDMA wireless communication systems.

  9. PSCAD modeling of a two-level space vector pulse width modulation algorithm for power electronics education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Mete Vural

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design details of a two-level space vector pulse width modulation algorithm in PSCAD that is able to generate pulses for three-phase two-level DC/AC converters with two different switching patterns. The presented FORTRAN code is generic and can be easily modified to meet many other kinds of space vector modulation strategies. The code is also editable for hardware programming. The new component is tested and verified by comparing its output as six gating signals with those of a similar component in MATLAB library. Moreover the component is used to generate digital signals for closed-loop control of STATCOM for reactive power compensation in PSCAD. This add-on can be an effective tool to give students better understanding of the space vector modulation algorithm for different control tasks in power electronics area, and can motivate them for learning.

  10. Adiabatic interpretation of a two-level atom diode, a laser device for unidirectional transmission of ground-state atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschhaupt, A.; Muga, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    We present a generalized two-level scheme for an 'atom diode', namely, a laser device that lets a two-level ground-state atom pass in one direction, say from left to right, but not in the opposite direction. The laser field is composed of two lateral state-selective mirror regions and a central pumping region. We demonstrate the robustness of the scheme and propose a physical realization. It is shown that the inclusion of a counterintuitive laser field blocking the excited atoms on the left side of the device is essential for a perfect diode effect. The reason for this, the diodic behavior, and the robustness may be understood with an adiabatic approximation. The conditions to break down the approximation, which imply also the diode failure, are analyzed

  11. Effects of a random noisy oracle on search algorithm complexity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenvi, Neil; Brown, Kenneth R.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2003-01-01

    Grover's algorithm provides a quadratic speed-up over classical algorithms for unstructured database or library searches. This paper examines the robustness of Grover's search algorithm to a random phase error in the oracle and analyzes the complexity of the search process as a function of the scaling of the oracle error with database or library size. Both the discrete- and continuous-time implementations of the search algorithm are investigated. It is shown that unless the oracle phase error scales as O(N -1/4 ), neither the discrete- nor the continuous-time implementation of Grover's algorithm is scalably robust to this error in the absence of error correction

  12. Ipsilateral transversus abdominis plane block provides effective analgesia after appendectomy in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carney, John

    2010-10-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block provides effective postoperative analgesia in adults undergoing major abdominal surgery. Its efficacy in children remains unclear, with no randomized clinical trials in this population. In this study, we evaluated its analgesic efficacy over the first 48 postoperative hours after appendectomy performed through an open abdominal incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  13. Solutions of the two-level problem in terms of biconfluent Heun functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishkhanyan, Artur [Engineering Center of Armenian National Academy of Sciences, Ashtarak (Armenia)]. E-mail: artur@ec.sci.am; Suominen, Kalle-Antti [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Applied Physics, University of Turku, Turku (Finland)

    2001-08-17

    Five four-parametric classes of quantum mechanical two-level models permitting solutions in terms of the biconfluent Heun function are derived. Three of these classes are generalizations of the well known classes of Landau-Zener, Nikitin and Crothers. It is shown that two other classes describe super- and sublinear and essentially nonlinear level crossings, as well as processes with three crossing points. In particular, these classes include two-level models where the field amplitude is constant and the detuning varies as {delta}{sub 0}t+{delta}{sub 2}t{sup 3} or {approx}t{sup 1/3}. For the essentially nonlinear cubic-crossing model, {delta}{sub t}{approx}{delta}{sub 2}t{sup 3}, the general solution of the two-level problem is shown to be expressed as series of confluent hypergeometric functions. (author)

  14. Two-Level Solutions to Exponentially Complex Problems in Glass Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauro, John C.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    Glass poses an especially challenging problem for physicists. The key to making progress in theoretical glass science is to extract the key physics governing properties of practical interest. In this spirit, we discuss several two-level solutions to exponentially complex problems in glass science....... Topological constraint theory, originally developed by J.C. Phillips, is based on a two-level description of rigid and floppy modes in a glass network and can be used to derive quantitatively accurate and analytically solvable models for a variety of macroscopic properties. The temperature dependence...... that captures both primary and secondary relaxation modes. Such a model also offers the ability to calculate the distinguishability of particles during glass transition and relaxation processes. Two-level models can also be used to capture the distribution of various network-forming species in mixed...

  15. Crossing rule for a PT-symmetric two-level time-periodic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2011-01-01

    For a two-level system in a time-periodic field we show that in the non-Hermitian PT case the level crossing is of two quasistationary states that have the same dynamical symmetry property. At the field's parameters where the two levels which have the same dynamical symmetry cross, the corresponding quasienergy states coalesce and a self-orthogonal state is obtained. This situation is very different from the Hermitian case where a crossing of two quasienergy levels happens only when the corresponding two quasistationary states have different dynamical symmetry properties and, unlike the situation in the non-Hermitian case, the spectrum remains complete also when the two levels cross.

  16. Kir2.1 channels set two levels of resting membrane potential with inward rectification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuihao; Zuo, Dongchuan; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Haijun

    2018-04-01

    Strong inward rectifier K + channels (Kir2.1) mediate background K + currents primarily responsible for maintenance of resting membrane potential. Multiple types of cells exhibit two levels of resting membrane potential. Kir2.1 and K2P1 currents counterbalance, partially accounting for the phenomenon of human cardiomyocytes in subphysiological extracellular K + concentrations or pathological hypokalemic conditions. The mechanism of how Kir2.1 channels contribute to the two levels of resting membrane potential in different types of cells is not well understood. Here we test the hypothesis that Kir2.1 channels set two levels of resting membrane potential with inward rectification. Under hypokalemic conditions, Kir2.1 currents counterbalance HCN2 or HCN4 cation currents in CHO cells that heterologously express both channels, generating N-shaped current-voltage relationships that cross the voltage axis three times and reconstituting two levels of resting membrane potential. Blockade of HCN channels eliminated the phenomenon in K2P1-deficient Kir2.1-expressing human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells or CHO cells expressing both Kir2.1 and HCN2 channels. Weakly inward rectifier Kir4.1 or inward rectification-deficient Kir2.1•E224G mutant channels do not set such two levels of resting membrane potential when co-expressed with HCN2 channels in CHO cells or when overexpressed in human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. These findings demonstrate a common mechanism that Kir2.1 channels set two levels of resting membrane potential with inward rectification by balancing inward currents through different cation channels such as hyperpolarization-activated HCN channels or hypokalemia-induced K2P1 leak channels.

  17. Efeito do período experimental sobre a digestão parcial e total em bovinos alimentados com dois níveis de volumosos Effect of experimental periods on the parcial and total digestion in cattle fed two levels of forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Cylene Guimarães

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram avaliar os efeitos de dois períodos experimentais e dois níveis de volumosos na dieta sobre a digestibilidade total e parcial da matéria seca (MS, matéria orgânica (MO, proteína bruta (PB, fibra em detergente ácido (FDA, fibra em detergente neutro (FDN, energia bruta (EB e amido. Foram utilizados quatro novilhos da raça Holandês Preto e Branco, com dois anos de idade e 340 kg de peso vivo e canulados no rúmen e duodeno. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o quadrado latino 4 x 4, em que os animais receberam quatro tratamentos, que consistiram de dois níveis de volumosos (30 e 70% e dois períodos experimentais (14 e 21 dias. Houve efeito significativo do nível de volumoso sobre a digestibilidade ruminal de FDA e FDN, a digestibilidade intestinal e total da MS, MO, PB e amido e a digestibilidade total da EB. Não houve efeito do período experimental sobre os coeficientes de digestibilidade dos nutrientes avaliados. Conclui-se que a utilização de período experimental de 14 dias, em experimentos de digestão, é viável, quando se utiliza feno como fonte de volumoso.The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of two experimental periods and two forage levels in the diet on the total and parcial apparent digestibility of dry matter (DM, organic matter (OM, crude protein (CP, acid detergent fiber (ADF, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, gross energy (GE and starch. Four Holstein steers, averaging two years old and 340 kg of body weight, ruminally and duodenally cannulated, were used. The experimental design was a 4 x 4 latin square and the animals received four treatments as following: two forage levels (30 and 70% and two experimental periods (14 and 21 days. There was effect of forage level on intestinal and total digestibility of DM, OM, CP and starch and on total digestibility of GE. There was effect of forage level on ruminal digestibility of ADF and NDF. There was no effect of

  18. A dynamic random effects multinomial logit model of household car ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bue Bjørner, Thomas; Leth-Petersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Using a large household panel we estimate demand for car ownership by means of a dynamic multinomial model with correlated random effects. Results suggest that the persistence in car ownership observed in the data should be attributed to both true state dependence and to unobserved heterogeneity...... (random effects). It also appears that random effects related to single and multiple car ownership are correlated, suggesting that the IIA assumption employed in simple multinomial models of car ownership is invalid. Relatively small elasticities with respect to income and car costs are estimated...

  19. A Two-Level Cache for Distributed Information Retrieval in Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhe Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the performance of distributed information retrieval in search engines, we propose a two-level cache structure based on the queries of the users’ logs. We extract the highest rank queries of users from the static cache, in which the queries are the most popular. We adopt the dynamic cache as an auxiliary to optimize the distribution of the cache data. We propose a distribution strategy of the cache data. The experiments prove that the hit rate, the efficiency, and the time consumption of the two-level cache have advantages compared with other structures of cache.

  20. A two-level cache for distributed information retrieval in search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhe; He, Hui; Ye, Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the performance of distributed information retrieval in search engines, we propose a two-level cache structure based on the queries of the users' logs. We extract the highest rank queries of users from the static cache, in which the queries are the most popular. We adopt the dynamic cache as an auxiliary to optimize the distribution of the cache data. We propose a distribution strategy of the cache data. The experiments prove that the hit rate, the efficiency, and the time consumption of the two-level cache have advantages compared with other structures of cache.

  1. Strong nonlinearity-induced correlations for counterpropagating photons scattering on a two-level emitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders; McCutcheon, Dara; Mørk, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    We analytically treat the scattering of two counterpropagating photons on a two-level emitter embedded in an optical waveguide. We find that the nonlinearity of the emitter can give rise to significant pulse-dependent directional correlations in the scattered photonic state, which could be quanti......We analytically treat the scattering of two counterpropagating photons on a two-level emitter embedded in an optical waveguide. We find that the nonlinearity of the emitter can give rise to significant pulse-dependent directional correlations in the scattered photonic state, which could...

  2. Complex networks: Effect of subtle changes in nature of randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sanchari; Biswas, Soham; Sen, Parongama

    2011-03-01

    In two different classes of network models, namely, the Watts Strogatz type and the Euclidean type, subtle changes have been introduced in the randomness. In the Watts Strogatz type network, rewiring has been done in different ways and although the qualitative results remain the same, finite differences in the exponents are observed. In the Euclidean type networks, where at least one finite phase transition occurs, two models differing in a similar way have been considered. The results show a possible shift in one of the phase transition points but no change in the values of the exponents. The WS and Euclidean type models are equivalent for extreme values of the parameters; we compare their behaviour for intermediate values.

  3. Entropy squeezing for a two-level atom in two-mode Raman coupled model with intrinsic decoherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jian; Shao Bin; Zou Jian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we investigate the entropy squeezing for a two-level atom interacting with two quantized fields through Raman coupling.We obtain the dynamical evolution of the total system under the influence of intrinsic decoherence when the two quantized fields are prepared in a two-mode squeezing vacuum state initially.The effects of the field squeezing factor,the two-level atomic transition frequency,the second field frequency and the intrinsic decoherence on the entropy squeezing are discussed.Without intrinsic decoherence,the increase of field squeezing factor can break the entropy squeezing.The two-level atomic transition frequency changes only the period of oscillation but not the strength of entropy squeezing.The influence of the second field frequency is complicated.With the intrinsic decoherence taken into consideration,the results show that the stronger the intrinsic decoherence is,the more quickly the entropy squeezing will disappear.The increase of the atomic transition frequency can hasten the disappearance of entropy squeezing.

  4. Entropy squeezing for a two-level atom in two-mode Raman coupled model with intrinsic decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian, Zhang; Bin, Shao; Jian, Zou

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the entropy squeezing for a two-level atom interacting with two quantized fields through Raman coupling. We obtain the dynamical evolution of the total system under the influence of intrinsic decoherence when the two quantized fields are prepared in a two-mode squeezing vacuum state initially. The effects of the field squeezing factor, the two-level atomic transition frequency, the second field frequency and the intrinsic decoherence on the entropy squeezing are discussed. Without intrinsic decoherence, the increase of field squeezing factor can break the entropy squeezing. The two-level atomic transition frequency changes only the period of oscillation but not the strength of entropy squeezing. The influence of the second field frequency is complicated. With the intrinsic decoherence taken into consideration, the results show that the stronger the intrinsic decoherence is, the more quickly the entropy squeezing will disappear. The increase of the atomic transition frequency can hasten the disappearance of entropy squeezing. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  5. Polynomial pseudosupersymmetry underlying a two-level atom in an external electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonov, B.F.; Shamshutdinova, V.V.; Gitman, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    Chains of transformations introduced previously were studied in order to obtain electric fields with a time-dependent frequency for which the equation of motion of a two-level atom in the presence of these fields can be solved exactly. It is shown that a polynomial pseudosupersymmetry may be associated to such chains

  6. Ultimate temperature for laser cooling of two-level neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnato, V.S.; Zilio, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    We present a simple pedagogical method to evaluate the minimum attainable temperature for laser cooling of two-level neutral atoms. Results are given as a function of the laser detuning and intensity. We also discuss the use of this approach to predict the minimum temperature of neutral atoms confined in magnetic traps. (author) [pt

  7. Resonant retuning of Rabi oscillations in a two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonov, A.V.; Feranchuk, I.D.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of a two-level system in a single-mode quantum field is considered beyond the rotating wave approximation. The existence of quasi-degenerate energy levels is shown to influence the essential characteristics of temporal and amplitude Rabi oscillations of the system in a resonant manner. (authors)

  8. An Owen-type value for games with two-level communication structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, René; Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna; van der Laan, Gerard

    We introduce an Owen-type value for games with two-level communication structure, which is a structure where the players are partitioned into a coalition structure such that there exists restricted communication between as well as within the a priori unions of the coalition structure. Both types of

  9. Reactive Power Impact on Lifetime Prediction of Two-level Wind Power Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede; Lau, M.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of reactive power injection on the dominating two-level wind power converter is investigated and compared in terms of power loss and thermal behavior. Then the lifetime of both the partial-scale and full-scale power converter is estimated based on the widely used Coffin-Manson model...

  10. A two-level strategy to realize life-cycle production optimization in an operational setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essen, van G.M.; Hof, Van den P.M.J.; Jansen, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    We present a two-level strategy to improve robustness against uncertainty and model errors in life-cycle flooding optimization. At the upper level, a physics-based large-scale reservoir model is used to determine optimal life-cycle injection and production profiles. At the lower level these profiles

  11. Excitation of graphene plasmons as an analogy with the two-level system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiahui [Microwave and Electromagnetic Laboratory, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, Xidazhi Street, Nangang District, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province (China); Lv, Bo, E-mail: lb19840313@126.com [Microwave and Electromagnetic Laboratory, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, Xidazhi Street, Nangang District, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province (China); Li, Rujiang [College of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Ma, Ruyu; Chen, Wan; Meng, Fanyi [Microwave and Electromagnetic Laboratory, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, Xidazhi Street, Nangang District, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province (China)

    2016-02-15

    The excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs) is presented as an interaction between the GPs and the incident electromagnetic field. In this Letter, the excitation of GPs in a plasmonic system is interpreted as an analogy with the two-level system by taking the two-coupled graphene-covered gratings as an example. Based on the equivalent circuit theory, the excitation of GPs in the graphene-covered grating is equivalent to the resonance of an oscillator. Thus, according to the governing equation, the electric currents at the resonant frequencies for two-coupled graphene-covered gratings correspond to the energy states in a two-level system. In addition, the excitation of GPs in different two-coupled graphene-covered gratings is numerically studied to validate our theoretical model. Our work provides an intuitive understanding of the excitation of GPs using an analogy with the two-level system. - Highlights: • The excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs) in graphene-covered grating is equivalent to the resonance of an oscillator. • We establish the equivalent circuit of two-level system to analyze the resonant character. • The excitation of GPs in different two-coupled graphene-covered gratings are numerically studied to validate our theoretical model.

  12. Analysis of Two-Level Support Systems with Time-Dependent Overflow - A Banking Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, Wolfgang; Manitz, Michael; Stolletz, Raik

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of call centers of financial service providers with two levels of support and a time-dependent overflow mechanism. Waiting calls from the front-office queue flow over to the back office if a waiting-time limit is reached and at least one back-office agent...

  13. Excitation of graphene plasmons as an analogy with the two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jiahui; Lv, Bo; Li, Rujiang; Ma, Ruyu; Chen, Wan; Meng, Fanyi

    2016-01-01

    The excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs) is presented as an interaction between the GPs and the incident electromagnetic field. In this Letter, the excitation of GPs in a plasmonic system is interpreted as an analogy with the two-level system by taking the two-coupled graphene-covered gratings as an example. Based on the equivalent circuit theory, the excitation of GPs in the graphene-covered grating is equivalent to the resonance of an oscillator. Thus, according to the governing equation, the electric currents at the resonant frequencies for two-coupled graphene-covered gratings correspond to the energy states in a two-level system. In addition, the excitation of GPs in different two-coupled graphene-covered gratings is numerically studied to validate our theoretical model. Our work provides an intuitive understanding of the excitation of GPs using an analogy with the two-level system. - Highlights: • The excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs) in graphene-covered grating is equivalent to the resonance of an oscillator. • We establish the equivalent circuit of two-level system to analyze the resonant character. • The excitation of GPs in different two-coupled graphene-covered gratings are numerically studied to validate our theoretical model.

  14. A two-level strategy to realize life-cycle production optimization in an operational setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essen, van G.M.; Hof, Van den P.M.J.; Jansen, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a two-level strategy to improve robustness against uncertainty and model errors in life-cycle flooding optimization. At the upper level, a physics-based large-scale reservoir model is used to determine optimal life-cycle injection and production profiles. At the lower level these profiles

  15. Localization of a two-level atom via the absorption spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Hu, Xiang-Ming

    2007-01-01

    We show that it is possible to localize a two-level atom as it passes through a standing-wave field by measuring the probe-field absorption. There is 50% detecting probability of the atom at the nodes of the standing-wave field in the subwavelength domain when the probe field is tuned resonant with the atomic transition

  16. Efficient two-level preconditionined conjugate gradient method on the GPU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, R.; Van Gijzen, M.B.; Vuik, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present an implementation of Two-Level Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Method for the GPU. We investigate a Truncated Neumann Series based preconditioner in combination with deflation and compare it with Block Incomplete Cholesky schemes. This combination exhibits fine-grain parallelism and

  17. A spatial scan statistic for nonisotropic two-level risk cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Zhou; Wang, Jin-Feng; Yang, Wei-Zhong; Li, Zhong-Jie; Lai, Sheng-Jie

    2012-01-30

    Spatial scan statistic methods are commonly used for geographical disease surveillance and cluster detection. The standard spatial scan statistic does not model any variability in the underlying risks of subregions belonging to a detected cluster. For a multilevel risk cluster, the isotonic spatial scan statistic could model a centralized high-risk kernel in the cluster. Because variations in disease risks are anisotropic owing to different social, economical, or transport factors, the real high-risk kernel will not necessarily take the central place in a whole cluster area. We propose a spatial scan statistic for a nonisotropic two-level risk cluster, which could be used to detect a whole cluster and a noncentralized high-risk kernel within the cluster simultaneously. The performance of the three methods was evaluated through an intensive simulation study. Our proposed nonisotropic two-level method showed better power and geographical precision with two-level risk cluster scenarios, especially for a noncentralized high-risk kernel. Our proposed method is illustrated using the hand-foot-mouth disease data in Pingdu City, Shandong, China in May 2009, compared with two other methods. In this practical study, the nonisotropic two-level method is the only way to precisely detect a high-risk area in a detected whole cluster. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Exact Solution of the Two-Level System and the Einstein Solid in the Microcanonical Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Dalia S.; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Miranda, E. N.

    2011-01-01

    The two-level system and the Einstein model of a crystalline solid are taught in every course of statistical mechanics and they are solved in the microcanonical formalism because the number of accessible microstates can be easily evaluated. However, their solutions are usually presented using the Stirling approximation to deal with factorials. In…

  19. The effect of COPD severity and study duration on exacerbation outcome in randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Goran; Calverley, Peter M.; Jenkins, Christine R.; Anzueto, Antonio R.; Make, Barry J.; Lindberg, Magnus; Fageras, Malin; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: When discontinuation in COPD randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is unevenly distributed between treatments (differential dropout), the capacity to demonstrate treatment effects may be reduced. We investigated the impact of the time of differential dropout on exacerbation outcomes in

  20. Approximate design theory for a simple block design with random block effects

    OpenAIRE

    Christof, Karin

    1985-01-01

    Approximate design theory for a simple block design with random block effects / K. Christof ; F. Pukelsheim. - In: Linear statistical inference / ed. by T. Calinski ... - Berlin u. a. : Springer, 1985. - S. 20-28. - (Lecture notes in statistics ; 35)

  1. Zero-inflated count models for longitudinal measurements with heterogeneous random effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huirong; Luo, Sheng; DeSantis, Stacia M

    2017-08-01

    Longitudinal zero-inflated count data arise frequently in substance use research when assessing the effects of behavioral and pharmacological interventions. Zero-inflated count models (e.g. zero-inflated Poisson or zero-inflated negative binomial) with random effects have been developed to analyze this type of data. In random effects zero-inflated count models, the random effects covariance matrix is typically assumed to be homogeneous (constant across subjects). However, in many situations this matrix may be heterogeneous (differ by measured covariates). In this paper, we extend zero-inflated count models to account for random effects heterogeneity by modeling their variance as a function of covariates. We show via simulation that ignoring intervention and covariate-specific heterogeneity can produce biased estimates of covariate and random effect estimates. Moreover, those biased estimates can be rectified by correctly modeling the random effects covariance structure. The methodological development is motivated by and applied to the Combined Pharmacotherapies and Behavioral Interventions for Alcohol Dependence (COMBINE) study, the largest clinical trial of alcohol dependence performed in United States with 1383 individuals.

  2. Comparison of PI and PR current controllers applied on two-level VSC-HVDC transmission system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoloiu, A.; Pereria, H.A.; Teodorescu, Remus

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes differences between αβ and dq reference frames regarding the control of two-level VSC-HVDC current loop and dc-link voltage outer loop. In the first part, voltage feedforward effect is considered with PI and PR controllers. In the second part, the feedforward effect is removed...... and the PR gains are tuned to keep the dynamic performance. Also, the power feedforward is removed and the outer loop PI controller is tuned in order to maintain the system dynamic performance. The paper is completed with simulation results, which highlight the advantages of using PR controller....

  3. Local lattice relaxations in random metallic alloys: Effective tetrahedron model and supercell approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Simak, S.I.; Shallcross, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple effective tetrahedron model for local lattice relaxation effects in random metallic alloys on simple primitive lattices. A comparison with direct ab initio calculations for supercells representing random Ni0.50Pt0.50 and Cu0.25Au0.75 alloys as well as the dilute limit of Au-ri......-rich CuAu alloys shows that the model yields a quantitatively accurate description of the relaxtion energies in these systems. Finally, we discuss the bond length distribution in random alloys....

  4. Small-world effect induced by weight randomization on regular networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Menghui; Fan, Ying; Wang, Dahui; Li, Daqing; Wu, Jinshan; Di, Zengru

    2007-01-01

    The concept of edge weight provides additional depth for describing and adjusting the properties of networks. Redistribution of edge weight can effectively change the properties of networks even though the corresponding binary topology remains unchanged. Based on regular networks with initially homogeneous dissimilarity weights, random redistribution of edge weight can be enough to induce small world phenomena. The effects of random weight redistribution on both static properties and dynamical models of networks are investigated. The results reveal that randomization of weight can enhance the ability of synchronization of chaotic systems dramatically

  5. The reverse effects of random perturbation on discrete systems for single and multiple population models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Li; Tang, Sanyi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The discrete single species and multiple species models with random perturbation are proposed. • The complex dynamics and interesting bifurcation behavior have been investigated. • The reverse effects of random perturbation on discrete systems have been discussed and revealed. • The main results can be applied for pest control and resources management. - Abstract: The natural species are likely to present several interesting and complex phenomena under random perturbations, which have been confirmed by simple mathematical models. The important questions are: how the random perturbations influence the dynamics of the discrete population models with multiple steady states or multiple species interactions? and is there any different effects for single species and multiple species models with random perturbation? To address those interesting questions, we have proposed the discrete single species model with two stable equilibria and the host-parasitoid model with Holling type functional response functions to address how the random perturbation affects the dynamics. The main results indicate that the random perturbation does not change the number of blurred orbits of the single species model with two stable steady states compared with results for the classical Ricker model with same random perturbation, but it can strength the stability. However, extensive numerical investigations depict that the random perturbation does not influence the complexities of the host-parasitoid models compared with the results for the models without perturbation, while it does increase the period of periodic orbits doubly. All those confirm that the random perturbation has a reverse effect on the dynamics of the discrete single and multiple population models, which could be applied in reality including pest control and resources management.

  6. Psychological Effects of Automated External Defibrillator Training A randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meischke, Hendrika; Diehr, Paula; Phelps, Randi; Damon, Susan; Rea, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to test if an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training program would positively affect the mental health of family members of high risk patients. Methods 305 ischemic heart disease patients and their family members were randomized to one of four AED training programs: two video-based training programs and two face-to-face training programs that emphasized self-efficacy and perceived control. Patients and family members were surveyed at baseline, 3 and 9 months post ischemic event on demographic characteristics, measures of quality of life (SF=36) , self-efficacy and perceived control. For this study, family members were the focus rather than the patients. Results Regression analyses showed that family members in the face-to-face training programs did not score better on any of the mental health status variables than family members who participated in the other training programs but for an increase in self-efficacy beliefs at 3 months post training. Conclusion The findings suggest that a specifically designed AED training program emphasizing self-efficacy and perceived control beliefs is not likely to enhance family member mental health. PMID:21411144

  7. A random effects meta-analysis model with Box-Cox transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Maruo, Kazushi; Partlett, Christopher; Riley, Richard D

    2017-07-19

    In a random effects meta-analysis model, true treatment effects for each study are routinely assumed to follow a normal distribution. However, normality is a restrictive assumption and the misspecification of the random effects distribution may result in a misleading estimate of overall mean for the treatment effect, an inappropriate quantification of heterogeneity across studies and a wrongly symmetric prediction interval. We focus on problems caused by an inappropriate normality assumption of the random effects distribution, and propose a novel random effects meta-analysis model where a Box-Cox transformation is applied to the observed treatment effect estimates. The proposed model aims to normalise an overall distribution of observed treatment effect estimates, which is sum of the within-study sampling distributions and the random effects distribution. When sampling distributions are approximately normal, non-normality in the overall distribution will be mainly due to the random effects distribution, especially when the between-study variation is large relative to the within-study variation. The Box-Cox transformation addresses this flexibly according to the observed departure from normality. We use a Bayesian approach for estimating parameters in the proposed model, and suggest summarising the meta-analysis results by an overall median, an interquartile range and a prediction interval. The model can be applied for any kind of variables once the treatment effect estimate is defined from the variable. A simulation study suggested that when the overall distribution of treatment effect estimates are skewed, the overall mean and conventional I 2 from the normal random effects model could be inappropriate summaries, and the proposed model helped reduce this issue. We illustrated the proposed model using two examples, which revealed some important differences on summary results, heterogeneity measures and prediction intervals from the normal random effects model. The

  8. A random effects meta-analysis model with Box-Cox transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamaguchi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a random effects meta-analysis model, true treatment effects for each study are routinely assumed to follow a normal distribution. However, normality is a restrictive assumption and the misspecification of the random effects distribution may result in a misleading estimate of overall mean for the treatment effect, an inappropriate quantification of heterogeneity across studies and a wrongly symmetric prediction interval. Methods We focus on problems caused by an inappropriate normality assumption of the random effects distribution, and propose a novel random effects meta-analysis model where a Box-Cox transformation is applied to the observed treatment effect estimates. The proposed model aims to normalise an overall distribution of observed treatment effect estimates, which is sum of the within-study sampling distributions and the random effects distribution. When sampling distributions are approximately normal, non-normality in the overall distribution will be mainly due to the random effects distribution, especially when the between-study variation is large relative to the within-study variation. The Box-Cox transformation addresses this flexibly according to the observed departure from normality. We use a Bayesian approach for estimating parameters in the proposed model, and suggest summarising the meta-analysis results by an overall median, an interquartile range and a prediction interval. The model can be applied for any kind of variables once the treatment effect estimate is defined from the variable. Results A simulation study suggested that when the overall distribution of treatment effect estimates are skewed, the overall mean and conventional I 2 from the normal random effects model could be inappropriate summaries, and the proposed model helped reduce this issue. We illustrated the proposed model using two examples, which revealed some important differences on summary results, heterogeneity measures and

  9. Comparison of Cervical Kinematics, Pain, and Functional Disability Between Single- and Two-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Andy; Lai, Dar-Ming; Wang, Shwu-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Li; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2016-08-01

    A prospective, time series design. The purpose of this study is two-fold: firstly, to investigate the impact of altered cervical alignment and range of motion (ROM) on patients' self-reported outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), and secondly, to comparatively differentiate the influence of single- and two-level ACDF on the cervical ROM and adjacent segmental kinematics up to 12-month postoperatively. ACDF is one of the most commonly employed surgical interventions to treat degenerative disc disease. However, there are limited in vivo data on the impact of ACDF on the cervical kinematics and its association with patient-reported clinical outcomes. Sixty-two patients (36 males; 55.63 ± 11.6 yrs) undergoing either a single- or consecutive two-level ACDF were recruited. The clinical outcomes were assessed with the Pain Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological results included cervical lordosis, global C2-C7 ROM, ROM of the Functional Spinal Unit (FSU), and its adjacent segments. The outcome measures were collected preoperatively and then at 3, 6, and 12-month postoperatively. A significant reduction of both VAS and NDI was found for both groups from the preoperative to 3-month period (P < 0.01). Pearson correlation revealed no significant correlation between global ROM with neither VAS (P = 0.667) nor NDI (P = 0.531). A significant reduction of global ROM was identified for the two-level ACDF group at 12 months (P = 0.017) but not for the single-level group. A significant interaction effect was identified for the upper adjacent segment ROM (P = 0.024) but not at the lower adjacent segment. Current study utilized dynamic radiographs to comparatively evaluate the biomechanical impact of single- and two-level ACDF. The results highlighted that the two-level group demonstrated a greater reduction of global ROM coupled with an increased upper adjacent segmental compensatory motions that

  10. A single-level random-effects cross-lagged panel model for longitudinal mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Carroll, Ian A; Chen, Po-Yi

    2017-12-06

    Cross-lagged panel models (CLPMs) are widely used to test mediation with longitudinal panel data. One major limitation of the CLPMs is that the model effects are assumed to be fixed across individuals. This assumption is likely to be violated (i.e., the model effects are random across individuals) in practice. When this happens, the CLPMs can potentially yield biased parameter estimates and misleading statistical inferences. This article proposes a model named a random-effects cross-lagged panel model (RE-CLPM) to account for random effects in CLPMs. Simulation studies show that the RE-CLPM outperforms the CLPM in recovering the mean indirect and direct effects in a longitudinal mediation analysis when random effects exist in the population. The performance of the RE-CLPM is robust to a certain degree, even when the random effects are not normally distributed. In addition, the RE-CLPM does not produce harmful results when the model effects are in fact fixed in the population. Implications of the simulation studies and potential directions for future research are discussed.

  11. Standardized Effect Size Measures for Mediation Analysis in Cluster-Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Laura M.; Pituch, Keenan A.; Dion, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This article presents 3 standardized effect size measures to use when sharing results of an analysis of mediation of treatment effects for cluster-randomized trials. The authors discuss 3 examples of mediation analysis (upper-level mediation, cross-level mediation, and cross-level mediation with a contextual effect) with demonstration of the…

  12. Bounding the per-protocol effect in randomized trials: An application to colorectal cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Swanson (Sonja); Holme (Øyvind); M. Løberg (Magnus); M. Kalager (Mette); M. Bretthauer (Michael); G. Hoff (G.); E. Aas (Eline); M.A. Hernán (M.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The per-protocol effect is the effect that would have been observed in a randomized trial had everybody followed the protocol. Though obtaining a valid point estimate for the per-protocol effect requires assumptions that are unverifiable and often implausible, lower and upper

  13. Semi-parametric estimation of random effects in a logistic regression model using conditional inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jørgen Holm

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach to the estimation in a logistic regression model with two crossed random effects where special interest is in estimating the variance of one of the effects while not making distributional assumptions about the other effect. A composite likelihood is studied...

  14. Analysis of stationary availability factor of two-level backbone computer networks with arbitrary topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, P. A.

    2018-05-01

    This scientific paper deals with the two-level backbone computer networks with arbitrary topology. A specialized method, offered by the author for calculation of the stationary availability factor of the two-level backbone computer networks, based on the Markov reliability models for the set of the independent repairable elements with the given failure and repair rates and the methods of the discrete mathematics, is also discussed. A specialized algorithm, offered by the author for analysis of the network connectivity, taking into account different kinds of the network equipment failures, is also observed. Finally, this paper presents an example of calculation of the stationary availability factor for the backbone computer network with the given topology.

  15. Two-Level Iteration Penalty Methods for the Navier-Stokes Equations with Friction Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two-level iteration penalty finite element methods to approximate the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with friction boundary conditions. The basic idea is to solve the Navier-Stokes type variational inequality problem on a coarse mesh with mesh size H in combining with solving a Stokes, Oseen, or linearized Navier-Stokes type variational inequality problem for Stokes, Oseen, or Newton iteration on a fine mesh with mesh size h. The error estimate obtained in this paper shows that if H, h, and ε can be chosen appropriately, then these two-level iteration penalty methods are of the same convergence orders as the usual one-level iteration penalty method.

  16. Minimax terminal approach problem in two-level hierarchical nonlinear discrete-time dynamical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorikov, A. F., E-mail: afshorikov@mail.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 S. Mira, Ekaterinburg, 620002, Russia Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 16 S. Kovalevskaya, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    We consider a discrete–time dynamical system consisting of three controllable objects. The motions of all objects are given by the corresponding vector nonlinear or linear discrete–time recurrent vector relations, and control system for its has two levels: basic (first or I level) that is dominating and subordinate level (second or II level) and both have different criterions of functioning and united a priori by determined informational and control connections defined in advance. For the dynamical system in question, we propose a mathematical formalization in the form of solving a multistep problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control over the terminal approach process with incomplete information and give a general scheme for its solving.

  17. A modified two-level three-phase quasi-soft-switching inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yusheng; Wu, Weimin; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    A traditional Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) has higher efficiency than a Current Voltage Source (CSI) due to the less conduction power loss. However, the reverse recovery of the free-wheeling diode limits the efficiency improvement for the silicon devices based hard-switching VSI. The traditional...... quasi-soft-switching inverter can alternate between VSI and CSI by using a proper control scheme and thereby reduce the power losses caused by the reverse recovery of the free-wheeling diode. Nevertheless, slightly extra conduction power loss of the auxiliary switch is also introduced. In order...... to reduce the extra conduction power loss and the voltage stress across the DC-link capacitor, a modified two-level three-phase quasi-soft-switching inverter is proposed by using a SiC MOSFET instead of an IGBT. The principle of the modified two-level three-phase quasi-soft-switching inverter is analyzed...

  18. Revisional Surgery for Hallux Valgus with Serial Osteotomies at Two Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B. T. Lim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aetiology and form of hallux valgus (HV is varied with many corrective procedures described. We report a 39-year-old woman, previously treated with a Chevron osteotomy, who presented with recurrent right HV, metatarsus primus varus, and associated bunion. Osteotomies were performed at two levels as a revisional procedure. This report highlights (1 limitations of the Chevron osteotomy and (2 the revisional procedure of the two level osteotomies: (i proximal opening-wedge basal osteotomy and (ii distal short Scarf with medial closing wedges. If a Chevron osteotomy is used inappropriately, for example, in an attempt to correct too large a deformity, it may angulate laterally causing a malunion with an increased distal metatarsal articular angle. Secondly, it is feasible to correct this combined deformity using a combination of proximal opening-wedge and distal short Scarf osteotomies.

  19. Non-zero temperature two-mode squeezing for time-dependent two-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliaga, J.; Gruver, J.L.; Proto, A.N.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1994-01-01

    A Maximum Entropy Principle density matrix method, valid for systems with temperature different from zero, is presented making it possible two-mode squeezed states in two-level systems with relevant operators and Hamiltonian connected with O(3,2). A method which allows one to relate the appearance of squeezing to the relevant operators, included in order to define the density matrix of the system is given. (author). 14 refs, 1 fig

  20. Urea metabolism in buffalo calves fed on rations containing two levels of crude protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, D.N.; Singh, U.B.; Lal, M.; Varma, A.; Ranjhan, S.K.

    1974-01-01

    Urea entry rates into the body pools of Murrah Buffalo calves have been estimated using a single injection isotope dilution technique using 14 C-urea. The animals were fed two levels of crude proteins, namely, 13 percent lower and 19 percent higher than N.R.C. recommendations. Results show that the recycling of urea is significantly better in animals given low crude protein contents. (M.G.B.)

  1. Experiences of building a medical data acquisition system based on two-level modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Li, Jianbin; Lan, Xiaoyun; An, Ying; Gao, Wuqiang; Jiang, Yuqiao

    2018-04-01

    Compared to traditional software development strategies, the two-level modeling approach is more flexible and applicable to build an information system in the medical domain. However, the standards of two-level modeling such as openEHR appear complex to medical professionals. This study aims to investigate, implement, and improve the two-level modeling approach, and discusses the experience of building a unified data acquisition system for four affiliated university hospitals based on this approach. After the investigation, we simplified the approach of archetype modeling and developed a medical data acquisition system where medical experts can define the metadata for their own specialties by using a visual easy-to-use tool. The medical data acquisition system for multiple centers, clinical specialties, and diseases has been developed, and integrates the functions of metadata modeling, form design, and data acquisition. To date, 93,353 data items and 6,017 categories for 285 specific diseases have been created by medical experts, and over 25,000 patients' information has been collected. OpenEHR is an advanced two-level modeling method for medical data, but its idea to separate domain knowledge and technical concern is not easy to realize. Moreover, it is difficult to reach an agreement on archetype definition. Therefore, we adopted simpler metadata modeling, and employed What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get (WYSIWYG) tools to further improve the usability of the system. Compared with the archetype definition, our approach lowers the difficulty. Nevertheless, to build such a system, every participant should have some knowledge in both medicine and information technology domains, as these interdisciplinary talents are necessary. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Feedback controlled dephasing and population relaxation in a two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin

    2009-01-01

    This Letter presents the maximum achievable stability and purity that can be obtained in a two-level system with both dephasing and population relaxation processes by using homodyne-mediated feedback control. An analytic formula giving the optimal amplitudes of the driving and feedback for the steady-state is also presented. Experimental examples are used to show the importance of controlling the dephasing process.

  3. FAST COMMUNICATION: A PDE Based Two Level Model of the Masking Property of the Human Ear

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Jack; Qi, Yingyong

    2003-01-01

    Human ear has the masking property that certain audible sound becomes inaudible in the presence of another sound. Masking is quantified by the raised threshold from the absolute hearing threshold in quiet. It is of scientific and practical importance to compute masking thresholds. Empirical models on masking have applications in low bit rate digital music compression. A first principle based two level model is developed with partial differential equation (PDE) at the periphe...

  4. Effects of unstratified and centre-stratified randomization in multi-centre clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of randomization effects in multi-centre clinical trials. The two randomization schemes most often used in clinical trials are considered: unstratified and centre-stratified block-permuted randomization. The prediction of the number of patients randomized to different treatment arms in different regions during the recruitment period accounting for the stochastic nature of the recruitment and effects of multiple centres is investigated. A new analytic approach using a Poisson-gamma patient recruitment model (patients arrive at different centres according to Poisson processes with rates sampled from a gamma distributed population) and its further extensions is proposed. Closed-form expressions for corresponding distributions of the predicted number of the patients randomized in different regions are derived. In the case of two treatments, the properties of the total imbalance in the number of patients on treatment arms caused by using centre-stratified randomization are investigated and for a large number of centres a normal approximation of imbalance is proved. The impact of imbalance on the power of the study is considered. It is shown that the loss of statistical power is practically negligible and can be compensated by a minor increase in sample size. The influence of patient dropout is also investigated. The impact of randomization on predicted drug supply overage is discussed. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Minimum time control of a pair of two-level quantum systems with opposite drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Raffaele; D’Alessandro, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we solve two equivalent time optimal control problems. On one hand, we design the control field to implement in minimum time the SWAP (or equivalent) operator on a two-level system, assuming that it interacts with an additional, uncontrollable, two-level system. On the other hand, we synthesize the SWAP operator simultaneously, in minimum time, on a pair of two-level systems subject to opposite drifts. We assume that it is possible to perform three independent control actions, and that the total control strength is bounded. These controls either affect the dynamics of the target system, under the first perspective, or, simultaneously, the dynamics of both systems, in the second view. We obtain our results by using techniques of geometric control theory on Lie groups. In particular, we apply the Pontryagin maximum principle, and provide a complete characterization of singular and nonsingular extremals. Our analysis shows that the problem can be formulated as the motion of a material point in a central force, a well known system in classical mechanics. Although we focus on obtaining the SWAP operator, many of the ideas and techniques developed in this work apply to the time optimal implementation of an arbitrary unitary operator. (paper)

  6. Two-Level Micro-to-Nanoscale Hierarchical TiO2 Nanolayers on Titanium Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena G. Zemtsova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Joint replacement is being actively developed within modern orthopedics. One novel material providing fast implantation is bioactive coatings. The synthesis of targeted nanocoatings on metallic nanotitanium surface is reported in this paper. TiO2-based micro- and nanocoatings were produced by sol-gel synthesis using dip-coating technology with subsequent fast (shock drying in hot plate mode at 400 °C. As a result of shock drying, the two-level hierarchical TiO2 nanolayer on the nanotitanium was obtained. This two-level hierarchy includes nanorelief of porous xerogel and microrelief of the micron-sized “defect” network (a crack network. The thickness of TiO2 nanolayers was controlled by repeating dip-coating process the necessary number of times after the first layer deposition. The state of the MS3T3-E1 osteoblast cell line (young cells that form bone tissue on the two-level hierarchical surface has been studied. Particularly, adhesion character, adhesion time and morphology have been studied. The reported results may serve the starting point for the development of novel bioactive coatings for bone and teeth implants.

  7. A simulation-based goodness-of-fit test for random effects in generalized linear mixed models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    The goodness-of-fit of the distribution of random effects in a generalized linear mixed model is assessed using a conditional simulation of the random effects conditional on the observations. Provided that the specified joint model for random effects and observations is correct, the marginal...... distribution of the simulated random effects coincides with the assumed random effects distribution. In practice, the specified model depends on some unknown parameter which is replaced by an estimate. We obtain a correction for this by deriving the asymptotic distribution of the empirical distribution...

  8. A simulation-based goodness-of-fit test for random effects in generalized linear mixed models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    The goodness-of-fit of the distribution of random effects in a generalized linear mixed model is assessed using a conditional simulation of the random effects conditional on the observations. Provided that the specified joint model for random effects and observations is correct, the marginal...... distribution of the simulated random effects coincides with the assumed random effects distribution. In practice the specified model depends on some unknown parameter which is replaced by an estimate. We obtain a correction for this by deriving the asymptotic distribution of the empirical distribution function...

  9. Effect of randomness on multi-frequency aeroelastic responses resolved by Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witteveen, Jeroen A.S.; Bijl, Hester

    2009-01-01

    The Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements (UASFE) method resolves the effect of randomness in numerical simulations of single-mode aeroelastic responses with a constant accuracy in time for a constant number of samples. In this paper, the UASFE framework is extended to multi-frequency responses and continuous structures by employing a wavelet decomposition pre-processing step to decompose the sampled multi-frequency signals into single-frequency components. The effect of the randomness on the multi-frequency response is then obtained by summing the results of the UASFE interpolation at constant phase for the different frequency components. Results for multi-frequency responses and continuous structures show a three orders of magnitude reduction of computational costs compared to crude Monte Carlo simulations in a harmonically forced oscillator, a flutter panel problem, and the three-dimensional transonic AGARD 445.6 wing aeroelastic benchmark subject to random fields and random parameters with various probability distributions.

  10. Effects of randomness on chaos and order of coupled logistic maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savi, Marcelo A.

    2007-01-01

    Natural systems are essentially nonlinear being neither completely ordered nor completely random. These nonlinearities are responsible for a great variety of possibilities that includes chaos. On this basis, the effect of randomness on chaos and order of nonlinear dynamical systems is an important feature to be understood. This Letter considers randomness as fluctuations and uncertainties due to noise and investigates its influence in the nonlinear dynamical behavior of coupled logistic maps. The noise effect is included by adding random variations either to parameters or to state variables. Besides, the coupling uncertainty is investigated by assuming tinny values for the connection parameters, representing the idea that all Nature is, in some sense, weakly connected. Results from numerical simulations show situations where noise alters the system nonlinear dynamics

  11. Gender peer effects in university: evidence from a randomized experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbeek, H.; van Ewijk, R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies for primary and secondary education find positive effects of the share of girls in the classroom on achievement of boys and girls. This study examines whether these results can be extrapolated to post-secondary education. We conduct an experiment in which the shares of girls in

  12. Estimating safety effects of pavement management factors utilizing Bayesian random effect models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ximiao; Huang, Baoshan; Zaretzki, Russell L; Richards, Stephen; Yan, Xuedong

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of pavement management factors that relate to the occurrence of traffic-related crashes are rare. Traditional research has mostly employed summary statistics of bidirectional pavement quality measurements in extended longitudinal road segments over a long time period, which may cause a loss of important information and result in biased parameter estimates. The research presented in this article focuses on crash risk of roadways with overall fair to good pavement quality. Real-time and location-specific data were employed to estimate the effects of pavement management factors on the occurrence of crashes. This research is based on the crash data and corresponding pavement quality data for the Tennessee state route highways from 2004 to 2009. The potential temporal and spatial correlations among observations caused by unobserved factors were considered. Overall 6 models were built accounting for no correlation, temporal correlation only, and both the temporal and spatial correlations. These models included Poisson, negative binomial (NB), one random effect Poisson and negative binomial (OREP, ORENB), and two random effect Poisson and negative binomial (TREP, TRENB) models. The Bayesian method was employed to construct these models. The inference is based on the posterior distribution from the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. These models were compared using the deviance information criterion. Analysis of the posterior distribution of parameter coefficients indicates that the pavement management factors indexed by Present Serviceability Index (PSI) and Pavement Distress Index (PDI) had significant impacts on the occurrence of crashes, whereas the variable rutting depth was not significant. Among other factors, lane width, median width, type of terrain, and posted speed limit were significant in affecting crash frequency. The findings of this study indicate that a reduction in pavement roughness would reduce the likelihood of traffic

  13. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Perraton, Luke; Machotka, Zuzana; Kumar, Saravana

    2009-01-01

    Luke Perraton, Zuzana Machotka, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAim: Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials.Method: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Onl...

  14. Rapid characterization of microscopic two-level systems using Landau-Zener transitions in a superconducting qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Xinsheng; Yu, Haifeng; Yu, Yang; Han, Siyuan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a fast method to detect microscopic two-level systems in a superconducting phase qubit. By monitoring the population leak after sweeping the qubit bias flux, we are able to measure the two-level systems that are coupled with the qubit. Compared with the traditional method that detects two-level systems by energy spectroscopy, our method is faster and more sensitive. This method supplies a useful tool to investigate two-level systems in solid-state qubits

  15. The off-resonant aspects of decoherence and a critique of the two-level approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savran, Kerim; Hakioglu, T; Mese, E; Sevincli, Haldun

    2006-01-01

    Conditions in favour of a realistic multilevelled description of a decohering quantum system are examined. In this regard the first crucial observation is that the thermal effects, contrary to the conventional belief, play a minor role at low temperatures in the decoherence properties. The system-environment coupling and the environmental energy spectrum dominantly affect the decoherence. In particular, zero temperature quantum fluctuations or non-equilibrium sources can be present and influential on the decoherence rates in a wide energy range allowed by the spectrum of the environment. A crucial observation against the validity of the two-level approximation is that the decoherence rates are found to be dominated not by the long time resonant but the short time off-resonant processes. This observation is demonstrated in two stages. Firstly, our zero temperature numerical results reveal that the calculated short time decoherence rates are Gaussian-like (the time dependence of the density matrix is led by the second time derivative at t = 0). Exact analytical results are also permitted in the short time limit, which, consistent with our numerical results, reveal that this specific Gaussian-like behaviour is a property of the non-Markovian correlations in the environment. These Gaussian-like rates have no dependence on any spectral parameter (position and the width of the spectrum) except, in totality, the spectral area itself. The dependence on the spectral area is a power law. Furthermore, the Gaussian-like character at short times is independent of the number of levels (N), but the numerical value of the decoherence rates is a monotonic function of N. In this context, we demonstrate that leakage, as a characteristic multilevel effect, is dominated by the non-resonant processes. The long time behaviour of decoherence is also examined. Since our spectral model allows Markovian environmental correlations at long times, the decoherence rates in this regime become

  16. Random operators disorder effects on quantum spectra and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Aizenman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the mathematical theory of disorder effects on quantum spectra and dynamics. Topics covered range from the basic theory of spectra and dynamics of self-adjoint operators through Anderson localization-presented here via the fractional moment method, up to recent results on resonant delocalization. The subject's multifaceted presentation is organized into seventeen chapters, each focused on either a specific mathematical topic or on a demonstration of the theory's relevance to physics, e.g., its implications for the quantum Hall effect. The mathematical chapters include general relations of quantum spectra and dynamics, ergodicity and its implications, methods for establishing spectral and dynamical localization regimes, applications and properties of the Green function, its relation to the eigenfunction correlator, fractional moments of Herglotz-Pick functions, the phase diagram for tree graph operators, resonant delocalization, the spectral statistics conjecture, and rela...

  17. Application of random effects to the study of resource selection by animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Cameron S; Hebblewhite, Mark; Nielsen, Scott E; Krawchuk, Meg A; Aldridge, Cameron L; Frair, Jacqueline L; Saher, D Joanne; Stevens, Cameron E; Jerde, Christopher L

    2006-07-01

    1. Resource selection estimated by logistic regression is used increasingly in studies to identify critical resources for animal populations and to predict species occurrence. 2. Most frequently, individual animals are monitored and pooled to estimate population-level effects without regard to group or individual-level variation. Pooling assumes that both observations and their errors are independent, and resource selection is constant given individual variation in resource availability. 3. Although researchers have identified ways to minimize autocorrelation, variation between individuals caused by differences in selection or available resources, including functional responses in resource selection, have not been well addressed. 4. Here we review random-effects models and their application to resource selection modelling to overcome these common limitations. We present a simple case study of an analysis of resource selection by grizzly bears in the foothills of the Canadian Rocky Mountains with and without random effects. 5. Both categorical and continuous variables in the grizzly bear model differed in interpretation, both in statistical significance and coefficient sign, depending on how a random effect was included. We used a simulation approach to clarify the application of random effects under three common situations for telemetry studies: (a) discrepancies in sample sizes among individuals; (b) differences among individuals in selection where availability is constant; and (c) differences in availability with and without a functional response in resource selection. 6. We found that random intercepts accounted for unbalanced sample designs, and models with random intercepts and coefficients improved model fit given the variation in selection among individuals and functional responses in selection. Our empirical example and simulations demonstrate how including random effects in resource selection models can aid interpretation and address difficult assumptions

  18. Note on an Identity Between Two Unbiased Variance Estimators for the Grand Mean in a Simple Random Effects Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Bruce; Leu, Cheng-Shiun

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the algebraic equivalence of two unbiased variance estimators for the sample grand mean in a random sample of subjects from an infinite population where subjects provide repeated observations following a homoscedastic random effects model.

  19. A spatial error model with continuous random effects and an application to growth convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurini, Márcio Poletti

    2017-10-01

    We propose a spatial error model with continuous random effects based on Matérn covariance functions and apply this model for the analysis of income convergence processes (β -convergence). The use of a model with continuous random effects permits a clearer visualization and interpretation of the spatial dependency patterns, avoids the problems of defining neighborhoods in spatial econometrics models, and allows projecting the spatial effects for every possible location in the continuous space, circumventing the existing aggregations in discrete lattice representations. We apply this model approach to analyze the economic growth of Brazilian municipalities between 1991 and 2010 using unconditional and conditional formulations and a spatiotemporal model of convergence. The results indicate that the estimated spatial random effects are consistent with the existence of income convergence clubs for Brazilian municipalities in this period.

  20. Effect of Randomness in Element Position on Performance of Communication Array Antennas in Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congsi Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a critical component for wireless communication, active phased array antennas face the restrictions of creating effective performance with the effect of randomness in the position of the array element, which are inevitably produced in the manufacturing and operating process of antenna. A new method for efficiently and effectively evaluating the statistic performance of antenna is presented, with consideration of randomness in element position. A coupled structural-electromagnetic statistic model for array antenna is proposed from the viewpoint of electromechanical coupling. Lastly, a 12×12 planar array is illustrated to evaluate the performance of antenna with the saddle-shaped distortion and random position error. The results show that the presented model can obtain the antenna performance quickly and effectively, providing an advantageous guidance for structural design and performance optimization for array antennas in wireless application.

  1. Exploring the Influence of Neighborhood Characteristics on Burglary Risks: A Bayesian Random Effects Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqiang Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A Bayesian random effects modeling approach was used to examine the influence of neighborhood characteristics on burglary risks in Jianghan District, Wuhan, China. This random effects model is essentially spatial; a spatially structured random effects term and an unstructured random effects term are added to the traditional non-spatial Poisson regression model. Based on social disorganization and routine activity theories, five covariates extracted from the available data at the neighborhood level were used in the modeling. Three regression models were fitted and compared by the deviance information criterion to identify which model best fit our data. A comparison of the results from the three models indicates that the Bayesian random effects model is superior to the non-spatial models in fitting the data and estimating regression coefficients. Our results also show that neighborhoods with above average bar density and department store density have higher burglary risks. Neighborhood-specific burglary risks and posterior probabilities of neighborhoods having a burglary risk greater than 1.0 were mapped, indicating the neighborhoods that should warrant more attention and be prioritized for crime intervention and reduction. Implications and limitations of the study are discussed in our concluding section.

  2. Effective permittivity of random composite media: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Ashutosh; Prasad, K.

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, experimental data for effective permittivity of amorphous, polycrystalline thick films, and ceramic form of samples, taken from the literature, have been chosen for their comparison with those yielded by different mixture equations. In order to test the acceptability of dielectric mixture equations for high volume fractions of the inclusion material in the mixture, eleven such equations have been chosen. It is found that equations given by Cuming, Maxwell-Wagner, Webmann, Skipetrov and modified Cule-Torquato show their coherence and minimal deviation from the experimental results of permittivity for all the chosen test materials almost over the entire measurement range of volume fractions. It is further found that Maxwell-Wagner, Webmann, and Skipetrov equations yielded equivalent results and consequently they have been combined together and reckoned as a single equation named MWWS. The study revealed that the Cuming equation had the highest degree of acceptability (errors <±1-5%) in all the cases

  3. Can centralized sanctioning promote trust in social dilemmas? A two-level trust game with incomplete information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Raymond Yu; Ng, Cho Nam

    2015-01-01

    The problem of trust is a paradigmatic social dilemma. Previous literature has paid much academic attention on effects of peer punishment and altruistic third-party punishment on trust and human cooperation in dyadic interactions. However, the effects of centralized sanctioning institutions on decentralized reciprocity in hierarchical interactions remain to be further explored. This paper presents a formal two-level trust game with incomplete information which adds an authority as a strategic purposive actor into the traditional trust game. This model allows scholars to examine the problem of trust in more complex game theoretic configurations. The analysis demonstrates how the centralized institutions might change the dynamics of reciprocity between the trustor and the trustee. Findings suggest that the sequential equilibria of the newly proposed two-level model simultaneously include the risk of placing trust for the trustor and the temptation of short-term defection for the trustee. Moreover, they have shown that even a slight uncertainty about the type of the newly introduced authority might facilitate the establishment of trust and reciprocity in social dilemmas.

  4. Can centralized sanctioning promote trust in social dilemmas? A two-level trust game with incomplete information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Yu Wang

    Full Text Available The problem of trust is a paradigmatic social dilemma. Previous literature has paid much academic attention on effects of peer punishment and altruistic third-party punishment on trust and human cooperation in dyadic interactions. However, the effects of centralized sanctioning institutions on decentralized reciprocity in hierarchical interactions remain to be further explored. This paper presents a formal two-level trust game with incomplete information which adds an authority as a strategic purposive actor into the traditional trust game. This model allows scholars to examine the problem of trust in more complex game theoretic configurations. The analysis demonstrates how the centralized institutions might change the dynamics of reciprocity between the trustor and the trustee. Findings suggest that the sequential equilibria of the newly proposed two-level model simultaneously include the risk of placing trust for the trustor and the temptation of short-term defection for the trustee. Moreover, they have shown that even a slight uncertainty about the type of the newly introduced authority might facilitate the establishment of trust and reciprocity in social dilemmas.

  5. The Effect of Some Estimators of Between-Study Variance on Random

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samson Henry Dogo

    the first step to such objectivity (Schmidt, 1992), allows to combine results from many studies and accurately ... Schmidt, 2000) due to its ability to account for variation in effects across the studies. Random-effects model ... (2015), and each of the estimators differs in terms of their bias and precision in estimation. By definition ...

  6. Random-Effects Models for Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling: Review, Issues, and Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mike W.-L.; Cheung, Shu Fai

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) combines the techniques of meta-analysis and structural equation modeling for the purpose of synthesizing correlation or covariance matrices and fitting structural equation models on the pooled correlation or covariance matrix. Both fixed-effects and random-effects models can be defined in MASEM.…

  7. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in children with chronic otitis media: a randomized comparison of costs and effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, C.W.; Veen, E.L. van der; Wilt, G.J. van der; Schilder, A.G.M.; Rovers, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the cost-effectiveness of a 6- to 12-week course of high-dose oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in children with chronic active otitis media (COM). STUDY DESIGN: Cost-effectiveness study including both direct and indirect costs alongside a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  8. Effect of texture randomization on the slip and interfacial robustness in turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jongmin; Mani, Ali

    2018-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces demonstrate promising potential for skin friction reduction in naval and hydrodynamic applications. Recent developments of superhydrophobic surfaces aiming for scalable applications use random distribution of roughness, such as spray coating and etched process. However, most previous analyses of the interaction between flows and superhydrophobic surfaces studied periodic geometries that are economically feasible only in laboratory-scale experiments. In order to assess the drag reduction effectiveness as well as interfacial robustness of superhydrophobic surfaces with randomly distributed textures, we conduct direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over randomly patterned interfaces considering a range of texture widths w+≈4 -26 , and solid fractions ϕs=11 %-25 % . Slip and no-slip boundary conditions are implemented in a pattern, modeling the presence of gas-liquid interfaces and solid elements. Our results indicate that slip of randomly distributed textures under turbulent flows is about 30 % less than those of surfaces with aligned features of the same size. In the small texture size limit w+≈4 , the slip length of the randomly distributed textures in turbulent flows is well described by a previously introduced Stokes flow solution of randomly distributed shear-free holes. By comparing DNS results for patterned slip and no-slip boundary against the corresponding homogenized slip length boundary conditions, we show that turbulent flows over randomly distributed posts can be represented by an isotropic slip length in streamwise and spanwise direction. The average pressure fluctuation on a gas pocket is similar to that of the aligned features with the same texture size and gas fraction, but the maximum interface deformation at the leading edge of the roughness element is about twice as large when the textures are randomly distributed. The presented analyses provide insights on implications of texture randomness on drag

  9. Renormalization of correlations in a quasiperiodically forced two-level system: quadratic irrationals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestel, B D; Osbaldestin, A H

    2004-01-01

    Generalizing from the case of golden mean frequency to a wider class of quadratic irrationals, we extend our renormalization analysis of the self-similarity of correlation functions in a quasiperiodically forced two-level system. We give a description of all piecewise-constant periodic orbits of an additive functional recurrence generalizing that present in the golden mean case. We establish a criterion for periodic orbits to be globally bounded, and also calculate the asymptotic height of the main peaks in the correlation function

  10. Aspects of two-level systems under external time-dependent fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G.; Wreszinski, W.F. [Tomsk State University and Tomsk Institute of High Current Electronics (Russian Federation); Barata, J.C.A.; Gitman D.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil)]. E-mails: jbarata@fma.if.usp.br; gitman@fma.if.usp.br

    2001-12-14

    The dynamics of two-level systems in time-dependent backgrounds is under consideration. We present some new exact solutions in special backgrounds decaying in time. On the other hand, following ideas of Feynman et al, we discuss in detail the possibility of reducing the quantum dynamics to a classical Hamiltonian system. This, in particular, opens the possibility of directly applying powerful methods of classical mechanics (e.g. KAM methods) to study the quantum system. Following such an approach, we draw conclusions of relevance for 'quantum chaos' when the external background is periodic or quasi-periodic in time. (author)

  11. Characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami and introduction of two level tsunamis for tsunami disaster mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami have been revealed by collaborative tsunami surveys extensively performed under the coordination of the Joint Tsunami Survey Group. The complex behaviors of the mega-tsunami were characterized by the unprecedented scale and the low occurrence frequency. The limitation and the performance of tsunami countermeasures were described on the basis of tsunami surveys, laboratory experiments and numerical analyses. These findings contributed to the introduction of two-level tsunami hazards to establish a new strategy for tsunami disaster mitigation, combining structure-based flood protection designed by the Level-1 tsunami and non-structure-based damage reduction planned by the Level-2 tsunami.

  12. Teleporting the one-qubit state via two-level atoms with spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Mingliang, E-mail: mingliang0301@xupt.edu.cn, E-mail: mingliang0301@163.com [School of Science, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2011-05-14

    We study quantum teleportation via two two-level atoms coupled collectively to a multimode vacuum field and prepared initially in different atomic states. We concentrated on the influence of the spontaneous emission, collective damping and dipole-dipole interaction of the atoms on fidelity dynamics of quantum teleportation and obtained the region of spatial distance between the two atoms over which the state can be teleported nonclassically. Moreover, we showed through concrete examples that entanglement of the channel state is the prerequisite but not the only essential quantity for predicting the teleportation fidelity.

  13. A January angular momentum balance in the OSU two-level atmospheric general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-W.; Grady, W.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an analysis of the atmospheric angular momentum balance, based on the simulation data of the Oregon State University two-level atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). An attempt is also made to gain an understanding of the involved processes. Preliminary results on the angular momentum and mass balance in the AGCM are shown. The basic equations are examined, and questions of turbulent momentum transfer are investigated. The methods of analysis are discussed, taking into account time-averaged balance equations, time and longitude-averaged balance equations, mean meridional circulation, the mean meridional balance of relative angular momentum, and standing and transient components of motion.

  14. Thermal analysis of two-level wind power converter under symmetrical grid fault

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the case of symmetrical grid fault when using the multi-MW wind turbine of partial-scale and full-scale two-level power converter are designed and investigated. Firstly, the different operation behaviors of the relevant power converters under the voltage dip will be described......) condition as well as the junction temperature. For the full-scale wind turbine system, the most thermal stressed power device in the grid-side converter will appear at the grid voltage below 0.5 pu, and for the partial-scale wind turbine system, the most thermal stressed power device in the rotor...

  15. Geometric manipulation of the quantum states of two-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Mingzhen; Barber, Zeb W.; Fischer, Joe A.; Babbitt, Wm. Randall

    2004-01-01

    Manipulation of the quantum states of two-level atoms has been investigated using laser-controlled geometric phase change, which has the potential to build robust quantum logic gates for quantum computing. For a qubit based on two electronic transition levels of an atom, two basic quantum operations that can make any universal single qubit gate have been designed employing resonant laser pulses. An operation equivalent to a phase gate has been demonstrated using Tm 3+ doped in a yttrium aluminum garnet crystal

  16. Limitations of two-level emitters as nonlinearities in two-photon controlled-PHASE gates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders; McCutcheon, Dara P. S.; Heuck, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the origin of imperfections in the fidelity of a two-photon controlled-PHASE gate based on two-level-emitter nonlinearities. We focus on a passive system that operates without external modulations to enhance its performance. We demonstrate that the fidelity of the gate is limited...... by opposing requirements on the input pulse width for one-and two-photon-scattering events. For one-photon scattering, the spectral pulse width must be narrow compared with the emitter linewidth, while two-photon-scattering processes require the pulse width and emitter linewidth to be comparable. We find...

  17. Disentangling the effects of alternation rate and maximum run length on judgments of randomness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine G. Scholl

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Binary sequences are characterized by various features. Two of these characteristics---alternation rate and run length---have repeatedly been shown to influence judgments of randomness. The two characteristics, however, have usually been investigated separately, without controlling for the other feature. Because the two features are correlated but not identical, it seems critical to analyze their unique impact, as well as their interaction, so as to understand more clearly what influences judgments of randomness. To this end, two experiments on the perception of binary sequences orthogonally manipulated alternation rate and maximum run length (i.e., length of the longest run within the sequence. Results show that alternation rate consistently exerts a unique effect on judgments of randomness, but that the effect of alternation rate is contingent on the length of the longest run within the sequence. The effect of maximum run length was found to be small and less consistent. Together, these findings extend prior randomness research by integrating literature from the realms of perception, categorization, and prediction, as well as by showing the unique and joint effects of alternation rate and maximum run length on judgments of randomness.

  18. Effects of psychological therapies in randomized trials and practice-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkham, Michael; Stiles, William B; Connell, Janice; Twigg, Elspeth; Leach, Chris; Lucock, Mike; Mellor-Clark, John; Bower, Peter; King, Michael; Shapiro, David A; Hardy, Gillian E; Greenberg, Leslie; Angus, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Randomized trials of the effects of psychological therapies seek internal validity via homogeneous samples and standardized treatment protocols. In contrast, practice-based studies aim for clinical realism and external validity via heterogeneous samples of clients treated under routine practice conditions. We compared indices of treatment effects in these two types of studies. Using published transformation formulas, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores from five randomized trials of depression (N = 477 clients) were transformed into Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) scores and compared with CORE-OM data collected in four practice-based studies (N = 4,196 clients). Conversely, the practice-based studies' CORE-OM scores were transformed into BDI scores and compared with randomized trial data. Randomized trials showed a modest advantage over practice-based studies in amount of pre-post improvement. This difference was compressed or exaggerated depending on the direction of the transformation but averaged about 12%. There was a similarly sized advantage to randomized trials in rates of reliable and clinically significant improvement (RCSI). The largest difference was yielded by comparisons of effect sizes which suggested an advantage more than twice as large, reflecting narrower pre-treatment distributions in the randomized trials. Outcomes of completed treatments for depression in randomized trials appeared to be modestly greater than those in routine care settings. The size of the difference may be distorted depending on the method for calculating degree of change. Transforming BDI scores into CORE-OM scores and vice versa may be a preferable alternative to effect sizes for comparisons of studies using these measures.

  19. Random effects model for the reliability management of modules of a fighter aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, So Young [Department of Computer Science and Industrial Systems Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchondong 134, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: sohns@yonsei.ac.kr; Yoon, Kyung Bok [Department of Computer Science and Industrial Systems Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchondong 134, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: ykb@yonsei.ac.kr; Chang, In Sang [Department of Computer Science and Industrial Systems Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchondong 134, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: isjang@yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-04-15

    The operational availability of fighter aircrafts plays an important role in the national defense. Low operational availability of fighter aircrafts can cause many problems and ROKA (Republic of Korea Airforce) needs proper strategies to improve the current practice of reliability management by accurately forecasting both MTBF (mean time between failure) and MTTR (mean time to repair). In this paper, we develop a random effects model to forecast both MTBF and MTTR of installed modules of fighter aircrafts based on their characteristics and operational conditions. Advantage of using such a random effects model is the ability of accommodating not only the individual characteristics of each module and operational conditions but also the uncertainty caused by random error that cannot be explained by them. Our study is expected to contribute to ROKA in improving operational availability of fighter aircrafts and establishing effective logistics management.

  20. Two-level method for unsteady Navier-Stokes equations based on a new projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Yanren; Li Kaitai

    2004-12-01

    A two-level algorithm for the two dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations based on a new projection is proposed and investigated. The approximate solution is solved as a sum of a large eddy component and a small eddy component, which are in the sense of the new projection, constructed in this paper. These two terms advance in time explicitly. Actually, the new algorithm proposed here can be regarded as a sort of postprocessing algorithm for the standard Galerkin method (SGM). The large eddy part is solved by SGM in the usual L 2 -based large eddy subspace while the small eddy part (the correction part) is obtained in its complement subspace in the sense of the new projection. The stability analysis indicates the improvement of the stability comparing with SGM of the same scale, and the L 2 -error estimate shows that the scheme can improve the accuracy of SGM approximation for half order. We also propose a numerical implementation based on Lagrange multiplier for this two-level algorithm. (author)

  1. Protecting quantum coherence of two-level atoms from vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaobao; Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of open quantum systems, we study the dynamics of a static polarizable two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field and explore under which conditions the coherence of the open quantum system is unaffected by the environment. For both a single-qubit and two-qubit systems, we find that the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise when the atom interacts with a non-boundary electromagnetic field. However, with the presence of a boundary, the dynamical conditions for the insusceptible of quantum coherence are fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction. -- Highlights: •We study the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field. •For both a single and two-qubit systems, the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise without a boundary. •The insusceptible of the quantum coherence can be fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. •Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction.

  2. Ramsey interferometry with a two-level generalized Tonks-Girardeau gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi, S. V.; Campo, A. del; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a solvable generalization of the Tonks-Girardeau model that describes a coherent one-dimensional (1D) gas of cold two-level bosons which interact with two external fields in a Ramsey interferometer. They also interact among themselves by idealized, infinitely strong contact potentials, with interchange of momentum and internal state. We study the corresponding Ramsey fringes and the quantum projection noise which, essentially unaffected by the interactions, remains that for ideal bosons. The dual system of this gas, an ideal gas of two-level fermions coupled by the interaction with the separated fields, produces the same fringes and noise fluctuations. The cases of time-separated and spatially separated fields are studied. For spatially separated fields the fringes may be broadened slightly by increasing the number of particles, but only for large particle numbers far from present experiments with Tonks-Girardeau gases. The uncertainty in the determination of the atomic transition frequency diminishes, essentially with the inverse root of the particle number. The difficulties to implement the model experimentally and possible shortcomings of strongly interacting 1D gases for frequency standards and atomic clocks are discussed

  3. A Weighted Two-Level Bregman Method with Dictionary Updating for Nonconvex MR Image Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiegen Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonconvex optimization has shown that it needs substantially fewer measurements than l1 minimization for exact recovery under fixed transform/overcomplete dictionary. In this work, two efficient numerical algorithms which are unified by the method named weighted two-level Bregman method with dictionary updating (WTBMDU are proposed for solving lp optimization under the dictionary learning model and subjecting the fidelity to the partial measurements. By incorporating the iteratively reweighted norm into the two-level Bregman iteration method with dictionary updating scheme (TBMDU, the modified alternating direction method (ADM solves the model of pursuing the approximated lp-norm penalty efficiently. Specifically, the algorithms converge after a relatively small number of iterations, under the formulation of iteratively reweighted l1 and l2 minimization. Experimental results on MR image simulations and real MR data, under a variety of sampling trajectories and acceleration factors, consistently demonstrate that the proposed method can efficiently reconstruct MR images from highly undersampled k-space data and presents advantages over the current state-of-the-art reconstruction approaches, in terms of higher PSNR and lower HFEN values.

  4. Detuning-induced stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in dense two-level systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Lin, Gongwei; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the coherence generation in dense two-level systems under detuning-induced stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (D-STIRAP). In the dense two-level system, the near dipole-dipole (NDD) interaction should be taken into consideration. With the increase in the strength of the NDD interaction, it is found that a switchlike transition of the generated coherence from maximum value to zero appears. Meanwhile, the adiabatic condition of the D-STIRAP is destroyed in the presence of the NDD interaction. In order to avoid the sudden decrease in the generated coherence and maintain the maximum value, we can use stronger detuning pulse or pump pulse, between which increasing the intensity of the detuning pulse is of more efficiency. Except for taking advantage of such maximum coherence in the high density case into areas like enhancing the four-wave mixing process, we also point out that the phenomenon of the coherence transition can be applied as an optical switch.

  5. A novel two-level dynamic parallel data scheme for large 3-D SN calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoden, G.E.; Shedlock, D.; Haghighat, A.; Yi, C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a new dynamic parallel memory optimization scheme for executing large scale 3-D discrete ordinates (Sn) simulations on distributed memory parallel computers. In order for parallel transport codes to be truly scalable, they must use parallel data storage, where only the variables that are locally computed are locally stored. Even with parallel data storage for the angular variables, cumulative storage requirements for large discrete ordinates calculations can be prohibitive. To address this problem, Memory Tuning has been implemented into the PENTRAN 3-D parallel discrete ordinates code as an optimized, two-level ('large' array, 'small' array) parallel data storage scheme. Memory Tuning can be described as the process of parallel data memory optimization. Memory Tuning dynamically minimizes the amount of required parallel data in allocated memory on each processor using a statistical sampling algorithm. This algorithm is based on the integral average and standard deviation of the number of fine meshes contained in each coarse mesh in the global problem. Because PENTRAN only stores the locally computed problem phase space, optimal two-level memory assignments can be unique on each node, depending upon the parallel decomposition used (hybrid combinations of angular, energy, or spatial). As demonstrated in the two large discrete ordinates models presented (a storage cask and an OECD MOX Benchmark), Memory Tuning can save a substantial amount of memory per parallel processor, allowing one to accomplish very large scale Sn computations. (authors)

  6. Network meta-analysis of disconnected networks: How dangerous are random baseline treatment effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béliveau, Audrey; Goring, Sarah; Platt, Robert W; Gustafson, Paul

    2017-12-01

    In network meta-analysis, the use of fixed baseline treatment effects (a priori independent) in a contrast-based approach is regularly preferred to the use of random baseline treatment effects (a priori dependent). That is because, often, there is not a need to model baseline treatment effects, which carry the risk of model misspecification. However, in disconnected networks, fixed baseline treatment effects do not work (unless extra assumptions are made), as there is not enough information in the data to update the prior distribution on the contrasts between disconnected treatments. In this paper, we investigate to what extent the use of random baseline treatment effects is dangerous in disconnected networks. We take 2 publicly available datasets of connected networks and disconnect them in multiple ways. We then compare the results of treatment comparisons obtained from a Bayesian contrast-based analysis of each disconnected network using random normally distributed and exchangeable baseline treatment effects to those obtained from a Bayesian contrast-based analysis of their initial connected network using fixed baseline treatment effects. For the 2 datasets considered, we found that the use of random baseline treatment effects in disconnected networks was appropriate. Because those datasets were not cherry-picked, there should be other disconnected networks that would benefit from being analyzed using random baseline treatment effects. However, there is also a risk for the normality and exchangeability assumption to be inappropriate in other datasets even though we have not observed this situation in our case study. We provide code, so other datasets can be investigated. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Random Process Theory Approach to Geometric Heterogeneous Surfaces: Effective Fluid-Solid Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlyupin, Aleksey; Aslyamov, Timur

    2017-06-01

    Realistic fluid-solid interaction potentials are essential in description of confined fluids especially in the case of geometric heterogeneous surfaces. Correlated random field is considered as a model of random surface with high geometric roughness. We provide the general theory of effective coarse-grained fluid-solid potential by proper averaging of the free energy of fluid molecules which interact with the solid media. This procedure is largely based on the theory of random processes. We apply first passage time probability problem and assume the local Markov properties of random surfaces. General expression of effective fluid-solid potential is obtained. In the case of small surface irregularities analytical approximation for effective potential is proposed. Both amorphous materials with large surface roughness and crystalline solids with several types of fcc lattices are considered. It is shown that the wider the lattice spacing in terms of molecular diameter of the fluid, the more obtained potentials differ from classical ones. A comparison with published Monte-Carlo simulations was discussed. The work provides a promising approach to explore how the random geometric heterogeneity affects on thermodynamic properties of the fluids.

  8. Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Christopher H; Fielding, Roger A; Harvey, William F; Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Driban, Jeffrey B; Kalish, Robert; Rones, Ramel; McAlindon, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To determine the effectiveness of tai chi interventions compared with aerobic exercise, a current core standard treatment in patients with fibromyalgia, and to test whether the effectiveness of tai chi depends on its dosage or duration. Design Prospective, randomized, 52 week, single blind comparative effectiveness trial. Setting Urban tertiary care academic hospital in the United States between March 2012 and September 2016. Participants 226 adults with fibromyalgia (as defined by the American College of Rheumatology 1990 and 2010 criteria) were included in the intention to treat analyses: 151 were assigned to one of four tai chi groups and 75 to an aerobic exercise group. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to either supervised aerobic exercise (24 weeks, twice weekly) or one of four classic Yang style supervised tai chi interventions (12 or 24 weeks, once or twice weekly). Participants were followed for 52 weeks. Adherence was rigorously encouraged in person and by telephone. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was change in the revised fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQR) scores at 24 weeks compared with baseline. Secondary outcomes included changes of scores in patient’s global assessment, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, coping strategies, physical functional performance, functional limitation, sleep, and health related quality of life. Results FIQR scores improved in all five treatment groups, but the combined tai chi groups improved statistically significantly more than the aerobic exercise group in FIQR scores at 24 weeks (difference between groups=5.5 points, 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 10.4, P=0.03) and several secondary outcomes (patient’s global assessment=0.9 points, 0.3 to 1.4, P=0.005; anxiety=1.2 points, 0.3 to 2.1, P=0.006; self efficacy=1.0 points, 0.5 to 1.6, P=0.0004; and coping strategies, 2.6 points, 0.8 to 4.3, P=0.005). Tai chi treatment compared with aerobic exercise administered with

  9. Predicting longitudinal trajectories of health probabilities with random-effects multinomial logit regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian; Engel, Charles C

    2012-12-20

    Researchers often encounter longitudinal health data characterized with three or more ordinal or nominal categories. Random-effects multinomial logit models are generally applied to account for potential lack of independence inherent in such clustered data. When parameter estimates are used to describe longitudinal processes, however, random effects, both between and within individuals, need to be retransformed for correctly predicting outcome probabilities. This study attempts to go beyond existing work by developing a retransformation method that derives longitudinal growth trajectories of unbiased health probabilities. We estimated variances of the predicted probabilities by using the delta method. Additionally, we transformed the covariates' regression coefficients on the multinomial logit function, not substantively meaningful, to the conditional effects on the predicted probabilities. The empirical illustration uses the longitudinal data from the Asset and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old. Our analysis compared three sets of the predicted probabilities of three health states at six time points, obtained from, respectively, the retransformation method, the best linear unbiased prediction, and the fixed-effects approach. The results demonstrate that neglect of retransforming random errors in the random-effects multinomial logit model results in severely biased longitudinal trajectories of health probabilities as well as overestimated effects of covariates on the probabilities. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A Two-Level Sensorless MPPT Strategy Using SRF-PLL on a PMSG Wind Energy Conversion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Echchaachouai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a two-level sensorless Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT strategy is presented for a variable speed Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS. The proposed system is composed of a wind turbine, a direct-drive Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG and a three phase controlled rectifier connected to a DC load. The realised generator output power maximization analysis justifies the use of the Field Oriented Control (FOC giving the six Pulse Width Modulation (PWM signals to the active rectifier. The generator rotor speed and position required by the FOC and the sensorless MPPT are estimated using a Synchronous Reference Frame Phase Locked Loop (SRF-PLL. The MPPT strategy used consists of two levels, the first level is a power regulation loop and the second level is an extremum seeking bloc generating the coefficient gathering the turbine characteristics. Experimental results validated on a hardware test setup using a DSP digital board (dSPACE 1104 are presented. Figures illustrating the estimated speed and angle confirm that the SRF-PLL is able to give an estimated speed and angle which closely follow the real ones. Also, the power at the DC load and the power at the generator output indicate that the MPPT gives optimum extracted power. Finally, other results show the effectiveness of the adopted approach in real time applications.

  11. An Economic Order Quantity Model with Completely Backordering and Nondecreasing Demand under Two-Level Trade Credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Molamohamadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the traditional inventory system, it was implicitly assumed that the buyer pays to the seller as soon as he receives the items. In today’s competitive industry, however, the seller usually offers the buyer a delay period to settle the account of the goods. Not only the seller but also the buyer may apply trade credit as a strategic tool to stimulate his customers’ demands. This paper investigates the effects of the latter policy, two-level trade credit, on a retailer’s optimal ordering decisions within the economic order quantity framework and allowable shortages. Unlike most of the previous studies, the demand function of the customers is considered to increase with time. The objective of the retailer’s inventory model is to maximize the profit. The replenishment decisions optimally are obtained using genetic algorithm. Two special cases of the proposed model are discussed and the impacts of parameters on the decision variables are finally investigated. Numerical examples demonstrate the profitability of the developed two-level supply chain with backorder.

  12. Using observation-level random effects to model overdispersion in count data in ecology and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier A. Harrison

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Overdispersion is common in models of count data in ecology and evolutionary biology, and can occur due to missing covariates, non-independent (aggregated data, or an excess frequency of zeroes (zero-inflation. Accounting for overdispersion in such models is vital, as failing to do so can lead to biased parameter estimates, and false conclusions regarding hypotheses of interest. Observation-level random effects (OLRE, where each data point receives a unique level of a random effect that models the extra-Poisson variation present in the data, are commonly employed to cope with overdispersion in count data. However studies investigating the efficacy of observation-level random effects as a means to deal with overdispersion are scarce. Here I use simulations to show that in cases where overdispersion is caused by random extra-Poisson noise, or aggregation in the count data, observation-level random effects yield more accurate parameter estimates compared to when overdispersion is simply ignored. Conversely, OLRE fail to reduce bias in zero-inflated data, and in some cases increase bias at high levels of overdispersion. There was a positive relationship between the magnitude of overdispersion and the degree of bias in parameter estimates. Critically, the simulations reveal that failing to account for overdispersion in mixed models can erroneously inflate measures of explained variance (r2, which may lead to researchers overestimating the predictive power of variables of interest. This work suggests use of observation-level random effects provides a simple and robust means to account for overdispersion in count data, but also that their ability to minimise bias is not uniform across all types of overdispersion and must be applied judiciously.

  13. Quantum correlations between each two-level system in a pair of atoms and general coherent fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdel-Khalek

    Full Text Available The quantitative description of the quantum correlations between each two-level system in a two-atom system and the coherent fields initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs is considered. Specifically, we consider two atoms locally interacting with PLPCSs and take into account the different terms of interactions, the entanglement and quantum discord are studied including the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects. Using the monogamic relation between the entanglement of formation and quantum discord in tripartite systems, we show that the control and preservation of the different kinds of quantum correlations greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical quantities. Finally, we explore the link between the dynamical behavior of quantum correlations and nonclassicality of the fields with and without atomic motion effect. Keywords: Quantum correlations, Monogamic relation, Coherent states, Power-law potentials, Wehrl entropy

  14. Temporal Bell-type inequalities for two-level Rydberg atoms coupled to a high-Q resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huelga, S.F.; Marshall, T.W.; Santos, E.

    1996-01-01

    Following the strategy of showing specific quantum effects by means of the violation of a classical inequality, a pair of Bell-type inequalities is derived on the basis of certain additional assumptions, whose plausibility is discussed in detail. Such inequalities are violated by the quantum mechanical predictions for the interaction of a two-level Rydberg atom with a single mode sustained by a high-Q resonator. The experimental conditions required in order to show the existence of forbidden values, according to a hidden variables formalism, in a real experiment are analyzed for various initial field statistics. In particular, the revival dynamics expected for the interaction with a coherent field leads to classically forbidden values, which would indicate a purely quantum effect. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  15. Cavity quantum electrodynamics using a near-resonance two-level system: Emergence of the Glauber state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarabi, B.; Ramanayaka, A. N. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Burin, A. L. [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Wellstood, F. C. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Osborn, K. D. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Random tunneling two-level systems (TLSs) in dielectrics have been of interest recently because they adversely affect the performance of superconducting qubits. The coupling of TLSs to qubits has allowed individual TLS characterization, which has previously been limited to TLSs within (thin) Josephson tunneling barriers made from aluminum oxide. Here, we report on the measurement of an individual TLS within the capacitor of a lumped-element LC microwave resonator, which forms a cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system and allows for individual TLS characterization in a different structure and material than demonstrated with qubits. Due to the reduced volume of the dielectric (80 μm{sup 3}), even with a moderate dielectric thickness (250 nm), we achieve the strong coupling regime as evidenced by the vacuum Rabi splitting observed in the cavity spectrum. A TLS with a coherence time of 3.2 μs was observed in a film of silicon nitride as analyzed with a Jaynes-Cummings spectral model, which is larger than seen from superconducting qubits. As the drive power is increased, we observe an unusual but explicable set of continuous and discrete crossovers from the vacuum Rabi split transitions to the Glauber (coherent) state.

  16. Logistic Regression with Multiple Random Effects: A Simulation Study of Estimation Methods and Statistical Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonsang; Emery, Sherry

    2013-01-01

    Several statistical packages are capable of estimating generalized linear mixed models and these packages provide one or more of three estimation methods: penalized quasi-likelihood, Laplace, and Gauss-Hermite. Many studies have investigated these methods’ performance for the mixed-effects logistic regression model. However, the authors focused on models with one or two random effects and assumed a simple covariance structure between them, which may not be realistic. When there are multiple correlated random effects in a model, the computation becomes intensive, and often an algorithm fails to converge. Moreover, in our analysis of smoking status and exposure to anti-tobacco advertisements, we have observed that when a model included multiple random effects, parameter estimates varied considerably from one statistical package to another even when using the same estimation method. This article presents a comprehensive review of the advantages and disadvantages of each estimation method. In addition, we compare the performances of the three methods across statistical packages via simulation, which involves two- and three-level logistic regression models with at least three correlated random effects. We apply our findings to a real dataset. Our results suggest that two packages—SAS GLIMMIX Laplace and SuperMix Gaussian quadrature—perform well in terms of accuracy, precision, convergence rates, and computing speed. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the two packages in regard to sample sizes. PMID:24288415

  17. Logistic Regression with Multiple Random Effects: A Simulation Study of Estimation Methods and Statistical Packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonsang; Choi, Young-Ku; Emery, Sherry

    2013-08-01

    Several statistical packages are capable of estimating generalized linear mixed models and these packages provide one or more of three estimation methods: penalized quasi-likelihood, Laplace, and Gauss-Hermite. Many studies have investigated these methods' performance for the mixed-effects logistic regression model. However, the authors focused on models with one or two random effects and assumed a simple covariance structure between them, which may not be realistic. When there are multiple correlated random effects in a model, the computation becomes intensive, and often an algorithm fails to converge. Moreover, in our analysis of smoking status and exposure to anti-tobacco advertisements, we have observed that when a model included multiple random effects, parameter estimates varied considerably from one statistical package to another even when using the same estimation method. This article presents a comprehensive review of the advantages and disadvantages of each estimation method. In addition, we compare the performances of the three methods across statistical packages via simulation, which involves two- and three-level logistic regression models with at least three correlated random effects. We apply our findings to a real dataset. Our results suggest that two packages-SAS GLIMMIX Laplace and SuperMix Gaussian quadrature-perform well in terms of accuracy, precision, convergence rates, and computing speed. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the two packages in regard to sample sizes.

  18. SUBJECT «NUMBER SYSTEMS» IN TWO-LEVELED FORMAT PREPARATION TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Igoshin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyze the format of a two-leveled training – bachelor and master – future teachers of mathematics from the point of view of the content of mathematical material, which is to develop prospective teachers of mathematics at those two levels, shaping their professional competence.Methods. The study involves the theoretical methods: the analysis of pedagogical and methodical literature, normative documents; historical, comparative and logical analysis of the content of pedagogical mathematical education; forecasting, planning and designing of two-leveled methodical system of training of future teachers of mathematics.Results and scientific novelty. The level differentiation of the higher education system requires developing the appropriate curricula for undergraduate and graduate programs. The fundamental principle must be the principle of continuity – the magister must continue to deepen and broaden knowledge and skills, along with competences acquired, developed and formed on the undergraduate level. From these positions, this paper examines the course «Number Systems» – the most important in terms of methodology course for future mathematics teachers, and shows what content should be filled with this course at the undergraduate level and the graduate level. At the undergraduate level it is proposed to study classical number systems – natural, integer, rational, real and complex. Further extensions of the number systems are studied at the graduate level. The theory of numeric systems is presented as a theory of algebraic systems, arising at the intersection of algebra and mathematical logic. Here we study algebras over a field, division algebra over a field, an alternative algebra with division over the field, Jordan algebra, Lie algebra. Comprehension of bases of the theory of algebras by the master of the «mathematical education» profile will promote more conscious

  19. Comprehensive solutions to the Bloch equations and dynamical models for open two-level systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Thomas E.

    2018-01-01

    The Bloch equation and its variants constitute the fundamental dynamical model for arbitrary two-level systems. Many important processes, including those in more complicated systems, can be modeled and understood through the two-level approximation. It is therefore of widespread relevance, especially as it relates to understanding dissipative processes in current cutting-edge applications of quantum mechanics. Although the Bloch equation has been the subject of considerable analysis in the 70 years since its inception, there is still, perhaps surprisingly, significant work that can be done. This paper extends the scope of previous analyses. It provides a framework for more fully understanding the dynamics of dissipative two-level systems. A solution is derived that is compact, tractable, and completely general, in contrast to previous results. Any solution of the Bloch equation depends on three roots of a cubic polynomial that are crucial to the time dependence of the system. The roots are typically only sketched out qualitatively, with no indication of their dependence on the physical parameters of the problem. Degenerate roots, which modify the solutions, have been ignored altogether. Here the roots are obtained explicitly in terms of a single real-valued root that is expressed as a simple function of the system parameters. For the conventional Bloch equation, a simple graphical representation of this root is presented that makes evident the explicit time dependence of the system for each point in the parameter space. Several intuitive, visual models of system dynamics are developed. A Euclidean coordinate system is identified in which any generalized Bloch equation is separable, i.e., the sum of commuting rotation and relaxation operators. The time evolution in this frame is simply a rotation followed by relaxation at modified rates that play a role similar to the standard longitudinal and transverse rates. These rates are functions of the applied field, which

  20. The effect of atomoxetine on random and directed exploration in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christopher M; Wilson, Robert C; van der Wee, Nic J; Giltay, Eric J; van Noorden, Martijn S; Cohen, Jonathan D; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive regulation of the trade-off between pursuing a known reward (exploitation) and sampling lesser-known options in search of something better (exploration) is critical for optimal performance. Theory and recent empirical work suggest that humans use at least two strategies for solving this dilemma: a directed strategy in which choices are explicitly biased toward information seeking, and a random strategy in which decision noise leads to exploration by chance. Here we examined the hypothesis that random exploration is governed by the neuromodulatory locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system. We administered atomoxetine, a norepinephrine transporter blocker that increases extracellular levels of norepinephrine throughout the cortex, to 22 healthy human participants in a double-blind crossover design. We examined the effect of treatment on performance in a gambling task designed to produce distinct measures of directed exploration and random exploration. In line with our hypothesis we found an effect of atomoxetine on random, but not directed exploration. However, contrary to expectation, atomoxetine reduced rather than increased random exploration. We offer three potential explanations of our findings, involving the non-linear relationship between tonic NE and cognitive performance, the interaction of atomoxetine with other neuromodulators, and the possibility that atomoxetine affected phasic norepinephrine activity more so than tonic norepinephrine activity.

  1. Canyon of current suppression in an interacting two-level quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlström, O; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Samuelsson, P

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of a canyon of conductance suppression in a two-level equal-spin quantum dot system [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 186804 (2010)], the transport through this system is studied in detail. At low bias and low temperature a strong current suppression is found around...... the electron-hole symmetry point independent of the couplings, in agreement with previous results. By means of a Schrieffer–Wolff transformation we are able to give an intuitive explanation to this suppression in the low-energy regime. In the general situation, numerical simulations are carried out using...... for the current suppression. It is also shown how broadening, interference, and a finite interaction energy cause a shift of the current minimum away from degeneracy. Finally we see how an increased population of the upper level leads to current peaks on each side of the suppression line. At sufficiently high...

  2. Propagation of an attosecond pulse in a dense two-level medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Xiaohong; Gong Shangqing; Yang Weifeng; Xu Zhizhan

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of attosecond pulse in a dense two-level medium by using an iterative predictor-corrector finite-difference time-domain method. We find when attosecond pulse is considered, that the standard area theorem will break down even for small area pulses: ideal self-induced transparency cannot occur even for a 2π pulse, while the pulses whose areas are not integer multiples of 2π, such as 1.8π and 2.2π pulses, cannot evolve to 2π pulses as predicted by the standard area theorem. Significantly higher spectra components can occur on all these small area propagating pulses due to strong carrier reshaping. Furthermore, these higher spectral components dependent sensitively on the pulse area: the larger the pulse area is, the more evident are these higher spectral components

  3. Information Entropy Squeezing of a Two-Level Atom Interacting with Two-Mode Coherent Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Juan; FANG Mao-Fa

    2004-01-01

    From a quantum information point of view we investigate the entropy squeezing properties for a two-level atom interacting with the two-mode coherent fields via the two-photon transition. We discuss the influences of the initial state of the system on the atomic information entropy squeezing. Our results show that the squeezed component number,squeezed direction, and time of the information entropy squeezing can be controlled by choosing atomic distribution angle,the relative phase between the atom and the two-mode field, and the difference of the average photon number of the two field modes, respectively. Quantum information entropy is a remarkable precision measure for the atomic squeezing.

  4. Interacting two-level defects as sources of fluctuating high-frequency noise in superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Clemens [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Lisenfeld, Juergen [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Shnirman, Alexander [Institut fuer Theory der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); LD Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Poletto, Stefano [IBM TJ Watson Research Centre, Yorktown Heights (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Since the very first experiments, superconducting circuits have suffered from strong coupling to environmental noise, destroying quantum coherence and degrading performance. In state-of-the-art experiments, it is found that the relaxation time of superconducting qubits fluctuates as a function of time. We present measurements of such fluctuations in a 3D-transmon circuit and develop a qualitative model based on interactions within a bath of background two-level systems (TLS) which emerge from defects in the device material. In our model, the time-dependent noise density acting on the qubit emerges from its near-resonant coupling to high-frequency TLS which experience energy fluctuations due to their interaction with thermally fluctuating TLS at low frequencies. We support the model by providing experimental evidence of such energy fluctuations observed in a single TLS in a phase qubit circuit.

  5. Two-Level Hierarchical FEM Method for Modeling Passive Microwave Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polstyanko, Sergey V.; Lee, Jin-Fa

    1998-03-01

    In recent years multigrid methods have been proven to be very efficient for solving large systems of linear equations resulting from the discretization of positive definite differential equations by either the finite difference method or theh-version of the finite element method. In this paper an iterative method of the multiple level type is proposed for solving systems of algebraic equations which arise from thep-version of the finite element analysis applied to indefinite problems. A two-levelV-cycle algorithm has been implemented and studied with a Gauss-Seidel iterative scheme used as a smoother. The convergence of the method has been investigated, and numerical results for a number of numerical examples are presented.

  6. Thermal analysis of multi-MW two-level wind power converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede; Mogens, Lau

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the multi-MW wind turbine of partial-scale and full-scale two-level power converter with DFIG and direct-drive PMSG are designed and compared in terms of their thermal performance. Simulations of different configurations regarding loss distribution and junction temperature...... in the power device in the whole range of wind speed are presented and analyzed. It is concluded that in both partial-scale and full-scale power converter the most thermal stressed power device in the generator-side converter will have higher mean junction temperature and larger junction temperature...... fluctuation compared to grid-side converter at the rated wind speed. Moreover, the thermal performance of the generator-side converter in the partial-scale power converter becomes crucial around the synchronous operating point and should be considered carefully....

  7. Two-Level Verification of Data Integrity for Data Storage in Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangwei; Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Hongya; Zang, Zhuping; Pang, Mugen; Jiang, Ping

    Data storage in cloud computing can save capital expenditure and relive burden of storage management for users. As the lose or corruption of files stored may happen, many researchers focus on the verification of data integrity. However, massive users often bring large numbers of verifying tasks for the auditor. Moreover, users also need to pay extra fee for these verifying tasks beyond storage fee. Therefore, we propose a two-level verification of data integrity to alleviate these problems. The key idea is to routinely verify the data integrity by users and arbitrate the challenge between the user and cloud provider by the auditor according to the MACs and ϕ values. The extensive performance simulations show that the proposed scheme obviously decreases auditor's verifying tasks and the ratio of wrong arbitration.

  8. Two Level Versus Matrix Converters Performance in Wind Energy Conversion Systems Employing DFIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Gongati Pandu Ranga; Kumar, M. Vijaya

    2017-10-01

    Wind power capacity has received enormous growth during past decades. With substantial development of wind power, it is expected to provide a fifth of world's electricity by the end of 2030. In wind energy conversion system, the power electronic converters play an important role. This paper presents the two level and matrix converters performance in wind energy conversion system employing Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG). The DFIG is a wound rotor induction generator. Because of the advantages of the DFIG over other generators it is being used for most of the wind applications. This paper also discusses control of converters using the space vector pulse width modulation technique. The MATLAB/SIMULINK ® software is used to study the performance of the converters.

  9. Phonon induced optical gain in a current carrying two-level quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandari-asl, Amir, E-mail: amir.eskandari.asl@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Nano Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box: 19395-5531, Tehran, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In this work we consider a current carrying two level quantum dot (QD) that is coupled to a single mode phonon bath. Using self-consistent Hartree-Fock approximation, we obtain the I-V curve of QD. By considering the linear response of our system to an incoming classical light, we see that depending on the parametric regime, the system could have weak or strong light absorption or may even show lasing. This lasing occurs at high enough bias voltages and is explained by a population inversion considering side bands, while the total electron population in the higher level is less than the lower one. The frequency at which we have the most significant lasing depends on the level spacing and phonon frequency and not on the electron-phonon coupling strength.

  10. TWO-LEVEL HIERARCHICAL COORDINATION QUEUING METHOD FOR TELECOMMUNICATION NETWORK NODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Semenyaka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents hierarchical coordination queuing method. Within the proposed method a queuing problem has been reduced to optimization problem solving that was presented as two-level hierarchical structure. The required distribution of flows and bandwidth allocation was calculated at the first level independently for each macro-queue; at the second level solutions obtained on lower level for each queue were coordinated in order to prevent probable network link overload. The method of goal coordination has been determined for multilevel structure managing, which makes it possible to define the order for consideration of queue cooperation restrictions and calculation tasks distribution between levels of hierarchy. Decisions coordination was performed by the method of Lagrange multipliers. The study of method convergence has been carried out by analytical modeling.

  11. On Two-Level State-Dependent Routing Polling Systems with Mixed Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on priority differentiation and efficiency of the system, we consider an N+1 queues’ single-server two-level polling system which consists of one key queue and N normal queues. The novel contribution of the present paper is that we consider that the server just polls active queues with customers waiting in the queue. Furthermore, key queue is served with exhaustive service and normal queues are served with 1-limited service in a parallel scheduling. For this model, we derive an expression for the probability generating function of the joint queue length distribution at polling epochs. Based on these results, we derive the explicit closed-form expressions for the mean waiting time. Numerical examples demonstrate that theoretical and simulation results are identical and the new system is efficient both at key queue and normal queues.

  12. Intensity profiles of superdeformed bands in Pb isotopes in a two-level mixing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, A. N.; Szigeti, S. S.; Rogers, J. I.; Davidson, P. M.; Cardamone, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    A recently developed two-level mixing model of the decay out of superdeformed bands is applied to examine the loss of flux from the yrast superdeformed bands in 192 Pb, 194 Pb, and 196 Pb. Probability distributions for decay to states at normal deformations are calculated at each level. The sensitivity of the results to parameters describing the levels at normal deformation and their coupling to levels in the superdeformed well is explored. It is found that except for narrow ranges of the interaction strength coupling the states, the amount of intensity lost is primarily determined by the ratio of γ decay widths in the normal and superdeformed wells. It is also found that while the model can accommodate the observed fractional intensity loss profiles for decay from bands at relatively high excitation, it cannot accommodate the similarly abrupt decay from bands at lower energies if standard estimates of the properties of the states in the first minimum are employed

  13. Photon echo with a few photons in two-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonarota, M; Dajczgewand, J; Louchet-Chauvet, A; Le Gouët, J-L; Chanelière, T

    2014-01-01

    To store and retrieve signals at the single photon level, various photon echo schemes have resorted to complex preparation steps involving ancillary shelving states in multi-level atoms. For the first time, we experimentally demonstrate photon echo operation at such a low signal intensity without any preparation step, which allows us to work with mere two-level atoms. This simplified approach relies on the so-coined ‘revival of silenced echo’ (ROSE) scheme. Low noise conditions are obtained by returning the atoms to the ground state before the echo emission. In the present paper we manage ROSE in photon counting conditions, showing that very strong control fields can be compatible with extremely weak signals, making ROSE consistent with quantum memory requirements. (paper)

  14. Two-level modulation scheme to reduce latency for optical mobile fronthaul networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jiun-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chang, Gee-Kung

    2016-10-31

    A system using optical two-level orthogonal-frequency-division-multiplexing (OFDM) - amplitude-shift-keying (ASK) modulation is proposed and demonstrated to reduce the processing latency for the optical mobile fronthaul networks. At the proposed remote-radio-head (RRH), the high data rate OFDM signal does not need to be processed, but is directly launched into a high speed photodiode (HSPD) and subsequently emitted by an antenna. Only a low bandwidth PD is needed to recover the low data rate ASK control signal. Hence, it is simple and provides low-latency. Furthermore, transporting the proposed system over the already deployed optical-distribution-networks (ODNs) of passive-optical-networks (PONs) is also demonstrated with 256 ODN split-ratios.

  15. Segmental and global lordosis changes with two-level axial lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, Miguel A; Tobler, William D; Ernst, Robert J; Raley, Thomas J; Anand, Neel; Miller, Larry E; Nasca, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of lumbar lordosis has been reported after lumbar interbody fusion surgery and may portend poor clinical and radiographic outcome. The objective of this research was to measure changes in segmental and global lumbar lordosis in patients treated with presacral axial L4-S1 interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation and to determine if these changes influenced patient outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective, multi-center review of prospectively collected data in 58 consecutive patients with disabling lumbar pain and radiculopathy unresponsive to nonsurgical treatment who underwent L4-S1 interbody fusion with the AxiaLIF two-level system (Baxano Surgical, Raleigh NC). Main outcomes included back pain severity, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Odom's outcome criteria, and fusion status using flexion and extension radiographs and computed tomography scans. Segmental (L4-S1) and global (L1-S1) lumbar lordosis measurements were made using standing lateral radiographs. All patients were followed for at least 24 months (mean: 29 months, range 24-56 months). Results There was no bowel injury, vascular injury, deep infection, neurologic complication or implant failure. Mean back pain severity improved from 7.8±1.7 at baseline to 3.3±2.6 at 2 years (p lordosis, defined as a change in Cobb angle ≤ 5°, was identified in 84% of patients at L4-S1 and 81% of patients at L1-S1. Patients with loss or gain in segmental or global lordosis experienced similar 2-year outcomes versus those with less than a 5° change. Conclusions/Clinical Relevance Two-level axial interbody fusion supplemented with posterior fixation does not alter segmental or global lordosis in most patients. Patients with postoperative change in lordosis greater than 5° have similarly favorable long-term clinical outcomes and fusion rates compared to patients with less than 5° lordosis change. PMID:25694920

  16. The effectiveness of peer support groups in psychosis : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelein, S.; Bruggeman, R.; van Busschbach, J. T.; van der Gaag, M.; Stant, A. D.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a (minimally) guided peer support group (GPSG) for people with psychosis on social network, social support, self-efficacy, self-esteem, and quality of life, and to evaluate the intervention and its economic consequences. Method: In a multi-center randomized

  17. 93-106, 2015 93 Multilevel random effect and marginal models

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    injected by the candidate vaccine have a lower or higher risk for the occurrence of ... outcome relationship and test whether subjects inject- ... contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing ... to have different random effect variability at each cat- ... In the marginal models settings, the responses are ... Behavior as usual.

  18. The Effectiveness of Healthy Start Home Visit Program: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study reported the effectiveness of a home visit program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, using cluster randomized controlled trial design. Method: Participants included 191 parents and their children from 24 preschools, with 84 dyads (12 preschools) in the intervention group and 107 dyads (12 preschools) in…

  19. Cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthralgia: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.M.; Stant, A.D.; Quik, E.H.; Huddleston Slater, J.J.R.; Stegenga, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment compared to care as usual (CAU) for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. Materials and methods: 80 patients were randomly allocated to arthrocentesis as initial treatment (n = 40) or CAU (n = 40).

  20. Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Overweight Children's Cognitive Functioning: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Catherine L.; Tomporowski, Phillip D.; Boyle, Colleen A.; Waller, Jennifer L.; Miller, Patricia H.; Naglieri, Jack A.; Gregoski, Mathew

    2007-01-01

    The study tested the effect of aerobic exercise training on executive function in overweight children. Ninety-four sedentary, overweight but otherwise healthy children (mean age = 9.2 years, body mass index [greater than or equal to] 85th percentile) were randomized to a low-dose (20 min/day exercise), high-dose (40 min/day exercise), or control…

  1. Does epicatechin contribute to the acute vascular function effects of dark chocolate? A randomized, crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dower, James I.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Kroon, Paul A.; Philo, Mark; Mensink, Marco; Kromhout, Daan; Hollman, Peter C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Scope: Cocoa, rich in flavan-3-ols, improves vascular function, but the contribution of specific flavan-3-ols is unknown. We compared the effects of pure epicatechin, a major cocoa flavan-3-ol, and chocolate. Methods and results: In a randomized crossover study, twenty healthy men (40-80 years)

  2. The effect of adaptive versus static practicing on student learning - evidence from a randomized field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, Chris; Vonk, Sebastiaan; Cornelisz, Ilja

    2017-01-01

    Schools and governments are increasingly investing in adaptive practice software. To date, the evidence whether adaptivity improves learning outcomes is limited and mixed. A large-scale randomized control trial is conducted in Dutch secondary schools to evaluate the effectiveness of an adaptive

  3. Effects of PMTO in foster families with children with behavior problems : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, A.M.; van Rooij, F.B.; Overbeek, G.J.; Oort, F.J.; Arntz, M.; Hermanns, J.M.A.

    The present randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of Parent Management Training Oregon for foster parents with foster children (aged 4–12) with severe externalizing behavior problems in long-term foster care arrangements. Foster children’s behavior problems are challenging for

  4. The effect of financial rewards on students' achievement: Evidence from a randomized experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuven, E.; Oosterbeek, H.; van der Klaauw, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a randomized field experiment in which first-year university students could earn financial rewards for passing all first-year requirements within one year. Financial incentives turn out to have positive effects on achievement of high-ability students, whereas they have a

  5. P2 : A random effects model with covariates for directed graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijn, M.A.J.; Snijders, T.A.B.; Zijlstra, B.J.H.

    A random effects model is proposed for the analysis of binary dyadic data that represent a social network or directed graph, using nodal and/or dyadic attributes as covariates. The network structure is reflected by modeling the dependence between the relations to and from the same actor or node.

  6. Effectiveness of Stepped Care for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Randomized Noninferiority Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Marcia; Knoop, Hans; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this randomized noninferiority study, the effectiveness and efficiency of stepped care for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was compared to care as usual. Stepped care was formed by guided self-instruction, followed by cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) if the patient desired it. Care as usual encompassed CBT after a waiting period.…

  7. Effects of Assertiveness Training and Expressive Writing on Acculturative Stress in International Students: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Shedeh; Lumley, Mark A.; Hijazi, Alaa M.; Slavin-Spenny, Olga M.; Parris, George P.

    2009-01-01

    International university students often experience acculturative stress, and culturally appropriate techniques to manage stress are needed. This randomized trial tested the effects of group assertiveness training, private expressive writing, their combination, and a wait-list control on the acculturative stress, affect, and health of 118…

  8. Generalized Dynamic Panel Data Models with Random Effects for Cross-Section and Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesters, G.; Koopman, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    An exact maximum likelihood method is developed for the estimation of parameters in a nonlinear non-Gaussian dynamic panel data model with unobserved random individual-specific and time-varying effects. We propose an estimation procedure based on the importance sampling technique. In particular, a

  9. Exploring Mechanisms of Effective Teacher Coaching: A Tale of Two Cohorts From a Randomized Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazar, David; Kraft, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous research has shown that teacher coaching can improve teaching practices and student achievement, little is known about specific features of effective coaching programs. We estimate the impact of MATCH Teacher Coaching (MTC) on a range of teacher practices using a blocked randomized trial and explore how changes in the coaching…

  10. Testing Mediators of Intervention Effects in Randomized Controlled Trials: An Evaluation of Three Depression Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Gau, Jeff M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a new 5-step method for testing mediators hypothesized to account for the effects of depression prevention programs. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, at-risk teens with elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a group cognitive-behavioral (CB) intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  11. Moving from Efficacy to Effectiveness in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis: A Randomized Clinical Practice Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M.; Ziegler, Michael; Mehl, Stephanie; Kesting, Marie-Luise; Lullmann, Eva; Westermann, Stefan; Rief, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized controlled trials have attested the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing psychotic symptoms. Now, studies are needed to investigate its effectiveness in routine clinical practice settings. Method: Eighty patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who were seeking outpatient treatment were randomized…

  12. The effectiveness of foot reflexology in inducing ovulation: a sham-controlled randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jane; Lord, Jonathan; Acharya, Umesh; White, Adrian; O'Neill, Nyree; Shaw, Steve; Barton, Andy

    2009-06-01

    To determine whether foot reflexology, a complementary therapy, has an effect greater than sham reflexology on induction of ovulation. Sham-controlled randomized trial with patients and statistician blinded. Infertility clinic in Plymouth, United Kingdom. Forty-eight women attending the clinic with anovulation. Women were randomized to receive eight sessions of either genuine foot reflexology or sham reflexology with gentle massage over 10 weeks. The primary outcome was ovulation detected by serum progesterone level of >30 nmol/L during the study period. Twenty-six patients were randomized to genuine reflexology and 22 to sham (one randomized patient was withdrawn). Patients remained blinded throughout the trial. The rate of ovulation during true reflexology was 11 out of 26 (42%), and during sham reflexology it was 10 out of 22 (46%). Pregnancy rates were 4 out of 26 in the true group and 2 out of 22 in the control group. Because of recruitment difficulties, the required sample size of 104 women was not achieved. Patient blinding of reflexology studies is feasible. Although this study was too small to reach a definitive conclusion on the specific effect of foot reflexology, the results suggest that any effect on ovulation would not be clinically relevant. Sham reflexology may have a beneficial general effect, which this study was not designed to detect.

  13. Effectiveness of a parent training program in (pre)adolescence: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, P.H.O.; Overbeek, G.J.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of the parent training program Parents and Children Talking Together (PCTT) for parents with children in the preadolescent period who experience parenting difficulties. The program is focused on reducing child problem behavior by

  14. Cosmic and terrestrial single-event radiation effects in dynamic random access memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massengill, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    A review of the literature on single-event radiation effects (SEE) on MOS integrated-circuit dynamic random access memories (DRAM's) is presented. The sources of single-event (SE) radiation particles, causes of circuit information loss, experimental observations of SE information upset, technological developments for error mitigation, and relationships of developmental trends to SE vulnerability are discussed

  15. Using the symptom monitor in a randomized controlled trial: the effect on symptom prevalence and severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Johanna; de Vos, Rien; van Duijn, Nico P.; Schadé, Egbert; Bindels, Patrick J. E.

    2006-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of reporting physical symptoms by using a systematic symptom monitoring instrument, the Symptom Monitor, on symptom prevalence and severity among patients with cancer in the palliative phase. The overall objective was to achieve symptom relief

  16. Effect of Liraglutide on Ectopic Fat in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøssing, Signe; Nylander, Malin; Chabanova, Elizaveta

    2018-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) were treated with the GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide to investigate the effect on liver fat content, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clin...

  17. The effects of a digital formative assessment tool on spelling achievement : Results of a randomized experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Janke M.; Visscher, Adrie J.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a randomized experimental design was used to examine the effects of a digital formative assessment tool on spelling achievement of third grade students (eight-to nine-years-olds). The sample consisted of 30 experimental schools (n = 619) and 39 control schools (n = 986). Experimental

  18. Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Schmid, Christopher H; Fielding, Roger A; Harvey, William F; Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Driban, Jeffrey B; Kalish, Robert; Rones, Ramel; McAlindon, Timothy

    2018-03-21

    To determine the effectiveness of tai chi interventions compared with aerobic exercise, a current core standard treatment in patients with fibromyalgia, and to test whether the effectiveness of tai chi depends on its dosage or duration. Prospective, randomized, 52 week, single blind comparative effectiveness trial. Urban tertiary care academic hospital in the United States between March 2012 and September 2016. 226 adults with fibromyalgia (as defined by the American College of Rheumatology 1990 and 2010 criteria) were included in the intention to treat analyses: 151 were assigned to one of four tai chi groups and 75 to an aerobic exercise group. Participants were randomly assigned to either supervised aerobic exercise (24 weeks, twice weekly) or one of four classic Yang style supervised tai chi interventions (12 or 24 weeks, once or twice weekly). Participants were followed for 52 weeks. Adherence was rigorously encouraged in person and by telephone. The primary outcome was change in the revised fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQR) scores at 24 weeks compared with baseline. Secondary outcomes included changes of scores in patient's global assessment, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, coping strategies, physical functional performance, functional limitation, sleep, and health related quality of life. FIQR scores improved in all five treatment groups, but the combined tai chi groups improved statistically significantly more than the aerobic exercise group in FIQR scores at 24 weeks (difference between groups=5.5 points, 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 10.4, P=0.03) and several secondary outcomes (patient's global assessment=0.9 points, 0.3 to 1.4, P=0.005; anxiety=1.2 points, 0.3 to 2.1, P=0.006; self efficacy=1.0 points, 0.5 to 1.6, P=0.0004; and coping strategies, 2.6 points, 0.8 to 4.3, P=0.005). Tai chi treatment compared with aerobic exercise administered with the same intensity and duration (24 weeks, twice weekly) had greater benefit (between group

  19. Effect of Providing Ankle-Foot Orthoses in Patients with Acute and Subacute Stroke: a Randomized Controlled Trial : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikamp-Simons, Corien D.M.; Buurke, Jaap H.; Van Der Palen, Job; Hermens, Hermie J.; Rietman, Johan S.; Ibánez, Jaime; Azorín, José María; Akay, Metin; Pons, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Despite frequent application of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs), little scientific evidence is available to guide AFO-provision early after stroke. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to study the effects of AFO-provision in (sub-) acute stroke patients. Primary aim: to study effects of the

  20. Cascaded two-photon nonlinearity in a one-dimensional waveguide with multiple two-level emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Dibyendu

    2013-01-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a model to realize cascaded optical nonlinearity with few atoms and photons in one-dimension (1D). The optical nonlinearity in our system is mediated by resonant interactions of photons with two-level emitters, such as atoms or quantum dots in a 1D photonic waveguide. Multi-photon transmission in the waveguide is nonreciprocal when the emitters have different transition energies. Our theory provides a clear physical understanding of the origin of nonreciprocity in the presence of cascaded nonlinearity. We show how various two-photon nonlinear effects including spatial attraction and repulsion between photons, background fluorescence can be tuned by changing the number of emitters and the coupling between emitters (controlled by the separation). PMID:23948782

  1. The EPQ model under conditions of two levels of trade credit and limited storage capacity in supply chain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kun-Jen

    2013-09-01

    An inventory problem involves a lot of factors influencing inventory decisions. To understand it, the traditional economic production quantity (EPQ) model plays rather important role for inventory analysis. Although the traditional EPQ models are still widely used in industry, practitioners frequently question validities of assumptions of these models such that their use encounters challenges and difficulties. So, this article tries to present a new inventory model by considering two levels of trade credit, finite replenishment rate and limited storage capacity together to relax the basic assumptions of the traditional EPQ model to improve the environment of the use of it. Keeping in mind cost-minimisation strategy, four easy-to-use theorems are developed to characterise the optimal solution. Finally, the sensitivity analyses are executed to investigate the effects of the various parameters on ordering policies and the annual total relevant costs of the inventory system.

  2. The estimation of branching curves in the presence of subject-specific random effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, Angelo; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Guo, Wensheng

    2014-12-20

    Branching curves are a technique for modeling curves that change trajectory at a change (branching) point. Currently, the estimation framework is limited to independent data, and smoothing splines are used for estimation. This article aims to extend the branching curve framework to the longitudinal data setting where the branching point varies by subject. If the branching point is modeled as a random effect, then the longitudinal branching curve framework is a semiparametric nonlinear mixed effects model. Given existing issues with using random effects within a smoothing spline, we express the model as a B-spline based semiparametric nonlinear mixed effects model. Simple, clever smoothness constraints are enforced on the B-splines at the change point. The method is applied to Women's Health data where we model the shape of the labor curve (cervical dilation measured longitudinally) before and after treatment with oxytocin (a labor stimulant). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Modeling and understanding of effects of randomness in arrays of resonant meta-atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tretyakov, Sergei A.; Albooyeh, Mohammad; Alitalo, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    In this review presentation we will discuss approaches to modeling and understanding electromagnetic properties of 2D and 3D lattices of small resonant particles (meta-atoms) in transition from regular (periodic) to random (amorphous) states. Nanostructured metasurfaces (2D) and metamaterials (3D......) are arrangements of optically small but resonant particles (meta-atoms). We will present our results on analytical modeling of metasurfaces with periodical and random arrangements of electrically and magnetically resonant meta-atoms with identical or random sizes, both for the normal and oblique-angle excitations....... We show how the electromagnetic response of metasurfaces is related to the statistical parameters of the structure. Furthermore, we will discuss the phenomenon of anti-resonance in extracted effective parameters of metamaterials and clarify its relation to the periodicity (or amorphous nature...

  4. Effectiveness of energy conservation management on fatigue and participation in multiple sclerosis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikman, Lyan Jm; van Meeteren, Jetty; Twisk, Jos Wr; de Laat, Fred Aj; de Groot, Vincent; Beckerman, Heleen; Stam, Henk J; Bussmann, Johannes Bj

    2017-10-01

    Fatigue is a frequently reported and disabling symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate the effectiveness of an individual energy conservation management (ECM) intervention on fatigue and participation in persons with primary MS-related fatigue. A total of 86 severely fatigued and ambulatory adults with a definite diagnosis of MS were randomized in a single-blind, two-parallel-arm randomized clinical trial to the ECM group or the information-only control group in outpatient rehabilitation departments. Blinded assessments were carried out at baseline and at 8, 16, 26 and 52 weeks after randomization. Primary outcomes were fatigue (fatigue subscale of Checklist Individual Strength - CIS20r) and participation (Impact on Participation and Autonomy scale - IPA). Modified intention-to-treat analysis was based on 76 randomized patients (ECM, n = 36; MS nurse, n=40). No significant ECM effects were found for fatigue (overall difference CIS20r between the groups = -0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI), -3.71 to 2.11) or for four out of five IPA domains. An overall unfavourable effect was found in the ECM group for the IPA domain social relations (difference between the groups = 0.19; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.35). The individual ECM format used in this study did not reduce MS-related fatigue and restrictions in participation more than an information-only control condition.

  5. Effect of Probiotics on Serum Bilirubin Level in Term Neonates with Jaundice; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yadollah Zahed Pasha; Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho; Abes Ahmadi Jazi; Hemmat Gholinia

    2017-01-01

    Background In recent years, tendency to use drugs has been increasing in the treatment of neonatal jaundice. Several drugs have been used since then, but the effect of probiotics on serum bilirubin level (SBL) is not so clear. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of probiotics on SBL and the duration of phototherapy in term neonates with hyperbilirubinemia. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, we studied 150 term neonate with jaundice hospitalized for photother...

  6. Psychosocial effects of workplace physical exercise among workers with chronic pain:Randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Lars L.; Persson, Roger; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Sundstrup, Emil

    2017-01-01

    Abstract While workplace physical exercise can help manage musculoskeletal disorders, less is known about psychosocial effects of such interventions. This aim of this study was to investigate the effect of workplace physical exercise on psychosocial factors among workers with chronic musculoskeletal pain. The trial design was a 2-armed parallel-group randomized controlled trial with allocation concealment. A total of 66 slaughterhouse workers (51 men and 15 women, mean age 45 years [standard ...

  7. A note on the effective medium theory of random resistive-reactive medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Jayannavar, A.M.

    1981-06-01

    The effective medium theory for a system with randomly distributed point conductivity and polarizability is re-formulated, with attention to cross-terms involving the two disorder parameters. The treatment reveals a certain inconsistency of the conventional theory owing to the neglect of the Maxwell-Wagner effect. The results are significant for the critical resistivity and dielectric anomalies of a binary liquid mixture at the phase-separation point. (author)

  8. Behavioral effects of neurofeedback in adolescents with ADHD: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Marleen; van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs; Popma, Arne; Bongers, Ilja L; van Boxtel, Geert J M

    2015-09-01

    Neurofeedback has been proposed as a potentially effective intervention for reducing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms. However, it remains unclear whether neurofeedback is of additional value to treatment as usual (TAU) for adolescents with clinical ADHD symptoms. Using a multicenter parallel-randomized controlled trial design, adolescents with ADHD symptoms were randomized to receive either a combination of TAU and neurofeedback (NFB + TAU, n = 45) or TAU-only (n = 26). Randomization was computer generated and stratified for age group (ages 12 through 16, 16 through 20, 20 through 24). Neurofeedback treatment consisted of approximately 37 sessions of theta/sensorimotor rhythm (SMR)-training on the vertex (Cz). Primary behavioral outcome measures included the ADHD-rating scale, Youth Self Report, and Child Behavior Checklist all assessed pre- and post-intervention. Behavioral problems decreased equally for both groups with medium to large effect sizes, range of partial η2 = 0.08-0.31, p neurofeedback and TAU was as effective as TAU-only for adolescents with ADHD symptoms. Considering the absence of additional behavioral effects in the current study, in combination with the limited knowledge of specific treatment effects, it is questionable whether theta/SMR neurofeedback for adolescents with ADHD and comorbid disorders in clinical practice should be used. Further research is warranted to investigate possible working mechanisms and (long-term) specific treatment effects of neurofeedback.

  9. DNCON2: improved protein contact prediction using two-level deep convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Badri; Hou, Jie; Cheng, Jianlin

    2018-05-01

    Significant improvements in the prediction of protein residue-residue contacts are observed in the recent years. These contacts, predicted using a variety of coevolution-based and machine learning methods, are the key contributors to the recent progress in ab initio protein structure prediction, as demonstrated in the recent CASP experiments. Continuing the development of new methods to reliably predict contact maps is essential to further improve ab initio structure prediction. In this paper we discuss DNCON2, an improved protein contact map predictor based on two-level deep convolutional neural networks. It consists of six convolutional neural networks-the first five predict contacts at 6, 7.5, 8, 8.5 and 10 Å distance thresholds, and the last one uses these five predictions as additional features to predict final contact maps. On the free-modeling datasets in CASP10, 11 and 12 experiments, DNCON2 achieves mean precisions of 35, 50 and 53.4%, respectively, higher than 30.6% by MetaPSICOV on CASP10 dataset, 34% by MetaPSICOV on CASP11 dataset and 46.3% by Raptor-X on CASP12 dataset, when top L/5 long-range contacts are evaluated. We attribute the improved performance of DNCON2 to the inclusion of short- and medium-range contacts into training, two-level approach to prediction, use of the state-of-the-art optimization and activation functions, and a novel deep learning architecture that allows each filter in a convolutional layer to access all the input features of a protein of arbitrary length. The web server of DNCON2 is at http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/dncon2/ where training and testing datasets as well as the predictions for CASP10, 11 and 12 free-modeling datasets can also be downloaded. Its source code is available at https://github.com/multicom-toolbox/DNCON2/. chengji@missouri.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Self-Powered Random Number Generator Based on Coupled Triboelectric and Electrostatic Induction Effects at the Liquid-Dielectric Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Aifang; Chen, Xiangyu; Cui, Haotian; Chen, Libo; Luo, Jianjun; Tang, Wei; Peng, Mingzeng; Zhang, Yang; Zhai, Junyi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-12-27

    Modern cryptography increasingly employs random numbers generated from physical sources in lieu of conventional software-based pseudorandom numbers, primarily owing to the great demand of unpredictable, indecipherable cryptographic keys from true random numbers for information security. Thus, far, the sole demonstration of true random numbers has been generated through thermal noise and/or quantum effects, which suffers from expensive and complex equipment. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for self-powered creation of true random numbers by using triboelectric technology to collect random signals from nature. This random number generator based on coupled triboelectric and electrostatic induction effects at the liquid-dielectric interface includes an elaborately designed triboelectric generator (TENG) with an irregular grating structure, an electronic-optical device, and an optical-electronic device. The random characteristics of raindrops are harvested through TENG and consequently transformed and converted by electronic-optical device and an optical-electronic device with a nonlinear characteristic. The cooperation of the mechanical, electrical, and optical signals ensures that the generator possesses complex nonlinear input-output behavior and contributes to increased randomness. The random number sequences are deduced from final electrical signals received by an optical-electronic device using a familiar algorithm. These obtained random number sequences exhibit good statistical characteristics, unpredictability, and unrepeatability. Our study supplies a simple, practical, and effective method to generate true random numbers, which can be widely used in cryptographic protocols, digital signatures, authentication, identification, and other information security fields.

  11. Randomized controlled trial of the effect of medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbæk, Annelli

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including a p...... of such consultations initiated by the GPs. CONCLUSIONS: Medical audit had no observed effect on AIDS prevention in general practice. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Oct......OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including....... One hundred and thirty-three GPs completed the project. The main outcome measures were the number of consultations involving AIDS prevention and the number of talks about AIDS initiated by the GP, and some elements of the content were registered on a chart. RESULTS: No statistically significant...

  12. An evaluation of the effectiveness of recruitment methods: the staying well after depression randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusche, Adele; Rudolf von Rohr, Isabelle; Muse, Kate; Duggan, Danielle; Crane, Catherine; Williams, J Mark G

    2014-04-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely accepted as being the most efficient way of investigating the efficacy of psychological therapies. However, researchers conducting RCTs commonly report difficulties in recruiting an adequate sample within planned timescales. In an effort to overcome recruitment difficulties, researchers often are forced to expand their recruitment criteria or extend the recruitment phase, thus increasing costs and delaying publication of results. Research investigating the effectiveness of recruitment strategies is limited, and trials often fail to report sufficient details about the recruitment sources and resources utilized. We examined the efficacy of strategies implemented during the Staying Well after Depression RCT in Oxford to recruit participants with a history of recurrent depression. We describe eight recruitment methods utilized and two further sources not initiated by the research team and examine their efficacy in terms of (1) the return, including the number of potential participants who contacted the trial and the number who were randomized into the trial; (2) cost-effectiveness, comprising direct financial cost and manpower for initial contacts and randomized participants; and (3) comparison of sociodemographic characteristics of individuals recruited from different sources. Poster advertising, web-based advertising, and mental health worker referrals were the cheapest methods per randomized participant; however, the ratio of randomized participants to initial contacts differed markedly per source. Advertising online, via posters, and on a local radio station were the most cost-effective recruitment methods for soliciting participants who subsequently were randomized into the trial. Advertising across many sources (saturation) was found to be important. It may not be feasible to employ all the recruitment methods used in this trial to obtain participation from other populations, such as those currently unwell, or in

  13. Induced absorption and stimulated emission in a driven two-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroyannis, C.

    1992-01-01

    We have considered the induced processes that occur in a driven two-level atom, where a laser photon is absorbed and emitted by the ground and by the excited states of the atom, respectively. In the low-intensity limit of the laser field, the induced spectra arising when a laser photon is absorbed by the ground state of the atom consist of two peaks describing induced absorption and stimulated-emission processes, respectively, where the former prevails over the latter. Asymmetry of the spectral lines occurs at off-resonance and its extent depends on the detuning of the laser field. The physical. process where a laser photon is emitted by the excited state is the reverse of that arising from the absorption of a laser photon by the ground state of the atom. The former differs from the latter in that the emission of a laser photon by the excited state occurs in the low frequency regime and that the stimulated-emission process prevails over that of the induced absorption. In this case, amplification of ultrashort pulses is likely to occur without the need of population inversion between the optical transitions. The computed spectra are graphically presented and discussed. (author)

  14. Vorticity, backscatter and counter-gradient transport predictions using two-level simulation of turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, R.; Menon, S.

    2018-04-01

    The two-level simulation (TLS) method evolves both the large-and the small-scale fields in a two-scale approach and has shown good predictive capabilities in both isotropic and wall-bounded high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows in the past. Sensitivity and ability of this modelling approach to predict fundamental features (such as backscatter, counter-gradient turbulent transport, small-scale vorticity, etc.) seen in high Re turbulent flows is assessed here by using two direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets corresponding to a forced isotropic turbulence at Taylor's microscale-based Reynolds number Reλ ≈ 433 and a fully developed turbulent flow in a periodic channel at friction Reynolds number Reτ ≈ 1000. It is shown that TLS captures the dynamics of local co-/counter-gradient transport and backscatter at the requisite scales of interest. These observations are further confirmed through a posteriori investigation of the flow in a periodic channel at Reτ = 2000. The results reveal that the TLS method can capture both the large- and the small-scale flow physics in a consistent manner, and at a reduced overall cost when compared to the estimated DNS or wall-resolved LES cost.

  15. Robust Methods for Moderation Analysis with a Two-Level Regression Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Miao; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Moderation analysis has many applications in social sciences. Most widely used estimation methods for moderation analysis assume that errors are normally distributed and homoscedastic. When these assumptions are not met, the results from a classical moderation analysis can be misleading. For more reliable moderation analysis, this article proposes two robust methods with a two-level regression model when the predictors do not contain measurement error. One method is based on maximum likelihood with Student's t distribution and the other is based on M-estimators with Huber-type weights. An algorithm for obtaining the robust estimators is developed. Consistent estimates of standard errors of the robust estimators are provided. The robust approaches are compared against normal-distribution-based maximum likelihood (NML) with respect to power and accuracy of parameter estimates through a simulation study. Results show that the robust approaches outperform NML under various distributional conditions. Application of the robust methods is illustrated through a real data example. An R program is developed and documented to facilitate the application of the robust methods.

  16. Multilevel Converter by Cascading Two-Level Three-Phase Voltage Source Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullrahman A. Al-Shamma’a

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a topology using isolated, cascaded multilevel voltage source converters (VSCs and employing two-winding magnetic elements for high-power applications. The proposed topology synthesizes 6 two-level, three-phase VSCs, so the power capability of the presented converter is six times the capability of each VSC module. The characteristics of the proposed topology are demonstrated through analyzing its current relationships, voltage relationships and power capability in detail. The power rating is equally shared among the VSC modules without the need for a sharing algorithm; thus, the converter operates as a single three-phase VSC. The comparative analysis with classical neutral-point clamped, flying capacitor and cascaded H-bridge exhibits the superior features of fewer insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs, capacitor requirement and fewer diodes. To validate the theoretical performance of the proposed converter, it is simulated in a MATLAB/Simulink environment and the results are experimentally demonstrated using a laboratory prototype.

  17. Generalized Heine–Stieltjes and Van Vleck polynomials associated with two-level, integrable BCS models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquette, Ian; Links, Jon

    2012-01-01

    We study the Bethe ansatz/ordinary differential equation (BA/ODE) correspondence for Bethe ansatz equations that belong to a certain class of coupled, nonlinear, algebraic equations. Through this approach we numerically obtain the generalized Heine–Stieltjes and Van Vleck polynomials in the degenerate, two-level limit for four cases of integrable Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer (BCS) pairing models. These are the s-wave pairing model, the p + ip-wave pairing model, the p + ip pairing model coupled to a bosonic molecular pair degree of freedom, and a newly introduced extended d + id-wave pairing model with additional interactions. The zeros of the generalized Heine–Stieltjes polynomials provide solutions of the corresponding Bethe ansatz equations. We compare the roots of the ground states with curves obtained from the solution of a singular integral equation approximation, which allows for a characterization of ground-state phases in these systems. Our techniques also permit the computation of the roots of the excited states. These results illustrate how the BA/ODE correspondence can be used to provide new numerical methods to study a variety of integrable systems. (paper)

  18. SPONGY (SPam ONtoloGY: Email Classification Using Two-Level Dynamic Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongwook Youn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Email is one of common communication methods between people on the Internet. However, the increase of email misuse/abuse has resulted in an increasing volume of spam emails over recent years. An experimental system has been designed and implemented with the hypothesis that this method would outperform existing techniques, and the experimental results showed that indeed the proposed ontology-based approach improves spam filtering accuracy significantly. In this paper, two levels of ontology spam filters were implemented: a first level global ontology filter and a second level user-customized ontology filter. The use of the global ontology filter showed about 91% of spam filtered, which is comparable with other methods. The user-customized ontology filter was created based on the specific user’s background as well as the filtering mechanism used in the global ontology filter creation. The main contributions of the paper are (1 to introduce an ontology-based multilevel filtering technique that uses both a global ontology and an individual filter for each user to increase spam filtering accuracy and (2 to create a spam filter in the form of ontology, which is user-customized, scalable, and modularized, so that it can be embedded to many other systems for better performance.

  19. Quasiparticle-induced decoherence of microscopic two-level-systems in superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilmes, Alexander; Lisenfeld, Juergen; Zanker, Sebastian; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V. [PHI, KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Marthaler, Michael; Schoen, Gerd [TFP, KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic Two-Level-Systems (TLS) are one of the main sources of decoherence in superconducting nano-scale devices such as SQUIDs, resonators and quantum bits (qubits), although the TLS' microscopic nature remains unclear. We use a superconducting phase qubit to detect TLS contained within the tunnel barrier of the qubit's Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junction. If the TLS transition frequency lies within the 6-10 GHz range, we can coherently drive it by resonant microwave pulses and access its quantum state by utilizing the strong coupling to the qubit. Our previous measurements of TLS coherence in dependence of the temperature indicate that quasiparticles (QPs), which diffuse from the superconducting Al electrodes into the oxide layer, may give rise to TLS energy loss and dephasing. Here, we probe the TLS-QP interaction using a reliable method of in-situ QP injection via an on-chip dc-SQUID that is pulse-biased beyond its switching current. The QP density is calibrated by measuring associated characteristic changes to the qubit's energy relaxation rate. We will present experimental data which show the QP-induced TLS decoherence in good agreement to theoretical predictions.

  20. Amplification without inversion, fast light and optical bistability in a duplicated two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi Zohravi, Lida; Vafafard, Azar; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of a weak probe field in a duplicated two-level system are investigated in multi-photon resonance (MPR) condition and beyond it. It is shown that by changing the relative phase of applied fields, the absorption switches to the amplification without inversion in MPR condition. By applying the Floquet decomposition to the equations of motion beyond MPR condition, it is shown that the phase-dependent behavior is valid only in MPR condition. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the group velocity of light pulse can be controlled by the intensity of the applied fields and the gain-assisted superluminal light propagation (fast light) is obtained in this system. In addition, the optical bistability (OB) behavior of the system is studied beyond MPR condition. We apply an indirect incoherent pumping field to the system and it is found that the group velocity and OB behavior of the system can be controlled by the incoherent pumping rate. - Highlights: • We studied the optical properties of DTL system under MPR condition and beyond it. • By changing the relative phase, the absorption switches to the amplification without inversion in MPR condition. • The gain-assisted superluminal light propagation (fast light) is obtained in this system. • The optical bistability (OB) behavior of the system is studied beyond MPR condition. • The incoherent pumping rate has a major role in controlling the group velocity and OB behavior of the system

  1. Automatic QRS complex detection using two-level convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yande; Lin, Zhitao; Meng, Jianyi

    2018-01-29

    The QRS complex is the most noticeable feature in the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal, therefore, its detection is critical for ECG signal analysis. The existing detection methods largely depend on hand-crafted manual features and parameters, which may introduce significant computational complexity, especially in the transform domains. In addition, fixed features and parameters are not suitable for detecting various kinds of QRS complexes under different circumstances. In this study, based on 1-D convolutional neural network (CNN), an accurate method for QRS complex detection is proposed. The CNN consists of object-level and part-level CNNs for extracting different grained ECG morphological features automatically. All the extracted morphological features are used by multi-layer perceptron (MLP) for QRS complex detection. Additionally, a simple ECG signal preprocessing technique which only contains difference operation in temporal domain is adopted. Based on the MIT-BIH arrhythmia (MIT-BIH-AR) database, the proposed detection method achieves overall sensitivity Sen = 99.77%, positive predictivity rate PPR = 99.91%, and detection error rate DER = 0.32%. In addition, the performance variation is performed according to different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values. An automatic QRS detection method using two-level 1-D CNN and simple signal preprocessing technique is proposed for QRS complex detection. Compared with the state-of-the-art QRS complex detection approaches, experimental results show that the proposed method acquires comparable accuracy.

  2. A Two-Level Task Scheduler on Multiple DSP System for OpenCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem that multiple DSP system does not support OpenCL programming. With the compiler, runtime, and the kernel scheduler proposed, an OpenCL application becomes portable not only between multiple CPU and GPU, but also between embedded multiple DSP systems. Firstly, the LLVM compiler was imported for source-to-source translation in which the translated source was supported by CCS. Secondly, two-level schedulers were proposed to support efficient OpenCL kernel execution. The DSP/BIOS is used to schedule system level tasks such as interrupts and drivers; however, the synchronization mechanism resulted in heavy overhead during task switching. So we designed an efficient second level scheduler especially for OpenCL kernel work-item scheduling. The context switch process utilizes the 8 functional units and cross path links which was superior to DSP/BIOS in the aspect of task switching. Finally, dynamic loading and software managed CACHE were redesigned for OpenCL running on multiple DSP system. We evaluated the performance using some common OpenCL kernels from NVIDIA, AMD, NAS, and Parboil benchmarks. Experimental results show that the DSP OpenCL can efficiently exploit the computing resource of multiple cores.

  3. SPONGY (SPam ONtoloGY): email classification using two-level dynamic ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Seongwook

    2014-01-01

    Email is one of common communication methods between people on the Internet. However, the increase of email misuse/abuse has resulted in an increasing volume of spam emails over recent years. An experimental system has been designed and implemented with the hypothesis that this method would outperform existing techniques, and the experimental results showed that indeed the proposed ontology-based approach improves spam filtering accuracy significantly. In this paper, two levels of ontology spam filters were implemented: a first level global ontology filter and a second level user-customized ontology filter. The use of the global ontology filter showed about 91% of spam filtered, which is comparable with other methods. The user-customized ontology filter was created based on the specific user's background as well as the filtering mechanism used in the global ontology filter creation. The main contributions of the paper are (1) to introduce an ontology-based multilevel filtering technique that uses both a global ontology and an individual filter for each user to increase spam filtering accuracy and (2) to create a spam filter in the form of ontology, which is user-customized, scalable, and modularized, so that it can be embedded to many other systems for better performance.

  4. Crises-induced intermittencies in a coherently driven system of two-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pando L, C.L.; Perez, G.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1993-04-01

    We study the coherent dynamics of a thin layer of two-level atoms driven by an external coherent field and a phase conjugated mirror (PCM). Since the variables of the system are defined on the Bloch sphere, the third dimension is provided by the temporal modulation of the Rabi frequencies, which are induced by a PCM which reflects an electric field with a carrier frequency different from the incident one. We show that as the PCM gain coefficient is changed period doubling leading to chaos occurs. We find crises of attractor merging and attractor widening types related to homoclinic and heteroclinic tangencies respectively. For the attractor merging crises we find the critical exponent for the characteristic time of intermittency versus the control parameter which is given by the gain coefficient of the PCM. We show that during the crises of attractor widening type, another crisis due to attractor destruction occurs as the control parameter is changed. The latter is due to the collision of the old attractor with its basin boundary when a new attractor is created. This new attractor is stable only in a very small interval in the neighborhood of this second crisis. (author). 31 refs, 15 figs

  5. Injury patterns of child abuse: Experience of two Level 1 pediatric trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yangyang R; DeMello, Annalyn S; Greeley, Christopher S; Cox, Charles S; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi J; Wesson, David E

    2018-05-01

    This study examines non-accidental trauma (NAT) fatalities as a percentage of all injury fatalities and identifies injury patterns in NAT admissions to two level 1 pediatric trauma centers. We reviewed all children (<5years old) treated for NAT from 2011 to 2015. Patient demographics, injury sites, and survival were obtained from both institutional trauma registries. Of 4623 trauma admissions, 557 (12%) were due to NAT. However, 43 (46%) of 93 overall trauma fatalities were due to NAT. Head injuries were the most common injuries sustained (60%) and led to the greatest increased risk of death (RR 5.1, 95% CI 2.0-12.7). Less common injuries that increased the risk of death were facial injuries (14%, RR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.3), abdominal injuries (8%, RR 2.8, 95% CI 1.4-5.6), and spinal injuries (3%, RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.8-8.8). Although 76% of head injuries occurred in infants <1year, children ages 1-4years old with head injuries had a significantly higher case fatality rate (27% vs. 6%, p<0.001). Child abuse accounts for a large proportion of trauma fatalities in children under 5years of age. Intracranial injuries are common in child abuse and increase the risk of death substantially. Preventing NAT in infants and young children should be a public health priority. Retrospective Review. II. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Bayesian feedback versus Markovian feedback in a two-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, H.M.; Mancini, Stefano; Wang Jin

    2002-01-01

    We compare two different approaches to the control of the dynamics of a continuously monitored open quantum system. The first is Markovian feedback, as introduced in quantum optics by Wiseman and Milburn [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 548 (1993)]. The second is feedback based on an estimate of the system state, developed recently by Doherty and Jacobs [Phys. Rev. A 60, 2700 (1999)]. Here we choose to call it, for brevity, Bayesian feedback. For systems with nonlinear dynamics, we expect these two methods of feedback control to give markedly different results. The simplest possible nonlinear system is a driven and damped two-level atom, so we choose this as our model system. The monitoring is taken to be homodyne detection of the atomic fluorescence, and the control is by modulating the driving. The aim of the feedback in both cases is to stabilize the internal state of the atom as close as possible to an arbitrarily chosen pure state, in the presence of inefficient detection and other forms of decoherence. Our results (obtained without recourse to stochastic simulations) prove that Bayesian feedback is never inferior, and is usually superior, to Markovian feedback. However, it would be far more difficult to implement than Markovian feedback and it loses its superiority when obvious simplifying approximations are made. It is thus not clear which form of feedback would be better in the face of inevitable experimental imperfections

  7. Risk Analysis of a Two-Level Supply Chain Subject to Misplaced Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijing Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Misplaced inventory is prevalent in retail stores and may lead to the overall poor performance of the supply chain. We explore the impact of misplaced inventory on a two-level supply chain, which consists of a risk-neutral supplier and a risk-averse retailer. The supplier decides the wholesale price to maximize her profit, whereas the retailer decides the order quantity to maximize his utility. Under the Conditional Value-at-Risk (CVaR criterion, we formulate the problem as a Stackelberg game model and obtain the equilibrium solutions in three cases: (i information asymmetry about inventory errors exists; (ii the retailer shares information about inventory errors with the supplier; and (iii in order to reduce misplaced inventory, the supply chain deploys Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID technology. The benefits of information sharing and RFID implementation are explored. A revenue and cost sharing contract is proposed to coordinate the supply chain and to allocate the cost savings from RFID implementation among supply chain participants. Finally, we provide managerial insights for risk-averse decision makers that are considering investing in the RFID technology.

  8. Testing a Quantum Heat Pump with a Two-Level Spin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Correa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Once in its non-equilibrium steady state, a nanoscale system coupled to several heat baths may be thought of as a “quantum heat pump”. Depending on the direction of its stationary heat flows, it may function as, e.g., a refrigerator or a heat transformer. These continuous heat devices can be arbitrarily complex multipartite systems, and yet, their working principle is always the same: they are made up of several elementary three-level stages operating in parallel. As a result, it is possible to devise external “black-box” testing strategies to learn about their functionality and performance regardless of any internal details. In particular, one such heat pump can be tested by coupling a two-level spin to one of its “contact transitions”. The steady state of this external probe contains information about the presence of heat leaks and internal dissipation in the device and, also, about the direction of its steady-state heat currents. Provided that the irreversibility of the heat pump is low, one can further estimate its coefficient of performance. These techniques may find applications in the emerging field of quantum thermal engineering, as they facilitate the diagnosis and design optimization of complex thermodynamic cycles.

  9. SPONGY (SPam ONtoloGY): Email Classification Using Two-Level Dynamic Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Email is one of common communication methods between people on the Internet. However, the increase of email misuse/abuse has resulted in an increasing volume of spam emails over recent years. An experimental system has been designed and implemented with the hypothesis that this method would outperform existing techniques, and the experimental results showed that indeed the proposed ontology-based approach improves spam filtering accuracy significantly. In this paper, two levels of ontology spam filters were implemented: a first level global ontology filter and a second level user-customized ontology filter. The use of the global ontology filter showed about 91% of spam filtered, which is comparable with other methods. The user-customized ontology filter was created based on the specific user's background as well as the filtering mechanism used in the global ontology filter creation. The main contributions of the paper are (1) to introduce an ontology-based multilevel filtering technique that uses both a global ontology and an individual filter for each user to increase spam filtering accuracy and (2) to create a spam filter in the form of ontology, which is user-customized, scalable, and modularized, so that it can be embedded to many other systems for better performance. PMID:25254240

  10. Two level undercut-profile substrate-based filamentary coated conductors produced using metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insinga, Andrea R.; Sundaram, Aarthi; Hazelton, Drew W.

    2018-01-01

    The two level undercut-profile substrate (2LUPS) has been introduced as a concept for subdividing rare-earth-Ba$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{7}$ (REBCO) coated conductors (CC) into narrow filaments which reduces the AC losses and improves field stability for DC magnets. The 2LUPS consists of two levels...

  11. Effect of random microstructure on crack propagation in cortical bone tissue under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, X; Li, S; Adel-Wahab, A; Silberschmidt, V

    2013-01-01

    A fracture process in a cortical bone tissue depends on various factors, such as bone loss, heterogeneous microstructure, variation of its material properties and accumulation of microcracks. Therefore, it is crucial to comprehend and describe the effect of microstructure and material properties of the components of cortical bone on crack propagation in a dynamic loading regime. At the microscale level, osteonal bone demonstrates a random distribution of osteons imbedded in an interstitial matrix and surrounded by a thin layer known as cement line. Such a distribution of osteons can lead to localization of deformation processes. The global mechanical behavior of bone and the crack-propagation process are affected by such localization under external loads. Hence, the random distribution of microstructural features plays a key role in the fracture process of cortical bone. The purpose of this study is two-fold: firstly, to develop two-dimensional microstructured numerical models of cortical bone tissue in order to examine the interaction between the propagating crack and bone microstructure using an extended finite-element method under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions; secondly, to investigate the effect of randomly distributed microstructural constituents on the crack propagation processes and crack paths. The obtained results of numerical simulations showed the influence of random microstructure on the global response of bone tissue at macroscale and on the crack-propagation process for quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions

  12. Completion report : Effect of Comprehensive Yogic Breathing program on type 2 diabetes: A randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Jyotsna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Yoga has been shown to be benefi cial in diabetes in many studies, though randomized control trials are few. The aim of this randomized control trial was to see the effect of Sudarshan Kriya and related practices (comprehensive yogic breathing program on quality of life, glycemic control, and cardiac autonomic functions in diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy has been implicated in the causation of sudden cardiac death. Therefore, a maneuver to prevent progression of cardiac autonomic neuropathy holds signifi cance. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 patients of diabetes on oral medication and diet and exercise advice were randomized into two groups: (1 Continued to receive standard treatment for diabetes. (2 Patients administered comprehensive yogic breathing program and monitored to regularly practice yoga in addition to standard treatment of diabetes. At 6 months, quality of life and postprandial plasma glucose signifi cantly improved in the group practicing yoga compared to baseline, but there was no significant improvement in the fasting plasma glucose and glycated hemoglobin. Results: On per protocol analysis, sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions signifi cantly improved from baseline in the group practicing comprehensive yogic breathing. Conclusion: This randomized control trial points towards the beneficial effect of yogic breathing program in preventing progression of cardiac neuropathy. This has important implications as cardiac autonomic neuropathy has been considered as one of the factors for sudden cardiac deaths.Keywords: comprehensive yogic breathing program, diabetes mellitus, cardiac autonomic function

  13. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy in the Netherlands: post-treatment changes and moderator effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Dekovic, M.; Manders, W.A.; Prins, P.J.M.; van der Laan, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In the present randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy (MST) in The Netherlands was examined. Moderator tests were conducted for ethnicity, age and gender. Methods: The sample consisted of N = 256 adolescents, referred because of conduct problems, and

  14. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy in the Netherlands: post-treatment changes and moderator effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Deković, M.; Manders, W.A.; van der Laan, P.H.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In the present randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy (MST) in The Netherlands was examined. Moderator tests were conducted for ethnicity, age and gender. Methods: The sample consisted of N = 256 adolescents, referred because of conduct problems, and

  15. Estimating required information size by quantifying diversity in random-effects model meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Thorlund, Kristian; Brok, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    an intervention effect suggested by trials with low-risk of bias. METHODS: Information size calculations need to consider the total model variance in a meta-analysis to control type I and type II errors. Here, we derive an adjusting factor for the required information size under any random-effects model meta......-analysis. RESULTS: We devise a measure of diversity (D2) in a meta-analysis, which is the relative variance reduction when the meta-analysis model is changed from a random-effects into a fixed-effect model. D2 is the percentage that the between-trial variability constitutes of the sum of the between...... and interpreted using several simulations and clinical examples. In addition we show mathematically that diversity is equal to or greater than inconsistency, that is D2 >or= I2, for all meta-analyses. CONCLUSION: We conclude that D2 seems a better alternative than I2 to consider model variation in any random...

  16. Effect of inter-crystal scatter on estimation methods for random coincidences and subsequent correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Espallardo, I; Spanoudaki, V; Ziegler, S I; Rafecas, M; McElroy, D P

    2008-01-01

    Random coincidences can contribute substantially to the background in positron emission tomography (PET). Several estimation methods are being used for correcting them. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of techniques for random coincidence estimation, with various low-energy thresholds (LETs). Simulated singles list-mode data of the MADPET-II small animal PET scanner were used as input. The simulations have been performed using the GATE simulation toolkit. Several sources with different geometries have been employed. We evaluated the number of random events using three methods: delayed window (DW), singles rate (SR) and time histogram fitting (TH). Since the GATE simulations allow random and true coincidences to be distinguished, a comparison between the number of random coincidences estimated using the standard methods and the number obtained using GATE was performed. An overestimation in the number of random events was observed using the DW and SR methods. This overestimation decreases for LETs higher than 255 keV. It is additionally reduced when the single events which have undergone a Compton interaction in crystals before being detected are removed from the data. These two observations lead us to infer that the overestimation is due to inter-crystal scatter. The effect of this mismatch in the reconstructed images is important for quantification because it leads to an underestimation of activity. This was shown using a hot-cold-background source with 3.7 MBq total activity in the background region and a 1.59 MBq total activity in the hot region. For both 200 keV and 400 keV LET, an overestimation of random coincidences for the DW and SR methods was observed, resulting in approximately 1.5% or more (at 200 keV LET: 1.7% for DW and 7% for SR) and less than 1% (at 400 keV LET: both methods) underestimation of activity within the background region. In almost all cases, images obtained by compensating for random events in the reconstruction

  17. Lambda-Based Data Processing Architecture for Two-Level Load Forecasting in Residential Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gde Dharma Nugraha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Building energy management systems (BEMS have been intensively used to manage the electricity consumption of residential buildings more efficiently. However, the dynamic behavior of the occupants introduces uncertainty problems that affect the performance of the BEMS. To address this uncertainty problem, the BEMS may implement load forecasting as one of the BEMS modules. Load forecasting utilizes historical load data to compute model predictions for a specific time in the future. Recently, smart meters have been introduced to collect electricity consumption data. Smart meters not only capture aggregation data, but also individual data that is more frequently close to real-time. The processing of both smart meter data types for load forecasting can enhance the performance of the BEMS when confronted with uncertainty problems. The collection of smart meter data can be processed using a batch approach for short-term load forecasting, while the real-time smart meter data can be processed for very short-term load forecasting, which adjusts the short-term load forecasting to adapt to the dynamic behavior of the occupants. This approach requires different data processing techniques for aggregation and individual of smart meter data. In this paper, we propose Lambda-based data processing architecture to process the different types of smart meter data and implement the two-level load forecasting approach, which combines short-term and very short-term load forecasting techniques on top of our proposed data processing architecture. The proposed approach is expected to enhance the BEMS to address the uncertainty problem in order to process data in less time. Our experiment showed that the proposed approaches improved the accuracy by 7% compared to a typical BEMS with only one load forecasting technique, and had the lowest computation time when processing the smart meter data.

  18. Absorption spectrum of a two-level atom in a bad cavity with injected squeezed vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Swain, S.

    1996-02-01

    We study the absorption spectrum of a coherently driven two-level atom interacting with a resonant cavity mode which is coupled to a broadband squeezed vacuum through its input-output mirror in the bad cavity limit. We study the modification of the two-photon correlation strength of the injected squeezed vacuum inside the cavity, and show that the equations describing probe absorption in the cavity environment are formally identical to these in free space, but with modified parameters describing the squeezed vacuum. The two photon correlations induced by the squeezed vacuum are always weaker than in free space. We pay particular attention to the spectral behaviour at line centre in the region of intermediate trength driving intensities, where anomalous spectral features such as hole-burning and dispersive profiles are displayed. These unusual spectral features are very sensitive to the squeezing phase and the Rabi frequency of the driving field. We also derive the threshold value of the Rabi frequency which gives rise to the transparency of the probe beam at the driving frequency. When the Rabi frequency is less than the threshold value, the probe beam is absorbed, whilst the probe beam is amplified (without population inversion under certain conditions) when the Rabi frequency is larger than this threshold. The anomalous spectral features all take place in the vicinity of the critical point dividing the different dynamical regimes, probe absorption and amplification, of the atomic radiation. The physical origin of the strong amplification without population inversion, and the feasibility of observing it, are discussed.

  19. A two level mutation-selection model of cultural evolution and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac

    2010-11-21

    Cultural evolution is a complex process that can happen at several levels. At the level of individuals in a population, each human bears a set of cultural traits that he or she can transmit to its offspring (vertical transmission) or to other members of his or her society (horizontal transmission). The relative frequency of a cultural trait in a population or society can thus increase or decrease with the relative reproductive success of its bearers (individual's level) or the relative success of transmission (called the idea's level). This article presents a mathematical model on the interplay between these two levels. The first aim of this article is to explore when cultural evolution is driven by the idea's level, when it is driven by the individual's level and when it is driven by both. These three possibilities are explored in relation to (a) the amount of interchange of cultural traits between individuals, (b) the selective pressure acting on individuals, (c) the rate of production of new cultural traits, (d) the individual's capacity to remember cultural traits and to the population size. The aim is to explore the conditions in which cultural evolution does not lead to a better adaptation of individuals to the environment. This is to contrast the spread of fitness-enhancing ideas, which make individual bearers better adapted to the environment, to the spread of "selfish" ideas, which spread well simply because they are easy to remember but do not help their individual bearers (and may even hurt them). At the same time this article explores in which conditions the adaptation of individuals is maximal. The second aim is to explore how these factors affect cultural diversity, or the amount of different cultural traits in a population. This study suggests that a larger interchange of cultural traits between populations could lead to cultural evolution not improving the adaptation of individuals to their environment and to a decrease of cultural diversity

  20. Short-Term-Effectiveness of a Relationship Education Program for Distressed Military Couples, in the Context of Foreign Assignments for the German Armed Forces. Preliminary Findings From a Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Christoph; Kliem, Sören; Zimmermann, Peter; Kowalski, Jens

    2018-04-01

    This study examines the short-term effectiveness of a relationship education program designed for military couples. Distressed couples were randomly placed in either a wait-list control group or an intervention group. We conducted training sessions before a 3-month foreign assignment, and refresher courses approximately 6-week post-assignment. We analyzed the dyadic data of 32 couples, using hierarchical linear modeling in a two-level model. Reduction in unresolved conflicts was found in the intervention group, with large pre-post effects for both partners. Relationship satisfaction scores were improved, with moderate-to-large effects only for soldiers, rather than their partners. Post-follow-up effect sizes suggested further improvement in the intervention group. Future research should examine the long-term effectiveness of this treatment. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  1. Effect of dynamic random leaks on the monitoring accuracy of home mechanical ventilators: a bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogo, Ana; Montanyà, Jaume; Monsó, Eduard; Blanch, Lluís; Pomares, Xavier; Lujàn, Manel

    2013-12-10

    So far, the accuracy of tidal volume (VT) and leak measures provided by the built-in software of commercial home ventilators has only been tested using bench linear models with fixed calibrated and continuous leaks. The objective was to assess the reliability of the estimation of tidal volume (VT) and unintentional leaks in a single tubing bench model which introduces random dynamic leaks during inspiratory or expiratory phases. The built-in software of four commercial home ventilators and a fifth ventilator-independent ad hoc designed external software tool were tested with two levels of leaks and two different models with excess leaks (inspiration or expiration). The external software analyzed separately the inspiratory and expiratory unintentional leaks. In basal condition, all ventilators but one underestimated tidal volume with values ranging between -1.5 ± 3.3% to -8.7% ± 3.27%. In the model with excess of inspiratory leaks, VT was overestimated by all four commercial software tools, with values ranging from 18.27 ± 7.05% to 35.92 ± 17.7%, whereas the ventilator independent-software gave a smaller difference (3.03 ± 2.6%). Leaks were underestimated by two applications with values of -11.47 ± 6.32 and -5.9 ± 0.52 L/min. With expiratory leaks, VT was overestimated by the software of one ventilator and the ventilator-independent software and significantly underestimated by the other three, with deviations ranging from +10.94 ± 7.1 to -48 ± 23.08%. The four commercial tools tested overestimated unintentional leaks, with values between 2.19 ± 0.85 to 3.08 ± 0.43 L/min. In a bench model, the presence of unintentional random leaks may be a source of error in the measurement of VT and leaks provided by the software of home ventilators. Analyzing leaks during inspiration and expiration separately may reduce this source of error.

  2. Generalized linear models with random effects unified analysis via H-likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Youngjo; Pawitan, Yudi

    2006-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1972, generalized linear models (GLMs) have proven useful in the generalization of classical normal models. Presenting methods for fitting GLMs with random effects to data, Generalized Linear Models with Random Effects: Unified Analysis via H-likelihood explores a wide range of applications, including combining information over trials (meta-analysis), analysis of frailty models for survival data, genetic epidemiology, and analysis of spatial and temporal models with correlated errors.Written by pioneering authorities in the field, this reference provides an introduction to various theories and examines likelihood inference and GLMs. The authors show how to extend the class of GLMs while retaining as much simplicity as possible. By maximizing and deriving other quantities from h-likelihood, they also demonstrate how to use a single algorithm for all members of the class, resulting in a faster algorithm as compared to existing alternatives. Complementing theory with examples, many of...

  3. LED Lighting System Reliability Modeling and Inference via Random Effects Gamma Process and Copula Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibing Hao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Light emitting diode (LED lamp has attracted increasing interest in the field of lighting systems due to its low energy and long lifetime. For different functions (i.e., illumination and color, it may have two or more performance characteristics. When the multiple performance characteristics are dependent, it creates a challenging problem to accurately analyze the system reliability. In this paper, we assume that the system has two performance characteristics, and each performance characteristic is governed by a random effects Gamma process where the random effects can capture the unit to unit differences. The dependency of performance characteristics is described by a Frank copula function. Via the copula function, the reliability assessment model is proposed. Considering the model is so complicated and analytically intractable, the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method is used to estimate the unknown parameters. A numerical example about actual LED lamps data is given to demonstrate the usefulness and validity of the proposed model and method.

  4. Cultivating teacher mindfulness: Effects of a randomized controlled trial on work, home, and sleep outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Tori L; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A; Roeser, Robert W

    2017-04-01

    The effects of randomization to a workplace mindfulness training (WMT) or a waitlist control condition on teachers' well-being (moods and satisfaction at work and home), quantity of sleep, quality of sleep, and sleepiness during the day were examined in 2 randomized, waitlist controlled trials (RCTs). The combined sample of the 2 RCTs, conducted in Canada and the United States, included 113 elementary and secondary school teachers (89% female). Measures were collected at baseline, postprogram, and 3-month follow-up; teachers were randomly assigned to condition after baseline assessment. Results showed that teachers randomized to WMT reported less frequent bad moods at work and home, greater satisfaction at work and home, more sleep on weekday nights, better quality sleep, and decreased insomnia symptoms and daytime sleepiness. Training-related group differences in mindfulness and rumination on work at home at postprogram partially mediated the reductions in negative moods at home and increases in sleep quality at follow-up. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Neighborhood Effects on Crime for Female and Male Youth: Evidence from a Randomized Housing Voucher Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey R. Kling; Jens Ludwig; Lawrence F. Katz

    2004-01-01

    The Moving to Opportunity (MTO) demonstration assigned housing vouchers via random lottery to public housing residents in five cities. We use the exogenous variation in residential locations generated by MTO to estimate neighborhood effects on youth crime and delinquency. The offer to relocate to lower-poverty areas reduces arrests among female youth for violent and property crimes, relative to a control group. For males the offer to relocate reduces arrests for violent crime, at least in the...

  6. Effect of a mobile app intervention on vegetable consumption in overweight adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummah, Sarah; Robinson, Thomas N; Mathur, Maya; Farzinkhou, Sarah; Sutton, Stephen; Gardner, Christopher D

    2017-09-15

    Mobile applications (apps) have been heralded as transformative tools to deliver behavioral health interventions at scale, but few have been tested in rigorous randomized controlled trials. We tested the effect of a mobile app to increase vegetable consumption among overweight adults attempting weight loss maintenance. Overweight adults (n=135) aged 18-50 years with BMI=28-40 kg/m 2 near Stanford, CA were recruited from an ongoing 12-month weight loss trial (parent trial) and randomly assigned to either the stand-alone, theory-based Vegethon mobile app (enabling goal setting, self-monitoring, and feedback and using "process motivators" including fun, surprise, choice, control, social comparison, and competition) or a wait-listed control condition. The primary outcome was daily vegetables servings, measured by an adapted Harvard food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) 8 weeks post-randomization. Daily vegetable servings from 24-hour dietary recalls, administered by trained, certified, and blinded interviewers 5 weeks post-randomization, was included as a secondary outcome. All analyses were conducted according to principles of intention-to-treat. Daily vegetable consumption was significantly greater in the intervention versus control condition for both measures (adjusted mean difference: 2.0 servings; 95% CI: 0.1, 3.8, p=0.04 for FFQ; and 1.0 servings; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.9; p=0.02 for 24-hour recalls). Baseline vegetable consumption was a significant moderator of intervention effects (p=0.002) in which effects increased as baseline consumption increased. These results demonstrate the efficacy of a mobile app to increase vegetable consumption among overweight adults. Theory-based mobile interventions may present a low-cost, scalable, and effective approach to improving dietary behaviors and preventing associated chronic diseases. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01826591. Registered 27 March 2013.

  7. Effects of early childhood intervention on fertility and maternal employment: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sandner, Malte

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a randomized study of a home visiting program implemented in Germany for low-income, first-time mothers. A major goal of the program is to improve the participants' economic self-sufficiency and family planning. I use administrative data from the German social security system and detailed telephone surveys to examine the effects of the intervention on maternal employment, welfare benefits, and household composition. The study reveals that the intervention un...

  8. Effects of two exercise protocols on postural balance of elderly women: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mesquita, Laiana Sep?lveda de Andrade; de Carvalho, Fabiana Texeira; Freire, Lara Sep?lveda de Andrade; Neto, Osmar Pinto; Z?ngaro, Renato Amaro

    2015-01-01

    Background The aging process reduces both sensory capabilities and the capabilities of the motor systems responsible for postural control, resulting in a high number of falls among the elderly. Some therapeutic interventions can directly interrupt this process, including physical exercise. This study compares and examines the effects of two exercise protocols on the balance of elderly women. Methods Elderly women who participated in a local church project (n?=?63) were randomly divided into t...

  9. Meaningful Effect Sizes, Intraclass Correlations, and Proportions of Variance Explained by Covariates for Planning Two- and Three-Level Cluster Randomized Trials of Social and Behavioral Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo; Reinke, Wendy M; Herman, Keith C; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Murray, Desiree W

    2016-09-30

    There is a need for greater guidance regarding design parameters and empirical benchmarks for social and behavioral outcomes to inform assumptions in the design and interpretation of cluster randomized trials (CRTs). We calculated the empirical reference values on critical research design parameters associated with statistical power for children's social and behavioral outcomes, including effect sizes, intraclass correlations (ICCs), and proportions of variance explained by a covariate at different levels (R 2 ). Children from kindergarten to Grade 5 in the samples from four large CRTs evaluating the effectiveness of two classroom- and two school-level preventive interventions. Teacher ratings of students' social and behavioral outcomes using the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation-Checklist and the Social Competence Scale-Teacher. Two types of effect size benchmarks were calculated: (1) normative expectations for change and (2) policy-relevant demographic performance gaps. The ICCs and R 2 were calculated using two-level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), where students are nested within schools, and three-level HLM, where students were nested within classrooms, and classrooms were nested within schools. Comprehensive tables of benchmarks and ICC values are provided to inform prevention researchers in interpreting the effect size of interventions and conduct power analyses for designing CRTs of children's social and behavioral outcomes. The discussion also provides a demonstration for how to use the parameter reference values provided in this article to calculate the sample size for two- and three-level CRTs designs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Effects of traditional cupping therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Andreas; Bock, Silke; Lüdtke, Rainer; Rampp, Thomas; Baecker, Marcus; Bachmann, Jürgen; Langhorst, Jost; Musial, Frauke; Dobos, Gustav J

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of cupping, a traditional method of treating musculoskeletal pain, in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in an open randomized trial. n = 52 outpatients (58.5 +/- 8.0 years) with neurologically confirmed CTS were randomly assigned to either a verum (n = 26) or a control group (n = 26). Verum patients were treated with a single application of wet cupping, and control patients with a single local application of heat within the region overlying the trapezius muscle. Patients were followed up on day 7 after treatment. The primary outcome, severity of CTS symptoms (VAS), was reduced from 61.5 +/- 20.5 to 24.6 +/- 22.7 mm at day 7 in the cupping group and from 67.1 +/- 20.2 to 51.7 +/- 23.9 mm in the control group [group difference -24.5mm (95%CI -36.1; -2.9, P cupping therapy may be effective in relieving the pain and other symptoms related to CTS. The efficacy of cupping in the long-term management of CTS and related mechanisms remains to be clarified. The results of a randomized trial on the clinical effects of traditional cupping therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome are presented. Cupping of segmentally related shoulder zones appears to alleviate the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  11. Effect of music in endoscopy procedures: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man Cai; Zhang, Ling Yi; Zhang, Yu Long; Zhang, Ya Wu; Xu, Xiao Dong; Zhang, You Cheng

    2014-10-01

    Endoscopies are common clinical examinations that are somewhat painful and even cause fear and anxiety for patients. We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to determine the effect of music on patients undergoing various endoscopic procedures. We searched the Cochrane Library, Issue 6, 2013, PubMed, and EMBASE databases up to July 2013. Randomized controlled trials comparing endoscopies, with and without the use of music, were included. Two authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Subgroup analyses were performed to examine the impact of music on different types of endoscopic procedures. Twenty-one randomized controlled trials involving 2,134 patients were included. The overall effect of music on patients undergoing a variety of endoscopic procedures significantly improved pain score (weighted mean difference [WMD] = -1.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] [-2.53, -0.53]), anxiety (WMD = -6.04, 95% CI [-9.61, -2.48]), heart rate (P = 0.01), arterial pressure (P music group, compared with the control group. Furthermore, music had little effect for patients undergoing colposcopy and bronchoscopy in the subanalysis. Our meta-analysis suggested that music may offer benefits for patients undergoing endoscopy, except in colposcopy and bronchoscopy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Perraton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Luke Perraton, Zuzana Machotka, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAim: Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials.Method: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Only trials that have reported significant FMS-related outcomes were included. Data relating to the components of hydrotherapy programs (exercise type, duration, frequency and intensity, environmental factors, and service delivery were analyzed.Results: Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Overall, the quality of trials was good. Aerobic exercise featured in all 11 trials and the majority of hydrotherapy programs included either a strengthening or flexibility component. Great variability was noted in both the environmental components of hydrotherapy programs and service delivery.Conclusions: Aerobic exercise, warm up and cool-down periods and relaxation exercises are common features of hydrotherapy programs that report significant FMS-related outcomes. Treatment duration of 60 minutes, frequency of three sessions per week and an intensity equivalent to 60%–80% maximum heart rate were the most commonly reported exercise components. Exercise appears to be the most important component of an effective hydrotherapy program for FMS, particularly when considering mental health-related outcomes.Keywords: hydrotherapy, fibromyalgia syndrome, exercise, effective, components

  13. Two levels decision system for efficient planning and implementation of bioenergy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayoub, Nasser; Martins, Ricardo; Wang, Kefeng; Seki, Hiroya; Naka, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    When planning bioenergy production from biomass, planners should take into account each and every stakeholder along the biomass supply chains, e.g. biomass resources suppliers, transportation, conversion and electricity suppliers. Also, the planners have to consider social concerns, environmental and economical impacts related with establishing the biomass systems and the specific difficulties of each country. To overcome these problems in a sustainable manner, a robust decision support system is required. For that purpose, a two levels general Bioenergy Decision System (gBEDS) for bioenergy production planning and implementation was developed. The core part of the gBEDS is the information base, which includes the basic bioenergy information and the detailed decision information. Basic bioenergy information include, for instance, the geographical information system (GIS) database, the biomass materials' database, the biomass logistic database and the biomass conversion database. The detailed decision information considers the parameters' values database with their default values and the variables database, values obtained by simulation and optimization. It also includes a scenario database, which is used for demonstration to new users and also for case based reasoning by planners and executers. Based on the information base, the following modules are included to support decision making: the simulation module with graph interface based on the unit process (UP) definition and the genetic algorithms (GAs) methods for optimal decisions and the Matlab module for applying data mining methods (fuzzy C-means clustering and decision trees) to the biomass collection points, to define the location of storage and bioenergy conversion plants based on the simulation and optimization model developed of the whole life cycle of bioenergy generation. Furthermore, Matlab is used to set up a calculation model with crucial biomass planning parameters (e.g. costs, CO 2 emissions), over

  14. Effects of functional restoration versus 3 hours per week physical therapy: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Nathalie; Fanello, Serge; Bontoux, Luc; Dubus, Valérie; Billabert, Colette; Vielle, Bruno; Roquelaure, Yves; Penneau-Fontbonne, Dominique; Richard, Isabelle

    2004-03-01

    Randomized parallel-group comparative trial with a 6-month follow-up period. To compare, in chronic low back pain patients, the effectiveness of a functional restoration program, including intensive physical training, occupational therapy, and psychological support to an active individual therapy consisting of 3 hours physical therapy per week during 5 weeks. Controlled studies conducted in the United States showed a benefit of functional restoration in patients with low back pain, especially on return to work. Randomized Canadian and European trials had less favorable results. In France, there has been up to now no randomized study. Controlled studies suggested a positive effect of functional restoration programs. Eighty-six patients with low back pain were randomized to either the functional restoration (44 patients) or the active individual therapy (42 patients) program. One person in each group never started the program. Two patients did not complete the functional restoration program, and one was lost to follow-up at 6 months. The mean number of sick-leave days in the 2 previous years was 6 months. After adjustment on the variable "workplace enrolled in an ergonomic program", the mean number of sick-leave days was significantly lower in the functional restoration group. Physical criteria and treatment appreciation were also better. There was no significant difference in the intensity of pain, the quality of life and functional indexes, the psychological characteristics, the number of contacts with the medical system, and the drug intake. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a functional restoration program on important outcome measures, such as sick leave, in a country that has a social system that protects people facing difficulties at work.

  15. Randomized Controlled Trial of Social Media: Effect of Increased Intensity of the Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Caroline S; Gurary, Ellen B; Ryan, John; Bonaca, Marc; Barry, Karen; Loscalzo, Joseph; Massaro, Joseph

    2016-04-27

    A prior randomized controlled trial of social media exposure at Circulation determined that social media did not increase 30-day page views. Whether insufficient social media intensity contributed to these results is uncertain. Original article manuscripts were randomized to social media exposure compared with no social media exposure (control) at Circulation beginning in January 2015. Social media exposure consisted of Facebook and Twitter posts on the journal's accounts. To increase social media intensity, a larger base of followers was built using advertising and organic growth, and posts were presented in triplicate and boosted on Facebook and retweeted on Twitter. The primary outcome was 30-day page views. Stopping rules were established at the point that 50% of the manuscripts were randomized and had 30-day follow-up to compare groups on 30-day page views. The trial was stopped for futility on September 26, 2015. Overall, 74 manuscripts were randomized to receive social media exposure, and 78 manuscripts were randomized to the control arm. The intervention and control arms were similar based on article type (P=0.85), geographic location of the corresponding author (P=0.33), and whether the manuscript had an editorial (P=0.80). Median number of 30-day page views was 499.5 in the social media arm and 450.5 in the control arm; there was no evidence of a treatment effect (P=0.38). There were no statistically significant interactions of treatment by manuscript type (P=0.86), by corresponding author (P=0.35), by trimester of publication date (P=0.34), or by editorial status (P=0.79). A more intensive social media strategy did not result in increased 30-day page views of original research. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Comparative effectiveness of childhood obesity interventions in pediatric primary care: a cluster-randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveras, Elsie M; Marshall, Richard; Kleinman, Ken P; Gillman, Matthew W; Hacker, Karen; Horan, Christine M; Smith, Renata L; Price, Sarah; Sharifi, Mona; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Simon, Steven R

    2015-06-01

    Evidence of effective treatment of childhood obesity in primary care settings is limited. To examine the extent to which computerized clinical decision support (CDS) delivered to pediatric clinicians at the point of care of obese children, with or without individualized family coaching, improved body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and quality of care. We conducted a cluster-randomized, 3-arm clinical trial. We enrolled 549 children aged 6 to 12 years with a BMI at the 95% percentile or higher from 14 primary care practices in Massachusetts from October 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012. Patients were followed up for 1 year (last follow-up, August 30, 2013). In intent-to-treat analyses, we used linear mixed-effects models to account for clustering by practice and within each person. In 5 practices randomized to CDS, pediatric clinicians received decision support on obesity management, and patients and their families received an intervention for self-guided behavior change. In 5 practices randomized to CDS + coaching, decision support was augmented by individualized family coaching. The remaining 4 practices were randomized to usual care. Smaller age-associated change in BMI and the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) performance measures for obesity during the 1-year follow-up. At baseline, mean (SD) patient age and BMI were 9.8 (1.9) years and 25.8 (4.3), respectively. At 1 year, we obtained BMI from 518 children (94.4%) and HEDIS measures from 491 visits (89.4%). The 3 randomization arms had different effects on BMI over time (P = .04). Compared with the usual care arm, BMI increased less in children in the CDS arm during 1 year (-0.51 [95% CI, -0.91 to -0.11]). The CDS + coaching arm had a smaller magnitude of effect (-0.34 [95% CI, -0.75 to 0.07]). We found substantially greater achievement of childhood obesity HEDIS measures in the CDS arm (adjusted odds ratio, 2.28 [95% CI, 1

  17. Effects of prenatal yoga on women's stress and immune function across pregnancy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pao-Ju; Yang, Luke; Chou, Cheng-Chen; Li, Chia-Chi; Chang, Yu-Cune; Liaw, Jen-Jiuan

    2017-04-01

    The effects of prenatal yoga on biological indicators have not been widely studied. Thus, we compared changes in stress and immunity salivary biomarkers from 16 to 36 weeks' gestation between women receiving prenatal yoga and those receiving routine prenatal care. For this longitudinal, prospective, randomized controlled trial, we recruited 94 healthy pregnant women at 16 weeks' gestation through convenience sampling from a prenatal clinic in Taipei. Participants were randomly assigned to intervention (n=48) or control (n=46) groups using Clinstat block randomization. The 20-week intervention comprised two weekly 70-min yoga sessions led by a midwife certified as a yoga instructor; the control group received only routine prenatal care. In both groups, participants' salivary cortisol and immunoglobulin A levels were collected before and after yoga every 4 weeks from 16 to 36 weeks' gestation. The intervention group had lower salivary cortisol (pcontrol group. Specifically, the intervention group had significantly higher long-term salivary immunoglobulin A levels than the control group (p=0.018), and infants born to women in the intervention group weighed more than those born to the control group (pPrenatal yoga significantly reduced pregnant women's stress and enhanced their immune function. Clinicians should learn the mechanisms of yoga and its effects on pregnant women. Our findings can guide clinicians to help pregnant women alleviate their stress and enhance their immune function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. An effective group psychoeducational intervention for improving compliance with vaginal dilation: A randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffries, Sherryl A.; Robinson, John W.; Craighead, Peter S.; Keats, Melanie R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal dilation is often recommended to minimize or prevent vaginal scarring after pelvic radiotherapy, compliance with this recommendation has historically been very low. Therefore, effective intervention strategies are needed to enhance compliance with vaginal dilation after radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of a psychoeducational intervention specifically designed to increase compliance with vaginal dilation. The information-motivation-behavioral skills model of enhancing compliance with behavioral change was the basis for the intervention design. Forty-two sexually active women, 21 to 65 years of age, diagnosed with Stages Ic-III cervical or endometrial cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy, were randomized to either the experimental psychoeducational group or the information-only control group. Assessment via questionnaire occurred before treatment and at 6-week, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Assessment via interview also occurred at 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Results: The psychoeducational intervention was successful in increasing compliance with vaginal dilation. Conclusions: This study is the first randomized controlled study to demonstrate the effectiveness of an intervention in increasing compliance with the use of vaginal dilators

  19. An effective approach to attenuate random noise based on compressive sensing and curvelet transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Cao, Siyuan; Zu, Shaohuan; Chen, Yangkang

    2016-01-01

    Random noise attenuation is an important step in seismic data processing. In this paper, we propose a novel denoising approach based on compressive sensing and the curvelet transform. We formulate the random noise attenuation problem as an L _1 norm regularized optimization problem. We propose to use the curvelet transform as the sparse transform in the optimization problem to regularize the sparse coefficients in order to separate signal and noise and to use the gradient projection for sparse reconstruction (GPSR) algorithm to solve the formulated optimization problem with an easy implementation and a fast convergence. We tested the performance of our proposed approach on both synthetic and field seismic data. Numerical results show that the proposed approach can effectively suppress the distortion near the edge of seismic events during the noise attenuation process and has high computational efficiency compared with the traditional curvelet thresholding and iterative soft thresholding based denoising methods. Besides, compared with f-x deconvolution, the proposed denoising method is capable of eliminating the random noise more effectively while preserving more useful signals. (paper)

  20. Assessment of effectiveness of smoking cessation intervention among male prisoners in India: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sachin; Khanagar, Sanjeev; Kumar, Amit; Ramachandra, Sujith; Vadavadagi, Sunil V; Dhananjaya, Kiran Murthy

    2014-12-01

    Tobacco smoking is an integral part of prison life and an established part of the culture. Little attention has been paid to prevention of smoking in prison. Approximately 70-80% of prisoners have been identified as current smokers. To assess the effectiveness of smoking cessation intervention among male prisoners at Central Jail, Bangalore city. To assess the effectiveness of smoking cessation intervention among male prisoners at Central Jail, Bangalore city. A randomized controlled trial was planned among male prisoners in Central Jail, Bangalore city. There were 1600 convicted prisoners. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the prisoners to assess their smoking behavior by which prevalence of tobacco smoking was found. Exactly 1352 tobacco users were studied. Among them, there were 1252 smokers. Based on inclusion criteria and informed consent given by the prisoners, a sample of 600 was chosen for the study by systematic random sampling. Among the 600 prisoners, 300 were randomly selected for the study group and 300 for the control group. Prevalence of tobacco smoking among the prisoners was 92.60%. In the present study, after smoking cessation intervention, 17% showed no change in smoking, 21.66% reduced smoking, 16% stopped smoking, and 45.33% relapsed (P prison even if the living conditions are not favorable. Relatively high rate of relapse in our study indicates that some policies should be adopted to improve smokers' information on consequences of tobacco on health and motivational intervention should be added to prisoners.

  1. Random crystal field effect on the magnetic and hysteresis behaviors of a spin-1 cylindrical nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaim, N.; Zaim, A., E-mail: ah_zaim@yahoo.fr; Kerouad, M., E-mail: kerouad@fs-umi.ac.ma

    2017-02-15

    In this work, the magnetic behavior of the cylindrical nanowire, consisting of a ferromagnetic core of spin-1 atoms surrounded by a ferromagnetic shell of spin-1 atoms is studied in the presence of a random crystal field interaction. Based on Metropolis algorithm, the Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate the effects of the concentration of the random crystal field p, the crystal field D and the shell exchange interaction J{sub s} on the phase diagrams and the hysteresis behavior of the system. Some characteristic behaviors have been found, such as the first and second-order phase transitions joined by tricritical point for appropriate values of the system parameters, triple and isolated critical points can be also found. Depending on the Hamiltonian parameters, single, double and para hysteresis regions are explicitly determined. - Highlights: • Phase diagrams of a ferromagnetic nanowire are examined by the Monte Carlo simulation. • Different types of the phase diagrams are obtained. • The effect of the random crystal field on the hysteresis loops is studied. • Single, double and para hysteresis regions are explicitly determined.

  2. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, Luke; Machotka, Zuzana; Kumar, Saravana

    2009-11-30

    Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Only trials that have reported significant FMS-related outcomes were included. Data relating to the components of hydrotherapy programs (exercise type, duration, frequency and intensity, environmental factors, and service delivery) were analyzed. Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Overall, the quality of trials was good. Aerobic exercise featured in all 11 trials and the majority of hydrotherapy programs included either a strengthening or flexibility component. Great variability was noted in both the environmental components of hydrotherapy programs and service delivery. Aerobic exercise, warm up and cool-down periods and relaxation exercises are common features of hydrotherapy programs that report significant FMS-related outcomes. Treatment duration of 60 minutes, frequency of three sessions per week and an intensity equivalent to 60%-80% maximum heart rate were the most commonly reported exercise components. Exercise appears to be the most important component of an effective hydrotherapy program for FMS, particularly when considering mental health-related outcomes.

  3. Does sucralfate reduce early side effects of pelvic radiation? A double-blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellamans, Karin; Lievens, Yolande; Lambin, Philippe; Van den Weyngaert, Danielle; Van den Bogaert, Walter; Scalliet, Pierre; Hutsebaut, Liesbeth; Haustermans, Karin

    2002-11-01

    STUDY AND METHODS: A double-blind placebo-controlled study randomized 108 patients to investigate the effect of sucralfate on gastrointestinal side effects of pelvic radiation. Overall, pelvic radiation with the administered doses and fields and performed according to nowadays technical standards, was well tolerated. Comparison of the mean scores and the peak reactions for radiotherapy discomfort, diarrhoea and number of stools per day in the 80 evaluable patients showed no statistically significant difference between sucralfate and placebo. Based on these results, the use of sucralfate can not be recommended as standard practice.

  4. Does sucralfate reduce early side effects of pelvic radiation? A double-blind randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellamans, Karin; Lievens, Yolande; Lambin, Philippe; Van den Weyngaert, Danielle; Van den Bogaert, Walter; Scalliet, Pierre; Hutsebaut, Liesbeth; Haustermans, Karin

    2002-01-01

    Study and methods: A double-blind placebo-controlled study randomized 108 patients to investigate the effect of sucralfate on gastrointestinal side effects of pelvic radiation. Results: Overall, pelvic radiation with the administered doses and fields and performed according to nowadays technical standards, was well tolerated. Comparison of the mean scores and the peak reactions for radiotherapy discomfort, diarrhoea and number of stools per day in the 80 evaluable patients showed no statistically significant difference between sucralfate and placebo. Conclusion: Based on these results, the use of sucralfate can not be recommended as standard practice

  5. Effects of exercise and diet in nonobese asthma patients - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Louise Lindhardt; Meteran, Howraman; Hostrup, Morten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioral interventions focusing on exercise and healthy diet improve asthma control in obese patients with asthma, but whether these interventions can lead to improvements in nonobese patients remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: In a randomized, controlled parallel-group design, we studied...... the effects of an 8-week intervention of either exercise (high-intensity interval training), diet (high protein/low glycemic index), or a combination of the 2, on asthma control and clinical outcomes in nonobese patients with asthma. METHODS: Nonobese adult patients with asthma (n = 149) were randomized to 1...... of 4 groups: an exercise group, a diet group, an exercise + diet group, or a control group. Outcomes included Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score, asthma-related quality-of-life (Asthma-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [AQLQ]) score, inflammatory cell counts in induced sputum, FEV1...

  6. Antioxidant effects of curcuminoids in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Khalili, Nahid; Sahebi, Ebrahim; Namazi, Soha; Karimian, Maryam Saberi; Majeed, Muhammed; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress has a key role in the pathogenesis of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its vascular complications. Antioxidant therapy has been suggested as a potential approach to blunt T2DM development and progression. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of supplementation with curcuminoids, which are natural polyphenolics from turmeric, on oxidative indices in diabetic individuals. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 118 subjects with T2DM were randomized to curcuminoids (1000 mg/day co-administered with piperine 10 mg/day) or matching placebo for a period of 8 weeks. Serum total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were measured at baseline and after the supplementation period. Curcuminoids supplementation caused a significant elevation in serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (p diabetic complications and cardiovascular endpoints.

  7. Effect of probiotic chewing tablets on early childhood caries--a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedayati-Hajikand, Trifa; Lundberg, Ulrika; Eldh, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effect of probiotic chewing tablets on early childhood caries development in preschool children living in a low socioeconomic multicultural area. METHODS: The investigation employed a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design. The study group consisted of 138...... healthy 2-3-year-old children that were consecutively recruited after informed parental consent. After enrollment, they were randomized to a test or a placebo group. The parents of the test group were instructed to give their child one chewing tablet per day containing three strains of live probiotic...... childhood caries development could be reduced through administration of these probiotic chewing tablets as adjunct to daily use of fluoride toothpaste in preschool children. Further studies on a possible dose-response relationship seem justified TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01720771...

  8. The effect of random mass, stiffness and eccentricity parameters on seismic response of torsional system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafory-Ashtiany, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of random eccentricity, mass and stiffness parameter on the dynamic characteristics of structure and story shear and torsional response has been comprehensively examined. Numerical results are obtained for a five-story torsional building excited by random excitation with various damping ration and frequency parameter values using both approaches of response calculations-a more accurate complex mode and an approximate normal mode have been used. The results show that the introduction of eccentricity in a direction introduces torsional moments in the system and reduces the direct story shear. For a safe design, eccentricity should be neglected in the calculations for shear, and a value of 0.05 of radius of gyration for calculation of torsional moment should be considered, even if a structure is intended to be symmetrical

  9. Effectivity of artrihpi irrigation for diabetic ulcer healing: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Dewi; Asmorohadi, Aries; Dahlia, Debie

    2018-02-01

    The healing process of diabetic ulcer is often impeded by inflammation, infection, and decreased immune state. High pressure irrigation (10-15 psi) may be used to control the infection level. This research was designed to identify the effectiveness of artrihpi irrigation device towards diabetic ulcers in public hospitals in the Central Java. This research is a randomized control trial with cross over design. Sixty four subjects were selected using block randomization technique, and were divided into control and intervention group. The intervention was given in 6 days along with wound healing evaluation in every 3 days. The results demonstrated that there was a significant difference decrease scoring healing after treatment, even though the difference scoring healing between both groups was not statistically significant. However, it means difference was found that in the intervention artrihpi the wound healing was better than the spuit. These results illustrates the artrihpi may be solution of using high pressure irrigation to help healing process diabetic ulcers.

  10. Effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality in cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibagheri, Ali; Babaii, Atye; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    Sleep disorders are common among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit (CCU). This study aimed to investigate the effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality of patients hospitalized in CCU. In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were conveniently sampled and randomly allocated to the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. In the experimental group, patients received routine care and Rosa damascene aromatherapy for three subsequent nights. In the both groups the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. After the study, the mean scores of five domains of Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index as well as the mean of total score of the index in the experimental group were significantly lower than the control group. Rosa damascene aromatherapy can significantly improve the sleep quality of patients hospitalized in CCUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effective degrees of freedom of a random walk on a fractal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balankin, Alexander S.

    2015-12-01

    We argue that a non-Markovian random walk on a fractal can be treated as a Markovian process in a fractional dimensional space with a suitable metric. This allows us to define the fractional dimensional space allied to the fractal as the ν -dimensional space Fν equipped with the metric induced by the fractal topology. The relation between the number of effective spatial degrees of freedom of walkers on the fractal (ν ) and fractal dimensionalities is deduced. The intrinsic time of random walk in Fν is inferred. The Laplacian operator in Fν is constructed. This allows us to map physical problems on fractals into the corresponding problems in Fν. In this way, essential features of physics on fractals are revealed. Particularly, subdiffusion on path-connected fractals is elucidated. The Coulomb potential of a point charge on a fractal embedded in the Euclidean space is derived. Intriguing attributes of some types of fractals are highlighted.

  12. Random crystal field effects on the integer and half-integer mixed-spin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Ali; Albayrak, Erhan

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have focused on the random crystal field effects on the phase diagrams of the mixed spin-1 and spin-5/2 Ising system obtained by utilizing the exact recursion relations (ERR) on the Bethe lattice (BL). The distribution function P(Di) = pδ [Di - D(1 + α) ] +(1 - p) δ [Di - D(1 - α) ] is used to randomize the crystal field.The phase diagrams are found to exhibit second- and first-order phase transitions depending on the values of α, D and p. It is also observed that the model displays tricritical point, isolated point, critical end point and three compensation temperatures for suitable values of the system parameters.

  13. A Bayesian Analysis of a Random Effects Small Business Loan Credit Scoring Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Farrell

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important aspects of credit scoring is constructing a model that has low misclassification rates and is also flexible enough to allow for random variation. It is also well known that, when there are a large number of highly correlated variables as is typical in studies involving questionnaire data, a method must be found to reduce the number of variables to those that have high predictive power. Here we propose a Bayesian multivariate logistic regression model with both fixed and random effects for small business loan credit scoring and a variable reduction method using Bayes factors. The method is illustrated on an interesting data set based on questionnaires sent to loan officers in Canadian banks and venture capital companies

  14. Effects of manipulating eating frequency during a behavioral weight loss intervention: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jessica L; Raynor, Hollie A

    2012-05-01

    Eating frequency has been inversely related to BMI but the impact of eating frequency on weight loss is unclear. This randomized controlled trial pilot study examined the effect of eating frequency on hunger, energy intake, and weight loss during a 6-month behavioral weight loss intervention. Participants (age: 51.0 ± 9.9 years, BMI: 35.5 ± 4.8 kg/m(2), 57.8% female, 94.1% white) were randomized to one of two eating frequency prescriptions: Three meal (n = 25): three eating bouts/day; or grazing (n = 26): eat at least 100 kcals every 2-3 h. Both groups attended 20 sessions and had identical dietary (1,200-1,500 kcals/day, frequency than three meal at 6 months (5.8 ± 1.1 eating bouts/day vs. 3.2 ± 0.6 eating bouts/day, P weight loss intervention.

  15. Effects of systematic phase errors on optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu-Chao; Bao Wan-Su; Wang Xiang; Fu Xiang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of systematic errors in phase inversions on the success rate and number of iterations in the optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm. Using the geometric description of this algorithm, a model of the algorithm with phase errors is established, and the relationship between the success rate of the algorithm, the database size, the number of iterations, and the phase error is determined. For a given database size, we obtain both the maximum success rate of the algorithm and the required number of iterations when phase errors are present in the algorithm. Analyses and numerical simulations show that the optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm is more robust against phase errors than Grover’s algorithm. (paper)

  16. Aerobic exercise effects upon cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammisuli, D M; Innocenti, A; Franzoni, F; Pruneti, C

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have shown that physical activity has positive effects on cognition in healthy older adults without cognitive complains but lesser is known about the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in patients suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The aim of the present study was to systematically review the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the effects of aerobic exercise upon cognition in MCI patients. To this end, PubMed, Cochrane and Web of Science databases were analytically searched for RCTs including aerobic exercise interventions for MCI patients. There is evidence that aerobic exercise improves cognition in MCI patients. Overall research reported moderate effects for global cognition, logical memory, inhibitory control and divided attention. Due to methodological limitations of the investigated studies, findings should be interpreted with caution. Standardized training protocols, larger scale interventions and follow-ups may also provide better insight into the preventive effects of aerobic exercise on cognitive deterioration in MCI and its conversion into dementia.

  17. The Effect of Random Error on Diagnostic Accuracy Illustrated with the Anthropometric Diagnosis of Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background It is often thought that random measurement error has a minor effect upon the results of an epidemiological survey. Theoretically, errors of measurement should always increase the spread of a distribution. Defining an illness by having a measurement outside an established healthy range will lead to an inflated prevalence of that condition if there are measurement errors. Methods and results A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted of anthropometric assessment of children with malnutrition. Random errors of increasing magnitude were imposed upon the populations and showed that there was an increase in the standard deviation with each of the errors that became exponentially greater with the magnitude of the error. The potential magnitude of the resulting error of reported prevalence of malnutrition were compared with published international data and found to be of sufficient magnitude to make a number of surveys and the numerous reports and analyses that used these data unreliable. Conclusions The effect of random error in public health surveys and the data upon which diagnostic cut-off points are derived to define “health” has been underestimated. Even quite modest random errors can more than double the reported prevalence of conditions such as malnutrition. Increasing sample size does not address this problem, and may even result in less accurate estimates. More attention needs to be paid to the selection, calibration and maintenance of instruments, measurer selection, training & supervision, routine estimation of the likely magnitude of errors using standardization tests, use of statistical likelihood of error to exclude data from analysis and full reporting of these procedures in order to judge the reliability of survey reports. PMID:28030627

  18. A practical guide and power analysis for GLMMs: detecting among treatment variation in random effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan P. Kain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In ecology and evolution generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs are becoming increasingly used to test for differences in variation by treatment at multiple hierarchical levels. Yet, the specific sampling schemes that optimize the power of an experiment to detect differences in random effects by treatment/group remain unknown. In this paper we develop a blueprint for conducting power analyses for GLMMs focusing on detecting differences in variance by treatment. We present parameterization and power analyses for random-intercepts and random-slopes GLMMs because of their generality as focal parameters for most applications and because of their immediate applicability to emerging questions in the field of behavioral ecology. We focus on the extreme case of hierarchically structured binomial data, though the framework presented here generalizes easily to any error distribution model. First, we determine the optimal ratio of individuals to repeated measures within individuals that maximizes power to detect differences by treatment in among-individual variation in intercept, among-individual variation in slope, and within-individual variation in intercept. Second, we explore how power to detect differences in target variance parameters is affected by total variation. Our results indicate heterogeneity in power across ratios of individuals to repeated measures with an optimal ratio determined by both the target variance parameter and total sample size. Additionally, power to detect each variance parameter was low overall (in most cases >1,000 total observations per treatment needed to achieve 80% power and decreased with increasing variance in non-target random effects. With growing interest in variance as the parameter of inquiry, these power analyses provide a crucial component for designing experiments focused on detecting differences in variance. We hope to inspire novel experimental designs in ecology and evolution investigating the causes and

  19. A Randomized Control Intervention Investigating the Effects of Acute Exercise on Emotional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Meghan K; Rhodes, Ryan E; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    Exercise may help to cope with hectic or demanding events after a stressful situation occurs. Limited research has evaluated whether exercise, prior to a stressor, helps to facilitate subsequent emotional regulation. This pilot study addresses this novel paradigm. We employed a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effects of acute exercise on emotional regulation. Participants were randomly assigned to stretch (control group, N = 10), walk (N = 9), or jog (N = 8) for 15-minutes, after which they were exposed to a film clip intended to elicit a negative emotional response. Participants' emotions were monitored before and during exercise, as well as after the film clip. Emotional responses were evaluated using the Exercise Induced Feeling Inventory and Affective Circumplex Scale. A group x time splitplot interaction effect was significant for anger (p = .046) and anxiousness (p = .038). Follow-up analyses showed that only the stretching group (p = .048) had a significantly increased anger score from baseline to post-film clip, suggesting a protective emotional effect from walking and jogging. Exercise was effective in regulating anger and anxiousness after a stressful event. These findings provide evidence for potential preventive effects of exercise in facilitating emotional regulation.

  20. Effect of cocoa and theobromine consumption on serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufingerl, Nicole; Zebregs, Yvonne E M P; Schuring, Ewoud A H; Trautwein, Elke A

    2013-06-01

    Evidence from clinical studies has suggested that cocoa may increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentrations. However, it is unclear whether this effect is attributable to flavonoids or theobromine, both of which are major cocoa components. We investigated whether pure theobromine increases serum HDL cholesterol and whether there is an interaction effect between theobromine and cocoa. The study had a 2-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, full factorial parallel design. After a 2-wk run-in period, 152 healthy men and women (aged 40-70 y) were randomly allocated to consume one 200-mL drink/d for 4 wk that contained 1) cocoa, which naturally provided 150 mg theobromine and 325 mg flavonoids [cocoa intervention (CC)], 2) 850 mg pure theobromine [theobromine intervention (TB)], 3) cocoa and added theobromine, which provided 1000 mg theobromine and 325 mg flavonoids [theobromine and cocoa intervention (TB+CC)], or 4) neither cocoa nor theobromine (placebo). Blood lipids and apolipoproteins were measured at the start and end of interventions. In a 2-factor analysis, there was a significant main effect of the TB (P cocoa and interaction effects suggested that theobromine may be the main ingredient responsible for the HDL cholesterol-raising effect. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01481389.

  1. A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Testing the Effectiveness of Houvast: A Strengths-Based Intervention for Homeless Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenborg, Manon A. M.; Boersma, Sandra N.; van der Veld, William M.; van Hulst, Bente; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.; Wolf, Judith R. L. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the effectiveness of Houvast: a strengths-based intervention for homeless young adults. Method: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 10 Dutch shelter facilities randomly allocated to an intervention and a control group. Homeless young adults were interviewed when entering the facility and when care ended.…

  2. Mediating Parent Learning to Promote Social Communication for Toddlers with Autism: Effects from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertz, Hannah H.; Odom, Samuel L.; Baggett, Kathleen M.; Sideris, John H.

    2018-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate effects of the Joint Attention Mediated Learning (JAML) intervention. Toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) aged 16-30 months (n = 144) were randomized to intervention and community control conditions. Parents, who participated in 32 weekly home-based sessions, followed a mediated…

  3. A cluster randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of Houvast: A strengths-based intervention for homeless young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbenborg, M.A.M.; Boersma, S.N.; Veld, W.M. van der; Hulst, B. van; Vollebergh, W.A.M.; Wolf, J.R.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the effectiveness of Houvast: a strengths-based intervention for homeless young adults. Method: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 10 Dutch shelter facilities randomly allocated to an intervention and a control group. Homeless young adults were interviewed

  4. The effectiveness of participatory ergonomics to prevent low-back and neck pain - results of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.T.; Proper, K.I.; Anema, J.R.; Knol, D.L.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to investigate the effectiveness of the Stay@ Work participatory ergonomics (PE) program to prevent low-back and neck pain. Methods A total of 37 departments were randomly allocated to either the intervention (PE) or control group (no

  5. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on serum homocysteine levels in perimenopausal women : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, AE; Bak, AAA; Lindemans, J; Planellas, J; Bennink, HJTC; Hofman, A; Grobbee, DE; Witteman, JCM

    2001-01-01

    Serum homocysteine levels may be lowered by hormone replacement therapy, but randomized controlled trial data are scarce. We performed a single center randomized placebo-controlled trial to assess the 6 months effect of hormone replacement therapy compared with placebo on fasting serum homocysteine

  6. Effects of Nurse-Led Multifactorial Care to Prevent Disability in Community-Living Older People : Cluster Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijker, Jacqueline J.; van Rijn, Marjon; Buurman, Bianca M.; ter Riet, Gerben; van Charante, Eric P. Moll; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effects of nurse-led multifactorial care to prevent disability in community-living older people. Methods In a cluster randomized trail, 11 practices (n = 1,209 participants) were randomized to the intervention group, and 13 practices (n = 1,074 participants) were

  7. Utility and Cost-Effectiveness of Motivational Messaging to Increase Survey Response in Physicians: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Randolph C. H.; Mak, Winnie W. S.; Pang, Ingrid H. Y.; Wong, Samuel Y. S.; Tang, Wai Kwong; Lau, Joseph T. F.; Woo, Jean; Lee, Diana T. F.; Cheung, Fanny M.

    2018-01-01

    The present study examined whether, when, and how motivational messaging can boost the response rate of postal surveys for physicians based on Higgin's regulatory focus theory, accounting for its cost-effectiveness. A three-arm, blinded, randomized controlled design was used. A total of 3,270 doctors were randomly selected from the registration…

  8. Quantum phase transition in a coupled two-level system embedded in anisotropic three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H Z; Shao, X Q; Wang, G C; Zhao, X L; Yi, X X

    2016-01-01

    The quantum phase transition (QPT) describes a sudden qualitative change of the macroscopic properties mapped from the eigenspectrum of a quantum many-body system. It has been studied intensively in quantum systems with the spin-boson model, but it has barely been explored for systems in coupled spin-boson models. In this paper, we study the QPT with coupled spin-boson models consisting of coupled two-level atoms embedded in three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. The dynamics of the system is derived exactly by means of the Laplace transform method, which has been proven to be equivalent to the dissipationless non-Markovian dynamics. Drawing on methods for analyzing the ground state, we obtain the phase diagrams through two exact critical equations and two QPTs are found: one QPT is that from the phase without one bound state to the phase with one bound state and another is that from one phase with the bound state having one eigenvalue to another phase where the bound state has two eigenvalues. Our analytical results also suggest a way of control to overcome the effect of decoherence by engineering the spectrum of the reservoirs to approach the non-Markovian regime and to form the bound state of the whole system for quantum devices and quantum statistics.

  9. Phase-controlled all-optical switching based on coherent population oscillation in a two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Ping; Yu, Song; Luo, Bin; Shen, Jing; Gu, Wanyi; Guo, Hong

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically propose a scheme of phase-controlled all-optical switching due to the effect of degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) and coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a two-level system driven by a strong coupling field and two weak symmetrically detuned fields. The results show that the phase of the FWM field can be utilized to switch between constructive and destructive interference, which can lead to the transmission or attenuation of the probe field and thus switch the field on or off. We also find the intensity of the coupling field and the propagation distance have great influence on the performance of the switching. In our scheme, due to the quick response in semiconductor systems, a fast all-optical switching can be realized at low light level. -- Highlights: ► We study a new all-optical switching based on coherent population oscillation. ► The phase of the FWM field can be utilized to switch the probe field on or off. ► A fast and low-light-level switching can be realized in semiconductors.

  10. Demand response strategy management with active and reactive power incentive in the smart grid: a two-level optimization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuto Shigenobu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available High penetration of distributed generators (DGs using renewable energy sources (RESs is raising some important issues in the operation of modern po­wer system. The output power of RESs fluctuates very steeply, and that include uncertainty with weather conditions. This situation causes voltage deviation and reverse power flow. Several methods have been proposed for solving these problems. Fundamentally, these methods involve reactive power control for voltage deviation and/or the installation of large battery energy storage system (BESS at the interconnection point for reverse power flow. In order to reduce the installation cost of static var compensator (SVC, Distribution Company (DisCo gives reactive power incentive to the cooperating customers. On the other hand, photovoltaic (PV generator, energy storage and electric vehicle (EV are introduced in customer side with the aim of achieving zero net energy homes (ZEHs. This paper proposes not only reactive power control but also active power flow control using house BESS and EV. Moreover, incentive method is proposed to promote participation of customers in the control operation. Demand response (DR system is verified with several DR menu. To create profit for both side of DisCo and customer, two level optimization approach is executed in this research. Mathematical modeling of price elasticity and detailed simulations are executed by case study. The effectiveness of the proposed incentive menu is demonstrated by using heuristic optimization method.

  11. Effectiveness of strengthened stimulation during acupuncture for the treatment of Bell palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sha-bei; Huang, Bo; Zhang, Chen-yan; Du, Peng; Yuan, Qi; Bi, Gui-juan; Zhang, Gui-bin; Xie, Min-jie; Luo, Xiang; Huang, Guang-ying; Wang, Wei

    2013-04-02

    The traditional Chinese theory of acupuncture emphasizes that the intensity of acupuncture must reach a threshold to generate de qi, which is necessary to achieve the best therapeutic effect. De qi is an internal compound sensation of soreness, tingling, fullness, aching, cool, warmth and heaviness, and a radiating sensation at and around the acupoints. However, the notion that de qi must be achieved for maximum benefit has not been confirmed by modern scientific evidence. We performed a prospective multicentre randomized controlled trial involving patients with Bell palsy. Patients were randomly assigned to the de qi (n = 167) or control (n = 171) group. Both groups received acupuncture: in the de qi group, the needles were manipulated manually until de qi was reached, whereas in the control group, the needles were inserted without any manipulation. All patients received prednisone as a basic treatment. The primary outcome was facial nerve function at month 6. We also assessed disability and quality of life 6 months after randomization. After 6 months, patients in the de qi group had better facial function (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.23-7.78), better disability assessment (differences of least squares means 9.80, 95% CI 6.29-13.30) and better quality of life (differences of least squares means 29.86, 95% CI 22.33-37.38). Logistic regression analysis showed a positive effect of the de qi score on facial-nerve function (adjusted OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.09). Among patients with Bell palsy, acupuncture with strong stimulation that elicited de qi had a greater therapeutic effect, and stronger intensity of de qi was associated with the better therapeutic effects. Clinicaltrials.gov no. NCT00685789.

  12. Cardiac effects of granisetron in a prospective crossover randomized dose comparison trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, F B; Yapar, O; Canpolat, C; Akalin, F; Berrak, S G

    2012-10-01

    Cardiac side effects of granisetron have been studied mostly in adult patients that are using cardiotoxic chemotherapeutics. There is limited evidence in pediatric age group and no information in pediatric oncology patients with non-cardiotoxic chemotherapeutics. In this prospective, crossover randomized study, the cardiac side effects of granisetron are compared in pediatric oncology patients who had carboplatin based chemotherapy. They were randomized to receive either 10 or 40 μg kg(-1) dose(-1) of granisetron before each cycle of chemotherapy. We drew blood for creatine phosphokinase (CPK), CPK-muscle band (MB) and Troponin-T before and 24 h after administering granisetron. Electrocardiography (ECG) tracings were taken at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6 and 24 h of granisetron. Twenty-four hours Holter ECG monitorisation was performed after each granisetron infusion. A total of 16 patients (median 8.7 years of age) were treated with weekly consecutive courses of carboplatin. There was bradycardia (p = 0.000) in patients that had granisetron at 40 μg/kg and PR interval was shortened in patients that had granisetron at 10 μg/kg dose (p = 0.021). At both doses of granisetron, QTc interval and dispersion were found to be similar. CPK, CK-MB and Troponin-T values were found to be normal before and 24 h after granisetron infusion. As the first study that has studied cardiac side effects of granisetron in patients that are not using cardiotoxic chemotherapeutics, we conclude that granisetron at 40 μg kg(-1) dose(-1) causes bradycardia only. We have also demonstrated that granisetron does not cause any clinically cardiac side effects either at 10 or 40 μg kg(-1) dose(-1). However, our results should be supported by prospective randomized studies with larger samples of patient groups.

  13. Effectiveness and moderators of the preventive intervention kids in divorce situations: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleboer-Gunnink, Hannah A; Van der Valk, Inge E; Branje, Susan J T; Van Doorn, Muriel D; Deković, Maja

    2015-10-01

    Children of divorced parents have an increased risk of a variety of problems in comparison to children from intact families. Therefore, several intervention programs have been developed directed at children of divorced parents. Yet, empirical data on the effectiveness of these interventions are limited. This study evaluated the school-based, child-directed prevention program Kids In Divorce Situations (KIDS) using a randomized controlled trial. The sample consisted of 156 children randomly assigned at the school level into an experimental (80 children) and control condition (76 children). In addition, 131 mothers and 76 fathers participated in the study. Four assessments took place: a pretest, a posttest, and two follow-up assessments conducted 6 months and 1 year after finishing KIDS. Latent growth analyses demonstrated that the intervention significantly reduced child-reported emotional problems and enhanced child-reported communication with the father and mother-reported communication with the child. The effect sizes ranged from .30-.63. Few moderation effects of gender, time since divorce, or perceived parental conflict on the intervention effects were found. After parental divorce, a limited school-based intervention for children can be efficacious in promoting children's emotional well-being and parent-child communication. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Bayesian Nonparametric Regression Analysis of Data with Random Effects Covariates from Longitudinal Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Ryu, Duchwan

    2010-09-28

    We consider nonparametric regression analysis in a generalized linear model (GLM) framework for data with covariates that are the subject-specific random effects of longitudinal measurements. The usual assumption that the effects of the longitudinal covariate processes are linear in the GLM may be unrealistic and if this happens it can cast doubt on the inference of observed covariate effects. Allowing the regression functions to be unknown, we propose to apply Bayesian nonparametric methods including cubic smoothing splines or P-splines for the possible nonlinearity and use an additive model in this complex setting. To improve computational efficiency, we propose the use of data-augmentation schemes. The approach allows flexible covariance structures for the random effects and within-subject measurement errors of the longitudinal processes. The posterior model space is explored through a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler. The proposed methods are illustrated and compared to other approaches, the "naive" approach and the regression calibration, via simulations and by an application that investigates the relationship between obesity in adulthood and childhood growth curves. © 2010, The International Biometric Society.

  15. The effect of random dopant fluctuation on threshold voltage and drain current variation in junctionless nanotransistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezapour, Arash; Rezapour, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of dopant random fluctuation on threshold voltage and drain current variation in a two-gate nanoscale transistor. We used a quantum-corrected technology computer aided design simulation to run the simulation (10000 randomizations). With this simulation, we could study the effects of varying the dimensions (length and width), and thicknesses of oxide and dopant factors of a transistor on the threshold voltage and drain current in subthreshold region (off) and overthreshold (on). It was found that in the subthreshold region the variability of the drain current and threshold voltage is relatively fixed while in the overthreshold region the variability of the threshold voltage and drain current decreases remarkably, despite the slight reduction of gate voltage diffusion (compared with that of the subthreshold). These results have been interpreted by using previously reported models for threshold current variability, load displacement, and simple analytical calculations. Scaling analysis shows that the variability of the characteristics of this semiconductor increases as the effects of the short channel increases. Therefore, with a slight increase of length and a reduction of width, oxide thickness, and dopant factor, we could correct the effect of the short channel. (paper)

  16. Clinical effects of probiotics containing Bacillus species on gingivitis: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaya, B; Laleman, I; Keceli, S; Ozcelik, O; Cenk Haytac, M; Teughels, W

    2017-06-01

    Lactobacillus spp. and bifidobacteria are the most frequently used probiotics in oral health research. However, although probiotic effects have been suggested for other genera, such as bacilli, no trials are available to describe the effect of bacilli probiotics on gingivitis in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical effects of a bacilli-containing toothpaste, a mouthrinse and a toothbrush cleaner versus a placebo in patients with generalized gingivitis. In this double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, nonsmoking, systemically healthy patients with generalized gingivitis were included. They used a placebo or an experimental probiotic Bacillus subtilis-, Bacillus megaterium- and Bacillus pumulus-containing toothpaste, mouthrinse and toothbrush cleaner for 8 wk. Primary outcome measures of interest were plaque and gingivitis index, and the secondary outcome measures were pocket probing depth and bleeding on probing. Twenty male and 20 female patients were randomized over the two groups. All participants could be included in the final analysis. Although plaque and gingivitis indices were significantly reduced after 8 wk, no intergroup differences could be found at any time point. Also, for the secondary outcome measure, intragroup but no intergroup differences could be detected. No harm or unintended effects were reported by the patients after using the study products. This study did not show any statistically significant differences between a placebo and a bacilli-containing toothpaste, mouthrinse and toothbrush cleaner on gingivitis parameters. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Zahra; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Farrokhian, Alireza; Tagharrobi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an important mental health problem in patients with cardiac disease. Anxiety reduces patients’ quality of life and increases the risk of different cardiac complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial conduced on 68 patients with myocardial infarction hospitalized in coronary care units of a large-scale teaching hospital affiliated to Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran in 2013. By using the block randomization technique, patients were randomly assigned to experimental (33 patients receiving inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma twice a day for two subsequent days) and control (35 patients receiving routine care of study setting including no aromatherapy) groups. At the beginning of study and twenty minutes after each aromatherapy session, anxiety state of patients was assessed using the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed using SPSS v. 16.0. We used Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, independent-samples T-test and repeated measures analysis of variance to analyze the study data. Results: The study groups did not differ significantly regarding baseline anxiety mean and demographic characteristics. However, after the administration of aromatherapy, anxiety mean in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma can reduce anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Consequently, healthcare providers, particularly nurses, can use this strategy to improve postmyocardial infarction anxiety management. PMID:25389481

  18. Effect of Vitamin E on Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Zeinab; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most important limitations of oxaliplatin base regimen, which is the standard for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Evidence has shown that Vitamin E may be protective in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Vitamin E administration on prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer. This was a prospective randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients with colorectal cancer and scheduled to receive oxaliplatin-based regimens were enrolled in this study. Enrolled patients were randomized into two groups. The first group received Vitamin E at a dose of 400 mg daily and the second group observed, until after the sixth course of the oxaliplatin regimen. For oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy assessment, we used the symptom experience diary questionnaire that completed at baseline and after the sixth course of chemotherapy. Only patients with a score of zero at baseline were eligible for this study. Thirty-two patients were randomized to the Vitamin E group and 33 to the control group. There was no difference in the mean peripheral neuropathy score changes (after - before) between two groups, after sixth course of the oxaliplatin base regimen (mean difference [after - before] of Vitamin E group = 6.37 ± 2.85, control group = 6.57 ± 2.94; P = 0.78). Peripheral neuropathy scores were significantly increased after intervention compared with a base line in each group (P peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Effect of intradermal human recombinant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase on random pattern flaps in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Ophir; Westreich, Melvyn; Shalom, Avshalom

    2013-09-01

    Studies have focused on enhancing flap viability using superoxide dismutase (SOD), but only a few used SOD from human origin, and most gave the compound systemically. We evaluated the ability of SOD to improve random skin flap survival using human recombinant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Hr-CuZnSOD) in variable doses, injected intradermally into the flap. Seventy male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups. Cephalic random pattern flaps were elevated on their backs and intradermal injections of different dosages of Hr-CuZnSOD were given 15 minutes before surgery. Flap survival was evaluated by fluorescein fluorescence. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t test statistical analyses were performed. Flap survival in all treated groups was significantly better than in the controls. The beneficial effect of HR-CuZnSOD on flap survival is attained when it is given intradermally into the flap tissue. Theoretically, Hr-CuZnSOD delivered with local anesthetics used in flap elevation may be a valuable clinical tool. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Multilevel covariance regression with correlated random effects in the mean and variance structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Adrian; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2017-09-01

    Multivariate regression methods generally assume a constant covariance matrix for the observations. In case a heteroscedastic model is needed, the parametric and nonparametric covariance regression approaches can be restrictive in the literature. We propose a multilevel regression model for the mean and covariance structure, including random intercepts in both components and allowing for correlation between them. The implied conditional covariance function can be different across clusters as a result of the random effect in the variance structure. In addition, allowing for correlation between the random intercepts in the mean and covariance makes the model convenient for skewedly distributed responses. Furthermore, it permits us to analyse directly the relation between the mean response level and the variability in each cluster. Parameter estimation is carried out via Gibbs sampling. We compare the performance of our model to other covariance modelling approaches in a simulation study. Finally, the proposed model is applied to the RN4CAST dataset to identify the variables that impact burnout of nurses in Belgium. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Neurocognitive effects of neurofeedback in adolescents with ADHD: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Marleen; van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs; Popma, Arne; Bongers, Ilja L; van Boxtel, Geert J M

    2014-05-01

    Neurofeedback aims to reduce symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mainly attention problems. However, the additional influence of neurofeedback over treatment as usual (TAU) on neurocognitive functioning for adolescents with ADHD remains unclear. By using a multicenter parallel randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, male adolescents with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of ADHD (mean age = 16.1 years; range, 12-24) were randomized to receive either a combination of TAU and neurofeedback (n = 45) or TAU (n = 26). Randomization was computer generated and stratified by age group (ages 12 through 15, 16 through 20, and 21 through 24 years). The neurofeedback intervention consisted of approximately 37 sessions over a period of 25 weeks of theta/sensorimotor rhythm training on the vertex (Cz). Primary neurocognitive outcomes included performance parameters derived from the D2 Test of Attention, the Digit Span backward, the Stroop Color-Word Test and the Tower of London, all assessed preintervention and postintervention. Data were collected between December 2009 and July 2012. At postintervention, outcomes of attention and/or motor speed were improved, with faster processing times for both intervention conditions and with medium to large effect sizes (range, ηp2 = .08-.54; P values neurofeedback over TAU was observed. Hence, this study does not provide evidence for using theta/sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback to enhance neurocognitive performance as additional intervention to TAU for adolescents with ADHD symptoms. Trialregister.nl identifier: 1759. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  2. The effectiveness of lifestyle triple P in the Netherlands: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerards, Sanne M P L; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Gubbels, Jessica S; van Buuren, Stef; Hamers, Femke J M; Jansen, Maria W J; van der Goot, Odilia H M; de Vries, Nanne K; Sanders, Matthew R; Kremers, Stef P J

    2015-01-01

    Lifestyle Triple P is a general parenting intervention which focuses on preventing further excessive weight gain in overweight and obese children. The objective of the current study was to assess the effectiveness of the Lifestyle Triple P intervention in the Netherlands. We used a parallel randomized controlled design to test the effectiveness of the intervention. In total, 86 child-parent triads (children 4-8 years old, overweight or obese) were recruited and randomly assigned (allocation ratio 1:1) to the Lifestyle Triple P intervention or the control condition. Parents in the intervention condition received a 14-week intervention consisting of ten 90-minute group sessions and four individual telephone sessions. Primary outcome measure was the children's body composition (BMI z-scores, waist circumference and skinfolds). The research assistant who performed the measurements was blinded for group assignment. Secondary outcome measures were the children's dietary behavior and physical activity level, parenting practices, parental feeding style, parenting style, and parental self-efficacy. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and 4 months (short-term) and 12 months (long-term) after baseline. Multilevel multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the effect of the intervention on primary and secondary outcome measures. No intervention effects were found on children's body composition. Analyses of secondary outcomes showed positive short-term intervention effects on children's soft-drink consumption and parental responsibility regarding physical activity, encouragement to eat, psychological control, and efficacy and satisfaction with parenting. Longer-term intervention effects were found on parent's report of children's time spent on sedentary behavior and playing outside, parental monitoring food intake, and responsibility regarding nutrition. Although the Lifestyle Triple P intervention showed positive effects on some parent reported child

  3. The effectiveness of lifestyle triple P in the Netherlands: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne M P L Gerards

    Full Text Available Lifestyle Triple P is a general parenting intervention which focuses on preventing further excessive weight gain in overweight and obese children. The objective of the current study was to assess the effectiveness of the Lifestyle Triple P intervention in the Netherlands.We used a parallel randomized controlled design to test the effectiveness of the intervention. In total, 86 child-parent triads (children 4-8 years old, overweight or obese were recruited and randomly assigned (allocation ratio 1:1 to the Lifestyle Triple P intervention or the control condition. Parents in the intervention condition received a 14-week intervention consisting of ten 90-minute group sessions and four individual telephone sessions. Primary outcome measure was the children's body composition (BMI z-scores, waist circumference and skinfolds. The research assistant who performed the measurements was blinded for group assignment. Secondary outcome measures were the children's dietary behavior and physical activity level, parenting practices, parental feeding style, parenting style, and parental self-efficacy. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and 4 months (short-term and 12 months (long-term after baseline. Multilevel multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the effect of the intervention on primary and secondary outcome measures.No intervention effects were found on children's body composition. Analyses of secondary outcomes showed positive short-term intervention effects on children's soft-drink consumption and parental responsibility regarding physical activity, encouragement to eat, psychological control, and efficacy and satisfaction with parenting. Longer-term intervention effects were found on parent's report of children's time spent on sedentary behavior and playing outside, parental monitoring food intake, and responsibility regarding nutrition.Although the Lifestyle Triple P intervention showed positive effects on some parent reported

  4. Effect of an Immersive Preoperative Virtual Reality Experience on Patient Reported Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Calnan, Daniel; Simmons, Nathan; MacKenzie, Todd A; Kakoulides, George

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to a virtual reality (VR) environment preoperatively on patient-reported outcomes for surgical operations. There is a scarcity of well-developed quality improvement initiatives targeting patient satisfaction. We performed a randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing cranial and spinal operations in a tertiary referral center. Patients underwent a 1:1 randomization to an immersive preoperative VR experience or standard preoperative experience stratified on type of operation. The primary outcome measures were the Evaluation du Vecu de l'Anesthesie Generale (EVAN-G) score and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information (APAIS) score, as markers of the patient's experience during the surgical encounter. During the study period, a total of 127 patients (mean age 55.3 years, 41.9% females) underwent randomization. The average EVAN-G score was 84.3 (standard deviation, SD, 6.4) after VR, and 64.3 (SD, 11.7) after standard preoperative experience (difference, 20.0; 95% confidence interval, CI, 16.6-23.3). Exposure to an immersive VR experience also led to higher APAIS score (difference, 29.9; 95% CI, 24.5-35.2). In addition, VR led to lower preoperative VAS stress score (difference, -41.7; 95% CI, -33.1 to -50.2), and higher preoperative VAS preparedness (difference, 32.4; 95% CI, 24.9-39.8), and VAS satisfaction (difference, 33.2; 95% CI, 25.4-41.0) scores. No association was identified with VAS stress score (difference, -1.6; 95% CI, -13.4 to 10.2). In a randomized controlled trial, we demonstrated that patients exposed to preoperative VR had increased satisfaction during the surgical encounter. Harnessing the power of this technology, hospitals can create an immersive environment that minimizes stress, and enhances the perioperative experience.

  5. Two-level mixed modeling of longitudinal pedigree data for genetic association analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Q.

    2013-01-01

    of follow-up. Approaches have been proposed to integrate kinship correlation into the mixed effect models to explicitly model the genetic relationship which have been proven as an efficient way for dealing with sample clustering in pedigree data. Although useful for adjusting relatedness in the mixed...... assess the genetic associations with the mean level and the rate of change in a phenotype both with kinship correlation integrated in the mixed effect models. We apply our method to longitudinal pedigree data to estimate the genetic effects on systolic blood pressure measured over time in large pedigrees......Genetic association analysis on complex phenotypes under a longitudinal design involving pedigrees encounters the problem of correlation within pedigrees which could affect statistical assessment of the genetic effects on both the mean level of the phenotype and its rate of change over the time...

  6. Effect of acupuncture on insomnia following stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Yin, Xuan; Soto-Aguilar, Francisca; Liu, Yiping; Yin, Ping; Wu, Junyi; Zhu, Bochang; Li, Wentao; Lao, Lixing; Xu, Shifen

    2016-11-16

    The incidence, mortality, and prevalence of stroke are high in China. Stroke is commonly associated with insomnia; both insomnia and stroke have been effectively treated with acupuncture for a long time. The aim of this proposed trial is to assess the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on insomnia following stroke. This proposed study is a single-center, single-blinded (patient-assessor-blinded), parallel-group randomized controlled trial. We will randomly assign 60 participants with insomnia following stroke into two groups in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention group will undergo traditional acupuncture that achieves the De-qi sensation, and the control group will receive sham acupuncture without needle insertion. The same acupoints (DU20, DU24, EX-HN3, EX-HN22, HT7, and SP6) will be used in both groups. Treatments will be given to all participants three times a week for the subsequent 4 weeks. The primary outcome will be the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The secondary outcomes will be: the Insomnia Severity Index; sleep efficacy, sleep awakenings, and total sleep time recorded via actigraphy; the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale; the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life score; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The use of estazolam will be permitted and regulated under certain conditions. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 2 weeks after treatment commencement, 4 weeks after treatment commencement, and at the 8-week follow-up. This proposed study will contribute to expanding knowledge about acupuncture treatment for insomnia following stroke. This will be a high-quality randomized controlled trial with strict methodology and few design deficits. It will investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture as an alternative treatment for insomnia following stroke. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry identifier: ChiCTR-IIC-16008382 . Registered on 28 April 2016.

  7. Coordinate based random effect size meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tench, C R; Tanasescu, Radu; Constantinescu, C S; Auer, D P; Cottam, W J

    2017-06-01

    Low power in neuroimaging studies can make them difficult to interpret, and Coordinate based meta-analysis (CBMA) may go some way to mitigating this issue. CBMA has been used in many analyses to detect where published functional MRI or voxel-based morphometry studies testing similar hypotheses report significant summary results (coordinates) consistently. Only the reported coordinates and possibly t statistics are analysed, and statistical significance of clusters is determined by coordinate density. Here a method of performing coordinate based random effect size meta-analysis and meta-regression is introduced. The algorithm (ClusterZ) analyses both coordinates and reported t statistic or Z score, standardised by the number of subjects. Statistical significance is determined not by coordinate density, but by a random effects meta-analyses of reported effects performed cluster-wise using standard statistical methods and taking account of censoring inherent in the published summary results. Type 1 error control is achieved using the false cluster discovery rate (FCDR), which is based on the false discovery rate. This controls both the family wise error rate under the null hypothesis that coordinates are randomly drawn from a standard stereotaxic space, and the proportion of significant clusters that are expected under the null. Such control is necessary to avoid propagating and even amplifying the very issues motivating the meta-analysis in the first place. ClusterZ is demonstrated on both numerically simulated data and on real data from reports of grey matter loss in multiple sclerosis (MS) and syndromes suggestive of MS, and of painful stimulus in healthy controls. The software implementation is available to download and use freely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of Statistical Random-Effects Linear Models in Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francisco J; Yeh, Hung-Wen; de Leon, Jose

    2012-03-01

    Some empirical studies and recent developments in pharmacokinetic theory suggest that statistical random-effects linear models are valuable tools that allow describing simultaneously patient populations as a whole and patients as individuals. This remarkable characteristic indicates that these models may be useful in the development of personalized medicine, which aims at finding treatment regimes that are appropriate for particular patients, not just appropriate for the average patient. In fact, published developments show that random-effects linear models may provide a solid theoretical framework for drug dosage individualization in chronic diseases. In particular, individualized dosages computed with these models by means of an empirical Bayesian approach may produce better results than dosages computed with some methods routinely used in therapeutic drug monitoring. This is further supported by published empirical and theoretical findings that show that random effects linear models may provide accurate representations of phase III and IV steady-state pharmacokinetic data, and may be useful for dosage computations. These models have applications in the design of clinical algorithms for drug dosage individualization in chronic diseases; in the computation of dose correction factors; computation of the minimum number of blood samples from a patient that are necessary for calculating an optimal individualized drug dosage in therapeutic drug monitoring; measure of the clinical importance of clinical, demographic, environmental or genetic covariates; study of drug-drug interactions in clinical settings; the implementation of computational tools for web-site-based evidence farming; design of pharmacogenomic studies; and in the development of a pharmacological theory of dosage individualization.

  9. QT-interval effects of methadone, levomethadyl, and buprenorphine in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedam, Erich F; Bigelow, George E; Johnson, Rolley E; Nuzzo, Paul A; Haigney, Mark C P

    2007-12-10

    Levomethadyl acetate, methadone hydrochloride, and buprenorphine hydrochloride are equally effective treatments for opioid dependence. Each blocks the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-associated channel in vitro and represents a risk for QT prolongation. To compare the effects of 3 known hERG-associated channel blockers on the corrected QT (QTc), we conducted a randomized, controlled trial of opioid-addicted subjects. We analyzed 12-lead electrocardiograms collected at baseline and every 4 weeks from 165 opioid-addicted participants in a 17-week randomized double-blind clinical trial of equally effective doses of levomethadyl, methadone, and buprenorphine at a major referral center. Analyses were limited to the 154 patients with a normal baseline QTc = (QT/ radical R-R) who had at least 1 subsequent in-treatment electrocardiogram. Patients were randomized to receive treatment with levomethadyl, methadone, or buprenorphine (hereinafter, levomethadyl, methadone, and buprenorphine groups, respectively). The prespecified end points were a QTc greater than 470 milliseconds in men (or >490 milliseconds in women), or an increase from baseline in QTc greater than 60 milliseconds. Baseline QTc was similar in the 3 groups. The levomethadyl and methadone groups were significantly more likely to manifest a QTc greater than 470 or 490 milliseconds (28% for the levomethadyl group vs 23% for the methadone group vs 0% for the buprenorphine group; P methadone group [odds ratio, 8.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-36.4]) compared with the buprenorphine group (2% of subjects; P methadone remained fixed over at least 8 weeks, the QTc continued to increase progressively over time (P = .08 for the levomethadyl group, P = .01 for the methadone group). Buprenorphine is associated with less QTc prolongation than levomethadyl or methadone and may be a safe alternative.

  10. Cognitive effects of calligraphy therapy for older people: a randomized controlled trial in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok TCY

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Timothy CY Kwok1,2, Xue Bai1,3, Henry SR Kao4,5, Jessie CY Li1, Florence KY Ho11Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; 3Department of Social Work and Social Administration; 4Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 5Department of Psychology, Fu Jen Catholic University, TaiwanBackground: This pilot study investigated the effects of calligraphy therapy on cognitive function in older Hong Kong Chinese people with mild cognitive impairment.Methods: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial was carried out in a sample of 31 adults aged 65 years or older with mild cognitive impairment. They were randomly assigned to receive either intensive calligraphy training led by a trained research assistant for eight weeks (calligraphy group, n = 14 or no calligraphy treatment (control group, n = 17. Participants' cognitive function was assessed by the Chinese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (CMMSE before and after calligraphy treatment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and paired samples t-tests were used to analyze the data.Results: A significant interaction effect of time and intervention was detected [F (1, 29 = 9.11, P = 0.005, η2= 0.24]. The calligraphy group was found to have a prominent increase in CMMSE global score, and scores in the cognitive areas of orientation, attention, and calculation after two months (∆M = 2.36, P < 0.01, whereas their counterparts in the control group experienced a decline in CMMSE score (∆M = -0.41, P < 0.05.Conclusion: Calligraphy therapy was effective for enhancing cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment and should be incorporated as part of routine programs in both community and residential care settings.Keywords: calligraphy therapy, Chinese elderly, mild cognitive impairment, cognitive function, randomized controlled trial

  11. Postural stability effects of random vibration at the feet of construction workers in simulated elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, P; Hsiao, H; Powers, J; Ammons, D; Kau, T; Amendola, A

    2011-07-01

    The risk of falls from height on a construction site increases under conditions which degrade workers' postural control. At elevation, workers depend heavily on sensory information from their feet to maintain balance. The study tested two hypotheses: "sensory enhancement"--sub-sensory (undetectable) random mechanical vibrations at the plantar surface of the feet can improve worker's balance at elevation; and "sensory suppression"--supra-sensory (detectable) random mechanical vibrations can have a degrading effect on balance in the same experimental settings. Six young (age 20-35) and six aging (age 45-60) construction workers were tested while standing in standard and semi-tandem postures on instrumented gel insoles. The insoles applied sub- or supra-sensory levels of random mechanical vibrations to the feet. The tests were conducted in a surround-screen virtual reality system, which simulated a narrow plank at elevation on a construction site. Upper body kinematics was assessed with a motion-measurement system. Postural stability effects were evaluated by conventional and statistical mechanics sway measures, as well as trunk angular displacement parameters. Analysis of variance did not confirm the "sensory enhancement" hypothesis, but provided evidence for the "sensory suppression" hypothesis. The supra-sensory vibration had a destabilizing effect, which was considerably stronger in the semi-tandem posture and affected most of the sway variables. Sensory suppression associated with elevated vibration levels on a construction site may increase the danger of losing balance. Construction workers at elevation, e.g., on a beam or narrow plank might be at increased risk of fall if they can detect vibrations under their feet. To reduce the possibility of losing balance, mechanical vibration to supporting structures used as walking/working surfaces should be minimized when performing construction tasks at elevation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Coherent light scattering of heterogeneous randomly rough films and effective medium in the theory of electromagnetic wave multiple scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berginc, G [THALES, 2 avenue Gay-Lussac 78995 ELANCOURT (France)

    2013-11-30

    We have developed a general formalism based on Green's functions to calculate the coherent electromagnetic field scattered by a random medium with rough boundaries. The approximate expression derived makes it possible to determine the effective permittivity, which is generalised for a layer of an inhomogeneous random medium with different types of particles and bounded with randomly rough interfaces. This effective permittivity describes the coherent propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a random medium with randomly rough boundaries. We have obtained an expression, which contains the Maxwell – Garnett formula at the low-frequency limit, and the Keller formula; the latter has been proved to be in good agreement with experiments for particles whose dimensions are larger than a wavelength. (coherent light scattering)

  13. Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Different Weekly Frequencies of Pilates for Chronic Low Back Pain: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Gisela Cristiane; Moura, Katherinne Ferro; Franco, Yuri Rafael dos Santos; Oliveira, Naiane Teixeira Bastos de; Amaral, Diego Diulgeroglo Vicco; Branco, Amanda Nery Castelo; Silva, Maria Liliane da; Lin, Christine; Cabral, Cristina Maria Nunes

    2016-03-01

    The Pilates method has been recommended to patients with low back pain, but the evidence on effectiveness is inconclusive. In addition, there is still no evidence for the cost-effectiveness of this method or for the ideal number of sessions to achieve the highest effectiveness. The aim of this study will be to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Pilates method with different weekly frequencies in the treatment of patients with nonspecific low back pain. This is a randomized controlled trial with blinded assessor. This study will be conducted at a physical therapy clinic in São Paulo, Brazil. Two hundred ninety-six patients with nonspecific low back pain between the ages of 18 and 80 years will be assessed and randomly allocated to 4 groups (n=74 patients per group). All groups will receive an educational booklet. The booklet group will not receive additional exercises. Pilates group 1 will follow a Pilates-based program once a week, Pilates group 2 will follow the same program twice a week, and Pilates group 3 will follow the same program 3 times a week. The intervention will last 6 weeks. A blinded assessor will evaluate pain, quality-adjusted life-years, general and specific disability, kinesiophobia, pain catastrophizing, and global perceived effect 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after randomization. Therapists and patients will not be blinded. This will be the first study to investigate different weekly frequencies of treatment sessions for nonspecific low back pain. The results of this study will contribute to a better definition of treatment programs for this population. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  14. Effect of a data buffer on the recorded distribution of time intervals for random events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, J C [Polytechnic of North London (UK)

    1976-03-15

    The use of a data buffer enables the distribution of the time intervals between events to be studied for times less than the recording system dead-time but the usual negative exponential distribution for random events has to be modified. The theory for this effect is developed for an n-stage buffer followed by an asynchronous recorder. Results are evaluated for the values of n from 1 to 5. In the language of queueing theory the system studied is of type M/D/1/n+1, i.e. with constant service time and a finite number of places.

  15. Effectiveness of the random sequential absorption algorithm in the analysis of volume elements with nanoplatelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontefisso, Alessandro; Zappalorto, Michele; Quaresimin, Marino

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a study of the Random Sequential Absorption (RSA) algorithm in the generation of nanoplatelet Volume Elements (VEs) is carried out. The effect of the algorithm input parameters on the reinforcement distribution is studied through the implementation of statistical tools, showing...... that the platelet distribution is systematically affected by these parameters. The consequence is that a parametric analysis of the VE input parameters may be biased by hidden differences in the filler distribution. The same statistical tools used in the analysis are implemented in a modified RSA algorithm...

  16. Effectiveness of horticultural therapy: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Hiroharu; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Yamada, Minoru; Park, Hyuntae; Okuizumi, Hiroyasu; Honda, Takuya; Okada, Shinpei; Park, Sang-Jun; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Abe, Takafumi; Handa, Shuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiteru

    2014-10-01

    To summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of horticultural therapy (HT). Studies were eligible if they were RCTs. Studies included one treatment group in which HT was applied. We searched the following databases from 1990 up to August 20, 2013: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Ichushi-Web, GHL, WPRIM, and PsyclNFO. We also searched all Cochrane Database and Campbell Systematic Reviews up to September 20, 2013. Four studies met all inclusion criteria. The language of all eligible publications was English and Korean. Target diseases and/or symptoms were dementia, severe mental illness such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression, frail elderly in nursing home, and hemiplegic patients after stroke. These studies showed significant effectiveness in one or more outcomes for mental health and behavior. However, our review especially detected omissions of the following descriptions: method used to generate randomization, concealment, blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. In addition, the results of this study suggested that the RCTs conducted have been of relatively low quality. Although there was insufficient evidence in the studies of HT due to poor methodological and reporting quality and heterogeneity, HT may be an effective treatment for mental and behavioral disorders such as dementia, schizophrenia, depression, and terminal-care for cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effectiveness of preemptive lysine clonixinate in tooth extraction: A randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aravena

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylaxis with single-dose analgesic clonixinate lysine (CL 125mg in patients undergoing tooth extraction. Methods: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Were included in the study patients ASA I and II with dental extraction indication in the city of Valdivia, Chile in October 2012. Were randomly assigned in two groups: the treatment group received a doses of 125mg of CL fifteen minutes before the surgery, and a control group who received placebo. Both groups used a CL as a rescue analgesic. Using a survey, patients reported the degree of pain via a visual analog scale (VAS during the first day, at 24 and 48 hours after surgery. In addition, registered the number of CL capsules consumed as a ransom for 3 days after the surgery. We compared the analgesic effect observed in (VAS and the number of additional analgesic consumption between the two groups using t-test (p<0.05. Results: Fifty-four patients were operated and there was no statistically significant difference between the pain scores between the two groups. Premedication patients reported the use of equal number of rescue capsules comparing with the control group. Conclusion: CL analgesic prophylaxis proved no more effective in reducing pain after tooth extraction when comparing to the use of placebo in a postoperative doses.

  18. Effect of flashlight guidance on manual ventilation performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A randomized controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Beom, Jin Ho; You, Je Sung; Cho, Junho; Min, In Kyung; Chung, Hyun Soo

    2018-01-01

    Several auditory-based feedback devices have been developed to improve the quality of ventilation performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but their effectiveness has not been proven in actual CPR situations. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of visual flashlight guidance in maintaining high-quality ventilation performance. We conducted a simulation-based, randomized, parallel trial including 121 senior medical students. All participants were randomized to perform ventilation during 2 minutes of CPR with or without flashlight guidance. For each participant, we measured mean ventilation rate as a primary outcome and ventilation volume, inspiration velocity, and ventilation interval as secondary outcomes using a computerized device system. Mean ventilation rate did not significantly differ between flashlight guidance and control groups (P = 0.159), but participants in the flashlight guidance group exhibited significantly less variation in ventilation rate than participants in the control group (Pguidance group. Our results demonstrate that flashlight guidance is effective in maintaining a constant ventilation rate and interval. If confirmed by further studies in clinical practice, flashlight guidance could be expected to improve the quality of ventilation performed during CPR.

  19. Clinical Effects of Dry Needling Among Asymptomatic Individuals With Hamstring Tightness: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kathleen; Bradley, Claire; Hofman, Alan; Koester, Rob; Roche, Fenella; Shields, Annalise; Frierson, Elizabeth; Rossi, Ainsley; Johanson, Marie

    2017-11-01

    Randomized controlled trial. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dry needling on hamstring extensibility and functional performance tests among asymptomatic individuals with hamstring muscle tightness. Dry needling has been shown to increase range of motion in the upper quarter and may have similar effects in the lower quarter. 27 subjects with hamstring extensibility deficits were randomly assigned to side of treatment (dominant or nondominant) and group (blunt needling or dry needling). The first session included measurement of hamstring extensibility and performance on 4 unilateral hop tests, instruction in home hamstring stretching exercises and needling distal to the ischial tuberosity and midbellies of the medial and lateral hamstrings. A second session, 3-5 days following the first session, included outcome measures and a second needling intervention, and a third session, 4-6 weeks following the first session, included outcome measures only. A 2 × 3 × 2 ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the data. Hamstring extensibility showed a significant side × time interaction (P < .05). The single hop for distance, timed 6-meter hop, and the crossover hop test had a significant main effect of time (P < .05). The triple hop for distance showed a significant side × time × group interaction (P < .05). It does not appear dry needling results in increased extensibility beyond that of stretching alone in asymptomatic individuals. Our study findings suggest that dry needling may improve certain dimensions of functional performance, although no clear conclusion can be made. Intervention, level 2b.

  20. Effect of tranexamic acid on gross hematuria: A pilot randomized clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharamzadeh, Payman; Ojaghihaghighi, Seyedhossein; Amjadi, Mohsen; Rahmani, Farzad; Farjamnia, Arezoo

    2017-12-01

    Local forms of the tranexamic acid have been effective in treating many haemorrhagic cases. So that the aim of the current study is to assess the effectiveness of local tranexamic acid in controlling painless hematuria in patients referred to the emergency department. This is a randomized, double-blind clinical trial study, which was conducted on 50 patients with complaints of painless lower urinary tract bleeding during June 2014 and August 2015. The patients were randomly divided into two groups of 25 people each, one group receiving tranexamic acid and the other given a placebo. During bladder irrigation, local tranexamic acid and the placebo were injected into the bladder via Foley catheter. Patients were examined over 24h in terms of the amount of normal saline serum used for irrigation, level of hemoglobin, and blood in urine. In this study it was observed that consumption of tranexamic acid significantly decreased the volume of used serum for bladder irrigation (P=0.041) and the microscopic status of urine decreased significantly in terms of the hematuria after 24h (P=0.026). However, the rate of packed cell transfusion and drop in hemoglobin levels showed no significant difference in both groups of patients (P˃0.05). The results of this study showed that tranexamic acid could significantly reduce the volume of required serum for bladder irrigation to clear urine, but it had no significant effect on the drop in serum hemoglobin levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of guided relaxation and imagery on falls self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Newton, Roberta A; Sachs, Michael L; Glutting, Joseph J; Glanz, Karen

    2012-06-01

    To examine the effects of guided relaxation and imagery (GRI) on improvement in falls self-efficacy in older adults who report having a fear of falling. Randomized, controlled trial with allocation to GRI or guided relaxation with music of choice. General community. Ninety-one men and women aged 60 to 92. Participants were randomized to listen to a GRI audio compact disk (intervention group) or a guided relaxation audio compact disk and music of choice (control group) twice a week for 6 weeks for 10 minutes per session. Primary outcome measure was the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). Secondary outcome measures were the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LTEQ) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) mobility test. GRI participants reported greater improvements on the Short FES-I (P = .002) and LTEQ (P = .001) scores and shorter time on the TUG (P = .002) than the guided relaxation and music-of-choice group. GRI was more effective at increasing falls self-efficacy and self-reported leisure time exercise and reducing times on a simple mobility test than was guided relaxation with music of choice. GRI is an effective, simple, low-cost tool for older adults to improve falls self-efficacy and leisure time exercise behaviors. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Unexpected Effects of a System-Distributed Mobile Application in Maternity Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J W; Womack, Jasmyne J; Rider, Heather A; Seehusen, Angela B; Conner, Stephen J; Lauters, Rebecca A; Hodge, Joshua A

    2018-06-01

    As pregnant mothers increasingly engage in shared decision making regarding prenatal decisions, such as induction of labor, the patient's level of activation may influence pregnancy outcomes. One potential tool to increase patient activation in the clinical setting is mobile applications. However, research is limited in comparing mobile apps with other modalities of patient education and engagement tools. This study was designed to test the effectiveness of a mobile app as a replacement for a spiral notebook guide as a patient education and engagement tool in the prenatal clinical setting. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Women's Health Clinic and Family Health Clinic of three hospitals. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance was used to test intervention effects in the study sample of 205 patients. Mothers used a mobile app interface to more frequently record information about their pregnancy; however, across time, mothers using a mobile app reported a significant decrease in patient activation. The unexpected negative effects in the group of patients randomized to the mobile app prompt these authors to recommend that health systems pause before distributing their own version of mobile apps that may decrease patient activation. Mobile apps can be inherently empowering and engaging, but how a system encourages their use may ultimately determine their adoption and success.

  3. Effects of music on physiological and behavioral responses of premature infants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Zahra; Eskandari, Narges; Ahmari Tehran, Hoda; Eshagh Hossaini, Seyed Kamal; Sangi, Sareh

    2013-08-01

    Despite persuasive theories about the beneficial effects of music and singing in developmental care for premature infants, few small studies are available in this regard. We conducted this study to investigate the physiological and behavioral responses of premature infants to recorded lullaby music and silence. In a randomized controlled trial, 90 premature infants in the neonatal care unit of a hospital in Qom (Iran) were randomly allocated to intervention (lullaby and silence) or control groups. Lullaby music was played via headphones at a volume of 50-60 dB. In the silence group, headphones were placed on the infants' ears while no music was played. The three groups were surveyed for physiological responses including oxygen saturation, respiratory and heart rates, and behavioral states every five minutes before, during, and after the intervention. The three groups were not significantly different in terms of mean values of respiratory and heart rates, oxygen saturation, and behavioral states of infants. Similarly, no significant within group differences in respiratory and heart rates, oxygen saturation, and behavioral states were observed at different times. Our findings did not support the beneficial effects of music for premature infants. However, music is a noninvasive, non-pharmaceutical, and relatively low-cost intervention that can be implemented at infants' bedside. Thus further research is warranted to determine whether the effects noted in previous studies can be consistently replicated in diverse settings and with diverse groups of preterm infants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Pentoxifylline on Microalbuminuria in Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Shahidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pentoxifylline is a nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-inflammatory properties. Human studies have proved its antiproteinuric effect in patients with glomerular diseases, but this study was designed to assess the effects of add-on pentoxifylline to available treatment on reduction of microalbuminuria in diabetic patients without glomerular diseases. Methods. In a double-blind placebo-controlled, randomized study we evaluated the influence of pentoxifylline on microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients. 40 diabetic patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of more than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 in eight weeks and microalbuminuria were randomized to two groups which will receive pentoxifylline 1200 mg/day or placebo added to regular medications for 6 months. albuminuria; eGFR was evaluated at three- and six-month follow-up period. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. At six months, the mean estimated GFR and albuminuria were not different between two groups at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Trend of albumin to creatinine ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and eGFR in both groups were decreased, but no significant differences were noted between two groups (P value > 0.05. Conclusion. Pentoxifylline has not a significant additive antimicroalbuminuric effect compared with placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes with early stage of kidney disease; however, further clinical investigations are necessary to be done.

  5. Random reward priming is task-contingent: The robustness of the 1-trial reward priming effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árni Gunnar Ásgeirsson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Consistent financial reward of particular features influences the allocation of visual attention in many ways. More surprising are 1-trial reward priming effects on attention where reward schedules are random and reward on one trial influences attentional allocation on the next. Those findings are thought to reflect that rewarded features become more salient than unrewarded ones on the subsequent trial. Here we attempt to conceptually replicate this effect, testing its generalizability. In three versions of an analogous paradigm to the additional singleton paradigm involving singleton search for a Gabor patch of odd spatial frequency we found no evidence of reward priming, while we only partially replicate the reward priming in the exact original paradigm tested by Hickey and colleagues. The results cast doubt on the proposal that random reward enhances salience, suggested in the original papers, and highlight the need for a more nuanced account. In many other paradigms reward effects have been found to progress gradually, becoming stronger as they build up, and we argue that for robust reward priming, reward schedules need to be more consistent than in the original 1-trial reward priming paradigm.

  6. Effect of botulinum toxin A and nitroglycerin on random skin flap survival in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Kourosh; Tabatabaie, Omid Reza; Salehifar, Ebrahim; Amanlou, Massoud; Khorasani, Ghasemali

    2016-01-01

    A suitable pharmacological substitute for the well-established surgical delay technique for random skin flaps to increase viability has been elusive. To evaluate the effects of nitroglycerin and botulinum toxin type A on random flap survival in a rat model. The present controlled experimental study was performed in the four groups of rats. One week after intervention in each group, the flap was raised and kept in situ, and flap necrosis was evaluated through follow-up. Group 1 received intradermal botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) and topical nitroglycerin 2%; group 2 received BTX-A and topical Vaseline (Unilever, USA); group 3 received topical nitroglycerin and intradermal normal saline; and group 4 received topical Vaseline and intradermal normal saline. BTX-A reduced the area of necrosis compared with control (24% versus 56% respectively; P<0.001). Nitroglycerin application was associated with a trend toward improved flap viability (42% versus 56%; P=0.059). The combination of topical nitroglycerin and BTX-A, compared with Vaseline and BTX-A, was associated with decreased flap necrosis (16.1% versus 24%, respectively), although it was not statistically significant (P=0.45). BTX-A was effective in reducing distal flap necrosis. The effect of BTX-A was significantly more pronounced than nitroglycerin ointment.

  7. The effect of different types of music on patients' preoperative anxiety: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğraş, Gülay Altun; Yıldırım, Güven; Yüksel, Serpil; Öztürkçü, Yusuf; Kuzdere, Mustafa; Öztekin, Seher Deniz

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effect of three different types of music on patients' preoperative anxiety. This randomized controlled trial included 180 patients who were randomly divided into four groups. While the control group didn't listen to music, the experimental groups respectively listened to natural sounds, Classical Turkish or Western Music for 30 min. The State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and cortisol levels were checked. The post-music STAI-S, SBP, DBP, HR and cortisol levels of the patients in music groups were significantly lower than pre-music time. All types of music decreased STAI-S, SBP, and cortisol levels; additionally natural sounds reduced DBP; Classical Turkish Music also decreased DBP, and HR. All types of music had an effect on reducing patients' preoperative anxiety, and listening to Classical Turkish Music was particularly the most effective one. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of a model to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of randomly packed fusion pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    In our precious study, a prediction model, which calculates the effective thermal conductivity k{sub eff} of mono-sized pebble beds, has been developed and validated. Based on this model, here the effects of these influencing factors such as pebble size, thermal radiation, contact area, filling gas, gas flow, gas pressure, etc. on the k{sub eff} of randomly packed fusion pebble beds are studied and analyzed. The pebble beds investigated include Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}O, Be and BeO pebble beds. In the current study, many important and meaningful conclusions are derived and some of them are similar to the existing research results. Particularly, some critters that under which conditions the effect of some influencing factors can be neglected or should be considered are also presented.

  9. A prospective randomized study of the effectiveness of aromatherapy for relief of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Nancy S; McCarthy, Mary S; Pierce, Roslyn M

    2014-02-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a major concern for patients having surgery under general anesthesia as it causes subjective distress along with increased complications and delays in discharge from the hospital. Aromatherapy represents a complementary and alternative therapy for the management of PONV. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of aromatherapy (QueaseEase, Soothing Scents, Inc, Enterprise, AL) versus an unscented inhalant in relieving PONV. One hundred twenty-one patients with postoperative nausea were randomized into a treatment group receiving an aromatic inhaler and a control group receiving a placebo inhaler to evaluate the effectiveness of aromatherapy. Initial and follow-up nausea assessment scores in both treatment and placebo groups decreased significantly (P aromatherapy was significantly higher in the treatment group (P Aromatherapy was favorably received by most patients and represents an effective treatment option for postoperative nausea. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Random Intercept and Random Slope 2-Level Multilevel Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan Ahmad Khan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Random intercept model and random intercept & random slope model carrying two-levels of hierarchy in the population are presented and compared with the traditional regression approach. The impact of students’ satisfaction on their grade point average (GPA was explored with and without controlling teachers influence. The variation at level-1 can be controlled by introducing the higher levels of hierarchy in the model. The fanny movement of the fitted lines proves variation of student grades around teachers.

  11. Effect of a tailored physical activity intervention delivered in general practice settings: results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, van E.M.F.; Poppel - Bruinvels, van M.N.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Paw, M.J.M. Chin A; Calfas, K.J.; Mechelen, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effectiveness of a minimal intervention physical activity strategy (physician-based assessment and counseling for exercise [PACE]) applied in general practice settings in the Netherlands. METHODS: Randomization took place at the general practice level. Participants were

  12. Effect of a tailored physical activity intervention delivered in general practice settings: results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sluijs, E.M.F.; van Poppel-Bruinvels, M.N.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Calfas, K.J.; van Mechelen, W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of a minimal intervention physical activity strategy (physician-based assessment and counseling for exercise [PACE]) applied in general practice settings in the Netherlands. Methods. Randomization took place at the general practice level. Participants were

  13. Effectiveness of Shockwave Treatment Combined With Eccentric Training for Patellar Tendinopathy : A Double-Blinded Randomized Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Karin M; Zwerver, Johannes; Backx, Frank J G; Steeneken, Victor; Rayer, Stephan; Groenenboom, Petra; Moen, Maarten H

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined treatment of focused shockwave therapy (ESWT) and eccentric training compared with sham-shockwave therapy (placebo) and eccentric training in participants with patellar tendinopathy (PT) after 24 weeks. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.

  14. Effectiveness of Shockwave Treatment Combined With Eccentric Training for Patellar Tendinopathy : A Double-Blinded Randomized Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Karin M.; Zwerver, Johannes; Backx, Frank J. G.; Steeneken, Victor; Rayer, Stephan; Groenenboom, Petra; Moen, Maarten H.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined treatment of focused shockwave therapy (ESWT) and eccentric training compared with sham-shockwave therapy (placebo) and eccentric training in participants with patellar tendinopathy (PT) after 24 weeks. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.

  15. Results of a multicenter randomized controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness of schema therapy for personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bamelis, L.L.M.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; Spinhoven, P.; Arntz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the effectiveness of 50 sessions of schema therapy with clarification-oriented psychotherapy and with treatment as usual among patients with cluster C, paranoid, histrionic, or narcissistic personality disorder. Method: A multicenter randomized controlled trial, with

  16. Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effects of CCTV Training on Quality of Life, Depression, and Adaptation to Vision Loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaff, M.C.; van Nispen, R.M.A.; Knol, D.L.; Ringens, P.J.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE. In addition to performance-based measures, visionrelated quality of life (QOL) and other subjective measures of psychosocial functioning are considered important outcomes of training in the visually impaired. In a multicenter, masked, randomized controlled trial, subjective effects of

  17. Does High School Facility Quality Affect Student Achievement? A Two-Level Hierarchical Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Alex J.; Urick, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to isolate the independent effects of high school facility quality on student achievement using a large, nationally representative U.S. database of student achievement and school facility quality. Prior research on linking school facility quality to student achievement has been mixed. Studies that relate overall…

  18. The Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Lamotrigine in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mike J; Sanatinia, Rahil; Barrett, Barbara; Cunningham, Gillian; Dale, Oliver; Ganguli, Poushali; Lawrence-Smith, Geoff; Leeson, Verity; Lemonsky, Fenella; Lykomitrou, Georgia; Montgomery, Alan A; Morriss, Richard; Munjiza, Jasna; Paton, Carol; Skorodzien, Iwona; Singh, Vineet; Tan, Wei; Tyrer, Peter; Reilly, Joseph G

    2018-04-06

    The authors examined whether lamotrigine is a clinically effective and cost-effective treatment for people with borderline personality disorder. This was a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Between July 2013 and November 2016, the authors recruited 276 people age 18 or over who met diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder. Individuals with coexisting bipolar affective disorder or psychosis, those already taking a mood stabilizer, and women at risk of pregnancy were excluded. A web-based randomization service was used to allocate participants randomly in a 1:1 ratio to receive either an inert placebo or up to 400 mg/day of lamotrigine. The primary outcome measure was score on the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder (ZAN-BPD) at 52 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included depressive symptoms, deliberate self-harm, social functioning, health-related quality of life, resource use and costs, side effects of treatment, and adverse events. A total of 195 (70.6%) participants were followed up at 52 weeks, at which point 49 (36%) of those in the lamotrigine group and 58 (42%) of those in the placebo group were taking study medication. The mean ZAN-BPD score was 11.3 (SD=6.6) among those in the lamotrigine group and 11.5 (SD=7.7) among those in the placebo group (adjusted difference in means=0.1, 95% CI=-1.8, 2.0). There was no evidence of any differences in secondary outcomes. Costs of direct care were similar in the two groups. The results suggest that treating people with borderline personality disorder with lamotrigine is not a clinically effective or cost-effective use of resources.

  19. The Effects of Positive or Neutral Communication during Acupuncture for Relaxing Effects: A Sham-Controlled Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelie Rosén

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The link between patient-clinician communication and its effect on clinical outcomes is an important clinical issue that is yet to be elucidated. Objective. Investigating if communication type (positive or neutral about the expected treatment outcome affected (i participants’ expectations and (ii short-term relaxation effects in response to genuine or sham acupuncture and investigating if expectations were related to outcome. Methods. Healthy volunteers (n=243, mean age of 42 were randomized to one treatment with genuine or sham acupuncture. Within groups, participants were randomized to positive or neutral communication, regarding expected treatment effects. Visual Analogue Scales (0–100 millimeters were used to measure treatment expectations and relaxation, directly before and after treatment. Results. Participants in the positive communication group reported higher treatment expectancy, compared to the neutral communication group (md 12 versus 6 mm, p=0.002. There was no difference in relaxation effects between acupuncture groups or between communication groups. Participants with high baseline expectancy perceived greater improvement in relaxation, compared to participants with low baseline levels (md 27 versus 15 mm, p=0.022. Conclusion. Our data highlights the importance of expectations for treatment outcome and demonstrates that expectations can be effectively manipulated using a standardized protocol that in future research may be implemented in clinical trials.

  20. The effects of assertiveness training in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized, single-blind, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tso-Ying; Chang, Shih-Chin; Chu, Hsin; Yang, Chyn-Yng; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chung, Min-Huey; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of group assertiveness training on assertiveness, social anxiety and satisfaction with interpersonal communication among patients with chronic schizophrenia. Only limited studies highlighted the effectiveness of group assertiveness training among inpatients with schizophrenia. Given the lack of group assertiveness training among patients with schizophrenia, further development of programmes focusing on facilitating assertiveness, self-confidence and social skills among inpatients with chronic schizophrenia is needed. This study used a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, parallel-group design. This study employed a prospective, randomized, parallel-group design. Seventy-four patients were randomly assigned to experimental group receiving 12 sessions of assertiveness training, or a supportive control group. Data collection took place for the period of June 2009-July 2010. Among patients with chronic schizophrenia, assertiveness, levels of social anxiety and satisfaction with interpersonal communication significantly improved immediately after the intervention and at the 3-month follow-up in the intervention group. The results of a generalized estimating equation (GEE) indicated that: (1) assertiveness significantly improved from pre- to postintervention and was maintained until the follow-up; (2) anxiety regarding social interactions significantly decreased after assertiveness training; and (3) satisfaction with interpersonal communication slightly improved after the 12-session intervention and at the 3-month follow-up. Assertivenss training is a non-invasive and inexpensive therapy that appears to improve assertiveness, social anxiety and interpersonal communication among inpatients with chronic schizophrenia. These findings may provide a reference guide to clinical nurses for developing assertiveness-training protocols. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Effects of oral vitamin E on treatment of atopic dermatitis: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Jaffary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD remains to be determined; recently a possible change in the immune system with production of immunoglobulins is proposed. As vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, with the ability to decrease the serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE in atopic patients, we aimed to evaluate the effect of oral vitamin E on treatment of AD. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprised seventy participants with mild-to-moderate AD, based on the Hanifin and Rajka diagnostic criteria. The patients were randomly selected from teaching skin clinics in Isfahan, Iran. They were randomly assigned to two groups of equal number, receiving vitamin E (400 IU/day and placebo for four 4 months. Each month, the extent, severity, and subjective symptoms including itch and sleeplessness were measured by SCORAD index. Three months after the end of intervention, the recurrence rate was assessed. Results: The improvement in all symptoms, except sleeplessness, was significantly higher in the group receiving vitamin E than in controls (-1.5 vs. 0.218 in itching, -10.85 vs. -3.54 in extent of lesion, and -11.12 vs. -3.89 in SCORAD index, respectively, P 0.05. Conclusion: This study suggests that vitamin E can improve the symptoms and the quality of life in patients with AD. As vitamin E has no side effects with a dosage of 400 IU/day, it can be recommended for the treatment of AD.

  2. Effects of oral vitamin E on treatment of atopic dermatitis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffary, Fariba; Faghihi, Gita; Mokhtarian, Arghavan; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) remains to be determined; recently a possible change in the immune system with production of immunoglobulins is proposed. As vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, with the ability to decrease the serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in atopic patients, we aimed to evaluate the effect of oral vitamin E on treatment of AD. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprised seventy participants with mild-to-moderate AD, based on the Hanifin and Rajka diagnostic criteria. The patients were randomly selected from teaching skin clinics in Isfahan, Iran. They were randomly assigned to two groups of equal number, receiving vitamin E (400 IU/day) and placebo for four 4 months. Each month, the extent, severity, and subjective symptoms including itch and sleeplessness were measured by SCORAD index. Three months after the end of intervention, the recurrence rate was assessed. The improvement in all symptoms, except sleeplessness, was significantly higher in the group receiving vitamin E than in controls (-1.5 vs. 0.218 in itching, -10.85 vs. -3.54 in extent of lesion, and -11.12 vs. -3.89 in SCORAD index, respectively, P vitamin E compared to the placebo group was 1.17, without significant differences between the two groups (P > 0.05). This study suggests that vitamin E can improve the symptoms and the quality of life in patients with AD. As vitamin E has no side effects with a dosage of 400 IU/day, it can be recommended for the treatment of AD.

  3. The effectiveness of xylitol in a school-based cluster-randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonik; Spiekerman, Charles; Heima, Masahiro; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn; Ferretti, Gerald; Milgrom, Peter; Nelson, Suchitra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this double-blind, cluster-randomized clinical trial was to examine the effects of xylitol gummy bear snacks on dental caries progression in primary and permanent teeth of inner-city school children. A total of 562 children aged 5-6 years were recruited from five elementary schools in East Cleveland, Ohio. Children were randomized by classroom to receive xylitol (7.8 g/day) or placebo (inulin fiber 20 g/day) gummy bears. Gummy bears were given three times per day for the 9-month kindergarten year within a supervised school environment. Children in both groups also received oral health education, toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste, topical fluoride varnish treatment and dental sealants. The numbers of new decayed, missing, and filled surfaces for primary teeth (dmfs) and permanent teeth (DMFS) from baseline to the middle of 2nd grade (exit exam) were compared between the treatment (xylitol/placebo) groups using an optimally-weighted permutation test for cluster-randomized data. The mean new d(3-6)mfs at the exit exam was 5.0 ± 7.6 and 4.0 ± 6.5 for the xylitol and placebo group, respectively. Similarly, the mean new D(3-6)MFS was 0.38 ± 0.88 and 0.48 ± 1.39 for the xylitol and placebo group, respectively. The adjusted mean difference between the two groups was not statistically significant: new d(3-6)mfs: mean 0.4, 95% CI -0.25, 0.8), and new D(3-6)MFS: mean 0.16, 95% CI -0.16, 0.43. Xylitol consumption did not have additional benefit beyond other preventive measures. Caries progression in the permanent teeth of both groups was minimal, suggesting that other simultaneous prevention modalities may have masked the possible beneficial effects of xylitol in this trial. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)( n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)( n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0( p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2( p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 ( p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  5. Effect of an educational toolkit on quality of care: a pragmatic cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Baiju R; Bhattacharyya, Onil; Yu, Catherine H Y; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Parsons, Janet A; Straus, Sharon E; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2014-02-01

    Printed educational materials for clinician education are one of the most commonly used approaches for quality improvement. The objective of this pragmatic cluster randomized trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational toolkit focusing on cardiovascular disease screening and risk reduction in people with diabetes. All 933,789 people aged ≥40 years with diagnosed diabetes in Ontario, Canada were studied using population-level administrative databases, with additional clinical outcome data collected from a random sample of 1,592 high risk patients. Family practices were randomly assigned to receive the educational toolkit in June 2009 (intervention group) or May 2010 (control group). The primary outcome in the administrative data study, death or non-fatal myocardial infarction, occurred in 11,736 (2.5%) patients in the intervention group and 11,536 (2.5%) in the control group (p = 0.77). The primary outcome in the clinical data study, use of a statin, occurred in 700 (88.1%) patients in the intervention group and 725 (90.1%) in the control group (p = 0.26). Pre-specified secondary outcomes, including other clinical events, processes of care, and measures of risk factor control, were also not improved by the intervention. A limitation is the high baseline rate of statin prescribing in this population. The educational toolkit did not improve quality of care or cardiovascular outcomes in a population with diabetes. Despite being relatively easy and inexpensive to implement, printed educational materials were not effective. The study highlights the need for a rigorous and scientifically based approach to the development, dissemination, and evaluation of quality improvement interventions. http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01411865 and NCT01026688.

  6. Causal Effects of Single-Sex Schools on College Entrance Exams and College Attendance: Random Assignment in Seoul High Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyunjoon; Behrman, Jere R.; Choi, Jaesung

    2013-01-01

    Despite the voluminous literature on the potentials of single-sex schools, there is no consensus on the effects of single-sex schools because of student selection of school types. We exploit a unique feature of schooling in Seoul—the random assignment of students into single-sex versus coeducational high schools—to assess causal effects of single-sex schools on college entrance exam scores and college attendance. Our validation of the random assignment shows comparable socioeconomic backgroun...

  7. Randomized controlled trial on the effects of legumes on cardiovascular risk factors in women with abdominal obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Safaeiyan, Abdolrasoul; Pourghassem-Gargari, Bahram; Zarrin, Rasoul; Fereidooni, Javid; Alizadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effect of legume-based hypocaloric diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in women is unclear. This study provides an opportunity to find effects of high-legume diet on CVD risk factors in women who consumed high legumes at baseline. METHODS This randomized controlled trial was undertaken in 34 premenopausal women with central obesity. After 2 weeks of a run-in period on an isocaloric diet, subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: (1) hypocaloric diet enriche...

  8. Randomized controlled trial on the effects of legumes on cardiovascular risk factors in women with abdominal obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolrasoul Safaeiyan; Bahram Pourghassem-Gargari; Rasoul Zarrin; Javid Fereidooni; Mohammad Alizadeh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of legume-based hypocaloric diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in women is unclear. This study provides an opportunity to find effects of high-legume diet on CVD risk factors in women who consumed high legumes at baseline. METHODS: This randomized controlled trial was undertaken in 34 premenopausal women with central obesity. After 2 weeks of a run-in period on an isocaloric diet, subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: (1) hypocaloric diet enric...

  9. Effects of Horticulture on Frail and Prefrail Nursing Home Residents: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Claudia K Y; Kwan, Rick Y C; Lo, Shirley K L; Fung, Connie Y Y; Lau, Jordan K H; Tse, Mimi M Y

    2018-05-24

    Frail nursing home residents face multiple health challenges as a result of their frail status. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of HT on the psychosocial well-being of frail and prefrail nursing home residents. Randomized controlled trial. Nursing homes. One hundred eleven participants were randomly allocated into the intervention [horticultural therapy (HT)] and control (social activities) conditions. HT group participants attended a weekly 60-minute session for 8 consecutive weeks. Control group activities were social in nature, without any horticulture components. The outcome measures include happiness, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, well-being, social network, and social engagement. The time points of measurement were at baseline (T 0 ), immediately postintervention (T 1 ), and 12 weeks postintervention (T 2 ). A modified intention-to-treat approach was adopted. A multivariate general estimating equation was used to analyze the data. Forty-six and 50 participants received at least 1 session of the intervention and control condition protocol, respectively. A significant interaction effect between group and time was observed only on the happiness scale (β = 1.457, P = .036), but not on other outcome variables. In a follow-up cluster analysis of those who received HT, a greater effect on subjective happiness (mean difference = 6.23, P < .001) was observed for participants who were happier at baseline. HT was found to be effective in promoting subjective happiness for frail and prefrail nursing home residents. Its favorable effect suggests that HT should be used to promote the psychosocial well-being of those who are frail. Copyright © 2018 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Immediate analgesic effect of wrist-ankle acupuncture for acute lumbago: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiang-tao; Zhou, Qing-hui; Li, Rui; Zhang, Jie; Li, Wei-hong; Wang, Qiong

    2010-08-01

    To assess the immediate analgesic effect of wrist-ankle acupuncture on acute lumbago and the relationship between the analgesic effect and the expectation of patients. A randomized, single-blind, sham-controlled trial was designed. Sixty cases of acute lumbago were randomly divided into two groups, 30 cases in each one. In observation group, wrist-ankle acupuncture was adopted to the Lower 5 and Lower 6 bilaterally, no requirement of Deqi (arrival of qi). In control group, sham acupuncture was adopted. The treatment was applied once in either group, with the needles retained for 30 min. The Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and the Modified-Modified Schober (MMS) test were used to assess the motion related pain and the situation of spinal flexion in 3 min before treatment and 5 min, 10 min, 15 min, during treatment and 30 min (needle removed), respectively. The Expectation and Treatment Credibility Scale (ETCS) was applied to analyze the relationship between the expectation of patients and the analgesic effect. The adverse reaction was recorded. There were no statistically significant differences in SF-MPQ, MMS and ETCS before treatment between two groups (all P>0.05). In 5 min after needles insertion, the scores of the items in SF-MPQ in observation group were lower than those in control group (P0.05). No adverse reaction was reported. Wrist-ankle acupuncture can reduce acute lumbago immediately and significantly. The higher the expectation on the analgesic effect of wrist-ankle acupuncture the patients have, the better the analgesic effect will be. This therapy is highly safe in the treatment.

  11. The Effect of Music Therapy in Patients with Huntington's Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    van Bruggen-Rufi, Monique C H; Vink, Annemieke C; Wolterbeek, Ron; Achterberg, Wilco P; Roos, Raymund A C

    2017-01-01

    Music therapy may have beneficial effects on improving communication and expressive skills in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). Most studies are, however, small observational studies and methodologically limited. Therefore we conducted a multi-center randomized controlled trial. To determine the efficacy of music therapy in comparison with recreational therapy in improving quality of life of patients with advanced Huntington's disease by means of improving communication. Sixty-three HD-patients with a Total Functional Capacity (TFC) score of ≤7, admitted to four long-term care facilities in The Netherlands, were randomized to receive either group music therapy or group recreational therapy in 16 weekly sessions. They were assessed at baseline, after 8, 16 and 28 weeks using the Behaviour Observation Scale for Huntington (BOSH) and the Problem Behaviour Assessment-short version (PBA-s). A linear mixed model with repeated measures was used to compare the scores between the two groups. Group music therapy offered once weekly for 16 weeks to patients with Huntington's disease had no additional beneficial effect on communication or behavior compared to group recreational therapy. This was the first study to assess the effect of group music therapy on HD patients in the advanced stages of the disease. The beneficial effects of music therapy, recorded in many, mainly qualitative case reports and studies, could not be confirmed with the design (i.e. group therapy vs individual therapy) and outcome measures that have been used in the present study. A comprehensive process-evaluation alongside the present effect evaluation is therefore performed.

  12. Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation on Bone Turnover Markers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Verena Schwetz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone turnover markers (BTMs are used to evaluate bone health together with bone mineral density and fracture assessment. Vitamin D supplementation is widely used to prevent and treat musculoskeletal diseases but existing data on vitamin D effects on markers of bone resorption and formation are inconsistent. We therefore examined the effects of vitamin D supplementation on bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bALP, osteocalcin (OC, C-terminal telopeptide (CTX, and procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP. This is a post-hoc analysis of the Styrian Vitamin D Hypertension Trial, a single-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (RCT performed at the Medical University of Graz, Austria (2011–2014. Two hundred individuals with arterial hypertension and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels <75 nmol/L were randomized to 2800 IU of vitamin D daily or placebo for eight weeks. One hundred ninety-seven participants (60.2 ± 11.1 years; 47% women were included in this analysis. Vitamin D had no significant effect on bALP (mean treatment effect (MTE 0.013, 95% CI −0.029 to 0.056 µg/L; p = 0.533, CTX (MTE 0.024, 95% CI −0.163 to 0.210 ng/mL, p = 0.802, OC (MTE 0.020, 95% CI −0.062 to 0.103 ng/mL, p = 0.626, or P1NP (MTE −0.021, 95% CI −0.099 to 0.057 ng/mL, p = 0.597. Analyzing patients with 25(OHD levels <50 nmol/L separately (n = 74 left results largely unchanged. In hypertensive patients with low 25(OHD levels, we observed no significant effect of vitamin D supplementation for eight weeks on BTMs.

  13. Effect of Mozart music on heel prick pain in preterm infants: a pilot randomized controlled trial

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    Cristina Cavaiuolo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of music by Mozart on heel prick procedural pain in premature infants.Background: Painful procedures are routinely performed in the setting of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Pain may exert short- and long-term deleterious effects on premature babies. Many non-pharmacological interventions have been proven efficacious for blunting neonatal pain.Study design: Randomized, controlled trial.Methods: The study was carried out in the NICU of the “G. Rummo” Hospital in Benevento, Italy. The sample consisted of 42 preterm infants, with no hearing loss or significant cerebral lesions on cranial ultrasound. They were randomized to receive heel lance during a music condition or a no-music control condition. We set strict criteria for selecting and delivering the music. Baseline and postprocedural heart rate and transcutaneous oxygen saturation were manually recorded. The Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP score was used to measure the behavioral response to prick. An unpaired t-test was performed for the intergroup comparisons.Results: There were significant differences between groups on heart rate increase, oxygen saturation reduction and PIPP score following the procedure.Conclusions: Listening to Mozart music during heel prick is a simple and inexpensive tool for pain alleviating in preterm stable neonates.

  14. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

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    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p natural sounds via headphones is a simple, safe, nonpharmacologic nursing intervention that may be used to allay pain for up to 120 minutes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of three different oral hygiene techniques on Viridans streptococci: A randomized controlled trial

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    N Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tongue cleaning is an important aspect of oral hygiene maintenance along with other mechanical and chemical aids. These methods have an influence on microorganism count in saliva. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of three different oral hygiene techniques on Viridans streptococci. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial with 45 study subjects aged between 14 and 16 years and were randomly allocated into three groups: Group A - plastic tongue scraper, Group B - chlorhexidine mouthwash along with plastic tongue scraper, and Group C - chlorhexidine mouthwash. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected on the 1st, 7th, and 15th day before routine oral hygiene practices. Saliva samples were collected and incubated for 48 h on itis Salivarius(MS agar. Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Streptococcus salivarius were counted. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The mean count of S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. salivarius for Group A, B, and C was found to be significant (P < 0.001 when compared between 1st, 7th, and 15th day. Between-groups comparisons revealed a significant difference between Groups A and C, B and C (P < 0.001. Conclusion: There was a significant reduction in bacterial count in all the participants indicating that all the three methods are useful in improving oral hygiene. Combination technique was found to be most effective.

  16. Analgesic Effect of Intraperitoneal Bupivacaine Hydrochloride After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamdari, Nasser Malekpour; Bakhtiyari, Mahmood; Gholizadeh, Barmak; Shariati, Catrine

    2018-03-01

    The indications for sleeve gastrectomy as a primary procedure for the surgical treatment of morbid obesity have increased worldwide. Pain is the most common complaint for patients on the first day after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. There are various methods for decreasing pain after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy such as the use of intraperitoneal bupivacaine hydrochloride. This clinical trial was an attempt to discover the effects of intraperitoneal bupivacaine hydrochloride on alleviating postoperative pain after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. In general, 120 patients meeting the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated into two interventions and control groups using a balanced block randomization technique. One group received intraperitoneal bupivacaine hydrochloride (30 cm 3 ), and the other group served as the control one and did not receive bupivacaine hydrochloride. Diclofenac suppository and paracetamol injection were administered to both groups for postoperative pain management. The mean subjective postoperative pain score was significantly decreased in patients who received intraperitoneal bupivacaine hydrochloride within the first 24 h after the surgery; thus, the instillation of bupivacaine hydrochloride was beneficial in managing postoperative pain. The intraoperative peritoneal irrigation of bupivacaine hydrochloride (30 cm 3 , 0.25%) in sleeve gastrectomy patients was safe and effective in reducing postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting (IRCT2016120329181N4).

  17. Effect of a Prebiotic Formulation on Frailty Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buigues, Cristina; Fernández-Garrido, Julio; Pruimboom, Leo; Hoogland, Aldert J; Navarro-Martínez, Rut; Martínez-Martínez, Mary; Verdejo, Yolanda; Mascarós, Mari Carmen; Peris, Carlos; Cauli, Omar

    2016-06-14

    Aging can result in major changes in the composition and metabolic activities of bacterial populations in the gastrointestinal system and result in impaired function of the immune system. We assessed the efficacy of prebiotic Darmocare Pre(®) (Bonusan Besloten Vennootschap (BV), Numansdorp, The Netherlands) to evaluate whether the regular intake of this product can improve frailty criteria, functional status and response of the immune system in elderly people affected by the frailty syndrome. The study was a placebo-controlled, randomized, double blind design in sixty older participants aged 65 and over. The prebiotic product was composed of a mixture of inulin plus fructooligosaccharides and was compared with placebo (maltodextrin). Participants were randomized to a parallel group intervention of 13 weeks' duration with a daily intake of Darmocare Pre(®) or placebo. Either prebiotic or placebo were administered after breakfast (between 9-10 a.m.) dissolved in a glass of water carefully stirred just before drinking. The primary outcome was to study the effect on frailty syndrome. The secondary outcomes were effect on functional and cognitive behavior and sleep quality. Moreover, we evaluated whether prebiotic administration alters blood parameters (haemogram and biochemical analysis). The overall rate of frailty was not significantly modified by Darmocare Pre(®) administration. Nevertheless, prebiotic administration compared with placebo significantly improved two frailty criteria, e.g., exhaustion and handgrip strength (p sleep quality. The use of novel therapeutic approaches influencing the gut microbiota-muscle-brain axis could be considered for treatment of the frailty syndrome.

  18. Periodontal Therapy Effects on Nitrite Related to Oral Bacteria: A 6-Month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelli, Sheila C; Costa, Fernando O; Rodrigues, Edson; Cota, Luis O M; Cortelli, Jose R

    2015-08-01

    Nitrite is a biologic factor relevant to oral and systemic homeostasis. Through an oral bacteria reduction process, it was suggested that periodontal therapy and chlorhexidine (CHX) rinse could affect nitrite levels, leading to negative effects, such as an increase in blood pressure. This 6-month randomized clinical trial evaluated the effects of periodontal therapeutic protocols on salivary nitrite and its relation to subgingival bacteria. One hundred patients with periodontitis were allocated randomly to debridement procedures in four weekly sections (quadrant scaling [QS]) or within 24 hours (full-mouth scaling [FMS]) in conjunction with a 60-day CHX (QS + CHX and FMS + CHX), placebo (QS + placebo and FMS + placebo), or no mouthrinse (QS + none and FMS + none) use. Real-time polymerase chain reaction determined total bacterial, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces naeslundii levels. Salivary nitrite concentration was determined with Griess reagent. Data were analyzed statistically at baseline and 3 and 6 months by analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Spearman correlation tests (P periodontal pockets. The relationship between nitrite and bacterial levels appears weak. Short-term scaling exhibited a greater influence on nitrite concentrations then long-term CHX use.

  19. The Effects of Bougie Diameters on Tissue Oxygen Levels After Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Randomized Experimental Trial

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    Can Konca

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staple-line leak is the most frightening complication of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and several predisposing factors such as using improper staple sizes regardless of gastric wall thickness, narrower bougie diameter and ischemia of the staple line are asserted. Aims: To evaluate the effects of different bougie diameters on tissue oxygen partial pressure at the esophagogastric junction after sleeve gastrectomy. Study Design: A randomized and controlled animal experiment with 1:1:1:1 allocation ratio. Methods: Thirty-two male Wistar Albino rats were randomly divided into 4 groups of 8 each. While 12-Fr bougies were used in groups 1 and 3, 8-Fr bougies were used in groups 2 and 4. Fibrin sealant application was also carried out around the gastrectomy line after sleeve gastrectomy in groups 3 and 4. Burst pressure of gastrectomy line, tissue oxygen partial pressure and hydroxyproline levels at the esophagogastric junction were measured and compared among groups. Results: Mortality was detected in 2 out of 32 rats (6.25% and one of them was in group 2 and the cause of this mortality was gastric leak. Gastric leak was detected in 2 out of 32 rats (6.25%. There was no significant difference in terms of burst pressures, tissue oxygen partial pressure and tissue hydroxyproline levels among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The use of narrower bougie along with fibrin sealant has not had a negative effect on tissue perfusion and wound healing.

  20. The effectiveness of core stabilization exercise in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Gözde; Ayhan, Cigdem; Yakut, Yavuz

    2017-06-01

    Core stabilization training is used to improve postural balance in musculoskeletal problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of stabilization training in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A randomized controlled trial, pretest-posttest design. In total, 25 subjects with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were randomly divided into two groups: stabilization group ( n = 12) and control group ( n = 13). The stabilization group received core stabilization in addition to traditional rehabilitation, and the control group received traditional rehabilitation for 10 weeks. Assessment included Cobb's angle on radiograph, apical vertebral rotation in Adam's test, trunk asymmetry (Posterior Trunk Symmetry Index), cosmetic trunk deformity (Trunk Appearance Perception Scale), and quality of life (Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire). Inter-group comparisons showed significantly greater improvements in the mean change in lumbar apical vertebral rotation degree and the pain domain of Scoliosis Research Society-22 in the stabilization group than those in the control group ( p adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Clinical relevance Stabilization exercises are more effective in reducing rotation deformity and pain than traditional exercises in the conservative rehabilitation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. These improvements suggest that stabilization training should be added to rehabilitation programs in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  1. The effects of mirror therapy on the gait of subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sang Gu; Kim, Myoung Kwon

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effect of mirror therapy on the gait of patients with subacute stroke. Randomized controlled experimental study. Outpatient rehabilitation hospital. Thirty-four patients with stroke were randomly assigned to two groups: a mirror therapy group (experimental) and a control group. The stroke patients in the experimental group underwent comprehensive rehabilitation therapy and mirror therapy for the lower limbs. The stroke patients in the control group underwent sham therapy and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for four weeks. Temporospatial gait characteristics, such as single stance, stance phase, step length, stride, swing phase, velocity, and cadence, were assessed before and after the four weeks therapy period. A significant difference was observed in post-training gains for the single stance (10.32 SD 4.14 vs. 6.54 SD 3.23), step length (8.47 SD 4.12 vs. 4.83 SD 2.14), and stride length (17.03 SD 6.57 vs 10.54 SD 4.34) between the experimental group and the control group (p two groups on stance phase, swing phase, velocity, cadence, and step width (P > 0.05). We conclude that mirror therapy may be beneficial in improving the effects of stroke on gait ability. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Effect of cryotherapy after elbow arthrolysis: a prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shi-yang; Chen, Shuai; Yan, He-de; Fan, Cun-yi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cryotherapy after elbow arthrolysis on elbow pain, blood loss, analgesic consumption, range of motion, and long-term elbow function. Prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled study. University hospital. Patients (N=59; 27 women, 32 men) who received elbow arthrolysis. Patients were randomly assigned into a cryotherapy group (n=31, cryotherapy plus standard care) or a control group (n=28, standard care). Elbow pain at rest and in motion were measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) on postoperative day (POD) 1 to POD 7 and at 2 weeks and 3 months after surgery. Blood loss and analgesic consumption were recorded postoperatively. Elbow range of motion (ROM) was measured before surgery and on POD 1, POD 7, and 3 months after surgery. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) was evaluated preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. VAS scores were significantly lower in the cryotherapy group during the first 7 PODs, both at rest and in motion (Pcryotherapy group than the control group for pain relief (P.05). Cryotherapy is effective in relieving pain and reducing analgesic consumption for patients received elbow arthrolysis. The application of cryotherapy will not affect blood loss, ROM, or elbow function. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of lullaby and classical music on physiologic stability of hospitalized preterm infants: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, E; Rafiei, P; Zarei, K; Gohari, M; Hamidi, M

    2013-01-01

    Music is considered a subset of developmental supportive care. It may act as a suitable auditory stimulant in preterm infants. Also, it may reduce stress responses in autonomic, motor and state systems. To assess and compare the influence of lullaby and classical music on physiologic parameters. This is a randomized clinical trial with cross-over design. A total of 25 stable preterm infants with birth weight of 1000-2500 grams were studied for six consecutive days. Each infant was exposed to three phases: lullaby music, classical music, and no music (control) for two days each. The sequence of these phases was assigned randomly to each subject. Babies were continuously monitored for heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation and changes between phases were analyzed. Lullaby reduced heart rate (p music reduced heart rate (p = 0.018). The effects of classical music disappeared once the music stopped. Oxygen saturation did not change during intervention. Music can affect vital signs of preterm infants; this effect can possibly be related to the reduction of stress during hospitalization. The implications of these findings on clinical and developmental outcomes need further study.

  4. Effectiveness of oncogenetics training on general practitioners' consultation skills: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwink, Elisa J F; Muijtjens, Arno M M; van Teeffelen, Sarah R; Henneman, Lidewij; Rethans, Jan Joost; van der Jagt, Liesbeth E J; van Luijk, Scheltus J; Dinant, Geert Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees; Cornel, Martina C

    2014-01-01

    General practitioners are increasingly called upon to deliver genetic services and could play a key role in translating potentially life-saving advancements in oncogenetic technologies to patient care. If general practitioners are to make an effective contribution in this area, their genetics competencies need to be upgraded. The aim of this study was to investigate whether oncogenetics training for general practitioners improves their genetic consultation skills. In this pragmatic, blinded, randomized controlled trial, the intervention consisted of a 4-h training (December 2011 and April 2012), covering oncogenetic consultation skills (family history, familial risk assessment, and efficient referral), attitude (medical ethical issues), and clinical knowledge required in primary-care consultations. Outcomes were measured using observation checklists by unannounced standardized patients and self-reported questionnaires. Of 88 randomized general practitioners who initially agreed to participate, 56 completed all measurements. Key consultation skills significantly and substantially improved; regression coefficients after intervention were equivalent to 0.34 and 0.28 at 3-month follow-up, indicating a moderate effect size. Satisfaction and perceived applicability of newly learned skills were highly scored. The general practitioner-specific training proved to be a feasible, satisfactory, and clinically applicable method to improve oncogenetics consultation skills and could be used as an educational framework to inform future training activities with the ultimate aim of improving medical care.

  5. The effectiveness of Narrative Exposure Therapy with traumatised firefighters in Saudi Arabia: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Mohammed; Hunt, Nigel; Thomas, Shirley

    2015-03-01

    Firefighters are exposed to many traumatic events. The psychological costs of this exposure increase the risk of Post-Traumatic Stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety. This study examined the effectiveness of Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) as a short-term treatment for reducing PTSD symptoms among Saudi firefighters. A randomized waiting-list control study was conducted with 34 traumatized firefighters were randomly allocated to NET or Waiting-list Control (WLC). The NET group received four therapy sessions of 60-90 min over a three-week period; those in the WLC condition received the same sessions after a three-week waiting period. Participants in both groups were assessed at baseline, immediately post-intervention and at 3 and 6 month follow ups. NET led to significant reductions in PTSD symptoms, anxiety and depression compared with WLC. After the WLC group received treatment, it showed the same improvements as the NET group. This occurred immediately post-treatment in both groups, but was not sustained at 3 and 6 month follow ups. Coping strategies and social support led to significant changes only in follow up times. NET was effective in reducing PTSD symptoms in traumatised Saudi firefighters. This finding could be helpful in the management of PTSD among people who work as first responders such as firefighters, police officers and emergency medical personal, as well as security officers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The effectiveness of massage therapy in the treatment of infantile colic symptoms: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheidaei, Ali; Abadi, Alireza; Zayeri, Farid; Nahidi, Fatemeh; Gazerani, Nafiseh; Mansouri, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Infantile colic, cry-fuss and sleep problems are transient in the initial months of life, but they contribute to maternal depression, parenting stress and family mental health problems. In this randomized clinical trial, we aimed to explore the efficacy of massage therapy compared to rocking in reducing infantile colic symptoms including duration and number of cries, sleep duration and severity of infant colic. This was a single blind RCT study with a one-week follow-up. One hundred colicky infants aged younger than 12 weeks old were randomly assigned into massage and rocking groups. Infants in the massage group received a massage for 15-20 minutes once during a day and once at night before sleeping for a week. In the control group, mothers rocked their infants gently for 5-25 minutes when the symptoms of colic appeared. Parents recorded the details of the colic symptoms in a diary every day. A GEE approach was applied to explore the effect of the intervention. Efficiency of massage therapy was significantly higher than rocking. At the end of the study, the mean number of daily cries was 4.26±1.40 in the massage and 6.9±2.14 the rocking groups (pmassage therapy is more effective than rocking for treating infant colic symptoms.

  7. The preliminary effect of a parenting program for Korean American mothers: a randomized controlled experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjung; Cain, Kevin C; Webster-Stratton, Carolyn

    2008-09-01

    Traditional Korean American discipline is characterized by a lack of expression of affection and use of harsh discipline. The purpose of this study was to pilot test the effect of the Incredible Years Parenting Program among Korean American mothers. A randomized controlled experimental study design was used; 29 first-generation Korean American mothers of young children (3-8 years old) were randomly assigned to intervention (n=20) and control (n=9) groups. Intervention group mothers received a 12-week parenting program. Control group mothers did not receive the intervention. Mothers reported on discipline styles (positive, appropriate, and harsh), level of acculturation, and their child's outcomes (behavioral problems and social competence) at pre-, post-, and 1-year follow-up intervals. After completing the program, intervention group mothers significantly increased use of positive discipline as compared to control group mothers. Among intervention group mothers, high-acculturated mothers significantly increased appropriate discipline whereas low-acculturated mothers significantly decreased harsh discipline. In the 1-year follow-up, intervention group mothers maintained the significant effect for positive discipline. Providing this program appears to be a promising way of promoting positive discipline among Korean American mothers.

  8. Effect of aromatherapy on dental patient anxiety: A randomized controlled trial

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    M Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental anxiety is a common and potentially distressing problem, both for the patients and for dental practitioners. It is considered to be the main barrier and affects the working lives of dental professional potentially compromising their performance. Aim: To know the effect of aromatherapy in the reduction of dental anxiety and to compare the anxiety levels of dental patients with the control group. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial design was used. Of 40 dental clinics in Khammam town, 10 dental clinics were selected by simple random sampling method. A total of 100 patients attending the dental clinic for the first time were included in the study. Ambient odor of lavender was maintained with a candle warmer. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, smoking status, Modified dental anxiety scale (Humphries et al. in 1995, was given to the patients when they were waiting in the waiting room. Student's t-test and ANOVA test were used for data analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Considerable decrease in anxiety scores in 3 age groups was observed. A statistically significant (P = 0.002 decrease with age in mean anxiety score. A significant difference in anxiety scores of lavender group, a significant decrease of anxiety scores with an increase of age. Conclusion: Lavender decreased the current anxiety scores of patients effectively.

  9. Effect of a stress management program on subjects with neck pain: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metikaridis, T Damianos; Hadjipavlou, Alexander; Artemiadis, Artemios; Chrousos, George; Darviri, Christina

    2016-05-20

    Studies have shown that stress is implicated in the cause of neck pain (NP). The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of a simple, zero cost stress management program on patients suffering from NP. This study is a parallel-type randomized clinical study. People suffering from chronic non-specific NP were chosen randomly to participate in an eight week duration program of stress management (N= 28) (including diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation) or in a no intervention control condition (N= 25). Self-report measures were used for the evaluation of various variables at the beginning and at the end of the eight-week monitoring period. Descriptive and inferential statistic methods were used for the statistical analysis. At the end of the monitoring period, the intervention group showed a statistically significant reduction of stress and anxiety (p= 0.03, p= 0.01), report of stress related symptoms (p= 0.003), percentage of disability due to NP (p= 0.000) and NP intensity (p= 0.002). At the same time, daily routine satisfaction levels were elevated (p= 0.019). No statistically significant difference was observed in cortisol measurements. Stress management has positive effects on NP patients.

  10. 1% hydrocortisone ointment is an effective treatment of pruritus ani: a pilot randomized controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghnaniem, R; Short, K; Pullen, A; Fuller, L C; Rennie, J A; Leather, A J M

    2007-12-01

    Pruritus ani (PA) is a common condition which is difficult to treat in the absence of obvious predisposing factors. There is paucity of evidence-based guidelines on the treatment of this condition. We examined whether 1% hydrocortisone ointment is an effective treatment for PA. A pilot randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial was carried out. Eleven patients consented to take part in the trial and ten completed the study. After a 2-week run-in period, patients with primary PA were randomly allocated to receive 1% hydrocortisone ointment or placebo for 2 weeks followed by the opposite treatment for a further 2-week period. There was a washout period of 2 weeks between treatments. The primary outcome measure was reduction in itch using a visual analogue score (VAS). The secondary outcome measures were improvement in quality of life measured using a validated questionnaire (Dermatology Life Quality Index, DLQI) and improvement in clinical appearance of the perianal skin using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) score. Treatment with 1% hydrocortisone ointment resulted in a 68% reduction in VAS compared with placebo (P=0.019), a 75% reduction in DLQI score (P=0.067), and 81% reduction in EASI score (P=0.01). A short course of mild steroid ointment is an effective treatment for PA.

  11. Direct Power Control for Three-Phase Two-Level Voltage-Source Rectifiers Based on Extended-State Observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhanfeng; Tian, Yanjun; Yan, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a direct power control strategy for three-phase two-level voltage-source rectifiers based on extended-state observation. Active and reactive powers are directly regulated in the stationary reference frame. Similar to the family of predictive controllers whose inherent characte......This paper proposed a direct power control strategy for three-phase two-level voltage-source rectifiers based on extended-state observation. Active and reactive powers are directly regulated in the stationary reference frame. Similar to the family of predictive controllers whose inherent...

  12. Pesticide impacts on predator-prey interactions across two levels of organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jes Jessen; Nørum, Ulrik; Rygaard Jerris, Morten

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of a short pulse exposure of the pyrethroid lambdacyhalothrin (LC) on the predator and anti-predator behaviour of the same species; Gammartts pulex. Predator behaviour, at the level of the individual, was studied in indoor microcosms using video...... through the subsequent 60 min of exposure. The anti-predator behaviour of G. pulex (drift suppression in response to the presence of brown trout) was studied in outdoor stream channels during a 90 min pulse exposure to LC (7.4 or 79.5 ng L-1) with, or without, brown trout. Based on survival curves for L...

  13. Two-level system in spin baths: Non-adiabatic dynamics and heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira

    2014-04-01

    We study the non-adiabatic dynamics of a two-state subsystem in a bath of independent spins using the non-interacting blip approximation, and derive an exact analytic expression for the relevant memory kernel. We show that in the thermodynamic limit, when the subsystem-bath coupling is diluted (uniformly) over many (infinite) degrees of freedom, our expression reduces to known results, corresponding to the harmonic bath with an effective, temperature-dependent, spectral density function. We then proceed and study the heat current characteristics in the out-of-equilibrium spin-spin-bath model, with a two-state subsystem bridging two thermal spin-baths of different temperatures. We compare the behavior of this model to the case of a spin connecting boson baths, and demonstrate pronounced qualitative differences between the two models. Specifically, we focus on the development of the thermal diode effect, and show that the spin-spin-bath model cannot support it at weak (subsystem-bath) coupling, while in the intermediate-strong coupling regime its rectifying performance outplays the spin-boson model.

  14. Two-level system in spin baths: Non-adiabatic dynamics and heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, Dvira [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 Saint George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2014-04-28

    We study the non-adiabatic dynamics of a two-state subsystem in a bath of independent spins using the non-interacting blip approximation, and derive an exact analytic expression for the relevant memory kernel. We show that in the thermodynamic limit, when the subsystem-bath coupling is diluted (uniformly) over many (infinite) degrees of freedom, our expression reduces to known results, corresponding to the harmonic bath with an effective, temperature-dependent, spectral density function. We then proceed and study the heat current characteristics in the out-of-equilibrium spin-spin-bath model, with a two-state subsystem bridging two thermal spin-baths of different temperatures. We compare the behavior of this model to the case of a spin connecting boson baths, and demonstrate pronounced qualitative differences between the two models. Specifically, we focus on the development of the thermal diode effect, and show that the spin-spin-bath model cannot support it at weak (subsystem-bath) coupling, while in the intermediate-strong coupling regime its rectifying performance outplays the spin-boson model.

  15. Productive and metabolic response to two levels of corn silage supplementation in grazing dairy cows in early lactation during autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Morales

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Corn (Zea mays L. silage (CS is a nutritious food that can be used as a supplement in dairy cows. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of supplementation with two amounts of CS on milk production and composition, live weight and body condition, as well as on some blood indicators for energy and protein metabolism on dairy cows in early lactation and grazing low mass pasture during autumn. The study was carried out in 40 Holstein Friesian cows over 57 d. Prior to experimental treatment, milk production and days of lactation averaged 24.1 ± 2.8 kg d-1 and 62 ± 14 d, respectively. The dietary treatments consisted of two levels of supplementation with CS; 4.5 and 9 kg DM cow-1 d-1 (treatments LCS and HCS, respectively. Additionally, all the cows received a pasture allowance of 21 and 3 kg DM cow-1 d-1 of concentrate. Milk composition was determined using infrared spectrophotometry, while blood indicators were obtained using an autoanalyzer. There were not differences between treatments regarding milk production or composition, total DM or energy intake. Herbage and protein intake was higher for LCS treatment (P < 0.001. Increasing supplementation decreased (P < 0.001 daily weight gain but did not affect body condition. Plasma concentrations of βOH-butyrate were lower (P = 0.038 for the LCS treatment; while urea concentrations were higher (P = 0.003, with no differences for non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA concentrations. Supplementation with 4.5 kg d-1 of CS was sufficient to meet the production requirements of the cows.

  16. Identification of immiscible NAPL contaminant sources in aquifers by a modified two-level saturation based imperialist competitive algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, H. R.; Mosharaf-Dehkordi, M.; Afzalan, B.

    2017-07-01

    A simulation-optimization model is proposed for identifying the characteristics of local immiscible NAPL contaminant sources inside aquifers. This model employs the UTCHEM 9.0 software as its simulator for solving the governing equations associated with the multi-phase flow in porous media. As the optimization model, a novel two-level saturation based Imperialist Competitive Algorithm (ICA) is proposed to estimate the parameters of contaminant sources. The first level consists of three parallel independent ICAs and plays as a pre-conditioner for the second level which is a single modified ICA. The ICA in the second level is modified by dividing each country into a number of provinces (smaller parts). Similar to countries in the classical ICA, these provinces are optimized by the assimilation, competition, and revolution steps in the ICA. To increase the diversity of populations, a new approach named knock the base method is proposed. The performance and accuracy of the simulation-optimization model is assessed by solving a set of two and three-dimensional problems considering the effects of different parameters such as the grid size, rock heterogeneity and designated monitoring networks. The obtained numerical results indicate that using this simulation-optimization model provides accurate results at a less number of iterations when compared with the model employing the classical one-level ICA. A model is proposed to identify characteristics of immiscible NAPL contaminant sources. The contaminant is immiscible in water and multi-phase flow is simulated. The model is a multi-level saturation-based optimization algorithm based on ICA. Each answer string in second level is divided into a set of provinces. Each ICA is modified by incorporating a new knock the base model.

  17. Strategic production modeling for defective items with imperfect inspection process, rework, and sales return under two-level trade credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality decisions are one of the major decisions in inventory management. It affects customer’s demand, loyalty and customer satisfaction and also inventory costs. Every manufacturing process is inherent to have some chance causes of variation which may lead to some defectives in the lot. So, in order to cater the customers with faultless products, an inspection process is inevitable, which may also be prone to errors. Thus for an operations manager, maintaining the quality of the lot and the screening process becomes a challenging task, when his objective is to determine the optimal order quantity for the inventory system. Besides these operational tasks, the goal is also to increase the customer base which eventually leads to higher profits. So, as a promotional tool, trade credit is being offered by both the retailer and supplier to their respective customers to encourage more frequent and higher volume purchases. Thus taking into account of these facts, a strategic production model is formulated here to study the combined effects of imperfect quality items, faulty inspection process, rework process, sales return under two level trade credit. The present study is a general framework for many articles and classical EPQ model. An analytical method is employed which jointly optimizes the retailer’s credit period and order quantity, so as to maximize the expected total profit per unit time. To study the behavior and application of the model, a numerical example has been cited and a comprehensive sensitivity analysis has been performed. The model can be widely applicable in manufacturing industries like textile, footwear, plastics, electronics, furniture etc.

  18. Two-Level Chebyshev Filter Based Complementary Subspace Method: Pushing the Envelope of Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amartya S; Lin, Lin; Suryanarayana, Phanish; Yang, Chao; Pask, John E

    2018-06-12

    We describe a novel iterative strategy for Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations aimed at large systems (>1,000 electrons), applicable to metals and insulators alike. In lieu of explicit diagonalization of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian on every self-consistent field (SCF) iteration, we employ a two-level Chebyshev polynomial filter based complementary subspace strategy to (1) compute a set of vectors that span the occupied subspace of the Hamiltonian; (2) reduce subspace diagonalization to just partially occupied states; and (3) obtain those states in an efficient, scalable manner via an inner Chebyshev filter iteration. By reducing the necessary computation to just partially occupied states and obtaining these through an inner Chebyshev iteration, our approach reduces the cost of large metallic calculations significantly, while eliminating subspace diagonalization for insulating systems altogether. We describe the implementation of the method within the framework of the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) electronic structure method and show that this results in a computational scheme that can effectively tackle bulk and nano systems containing tens of thousands of electrons, with chemical accuracy, within a few minutes or less of wall clock time per SCF iteration on large-scale computing platforms. We anticipate that our method will be instrumental in pushing the envelope of large-scale ab initio molecular dynamics. As a demonstration of this, we simulate a bulk silicon system containing 8,000 atoms at finite temperature, and obtain an average SCF step wall time of 51 s on 34,560 processors; thus allowing us to carry out 1.0 ps of ab initio molecular dynamics in approximately 28 h (of wall time).

  19. Randomized controlled trial of the effect of medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbæk, Annelli

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including...... of such consultations initiated by the GPs. CONCLUSIONS: Medical audit had no observed effect on AIDS prevention in general practice. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Oct...... a primary activity registration, feedback of own data and a meeting with colleagues and experts, and had received brief summaries of the meetings and reminders about the project (a full 'audit circle'). The participants were from general practices in Copenhagen and the Counties of Funen and Vejle, Denmark...

  20. Methods for synthesizing findings on moderation effects across multiple randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C Hendricks; Sloboda, Zili; Faggiano, Fabrizio; Teasdale, Brent; Keller, Ferdinand; Burkhart, Gregor; Vigna-Taglianti, Federica; Howe, George; Masyn, Katherine; Wang, Wei; Muthén, Bengt; Stephens, Peggy; Grey, Scott; Perrino, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents new methods for synthesizing results from subgroup and moderation analyses across different randomized trials. We demonstrate that such a synthesis generally results in additional power to detect significant moderation findings above what one would find in a single trial. Three general methods for conducting synthesis analyses are discussed, with two methods, integrative data analysis and parallel analyses, sharing a large advantage over traditional methods available in meta-analysis. We present a broad class of analytic models to examine moderation effects across trials that can be used to assess their overall effect and explain sources of heterogeneity, and present ways to disentangle differences across trials due to individual differences, contextual level differences, intervention, and trial design.

  1. Effectiveness of exercise at workplace in physical fitness: uncontrolled randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Antônio José; Silva, Valter; Parra, Sérgio Alencar

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of workplace exercise for employee health by means of health-related physical activity components. A randomized uncontrolled study with 20 workers was carried out during three months to evaluate a workplace exercise program. The selected outcomes were flexibility, body mass, fat percentage, lean mass, blood pressure, and heart rate. For statistical analysis, the paired t test and the intent-to-treat analysis were used. There was a significant increase in weight, fat percentage, blood pressure, and heart rate. However the clinical significance was 10% in the size of the effect. The changes verified in the outcomes analyzed were not significant; the variables are within normality ranges proposed by academic organizations.

  2. Methods for Synthesizing Findings on Moderation Effects Across Multiple Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C Hendricks; Sloboda, Zili; Faggiano, Fabrizio; Teasdale, Brent; Keller, Ferdinand; Burkhart, Gregor; Vigna-Taglianti, Federica; Howe, George; Masyn, Katherine; Wang, Wei; Muthén, Bengt; Stephens, Peggy; Grey, Scott; Perrino, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents new methods for synthesizing results from subgroup and moderation analyses across different randomized trials. We demonstrate that such a synthesis generally results in additional power to detect significant moderation findings above what one would find in a single trial. Three general methods for conducting synthesis analyses are discussed, with two methods, integrative data analysis, and parallel analyses, sharing a large advantage over traditional methods available in meta-analysis. We present a broad class of analytic models to examine moderation effects across trials that can be used to assess their overall effect and explain sources of heterogeneity, and present ways to disentangle differences across trials due to individual differences, contextual level differences, intervention, and trial design. PMID:21360061

  3. Cost-effective degradation test plan for a nonlinear random-coefficients model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong-Joon; Bae, Suk Joo

    2013-01-01

    The determination of requisite sample size and the inspection schedule considering both testing cost and accuracy has been an important issue in the degradation test. This paper proposes a cost-effective degradation test plan in the context of a nonlinear random-coefficients model, while meeting some precision constraints for failure-time distribution. We introduce a precision measure to quantify the information losses incurred by reducing testing resources. The precision measure is incorporated into time-varying cost functions to reflect real circumstances. We apply a hybrid genetic algorithm to general cost optimization problem with reasonable constraints on the level of testing precision in order to determine a cost-effective inspection scheme. The proposed method is applied to the degradation data of plasma display panels (PDPs) following a bi-exponential degradation model. Finally, sensitivity analysis via simulation is provided to evaluate the robustness of the proposed degradation test plan.

  4. Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on heavy menstrual bleeding: a placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashefi, Farzaneh; Khajehei, Marjan; Alavinia, Mohammad; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Asili, Javad

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of herbal plants have been reported to treat various gynecological problems of women. This study was set out to investigate the effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) in high school girls. Ninety-two young women who experienced HMB and met the inclusion criteria were recruited in this study. Participants were evaluated for six consecutive menstrual cycles. During 3 assessment cycles, their HMB was confirmed by Pictorial Blood Assessment Chart. They were then randomly allocated to two study groups to receive either ginger or placebo capsules. The participants filled in the same chart during three intervention cycles. The level of menstrual blood loss dramatically declined during the three intervention cycles in ginger-receiving group. The decrease of blood loss in ginger-receiving group was significantly more remarkable than that of participants receiving placebo (pginger may be considered as an effective therapeutic option for HMB. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Adjunctive social media for more effective contraceptive counseling: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofinas, Jason D; Varrey, Aneesha; Sapra, Katherine J; Kanj, Rula V; Chervenak, Frank A; Asfaw, Tirsit

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether social media, specifically Facebook, is an effective tool for improving contraceptive knowledge. English-speaking women aged 18-45 years receiving care at an urban academic center obstetrics and gynecology clinic were included and randomized to a trial of standard contraceptive education and pamphlet (n=74) compared with standard contraceptive education and Facebook (n=69) information for contraception counseling. Contraceptive knowledge was evaluated preintervention and postintervention by the Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory. We evaluated the effect of the intervention by raw score and percent increase in Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory score, participant satisfaction with counseling method, and contraceptive preference postintervention. All analyses were stratified by age group. The median raw postintervention Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory score was significantly higher in the Facebook compared with the pamphlet group (15 compared with 12, PSocial media as an adjunct to traditional in-office counseling improves patient contraceptive knowledge and increases patient preference for LARCs. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01994005.

  6. Cost effectiveness of preventive home visits to the elderly: economic evaluation alongside randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Christian; Vass, Mikkel; Lauridsen, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the cost effectiveness of preventive home visits to elderly persons in Denmark alongside a 3-year randomized controlled study. The main outcome measure was incremental costs per active life-year gained. The number of active life-years was defined as those during which the person...... is able independently to transfer, walk indoors, go outdoors, walk outdoors in both pleasant and poor weather, and climb stairs. In 17 of 34 municipalities health visitors and general practitioners were offered geriatric training, which focused on early signs of disability, physical activity......,455 to 744) in 75-year-olds and 694 euro (-2,684 to 4,071) in 80-year-olds. The discounted difference in mean active life-years was 0.034 (-0.058 to 0.125) and 0.197 (0.013 to 0.380), respectively. The study did not provide conclusive evidence on the cost effectiveness of the programs under consideration....

  7. Random safety auditing, root cause analysis, failure mode and effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursprung, Robert; Gray, James

    2010-03-01

    Improving quality and safety in health care is a major concern for health care providers, the general public, and policy makers. Errors and quality issues are leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the health care industry. There is evidence that patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at high risk for serious medical errors. To facilitate compliance with safe practices, many institutions have established quality-assurance monitoring procedures. Three techniques that have been found useful in the health care setting are failure mode and effects analysis, root cause analysis, and random safety auditing. When used together, these techniques are effective tools for system analysis and redesign focused on providing safe delivery of care in the complex NICU system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Organization of the two-level memory in the image processing system on scanning measuring projectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sychev, A.Yu.

    1977-01-01

    Discussed are the problems of improving the efficiency of the system for processing pictures taken in bubble chambers with the use of scanning measuring projectors. The system comprises 20 to 30 pro ectors linked with the ICL-1903A computer provided with a mainframe memory, 64 kilobytes in size. Because of the insufficient size of a mainframe memory, a part of the programs and data is located in a second-level memory, i.e. in an external memory. The analytical model described herein is used to analyze the effect of the memory organization on the characteristics of the system. It is shown that organization of pure procedures and introduction of the centralized control of the tWo-leVel memory result in substantial improvement of the efficiency of the picture processing system

  9. Geometric phase for a two-level system in photonic band gab crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrada, K.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the geometric phase (GP) for a qubit system coupled to its own anisotropic and isotropic photonic band gap (PBG) crystal environment without Born or Markovian approximation. The qubit frequency affects the GP of the qubit directly through the effect of the PBG environment. The results show the deviation of the GP depends on the detuning parameter and this deviation will be large for relatively large detuning of atom frequency inside the gap with respect to the photonic band edge. Whereas for detunings outside the gap, the GP of the qubit changes abruptly to zero, exhibiting collapse phenomenon of the GP. Moreover, we find that the GP in the isotropic PBG photonic crystal is more robust than that in the anisotropic PBG under the same condition. Finally, we explore the relationship between the variation of the GP and population in terms of the physical parameters.

  10. Effects of acupuncture on patients with fibromyalgia: study protocol of a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos-Rey Koldo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia is a multidimensional disorder for which treatment as yet remains unsatisfactory. Studies of an acupuncture-based approach, despite its broad acceptance among patients and healthcare staff, have not produced sufficient evidence of its effectiveness in treating this syndrome. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of individualized acupuncture for patients with fibromyalgia, with respect to reducing their pain and level of incapacity, and improving their quality of life. Methods/design Randomized controlled multicentre study, with 156 outpatients, aged over 17 years, diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology criteria, either alone or associated with severe depression, according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders. The participants will be randomly assigned to receive either "True acupuncture" or "Sham acupuncture". They will be evaluated using a specific measurement system, constituted of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Hamilton rating scale for depression. Also taken into consideration will be the clinical and subjective pain intensity, the patient's family structure and relationships, psychological aspects, quality of life, the duration of previous temporary disability, the consumption of antidepressant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory medication, and the potential effect of factors considered to be predictors of a poor prognosis. All these aspects will be examined by questionnaires and other suitably-validated instruments. The results obtained will be analysed at 10 weeks, and 6 and 12 months from the start of treatment. Discussion This trial will utilize high quality trial methodologies in accordance with CONSORT guidelines. It may provide evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for fibromyalgia either alone or associated with severe depression. Trial registration ISRCTN trial number

  11. Effect of Turkish classical music on blood pressure: a randomized controlled trial in hypertensive elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiroğlu, Tansel; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ergün, Yusuf; Ekerbiçer, Hasan Çetin

    2013-06-01

    Existing studies suggest that music therapy can have favorable effects on hypertension and anxiety. We therefore set out to investigate the effect of Turkish classical music. To investigate whether Turkish classical music has positive effects on blood pressures and anxiety levels in elderly patients. This was a randomized controlled trial performed on 60 hypertensive patients living in a local elderly home in Adana, Turkey. Following the completion of a socio-demographic form for each patient, Hamilton anxiety scale was applied. Thereafter, the subjects were randomly divided into two equal-size groups and were allowed to either listen to Turkish classical music (music therapy group) or have a resting period (control group) for 25 min. The primary and secondary outcome measures were blood pressure and Hamilton anxiety scale scores, respectively. The mean reduction in systolic blood pressure was 13.00 mmHg in the music therapy group and 6.50 mmHg in the control group. The baseline adjusted between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (95% CI 6.80-9.36). The median reductions in diastolic blood pressures were 10 mmHg both in the music therapy and control groups. The between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.839). The mean reduction in HAMA-A was 1.63 in the music therapy group and 0.77 in the control group. The baseline adjusted between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.82-1.92). The study demonstrated that both Turkish classical music and resting alone have positive effects on blood pressure in patients with hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Vitex agnus and Flaxseed on cyclic mastalgia: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Ahmadpour, Parivash; Javadzadeh, Yousef

    2016-02-01

    Evidence on the effect of Vitex agnus and Flaxseed on cyclical mastalgia is not enough. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of V. agnus and Flaxseed on cyclical mastalgia. This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 159 women referred to health centers of Tabriz, Iran. Subjects were allocated into three groups (n=53 per group) using block randomization. Group I received 25g daily Flaxseed powder and placebo of V. agnus; group II received daily 3.2-4.8mg V. agnus tablet and placebo of Flaxseed and control group received both placebo. Nominal day breast pain was applied at baseline, first, and second month after the intervention. Data was analyzed using general linear model. There was no statistical significant difference between the three groups in terms of socio-demographic characteristics and baseline values. The breast pain improved significantly in both intervention groups during the first and second month after intervention. Mean NDBP score was significantly lower than that in the control group at the first month after the intervention in the Flaxseed [adjusted mean difference: -3.1 (95% CI: -4.2 to -2.0)] and V. agnus groups [-3.3 (-4.3 to -2.2)] and the second month after the intervention in Flaxseed [-7.0 (-8.1 to -5.9)] and V. agnus groups [-6.4 (-7.5 to -5.3)]. Flaxseed and V. agnus are effective in short-term period in decreasing cyclical mastalgia. However, further studies are needed to examine the long-term effectiveness and sustainability of the effects after stopping the treatment in order to decide whether these alternative treatments are suitable to treat mastalgia or not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-depressive effectiveness of olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone: a pragmatic, randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Løberg Else-Marie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficacy studies indicate anti-depressive effects of at least some second generation antipsychotics (SGAs. The Bergen Psychosis Project (BPP is a 24-month, pragmatic, industry-independent, randomized, head-to-head comparison of olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone in patients acutely admitted with psychosis. The aim of the study is to investigate whether differential anti-depressive effectiveness exists among SGAs in a clinically relevant sample of patients acutely admitted with psychosis. Methods Adult patients acutely admitted to an emergency ward for psychosis were randomized to olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone or ziprasidone and followed for up to 2 years. Participants were assessed repeatedly using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale - Depression factor (PANSS-D and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS. Results A total of 226 patients were included. A significant time-effect showing a steady decline in depressive symptoms in all medication groups was demonstrated. There were no substantial differences among the SGAs in reducing the PANSS-D score or the CDSS sum score. Separate analyses of groups with CDSS sum scores > 6 or ≤6, respectively, reflecting degree of depressive morbidity, revealed essentially identical results to the primary analyses. There was a high correlation between the PANSS-D and the CDSS sum score (r = 0.77; p Conclusions There was no substantial difference in anti-depressive effectiveness among olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone or ziprasidone in this clinically relevant sample of patients acutely admitted to hospital for symptoms of psychosis. Based on our findings we can make no recommendations concerning choice of any particular SGA for targeting symptoms of depression in a patient acutely admitted with psychosis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID; URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/: NCT00932529

  14. Effects of yoga, strength training and advice on back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Bergström, Gunnar; Jensen, Irene; Hagberg, Jan; Kwak, Lydia

    2017-03-29

    Among the working population, non-specific low-back pain and neck pain are one of the most common reasons for sickness absenteeism. The aim was to evaluate the effects of an early intervention of yoga - compared with strength training or evidence-based advice - on sickness absenteeism, sickness presenteeism, back and neck pain and disability among a working population. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 159 participants with predominantly (90%) chronic back and neck pain. After screening, the participants were randomized to kundalini yoga, strength training or evidence-based advice. Primary outcome was sickness absenteeism. Secondary outcomes were sickness presenteeism, back and neck pain and disability. Self-reported questionnaires and SMS text messages were completed at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months. The results did not indicate that kundalini yoga and strength training had any statistically significant effects on the primary outcome compared with evidence-based advice. An interaction effect was found between adherence to recommendations and sickness absenteeism, indicating larger significant effects among the adherers to kundalini yoga versus evidence-based advice: RR = 0.47 (CI 0.30; 0.74, p = 0.001), strength training versus evidence-based advice: RR = 0.60 (CI 0.38; 0.96, p = 0.032). Some significant differences were also found for the secondary outcomes to the advantage of kundalini yoga and strength training. Guided exercise in the forms of kundalini yoga or strength training does not reduce sickness absenteeism more than evidence-based advice alone. However, secondary analyses reveal that among those who pursue kundalini yoga or strength training at least two times a week, a significantly reduction in sickness absenteeism was found. Methods to increase adherence to treatment recommendations should be further developed and applied in exercise interventions. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01653782, date of registration: June, 28

  15. Effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changhe; Ji, Kangshou; Cao, Huijuan; Wang, Ying; Jin, Hwang Hye; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Guanlin

    2015-03-28

    The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for angina pectoris. Eleven electronic databases were searched until January 2013. The study included randomized controlled trials that the effectiveness of acupuncture alone was compared to anti-angina medicines (in addition to conventional treatment) and the effectiveness of a combination of acupuncture plus anti-angina medicines was compared to anti-angina medicines alone. The trial selection, data extraction, quality assessment and data analytic procedures outlined in the 2011 Cochrane Handbook were involved. The study included 25 randomized controlled trials (involving 2,058 patients) that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled results showed that the number of patients with ineffectiveness of angina relief was less in the combined acupuncture-anti-angina treatment group than in the anti-angina medicines alone group (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.23-0.47, p angina medicines alone group, fewer patients in the combined treatment group showed no ECG improvement (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.40-0.62, p angina medicines alone for both outcome measures. Only four trials mentioned adverse effects. One trial found no significant difference between acupuncture and Chinese medicine, and three reported no adverse events. The quality of the trials was found to be low. The findings showed very low evidence to support the use of acupuncture for improving angina symptoms and ECG of angina patients. However, the quality of the trials included in this study was low. Large and rigorously designed trials are needed to confirm the potential benefit and adverse events of acupuncture.

  16. The effects of a tailored intensive care unit delirium prevention protocol: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyoung-Ja; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2015-09-01

    A decreased incidence of delirium following the application of non-pharmacologic intervention protocols to several patient populations has been previously reported. However, few studies have been conducted to examine the effects of their application to intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To examine the effects of applying a tailored delirium preventive protocol, developed by the authors, to ICU patients by analyzing its effects on delirium incidence, in-hospital mortality, ICU readmission, and length of ICU stay in a Korean hospital. A single-blind randomized controlled trial. A 1049-bed general hospital with a 105-bed ICU. Sixty and 63 ICU patients were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups, respectively. The researchers applied the delirium prevention protocol to the intervention group every day for the first 7 days of ICU hospitalization. Delirium incidence, mortality, and re-admission to the ICU during the same hospitalization period were analyzed by logistic regression analysis; the 7- and 30-day in-hospital mortality by Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis; and length of ICU stay was assessed by linear regression analysis. Application of the protocol had no significant effect on delirium incidence, in-hospital mortality, re-admission to the ICU, or length of ICU stay. Whereas the risk of 30-day in-hospital mortality was not significantly lower in the intervention than in the control group (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.10-1.09), we found a significantly decreased 7-day in-hospital mortality in the intervention group after protocol application (HR: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01-0.72). Application of a tailored delirium prevention protocol to acute stage patients during the first 7 days of ICU hospitalization appeared to reduce the 7-day in-hospital risk of mortality only for this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical and neurobiological effects of aerobic exercise in dental phobia: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberger, Brigitt L; Plag, Jens; Schumacher, Sarah; Gaudlitz, Katharina; Bischoff, Sophie; Bobbert, Thomas; Dimeo, Fernando; Petzold, Moritz B; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Dudás, Zsuzsa; Ströhle, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Physical activity has shown to be effective in anxiety disorders. For specific phobia, no studies are available that systematically examined the effects of an aerobic exercise intervention on phobic fear within a randomized-controlled design. Therefore, we investigated the acute effect of a standardized aerobic training on clinical symptoms of dental phobia as well as on stress-related neurobiological markers. Within a crossover design, 30 patients with dental phobia (mean age: 34.1 years; mean score of the Dental Anxiety Scale: 18.8) underwent two minor dental interventions separated by 7 days. Dental treatment was performed after 30 min of physical activity at either 20% VO 2 max (control) or 70% VO 2 max (intervention), respectively. To control for habituation, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions prior to the first intervention. Moreover, saliva samples were collected at five times in order to determine changes in salivary cortisol (sC) and alpha-amylase (sAA) due to treatment. In comparison to baseline, aerobic exercise within 70% VO 2 max significantly reduced clinical anxiety and sC concentrations before, during, and after the dental treatment. In contrast, the control condition led to decreased sAA levels at different time points of measurement. Habituation occurred at the second study day, independent of the order. Our study provides evidence for an effect of moderate-intense exercise on clinical symptoms and sC in patients with dental phobia. Therefore, acute aerobic exercise might be a simple and low-cost intervention to reduce disorder-specific phobic fear. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of Trospium Chloride on Cognitive Function in Women Aged 50 and Older: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Elizabeth J; Dumond, Julie B; Bowling, J Michael; Khandelwal, Christine M; Wu, Jennifer M; Busby-Whitehead, Jan; Kaufer, Daniel I

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of trospium chloride on cognitive function in postmenopausal women treated for overactive bladder (OAB). Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial conducted from April 2013 to April 2015. Women aged 50 years or older seeking treatment for OAB were randomized to either trospium chloride XR 60 mg daily or placebo. Baseline cognitive function was assessed via Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), Mini Mental Status Exam, Mini Mental Status X, Digit Span, Trails A, Trails B, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Cognitive function was reassessed at week 1 and week 4. A priori power analysis determined that 21 subjects were needed per group. Although 59 women were enrolled and randomized (28 trospium and 31 placebo), 45 completed assessment (21 trospium and 24 placebo). Mean age was 68 years, 78% were white, and 44% had previously taken OAB medication. For the primary outcome, there was no difference in HVLT-R total score between trospium and placebo groups at week 4 (P = 0.29). There were also no differences based on the other cognitive tests. There was a correlation between age and the following week-4 tests: HVLT-R total score (r = -0.3, P = 0.02), HVLT-R total recall subscale (r = -0.4, P = 0.007), Trails A (r = 0.4, P = 0.002), and Trails B (r = 0.4, P = 0.004). A linear regression model found that HVLT-R total score decreased by 0.372 points for each increased year of age. In women aged 50 years and older, there were no changes in cognitive function between those taking trospium and placebo. Cognitive function was correlated with age.

  19. Effectiveness of an Energy Management Training Course on Employee Well-Being: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sai Krupa; Mason, Shawn T; Vail, Taylor A; Rogers, Gail V; Livingston, Kara A; Whelan, Jillian G; Chin, Meghan K; Blanchard, Caroline M; Turgiss, Jennifer L; Roberts, Susan B

    2018-01-01

    Programs focused on employee well-being have gained momentum in recent years, but few have been rigorously evaluated. This study evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention designed to enhance vitality and purpose in life by assessing changes in employee quality of life (QoL) and health-related behaviors. A worksite-based randomized controlled trial. Twelve eligible worksites (8 randomized to the intervention group [IG] and 4 to the wait-listed control group [CG]). Employees (n = 240) at the randomized worksites. A 2.5-day group-based behavioral intervention. Rand Medical Outcomes Survey (MOS) 36-item Short-Form (SF-36) vitality and QoL measures, Ryff Purpose in Life Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies questionnaire for depression, MOS sleep, body weight, physical activity, diet quality, and blood measures for glucose and lipids (which were used to calculate a cardiometabolic risk score) obtained at baseline and 6 months. General linear mixed models were used to compare least squares means or prevalence differences in outcomes between IG and CG participants. As compared to CG, IG had a significantly higher mean 6-month change on the SF-36 vitality scale ( P = .003) and scored in the highest categories for 5 of the remaining 7 SF-36 domains: general health ( P = .014), mental health ( P = .027), absence of role limitations due to physical problems ( P = .026), and social functioning ( P = .007). The IG also had greater improvements in purpose in life ( P employee QoL and well-being over 6 months.

  20. Effects of hormone therapy on brain structure: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Kejal; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Lesnick, Timothy G; Zuk, Samantha M; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Gleason, Carey E; Wharton, Whitney; Dowling, N Maritza; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Senjem, Matthew L; Shuster, Lynne T; Bailey, Kent R; Rocca, Walter A; Jack, Clifford R; Asthana, Sanjay; Miller, Virginia M

    2016-08-30

    To investigate the effects of hormone therapy on brain structure in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in recently postmenopausal women. Participants (aged 42-56 years, within 5-36 months past menopause) in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study were randomized to (1) 0.45 mg/d oral conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), (2) 50 μg/d transdermal 17β-estradiol, or (3) placebo pills and patch for 48 months. Oral progesterone (200 mg/d) was given to active treatment groups for 12 days each month. MRI and cognitive testing were performed in a subset of participants at baseline, and at 18, 36, and 48 months of randomization (n = 95). Changes in whole brain, ventricular, and white matter hyperintensity volumes, and in global cognitive function, were measured. Higher rates of ventricular expansion were observed in both the CEE and the 17β-estradiol groups compared to placebo; however, the difference was significant only in the CEE group (p = 0.01). Rates of ventricular expansion correlated with rates of decrease in brain volume (r = -0.58; p ≤ 0.001) and with rates of increase in white matter hyperintensity volume (r = 0.27; p = 0.01) after adjusting for age. The changes were not different between the CEE and 17β-estradiol groups for any of the MRI measures. The change in global cognitive function was not different across the groups. Ventricular volumes increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received CEE compared to placebo but without changes in cognitive performance. Because the sample size was small and the follow-up limited to 4 years, the findings should be interpreted with caution and need confirmation. This study provides Class I evidence that brain ventricular volume increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received oral CEE compared to placebo. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.