WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-dimensional spatial resolution

  1. Two-dimensional, high spatial resolution, solar spectroscopy using a correlation tracker. I. Correlation tracker description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, E.; Collados, M.; Bonet, J. A.; Lorenzo, F.; Viera, T.; Reyes, M.; Rodriguez Hidalgo, I.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the description of the Solar Correlation Tracker prototype built by the Instituto de Astrof isica de Canarias is presented. The system is mainly conceived as a solar image tranquilizer, although a scanning utility has also been included in order to displace the image on the final focal plane with sub-arcsecond steps, thus allowing to perform two-dimensional high spatial resolution spectroscopy. The behaviour of the different elements of the tracker is shown, as well as their influence in the performance of the system. The restrictions of the Absolute Differences algorithm, used to detect image motion when granulation fields are considered, are extensively discussed. Laboratory and telescope tests have demonstrated the capabilities of the system. The electronic components have been adapted to new optics and mechanics developed at the Kiepenheuer Institut to build an Advanced Solar Correlation Tracker. The final version of the system has been installed at the German VTT of the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. The tests carried out have demonstrated that a bandwidth of about 60Hz (for an attenuation factor of two) is achieved, which is approximately four times larger than that of previous Correlation Trackers, at the same level of attenuation.

  2. Multifrequency observations of a solar microwave burst with two-dimensional spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    Frequency-agile interferometry observations using three baselines and the technique of frequency synthesis were used to obtain two-dimensional positions of multiple microwave sources at several frequency ranges in a solar flare. Source size and brightness temperature spectra were obtained near the peak of the burst. The size spectrum shows that the source size decreases rapidly with increasing frequency, but the brightness temperature spectrum can be well-fitted by gyrosynchrotron emission from a nonthermal distribution of electrons with power-law index of 4.8. The spatial structure of the burst showed several characteristics in common with primary/secondary bursts discussed by Nakajima et al. (1985). A source of coherent plasma emission at low frequencies is found near the secondary gyrosynchrotron source, associated with the leader spots of the active region.

  3. Uncertainty relation for resolution in space, spatial frequency, and orientation optimized by two-dimensional visual cortical filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugman, J G

    1985-07-01

    Two-dimensional spatial linear filters are constrained by general uncertainty relations that limit their attainable information resolution for orientation, spatial frequency, and two-dimensional (2D) spatial position. The theoretical lower limit for the joint entropy, or uncertainty, of these variables is achieved by an optimal 2D filter family whose spatial weighting functions are generated by exponentiated bivariate second-order polynomials with complex coefficients, the elliptic generalization of the one-dimensional elementary functions proposed in Gabor's famous theory of communication [J. Inst. Electr. Eng. 93, 429 (1946)]. The set includes filters with various orientation bandwidths, spatial-frequency bandwidths, and spatial dimensions, favoring the extraction of various kinds of information from an image. Each such filter occupies an irreducible quantal volume (corresponding to an independent datum) in a four-dimensional information hyperspace whose axes are interpretable as 2D visual space, orientation, and spatial frequency, and thus such a filter set could subserve an optimally efficient sampling of these variables. Evidence is presented that the 2D receptive-field profiles of simple cells in mammalian visual cortex are well described by members of this optimal 2D filter family, and thus such visual neurons could be said to optimize the general uncertainty relations for joint 2D-spatial-2D-spectral information resolution. The variety of their receptive-field dimensions and orientation and spatial-frequency bandwidths, and the correlations among these, reveal several underlying constraints, particularly in width/length aspect ratio and principal axis organization, suggesting a polar division of labor in occupying the quantal volumes of information hyperspace.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Spatial resolution and maximum compensation factor of two-dimensional selective excitation pulses for MRI of objects containing conductive implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeseong Woo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be disturbed by radiofrequency (RF field inhomogeneity induced by the conductive implants. This inhomogeneity causes a local decrease of the signal intensity around the conductor, resulting in a deterioration of the accurate quantification. In a previous study, we developed an MRI imaging method using a two-dimensional selective excitation pulse (2D pulse to mitigate signal inhomogeneity induced by metallic implants. In this paper, the effect of 2D pulse was evaluated quantitatively by numerical simulation and MRI experiments. We introduced two factors for evaluation, spatial resolution and maximum compensation factor. Numerical simulations were performed with two groups. One group was composed of four models with different signal loss width, to evaluate the spatial resolution of the 2D pulse. The other group is also composed of four models with different amounts of signal loss for evaluating maximum compensation factor. In MRI experiments, we prepared phantoms containing conductors, which have different electrical conductivities related with the amounts of signal intensity decrease. The recovery of signal intensity was observed by 2D pulses, in both numerical simulations and experiments.

  5. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard W; Mane, Anil U; Elam, Jeffrey W; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew; Chollet, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  6. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Mane, Anil; Elam, Jeffrey; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  7. TH-C-19A-12: Two-Dimensional High Spatial-Resolution Dosimeter Using Europium Doped Potassium Chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H; Yang, D; Xiao, Z [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Driewer, J [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Han, Z [Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports our attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. Methods: A thin layer of KCl:Eu2+ was deposited on a substrate of borosilicate glass (e.g., laboratory slides) with a PVD system. For tape casting, a homogenous suspension containing storage phosphor particles, liquid vehicle and polymer binder was formed and subsequently cast by doctor-blade onto a polyethylene terephthalate substrate to form a 150 μm thick SPF. Results: X ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 μm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had completed been incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl−) centers were the electron storage centers post x ray irradiation and that Eu2+ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150 μm thick casted KCl:Eu2+ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu2+ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu2+ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a Result of its intrinsic high radiation hardness. Conclusions: This discovery research provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu2+ based SPF with associated readout apparatus could Result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of

  8. Two-dimensional spatial patterning in developmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Keiko U

    2012-08-01

    Multicellular organisms produce complex tissues with specialized cell types. During animal development, numerous cell-cell interactions shape tissue patterning through mechanisms involving contact-dependent cell migration and ligand-receptor-mediated lateral inhibition. Owing to the presence of cell walls, plant cells neither migrate nor undergo apoptosis as a means to correct for mis-specified cells. How can plants generate functional tissue patterns? This review aims to deduce fundamental principles of pattern formation through examining two-dimensional (2-D) spatial tissue patterning in plants and animals. Turing's mathematical framework will be introduced and applied to classic examples of de novo 2-D patterning in both animal and plant systems. By comparing their regulatory circuits, new insights into the similarities and differences of the basic principles governing tissue patterning will be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Two-dimensional Fibonacci grating for far-field super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2016-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) Fibonacci grating is used to transform evanescent waves into propagating waves for far-field super-resolution imaging. By detecting far-field intensity distributions of light field through objects in front of the 2D Fibonacci grating in free space at once, we can retrieve the image of objects with beyond λ/7 spatial resolution. We also find that the coherent illumination case can give a better resolution than incoherent illumination case by such 2D grating-assisted imaging system. The analytical results are verified by numerical simulation.

  10. Spontaneous chiral resolution in two-dimensional systems of patchy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-González, J. A.; Chapela, G. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 México D.F. (Mexico); Quintana-H, J., E-mail: jaq@unam.mx [Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México - Apdo. Postal 70213, 04510 Coyoacán, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-21

    Short ranged potentials and their anisotropy produce spontaneous chiral resolution in a two dimensional model of patchy particles introduced in this paper. This model could represent an equimolar binary mixture (racemic mixture) of two kinds of chiral molecules (enantiomers) adsorbed to a bi-dimensional domain where only lateral short ranged interactions are present. Most racemic mixtures undergo chiral resolution due to their spatial anisotropy, the combined effect of long range forces and the thermodynamic conditions. The patchy particles are modeled as a hard disk and four different bonding sites located to produce chirality. Phase behavior and structural properties are analysed using Discontinuous Molecular Dynamics in the canonical ensemble. When the four patchy particles are separated by the angles (60°, 120°, 60°, 120°), spontaneous chiral resolution is produced, given by the formation of homochiral clusters, if started from the corresponding racemic mixture. Gel behavior is also obtained in all the systems for low temperatures and low densities.

  11. Two-dimensional Block of Spatial Convolution Algorithm and Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mussa Mohamed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm based on sub image-segmentation strategy. The proposed scheme divides a grayscale image into overlapped 6×6 blocks each of which is segmented into four small 3x3 non-overlapped sub-images. A new spatial approach for efficiently computing 2-dimensional linear convolution or cross-correlation between suitable flipped and fixed filter coefficients (sub image for cross-correlation) and corresponding input sub image is presented. Computation of convolution is itera...

  12. Resonant indirect exchange via spatially separated two-dimensional channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhansky, I. V., E-mail: rozhansky@gmail.com [Ioffe Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Krainov, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S. [Ioffe Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Aronzon, B. A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,” 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Davydov, A. B. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kugel, K. I. [Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tripathi, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Lähderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2015-06-22

    We apply the resonant indirect exchange interaction theory to explain the ferromagnetic properties of the hybrid heterostructure consisting of a InGaAs-based quantum well (QW) sandwiched between GaAs barriers with spatially separated Mn δ-layer. The experimentally obtained dependence of the Curie temperature on the QW depth exhibits a peak related to the region of resonant indirect exchange. We suggest the theoretical explanation and a fit to this dependence as a result of the two contributions to ferromagnetism—the intralayer contribution and the resonant exchange contribution provided by the QW.

  13. A Multi-Resolution Data Structure for Two-Dimensional Morse Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, P-T; Edelsbrunner, H; Hamann, B; Pascucci, V

    2003-07-30

    The efficient construction of simplified models is a central problem in the field of visualization. We combine topological and geometric methods to construct a multi-resolution data structure for functions over two-dimensional domains. Starting with the Morse-Smale complex we build a hierarchy by progressively canceling critical points in pairs. The data structure supports mesh traversal operations similar to traditional multi-resolution representations.

  14. Stability of two-dimensional spatial solitons in nonlocal nonlinear media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skupin, S.; Bang, Ole; Edmundson, D.;

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the existence and stability of two-dimensional solitons in media with spatially nonlocal nonlinear response. We show that such systems, which include thermal nonlinearity and dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, may support a variety of stationary localized structures, including rotating...

  15. Two-dimensional gain cross-grating based on spatial modulation of active Raman gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhou, Feng-Xue; Guo, Hong-Ju; Niu, Yue-Ping; Gong, Shang-Qing

    2016-11-01

    Based on the spatial modulation of active Raman gain, a two-dimensional gain cross-grating is theoretically proposed. As the probe field propagates along the z direction and passes through the intersectant region of the two orthogonal standing-wave fields in the x-y plane, it can be effectively diffracted into the high-order directions, and the zero-order diffraction intensity is amplified at the same time. In comparison with the two-dimensional electromagnetically induced cross-grating based on electromagnetically induced transparency, the two-dimensional gain cross-grating has much higher diffraction intensities in the first-order and the high-order directions. Hence, it is more suitable to be utilized as all-optical switching and routing in optical networking and communication. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274112 and 11347133).

  16. Resolution enhancement of scanning four-point-probe measurements on two-dimensional systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Torben Mikael; Stokbro, Kurt; Hansen, Ole; Hassenkam, T.; Shiraki, I.; Hasegawa, S.; Bøggild, Peter

    2003-01-01

    A method to improve the resolution of four-point-probe measurements of two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-2D systems is presented. By mapping the conductance on a dense grid around a target area and postprocessing the data, the resolution can be improved by a factor of approximately 50 to better than 1/15 of the four-point-probe electrode spacing. The real conductance sheet is simulated by a grid of discrete resistances, which is optimized by means of a standard optimization algorithm, until the ...

  17. Spatial statistics of magnetic field in two-dimensional chaotic flow in the resistive growth stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokolov, I. V.

    2017-03-01

    The correlation tensors of magnetic field in a two-dimensional chaotic flow of conducting fluid are studied. It is shown that there is a stage of resistive evolution where the field correlators grow exponentially with time. The two- and four-point field correlation tensors are computed explicitly in this stage in the framework of Batchelor-Kraichnan-Kazantsev model. They demonstrate strong temporal intermittency of the field fluctuations and high level of non-Gaussianity in spatial field distribution.

  18. Resolution enhancement of scanning four-point-probe measurements on two-dimensional systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Mikael; Stokbro, Kurt; Hansen, Ole;

    2003-01-01

    A method to improve the resolution of four-point-probe measurements of two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-2D systems is presented. By mapping the conductance on a dense grid around a target area and postprocessing the data, the resolution can be improved by a factor of approximately 50 to better than 1....../15 of the four-point-probe electrode spacing. The real conductance sheet is simulated by a grid of discrete resistances, which is optimized by means of a standard optimization algorithm, until the simulated voltage-to-current ratios converges with the measurement. The method has been tested against simulated...... data as well as real measurements and is found to successfully deconvolute the four-point-probe measurements. In conjunction with a newly developed scanning four-point probe with electrode spacing of 1.1 µm, the method can resolve the conductivity with submicron resolution. ©2003 American Institute...

  19. Halogen bonded two-dimensional supramolecul arassemblies studied by high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XunYu; WANG Fang; CHEN QiuXia; WANG LiYan; WANG ZhiQiang

    2007-01-01

    We described the formation of self-organized two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of N-(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro- 4-iodophenyl)hexadecylamine and 1-dodecyl-imidazole at the liquid/HOPG interface. The two-dimen- sional assemblies showed a fishbone-like pattern structure as revealed by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy. Although different interactions can drive the formation of 2D assemblies,as far as we know,this is the first report on halogen bond-driven 2D assemblies.

  20. Spatial dispersion in two-dimensional plasmonic crystals: Large blueshifts promoted by diffraction anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Christin; Christensen, Johan; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    We develop a methodology to incorporate nonlocal optical response of the free electron gas due to quantum-interaction effects in metal components of periodic two-dimensional plasmonic crystals and study the impact of spatial dispersion on promising building blocks for photonic circuits. Within th...... at normal incidence and the surprisingly large structural parameters at which finite blueshifts are observable, which we attribute to diffraction that offers nonvanishing in-plane wave vector components and increases the penetration depth of longitudinal (nonlocal) modes....

  1. Nonlinearity management and diffraction management for the stabilization of two-dimensional spatial solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P A Subha; C P Jisha; V C Kuriakose

    2007-08-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the dynamics of two-dimensional spatial solitons in Kerr media with periodically varying diffraction and nonlinearity has been analyzed in this paper using variational approach and numerical studies. Analytical expressions for soliton parameters have been derived using variational analysis. Variational equations and partial differential equation have been simulated numerically. Analytical and numerical studies have shown that nonlinearity management and diffraction management stabilize the pulse against decay or collapse providing undisturbed propagation even for larger energies of the incident beam.

  2. Effect of Quantum Fluctuation on Two-Dimensional Spatially Anisotropic Heisenberg Antiferromagnet with Integer Spin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI An-Chun; TIAN Guang-Shan

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, we calculate the Gaussian correction to the critical value Jc⊥ caused by quantum spin fluctuation in a two-dimensional spatially anisotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnet with integer spin S. Previously, someauthors computed this quantity by the mean-field theory based on the Schwinger boson representation of spin operators.However, for S = 1, their result is much less than the one derived by numerical calculations. By taking the effect ofquantum spin fluctuation into consideration, we are able to produce a greatly improved result.

  3. High resolution, two-dimensional imaging, microchannel plate detector for use on a sounding rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Siegmund, Oswald H.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Harris, Walter; Clarke, John

    1991-01-01

    We discuss a high resolution microchannel plate (MCP) imaging detector to be used in measurements of Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha line emission from Jupiter and the interplanetary medium. The detector is housed in a vacuum-tight stainless steel cylinder (to provide shielding from magnetic fields) with a MgF2 window. Operating at nominal voltage, the four plate configuration provides a gain of 1.2 x 10 exp 7 electrons per incident photon. The wedge-and-strip anode has two-dimensional imaging capabilities, with a resolution of 40 microns FWHM over a one centimeter diameter area. The detector has a high quantum efficiency while retaining a low background rate. A KBr photocathode is used to enhance the quantum efficiency of the bare MCPs to a value of 35 percent at Lyman-alpha.

  4. Optical generation of a spatially variant two-dimensional lattice structure by using a phase only spatial light modulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple and straightforward method to generate a spatially variant lattice structures by optical interference lithography method. Using this method, it is possible to independently vary the orientation and period of the two-dimensional lattice. The method consists of two steps which are: numerical synthesis of corresponding phase mask by employing a two-dimensional integrated gradient calculations and experimental implementation of synthesized phase mask by making use of a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. As a working example, we provide the experimental fabrication of a spatially variant square lattice structure which has the possibility to guide a Gaussian beam through a 90{\\deg} bend by photonic crystal self-collimation phenomena. The method is digitally reconfigurable, is completely scalable and could be extended to other kind of lattices as well.

  5. Optical generation of a spatially variant two-dimensional lattice structure by using a phase only spatial light modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manish, E-mail: manishk@physics.iitd.ac.in; Joseph, Joby, E-mail: joby@physics.iitd.ac.in [Photonics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-08-04

    We propose a simple and straightforward method to generate spatially variant lattice structures by optical interference lithography method. Using this method, it is possible to independently vary the orientation and period of the two-dimensional lattice. The method consists of two steps which are: numerical synthesis of corresponding phase mask by employing a two-dimensional integrated gradient calculations and experimental implementation of synthesized phase mask by making use of a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. As a working example, we provide the experimental fabrication of a spatially variant square lattice structure which has the possibility to guide a Gaussian beam through a 90° bend by photonic crystal self-collimation phenomena. The method is digitally reconfigurable, is completely scalable, and could be extended to other kind of lattices as well.

  6. Estimates of the statistical two-dimensional spatial structure in rain over a small network of disdrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, A. R.; Larsen, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    Microphysical understanding of the variability in rain requires a statistical characterization of different drop sizes both in time and in all dimensions of space. Temporally, there have been several statistical characterizations of raindrop counts. However, temporal and spatial structures are neither equivalent nor readily translatable. While there are recent reports of the one-dimensional spatial correlation functions in rain, they can only be assumed to represent the two-dimensional (2D) correlation function under the assumption of spatial isotropy. To date, however, there are no actual observations of the (2D) spatial correlation function in rain over areas. Two reasons for this deficiency are the fiscal and the physical impossibilities of assembling a dense network of instruments over even hundreds of meters much less over kilometers. Consequently, all measurements over areas will necessarily be sparsely sampled. A dense network of data must then be estimated using interpolations from the available observations. In this work, a network of 19 optical disdrometers over a 100 m by 71 m area yield observations of drop spectra every minute. These are then interpolated to a 1 m resolution grid. Fourier techniques then yield estimates of the 2D spatial correlation functions. Preliminary examples using this technique found that steadier, light rain decorrelates spatially faster than does the convective rain, but in both cases the 2D spatial correlation functions are anisotropic, reflecting an asymmetry in the physical processes influencing the rain reaching the ground not accounted for in numerical microphysical models.

  7. High Resolution Turntable Radar Imaging via Two Dimensional Deconvolution with Matrix Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinfei; Xia, Jie; Yin, Zhiping; Chen, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Resolution is the bottleneck for the application of radar imaging, which is limited by the bandwidth for the range dimension and synthetic aperture for the cross-range dimension. The demand for high azimuth resolution inevitably results in a large amount of cross-range samplings, which always need a large number of transmit-receive channels or a long observation time. Compressive sensing (CS)-based methods could be used to reduce the samples, but suffer from the difficulty of designing the measurement matrix, and they are not robust enough in practical application. In this paper, based on the two-dimensional (2D) convolution model of the echo after matched filter (MF), we propose a novel 2D deconvolution algorithm for turntable radar to improve the radar imaging resolution. Additionally, in order to reduce the cross-range samples, we introduce a new matrix completion (MC) algorithm based on the hyperbolic tangent constraint to improve the performance of MC with undersampled data. Besides, we present a new way of echo matrix reconstruction for the situation that only partial cross-range data are observed and some columns of the echo matrix are missing. The new matrix has a better low rank property and needs just one operation of MC for all of the missing elements compared to the existing ways. Numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28282904

  8. Spatial dispersion in two-dimensional plasmonic crystals: Large blueshifts promoted by diffraction anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Christin; Christensen, Johan; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-10-01

    We develop a methodology to incorporate nonlocal optical response of the free electron gas due to quantum-interaction effects in metal components of periodic two-dimensional plasmonic crystals and study the impact of spatial dispersion on promising building blocks for photonic circuits. Within the framework of the hydrodynamic model, we observe significant changes with respect to the commonly employed local-response approximation, but also in comparison with homogeneous metal films where nonlocal effects have previously been considered. Notable are the emergence of a contribution from nonlocality at normal incidence and the surprisingly large structural parameters at which finite blueshifts are observable, which we attribute to diffraction that offers nonvanishing in-plane wave vector components and increases the penetration depth of longitudinal (nonlocal) modes.

  9. Spatially structured oscillations in a two-dimensional excitatory neuronal network with synaptic depression

    KAUST Repository

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.

    2009-10-29

    We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a two-dimensional excitatory neuronal network with synaptic depression. Coupling between populations of neurons is taken to be nonlocal, while depression is taken to be local and presynaptic. We show that the network supports a wide range of spatially structured oscillations, which are suggestive of phenomena seen in cortical slice experiments and in vivo. The particular form of the oscillations depends on initial conditions and the level of background noise. Given an initial, spatially localized stimulus, activity evolves to a spatially localized oscillating core that periodically emits target waves. Low levels of noise can spontaneously generate several pockets of oscillatory activity that interact via their target patterns. Periodic activity in space can also organize into spiral waves, provided that there is some source of rotational symmetry breaking due to external stimuli or noise. In the high gain limit, no oscillatory behavior exists, but a transient stimulus can lead to a single, outward propagating target wave. © Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009.

  10. The Effect of Two-Dimensional and Stereoscopic Presentation on Middle School Students' Performance of Spatial Cognition Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Aaron; Lee, Hee-Sun

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether and how student performance on three types of spatial cognition tasks differs when worked with two-dimensional or stereoscopic representations. We recruited nineteen middle school students visiting a planetarium in a large Midwestern American city and analyzed their performance on a series of spatial cognition tasks in…

  11. Critical Behavior of Spatial Evolutionary Game with Altruistic to Spiteful Preferences on Two-Dimensional Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Teng; Chen, Wei; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2016-10-01

    Self-questioning mechanism which is similar to single spin-flip of Ising model in statistical physics is introduced into spatial evolutionary game model. We propose a game model with altruistic to spiteful preferences via weighted sums of own and opponent's payoffs. This game model can be transformed into Ising model with an external field. Both interaction between spins and the external field are determined by the elements of payoff matrix and the preference parameter. In the case of perfect rationality at zero social temperature, this game model has three different phases which are entirely cooperative phase, entirely non-cooperative phase and mixed phase. In the investigations of the game model with Monte Carlo simulation, two paths of payoff and preference parameters are taken. In one path, the system undergoes a discontinuous transition from cooperative phase to non-cooperative phase with the change of preference parameter. In another path, two continuous transitions appear one after another when system changes from cooperative phase to non-cooperative phase with the prefenrence parameter. The critical exponents v, β, and γ of two continuous phase transitions are estimated by the finite-size scaling analysis. Both continuous phase transitions have the same critical exponents and they belong to the same universality class as the two-dimensional Ising model. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11504384

  12. Ultrahigh-Resolution Magnetic Resonance in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields: Two-Dimensional Long-Lived-Coherence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthalapalli, Srinivas; Bornet, Aurélien; Segawa, Takuya F.; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-07-01

    A half-century quest for improving resolution in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has enabled the study of molecular structures, biological interactions, and fine details of anatomy. This progress largely relied on the advent of sophisticated superconducting magnets that can provide stable and homogeneous fields with temporal and spatial variations below ΔB0/B0lungs, tissue-air interfaces, surgical implants, etc., lead to fluctuations and losses of local homogeneity. A new method dubbed “long-lived-coherence correlation spectroscopy” (LLC-COSY) opens the way to overcome both inhomogeneous and homogeneous broadening, which arise from local variations in static fields and fluctuating dipole-dipole interactions, respectively. LLC-COSY makes it possible to obtain ultrahigh resolution two-dimensional spectra, with linewidths on the order of Δν=0.1 to 1 Hz, even in very inhomogeneous fields (ΔB0/B0>10ppm or 5000 Hz at 9.7 T), and can improve resolution by a factor up to 9 when the homogeneous linewidths are determined by dipole-dipole interactions. The resulting LLC-COSY spectra display chemical shift differences and scalar couplings in two orthogonal dimensions, like in “J spectroscopy.” LLC-COSY does not require any sophisticated gradient switching or frequency-modulated pulses. Applications to in-cell NMR and to magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of selected volume elements in MRI appear promising, particularly when susceptibility variations tend to preclude high resolution.

  13. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatiotemporal vector pulse shaping of femtosecond laser pulses with a multi-pass two-dimensional spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esumi, Y; Kabir, M D; Kannari, F

    2009-10-12

    A novel non-interferometric vector pulse-shaping scheme is developed for femtosecond laser pulses using a two-dimensional spatial light modulator (2D-SLM). By utilizing spatiotemporal pulse shaping obtainable by the 2D-SLM, we demonstrate spatiotemporal vector pulse shaping for the first time.

  15. Quantum limit for two-dimensional resolution of two incoherent optical point sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ang, Shan Zheng; Tsang, Mankei

    2016-01-01

    We obtain the multiple-parameter quantum Cram\\'er-Rao bound for estimating the Cartesian components of the centroid and separation of two incoherent optical point sources using an imaging system with finite spatial bandwidth. Under quite general and realistic assumptions on the point-spread function of the imaging system, and for weak source strengths, we show that the Cram\\'er-Rao bounds for the x and y components of the separation are independent of the values of those components, which may be well-below the conventional Rayleigh resolution limit. We also propose two linear optics-based measurement methods that approach the quantum bound for the estimation of the Cartesian components of the separation once the centroid has been located. One of the methods is an interferometric scheme that approaches the quantum bound for sub-Rayleigh separations. The other method uses fiber coupling to attain the bound regardless of the distance between the two sources.

  16. Two Dimensional Spatial Independent Component Analysis and Its Application in fMRI Data Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hua-fu; YAO De-zhong

    2005-01-01

    One important application of independent component analysis (ICA) is in image processing. A two dimensional (2-D) composite ICA algorithm framework for 2-D image independent component analysis (2-D ICA) is proposed. The 2-D nature of the algorithm provides it an advantage of circumventing the roundabout transforming procedures between two dimensional (2-D) image data and one-dimensional (1-D) signal. Moreover the combination of the Newton (fixed-point algorithm) and natural gradient algorithms in this composite algorithm increases its efficiency and robustness. The convincing results of a successful example in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) show the potential application of composite 2-D ICA in the brain activity detection.

  17. Spatial statistics of magnetic field in two-dimensional chaotic flow in the resistive growth stage

    CERN Document Server

    Kolokolov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The correlation tensors of magnetic field in a two-dimensional chaotic flow of conducting fluid are studied. It is shown that there is a stage of resistive evolution where the field correlators grow exponentially with time what contradicts to the statements present in literature. The two- and four-point field correlation tensors are computed explicitly in this stage in the framework of Batchelor-Kraichnan-Kazantsev model. These tensors demonstrate highly intermittent statistics of the field fluctuations both in space and time.

  18. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, M.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Yugova, I. A.; Karczewski, G.; Wiater, M.; Wojtowicz, T.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Akimov, I. A.; Meier, T.; Bayer, M.

    2017-07-01

    Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n -type CdTe /(Cd ,Mg )Te quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μ eV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  19. High-resolution two-dimensional image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We consider a technique for high-resolution image upconversion of thermal light. Experimentally, we demonstrate cw upconversion with a resolution of more than 200 × 1000 pixels of thermally illuminated objects. This is the first demonstration (to our knowledge) of high-resolution cw image...... upconversion. The upconversion method promises an alternative route to high-quantum-efficiency all-optical imaging in the mid-IR wavelength region and beyond using standard CCD cameras. A particular advantage of CCD cameras compared to state-of-the-art thermal cameras is the possibility to tailor and tune...

  20. Spatially correlated two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor and metal quantum dots in GaAs-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevedomskiy, V. N., E-mail: nevedom@mail.ioffe.ru; Bert, N. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Preobrazhernskiy, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A single molecular-beam epitaxy process is used to produce GaAs-based heterostructures containing two-dimensional arrays of InAs semiconductor quantum dots and AsSb metal quantum dots. The twodimensional array of AsSb metal quantum dots is formed by low-temperature epitaxy which provides a large excess of arsenic in the epitaxial GaAs layer. During the growth of subsequent layers at a higher temperature, excess arsenic forms nanoinclusions, i.e., metal quantum dots in the GaAs matrix. The two-dimensional array of such metal quantum dots is created by the δ doping of a low-temperature GaAs layer with antimony which serves as a precursor for the heterogeneous nucleation of metal quantum dots and accumulates in them with the formation of AsSb metal alloy. The two-dimensional array of InAs semiconductor quantum dots is formed via the Stranski–Krastanov mechanism at the GaAs surface. Between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots, a 3-nm-thick AlAs barrier layer is grown. The total spacing between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots is 10 nm. Electron microscopy of the structure shows that the arrangement of metal quantum dots and semiconductor quantum dots in the two-dimensional arrays is spatially correlated. The spatial correlation is apparently caused by elastic strain and stress fields produced by both AsSb metal and InAs semiconductor quantum dots in the GaAs matrix.

  1. Two-Dimensional Spatial Imaging of Charge Transport in Germanium Crystals at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffatt, Robert [Stanford U.

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation, I describe a novel apparatus for studying the transport of charge in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures. The motivation to conduct this experiment originated from an asymmetry observed between the behavior of electrons and holes in the germanium detector crystals used by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS). This asymmetry is a consequence of the anisotropic propagation of electrons in germanium at cryogenic temperatures. To better model our detectors, we incorporated this effect into our Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. The purpose of the experiment described in this dissertation is to test those models in detail. Our measurements have allowed us to discover a shortcoming in our most recent Monte Carlo simulations of electrons in germanium. This discovery would not have been possible without the measurement of the full, two-dimensional charge distribution, which our experimental apparatus has allowed for the first time at cryogenic temperatures.

  2. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n-type CdTe/(Cd,MgTe quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μeV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  3. Particle detector spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  4. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Linfan [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70808 (United States); Guo, Jiandong, E-mail: jdguo@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  5. Signatures of spatially correlated noise and non-secular effects in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, James; Ing, David J; Rosskopf, Joachim; Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2017-01-14

    We investigate how correlated fluctuations affect oscillatory features in rephasing and non-rephasing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of a model dimer system. Based on a beating map analysis, we show that non-secular environmental couplings induced by uncorrelated fluctuations lead to oscillations centered at both cross- and diagonal-peaks in rephasing spectra as well as in non-rephasing spectra. Using an analytical approach, we provide a quantitative description of the non-secular effects in terms of the Feynman diagrams and show that the environment-induced mixing of different inter-excitonic coherences leads to oscillations in the rephasing diagonal-peaks and non-rephasing cross-peaks. We demonstrate that as correlations in the noise increase, the lifetime of oscillatory 2D signals is enhanced at rephasing cross-peaks and non-rephasing diagonal-peaks, while the other non-secular oscillatory signals are suppressed. We discuss that the asymmetry of 2D lineshapes in the beating map provides information on the degree of correlations in environmental fluctuations. Finally we investigate how the oscillatory features in 2D spectra are affected by inhomogeneous broadening.

  6. Solitons and Vortices in Two-dimensional Discrete Nonlinear Schrodinger Systems with Spatially Modulated Nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Kevrekidis, P G; Saxena, A; Frantzeskakis, D J; Bishop, A R

    2014-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional (2D) generalization of a recently proposed model [Phys. Rev. E 88, 032905 (2013)], which gives rise to bright discrete solitons supported by the defocusing nonlinearity whose local strength grows from the center to the periphery. We explore the 2D model starting from the anti-continuum (AC) limit of vanishing coupling. In this limit, we can construct a wide variety of solutions including not only single-site excitations, but also dipole and quadrupole ones. Additionally, two separate families of solutions are explored: the usual "extended" unstaggered bright solitons, in which all sites are excited in the AC limit, with the same sign across the lattice (they represent the most robust states supported by the lattice, their 1D counterparts being what was considered as 1D bright solitons in the above-mentioned work), and the vortex cross, which is specific to the 2D setting. For all the existing states, we explore their stability (analytically, whenever possible). Typical scenarios ...

  7. Signatures of spatially correlated noise and non-secular effects in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, James; Ing, David J.; Rosskopf, Joachim; Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Huelga, Susana F.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate how correlated fluctuations affect oscillatory features in rephasing and non-rephasing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of a model dimer system. Based on a beating map analysis, we show that non-secular environmental couplings induced by uncorrelated fluctuations lead to oscillations centered at both cross- and diagonal-peaks in rephasing spectra as well as in non-rephasing spectra. Using an analytical approach, we provide a quantitative description of the non-secular effects in terms of the Feynman diagrams and show that the environment-induced mixing of different inter-excitonic coherences leads to oscillations in the rephasing diagonal-peaks and non-rephasing cross-peaks. We demonstrate that as correlations in the noise increase, the lifetime of oscillatory 2D signals is enhanced at rephasing cross-peaks and non-rephasing diagonal-peaks, while the other non-secular oscillatory signals are suppressed. We discuss that the asymmetry of 2D lineshapes in the beating map provides information on the degree of correlations in environmental fluctuations. Finally we investigate how the oscillatory features in 2D spectra are affected by inhomogeneous broadening.

  8. Stable low-resolution simulations of two-dimensional vesicle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabacaoglu, Gokberk; Quaife, Bryan; Biros, George

    2016-11-01

    Vesicles, which resist bending and are locally inextensible, serve as experimental and numerical proxies for red blood cells. Vesicle flows, which are governed by hydrodynamic and elastic forces, refer to flow of vesicles that are filled with and suspended in a Stokesian fluid. In this work we present algorithms for stable and accurate low-resolution simulations of the vesicle flows in two-dimensions. We use an integral equation formulation of the Stokes equation coupled to the interface mass continuity and force balance. The problem poses numerical difficulties such as long-range hydrodynamic interactions, strong nonlinearities and stiff governing equations. These difficulties make simulations with long time horizons challenging, especially at low resolutions. We develop algorithms to control aliasing errors, correct errors in vesicle's area and arc-length, and avoid collision of vesicles. Additionally, we discuss several error measures to study the accuracy of the simulations. Then we closely look at how accurate the low-resolution simulations can capture true physics of the vesicle flows.

  9. Toward two-dimensional nanometer resolution hard X-ray differential-interference-contrast imaging using modified photon sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Hailiang; Shi, Lina; Hua, Yilei; Liu, Ming

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, we report a significant step forward in the design of single-optical-element optics for two-dimensional (2D) hard X-ray differential-interference-contrast (DIC) imaging based on modified photon sieves (MPSs). MPSs were obtained by a modified optic, i.e., combining two overlaid binary gratings and a photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The superior performance of MPSs was demonstrated. Compared to Fresnel zone plates-based DIC diffractive optical elements (DOEs), which help to improve contrast only in one direction, MPSs can provide better resolution and 2D DIC imaging. Compared to normal photon sieves, MPSs are capable of imaging at a significantly higher image contrast. We anticipate that MPSs can provide a complementary and versatile high-resolution nondestructive imaging tool for ultra-large-scale integrated circuits at 45 nm node and below.

  10. Two-Dimensional GaAs/AlGaAs Multiple Quantum Well Spatial Light Modulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Wang; Jan Borglind; Smilja Becanovic; Stéphane Junique; Daniel (A)gren; Bertrand Noharet; Linda H(o)glund; Olof (O)berg; Erik Petrini; Jan Y. Andersson; Hedda Malm

    2003-01-01

    Multiple quantum well spatial light modulators with 128x128 array in 38μm pitch are fabricated using two pproaches, one with an attachment of an optical substrate and another one without. These two fabrication processes are described and compared.

  11. Two-dimensional periodic and quasiperiodic spatial structures in microchip laser resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Okulov, A Yu

    2014-01-01

    The spatially periodic 2D patterns at output mirror of solid state microchip laser with high Fresnel number (100-1000) are discussed in view of numerical modeling with split-step FFT code comprising nonlinear gain, relaxation of inversion and paraxial diffraction.

  12. Wavelet-based spatial comparison technique for analysing and evaluating two-dimensional geophysical model fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saux Picart

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex numerical models of the Earth's environment, based around 3-D or 4-D time and space domains are routinely used for applications including climate predictions, weather forecasts, fishery management and environmental impact assessments. Quantitatively assessing the ability of these models to accurately reproduce geographical patterns at a range of spatial and temporal scales has always been a difficult problem to address. However, this is crucial if we are to rely on these models for decision making. Satellite data are potentially the only observational dataset able to cover the large spatial domains analysed by many types of geophysical models. Consequently optical wavelength satellite data is beginning to be used to evaluate model hindcast fields of terrestrial and marine environments. However, these satellite data invariably contain regions of occluded or missing data due to clouds, further complicating or impacting on any comparisons with the model. A methodology has recently been developed to evaluate precipitation forecasts using radar observations. It allows model skill to be evaluated at a range of spatial scales and rain intensities. Here we extend the original method to allow its generic application to a range of continuous and discontinuous geophysical data fields, and therefore allowing its use with optical satellite data. This is achieved through two major improvements to the original method: (i all thresholds are determined based on the statistical distribution of the input data, so no a priori knowledge about the model fields being analysed is required and (ii occluded data can be analysed without impacting on the metric results. The method can be used to assess a model's ability to simulate geographical patterns over a range of spatial scales. We illustrate how the method provides a compact and concise way of visualising the degree of agreement between spatial features in two datasets. The application of the new method, its

  13. The Effect of Two-dimensional and Stereoscopic Presentation on Middle School Students' Performance of Spatial Cognition Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Aaron; Lee, Hee-Sun

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether and how student performance on three types of spatial cognition tasks differs when worked with two-dimensional or stereoscopic representations. We recruited nineteen middle school students visiting a planetarium in a large Midwestern American city and analyzed their performance on a series of spatial cognition tasks in terms of response accuracy and task completion time. Results show that response accuracy did not differ between the two types of representations while task completion time was significantly greater with the stereoscopic representations. The completion time increased as the number of mental manipulations of 3D objects increased in the tasks. Post-interviews provide evidence that some students continued to think of stereoscopic representations as two-dimensional. Based on cognitive load and cue theories, we interpret that, in the absence of pictorial depth cues, students may need more time to be familiar with stereoscopic representations for optimal performance. In light of these results, we discuss potential uses of stereoscopic representations for science learning.

  14. An Optimization Model for Scheduling Problems with Two-Dimensional Spatial Resource Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Christopher; Rabadi, Ghaith

    2010-01-01

    Traditional scheduling problems involve determining temporal assignments for a set of jobs in order to optimize some objective. Some scheduling problems also require the use of limited resources, which adds another dimension of complexity. In this paper we introduce a spatial resource-constrained scheduling problem that can arise in assembly, warehousing, cross-docking, inventory management, and other areas of logistics and supply chain management. This scheduling problem involves a twodimensional rectangular area as a limited resource. Each job, in addition to having temporal requirements, has a width and a height and utilizes a certain amount of space inside the area. We propose an optimization model for scheduling the jobs while respecting all temporal and spatial constraints.

  15. Spatial Rotation of the Fractional Derivative in Two-Dimensional Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab Malkawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transformations of the partial fractional derivatives under spatial rotation in R2 are derived for the Riemann-Liouville and Caputo definitions. These transformation properties link the observation of physical quantities, expressed through fractional derivatives, with respect to different coordinate systems (observers. It is the hope that such understanding could shed light on the physical interpretation of fractional derivatives. Also it is necessary to be able to construct interaction terms that are invariant with respect to equivalent observers.

  16. Modelling spatial trends in sorghum breeding field trials using a two-dimensional P-spline mixed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazco, Julio G; Rodríguez-Álvarez, María Xosé; Boer, Martin P; Jordan, David R; Eilers, Paul H C; Malosetti, Marcos; van Eeuwijk, Fred A

    2017-07-01

    A flexible and user-friendly spatial method called SpATS performed comparably to more elaborate and trial-specific spatial models in a series of sorghum breeding trials. Adjustment for spatial trends in plant breeding field trials is essential for efficient evaluation and selection of genotypes. Current mixed model methods of spatial analysis are based on a multi-step modelling process where global and local trends are fitted after trying several candidate spatial models. This paper reports the application of a novel spatial method that accounts for all types of continuous field variation in a single modelling step by fitting a smooth surface. The method uses two-dimensional P-splines with anisotropic smoothing formulated in the mixed model framework, referred to as SpATS model. We applied this methodology to a series of large and partially replicated sorghum breeding trials. The new model was assessed in comparison with the more elaborate standard spatial models that use autoregressive correlation of residuals. The improvements in precision and the predictions of genotypic values produced by the SpATS model were equivalent to those obtained using the best fitting standard spatial models for each trial. One advantage of the approach with SpATS is that all patterns of spatial trend and genetic effects were modelled simultaneously by fitting a single model. Furthermore, we used a flexible model to adequately adjust for field trends. This strategy reduces potential parameter identification problems and simplifies the model selection process. Therefore, the new method should be considered as an efficient and easy-to-use alternative for routine analyses of plant breeding trials.

  17. Metamaterials for Remote Generation of Spatially Controllable Two Dimensional Array of Microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pramod K.; Hopwood, Jeffrey; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2014-08-01

    Since the initial demonstration of negative refraction and cloaking using metamaterials, there has been enormous interest and progress in making practical devices based on metamaterials such as electrically small antennas, absorbers, modulators, detectors etc that span over a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum covering microwave, terahertz, infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We present metamaterial as an active substrate where each unit cell serves as an element for generation of plasma, the fourth state of matter. Sub-wavelength localization of incident electromagnetic wave energy, one of the most interesting properties of metamaterials is employed here for generating high electric field to ignite and sustain microscale plasmas. Frequency selective nature of the metamaterial unit cells make it possible to generate spatially localized microplasma in a large array using multiple resonators. A dual resonator topology is shown for the demonstration. Since microwave energy couples to the metamaterial through free space, the proposed approach is naturally wireless. Such spatially controllable microplasma arrays provide a fundamentally new material system for future investigations in novel applications, e.g. nonlinear metamaterials.

  18. Metamaterials for remote generation of spatially controllable two dimensional array of microplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pramod K; Hopwood, Jeffrey; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2014-08-07

    Since the initial demonstration of negative refraction and cloaking using metamaterials, there has been enormous interest and progress in making practical devices based on metamaterials such as electrically small antennas, absorbers, modulators, detectors etc that span over a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum covering microwave, terahertz, infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We present metamaterial as an active substrate where each unit cell serves as an element for generation of plasma, the fourth state of matter. Sub-wavelength localization of incident electromagnetic wave energy, one of the most interesting properties of metamaterials is employed here for generating high electric field to ignite and sustain microscale plasmas. Frequency selective nature of the metamaterial unit cells make it possible to generate spatially localized microplasma in a large array using multiple resonators. A dual resonator topology is shown for the demonstration. Since microwave energy couples to the metamaterial through free space, the proposed approach is naturally wireless. Such spatially controllable microplasma arrays provide a fundamentally new material system for future investigations in novel applications, e.g. nonlinear metamaterials.

  19. Two-dimensional position-sensitive gaseous detectors for high-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Marmotti, M; Kampmann, R

    2002-01-01

    Two-dimensional position-sensitive gaseous detectors have been developed at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility (GeNF) for high-resolution neutron and X-ray diffractometry. They are multi-wire proportional counters with delay-line readout and sensitive areas of 300 mm x 300 mm or 500 mm x 500 mm. For detecting X-rays, neutrons and hard X-rays the counters are filled with Ar/CO sub 2 , sup 3 He/CF sub 4 and Xe/CO sub 2 , respectively. One neutron detector is used at the ARES diffractometer at GKSS, which is dedicated to the analysis of residual stresses. Further ones are used for analysing textures and residual stresses at the hard-X-ray beamline PETRA-2 at HASYLAB, and one detector is being developed for the neutron reflectometer REFSANS at the research reactor FRM-II in Munich, Germany. (orig.)

  20. Interaction between Two-Dimensional White-Light Photovoltaic Dark Spatial Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-Hong; LIU Si-Min; GUO Ru; GAO Yuan-Mei; SONG Tao; ZHU Nan; QU Di

    2007-01-01

    Using fully incoherent white light emitted from an incandescent bulb (a line source) and amplitude mask, we study experimentally the interaction between two 2D white-light photovoltaic dark spatial solitons with three different separations (40 μm, 50 μm and 60 μm) and arrangement directions (parallel to, perpendicular to and tilted at 45° with respect to the crystalline c axis) propagating in parallel in close proximity in self-defocusing LiNbO3:Fe crystal. Experimental results reveal that a 2D white-light dark soliton pair only experiences attractive forces when their mutual separation is sufficiently small (< 60 μm), and the degree of the attraction depends on their mutual separation and their arrangement direction. When the separation is larger than 60 μm, the interaction is not evident.

  1. Buffer optimization for high resolution of human lung cancer tissue proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibeom; Pi, Kyungbae; Lee, Keeman

    2009-01-01

    A problem in proteomic analysis of lung cancer tissue is the presence of complex components of different histological backgrounds (squamous cell carcinoma, small cell lung carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma). The efficient solubilization of protein components before two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is a very critical. Poor solubilization has been associated with a failure to detect proteins and diffuse, streaked and/or trailing protein spots. Here, we have optimized the solubilization of human lung cancer tissue to increase protein resolution. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) rehydration buffer containing a thiourea-urea mixture provided superior resolution, whereas a buffer without thiourea yielded consistently poor results. In addition, IEF rehydration buffers containing CHAPS and DTT gave superior resolution, whereas buffers containing Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and/or Triton X-100 did not. A tributylphosphine-containing buffer gave consistently poor results. Using optimized conditions, we used 2-D gel analysis of human lung cancer tissue to identify 11 differentially-expressed protein spots by MALDI-mass spectrometry. This study provides a methodological tool to study the complex mammalian proteomes.

  2. Percolation in spatial evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game on two-dimensional lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woosik; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2015-11-01

    We study the spatial evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game with updates of imitation max on triangular, hexagonal, and square lattices. We use the weak prisoner's dilemma game with a single parameter b . Due to the competition between the temptation value b and the coordination number z of the base lattice, a greater variety of percolation properties is expected to occur on the lattice with the larger z . From the numerical analysis, we find six different regimes on the triangular lattice (z =6 ). Regardless of the initial densities of cooperators and defectors, cooperators always percolate in the steady state in two regimes for small b . In these two regimes, defectors do not percolate. In two regimes for the intermediate value of b , both cooperators and defectors undergo percolation transitions. The defector always percolates in two regimes for large b . On the hexagonal lattice (z =3 ), there exist two distinctive regimes. For small b , both the cooperators and the defectors undergo percolation transitions while only defectors always percolate for large b . On the square lattice (z =4 ), there exist three regimes. Combining with the finite-size scaling analyses, we show that all the observed percolation transitions belong to the universality class of the random percolation. We also show how the detailed growth mechanism of cooperator and defector clusters decides each regime.

  3. Design and realization of a two-dimensional spatial magnetic field mapping apparatus to measure magnetic fields of metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Chin, Jessie Yao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-07-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) spatial electric-field mapping apparatus [Opt. Express 14, 8694 (2006)] plays an important role in experiments involving metamaterials, such as the verification of free-space and ground-plane invisibility cloaks. However, such an apparatus is valid only for the transverse-electric (TE) mode and is invalid for the transverse-magnetic (TM) mode, as it requires perfectly magnetic conducting (PMC) planes, which do not exist in nature. In this paper, we propose a 2D spatial magnetic-field mapping apparatus based on artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) plates. The AMC structure is designed using periodically perfectly electrical conducting patches with a sub-wavelength size on a dielectric substrate backed with the ground plane, which can simulate a PMC plane. Using two parallel PMC plates to form a TM-wave planar waveguide, we realize the 2D spatial magnetic-field mapping apparatus in order to measure the external and internal magnetic fields of metamaterials. Two types of excitations, a plane-wave source and a magnetic dipole, are used to feed the system. In order to validate the performance of the magnetic-field mapper, two gradient-index metamaterial lenses are measured, and the experimental results are in good agreement with the full-wave simulations.

  4. Spatial Relation Resolution and Spatial Relation Abstraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Tinghua; LIU Yaolin

    2003-01-01

    This paper attempts toregard spatial relation transformationas an important process in map gener-alization. The spatial relation generali-zation can be divided into the compo-nents of abstraction: topology, dis-tance and orientation. The concept‘ spatial relation resolution' is intro-duced to describe the constraints ofrelative spatial relation. On the basisof nine intersection models, the cardi-nal direction models and the iso-dis-tance-relation models, this paper givesthree sorts of relation resolution repre-sentations for topological, distance andorientation relation, respectively. Twomapping implementations in map gen-eralization is discussed.

  5. Zoomed EPI-DWI of the pancreas using two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Riffel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Implementation of DWI in the abdomen is challenging due to artifacts, particularly those arising from differences in tissue susceptibility. Two-dimensional, spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF excitation pulses for single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI combined with a reduction in the FOV in the phase-encoding direction (i.e. zooming leads to a decreased number of k-space acquisition lines, significantly shortening the EPI echo train and potentially susceptibility artifacts. PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and image quality of a zoomed diffusion-weighted EPI (z-EPI sequence in MR imaging of the pancreas. The approach is compared to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 23 patients who had undergone an MRI study of the abdomen were included in this retrospective study. Examinations were performed on a 3T whole-body MR system (Magnetom Skyra, Siemens equipped with a two-channel fully dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens. The acquired sequences consisted of a conventional EPI DWI of the abdomen and a zoomed EPI DWI of the pancreas. For z-EPI, the standard sinc excitation was replaced with a two-dimensional spatially-selective RF pulse using an echo-planar transmit trajectory. Images were evaluated with regard to image blur, respiratory motion artifacts, diagnostic confidence, delineation of the pancreas, and overall scan preference. Additionally ADC values of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were calculated and compared between sequences. RESULTS: The pancreas was better delineated in every case (23/23 with z-EPI versus c-EPI. In every case (23/23, both readers preferred z-EPI overall to c-EPI. With z-EPI there was statistically significantly less image blur (p<0.0001 and respiratory motion artifact compared to c-EPI (p<0.0001. Diagnostic confidence was statistically significantly better with z-EPI (p<0.0001. No statistically significant differences in calculated ADC values were observed

  6. Quantitative analysis of essential oils in perfume using multivariate curve resolution combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Luiz Antonio Fonseca; Hantao, Leandro Wang; Pedroso, Marcio Pozzobon; Poppi, Ronei Jesus; Augusto, Fabio

    2011-08-05

    The use of multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to build multivariate quantitative models using data obtained from comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC×GC-FID) is presented and evaluated. The MCR algorithm presents some important features, such as second order advantage and the recovery of the instrumental response for each pure component after optimization by an alternating least squares (ALS) procedure. A model to quantify the essential oil of rosemary was built using a calibration set containing only known concentrations of the essential oil and cereal alcohol as solvent. A calibration curve correlating the concentration of the essential oil of rosemary and the instrumental response obtained from the MCR-ALS algorithm was obtained, and this calibration model was applied to predict the concentration of the oil in complex samples (mixtures of the essential oil, pineapple essence and commercial perfume). The values of the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and of the root mean square error of the percentage deviation (RMSPD) obtained were 0.4% (v/v) and 7.2%, respectively. Additionally, a second model was built and used to evaluate the accuracy of the method. A model to quantify the essential oil of lemon grass was built and its concentration was predicted in the validation set and real perfume samples. The RMSEP and RMSPD obtained were 0.5% (v/v) and 6.9%, respectively, and the concentration of the essential oil of lemon grass in perfume agreed to the value informed by the manufacturer. The result indicates that the MCR algorithm is adequate to resolve the target chromatogram from the complex sample and to build multivariate models of GC×GC-FID data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultra-sonografia bidimensional convencional, de alta resolução e tridimensional no acompanhamento da gestação em cadela Two-dimensional conventional, high resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasonography in the evaluation of pregnant bitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.R. Feliciano

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Gestational period in a bitch, after natural mating with a normal dog, was evaluated by two-dimensional conventional, high-resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasonography. High-resolution two-dimensional ultrasonography show better image and provides early diagnosis of pregnancy (15 days in comparison to conventional one (20 days. Three-dimensional ultrasonography was use to evaluate fetal morphology during late gestation period, however its application is still limited.

  8. Resolution and identification of major peanut allergens using a combination of fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis, western blotting and Q-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut allergy is triggered by several proteins known as allergens. The matching resolution and identification of major peanut allergens in 2D protein maps, was accomplished by the use of fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE), Western blotting and quadrupole time-of...

  9. How Attention Affects Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Marisa; Barbot, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    We summarize and discuss a series of psychophysical studies on the effects of spatial covert attention on spatial resolution, our ability to discriminate fine patterns. Heightened resolution is beneficial in most, but not all, visual tasks. We show how endogenous attention (voluntary, goal driven) and exogenous attention (involuntary, stimulus driven) affect performance on a variety of tasks mediated by spatial resolution, such as visual search, crowding, acuity, and texture segmentation. Exogenous attention is an automatic mechanism that increases resolution regardless of whether it helps or hinders performance. In contrast, endogenous attention flexibly adjusts resolution to optimize performance according to task demands. We illustrate how psychophysical studies can reveal the underlying mechanisms of these effects and allow us to draw linking hypotheses with known neurophysiological effects of attention. PMID:25948640

  10. Spatial distribution patterns of anorectal atresia/stenosis in China: Use of two-dimensional graph-theoretical clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Yuan; Liang Qiao; Li Dai; Yan-Ping Wang; Guang-Xuan Zhou; Ying Han; Xiao-Xia Liu; Xun Zhang; Yi Cao; Juan Liang; Jun Zhu

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the spatial distribution patterns of anorectal atresia/stenosis in China.METHODS:Data were collected from the Chinese Birth Defects Monitoring Network (CBDMN),a hospitalbased congenital malformations registry system.All fetuses more than 28 wk of gestation and neonates up to 7 d of age in hospitals within the monitoring sites of the CBDMN were monitored from 2001 to 2005.Two-dimensional graph-theoretical clustering was used to divide monitoring sites of the CBDMN into different clusters according to the average incidences of anorectal atresia/stenosis in the different monitoring sites.RESULTS:The overall average incidence of anorectal atresia/stenosis in China was 3.17 per 10 000 from 2001 to 2005.The areas with the highest average incidences of anorectal atresia/stenosis were almost always focused in Eastern China.The monitoring sites were grouped into 6 clusters of areas.Cluster 1 comprised the monitoring sites in Heilongjiang Province,Jilin Province,and Liaoning Province;Cluster 2 was composed of those in Fujian Province,Guangdong Province,Hainan Province,Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region,south Hunan Province,and south Jiangxi Province;Cluster 3 consisted of those in Beijing Municipal City,Tianjin Municipal City,Hebei Province,Shandong Province,north Jiangsu Province,and north Anhui Province;Cluster 4 was made up of those in Zhejiang Province,Shanghai Municipal City,south Anhui Province,south Jiangsu Province,north Hunan Province,north Jiangxi Province,Hubei Province,Henan Province,Shanxi Province and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region;Cluster 5 consisted of those in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region,Gansu Province and Qinghai Province;and Cluster 6 included those in Shaanxi Province,Sichuan Province,Chongqing Municipal City,Yunnan Province,Guizhou Province,Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Province and Tibet Autonomous Region.CONCLUSION:The findings in this research allow the display of the spatial distribution patterns of anorectal atresia/stenosis in

  11. Hydraulic validation of two-dimensional simulations of braided river flow with spatially continuous aDcp data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. D.; Brasington, J.; Hicks, M.; Measures, R.; Rennie, C. D.; Vericat, D.

    2013-09-01

    Gravel-bed braided rivers are characterized by shallow, branching flow across low relief, complex, and mobile bed topography. These conditions present a major challenge for the application of higher dimensional hydraulic models, the predictions of which are nevertheless vital to inform flood risk and ecosystem management. This paper demonstrates how high-resolution topographic survey and hydraulic monitoring at a density commensurate with model discretization can be used to advance hydrodynamic simulations in braided rivers. Specifically, we detail applications of the shallow water model, Delft3d, to the Rees River, New Zealand, at two nested scales: a 300 m braid bar unit and a 2.5 km reach. In each case, terrestrial laser scanning was used to parameterize the topographic boundary condition at hitherto unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Dense observations of depth and velocity acquired from a mobile acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp), along with low-altitude aerial photography, were then used to create a data-rich framework for model calibration and testing at a range of discharges. Calibration focused on the estimation of spatially uniform roughness and horizontal eddy viscosity, νH, through comparison of predictions with distributed hydraulic data. Results revealed strong sensitivity to νH, which influenced cross-channel velocity and localization of high shear zones. The high-resolution bed topography partially accounts for form resistance, and the recovered roughness was found to scale by 1.2-1.4 D84 grain diameter. Model performance was good for a range of flows, with minimal bias and tight error distributions, suggesting that acceptable predictions can be achieved with spatially uniform roughness and νH.

  12. Random attractors in $H^1$ for stochastic two dimensional micropolar fluid flows with spatial-valued noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Zhao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This work studies the long-time behavior of two-dimensional micropolar fluid flows perturbed by the generalized time derivative of the infinite dimensional Wiener processes. Based on the omega-limit compactness argument as well as some new estimates of solutions, it is proved that the generated random dynamical system admits an H^1-random attractor which is compact in H^1 space and attracts all tempered random subsets of L^2 space in H^1 topology. We also give a general abstract result which shows that the continuity condition and absorption of the associated random dynamical system in H^1 space is not necessary for the existence of random attractor in H^1 space.

  13. Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

    2011-07-01

    Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

  14. Two-dimensional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy IV: Resolution of fluorescence of tryptophan residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Hiroaki; Nakashima, Kenichi; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Noda, Isao

    2006-11-01

    Generalized two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy has been used to resolve the fluorescence spectra of two tryptophan (Trp) residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme. In each protein, one Trp residue is buried in a hydrophobic domain of the protein matrix and the other Trp residue is located at a hydrophilic domain close to the protein-water interface. Fluorescence quenching by iodide ion, a hydrophilic quencher, was employed as a perturbation to induce the intensity change in the spectra. The Trp residue which is located at the hydrophilic domain is effectively quenched by the quencher, while the Trp residue located at the hydrophobic domain is protected from the quenching. Therefore, the fluorescence of these two Trp residues have a different sensitivity to the quenching, showing a different response to the concentration of the quencher. Fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues in alcohol dehydrogenase, which are heavily overlapped in conventional one-dimensional spectra, have been successfully resolved by the 2D correlation technique. From the asynchronous correlation map, it was revealed that the quenching of Trp located at the hydrophobic part was brought about after that of Trp located at the hydrophilic part. In contrast, the fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues could not be resolved after the alcohol dehydrogenase was denatured with guanidine hydrochloride. These results are consistent with the well-known structure of alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was elucidated that the present 2D analysis is not interfered by Raman bands of the solvent, which sometimes bring difficulty into the conventional fluorescence analysis. Fluorescence spectra of the Trp residues in lysozyme could not be resolved by the 2D correlation technique. The differences between the two proteins are attributed to the fact that the Trp residue in the hydrophobic site of lysozyme is not sufficiently protected from the quenching.

  15. Conservation vs. livelihoods: spatial management of non-timber forest product harvests in a two-dimensional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Brian E

    2016-06-01

    Areas of high biodiversity often coincide with communities living in extreme poverty. As a livelihood support, these communities often harvest wild products from the environment. But harvest activities can have negative impacts on fragile and globally important ecosystems. This paper examines trade-offs in ecological protection and community welfare from the harvest of wild products. With a novel model and empirical evidence, I show that management of harvest activity does not always resolve these trade-offs. In a model of continuous harvests in a two-dimensional landscape, managed harvest activity improves welfare, but is uniformly bad for other ecosystem services that are sensitive to the presence (as opposed to the intensity) of human activity. Empirical results from a unique dataset of mushroom harvesters in Yunnan, China suggest more experienced, poorer, and more vulnerable individuals tend to rely on more distant harvests. Thus, policies that limit the extent of forest travel, such as protected areas, may protect fragile ecosystems but can have a disproportionately negative effect on those most vulnerable.

  16. Effect of long range spatial correlations on the lifetime statistics of an emitter in a two-dimensional disordered lattice

    CERN Document Server

    de Sousa, N; García-Martín, A; Froufe-Pérez, L S; Marqués, M I

    2014-01-01

    The effect of spatial correlations on the Purcell effect in a bidimensional dispersion of resonant nanoparticles is analyzed. We perform extensive calculations of the fluorescence decay rate of a point emitter embedded in a system of nanoparticles statistically distributed according to a sim- ple 2D lattice-gas model near the critical point. For short range correlations (high temperature thermalization) the Purcell factors present a non-Gaussian long-tailed statistics which evolves to- wards a bimodal distribution as approaching the critical point where the spatial correlation length diverges. Our results suggest long range correlations as a possible origin of the large fluctuations of experimental decay rates in disordered metal films.

  17. Assessment of the spatial pattern of colorectal tumour perfusion estimated at perfusion CT using two-dimensional fractal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Vicky; Sanghera, Bal [Mount Vernon Hospital, Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Wellsted, David M.; Sundin, Josefin [University of Hertfordshire, Research and Development Support Unit, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve [University College Hospital, Department of Academic Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    The aim was to evaluate the feasibility of fractal analysis for assessing the spatial pattern of colorectal tumour perfusion at dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (perfusion CT). Twenty patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma underwent a 65-s perfusion CT study from which a perfusion parametric map was generated using validated commercial software. The tumour was identified by an experienced radiologist, segmented via thresholding and fractal analysis applied using in-house software: fractal dimension, abundance and lacunarity were assessed for the entire outlined tumour and for selected representative areas within the tumour of low and high perfusion. Comparison was made with ten patients with normal colons, processed in a similar manner, using two-way mixed analysis of variance with statistical significance at the 5% level. Fractal values were higher in cancer than normal colon (p {<=} 0.001): mean (SD) 1.71 (0.07) versus 1.61 (0.07) for fractal dimension and 7.82 (0.62) and 6.89 (0.47) for fractal abundance. Fractal values were lower in 'high' than 'low' perfusion areas. Lacunarity curves were shifted to the right for cancer compared with normal colon. In conclusion, colorectal cancer mapped by perfusion CT demonstrates fractal properties. Fractal analysis is feasible, potentially providing a quantitative measure of the spatial pattern of tumour perfusion. (orig.)

  18. GPU Implementation of Two-Dimensional Rayleigh-Benard Code with High Resolution and Extremely High Rayleigh Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. M.; Sanchez, D. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    As computational modeling became prolific throughout the physical sciences community, newer and more efficient ways of processing large amounts of data needed to be devised. One particular method for processing such large amounts of data arose in the form of using a graphics processing unit (GPU) for calculations. Computational scientists were attracted to the GPU as a computational tool as the performance, growth, and availability of GPUs over the past decade increased. Scientists began to utilize the GPU as the sole workhorse for their brute force calculations and modeling. The GPUs, however, were not originally designed for this style of use. As a result, difficulty arose when trying to find a use for the GPU from a scientific standpoint. A lack of parallel programming routines was the main culprit behind the difficulty in programming with a GPU, but with time and a rise in popularity, NVIDIA released a proprietary architecture named Fermi. The Fermi architecture, when used in conjunction with development tools such as CUDA, allowed the programmer easier access to routines that made parallel programming with the NVIDIA GPUs an ease. This new architecture enabled the programmer full access to faster memory, double-precision support, and large amounts of global memory at their fingertips. Our model was based on using a second-order, spatially correct finite difference method and a third order Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme for studying the 2D Rayleigh-Benard code. The code extensively used the CUBLAS routines to do the heavy linear algebra calculations. The calculations themselves were completed using a single GPU, the NVDIA C2070 Fermi, which boasts 6 GB of global memory. The overall scientific goal of our work was to apply the Tesla C2070's computing potential to achieve an onset of flow reversals as a function of increasing large Rayleigh numbers. Previous investigations were successful using a smaller grid size of 1000x1999 and a Rayleigh number of 10^9. The

  19. Quantitative analysis of biodiesel in blends of biodiesel and conventional diesel by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and multivariate curve resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogollon, Noroska Gabriela Salazar; Ribeiro, Fabiana Alves de Lima; Lopez, Monica Mamian; Hantao, Leandro Wang; Poppi, Ronei Jesus; Augusto, Fabio

    2013-09-24

    In this paper, a method to determine the composition of blends of biodiesel with mineral diesel (BXX) by multivariate curve resolution with Alternating Least Squares (MRC-ALS) combined to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with Flame Ionization Detection (GC×GC-FID) is presented. Chromatographic profiles of BXX blends produced with biodiesels from different sources were used as input data. An initial evaluation carried out after multiway principal component analysis (MPCA) was used to reveal regions of the chromatograms were the signal was likely to be dependent on the concentration of biodiesel, regardless its vegetable source. After this preliminary step MCR-ALS modeling was carried out only using relevant parts of the chromatograms. The resulting procedure was able to predict accurately the concentration of biodiesel in the BXX samples regardless of its origin.

  20. Analysis of the horizontal two-dimensional near-surface structure of a winter tornadic vortex using high-resolution in situ wind and pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryohei; Kusunoki, Kenichi; Sato, Eiichi; Mashiko, Wataru; Inoue, Hanako Y.; Fujiwara, Chusei; Arai, Ken-ichiro; Nishihashi, Masahide; Saito, Sadao; Hayashi, Syugo; Suzuki, Hiroto

    2015-06-01

    The horizontal two-dimensional near-surface structure of a tornadic vortex within a winter storm was analyzed. The tornadic vortex was observed on 10 December 2012 by the high-resolution in situ observational linear array of wind and pressure sensors (LAWPS) system in conjunction with a high-resolution Doppler radar. The 0.1 s maximum wind speed and pressure deficit near the ground were recorded as 35.3 m s-1 and -3.8 hPa, respectively. The horizontal two-dimensional distributions of the tornadic vortex wind and pressure were retrieved by the LAWPS data, which provided unprecedented observational detail on the following important features of the near-surface structure of the tornadic vortex. Asymmetric convergent inflow toward the vortex center existed. Total wind speed was strong to the right and rear side of the translational direction of the vortex and weak in the forward part of the vortex possibly because of the strong convergent inflow in that region. The tangential wind speed profile of the vortex was better approximated using a modified Rankine vortex rather than the Rankine vortex both at 5 m above ground level (agl) and 100 m agl, and other vortex models (Burgers-Rott vortex and Wood-White vortex) were also compared. The cyclostrophic wind balance was violated in the core radius R0 and outside the core radius in the forward sector; however, it was held with a relatively high accuracy of approximately 14% outside the core of the vortex in the rearward sector (from 2 R0 to 5 R0) near the ground.

  1. Spatial structure of correlations around a quantum impurity at the edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerdt, Andrew; Feiguin, A. E.; Martins, G. B.

    2017-07-01

    We calculate exact zero-temperature real-space properties of a substitutional magnetic impurity coupled to the edge of a zigzag silicenelike nanoribbon. Using a Lanczos transformation [A. Allerdt et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 085101 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.085101] and the density-matrix renormalization-group method, we obtain a realistic description of stanene and germanene that includes the bulk and the edges as boundary one-dimensional helical metallic states. Our results for substitutional impurities indicate that the development of a Kondo state and the structure of the spin correlations between the impurity and the electron spins in the metallic edge state depend considerably on the location of the impurity. More specifically, our real-space resolution allows us to conclude that there is a sharp distinction between the impurity being located at a crest or a trough site at the zigzag edge. We also observe, as expected, that the spin correlations are anisotropic due to an emerging Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with the conduction electrons and that the edges scatter from the impurity and "snake" or circle around it. Our estimates for the Kondo temperature indicate that there is a very weak enhancement due to the presence of spin-orbit coupling.

  2. A method to improve fluence resolution derived from two-dimensional detector array measurements for patient-specific IMRT verification using the information collected in dynalog files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Juan Agustin Calama; Utrilla, Miguel Angel Infante; Rodriguez, Maria Elisa Lavado

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for improving the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurement using the information collected in dynalog files. From dynalog information, a file is generated with the actual multileaf collimator (MLC) positions and used as input to the treatment planning system (TPS) to obtain the dynalog-derived fluence and the theoretical response over the detector array. In contrast with the measured response, this theoretical response allows for correction of the dynalog-derived fluence and translation into the reconstructed fluence. This fluence is again introduced into the planning system to verify the treatment using clinical tools. Initially, more than 98% of the points passed the two-dimensional (2D) phantom gamma test (3% local dose - 3 mm) for all of the treatment verifications, but in some dose–volume histogram (DVH) comparisons, we note sensitive differences for the planning target volume (PTV) coverage and for the maximum doses in at-risk organs (up to 3.5%). In dose–distribution evaluations, we found differences of up to 5% in the PTV edges in certain cases due to detector array measurement errors. This work improves the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurements based on the treatment information, in contrast with the current commercial proposals based on planned data. PMID:26150681

  3. A method to improve fluence resolution derived from two-dimensional detector array measurements for patient-specific IMRT verification using the information collected in dynalog files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Agustin Calama Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method for improving the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurement using the information collected in dynalog files. From dynalog information, a file is generated with the actual multileaf collimator (MLC positions and used as input to the treatment planning system (TPS to obtain the dynalog-derived fluence and the theoretical response over the detector array. In contrast with the measured response, this theoretical response allows for correction of the dynalog-derived fluence and translation into the reconstructed fluence. This fluence is again introduced into the planning system to verify the treatment using clinical tools. Initially, more than 98% of the points passed the two-dimensional (2D phantom gamma test (3% local dose - 3 mm for all of the treatment verifications, but in some dose-volume histogram (DVH comparisons, we note sensitive differences for the planning target volume (PTV coverage and for the maximum doses in at-risk organs (up to 3.5%. In dose-distribution evaluations, we found differences of up to 5% in the PTV edges in certain cases due to detector array measurement errors. This work improves the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurements based on the treatment information, in contrast with the current commercial proposals based on planned data.

  4. Ultra resolution chemical fingerprinting of dense non-aqueous phase liquids from manufactured gas plants by reversed phase comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Laura A; Gauchotte-Lindsay, Caroline; Daéid, Niamh Nic; Thomas, Russell; Daly, Paddy; Kalin, Robert M

    2011-07-22

    Ultra resolution chemical fingerprinting of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) from former manufactured gas plants (FMGPs) was investigated using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC TOFMS). Reversed phase GC×GC (i.e. a polar primary column coupled to a non-polar secondary column) was found to significantly improve the separation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their alkylated homologues. Sample extraction and cleanup was performed simultaneously using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), with recovery rates between 76% and 97%, allowing fast, efficient extraction with minimal solvent consumption. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the GC×GC data was performed in an attempt to differentiate between twelve DNAPLs based on their chemical composition. Correlations were discovered between DNAPL composition and historic manufacturing processes used at different FMGP sites. Traditional chemical fingerprinting methods generally follow a tiered approach with sample analysis on several different instruments. We propose ultra resolution chemical fingerprinting as a fast, accurate and precise method of obtaining more chemical information than traditional tiered approaches while using only a single analytical technique.

  5. Two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Shaikh; S S Desai; A K Patra

    2004-08-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector has been developed. The detector is a 3He + Kr filled multiwire proportional counter with charge division position readout and has a sensitive area of 345 mm × 345 mm, pixel size 5 mm × 5 mm, active depth 25 mm and is designed for efficiency of 70% for 4 Å neutrons. The detector is tested with 0.5 bar 3He + 1.5 bar krypton gas mixture in active chamber and 2 bar 4He in compensating chamber. The pulse height spectrum recorded at an anode potential of 2000 V shows energy resolution of ∼ 25% for the 764 keV peak. A spatial resolution of 8 mm × 6 mm is achieved. The detector is suitable for SANS studies in the range of 0.02–0.25 Å-1.

  6. The Two-Dimensional Spatial Distributions of the Globular Clusters and Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries of NGC4649

    CERN Document Server

    D'Abrusco, R; Mineo, S; Strader, J; Fragos, T; Kim, D W; Luo, B; Zezas, A

    2014-01-01

    We report significant anisotropies in the projected two-dimensional (2D) spatial distributions of Globular Clusters (GCs) of the giant Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC4649 (M60). Similar features are found in the 2D distribution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), both associated with GCs and in the stellar field. Deviations from azimuthal symmetry suggest an arc-like excess of GCs extending north at 4-15 kpc galactocentric radii in the eastern side of major axis of NGC4649. This feature is more prominent for red GCs, but still persists in the 2D distribution of blue GCs. High and low luminosity GCs also show some segregation along this arc, with high-luminosity GCs preferentially located in the southern end and low-luminosity GCs in the northern section of the arc. GC-LMXBs follow the anisotropy of red-GCs, where most of them reside; however, a significant overdensity of (high-luminosity) field LMXBs is present to the south of the GC arc. These results suggest that NGC4649 has experienced mergers and/or multiple ...

  7. Spatial resolution in atom probe tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gault, Baptiste; de Geuser, Frederic; La Fontaine, Alex; Stephenson, Leigh T; Haley, Daniel; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses gaps in definitions and a lack of standard measurement techniques to assess the spatial resolution in atom probe tomography. This resolution is known to be anisotropic, being better in the depth than laterally. Generally the presence of atomic planes in the tomographic reconstruction is considered as being a sufficient proof of the quality of the spatial resolution of the instrument. Based on advanced spatial distribution maps, an analysis methodology that interrogates the local neighborhood of the atoms within the tomographic reconstruction, it is shown how both the in-depth and the lateral resolution can be quantified. The influences of the crystallography and the temperature are investigated, and models are proposed to explain the observed results. We demonstrate that the absolute value of resolution is specimenspecific.

  8. Classifying and assembling two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns of a single particle to reconstruct the three-dimensional diffraction intensity function: resolution limit due to the quantum noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Taka, Junichiro; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A new two-step algorithm is developed for reconstructing the three-dimensional diffraction intensity of a globular biological macromolecule from many experimentally measured quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The first step is classification of the two-dimensional patterns into groups according to the similarity of direction of the incident X-rays with respect to the molecule and an averaging within each group to reduce the noise. The second step is detection of common intersecting circles between the signal-enhanced two-dimensional patterns to identify their mutual location in the three-dimensional wavenumber space. The newly developed algorithm enables one to detect a signal for classification in noisy experimental photon-count data with as low as ∼0.1 photons per effective pixel. The wavenumber of such a limiting pixel determines the attainable structural resolution. From this fact, the resolution limit due to the quantum noise attainable by this new method of analysis as well as two important experimental parameters, the number of two-dimensional patterns to be measured (the load for the detector) and the number of pairs of two-dimensional patterns to be analysed (the load for the computer), are derived as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule. PMID:22514069

  9. Left ventricular mechanics assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of high-resolution speckle tracking and feature tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurich, Matthias; Keller, Marius; Greiner, Sebastian; Steen, Henning; Aus dem Siepen, Fabian; Riffel, Johannes; Katus, Hugo A; Buss, Sebastian J; Mereles, Derliz

    2016-12-01

    Assessment of left ventricular (LV) systolic function plays a central role in cardiac imaging. Calculation of ejection fraction (EF) is the current method of choice; however, its limited intermodal comparability represents a major drawback. The assessment of myocardial mechanics by strain imaging may better reflect the complex myocardial contractility. We aimed to evaluate different methods for quantification of LV strain on global and regional levels with a focus on the new non-proprietary feature tracking (FT) algorithm. Measurements of LV deformation were performed by means of high-resolution two-dimensional (2D) speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and compared with values obtained by 2D feature tracking echocardiography (FT-E) and feature tracking cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (FT-CMR). Assessments with echocardiography started within 30 min after CMR examination to minimize time-dependent variations in myocardial function. Forty-seven patients were included. Assessments by STE were -15.7 ± 5.0% for global longitudinal strain (GLS), -14.6 ± 4.5% for global circumferential strain (GCS), and 21.6 ± 13.3% for global radial strain (GRS), while values obtained with FT-E were -13.1 ± 4.0, -13.6 ± 4.0, 20.3 ± 9.5, and with FT-CMR -15.0 ± 4.0, -16.9 ± 5.4, and 35.0 ± 10.8, respectively. Linear regression and the Bland-Altman analysis showed the best intramodal association for STE GLS and FT-E GLS (r = 0.88, bias = -2.7%, LOA = ±4.7%). The correlation for GCS and GRS was weaker, and for regional strain was poor. In contrast to EF, GLS showed a better intermodal correlation between echocardiography and CMR (r = 0.81 by speckle tracking, r = 0.8 by FT, and r = 0.78 by EF). In our study, measurement of global longitudinal LV strain using the new FT algorithm with CMR and echocardiography was comparable with measurements obtained by high-resolution STE. Compared with echocardiographic EF determination, FT-E GLS shows a better reproducibility and a better

  10. Compression-induced crystallization of amorphous indomethacin in tablets: characterization of spatial heterogeneity by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Sarat; Stephenson, Gregory A; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2015-01-05

    Tablets of amorphous indomethacin were compressed at 10, 25, 50, or 100 MPa using either an unlubricated or a lubricated die and stored individually at 35 °C in sealed Mylar pouches. At selected time points, tablets were analyzed by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry (2D-XRD), which enabled us to profile the extent of drug crystallization in tablets, in both the radial and axial directions. To evaluate the role of lubricant, magnesium stearate was used as "internal" and/or "external" lubricant. Indomethacin crystallization propensity increased as a function of compression pressure, with 100 MPa pressure causing crystallization immediately after compression (detected using synchrotron radiation). However, the drug crystallization was not uniform throughout the tablets. In unlubricated systems, pronounced crystallization at the radial surface could be attributed to die wall friction. The tablet core remained substantially amorphous, irrespective of the compression pressure. Lubrication of the die wall with magnesium stearate, as external lubricant, dramatically decreased drug crystallization at the radial surface. The spatial heterogeneity in drug crystallization, as a function of formulation composition and compression pressure, was systematically investigated. When formulating amorphous systems as tablets, the potential for compression induced crystallization warrants careful consideration. Very low levels of crystallization on the tablet surface, while profoundly affecting product performance (decrease in dissolution rate), may not be readily detected by conventional analytical techniques. Early detection of crystallization could be pivotal in the successful design of a dosage form where, in order to obtain the desired bioavailability, the drug may be in a high energy state. Specialized X-ray diffractometric techniques (2D; use of high intensity synchrotron radiation) enabled detection of very low levels of drug crystallization and revealed the heterogeneity in

  11. Energetic, spatial, and momentum character of the electronic structure at a buried interface: The two-dimensional electron gas between two metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemšák, S.; Conti, G.; Gray, A. X.; Palsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Eiteneer, D.; Keqi, A.; Rattanachata, A.; Saw, A. Y.; Bostwick, A.; Moreschini, L.; Rotenberg, E.; Strocov, V. N.; Kobayashi, M.; Schmitt, T.; Stolte, W.; Ueda, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Jackson, C. A.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Borek, S.; Minar, J.; Braun, J.; Ebert, H.; Plucinski, L.; Kortright, J. B.; Schneider, C. M.; Balents, L.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Stemmer, S.; Fadley, C. S.

    2016-06-01

    The interfaces between two condensed phases often exhibit emergent physical properties that can lead to new physics and novel device applications and are the subject of intense study in many disciplines. We here apply experimental and theoretical techniques to the characterization of one such interesting interface system: the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed in multilayers consisting of SrTi O3 (STO) and GdTi O3 (GTO). This system has been the subject of multiple studies recently and shown to exhibit very high carrier charge densities and ferromagnetic effects, among other intriguing properties. We have studied a 2DEG-forming multilayer of the form [6unit cells (u .c .) STO /3 u .c .of GTO ] 20 using a unique array of photoemission techniques including soft and hard x-ray excitation, soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission, core-level spectroscopy, resonant excitation, and standing-wave effects, as well as theoretical calculations of the electronic structure at several levels and of the actual photoemission process. Standing-wave measurements below and above a strong resonance have been exploited as a powerful method for studying the 2DEG depth distribution. We have thus characterized the spatial and momentum properties of this 2DEG in detail, determining via depth-distribution measurements that it is spread throughout the 6 u.c. layer of STO and measuring the momentum dispersion of its states. The experimental results are supported in several ways by theory, leading to a much more complete picture of the nature of this 2DEG and suggesting that oxygen vacancies are not the origin of it. Similar multitechnique photoemission studies of such states at buried interfaces, combined with comparable theory, will be a very fruitful future approach for exploring and modifying the fascinating world of buried-interface physics and chemistry.

  12. Measurement of the spatial resolution and the relative density resolution in an industrial cone-beam micro computed tomography system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-Fang; QUE Jie-Min; CAO Da-Quan; SUN Cui-Li; ZHAO Wei; WEI Cun-Feng; SHI Rong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    The spatial resolution and the relative density resolution are the two most critical indicators in CT system.The method recommended in the ASTM E1695-95 and GJB 5311-2004 is only suitable to the fan-beam CT system.In this paper,for industrial cone-beam micro CT system,we will adopt the edge response function (ERF) created by the step edges of a steel ball to measure the system 3D PSF and MTF.To describe the contrast discrimination function more accurately,we will first propose to extend the two-dimensional measurement region to the three-dimensional space.Our experimental spatial resolution is (55.56±0.56) lp/mm and the relative density resolution is 1% within 300 μm×300 μm×300 μm according to the 3σ rule.

  13. Two-dimensional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Osserman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The basic component of several-variable calculus, two-dimensional calculus is vital to mastery of the broader field. This extensive treatment of the subject offers the advantage of a thorough integration of linear algebra and materials, which aids readers in the development of geometric intuition. An introductory chapter presents background information on vectors in the plane, plane curves, and functions of two variables. Subsequent chapters address differentiation, transformations, and integration. Each chapter concludes with problem sets, and answers to selected exercises appear at the end o

  14. Two dimensional vernier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional vernier scale is disclosed utilizing a cartesian grid on one plate member with a polar grid on an overlying transparent plate member. The polar grid has multiple concentric circles at a fractional spacing of the spacing of the cartesian grid lines. By locating the center of the polar grid on a location on the cartesian grid, interpolation can be made of both the X and Y fractional relationship to the cartesian grid by noting which circles coincide with a cartesian grid line for the X and Y direction.

  15. Polarization imaging with enhanced spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, A.; Lizana, A.; Iemmi, C.; Campos, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present the design and the experimental implementation of a new imaging set-up, based on Liquid Crystal technology, able to obtain super-resolved polarimetric images of polarimetric samples when the resolution is detector limited. The proposed set-up is a combination of two modules. One of them is an imaging Stokes polarimeter, based on Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal cells, which is used to analyze the polarization spatial distribution of an incident beam. The other module is used to obtain high resolved intensity images of the sample in an optical system whose resolution is mainly limited by the CCD pixel geometry. It contains a calibrated Parallel Aligned Liquid Crystal on Silicon display employed to introduce controlled linear phases. As a result, a set of different low resolved intensity images with sub-pixel displacements are captured by the CCD. By properly combining these images and after applying a deconvolution process, a super-resolved intensity image of the object is obtained. Finally, the combination of the two different optical modules permits to employ super-resolved images during the polarimetric data reduction calculation, leading to a final polarization image with enhanced spatial resolution. The proposed optical set-up performance is implemented and experimentally validated by providing super-resolved images of an amplitude resolution test and a birefringent resolution test. A significant improvement in the spatial resolution (by a factor of 1.4) of the obtained polarimetric images, in comparison with the images obtained with the regular imaging system, is clearly observed when applying our proposed technique.

  16. Two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the principles and applications of two-dimensional vibrational and optical spectroscopy techniques. This book provides an account of basic theory required for an understanding of two-dimensional vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  17. Two-dimensional subwavelength plasmonic lattice solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, F; Hu, B; Panoiu, N C

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of plasmonic lattice solitons (PLSs) formed in two-dimensional (2D) arrays of metallic nanowires embedded into a nonlinear medium with Kerr nonlinearity. We analyze two classes of 2D PLSs families, namely, fundamental and vortical PLSs in both focusing and defocusing media. Their existence, stability, and subwavelength spatial confinement are studied in detai

  18. Spaser spectroscopy with subwavelength spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozovik, Yurii E., E-mail: lozovik@isan.troitsk.ru [Institute of Spectroscopy RAS, Moscow Region, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow Region, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics, HSE, Moscow (Russian Federation); All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nechepurenko, Igor A.; Dorofeenko, Alexander V.; Andrianov, Eugeny S.; Pukhov, Alexander A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow Region, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electromagnetics RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-07

    We propose a method for high-sensitivity subwavelength spectromicroscopy based on the usage of a spaser (plasmonic nanolaser) in the form of a scanning probe microscope tip. The high spatial resolution is defined by plasmon localization at the tip, as is the case for apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy. In contrast to the latter method, we suggest using radiationless plasmon pumping with quantum dots instead of irradiation with an external laser beam. Due to absorption at the transition frequencies of neighboring nano-objects (molecules or clusters), dips appear in the plasmon generation spectrum. The highest sensitivity is achieved near the generation threshold.

  19. Analysis of spatial correlations in a model two-dimensional liquid through eigenvalues and eigenvectors of atomic-level stress matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V A; Stepanov, M G

    2016-01-01

    Considerations of local atomic-level stresses associated with each atom represent a particular approach to address structures of disordered materials at the atomic level. We studied structural correlations in a two-dimensional model liquid using molecular dynamics simulations in the following way. We diagonalized the atomic-level stress tensor of every atom and investigated correlations between the eigenvalues and orientations of the eigenvectors of different atoms as a function of distance between them. It is demonstrated that the suggested approach can be used to characterize structural correlations in disordered materials. In particular, we found that changes in the stress correlation functions on decrease of temperature are the most pronounced for the pairs of atoms with separation distance that corresponds to the first minimum in the pair density function. We also show that the angular dependencies of the stress correlation functions previously reported by Wu et al. [Phys. Rev. E 91, 032301 (2015)10.1103/PhysRevE.91.032301] do not represent the anisotropic Eshelby's stress fields, as it is suggested, but originate in the rotational properties of the stress tensors.

  20. High-resolution structural studies of ultra-thin magnetic, transition metal overlayers and two-dimensional transition metal oxides using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellar, S.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source Div.

    1997-05-01

    This thesis report the surface-structure determination of three, ultra-thin magnetic transition-metal films, Fe/Au(100), Mn/Ni(100), and Mn/Cu(100) using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) and photoelectron holography. These structural studies are the first to use non-s initial states in the ARPEFS procedure. This thesis also reports an ARPEFS surface-structure determination of a two-dimensional transition-metal oxide, [(1 x 1)O/W(110)] x 12. The authors have analyzed the ARPFES signal from the Au 4f{sub 7/5} core level of the Au(1 ML)/Fe(15 ML)/Au(100) system. The analysis shows that the Fe grows layer by layer with one monolayer of gold, acting as a surfactant, remaining on top of the growing Fe layers. These surface gold atoms sit in the four-fold hollow site, 1.67 {+-} 0.02 A above the iron surface. The grown Fe layer is very much like the bulk, bcc iron, with an interlayer spacing of 1.43 {+-} 0.03 A. Analysis of the Mn 3p ARPEFS signals from c(2 x 2)Mn/Ni(100) and c(2 x 2)Mn/Cu(100) shows that the Mn forms highly corrugated surface alloys. The corrugation of the Mn/Ni(100) and Mn/Cu(100) systems are 0.24 {+-} 0.02 A and 0.30 {+-} 0.04 A respectively. In both cases the Mn is sticking above the plane of the surface substrate atoms. For the Mn/Ni(100) system the first layer Ni is contracted 4% from the bulk value. The Mn/Cu(100) system shows bulk spacing for the substrate Cu. Photoelectron holography shows that the Mn/Ni interface is very abrupt with very little Mn leaking into the second layer, while the Mn/Cu(100) case has a significant amount of Mn leaking into the second layer. A new, five-element electrostatic electron lens was developed for hemispherical electron-energy analyzers. This lens system can be operated at constant transverse or constants angular magnification, and has been optimized for use with the very small photon-spot sizes. Improvements to the hemispherical electron-energy analyzer are also discussed.

  1. An Evaluation of Recently Developed RANS-Based Turbulence Models for Flow Over a Two-Dimensional Block Subjected to Different Mesh Structures and Grid Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardan, Farshid; Cheng, Wai-Chi; Baverel, Olivier; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Understanding, analyzing and predicting meteorological phenomena related to urban planning and built environment are becoming more essential than ever to architectural and urban projects. Recently, various version of RANS models have been established but more validation cases are required to confirm their capability for wind flows. In the present study, the performance of recently developed RANS models, including the RNG k-ɛ , SST BSL k-ω and SST ⪆mma-Reθ , have been evaluated for the flow past a single block (which represent the idealized architecture scale). For validation purposes, the velocity streamlines and the vertical profiles of the mean velocities and variances were compared with published LES and wind tunnel experiment results. Furthermore, other additional CFD simulations were performed to analyze the impact of regular/irregular mesh structures and grid resolutions based on selected turbulence model in order to analyze the grid independency. Three different grid resolutions (coarse, medium and fine) of Nx × Ny × Nz = 320 × 80 × 320, 160 × 40 × 160 and 80 × 20 × 80 for the computational domain and nx × nz = 26 × 32, 13 × 16 and 6 × 8, which correspond to number of grid points on the block edges, were chosen and tested. It can be concluded that among all simulated RANS models, the SST ⪆mma-Reθ model performed best and agreed fairly well to the LES simulation and experimental results. It can also be concluded that the SST ⪆mma-Reθ model provides a very satisfactory results in terms of grid dependency in the fine and medium grid resolutions in both regular and irregular structure meshes. On the other hand, despite a very good performance of the RNG k-ɛ model in the fine resolution and in the regular structure grids, a disappointing performance of this model in the coarse and medium grid resolutions indicates that the RNG k-ɛ model is highly dependent on grid structure and grid resolution. These quantitative validations are essential

  2. Interpolation by two-dimensional cubic convolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiazheng; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents results of image interpolation with an improved method for two-dimensional cubic convolution. Convolution with a piecewise cubic is one of the most popular methods for image reconstruction, but the traditional approach uses a separable two-dimensional convolution kernel that is based on a one-dimensional derivation. The traditional, separable method is sub-optimal for the usual case of non-separable images. The improved method in this paper implements the most general non-separable, two-dimensional, piecewise-cubic interpolator with constraints for symmetry, continuity, and smoothness. The improved method of two-dimensional cubic convolution has three parameters that can be tuned to yield maximal fidelity for specific scene ensembles characterized by autocorrelation or power-spectrum. This paper illustrates examples for several scene models (a circular disk of parametric size, a square pulse with parametric rotation, and a Markov random field with parametric spatial detail) and actual images -- presenting the optimal parameters and the resulting fidelity for each model. In these examples, improved two-dimensional cubic convolution is superior to several other popular small-kernel interpolation methods.

  3. Retrospective analysis by data processing tools for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: a challenge for matrix-rich sediment core sample from Tokyo Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zushi, Yasuyuki; Hashimoto, Shunji; Tamada, Masafumi; Masunaga, Shigeki; Kanai, Yutaka; Tanabe, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-18

    Data processing tools for non-target analysis using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-HRTOFMS) were developed and applied to a sediment core in Tokyo Bay, focusing on chlorinated compounds in this study. The processing tools were classified in two different methods: (1) the consecutive use of mass defect filter followed by artificial neutral loss scan (MDF/artificial NLS) as a qualitative non-target screening method and (2) Entire Domain Combined Spectra Extraction and Integration Program (ComSpec) and two-dimensional peak sentinel (T-SEN) as a semi-quantitative target screening method. MDF/artificial NLS as a non-target screening approach revealed that PCBs, followed by octachlorodibenzo dioxin (OCDD), were the main chlorinated compounds present in all sediment layers. Furthermore, unknown peaks thought to be chlorinated compounds were found in increasing numbers, some in increasing amounts. T-SEN and ComSpec as a target screening approach were adapted for automatic semi-quantitative analysis showed that, in decreasing concentration order, PCBs, OCDD, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDEs, DDDs) were the main chlorinated pollutants in the sediments. The complementary use of both techniques allows us to extract significant chlorinated pollutants, including non-targeted compounds. This retrospective analysis by this approach performed well even on matrix-rich sediment samples and provided us an interesting insight of historical trends of pollution in Tokyo Bay.

  4. Qualitative analysis of a sulfur-fumigated Chinese herbal medicine by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and high-resolution time of flight mass spectrometry using colorized fuzzy difference data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Cao, Gang; Zhang, Hong-Yan

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the chemical transformation of volatile compounds in sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-TOF/MS) with colorized fuzzy difference (CFD) method was used to investigate the effect of sulfur-fumigation on the volatile components from Radix Angelicae Sinensis. Twenty-five compounds that were found in sun-dried samples disappeared in sulfur-fumigated samples. Seventeen volatile components including two sulfur-containing compounds were newly generated for the first time in volatile oils of sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. The strategy can be successfully applied to rapidly and holistically discriminate sun-dried and sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. GC×GC-HR-TOF/MS based CFD is a powerful and feasible approach for the global quality evaluation of Radix Angelicae Sinensis as well as other herbal medicines.

  5. High spatial resolution probes for neurobiology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, D. E.; Kenney, C. J.; Litke, A. M.; Mathieson, K.

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive biological neural networks, such as the brain and the retina, require position-sensitive detection methods to identify, map and study their behavior. Traditionally, planar microelectrodes have been employed to record the cell's electrical activity with device limitations arising from the electrode's 2-D nature. Described here is the development and characterization of an array of electrically conductive micro-needles aimed at addressing the limitations of planar electrodes. The capability of this array to penetrate neural tissue improves the electrode-cell electrical interface and allows more complicated 3-D networks of neurons, such as those found in brain slices, to be studied. State-of-the-art semiconductor fabrication techniques were used to etch and passivate conformally the metal coat and fill high aspect ratio holes in silicon. These are subsequently transformed into needles with conductive tips. This process has enabled the fabrication of arrays of unprecedented dimensions: 61 hexagonally close-packed electrodes, ˜200 μm tall with 60 μm spacing. Electroplating the tungsten tips with platinum ensure suitable impedance values (˜600 kΩ at 1 kHz) for the recording of neuronal signals. Without compromising spatial resolution of the neuronal recordings, this array adds a new and exciting dimension to the study of biological neural networks.

  6. Two-dimensional visualization of cluster beams by microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoukaz, A., E-mail: khoukaz@uni-muenster.de; Bonaventura, D.; Grieser, S.; Hergemöller, A.-K.; Köhler, E.; Täschner, A.

    2014-01-21

    An advanced technique for a two-dimensional real time visualization of cluster beams in a vacuum as well as of the overlap volume of cluster beams with particle accelerator beams is presented. The detection system consists of an array of microchannel plates (MCPs) in combination with a phosphor screen which is read out by a CCD camera. This setup together with the ionization of a cluster beam by an electron or ion beam allows for spatial resolved investigations of the cluster beam position, size, and intensity. Moreover, since electrically uncharged clusters remain undetected, the operation in an internal beam experiment opens the way to monitor the overlap region and thus the position and size of an accelerator beam crossing an originally electrically neutral cluster jet. The observed intensity distribution of the recorded image is directly proportional to the convolution of the spatial ion beam and cluster beam intensities and is by this a direct measure of the two-dimensional luminosity distribution. This information can directly be used for the reconstruction of vertex positions as well as for an input for numerical simulations of the reaction zone. The spatial resolution of the images is dominated by the granularity of the complete MCP device and was found to be in the order of σ≈100μm. -- Highlights: • We present a MCP system for a 2D real time visualization of cluster target beams. • With this device the vertex region of storage ring experiments can be investigated. • Time resolved 2D information about the target thickness distribution is accessible. • A spatial resolution of the MCP device of 0.1 mm was achieved. • The presented MCP system also allows for measurements on cluster masses.

  7. Full-field, high-spatial-resolution detection of local structural damage from low-resolution random strain field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Sun, Peng; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2017-07-01

    Structural damage is typically a local phenomenon that initiates and propagates within a limited area. As such high spatial resolution measurement and monitoring is often needed for accurate damage detection. This requires either significantly increased costs from denser sensor deployment in the case of global simultaneous/parallel measurements, or increased measurement time and labor in the case of global sequential measurements. This study explores the feasibility of an alternative approach to this problem: a computational solution in which a limited set of randomly positioned, low-resolution global strain measurements are used to reconstruct the full-field, high-spatial-resolution, two-dimensional (2D) strain field and rapidly detect local damage. The proposed approach exploits the implicit low-rank and sparse data structure of the 2D strain field: it is highly correlated without many edges and hence has a low-rank structure, unless damage-manifesting itself as sparse local irregularity-is present and alters such a low-rank structure slightly. Therefore, reconstruction of the full-field, high-spatial-resolution strain field from a limited set of randomly positioned low-resolution global measurements is modeled as a low-rank matrix completion framework and damage detection as a sparse decomposition formulation, enabled by emerging convex optimization techniques. Numerical simulations on a plate structure are conducted for validation. The results are discussed and a practical iterative global/local procedure is recommended. This new computational approach should enable the efficient detection of local damage using limited sets of strain measurements.

  8. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    of this thesis is on online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (online LC×LC) with reverse phase in both dimensions (online RP×RP). Since online RP×RP has not been attempted before within this research group, a significant part of this thesis consists of knowledge and experience gained...

  9. Non-targeted analysis of electronics waste by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry: Using accurate mass information and mass defect analysis to explore the data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubukata, Masaaki; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Tao, Qingping; Hang, Jiliang; Wu, Zhanpin; Dane, A John; Cody, Robert B

    2015-05-22

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) offer the best possible separation of their respective techniques. Recent commercialization of combined GC×GC-HRMS systems offers new possibilities for the analysis of complex mixtures. However, such experiments yield enormous data sets that require new informatics tools to facilitate the interpretation of the rich information content. This study reports on the analysis of dust obtained from an electronics recycling facility by using GC×GC in combination with a new high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. New software tools for (non-traditional) Kendrick mass defect analysis were developed in this research and greatly aided in the identification of compounds containing chlorine and bromine, elements that feature in most persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In essence, the mass defect plot serves as a visual aid from which halogenated compounds are recognizable on the basis of their mass defect and isotope patterns. Mass chromatograms were generated based on specific ions identified in the plots as well as region of the plot predominantly occupied by halogenated contaminants. Tentative identification was aided by database searches, complementary electron-capture negative ionization experiments and elemental composition determinations from the exact mass data. These included known and emerging flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromobenzene, tetrabromo bisphenol A and tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), as well as other legacy contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs).

  10. High spatial and temporal resolution photon/electron counting detector for synchrotron radiation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Lebedev, G. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Hull, J. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y.; Guo, J. H.; Shen, Z. X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-10-01

    This paper reports on the development of a high resolution electron/photon/ion imaging system which detects events with a timing accuracy of <160 ps FWHM and a two-dimensional spatial accuracy of ˜50 μm FWHM. The event counting detector uses microchannel plates for signal amplification and can sustain counting rates exceeding 1.5 MHz for evenly distributed events (0.4 MHz with 10% dead time for randomly distributed events). The detector combined with a time-of-flight angular resolved photoelectron energy analyzer was tested at a synchrotron beamline. The results of these measurements illustrate the unique capabilities of the analytical system, allowing simultaneous imaging of photoelectrons in momentum space and measurement of the energy spectrum, as well as filtering the data in user defined temporal and/or spatial windows.

  11. Improving spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy by super-resolution image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Han; Zhao, Weiqian; Wang, Yun; Fan, Ying; Qiu, Lirong; Zhu, Ke

    2016-05-16

    A new super-resolution image restoration confocal Raman microscopy method (SRIR-RAMAN) is proposed for improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy. This method can recover the lost high spatial frequency of the confocal Raman microscopy by using Poisson-MAP super-resolution imaging restoration, thereby improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy and realizing its super-resolution imaging. Simulation analyses and experimental results indicate that the spatial resolution of SRIR-RAMAN can be improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm with the same confocal Raman microscopy system. This method can provide a new tool for high spatial resolution micro-probe structure detection in physical chemistry, materials science, biomedical science and other areas.

  12. Spatially Patterned Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Resolution of Retinal Prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Retinal prostheses electrically stimulate neurons to produce artificial vision in people blinded by photoreceptor degenerative diseases. The limited spatial resolution of current devices results in indiscriminate stimulation of interleaved cells of different types, precluding veridical reproduction of natural activity patterns in the retinal output. Here we investigate the use of spatial patterns of current injection to increase the spatial resolution of stimulation, using high-density multie...

  13. Inverse Kriging to Enhance Spatial Resolution of Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, Gregg M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Heasler, Patrick G.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Perry, Eileen M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Thompson, Sandra E.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Daly, Don S.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-12-15

    We describe a unique approach to image resolution enhancement, inverse kriging (IK), which takes advantage of the spatial relationship between high- and low-resolution images within an area of overlap. Once established, this mathematical relationship then can be applied across the entire low-resolution image to significantly sharpen the image. The mathematical relationship uses the spatial correlations within the low-resolution image and between the low and high spatial-resolution imagery. Two of the most important requirements of the technique are that the images be co-registered well within the resolution of the larger pixels and that the spatial structure of the training area (where the spatial correlation statistics are compared) is similar to the structure of the remaining image area where it will be applied. Testing was performed using same-sensor and multi-sensor imagery. We show results that indicate that the method does improve the low spatial-resolution imagery. The selection of a training area spatial structure similar to the area being processed is important, as areas with different spatial structure (e.g., vegetation versus buildings and roads) will produce poor results. Comparisons with bilinear interpolation demonstrate that IK could be used as an improved interpolation tool, for example, in the image-registration process.

  14. A 50 nm spatial resolution EUV imaging-resolution dependence on object thickness and illumination bandwidth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy

    2011-05-09

    In this paper we report a desk-top microscopy reaching 50 nm spatial resolution in very compact setup using a gas-puff laser plasma EUV source. The thickness of an object and the bandwidth of illuminating radiation were studied in order to estimate their quantitative influence on the EUV microscope spatial resolution. EUV images of various thickness objects obtained by illumination with variable bandwidth EUV radiation were compared in terms of knife-edge spatial resolution to study the bandwidth/object thickness parasitic influence on spatial resolution of the EUV microscope. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  15. Design and experimental study of a two-dimensional position sensitive X-ray detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A prototype of a two-dimensional position sensitive X-ray detector was designed and constructed for small angle X-ray scattering experiments at BSFR (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility). The detector is based on MWPC with cathode strip readout, and has a sensitive area of 200 mmx200 mm. The spatial resolution (FWHM) of about 210 μm along the anode wire direction was obtained from the 55Fe X-ray test of the detector.

  16. Spatial resolution of human RPC-PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceiro, M.; Crespo, P.; Mendes, L.; Ferreira, N.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fonte, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the spatial resolution of a human wide axial field of view RPC-PET system was studied. It was verified that physical processes involving the detection of 511 keV photons do not degrade the spatial resolution, compared with that attainable with systems based on inorganic scintillation crystals coupled to photomultiplier tubes. Considering the photon acollinearity effect, a detector depth-of-interaction resolution of 3.44 mm, and detector readout binnings of 1.0 and 2.0 mm, the spatial resolutions computed as the mean of full width at half maximum of point spread functions in three orthogonal directions (X, Y, and Z) were 1.4±0.0 and 2.1±0.1 mm, respectively. The corresponding mean spatial resolutions computed as the full width at tenth maximum were 3.9±0.4 and 4.8±0.3 mm, respectively.

  17. Scanning SQUID susceptometers with sub-micron spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirtley, John R., E-mail: jkirtley@stanford.edu; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Holland, Connor M.; Moler, Kathryn A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Paulius, Lisa [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Spanton, Eric M. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Schiessl, Daniel [Attocube Systems AG, Königinstraße 11A, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Fung, Y.-K.K.; Gibson, Gerald W. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Huber, Martin E. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 (United States); Ralph, Daniel C. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Ketchen, Mark B. [OcteVue, Hadley, Massachusetts 01035 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy has excellent magnetic field sensitivity, but suffers from modest spatial resolution when compared with other scanning probes. This spatial resolution is determined by both the size of the field sensitive area and the spacing between this area and the sample surface. In this paper we describe scanning SQUID susceptometers that achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while retaining a white noise floor flux sensitivity of ≈2μΦ{sub 0}/Hz{sup 1/2}. This high spatial resolution is accomplished by deep sub-micron feature sizes, well shielded pickup loops fabricated using a planarized process, and a deep etch step that minimizes the spacing between the sample surface and the SQUID pickup loop. We describe the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of these sensors. Although sub-micron spatial resolution has been achieved previously in scanning SQUID sensors, our sensors not only achieve high spatial resolution but also have integrated modulation coils for flux feedback, integrated field coils for susceptibility measurements, and batch processing. They are therefore a generally applicable tool for imaging sample magnetization, currents, and susceptibilities with higher spatial resolution than previous susceptometers.

  18. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  19. Two-Dimensional Vernier Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    Modified vernier scale gives accurate two-dimensional coordinates from maps, drawings, or cathode-ray-tube displays. Movable circular overlay rests on fixed rectangular-grid overlay. Pitch of circles nine-tenths that of grid and, for greatest accuracy, radii of circles large compared with pitch of grid. Scale enables user to interpolate between finest divisions of regularly spaced rule simply by observing which mark on auxiliary vernier rule aligns with mark on primary rule.

  20. Spectral methods for spatial resolution improvement of digital images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝鹏威; 徐冠华; 朱重光

    1999-01-01

    A general matrix formula is proposed for signal spectral aliasing of various or mutual resolution, the concept of spectral aliasing matrix is introduced, and some general spectral methods for spatial resolution improvement from multiframes of undersampled digital images are discussed. A simplified iterative method of parallel row-action projection for spectral de-aliasing is also given. The method can be applied to multiframe images with various spatial resolution,relative displacement, dissimilar point spread function, different image radiance, and additive random noise. Some experiments with a resolution test pattern and an image of vertical fin performed the convergence and the effectiveness of the algorithms.

  1. Attention Modifies Spatial Resolution According to Task Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Antoine; Carrasco, Marisa

    2017-03-01

    How does visual attention affect spatial resolution? In texture-segmentation tasks, exogenous (involuntary) attention automatically increases resolution at the attended location, which improves performance where resolution is too low (at the periphery) but impairs performance where resolution is already too high (at central locations). Conversely, endogenous (voluntary) attention improves performance at all eccentricities, which suggests a more flexible mechanism. Here, using selective adaptation to spatial frequency, we investigated the mechanism by which endogenous attention benefits performance in resolution tasks. Participants detected a texture target that could appear at several eccentricities. Adapting to high or low spatial frequencies selectively affected performance in a manner consistent with changes in resolution. Moreover, adapting to high, but not low, frequencies mitigated the attentional benefit at central locations where resolution was too high; this shows that attention can improve performance by decreasing resolution. Altogether, our results indicate that endogenous attention benefits performance by modulating the contribution of high-frequency information in order to flexibly adjust spatial resolution according to task demands.

  2. High spatial resolution LWIR hyperspectral sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Carson B.; Bodkin, Andrew; Daly, James T.; Meola, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Presented is a new hyperspectral imager design based on multiple slit scanning. This represents an innovation in the classic trade-off between speed and resolution. This LWIR design has been able to produce data-cubes at 3 times the rate of conventional single slit scan devices. The instrument has a built-in radiometric and spectral calibrator.

  3. Data analysis results of the second sea trial of ambient noise imaging with acoustic lens in 2014: Two-dimensional target images affected by direction of field of view and spatial noise distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    An aspherical lens with an aperture diameter of 1.0 m has been designed and fabricated to develop a prototype system for ambient noise imaging (ANI). A sea trial of silent target detection using the prototype ANI system was conducted under only natural ocean ambient noise at Uchiura Bay in November 2010. It was verified that targets are successfully detected under natural ocean ambient noise, mainly generated by snapping shrimps. Recently, we have built a second prototype ANI system using an acoustic lens with a two-dimensional (2D) receiver array with 127 elements corresponding to a field of view (FOV) spanning 15° horizontally by 9° vertically. In this study, we investigated the effects of the direction of the FOV and the spatial noise distribution on the 2D target image obtained by ANI. Here, the noise sources in front of the target are called “front light”, and those at the rear of the target are called “back light”. The second sea trial was conducted to image targets arranged in the FOV and measure the positions of noise sources at Uchiura Bay in November 10-14, 2014. For front light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were greater than those in other directions owing to the dominant target scatterings. Reversely, for back light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were lower than those in other directions owing to the dominant direct noises such as “silhouette”.

  4. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    Two-dimensional liquid chromatography has received increasing interest due to the rise in demand for analysis of complex chemical mixtures. Separation of complex mixtures is hard to achieve as a simple consequence of the sheer number of analytes, as these samples might contain hundreds or even...... dimensions. As a consequence of the conclusions made within this thesis, the research group has, for the time being, decided against further development of online LC×LC systems, since it was not deemed ideal for the intended application, the analysis of the polar fraction of oil. Trap-and...

  5. Infrared chemical imaging: Spatial resolution evaluation and super-resolution concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offroy, Marc [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Roggo, Yves [F. Hoffmann-La Roche A.G., Basel (Switzerland); Milanfar, Peyman [Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Duponchel, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.duponchel@univ-lille1.fr [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-03

    Chemical imaging systems help to solve many challenges in various scientific fields. Able to deliver rapid spatial and chemical information, modern infrared spectrometers using Focal Plane Array detectors (FPA) are of great interest. Considering conventional infrared spectrometers with a single element detector, we can consider that the diffraction-limited spatial resolution is more or less equal to the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5-25 {mu}m). Unfortunately, the spatial resolution of FPA spectroscopic setup is even lower due to the detector pixel size. This becomes a real constraint when micron-sized samples are analysed. New chemometrics methods are thus of great interest to overcome such resolution drawback, while keeping our far-field infrared imaging spectrometers. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the super-resolution concept in order to increase the spatial resolution of infrared imaging spectrometers using FPA detectors. The main idea of super-resolution is the fusion of several low-resolution images of the same sample to obtain a higher-resolution image. Applying the super-resolution concept on a relatively low number of FPA acquisitions, it was possible to observe a 30% decrease in spatial resolution.

  6. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, N.D., E-mail: nbrubaker@math.arizona.edu; Lega, J., E-mail: lega@math.arizona.edu

    2016-01-08

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  7. Improving detector spatial resolution using pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Langechuan; Lu, Minghui; Cao, Wanqing; Peng, Luke; Chen, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    Indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology are widely used in digital X-ray imaging. In such FPDs a scintillator layer is used for converting X-rays into visible light photons. However, the lateral spread of these photons inside the scintillator layer reduces spatial resolution of the FPD. In this study, FPDs incorporating pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure were developed to limit lateral spread of light photons thereby improving spatial resolution. For the pixelated scintillator, a two-dimensional barrier rib structure was first manufactured on a substrate layer, coated with reflective materials, and filled to the rim with the scintillating material of gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS). Several scintillator samples were fabricated, with pitch size varying from 160 to 280 μm and rib height from 200 to 280 μm. The samples were directly coupled to an a-Si flat panel photodiode array with a pitch of 200 μm to convert optical photons to electronic signals. With the pixelated scintillator, the detector modulation transfer function was shown to improve significantly (by 94% at 2 cycle/mm) compared to a detector using an unstructured GOS layer. However, the prototype does show lower sensitivity due to the decrease in scintillator fill factor. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of using the barrier-rib structure to improve the spatial resolution of FPDs. Such an improvement would greatly benefit nondestructive testing applications where the spatial resolution is the most important parameter. Further investigation will focus on improving the detector sensitivity and exploring its medical applications.

  8. Spatial resolution correction for hot-wire anemometry in wall turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, C.; Hutchins, N.; Ooi, A.; Marusic, I. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    We investigate spatial resolution issues in hot-wire anemometry measurements of turbulence intensity and energy spectra. Single normal hot-wire measurements are simulated by means of filtering direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow at Re{sub {tau}} = 934. Through analysis of the two-dimensional energy spectra from the DNS, the attenuation of the small-scale energy levels is documented, especially in the near-wall region. The missing energy displays anisotropic characteristics, and an attempt is made to model this using an empirical equation, thus providing a correction scheme for all wall normal locations. The empirical model is assessed using experimental boundary layer data and shown to effectively correct both the streamwise one-dimensional energy spectra and turbulence intensity at a Reynolds number significantly above that of the DNS. (orig.)

  9. Novel analytical methods for flame retardants and plasticizers based on gas chromatography, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography, and direct probe coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-high resolution time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim E G

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we assess the applicability of different analytical techniques, namely, direct probe (DP), gas chromatography (GC), and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) with a high resolution (HR)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) for the analysis of flame retardants and plasticizers in electronic waste and car interiors. APCI-HRTOFMS is a combination scarcely exploited yet with GC or with a direct probe for screening purposes and to the best of our knowledge, never with GC × GC to provide comprehensive information. Because of the increasing number of flame retardants and questions about their environmental fate, there is a need for the development of wider target and untargeted screening techniques to assess human exposure to these compounds. With the use of the APCI source, we took the advantage of using a soft ionization technique that provides mainly molecular ions, in addition to the accuracy of HRMS for identification. The direct probe provided a very easy and inexpensive method for the identification of flame retardants without any sample preparation. This technique seems extremely useful for the screening of solid materials such as electrical devices, electronics and other waste. GC-APCI-HRTOF-MS appeared to be more sensitive compared to liquid chromatography (LC)-APCI/atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI)-HRTOF-MS for a wider range of flame retardants with absolute detection limits in the range of 0.5-25 pg. A variety of tri- to decabromodiphenyl ethers, phosphorus flame retardants and new flame retardants were found in the samples at levels from microgram per gram to milligram per gram levels.

  10. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils.

  11. Post-polymerization photografting on methacrylate-based monoliths for separation of intact proteins and protein digests with comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography hyphenated with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Rudy J; Wouters, Sam; Barcaru, Andrei; Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; de Koning, Leo J; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Post-polymerization photografting is a versatile tool to alter the surface chemistry of organic-based monoliths so as to obtain desired stationary phase properties. In this study, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid was grafted to a hydrophobic poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) monolith to create a strong cation exchange stationary phase. Both single-step and two-step photografting were addressed, and the effects of grafting conditions were assessed. An experimental design has been applied in an attempt to optimize three of the key parameters of the two-step photografting chemistry, i.e. the grafting time of the initiator, the monomer concentration and the monomer irradiation time. The photografted columns were implemented in a comprehensive two-dimensional column liquid chromatography ( (t) LC ×  (t) LC) workflow and applied for the separation of intact proteins and peptides. A baseline separation of 11 intact proteins was obtained within 20 min by implementing a gradient across a limited RP composition window in the second dimension. (t) LC ×  (t) LC with UV detection was used for the separation of cytochrome c digest, bovine serum insulin digest and a digest of a complex protein mixture. A semi-quantitative estimation of the occupation of separation space, the orthogonality, of the (t) LC ×  (t) LC system yielded 75%. The (t) LC ×  (t) LC setup was hyphenated to a high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer instrument to identify the bovine serum insulin tryptic peptides and to demonstrate the compatibility with MS analysis.

  12. Two-dimensional photon counting imaging detector based on PCB delay line anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bingli; Bai, Yonglin; Lei, Fanpu; Bai, Xiaohong; Wang, Bo; Qin, Junjun; Cao, Weiwei; Gou, Yongsheng

    2016-11-01

    Delay line anode detector has high spatial resolution and high count rate. It has been an important technical means for single photon imaging from near earth space to deep space. A two dimensional delay line anode is designed using multilayer circuit board technology. A complete set of PCB delay line anode single photon detection system is established. The spatial resolution of the detector is theoretically analyzed. Moreover, the signal transmission characteristic of PCB delay line and the dark count rate of the detector are tested. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the detector spatial resolution is about 100um and the overall dark count rate is 4counts/cm2 at 2.3KV.

  13. Design and optimization of resistive anode for a two-dimensional imaging GEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xu-Dong; Dong, Ming-Yi; Zhao, Yi-Chen; Zhou, Chuan-Xing; Qun, Ou-Yang

    2016-08-01

    A resistive anode for two-dimensional imaging detectors, which consists of a series of high resistivity pads surrounded by low resistivity strips, can provide good spatial resolution while reducing the number of electronics channels required. The optimization of this kind of anode has been studied by both numerical simulations and experimental tests. It is found that to obtain good detector performance, the resistance ratio of the pads to the strips should be larger than 5, the nonuniformity of the pad surface resistivity should be less than 20%, a smaller pad width leads to a smaller spatial resolution, and when the pad width is 6 mm, the spatial resolution (σ) can reach about 105 μm. Based on the study results, a 2-D GEM detector prototype with optimized resistive anode is constructed and a good imaging performance is achieved. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375219) and CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  14. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  15. SCAPS, a two-dimensional ion detector for mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Faraday Cup (FC) and electron multiplier (EM) are of the most popular ion detector for mass spectrometer. FC is used for high-count-rate ion measurements and EM can detect from single ion. However, FC is difficult to detect lower intensities less than kilo-cps, and EM loses ion counts higher than Mega-cps. Thus, FC and EM are used complementary each other, but they both belong to zero-dimensional detector. On the other hand, micro channel plate (MCP) is a popular ion signal amplifier with two-dimensional capability, but additional detection system must be attached to detect the amplified signals. Two-dimensional readout for the MCP signals, however, have not achieve the level of FC and EM systems. A stacked CMOS active pixel sensor (SCAPS) has been developed to detect two-dimensional ion variations for a spatial area using semiconductor technology [1-8]. The SCAPS is an integrated type multi-detector, which is different from EM and FC, and is composed of more than 500×500 pixels (micro-detectors) for imaging of cm-area with a pixel of less than 20 µm in square. The SCAPS can be detected from single ion to 100 kilo-count ions per one pixel. Thus, SCAPS can be accumulated up to several giga-count ions for total pixels, i.e. for total imaging area. The SCAPS has been applied to stigmatic ion optics of secondary ion mass spectrometer, as a detector of isotope microscope [9]. The isotope microscope has capabilities of quantitative isotope images of hundred-micrometer area on a sample with sub-micrometer resolution and permil precision, and of two-dimensional mass spectrum on cm-scale of mass dispersion plane of a sector magnet with ten-micrometer resolution. The performance has been applied to two-dimensional isotope spatial distribution for mainly hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen of natural (extra-terrestrial and terrestrial) samples and samples simulated natural processes [e.g. 10-17]. References: [1] Matsumoto, K., et al. (1993) IEEE Trans. Electron Dev. 40

  16. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  17. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, N. D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid.

  18. Two-dimensional cubic convolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E; Geng, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The paper develops two-dimensional (2D), nonseparable, piecewise cubic convolution (PCC) for image interpolation. Traditionally, PCC has been implemented based on a one-dimensional (1D) derivation with a separable generalization to two dimensions. However, typical scenes and imaging systems are not separable, so the traditional approach is suboptimal. We develop a closed-form derivation for a two-parameter, 2D PCC kernel with support [-2,2] x [-2,2] that is constrained for continuity, smoothness, symmetry, and flat-field response. Our analyses, using several image models, including Markov random fields, demonstrate that the 2D PCC yields small improvements in interpolation fidelity over the traditional, separable approach. The constraints on the derivation can be relaxed to provide greater flexibility and performance.

  19. Exploring the limits of spatial resolution in radiation dose delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Karl; Clark, Brenda G; Huntzinger, Calvin

    2002-08-01

    Flexibility and complexity in patient treatment due to advances in radiotherapy techniques necessitates a simple method for evaluating spatial resolution capabilities of the dose delivery device. Our purpose in this investigation is to evaluate a model that describes the ability of a radiation therapy device to deliver a desired dose distribution. The model is based on linear systems theory and is analogous to methods used to describe resolution degradation in imaging systems. A qualitative analysis of spatial resolution degradation using the model is presented in the spatial and spatial frequency domains. The ability of the model to predict the effects of geometric dose conformity to treatment volumes is evaluated by varying multileaf collimator leaf width and magnitude of dose spreading. Dose distributions for three clinical treatment shapes, circular shapes of varying diameter and one intensity modulated shape are used in the evaluation. We show that the model accurately predicts the dependence of dose conformity on these parameters. The spatial resolution capabilities of different radiation therapy devices can be quantified using the model, providing a simple method for comparing different treatment machine characteristics. Also, as different treatment sites have different resolution requirements this model may be used to tailor machine characteristics to the specific site.

  20. Improved spatial resolution in PET scanners using sampling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, Suleman; Scheuermann, Ryan; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Increased focus towards improved detector spatial resolution in PET has led to the use of smaller crystals in some form of light sharing detector design. In this work we evaluate two sampling techniques that can be applied during calibrations for pixelated detector designs in order to improve the reconstructed spatial resolution. The inter-crystal positioning technique utilizes sub-sampling in the crystal flood map to better sample the Compton scatter events in the detector. The Compton scatter rejection technique, on the other hand, rejects those events that are located further from individual crystal centers in the flood map. We performed Monte Carlo simulations followed by measurements on two whole-body scanners for point source data. The simulations and measurements were performed for scanners using scintillators with Zeff ranging from 46.9 to 63 for LaBr3 and LYSO, respectively. Our results show that near the center of the scanner, inter-crystal positioning technique leads to a gain of about 0.5-mm in reconstructed spatial resolution (FWHM) for both scanner designs. In a small animal LYSO scanner the resolution improves from 1.9-mm to 1.6-mm with the inter-crystal technique. The Compton scatter rejection technique shows higher gains in spatial resolution but at the cost of reduction in scanner sensitivity. The inter-crystal positioning technique represents a modest acquisition software modification for an improvement in spatial resolution, but at a cost of potentially longer data correction and reconstruction times. The Compton scatter rejection technique, while also requiring a modest acquisition software change with no increased data correction and reconstruction times, will be useful in applications where the scanner sensitivity is very high and larger improvements in spatial resolution are desirable. PMID:19779586

  1. Wigner crystallization of electrons in deep traps in a two-dimensional dielectric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaimeev, S. S., E-mail: shaimeev@isp.nsc.ru; Gritsenko, V. A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    A two-dimensional model is used to examine the spatial distribution of electrons in deep traps in a two-dimensional dielectric. When the trap concentration is much higher than the trapped electron concentration, Coulomb repulsion leads to the formation of a two-dimensional quasi-periodic hexagonal lattice of localized electrons (Wigner glass).

  2. High spatial resolution hard X-ray microscope using X-ray refractive lens and phase contrast imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kohmura, Y; Takeuchi, A; Takano, H; Suzuki, Y; Ishikawa, T; Ohigashi, T; Yokosuka, H

    2001-01-01

    A high spatial resolution X-ray microscope was constructed using an X-ray refractive lens as an objective. The spatial resolution was tested using 18 keV X-ray. A 0.4 mu m line and 0.4 mu m space tantalum test pattern was successfully resolved. Using the similar setup with the addition of a phase plate, a Zernike type phase-contrast microscopy experiment was carried out for the phase retrieval of the samples. Two-dimensional phase-contrast images were successfully taken for the first time in the hard X-ray region. Images of a gold mesh sample were analyzed and the validity of this method was indicated. An improvement of the lens, however, is required for the precise phase retrieval of the samples.

  3. Duality between noise and spatial resolution in linear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gureyev, Timur E; Nesterets, Yakov I; de Hoog, Frank; Schmalz, Gerd; Mayo, Sheridan C; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana

    2014-04-21

    It is shown that in a broad class of linear systems, including general linear shift-invariant systems, the spatial resolution and the noise satisfy a duality relationship, resembling the uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics. The product of the spatial resolution and the standard deviation of output noise in such systems represents a type of phase-space volume that is invariant with respect to linear scaling of the point-spread function, and it cannot be made smaller than a certain positive absolute lower limit. A corresponding intrinsic "quality" characteristic is introduced and then evaluated for the cases of some popular imaging systems, including computed tomography, generic image convolution and phase-contrast imaging. It is shown that in the latter case the spatial resolution and the noise can sometimes be decoupled, potentially leading to a substantial increase in the imaging quality.

  4. Classifying Two-dimensional Hyporeductive Triple Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Issa, A Nourou

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional real hyporeductive triple algebras (h.t.a.) are investigated. A classification of such algebras is presented. As a consequence, a classification of two-dimensional real Lie triple algebras (i.e. generalized Lie triple systems) and two-dimensional real Bol algebras is given.

  5. A superresolution land-cover change detection method using remotely sensed images with different spatial resolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaodong; Ling, Feng; Giles M. Foody; Du, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The development of remote sensing has enabled the acquisition of information on land-cover change at different spatial scales. However, a trade-off between spatial and temporal resolutions normally exists. Fine-spatial-resolution images have low temporal resolutions, whereas coarse spatial resolution images have high temporal repetition rates. A novel super-resolution change detection method (SRCD)is proposed to detect land-cover changes at both fine spatial and temporal resolutions with the ...

  6. Spatial Resolution of the ECE for JET Typical Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribaldos, V. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to obtain estimations of the spatial resolution of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) phenomena for the typical plasmas found in JET tokamak. The analysis of the spatial resolution of the ECE is based on the underlying physical process of emission and a working definition is presented and discussed. In making these estimations a typical JET pulse is being analysed taking into account the magnetic configuration, the density and temperature profiles, obtained with the EFIT code and from the LIDAR diagnostic. Ray tracing simulations are performed for a Maxwellian plasma taking into account the antenna pattern. (Author) 5 refs.

  7. High resolution or optimum resolution? Spatial analysis of the Federmesser site at Andernach, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stapert, D; Street, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses spatial analysis at site level. It is suggested that spatial analysis has to proceed in several levels, from global to more detailed questions, and that optimum resolution should be established when applying any quantitative methods in this field. As an example, the ring and sec

  8. Spatially adaptive regularized iterative high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Won Bae; Park, Min K.; Kang, Moon Gi

    2000-12-01

    High resolution images are often required in applications such as remote sensing, frame freeze in video, military and medical imaging. Digital image sensor arrays, which are used for image acquisition in many imaging systems, are not dense enough to prevent aliasing, so the acquired images will be degraded by aliasing effects. To prevent aliasing without loss of resolution, a dense detector array is required. But it may be very costly or unavailable, thus, many imaging systems are designed to allow some level of aliasing during image acquisition. The purpose of our work is to reconstruct an unaliased high resolution image from the acquired aliased image sequence. In this paper, we propose a spatially adaptive regularized iterative high resolution image reconstruction algorithm for blurred, noisy and down-sampled image sequences. The proposed approach is based on a Constrained Least Squares (CLS) high resolution reconstruction algorithm, with spatially adaptive regularization operators and parameters. These regularization terms are shown to improve the reconstructed image quality by forcing smoothness, while preserving edges in the reconstructed high resolution image. Accurate sub-pixel motion registration is the key of the success of the high resolution image reconstruction algorithm. However, sub-pixel motion registration may have some level of registration error. Therefore, a reconstruction algorithm which is robust against the registration error is required. The registration algorithm uses a gradient based sub-pixel motion estimator which provides shift information for each of the recorded frames. The proposed algorithm is based on a technique of high resolution image reconstruction, and it solves spatially adaptive regularized constrained least square minimization functionals. In this paper, we show that the reconstruction algorithm gives dramatic improvements in the resolution of the reconstructed image and is effective in handling the aliased information. The

  9. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates $\\vec{r}$, it is different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals constituting by the medium columns of dielectric constants are constants. We find the band gaps of two-dimensional function photonic crystals are different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals, and when the functions form of dielectric constants are different, the band gaps structure should be changed, which can be designed into the appropriate band gaps structures by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals.

  10. Quantifying mangrove chlorophyll from high spatial resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenkenda, Muditha K.; Joyce, Karen E.; Maier, Stefan W.; de Bruin, Sytze

    2015-10-01

    Lower than expected chlorophyll concentration of a plant can directly limit photosynthetic activity, and resultant primary production. Low chlorophyll concentration may also indicate plant physiological stress. Compared to other terrestrial vegetation, mangrove chlorophyll variations are poorly understood. This study quantifies the spatial distribution of mangrove canopy chlorophyll variation using remotely sensed data and field samples over the Rapid Creek mangrove forest in Darwin, Australia. Mangrove leaf samples were collected and analyzed for chlorophyll content in the laboratory. Once the leaf area index (LAI) of sampled trees was estimated using the digital cover photography method, the canopy chlorophyll contents were calculated. Then, the nonlinear random forests regression algorithm was used to describe the relationship between canopy chlorophyll content and remotely sensed data (WorldView-2 satellite image bands and their spectral transformations), and to estimate the spatial distribution of canopy chlorophyll variation. The imagery was evaluated at full 2 m spatial resolution, as well as at decreased resampled resolutions of 5 m and 10 m. The root mean squared errors with validation samples were 0.82, 0.64 and 0.65 g/m2 for maps at 2 m, 5 m and 10 m spatial resolution respectively. The correlation coefficient was analyzed for the relationship between measured and predicted chlorophyll values. The highest correlation: 0.71 was observed at 5 m spatial resolution (R2 = 0.5). We therefore concluded that estimating mangrove chlorophyll content from remotely sensed data is possible using red, red-edge, NIR1 and NIR2 bands and their spectral transformations as predictors at 5 m spatial resolution.

  11. Research Relative to High Spatial Resolution Passive Microwave Sounding Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Methods to obtain high resolution passive microwave weather observations, and understanding of their probable impact on numerical weather prediction accuracy were investigated. The development of synthetic aperture concepts for geosynchronous passive microwave sounders were studied. The effects of clouds, precipitation, surface phenomena, and atmospheric thermal fine structure on a scale of several kilometers were examined. High resolution passive microwave sounders (e.g., AMSU) with an increased number of channels will produce initialization data for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models with both increased spatial resolution and coverage. The development of statistical models for error growth in high resolution primitive equation NWP models which permit the consequences of various observing system alternatives, including sensors and assimilation times and procedures is discussed. A high resolution three dimensional primitive equation NWP model to determine parameters in an error growth model similar to that formulated by Lorenz, but with more degrees of freedom is utilized.

  12. Operating mode of high pressure straws with high spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Davkov, K I; Peshekhonov, V D; Cholakov, V D

    2013-01-01

    The article presents results of studying the operating mode of thin-walled drift tubes (straws) at flushing it with a high-pressure gas mixture, which allowed obtaining extremely high spatial resolution for straw detectors. The results of studying the radiation ageing of straws operating in this mode are also described.

  13. Stars and planets at high spatial and spectral resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis involves the development of new instrumental techniques and analysing tools, combining high spectral resolution with high spatial information, with the aim to increase our understanding of the formation and evolution of stars and planets. First, a novel instrumental

  14. Comparison of Detector Intrinsic Spatial Resolution Characteristics for Sensor on the Entrance Surface and Conventional Readout Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Robert S; Li, Xiaoli; Lockhart, Cate; Lewellen, Tom K

    2010-01-01

    We report on a high resolution, monolithic crystal PET detector design concept that provides depth of interaction (DOI) positioning within the crystal. Our design utilizes a novel sensor on the entrance surface (SES) approach combined with a maximum likelihood positioning algorithm. We compare the intrinsic spatial resolution characteristics (i.e., X, Y and Z) using our SES design versus conventional placement of the photo-sensors on the rear surface of the crystal. The sensors can be any two-dimensional array of solid state readout devices (e.g., silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) or avalanche photodiodes (APD)). SiPMs are a new type of solid-state photodetector with Geiger mode operation that can provide signal gain similar to a photomltipiler tube (PMT). Utilizing a multi-step simulation process, we determined the intrinsic spatial resolution characteristics for a variety of detector configurations. The SES design was evaluated via simulation for three different two-dimensional array sizes: 8×8 with 5.8×5.8 mm(2) pads; 12×12 with 3.8×3.8mm(2) pads; and 16×16 with 2.8×2.8 mm(2) pads. To reduce the number of signal channels row-column summing readout was used for the 12×12 and 16×16 channel array devices. The crystal was modeled as a 15 mm monolithic slab of a lutetium-based scintillator with the large area surface varying from 48.8×48.8 mm(2) up to 49.6×49.6 mm(2) depending upon the dimensions of the two-dimensional photo-sensor array. The intrinsic spatial resolution for the 8×8 array is 0.88 mm FWHM in X and Y, and 1.83 mm FWHM in Z (i.e., DOI). Comparing the results versus using a conventional design with the photo-sensors on the backside of the crystal, an average improvement of ~24% in X and Y and 20% in Z is achieved. The X, Y intrinsic spatial resolution improved to 0.67 mm and 0.64 mm FWHM for the 12×12 and 16×16 arrays using row-column readout. Using the 12×12 and 16×16 arrays also led to a slight improvement in the DOI positioning accuracy.

  15. A two-dimensionally focusing, quasi-optical antenna for millimeter-wave scattering in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idehara, T.; Tatsukawa, T. (Faculty of Engineering, Fukui University, Fukui 910, Japan (JP)); Brand, G.F.; Fekete, P.W.; Moore, K.J. (School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia))

    1990-06-01

    A two-dimensionally focusing, quasi-optical antenna having one elliptical reflector and one parabolic reflector has been built for use with a tunable gyrotron in order to carry out millimeter-wave scattering measurements on the TORTUS tokamak plasma at the University of Sydney. The advantages of this antenna are the following: (1) The elliptical reflector focuses the radiation beam in the toroidal direction, while the parabolic reflector focuses in the direction of major radius. This gives excellent two-dimensional focusing in the plasma region, and consequently excellent spatial resolution. (2) The focal point can be easily swept along the direction of major radius in the whole plasma region, simply by changing the angle of the parabolic reflector by a small amount. These features have been demonstrated experimentally using the tunable gyrotron source, GYROTRON III, and in computations of the radiated fields.

  16. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J J

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI...

  17. SAGA GIS based processing of spatial high resolution temperature data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlitz, Lars; Bechtel, Benjamin; Kawohl, Tobias; Boehner, Juergen [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geography; Zaksek, Klemen [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geophysics

    2013-07-01

    Many climate change impact studies require surface and near surface temperature data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The resolution of state of the art climate models and remote sensing data is often by far to coarse to represent the meso- and microscale distinctions of temperatures. This is particularly the case for regions with a huge variability of topoclimates, such as mountainous or urban areas. Statistical downscaling techniques are promising methods to refine gridded temperature data with limited spatial resolution, particularly due to their low demand for computer capacity. This paper presents two downscaling approaches - one for climate model output and one for remote sensing data. Both are methodically based on the FOSS-GIS platform SAGA. (orig.)

  18. Towards 0.1-mm spatial resolution in neutron diffractometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stoica, A D

    2002-01-01

    A design goal for VULCAN, the SNS engineering neutron diffractometer, is to enable spatial mapping with 0.1-mm resolution. Because the targeted applications often involve the use of large samples or special environments, slits cannot be used for this purpose. In this paper, methods to achieve 0.1-mm spatial resolution are outlined. For the incident beam, a new compact focusing device is proposed. The device is made of a stack of bent silicon wafers, each having a reflective multilayer (supermirror) deposited on one side and a neutron-absorbing layer on the other side. The optimal design to minimize the optical spatial aberrations is discussed and Monte Carlo simulation results are presented. For the diffracted beam, imaging devices made from thick packets of diffracting bent silicon wafers (known as Bragg mirrors) could be used. The requirements to achieve sharp imaging together with a large phase-space acceptance window are discussed and preliminary testing results are presented. (orig.)

  19. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazi, Peymon M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Yang, Kai [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 940 N.E. 13th Street, Nicholson Tower, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104 (United States); Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 3100 Ellison Building, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M., E-mail: john.boone@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 3100 Ellison Building, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image

  20. Complex Organic Molecules at High Spatial Resolution Toward Orion-KL I: Spatial Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, Susanna L Widicus

    2012-01-01

    Here we present high spatial resolution (<1 arcsecond) observations of molecular emission in Orion-KL conducted using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA). This work was motivated by recent millimeter continuum imaging studies of this region conducted at a similarly high spatial resolution, which revealed that the bulk of the emission arises from numerous compact sources, rather than the larger-scale extended structures typically associated with the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge. Given that the spatial extent of molecular emission greatly affects the determination of molecular abundances, it is important to determine the true spatial scale for complex molecules in this region. Additionally, it has recently been suggested that the relative spatial distributions of complex molecules in a source might give insight into the chemical mechanisms that drive complex chemistry in star-forming regions. In order to begin to address these issues, this study seeks to determine the spa...

  1. Numerical blowup in two-dimensional Boussinesq equations

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Zhaohua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we perform a three-stage numerical relay to investigate the finite time singularity in the two-dimensional Boussinesq approximation equations. The initial asymmetric condition is the middle-stage output of a $2048^2$ run, the highest resolution in our study is $40960^2$, and some signals of numerical blowup are observed.

  2. Rewritable ghost floating gates by tunnelling triboelectrification for two-dimensional electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongsu; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Kim, Tae-Ho; Cimini, Francesco Arturo; Kim, Sung Kyun; Hinchet, Ronan; Kim, Sang-Woo; Falconi, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Gates can electrostatically control charges inside two-dimensional materials. However, integrating independent gates typically requires depositing and patterning suitable insulators and conductors. Moreover, after manufacturing, gates are unchangeable. Here we introduce tunnelling triboelectrification for localizing electric charges in very close proximity of two-dimensional materials. As representative materials, we use chemical vapour deposition graphene deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate. The triboelectric charges, generated by friction with a Pt-coated atomic force microscope tip and injected through defects, are trapped at the air-SiO2 interface underneath graphene and act as ghost floating gates. Tunnelling triboelectrification uniquely permits to create, modify and destroy p and n regions at will with the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopes. As a proof of concept, we draw rewritable p/n+ and p/p+ junctions with resolutions as small as 200 nm. Our results open the way to time-variant two-dimensional electronics where conductors, p and n regions can be defined on demand.

  3. Hadamard States and Two-dimensional Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, H

    2001-01-01

    We have used a two-dimensional analog of the Hadamard state-condition to study the local constraints on the two-point function of a linear quantum field conformally coupled to a two-dimensional gravitational background. We develop a dynamical model in which the determination of the state of the quantum field is essentially related to the determination of a conformal frame. A particular conformal frame is then introduced in which a two-dimensional gravitational equation is established.

  4. Topological defects in two-dimensional crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong; Qi, Wei-Kai

    2008-01-01

    By using topological current theory, we study the inner topological structure of the topological defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystal. We find that there are two elementary point defects topological current in two-dimensional crystal, one for dislocations and the other for disclinations. The topological quantization and evolution of topological defects in two-dimensional crystals are discussed. Finally, We compare our theory with Brownian-dynamics simulations in 2D Yukawa systems.

  5. High-Temporal-Resolution High-Spatial-Resolution Spaceborne SAR Based on Continuously Varying PRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Zhirong; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Chunsheng; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Fang, Yue

    2017-07-25

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a well-established and powerful imaging technique for acquiring high-spatial-resolution images of the Earth's surface. With the development of beam steering techniques, sliding spotlight and staring spotlight modes have been employed to support high-spatial-resolution applications. In addition to this strengthened high-spatial-resolution and wide-swath capability, high-temporal-resolution (short repeat-observation interval) represents a key capability for numerous applications. However, conventional SAR systems are limited in that the same patch can only be illuminated for several seconds within a single pass. This paper considers a novel high-squint-angle system intended to acquire high-spatial-resolution spaceborne SAR images with repeat-observation intervals varying from tens of seconds to several minutes within a single pass. However, an exponentially increased range cell migration would arise and lead to a conflict between the receive window and 'blind ranges'. An efficient data acquisition technique for high-temporal-resolution, high-spatial-resolution and high-squint-angle spaceborne SAR, in which the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) is continuously varied according to the changing slant range, is presented in this paper. This technique allows echo data to remain in the receive window instead of conflicting with the transmitted pulse or nadir echo. Considering the precision of hardware, a compromise and practical strategy is also proposed. Furthermore, a detailed performance analysis of range ambiguities is provided with respect to parameters of TerraSAR-X. For strong point-like targets, the range ambiguity of this technique would be better than that of uniform PRF technique. For this innovative technique, a resampling strategy and modified imaging algorithm have been developed to handle the non-uniformly sampled echo data. Simulations are performed to validate the efficiency of the proposed technique and the associated

  6. Improving PET spatial resolution and detectability for prostate cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, H.; Guerin, L.; Casey, M. E.; Conti, M.; Eriksson, L.; Michel, C.; Fanti, S.; Pettinato, C.; Adler, S.; Choyke, P.

    2014-08-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common forms of cancer among men, can benefit from recent improvements in positron emission tomography (PET) technology. In particular, better spatial resolution, lower noise and higher detectability of small lesions could be greatly beneficial for early diagnosis and could provide a strong support for guiding biopsy and surgery. In this article, the impact of improved PET instrumentation with superior spatial resolution and high sensitivity are discussed, together with the latest development in PET technology: resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction. Using simulated cancer lesions, inserted in clinical PET images obtained with conventional protocols, we show that visual identification of the lesions and detectability via numerical observers can already be improved using state of the art PET reconstruction methods. This was achieved using both resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction, and a high resolution image with 2 mm pixel size. Channelized Hotelling numerical observers showed an increase in the area under the LROC curve from 0.52 to 0.58. In addition, a relationship between the simulated input activity and the area under the LROC curve showed that the minimum detectable activity was reduced by more than 23%.

  7. Observations of solar scattering polarization at high spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Snik, F; Ichimoto, K; Fischer, C E; Keller, C U; Lites, B W

    2010-01-01

    The weak, turbulent magnetic fields that supposedly permeate most of the solar photosphere are difficult to observe, because the Zeeman effect is virtually blind to them. The Hanle effect, acting on the scattering polarization in suitable lines, can in principle be used as a diagnostic for these fields. However, the prediction that the majority of the weak, turbulent field resides in intergranular lanes also poses significant challenges to scattering polarization observations because high spatial resolution is usually difficult to attain. We aim to measure the difference in scattering polarization between granules and intergranules. We present the respective center-to-limb variations, which may serve as input for future models. We perform full Stokes filter polarimetry at different solar limb positions with the CN band filter of the Hinode-SOT Broadband Filter Imager, which represents the first scattering polarization observations with sufficient spatial resolution to discern the granulation. Hinode-SOT offer...

  8. Spatial resolution requirements for urban land cover mapping from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, William J.; Wrigley, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Very low resolution (VLR) satellite data (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, DMSP Operational Linescan System), low resolution (LR) data (Landsat MSS), medium resolution (MR) data (Landsat TM), and high resolution (HR) satellite data (Spot HRV, Large Format Camera) were evaluated and compared for interpretability at differing spatial resolutions. VLR data (500 m - 1.0 km) is useful for Level 1 (urban/rural distinction) mapping at 1:1,000,000 scale. Feature tone/color is utilized to distinguish generalized urban land cover using LR data (80 m) for 1:250,000 scale mapping. Advancing to MR data (30 m) and 1:100,000 scale mapping, confidence in land cover mapping is greatly increased, owing to the element of texture/pattern which is now evident in the imagery. Shape and shadow contribute to detailed Level II/III urban land use mapping possible if the interpreter can use HR (10-15 m) satellite data; mapping scales can be 1:25,000 - 1:50,000.

  9. Two dimensional convolute integers for machine vision and image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas R.

    1988-01-01

    Machine vision and image recognition require sophisticated image processing prior to the application of Artificial Intelligence. Two Dimensional Convolute Integer Technology is an innovative mathematical approach for addressing machine vision and image recognition. This new technology generates a family of digital operators for addressing optical images and related two dimensional data sets. The operators are regression generated, integer valued, zero phase shifting, convoluting, frequency sensitive, two dimensional low pass, high pass and band pass filters that are mathematically equivalent to surface fitted partial derivatives. These operators are applied non-recursively either as classical convolutions (replacement point values), interstitial point generators (bandwidth broadening or resolution enhancement), or as missing value calculators (compensation for dead array element values). These operators show frequency sensitive feature selection scale invariant properties. Such tasks as boundary/edge enhancement and noise or small size pixel disturbance removal can readily be accomplished. For feature selection tight band pass operators are essential. Results from test cases are given.

  10. High-resolution TFT-LCD for spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JaeWon; Kim, Yong-Hae; Byun, Chun-Won; Pi, Jae-Eun; Oh, Himchan; Kim, GiHeon; Lee, Myung-Lae; Chu, Hye-Yong; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2014-06-01

    SLM with very fine pixel pitch is needed for the holographic display system. Among various kinds of SLMs, commercially available high resolution LCoS has been widely used as a spatial light modulator. But the size of commercially available LCoS SLM is limited because the manufacturing technology of LCoS is based on the semiconductor process developed on small size Si wafer. Recently very high resolution flat panel display panel (~500ppi) was developed as a "retina display". Until now, the pixel pitch of flat panel display is several times larger than the pixel pitch of LCoS. But considering the possibility of shrink down the pixel pitch with advanced lithographic tools, the application of flat panel display will make it possible to build a SLM with high spatial bandwidth product. We simulated High resolution TFT-LCD panel on glass substrate using oxide semiconductor TFT with pixel pitch of 20um. And we considered phase modulation behavior of LC(ECB) mode. The TFT-LCD panel is reflective type with 4-metal structure with organic planarization layers. The technical challenge for high resolution large area SLM will be discussed with very fine pixel.

  11. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  12. Strongly interacting two-dimensional Dirac fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, L.K.; Lazarides, A.; Hemmerich, Andreas; de Morais Smith, C.

    2009-01-01

    We show how strongly interacting two-dimensional Dirac fermions can be realized with ultracold atoms in a two-dimensional optical square lattice with an experimentally realistic, inherent gauge field, which breaks time reversal and inversion symmetries. We find remarkable phenomena in a temperature

  13. Topology optimization of two-dimensional waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this work we use the method of topology optimization to design two-dimensional waveguides with low transmission loss.......In this work we use the method of topology optimization to design two-dimensional waveguides with low transmission loss....

  14. Spectral Radiative Properties of Two-Dimensional Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yimin; Han, Yuge; Zhou, Yue

    2012-12-01

    Spectral radiative properties of two-dimensional rough surfaces are important for both academic research and practical applications. Besides material properties, surface structures have impact on the spectral radiative properties of rough surfaces. Based on the finite difference time domain algorithm, this paper studies the spectral energy propagation process on a two-dimensional rough surface and analyzes the effect of different factors such as the surface structure, angle, and polarization state of the incident wave on the spectral radiative properties of the two-dimensional rough surface. To quantitatively investigate the spatial distribution of energy reflected from the rough surface, the concept of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function is introduced. Correlation analysis between the reflectance and different impact factors is conducted to evaluate the influence degree. Comparison between the theoretical and experimental data is given to elucidate the accuracy of the computational code. This study is beneficial to optimizing the surface structures of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells.

  15. Monitoring the Folding of Trp-cage Peptide by Two-dimensional Infrared (2DIR) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zaizhi; Preketes, Nicholas K.; Mukamel, Shaul; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protein folding is one of the most fundamental problems in modern molecular biology. Uncovering the detailed folding mechanism requires methods that can monitor the structures at high temporal and spatial resolution. Two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy is a new tool for studying protein structures and dynamics with high time resolution. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we illustrate the folding process of Trp-cage along the dominant pathway on free energy landscape by analyzing nonchiral and chiral coherent 2DIR spectra along the pathway. Isotope-labeling is used to reveal residue-specific information. We show that the high resolution structural sensitivity of 2DIR can differentiate the ensemble evolution of protein, and thus provides a microscopic picture of the folding process. PMID:23448437

  16. Two-dimensional localized structures in harmonically forced oscillatory systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.-P.; Knobloch, E.

    2016-12-01

    Two-dimensional spatially localized structures in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with 1:1 resonance are studied near the simultaneous presence of a steady front between two spatially homogeneous equilibria and a supercritical Turing bifurcation on one of them. The bifurcation structures of steady circular fronts and localized target patterns are computed in the Turing-stable and Turing-unstable regimes. In particular, localized target patterns grow along the solution branch via ring insertion at the core in a process reminiscent of defect-mediated snaking in one spatial dimension. Stability of axisymmetric solutions on these branches with respect to axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations is determined, and parameter regimes with stable axisymmetric oscillons are identified. Direct numerical simulations reveal novel depinning dynamics of localized target patterns in the radial direction, and of circular and planar localized hexagonal patterns in the fully two-dimensional system.

  17. Mapping two-dimensional polar active fluids to two-dimensional soap and one-dimensional sandblasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Leiming; Lee, Chiu Fan; Toner, John

    2016-07-01

    Active fluids and growing interfaces are two well-studied but very different non-equilibrium systems. Each exhibits non-equilibrium behaviour distinct from that of their equilibrium counterparts. Here we demonstrate a surprising connection between these two: the ordered phase of incompressible polar active fluids in two spatial dimensions without momentum conservation, and growing one-dimensional interfaces (that is, the 1+1-dimensional Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation), in fact belong to the same universality class. This universality class also includes two equilibrium systems: two-dimensional smectic liquid crystals, and a peculiar kind of constrained two-dimensional ferromagnet. We use these connections to show that two-dimensional incompressible flocks are robust against fluctuations, and exhibit universal long-ranged, anisotropic spatio-temporal correlations of those fluctuations. We also thereby determine the exact values of the anisotropy exponent ζ and the roughness exponents χx,y that characterize these correlations.

  18. New high spatial resolution portable camera in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, C.; Massari, R.; Palermo, N.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2007-07-01

    In the last years, many studies have been carried out on portable gamma cameras in order to optimize a device for medical imaging. In this paper, we present a new type of gamma camera, for low energies detection, based on a position sensitive photomultiplier tube Hamamatsu Flat Panel H8500 and an innovative technique based on CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals inserted into the square holes of a tungsten collimator. The geometrical features of this collimator-scintillator structure, which affect the camera spatial resolution and sensitivity, were chosen to offer optimal performances in clinical functional examinations. Detector sensitivity, energy resolution and spatial resolution were measured and the acquired image quality was evaluated with particular attention to the pixel identification capability. This low weight (about 2 kg) portable gamma camera was developed thanks to a miniaturized resistive chain electronic readout, combined with a dedicated compact 4 channel ADC board. This data acquisition board, designed by our research group, showed excellent performances, with respect to a commercial PCI 6110E card (National Intruments), in term of sampling period and additional on board operation for data pre-processing.

  19. Spatial-temperature high resolution map for early cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe V.; Hurduc, Anca; Ghimigean, Ana-Maria; Fumarel, Radu

    2009-02-01

    Heat is one of the most important parameters of living beings. Skin temperature is not the same on the entire body and so, a thermal signature can be got. Infrared map on serial imaging can constitute an early sign of an abnormality. Thermography detects changes in tissue that appear before and accompany many diseases including cancer. As this map has a better resolution an early cancer diagnosis can be done. The temperature of neoplasic tissue is different up to 1.5 °C than that of the healthy tissue as a result of the specific metabolic rate. The infrared camera images show very quickly the heat transferred by radiation. A lot of factors disturb the temperature conversion to pixel intensity. A sensitive temperature sensor with a 10 Mpixels video camera, showing its spatial position, and a computer fusion program were used for the map with high spatial-temperature resolution. A couple of minutes are necessary to get a high resolution map. The asymmetry and borders were the main parameters analyzed. The right cancer diagnosis was for about 78.4% of patients with thyroid cancer, and more than 89.6% from patients with breast cancer. In the near future, the medical prognosis will be improved by fractal analysis.

  20. Determination of spatial resolution of plastic scintillation fiber array with a simple method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The spatial resolution of a position sensitive gamma-ray detector configuration based on plastic scintillation fiber array was measured using a Monte Carlo simulation method. Both point spread function and modulation transfer function (MTF) were presented. The factors that influence the spatial resolution were also discussed. The results of the simulation showed that the intrinsic spatial resolution was consistent with the size of the physical pixels and a few centimeters spatial resolution could be obtained under certain circumstances.

  1. A direct time measurement technique for the two-dimensional precision coordinate detectors based on thin-walled drift tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makankin, A.M.; Myalkovskiy, V.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Peshekhonov, V.D., E-mail: Vladimir.Peshekhonov@sunse.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Vasilyev, S.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-21

    This article presents the results of a study of the longitudinal spatial resolution by means of the direct timing method (DTM) using 2 m long and 9.53 mm diameter straw tubes. The feasibility of achieving the spatial resolution (r.m.s.) better than 2 cm over full length of the straw is demonstrated. The spatial resolution changes little when measured by detecting gammas from a Fe-55 gamma ray source or minimum ionizing electrons from a Ru-106 source. The use of the same type of front end electronics (FEE) both for measuring the drift time of ionization electrons and propagation time of a signal along the anode wire allows one to construct a detector capable for measuring the two dimensional coordinates of charged particles.

  2. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  3. An RPC-PET prototype with high spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, A. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Dep-Fisica Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal)]. E-mail: alberto@lipc.fis.uc.pt; Carolino, N. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Dep-Fisica Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal); Correia, C.M.B.A. [CEI, Centro de Electronica e Instrumentacao, Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira Marques, R. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Dep-Fisica Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Fonte, P. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Dep-Fisica Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal); ISEC, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Gonzalez-Diaz, D. [GENP, Grupo Experimental de Nucleos y Particulas, Fac. Fisica Univ. Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lindote, A. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Dep-Fisica Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal); Lopes, M.I. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Dep-Fisica Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Macedo, M.P. [CEI, Centro de Electronica e Instrumentacao, Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); ISEC, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Policarpo, A. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Dep-Fisica Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra 3004-516 (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Univ. Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2004-11-01

    A small positron emission tomography system, based on the timing RPC technology has been built and tested. This first prototype is aimed at validating the expectations, derived from simulations, of a very high spatial resolution, which could be of value for the imaging of small animals. The system is composed of two counting heads, able to measure the photon interaction point in two dimensions, the transaxial dimension and the Depth of Interaction. Each head is composed of 16 independent stacked RPCs made from copper and glass (anode) electrodes. Point-like {sup 22}Na sources were so far reconstructed, using the standard filtered back-projection algorithm, with a spatial accuracy of 0.6 mm FWHM, free of parallax error.

  4. Neuromorphic model of magnocellular and parvocellular visual paths: spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Rolando C [Departamento de Luminotecnia, Luz y Vision, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina); Felice, Carmelo J [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman Argentina, Tucuman (Argentina); Colombo, Elisa M [Departamento de Luminotecnia, Luz y Vision, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Physiological studies of the human retina show the existence of at least two visual information processing channels, the magnocellular and the parvocellular ones. Both have different spatial, temporal and chromatic features. This paper focuses on the different spatial resolution of these two channels. We propose a neuromorphic model, so that they match the retina's physiology. Considering the Deutsch and Deutsch model (1992), we propose two configurations (one for each visual channel) of the connection between the retina's different cell layers. The responses of the proposed model have similar behaviour to those of the visual cells: each channel has an optimum response corresponding to a given stimulus size which decreases for larger or smaller stimuli. This size is bigger for the magno path than for the parvo path and, in the end, both channels produce a magnifying of the borders of a stimulus.

  5. Pixels simultaneous detection probabilities and spatial resolution determination of pixelized detectors by means of correlation measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Grabskii, V

    2007-01-01

    A novel method to estimate the pixels simultaneous detection probability and the spatial resolution of pixelized detectors is proposed, which is based on the determination of the statistical correlations between detector neighbor pixels. The correlations are determined by means of noise variance measurement for a isolated pixels and the difference between neighbor pixels. The method is validated using images from the two different GE Senographe 2000D mammographic units. The pixelized detector has been irradiated using x-rays along its entire surface. It is shown that the pixel simultaneous detection probabilities can be estimated within accuracy 0.001 - 0.003, where the systematic error is estimated to be smaller than 0.005. The presampled two-dimensional point-spread function (PSF0) is determined using a single Gaussian and a sum of two Gaussian approximations. The obtained results for the presampled PSF0 show that the single Gaussian approximation is not appropriate, and the sum of two Gaussian approximatio...

  6. Metadevice for intensity modulation with sub-wavelength spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cencillo-Abad, Pablo; Plum, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Effectively continuous control over propagation of a beam of light requires light modulation with pixelation that is smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we propose a spatial intensity modulator with sub-wavelength resolution in one dimension. The metadevice combines recent advances in reconfigurable nanomembrane metamaterials and coherent all-optical control of metasurfaces. It uses nanomechanical actuation of metasurface absorber strips placed near a mirror in order to control their interaction with light from perfect absorption to negligible loss, promising a path towards dynamic beam diffraction, light focusing and holography without unwanted diffraction artefacts.

  7. Two Dimensional Plasmonic Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) cavitiy modes on two dimensional Moire surfaces in the visible spectrum. Two dimensional hexagonal Moire surface can be recorded on a photoresist layer using Interference lithography (IL). Two sequential exposures at slightly different angles in IL generate one dimensional Moire surfaces. Further sequential exposure for the same sample at slightly different angles after turning the sample 60 degrees around its own axis generates two dimensional hexagonal Moire cavity. Spectroscopic reflection measurements have shown plasmonic band gaps and cavity states at all the azimuthal angles (omnidirectional cavity and band gap formation) investigated. The plasmonic band gap edge and the cavity states energies show six fold symmetry on the two dimensional Moire surface as measured in reflection measurements.

  8. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  9. Two-Dimensional Planetary Surface Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, H.; Sengupta, A.; Castillo, J.; McElrath, T.; Roberts, T.; Willis, P.

    2014-06-01

    A systems engineering study was conducted to leverage a new two-dimensional (2D) lander concept with a low per unit cost to enable scientific study at multiple locations with a single entry system as the delivery vehicle.

  10. Fourier domain design of microgrid imaging polarimeters with improved spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Keigo; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2014-05-01

    Microgrid polarimetric imagers sacrifice spatial resolution for sensitivity to states of linear polarization. We have recently shown that a 2 × 4 microgrid analyzer pattern sacrifices less spatial resolution than the conventional 2× 2 case without compromising polarization sensitivity. In this paper, we discuss the design strategy that uncovered the spatial resolution benefits of the 2 × 4 array.

  11. Results from laboratory tests of the two-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D; Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

    2014-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of two dimensional time-encoded imaging. A prototype two-dimensional time encoded imaging system was designed and constructed. Results from imaging measurements of single and multiple point sources as well as extended source distributions are presented. Time encoded imaging has proven to be a simple method for achieving high resolution two-dimensional imaging with potential to be used in future arms control and treaty verification applications.

  12. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. With picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement. PMID:26503116

  13. High Spatial Resolution of an Optical Addressing Spatial Light Modulator Made by Photorefractive Semi-Insulting Multiple Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兢; 李春勇; 韩英军; 郭丽伟; 黄绮; 张治国; 汤俊雄; 段明浩

    2002-01-01

    We use nondegenerate four-wave mixing to study the spatial resolution of photorefractive semi-insulating multiple quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By optimizing the experimental conditions, we have demonstrated that our sample has spatial resolution up to 2.5μm, which approaches the theoretical limit. We also analyse the factors that affect the spatial resolution of multiple quantum wells.

  14. A Method of Spatial Mapping and Reclassification for High-Spatial-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guizhou Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on a strategic mechanism of spatial mapping and reclassification. The proposed method includes four steps. First, the multispectral image is classified by a traditional pixel-based classification method (support vector machine. Second, the panchromatic image is subdivided by watershed segmentation. Third, the pixel-based multispectral image classification result is mapped to the panchromatic segmentation result based on a spatial mapping mechanism and the area dominant principle. During the mapping process, an area proportion threshold is set, and the regional property is defined as unclassified if the maximum area proportion does not surpass the threshold. Finally, unclassified regions are reclassified based on spectral information using the minimum distance to mean algorithm. Experimental results show that the classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on the spatial mapping mechanism and reclassification strategy can make use of both panchromatic and multispectral information, integrate the pixel- and object-based classification methods, and improve classification accuracy.

  15. Mapping seagrass coverage and spatial patterns with high spatial resolution IKONOS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Ruiliang; Bell, Susan

    2017-02-01

    Seagrass habitats in subtidal coastal waters provide a variety of ecosystem functions and services and there is an increasing need to acquire information on spatial and temporal dynamics of this resource. Here, we explored the capability of IKONOS (IKO) data of high resolution (4 m) for mapping seagrass cover [submerged aquatic vegetation (%SAV) cover] along the mid-western coast of Florida, USA. We also compared seagrass maps produced with IKO data with that obtained using the Landsat TM sensor with lower resolution (30 m). Both IKO and TM data, collected in October 2009, were preprocessed to calculate water depth invariant bands to normalize the effect of varying depth on bottom spectra recorded by the two satellite sensors and further the textural information was extracted from IKO data. Our results demonstrate that the high resolution IKO sensor produced a higher accuracy than the TM sensor in a three-class % SAV cover classification. Of note is that the OA of %SAV cover mapping at our study area created with IKO data was 5-20% higher than that from other studies published. We also examined the spatial distribution of seagrass over a spatial range of 4-240 m using the Ripley's K function [L(d)] and IKO data that represented four different grain sizes [4 m (one IKO pixel), 8 m (2 × 2 IKO pixels), 12 m (3 × 3 IKO pixels), and 16 m (4 × 4 IKO pixels)] from moderate-dense seagrass cover along a set of six transects. The Ripley's K metric repeatedly indicated that seagrass cover representing 4 m × 4 m pixels displayed a dispersed (or slightly dispersed) pattern over distances of pattern of cover over 9-240 m. The spatial pattern of seagrass cover created with the three additional grain sizes (i.e., 2 × 24 m IKO pixels, 3 × 34 m IKO pixels, and 4 × 4 m IKO pixels) show a dispersed (or slightly dispersed) pattern across 4-32 m and a random or slightly clustered pattern across 33-240 m. Given the first report on using satellite observations to quantify seagrass

  16. Efficiency and spatial resolution of the CASCADE thermal neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhli, M.; Allmendinger, F.; Häußler, W.; Schröder, T.; Klein, M.; Meven, M.; Schmidt, U.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the CASCADE project - a detection system, which has been designed for the purposes of neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy and which is continuously further developed and adapted to various applications. It features 2D spatially resolved detection of thermal neutrons at high rates. The CASCADE detector is composed of a stack of solid 10B coated Gas Electron Multiplier foils, which serve both as a neutron converter and as an amplifier for the primary ionization deposited in the standard counting gas environment. This multi-layer setup efficiently increases the detection efficiency and by extracting the signal of the charge traversing the stack the conversion layer can be identified allowing a precise determination of the time-of-flight. The spatial resolution is found by optical contrast determination to be σ =(1.39 ± 0.05) mm and by divergence corrected aperture measurements σ =(1.454 ± 0.007) mm , which is in agreement with the simulated detector model. Furthermore this enabled to investigate and describe the non-Gaussian resolution function. At the HEiDi diffractometer the absolute detection efficiency has been studied. At 0.6 Å for the 6 layer detector, which is currently part of the RESEDA spectrometer, an efficiency of 7.8% has been measured, which by means of Monte Carlo simulations translates to (21.0±1.5)% for thermal neutrons at 1.8 Å and (46.9±3.3)% at 5.4 Å.

  17. Spatial and temporal resolution of fluid flows: LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Schefer, R.W.; Perea, L.D.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activity to develop a diagnostic technique for simultaneous temporal and spatial resolution of fluid flows. The goal is to obtain two orders of magnitude resolution in two spatial dimensions and time simultaneously. The approach used in this study is to scale up Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) to acquire meter-size images at up to 200 frames/sec. Experiments were conducted in buoyant, fully turbulent, non-reacting and reacting plumes with a base diameter of one meter. The PIV results were successful in the ambient gas for all flows, and in the plume for non-reacting helium and reacting methane, but not reacting hydrogen. No PIV was obtained in the hot combustion product region as the seed particles chosen vaporized. Weak signals prevented PLIF in the helium. However, in reacting methane flows, PLIF images speculated to be from Poly-Aromatic-Hydrocarbons were obtained which mark the flame sheets. The results were unexpected and very insightful. A natural fluorescence from the seed particle vapor was also noted in the hydrogen tests.

  18. Development of high spatial resolution X-ray CT system at BL47XU in SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, K; Yagi, N; Tsuchiyama, A; Nakano, T

    2001-01-01

    High spatial resolution, micrometer range, X-ray CT system has been developed at SPring-8. The experiments were performed at the undulator beam line BL47XU. An 'in-vacuum type' undulator is employed as an X-ray source, and the X-rays are monochromatized with a liquid nitrogen cooled Si(1 1 1) double crystal monochromator. High precision rotation stage with air bearing was used for sample rotation. The transmitted images were obtained with a two-dimensional image detector, which consists of a single crystal phosphor screen (Lu sub 2 SiO sub 5 : Ce), an objective lens and a cooled CCD camera. In this system the smallest effective pixel size was set to 0.5 mu mx0.5 mu m. As a result of the experiments, three-dimensional images of a few micrometer-order texture has been successfully obtained with the developed CT system.

  19. Evaluation of two software tools dedicated to an automatic analysis of the CT scanner image spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfeh, Tarraf; Beaumont, Stéphane; Guédon, Jean Pierre; Denis, Eloïse

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation of two software tools dedicated to an automatic analysis of the CT scanner image spatial resolution is presented in this paper. The methods evaluated consist of calculating the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the CT scanners; the first uses an image of an impulse source, while the second method proposed by Droege and Morin uses an image of cyclic bar patterns. Two Digital Test Objects (DTO) are created to this purpose. These DTOs are then blurred by doing a convolution with a two-dimensional Gaussian Point Spread Function (PSF(Ref)), which has a well known Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). The evaluation process consists then of comparing the Fourier transform of the PSF on the one hand, and the two mentioned methods on the other hand.

  20. Spatial resolution effects on the assessment of evapotranspiration in olive orchards using high resolution thermal imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cristina; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo J.; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Allen, Richard G.

    2013-04-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques for estimating surface energy balance and water consumption has significantly improved the characterization of the agricultural systems by determining accurate information about crop evapotranspiration and stress, mainly for extensive crops. However the use of these methodologies for woody crops has been low due to the difficulty in the accurate characterization of these crops, mainly caused by a coarse resolution of the imagery provided by the most widely used satellites (such as Landsat 5 and 7). The coarse spatial resolution provided by these satellite sensors aggregates into a single pixel the tree crown, sunlit and shaded soil components. These surfaces can each exhibit huge differences in temperature, albedo and vegetation indexes calculated in the visible, near infrared and short-wave infrared regions. Recent studies have found that the use of energy balance approaches can provide useful results for non-homogeneous crops (Santos et al., 2012) but detailed analysis is required to determine the effect of the spatial resolution and the aggregation of the scene components in these heterogeneous canopies. In this study a comparison between different spatial resolutions has been conducted using images from Landsat 7 (with thermal resolution of 60m) and from an airborne thermal (with resolution of 80 cm) flown over olive orchards at different dates coincident with the Landsat overpass. The high resolution thermal imagery was resampled at different scales to generate images with spatial resolution ranging from 0.8 m up to 120m (thermal resolution for Landsat 5 images). The selection of the study area was made to avoid those areas with missing Landsat 7 data caused by SLC-off gaps. The selected area has a total area of around 2500 ha and is located in Southern Spain, in the province of Malaga. The selected area is mainly cultivated with olive orchards with different crop practices (rainfed, irrigated, high density, young and adult

  1. Spatial Ensemble Postprocessing of Precipitation Forecasts Using High Resolution Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Moritz N.; Schicker, Irene; Kann, Alexander; Wang, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Ensemble prediction systems are designed to account for errors or uncertainties in the initial and boundary conditions, imperfect parameterizations, etc. However, due to sampling errors and underestimation of the model errors, these ensemble forecasts tend to be underdispersive, and to lack both reliability and sharpness. To overcome such limitations, statistical postprocessing methods are commonly applied to these forecasts. In this study, a full-distributional spatial post-processing method is applied to short-range precipitation forecasts over Austria using Standardized Anomaly Model Output Statistics (SAMOS). Following Stauffer et al. (2016), observation and forecast fields are transformed into standardized anomalies by subtracting a site-specific climatological mean and dividing by the climatological standard deviation. Due to the need of fitting only a single regression model for the whole domain, the SAMOS framework provides a computationally inexpensive method to create operationally calibrated probabilistic forecasts for any arbitrary location or for all grid points in the domain simultaneously. Taking advantage of the INCA system (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis), high resolution analyses are used for the computation of the observed climatology and for model training. The INCA system operationally combines station measurements and remote sensing data into real-time objective analysis fields at 1 km-horizontal resolution and 1 h-temporal resolution. The precipitation forecast used in this study is obtained from a limited area model ensemble prediction system also operated by ZAMG. The so called ALADIN-LAEF provides, by applying a multi-physics approach, a 17-member forecast at a horizontal resolution of 10.9 km and a temporal resolution of 1 hour. The performed SAMOS approach statistically combines the in-house developed high resolution analysis and ensemble prediction system. The station-based validation of 6 hour precipitation sums

  2. Two-dimensional dopant profiling of gallium nitride p–n junctions by scanning capacitance microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamhamdi, M. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Ecole national des sciences appliquées khouribga, Université Hassan 1er, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Cayrel, F. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Frayssinet, E. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Grégory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Bazin, A.E.; Yvon, A.; Collard, E. [STMicroelectronics, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Cordier, Y. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Grégory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Alquier, D. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France)

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional imaging of dopant profiles for n and p-type regions are relevant for the development of new power semiconductors, especially for gallium nitride (GaN) for which classical profiling techniques are not adapted. This is a challenging task since it needs a technique with simultaneously good sensitivity, high spatial resolution and high dopant gradient resolution. To face these challenges, scanning capacitance microscopy combined with Atomic Force Microscopy is a good candidate, presenting reproducible results, as demonstrated in literature. In this work, we attempt to distinguish reliably and qualitatively the various doping concentrations and type at p–n and unipolar junctions. For both p–n and unipolar junctions three kinds of samples were prepared and measured separately. The space-charge region of the p–n metallurgical junction, giving rise to different contrasts under SCM imaging, is clearly observed, enlightening the interest of the SCM technique.

  3. Two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-12-05

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization based on the controlled spontaneous emission, in which the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Due to the spatially dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the resulting spontaneously emission spectrum. The phase sensitive property of the atomic system leads to quenching of the spontaneous emission in some regions of the standing-waves, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in the position measurement of the atom. We find that the frequency measurement of the emitted light localizes the atom in half-wavelength domain. Especially the probability of finding the atom at a particular position can reach 100% when a photon with certain frequency is detected. By increasing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields, such 2D sub-half-wavelength atom localization can acquire high spatial resolution.

  4. Spectral sensitivity, spatial resolution and temporal resolution and their implications for conspecific signalling in cleaner shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, Eleanor M; Frank, Tamara M; Johnsen, Sönke

    2016-02-01

    Cleaner shrimp (Decapoda) regularly interact with conspecifics and client reef fish, both of which appear colourful and finely patterned to human observers. However, whether cleaner shrimp can perceive the colour patterns of conspecifics and clients is unknown, because cleaner shrimp visual capabilities are unstudied. We quantified spectral sensitivity and temporal resolution using electroretinography (ERG), and spatial resolution using both morphological (inter-ommatidial angle) and behavioural (optomotor) methods in three cleaner shrimp species: Lysmata amboinensis, Ancylomenes pedersoni and Urocaridella antonbruunii. In all three species, we found strong evidence for only a single spectral sensitivity peak of (mean ± s.e.m.) 518 ± 5, 518 ± 2 and 533 ± 3 nm, respectively. Temporal resolution in dark-adapted eyes was 39 ± 1.3, 36 ± 0.6 and 34 ± 1.3 Hz. Spatial resolution was 9.9 ± 0.3, 8.3 ± 0.1 and 11 ± 0.5 deg, respectively, which is low compared with other compound eyes of similar size. Assuming monochromacy, we present approximations of cleaner shrimp perception of both conspecifics and clients, and show that cleaner shrimp visual capabilities are sufficient to detect the outlines of large stimuli, but not to detect the colour patterns of conspecifics or clients, even over short distances. Thus, conspecific viewers have probably not played a role in the evolution of cleaner shrimp appearance; rather, further studies should investigate whether cleaner shrimp colour patterns have evolved to be viewed by client reef fish, many of which possess tri- and tetra-chromatic colour vision and relatively high spatial acuity.

  5. Trade-offs between spatial and temporal resolutions in stochastic super-resolution microscopy techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Rupprecht, Jean-Francois; Tessier, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Widefield stochastic microscopy techniques such as PALM or STORM rely on the progressive accumulation of a large number of frames, each containing a scarce number of super-resolved point images. We justify that the redundancy in the localization of detected events imposes a specific limit on the temporal resolution. Based on a theoretical model, we derive analytical predictions for the minimal time required to obtain a reliable image at a given spatial resolution, called image completion time. In contrast to standard assumptions, we find that the image completion time scales logarithmically with the ratio of the image size by the spatial resolution volume. We justify that this non-linear relation is the hallmark of a random coverage problem. We propose a method to estimate the risk that the image reconstruction is not complete, which we apply to an experimental data set. Our results provide a theoretical framework to quantify the pattern detection efficiency and to optimize the trade-off between image coverag...

  6. TWO-DIMENSIONAL TOPOLOGY OF COSMOLOGICAL REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yougang; Xu, Yidong; Chen, Xuelei [Key Laboratory of Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100012 China (China); Park, Changbom [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juhan, E-mail: wangyg@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr [Center for Advanced Computation, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-20

    We study the two-dimensional topology of the 21-cm differential brightness temperature for two hydrodynamic radiative transfer simulations and two semi-numerical models. In each model, we calculate the two-dimensional genus curve for the early, middle, and late epochs of reionization. It is found that the genus curve depends strongly on the ionized fraction of hydrogen in each model. The genus curves are significantly different for different reionization scenarios even when the ionized faction is the same. We find that the two-dimensional topology analysis method is a useful tool to constrain the reionization models. Our method can be applied to the future observations such as those of the Square Kilometre Array.

  7. Two dimensional topology of cosmological reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yougang; Xu, Yidong; Chen, Xuelei; Kim, Juhan

    2015-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional topology of the 21-cm differential brightness temperature for two hydrodynamic radiative transfer simulations and two semi-numerical models. In each model, we calculate the two dimensional genus curve for the early, middle and late epochs of reionization. It is found that the genus curve depends strongly on the ionized fraction of hydrogen in each model. The genus curves are significantly different for different reionization scenarios even when the ionized faction is the same. We find that the two-dimensional topology analysis method is a useful tool to constrain the reionization models. Our method can be applied to the future observations such as those of the Square Kilometer Array.

  8. Two dimensional NMR of liquids and oriented molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gochin, M.

    1987-02-01

    Chapter 1 discusses the quantum mechanical formalism used for describing the interaction between magnetic dipoles that dictates the appearance of a spectrum. The NMR characteristics of liquids and liquid crystals are stressed. Chapter 2 reviews the theory of multiple quantum and two dimensional NMR. Properties of typical spectra and phase cycling procedures are discussed. Chapter 3 describes a specific application of heteronuclear double quantum coherence to the removal of inhomogeneous broadening in liquids. Pulse sequences have been devised which cancel out any contribution from this inhomogeneity to the final spectrum. An interpretation of various pulse sequences for the case of /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H is given, together with methods of spectral editing by removal or retention of the homo- or heteronuclear J coupling. The technique is applied to a demonstration of high resolution in both frequency and spatial dimensions with a surface coil. In Chapter 4, multiple quantum filtered 2-D spectroscopy is demonstrated as an effective means of studying randomly deuterated molecules dissolved in a nematic liquid crystal. Magnitudes of dipole coupling constants have been determined for benzene and hexane, and their signs and assignments found from high order multiple quantum spectra. For the first time, a realistic impression of the conformation of hexane can be estimated from these results. Chapter 5 is a technical description of the MDB DCHIB-DR11W parallel interface which has been set up to transfer data between the Data General Nova 820 minicomputer, interfaced to the 360 MHz spectrometer, and the Vax 11/730. It covers operation of the boards, physical specifications and installation, and programs for testing and running the interface.

  9. Nonstationarity of a two-dimensional perpendicular shock: Competing mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembège, Bertrand; Savoini, Philippe; Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2009-03-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are used for analyzing in detail different nonstationary behaviors of a perpendicular supercritical shock. A recent study by Hellinger et al. (2007) has shown that the front of a supercritical shock can be dominated by the emission of large-amplitude whistler waves. These waves inhibit the self-reformation driven by the reflected ions; then, the shock front appears almost ``quasi-stationary.'' The present study stresses new complementary results. First, for a fixed β i value, the whistler waves emission (WWE) persists for high M A above a critical Mach number (i.e., M A >= M A WWE). The quasi-stationarity is only apparent and disappears when considering the full 3-D field profiles. Second, for lower M A , the self-reformation is retrieved and becomes dominant as the amplitude of the whistler waves becomes negligible. Third, there exists a transition regime in M A within which both processes compete each other. Fourth, these results are observed for a strictly perpendicular shock only as B 0 is within the simulation plane. When B 0 is out of the simulation plane, no whistler waves emission is evidenced and only self-reformation is recovered. Fifth, the occurrence and disappearance of the nonlinear whistler waves are well recovered in both 2-D PIC and 2-D hybrid simulations. The impacts on the results of the mass ratio (2-D PIC simulations), of the resistivity and spatial resolution (2-D hybrid simulations), and of the size of the simulation box along the shock front are analyzed in detail.

  10. Tactile feedback display with spatial and temporal resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-01-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications.

  11. Tactile Feedback Display with Spatial and Temporal Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W.; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-08-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications.

  12. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  13. Matching Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis' Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Anjos, António; AL-Tam, Faroq; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches. This ar......This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches...

  14. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haifeng; Zhang, Shuqing; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-12-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering was theoretically studied using deformation potential theory. Based on the Boltzmann equation with the relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was derived, showing that the influence of effective mass on mobility anisotropy is larger than those of deformation potential constant or elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic two-dimensional materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC2N , MXene, TiS3, and GeCH3) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio is overestimated by the previously described method.

  15. Towards two-dimensional search engines

    OpenAIRE

    Ermann, Leonardo; Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way the ranking of nodes becomes two-dimensional that paves the way for development of two-dimensional search engines of new type. Statistical properties of inf...

  16. Procedures for two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollaksen, S.L.; Giometti, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) of proteins, using isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in the second, was first described in 1975. In the 20 years since those publications, numerous modifications of the original method have evolved. The ISO-DALT system of 2DE is a high-throughput approach that has stood the test of time. The problem of casting many isoelectric focusing gels and SDS-PAGE slab gels (up to 20) in a reproducible manner has been solved by the use of the techniques and equipment described in this manual. The ISO-DALT system of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis originated in the late 1970s and has been modified many times to improve its high-resolution, high-throughput capabilities. This report provides the detailed procedures used with the current ISO-DALT system to prepare, run, stain, and photograph two-dimensional gels for protein analysis.

  17. A direct time measurements technique for the two-dimensional precision coordinate detectors based on thin-walled drift tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Makankin, A M; Peshekhonov, V D; Ritt, S; Vasilyev, S E

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the longitudinal spatial resolution of 2 m long straw tubes by means of the direct timing method (DTM). The feasibility of achieving a coordinate resolution (r.m.s.) better than 2 cm over full length of the straw is demonstrated. The spatial resolution insignificantly changes when measured by detecting gammas from a Fe-55 gamma ray source or minimum ionizing particles from a Ru-106 source. The use of the same type of FEE for data taking both for measuring the drift time of ionization electrons and propagation of a signal along the anode wire allows one to construct a two-dimensional detector for precision coordinate measurements.

  18. Augmented reality simulator for training in two-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenbach, M; Wick, C; Pieper, S; Quast, K J; Fox, T; Grunst, G; Redel, D A

    2000-02-01

    In two-dimensional echocardiography the sonographer must synthesize multiple tomographic slices into a mental three-dimensional (3D) model of the heart. Computer graphics and virtual reality environments are ideal to visualize complex 3D spatial relationships. In augmented reality (AR) applications, real and virtual image data are linked, to increase the information content. In the presented AR simulator a 3D surface model of the human heart is linked with echocardiographic volume data sets. The 3D echocardiographic data sets are registered with the heart model to establish spatial and temporal congruence. The heart model, together with an animated ultrasound sector represents a reference scenario, which displays the currently selected two-dimensional echocardiographic cutting plane calculated from the volume data set. Modifications of the cutting plane within the echocardiographic data are transferred and visualized simultaneously and in real time within the reference scenario. The trainee can interactively explore the 3D heart model and the registered 3D echocardiographic data sets by an animated ultrasound probe, whose position is controlled by an electromagnetic tracking system. The tracking system is attached to a dummy transducer and placed on a plastic puppet to give a realistic impression of a two-dimensional echocardiographic examination.

  19. Molecular assembly on two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avijit; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Liljeroth, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Molecular self-assembly is a well-known technique to create highly functional nanostructures on surfaces. Self-assembly on two-dimensional (2D) materials is a developing field driven by the interest in functionalization of 2D materials in order to tune their electronic properties. This has resulted in the discovery of several rich and interesting phenomena. Here, we review this progress with an emphasis on the electronic properties of the adsorbates and the substrate in well-defined systems, as unveiled by scanning tunneling microscopy. The review covers three aspects of the self-assembly. The first one focuses on non-covalent self-assembly dealing with site-selectivity due to inherent moiré pattern present on 2D materials grown on substrates. We also see that modification of intermolecular interactions and molecule–substrate interactions influences the assembly drastically and that 2D materials can also be used as a platform to carry out covalent and metal-coordinated assembly. The second part deals with the electronic properties of molecules adsorbed on 2D materials. By virtue of being inert and possessing low density of states near the Fermi level, 2D materials decouple molecules electronically from the underlying metal substrate and allow high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging of molecular orbitals. The moiré pattern on the 2D materials causes site-selective gating and charging of molecules in some cases. The last section covers the effects of self-assembled, acceptor and donor type, organic molecules on the electronic properties of graphene as revealed by spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements. Non-covalent functionalization of 2D materials has already been applied for their application as catalysts and sensors. With the current surge of activity on building van der Waals heterostructures from atomically thin crystals, molecular self-assembly has the potential to add an extra level of flexibility and functionality for applications ranging

  20. VLBI observations of single stars, spatial resolution and astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, M.; Benz, A. O.; Conway, J. E.; Gudel, M.; Smith, K.

    VLBI studies can both spatially resolve single dMe stars and measure their positions at submilliarcsecond accuracy. The spatial resolution gives the brightness temperature and allows us to draw co nclusions about the nature of the emitting processes. In particular it is possib le to distinguish between thermal or non-thermal emission. The position accuracy gives better knowledge about the astrometric properties (like proper motion and parallax) especially for nearby stars. In this contribution recent results of c ontinuum VLBI observations towards two dMe stars (YZ CMi and AD Leo) at 8.4 GHz are presented. For YZ CMi an estimate of the size of the coronal emission is giv en (0.98 mas in diameter or 0.7 ±0.3 Rstar above the photosphere where Rstar refers to the photospheric radius). For AD Leo an upper limit is gi ven, i.e. the emitting region is shown to be Pestalozzi et al. 2000 ).

  1. Development of an Objective High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.; White, K.; Bell, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Drought detection, analysis, and mitigation has become a key challenge for a diverse set of decision makers, including but not limited to operational weather forecasters, climatologists, agricultural interests, and water resource management. One tool that is heavily used is the United States Drought Monitor (USDM), which is derived from a complex blend of objective data and subjective analysis on a state-by-state basis using a variety of modeled and observed precipitation, soil moisture, hydrologic, and vegetation and crop health data. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center currently runs a real-time configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) within the NASA Land Information System (LIS) framework. The LIS-Noah is run at 3-km resolution for local numerical weather prediction (NWP) and situational awareness applications at select NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices over the Continental U.S. (CONUS). To enhance the practicality of the LIS-Noah output for drought monitoring and assessing flood potential, a 30+-year soil moisture climatology has been developed in an attempt to place near real-time soil moisture values in historical context at county- and/or watershed-scale resolutions. This LIS-Noah soil moisture climatology and accompanying anomalies is intended to complement the current suite of operational products, such as the North American Land Data Assimilation System phase 2 (NLDAS-2), which are generated on a coarser-resolution grid that may not capture localized, yet important soil moisture features. Daily soil moisture histograms are used to identify the real-time soil moisture percentiles at each grid point according to the county or watershed in which the grid point resides. Spatial plots are then produced that map the percentiles as proxies to the different USDM categories. This presentation will highlight recent developments of this gridded, objective soil moisture index, comparison to subjective

  2. Entanglement Entropy in Two-Dimensional String Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnoll, Sean A; Mazenc, Edward A

    2015-09-18

    To understand an emergent spacetime is to understand the emergence of locality. Entanglement entropy is a powerful diagnostic of locality, because locality leads to a large amount of short distance entanglement. Two-dimensional string theory is among the very simplest instances of an emergent spatial dimension. We compute the entanglement entropy in the large-N matrix quantum mechanics dual to two-dimensional string theory in the semiclassical limit of weak string coupling. We isolate a logarithmically large, but finite, contribution that corresponds to the short distance entanglement of the tachyon field in the emergent spacetime. From the spacetime point of view, the entanglement is regulated by a nonperturbative "graininess" of space.

  3. Development of a two-dimensional imaging GEM detector using the resistive anode readout method with $6\\times6$ cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Chuan-Xing; Dong, Jing; Zhao, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Qi, Hui-Rong; Ou-Yang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of the resistive anode readout method on a two dimensional imaging GEM detector. The resistive anode consists $6\\times6$ cells with the cell size $6~\\mathrm{mm}\\times6~\\mathrm{mm}$. New electronics and DAQ system are used to process the signals from 49 readout channels. The detector has been tested by using the X-ray tube (8~keV). The spatial resolution of the detector is about $103.46~\\mathrm{{\\mu}m}$ with the signal part $66.41~\\mathrm{{\\mu}m}$. The nonlinearity of the detector is less than $0.5\\%$. A good two dimensional imaging capability is achieved as well. The performances of the detector show the prospect of the resistive anode readout method for the large readout area imaging detectors.

  4. Piezoelectricity in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Tao

    2015-02-25

    Powering up 2D materials: Recent experimental studies confirmed the existence of piezoelectricity - the conversion of mechanical stress into electricity - in two-dimensional single-layer MoS2 nanosheets. The results represent a milestone towards embedding low-dimensional materials into future disruptive technologies. © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Kronecker Product of Two-dimensional Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Hu

    2006-01-01

    Kronecker sequences constructed from short sequences are good sequences for spread spectrum communication systems. In this paper we study a similar problem for two-dimensional arrays, and we determine the linear complexity of the Kronecker product of two arrays. Our result shows that similar good property on linear complexity holds for Kronecker product of arrays.

  6. Two-Dimensional Toda-Heisenberg Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim E. Vekslerchik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a nonlinear model that is a combination of the anisotropic two-dimensional classical Heisenberg and Toda-like lattices. In the framework of the Hirota direct approach, we present the field equations of this model as a bilinear system, which is closely related to the Ablowitz-Ladik hierarchy, and derive its N-soliton solutions.

  7. A novel two dimensional particle velocity sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pjetri, Olti; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theo S.; Krijnen, Gijs J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a two wire, two-dimensional particle velocity sensor. The miniature sensor of size 1.0x2.5x0.525 mm, consisting of only two crossed wires, shows excellent directional sensitivity in both directions, thus requiring no directivity calibration, and is relatively easy to fabrica

  8. Two-dimensional microstrip detector for neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oed, A. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Because of their robust design, gas microstrip detectors, which were developed at ILL, can be assembled relatively quickly, provided the prefabricated components are available. At the beginning of 1996, orders were received for the construction of three two-dimensional neutron detectors. These detectors have been completed. The detectors are outlined below. (author). 2 refs.

  9. Two-dimensional magma-repository interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, O.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of magma-repository interactions reveal that the three phases --a shock tube, shock reflection and amplification, and shock attenuation and decay phase-- in a one-dimensional flow tube model have a precursor. This newly identified phase ``zero'' consists of the impact of

  10. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, Jose; Stampfer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2...

  11. Multivariate analysis of microbial communities in the River Elbe (Germany) on different phylogenetic and spatial levels of resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloep, Frank; Manz, Werner; Röske, Isolde

    2006-04-01

    The microbial communities of three different habitat types and from two sediment depths in the River Elbe were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization at various levels of complexity. Differences in the microbial community composition of free-flowing river water, water within the hyporheic interstitial and sediment-associated bacteria were quantitatively analyzed using domain- and group-specific oligonucleotide probes. Qualitative data on the presence/absence of specific bacterial taxa were gathered using genus- and species-specific probes. The complete data set was statistically processed by univariate statistical approaches, and two-dimensional ordinations of nonmetric multidimensional scaling. The analysis showed: (1) that the resolution of microbial community structures at microenvironments, habitats and locations can be regulated by targeted application of oligonucleotides on phylogenetic levels ranging from domains to species, and (2) that an extensive qualitative presence/absence analysis of multiparallel hybridization assays enables a fine-scale apportionment of spatial differences in microbial community structures that is robust against apparent limitations of fluorescence in situ hybridization such as false positive hybridization signals or inaccessibility of in situ oligonucleotide probes. A general model for the correlation of the phylogenetic depth of focus and the relative spatial resolution of microbial communities by fluorescence in situ hybridization is presented.

  12. Analysis of spatial inhomogeneities in cumulus clouds using high spatial resolution Landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lindsay; Welch, R. M.; Musil, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Aircraft observations and high resolution Landsat MSS digital data are used to determine the sizes of spatial inhomogeneities ('holes') in cumulus clouds. The majority of holes are found near cloud edges, but the larger holes tend to be found in cloud interiors. Aircraft measurements show these cloud spatial inhomogeneities in the range of 100 to 500 m, while Landsat data show them in the range of 100 m to 3 km. The number of holes per cloud decreases exponentially with increasing hole diameter. Small clouds not only have smaller holes, but also fewer holes than large clouds. Large clouds have large holes in them, as well as large numbers of the smaller holes. The total cloud area occupied by holes increases with increasing cloud size.

  13. Is Spatial Resolution Critical in Urbanization Velocity Analysis? Investigations in the Pearl River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunzhu Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Grid-based urbanization velocity analysis of remote sensing imagery is used to measure urban growth rates. However, it remains unclear how critical the spatial resolution of the imagery is to such grid-based approaches. This research therefore investigated how urbanization velocity estimates respond to different spatial resolutions, as determined by the grid sizes used. Landsat satellite images of the Pearl River Delta (PRD in China from the years 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015 were hierarchically aggregated using different grid sizes. Statistical analyses of urbanization velocity derived using different spatial resolutions (or grid sizes were used to investigate the relationships between socio-economic indicators and the velocity of urbanization for 27 large cities in PRD. The results revealed that those cities with above-average urbanization velocities remain unaffected by the spatial resolution (or grid-size, and the relationships between urbanization velocities and socio-economic indicators are independent of spatial resolution (or grid sizes used. Moreover, empirical variogram models, the local variance model, and the geographical variance model all indicated that coarse resolution version (480 m of Landsat images based on aggregated pixel yielded more appropriate results than the original fine resolution version (30 m, when identifying the characteristics of spatial autocorrelation and spatial structure variability of urbanization patterns and processes. The results conclude that the most appropriate spatial resolution for investigations into urbanization velocities is not always the highest resolution. The resulting patterns of urbanization velocities at different spatial resolutions can be used as a basis for studying the spatial heterogeneity of other datasets with variable spatial resolutions, especially for evaluating the capability of a multi-resolution dataset in reflecting spatial structure and spatial autocorrelation features in an

  14. Spatial-Resolution Improvement in Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry System Based on Tunable Linear Fiber Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guoyu; Li Yan [Institute of Information Engineering, Handan College, Handan, 056005 (China); Zhao Peng, E-mail: guoyu_li@yahoo.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) system, the spatial resolution is obtained by using the total frequency-sweep span of the tunable laser. However, in practice, the spatial resolution is severely limited by nonlinearity in the lightwave-frequency sweep of the tunable laser. A closed-loop PZT modulated DBR linear fiber laser is proposed to improve the spatial resolution of the OFDR system. Experimental results show that the spatial resolution of OFDR system has improved greatly. When the frequency sweep excursion is 66GHz and the fiber under test (FUT) is 7 m, the OFDR system has a spatial resolution of 1.5 m with open-loop PZT modulated laser. But the spatial resolution increases to 35 cm with closed-loop PZT modulated laser.

  15. Study of spatial resolution in a single GEM simulated by Monte-Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Lan-Lan, Yang; Shan-Le, MA; Pan-Pan, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Spatial resolution is a significant factor in the GEM performance in view of X-rays radiography and UV, visible light imaging. Monte-Carlo method is used to investigate the spatial resolution determined by the transverse diffusion in the device. The simulation results indicate that the electrical parameters, such as the GEM voltages and the electric field at the drift and induction regions, only have minor effects on the spatial resolution. The geometrical parameters and the working gases chosen, on the other hand, are the main parameters that determine the spatial resolution. The spatial resolution is determined more on the drift and diffusion processes than on the avalanche process. Especially for the different working gases, the square root function of the ratio of the electron diffusion coefficient and the mobility has a significant effect on the spatial resolution.

  16. Global anthropogenic heat flux database with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Varquez, A. C. G.; Kanda, M.

    2017-02-01

    This study developed a top-down method for estimating global anthropogenic heat emission (AHE), with a high spatial resolution of 30 arc-seconds and temporal resolution of 1 h. Annual average AHE was derived from human metabolic heating and primary energy consumption, which was further divided into three components based on consumer sector. The first and second components were heat loss and heat emissions from industrial sectors equally distributed throughout the country and populated areas, respectively. The third component comprised the sum of emissions from commercial, residential, and transportation sectors (CRT). Bulk AHE from the CRT was proportionally distributed using a global population dataset, with a radiance-calibrated nighttime lights adjustment. An empirical function to estimate monthly fluctuations of AHE based on gridded monthly temperatures was derived from various Japanese and American city measurements. Finally, an AHE database with a global coverage was constructed for the year 2013. Comparisons between our proposed AHE and other existing datasets revealed that the problem of overestimation of AHE intensity in previous top-down models was mitigated by the separation of energy consumption sectors; furthermore, the problem of AHE underestimation at central urban areas was solved by the nighttime lights adjustment. A strong agreement in the monthly profiles of AHE between our database and other bottom-up datasets further proved the validity of the current methodology. Investigations of AHE for the 29 largest urban agglomerations globally highlighted that the share of heat emissions from CRT sectors to the total AHE at the city level was 40-95%; whereas that of metabolic heating varied with the city's level of development by a range of 2-60%. A negative correlation between gross domestic product (GDP) and the share of metabolic heating to a city's total AHE was found. Globally, peak AHE values were found to occur between December and February, while

  17. High-throughput in-volume processing in glass with isotropic spatial resolutions in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yuanxin; Chu, Wei; Liao, Yang; Qiao, Lingling; Cheng, Ya

    2016-01-01

    We report on fabrication of three dimensional (3D) microstructures in glass with isotropic spatial resolutions. To achieve high throughput fabrication, we expand the focal spot size with a low-numerical-aperture lens, which naturally results in a degraded axial resolution. We solve the problem with simultaneous spatial temporal focusing which leads to an isotropic laser-affected volume with a spatial resolution of ~100 micron.

  18. The Effect of Spatial and Temporal Resolution of Cine Phase Contrast MRI on Wall Shear Stress and Oscillatory Shear Index Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsen, Frank J.; Marquering, Henk; van Ooij, Pim; vanBavel, Ed; Wentzel, Jolanda J.; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) are associated with atherosclerotic disease. Both parameters are derived from blood velocities, which can be measured with phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI). Limitations in spatiotemporal resolution of PC-MRI are known to affect these measurements. Our aim was to investigate the effect of spatiotemporal resolution using a carotid artery phantom. Methods A carotid artery phantom was connected to a flow set-up supplying pulsatile flow. MRI measurement planes were placed at the common carotid artery (CCA) and internal carotid artery (ICA). Two-dimensional PC-MRI measurements were performed with thirty different spatiotemporal resolution settings. The MRI flow measurement was validated with ultrasound probe measurements. Mean flow, peak flow, flow waveform, WSS and OSI were compared for these spatiotemporal resolutions using regression analysis. The slopes of the regression lines were reported in %/mm and %/100ms. The distribution of low and high WSS and OSI was compared between different spatiotemporal resolutions. Results The mean PC-MRI CCA flow (2.5±0.2mL/s) agreed with the ultrasound probe measurements (2.7±0.02mL/s). Mean flow (mL/s) depended only on spatial resolution (CCA:-13%/mm, ICA:-49%/mm). Peak flow (mL/s) depended on both spatial (CCA:-13%/mm, ICA:-17%/mm) and temporal resolution (CCA:-19%/100ms, ICA:-24%/100ms). Mean WSS (Pa) was in inverse relationship only with spatial resolution (CCA:-19%/mm, ICA:-33%/mm). OSI was dependent on spatial resolution for CCA (-26%/mm) and temporal resolution for ICA (-16%/100ms). The regions of low and high WSS and OSI matched for most of the spatiotemporal resolutions (CCA:30/30, ICA:28/30 cases for WSS; CCA:23/30, ICA:29/30 cases for OSI). Conclusion We show that both mean flow and mean WSS are independent of temporal resolution. Peak flow and OSI are dependent on both spatial and temporal resolution. However, the magnitude of mean and peak flow, WSS and

  19. Thematic and spatial resolutions affect model-based predictions of tree species distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liang

    Full Text Available Subjective decisions of thematic and spatial resolutions in characterizing environmental heterogeneity may affect the characterizations of spatial pattern and the simulation of occurrence and rate of ecological processes, and in turn, model-based tree species distribution. Thus, this study quantified the importance of thematic and spatial resolutions, and their interaction in predictions of tree species distribution (quantified by species abundance. We investigated how model-predicted species abundances changed and whether tree species with different ecological traits (e.g., seed dispersal distance, competitive capacity had different responses to varying thematic and spatial resolutions. We used the LANDIS forest landscape model to predict tree species distribution at the landscape scale and designed a series of scenarios with different thematic (different numbers of land types and spatial resolutions combinations, and then statistically examined the differences of species abundance among these scenarios. Results showed that both thematic and spatial resolutions affected model-based predictions of species distribution, but thematic resolution had a greater effect. Species ecological traits affected the predictions. For species with moderate dispersal distance and relatively abundant seed sources, predicted abundance increased as thematic resolution increased. However, for species with long seeding distance or high shade tolerance, thematic resolution had an inverse effect on predicted abundance. When seed sources and dispersal distance were not limiting, the predicted species abundance increased with spatial resolution and vice versa. Results from this study may provide insights into the choice of thematic and spatial resolutions for model-based predictions of tree species distribution.

  20. Thematic and spatial resolutions affect model-based predictions of tree species distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; He, Hong S; Fraser, Jacob S; Wu, ZhiWei

    2013-01-01

    Subjective decisions of thematic and spatial resolutions in characterizing environmental heterogeneity may affect the characterizations of spatial pattern and the simulation of occurrence and rate of ecological processes, and in turn, model-based tree species distribution. Thus, this study quantified the importance of thematic and spatial resolutions, and their interaction in predictions of tree species distribution (quantified by species abundance). We investigated how model-predicted species abundances changed and whether tree species with different ecological traits (e.g., seed dispersal distance, competitive capacity) had different responses to varying thematic and spatial resolutions. We used the LANDIS forest landscape model to predict tree species distribution at the landscape scale and designed a series of scenarios with different thematic (different numbers of land types) and spatial resolutions combinations, and then statistically examined the differences of species abundance among these scenarios. Results showed that both thematic and spatial resolutions affected model-based predictions of species distribution, but thematic resolution had a greater effect. Species ecological traits affected the predictions. For species with moderate dispersal distance and relatively abundant seed sources, predicted abundance increased as thematic resolution increased. However, for species with long seeding distance or high shade tolerance, thematic resolution had an inverse effect on predicted abundance. When seed sources and dispersal distance were not limiting, the predicted species abundance increased with spatial resolution and vice versa. Results from this study may provide insights into the choice of thematic and spatial resolutions for model-based predictions of tree species distribution.

  1. Electronics based on two-dimensional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Gianluca; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Palacios, Tomás; Neumaier, Daniel; Seabaugh, Alan; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Colombo, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    The compelling demand for higher performance and lower power consumption in electronic systems is the main driving force of the electronics industry's quest for devices and/or architectures based on new materials. Here, we provide a review of electronic devices based on two-dimensional materials, outlining their potential as a technological option beyond scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor switches. We focus on the performance limits and advantages of these materials and associated technologies, when exploited for both digital and analog applications, focusing on the main figures of merit needed to meet industry requirements. We also discuss the use of two-dimensional materials as an enabling factor for flexible electronics and provide our perspectives on future developments.

  2. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  3. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-04-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions.

  4. Towards two-dimensional search engines

    CERN Document Server

    Ermann, Leonardo; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way the ranking of nodes becomes two-dimensional that paves the way for development of two-dimensional search engines of new type. Information flow properties on PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian Universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  5. Toward two-dimensional search engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, L.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way, the ranking of nodes becomes two dimensional which paves the way for the development of two-dimensional search engines of a new type. Statistical properties of information flow on the PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. A special emphasis is done for British universities networks using the large database publicly available in the UK. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  6. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M.; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-01

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  7. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-09

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  8. High spatial and spectral resolution 10-micron observations of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, A. T.; Ridgway, S. T.; Knacke, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Ten-micrometer spectra of the North Tropical Zone, North Equatorial Belt, and Great Red Spot at a spectral resolution of 1.1/cm are compared to synthetic spectra. These ground-based spectra were obtained simultaneously with the Voyager 1 encounter with Jupiter in March, 1979. The NH3 vertical distribution is found to decrease with altitude significantly faster than the saturated vapor pressure curve and is different for the three observed regions. Spatial variability in the NH3 mixing ratio could be caused by changes in the amount of NH3 condensation or in the degree of the NH3 photolysis. The C2H6 emission at 12 microns has approximately the same strength at the North Tropical Zone and North Equatorial Belt, but it is 30% weaker at the Great Red Spot. A cooler temperature inversion or a smaller abundance of C2H6 could explain the lower C2H6 emission over the Great Red Spot.

  9. Two-Dimensional Scheduling: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuolei Xiao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a literature review, classification schemes and analysis of methodology for scheduling problems on Batch Processing machine (BP with both processing time and job size constraints which is also regarded as Two-Dimensional (TD scheduling. Special attention is given to scheduling problems with non-identical job sizes and processing times, with details of the basic algorithms and other significant results.

  10. Two dimensional fermions in four dimensional YM

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, R

    2009-01-01

    Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation of SU(N) live on a two dimensional torus flatly embedded in $R^4$. They interact with a four dimensional SU(N) Yang Mills vector potential preserving a global chiral symmetry at finite $N$. As the size of the torus in units of $\\frac{1}{\\Lambda_{SU(N)}}$ is varied from small to large, the chiral symmetry gets spontaneously broken in the infinite $N$ limit.

  11. Two-dimensional Kagome photonic bandgap waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Søndergaard, Thomas; Libori, Stig E. Barkou;

    2000-01-01

    The transverse-magnetic photonic-bandgap-guidance properties are investigated for a planar two-dimensional (2-D) Kagome waveguide configuration using a full-vectorial plane-wave-expansion method. Single-moded well-localized low-index guided modes are found. The localization of the optical modes...... is investigated with respect to the width of the 2-D Kagome waveguide, and the number of modes existing for specific frequencies and waveguide widths is mapped out....

  12. String breaking in two-dimensional QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hornbostel, K J

    1999-01-01

    I present results of a numerical calculation of the effects of light quark-antiquark pairs on the linear heavy-quark potential in light-cone quantized two-dimensional QCD. I extract the potential from the Q-Qbar component of the ground-state wavefunction, and observe string breaking at the heavy-light meson pair threshold. I briefly comment on the states responsible for the breaking.

  13. Two-dimensional supramolecular electron spin arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Nowakowski, Jan; Liu, Shi-Xia; Jaggi, Michael; Siewert, Dorota; Girovsky, Jan; Shchyrba, Aneliia; Hählen, Tatjana; Kleibert, Armin; Oppeneer, Peter M; Nolting, Frithjof; Decurtins, Silvio; Jung, Thomas A; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2013-05-07

    A bottom-up approach is introduced to fabricate two-dimensional self-assembled layers of molecular spin-systems containing Mn and Fe ions arranged in a chessboard lattice. We demonstrate that the Mn and Fe spin states can be reversibly operated by their selective response to coordination/decoordination of volatile ligands like ammonia (NH3). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effects of reconstruction parameters on image noise and spatial resolution in cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Wan; Lee, Chang-Lae; Cho, Hyo-Min; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Dae-Hong; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    CBCT (cone-beam computed tomography) is a promising modality in many medical applications due to the properties of fast volume coverage, lower radiation dose, easy hardware implementation, and higher spatial resolution. Recently, attention is being paid to the noise and resolution relationship for CBCT. In a CBCT system, image noise and spatial resolution play very important roles in image quality. However, there have not been many works to evaluate the relationship between the image noise and the spatial resolution in CBCT. In this study, we evaluated the effects of reconstruction parameters, such as the characteristics of the filter, the number of projections, and the voxel size, on the image noise and the spatial resolution in a CBCT system. The simulated projection data of a Catphan 600 phantom were reconstructed using the FDK (Feldkamp) algorithm. To evaluate the image noise and the spatial resolution, we calculated the COV (coefficient of variation) of the attenuation coefficient and the MTF (modulation transfer function) in axial images. Five reconstruction filters, Ram-Lak, Shepp-Logan, Cosine, Hamming, and Hann, were used to reconstruct the images. Different numbers of projections for a circular scan of 360 degrees and different voxel sizes were used to reconstruct the images to evaluate their effect on image noise and spatial resolution. The image noise given by the Hann filter was the lowest and the spatial resolution given by the Ram-Lak filter was the highest. The image noise was decreased as functions of the number of projections and the voxel size. The spatial resolution was increased as a function of the number of projections and decreased as a function of the voxel size. The results of this study show the relationship between the image noise and the spatial resolution in a CBCT system and the characteristics of the reconstruction factors for trade-off between the image noise and the spatial resolution. It can also provide information of the image

  15. Two dimensional echocardiographic detection of intraatrial masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, N L; Soulen, R L; Kotler, M N; Mintz, G S

    1981-11-01

    With two dimensional echocardiography, a left atrial mass was detected in 19 patients. Of these, 10 patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis had a left atrial thrombus. The distinctive two dimensional echocardiographic features of left atrial thrombus included a mass of irregular nonmobile laminated echos within an enlarged atrial cavity, usually with a broad base of attachment to the posterior left atrial wall. Seven patients had a left atrial myxoma. Usually, the myxoma appeared as a mottled ovoid, sharply demarcated mobile mass attached to the interatrial septum. One patient had a right atrial angiosarcoma that appeared as a nonmobile mass extending from the inferior vena caval-right atrial junction into the right atrial cavity. One patient had a left atrial leiomyosarcoma producing a highly mobile mass attached to the lateral wall of the left atrium. M mode echocardiography detected six of the seven myxomas, one thrombus and neither of the other tumors. Thus, two dimensional echocardiography appears to be the technique of choice in the detection, localization and differentiation of intraatrial masses.

  16. 基于压缩感知的双基SAR二维高分辨成像算法%Two-Dimensional High Resolution Bistatic SAR Imaging Algorithm Based on Compressed Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 张顺生; 常俊飞

    2012-01-01

    双基地合成孔径雷达(SAR)由于收发分置,具有广阔的应用前景,但常规的频域算法不仅面临距离史双根号问题,而且数据采集受Nyquist 理论限制,数据量大.近年来提出的压缩感知(CS)理论指出,在一定条件下可以从很少的采样点中以很大的概率重建原始未知稀疏信号.本文将CS理论与双基地SAR模型相结合,提出一种基于CS的双基地SAR二维高分辨成像算法.该算法将二维随机降采样回波数据作为测量值,根据发射信号构造距离向测量矩阵,通过方位向多普勒相位因子构建方位向测量矩阵,利用CS恢复算法对目标进行了分维重建.仿真结果与性能分析表明,该算法在严重欠采样情况下仍能完好的重建原始目标,而且对噪声具有一定的鲁棒性和免疫性.与传统双基SAR成像算法相比,该算法具有更高的分辨率,成像结果峰值更加尖锐,峰值旁瓣比(PLSR)和积分旁瓣比(ILSR)都较低,而且采样率低、数据量少,具有一定的有效性和实用性.%The bistatic SAR, when transmitter and receiver move along nonparallel tracks with unequal velocities, has the potential for various applications. But the double-square-root term of range history and a large amount of echo storage are two basic challenges of traditional frequency domain imaging for bistatic SAR. Recent theory of Compressed Sensing (CS) suggests that exact recovery of an unknown sparse signal can be achieved from few measurements with overwhelming probability. In this paper, a novel bistatic SAR high resolution imaging algorithm is proposed based on CS theory and the model of bistatic SAR. In the novel algorithm, the 2-D random down-sampling echo data is as measurement value and the targets are reconstructed via CS in the range and azimuth direction, respectively. The simulation results show that the targets can be perfectly reconstructed by only using few down-sampling echo data instead of all numbers of

  17. Are weed patches stable in location? Application of an explicitly two-dimensional methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijting, S.; Werf, van der W.; Stein, A.; Kropff, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Field observations were made in three years continuous maize cultivation in the Netherlands to study the spatial pattern and stability of spatial pattern over time in agricultural weeds. Two-dimensional correlograms were made, using data from single years, to characterise spatial correlation and pat

  18. Are weed patches stable in location? Application of an explicitly two-dimensional methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijting, S.; Werf, van der W.; Stein, A.; Kropff, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Field observations were made in three years continuous maize cultivation in the Netherlands to study the spatial pattern and stability of spatial pattern over time in agricultural weeds. Two-dimensional correlograms were made, using data from single years, to characterise spatial correlation and

  19. Two-Dimensional Proton Chemical-Shift Imaging of Human Muscle Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiani; Willcott, M. Robert; Moore, Gregory J.

    1997-06-01

    Large lipid signals and strong susceptibility gradients introduced by muscle-bone interfaces represent major technical challenges forin vivoproton MRS of human muscle. Here, the demonstration of two-dimensional proton chemical-shift imaging of human muscle metabolites is presented. This technique utilizes a chemical-shift-selective method for water and lipid suppression and automatic shimming for optimal homogeneity of the magnetic field. The 2D1H CSI technique described facilitates the acquisition of high-spatial-resolution spectra, and allows one to acquire data from multiple muscle groups in a single experiment. A preliminary investigation utilizing this technique in healthy adult males (n= 4) revealed a highly significant difference in the ratio of the creatine to trimethylamine resonance between the fast and slow twitch muscle groups examined. The technique is robust, can be implemented on a commercial scanner with relative ease, and should prove to be a useful tool for both clinical and basic investigators.

  20. Electronic Transmission Properties of Two-Dimensional Quasi-Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯志林; 傅秀军; 刘有延

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the tight binding model, the electronic transmission properties of two-dimensional Penrose lattices with free boundary conditions are studied using the generalized eigenfunction method (Phys. Rev. B 60(1999)13444). The electronic transmission coefficients for Penrose lattices with different sizes and widths are calculated, and the result shows strong energy dependence because of the quasiperiodic structure and quantum coherent effect. Around the Fermi level E = 0, there is an energy region with zero transmission amplitudes,which suggests that the studied systems are insulating. The spatial distributions of several typical electronic states with different transmission coefficients are plotted to display the propagation process.

  1. On two-dimensional magnetic reconnection with nonuniform resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, two theoretical approaches for the calculation of the rate of quasi-stationary, two-dimensional magnetic reconnection with nonuniform anomalous resistivity are considered in the framework of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In the first, 'global' equations approach, the MHD equations are approximately solved for a whole reconnection layer, including the upstream and downstream regions and the layer center. In the second, 'local' equations approach, the equations are solved across the reconnection layer, including only the upstream region and the layer center. Both approaches give the same approximate answer for the reconnection rate. Our theoretical model is in agreement with the results of recent simulations of reconnection with spatially nonuniform resistivity.

  2. Quantum skyrmions in two-dimensional chiral magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Rina; Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Balents, Leon

    2016-10-01

    We study the quantum mechanics of magnetic skyrmions in the vicinity of the skyrmion-crystal to ferromagnet phase boundary in two-dimensional magnets. We show that the skyrmion excitation has an energy dispersion that splits into multiple bands due to the combination of magnus force and the underlying lattice. Condensation of the skyrmions can give rise to an intermediate phase between the skyrmion crystal and ferromagnet: a quantum liquid, in which skyrmions are not spatially localized. We show that the critical behavior depends on the spin size S and the topological number of the skyrmion. Experimental signatures of quantum skyrmions in inelastic neutron-scattering measurements are also discussed.

  3. High spatial resolution mid-infrared studies of planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skemer, Andrew

    I present the results of six papers related the formation and evolution of planets and planetary systems, all of which are based on high-resolution, ground-based, mid-infrared observations. The first three chapters are studies of T Tauri binaries. T Tauri stars are young, low mass stars, whose disks form the building blocks of extrasolar planets. The first chapter is a study of the 0.68"/0.12" triple system, T Tauri. Our spatially resolved N-band photometry reveals silicate absorption towards one component, T Tau Sa, indicating the presence of an edge-on disk, which is in contrast to the other components. The second chapter is an adaptive optics fed N-band spectroscopy study of the 0.88" binary, UY Aur. We find that the dust grains around UY Aur A are ISM-like, while the mineralogy of the dust around UY Aur B is more uncertain, due to self-extinction. The third chapter presents a survey of spatially resolved silicate spectroscopy for nine T Tauri binaries. We find with 90%-95% confidence that the silicate features of the binaries are more similar than those of randomly paired single stars. This implies that a shared binary property, such as age or composition, is an important parameter in dust grain evolution. The fourth chapter is a study of the planetary system, 2MASS 1207. We explore the source of 2MASS 1207 b's under-luminosity, which has typically been explained as the result of an edge-on disk of large, grey-extincting dust grains. We find that the edge-on disk theory is incompatible with several lines of evidence, and suggest that 2MASS 1207 b's appearance can be explained by a thick cloudy atmosphere, which might be typical among young, planetary systems. The fifth chapter is a study of the white dwarf, Sirius B, which in the context of this thesis is being studied as a post-planetary system. Our N-band imaging demonstrates that Sirius B does not have an infrared excess, in contrast to previous results. The sixth chapter is a study of mid

  4. Evidence of two-dimensional quantum Wigner Crystal in a zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2014-03-01

    In disorder-dominated cases, Anderson localization occurs as a result of destructive interference effects caused by (short-ranged) random disorders. On the other hand, in interaction-dominated scenarios, striking manifestations of quantum physics emerge in response to strong inter-particle Coulomb energy (EC). The most prominent interaction-driven effect is the Wigner crystallization (WC) of electrons, an electron solid made up with spatially separated charges settling in a form of a lattice. The classical version of the crystallization, with the Debye temperature ΘD two-dimensional (2D) electrons on helium surfaces (EHS). However, the more desired quantum version with the Fermi energy EF <two-dimensional hole (2DH) systems in a genuine interaction-driven regime. A high resolution dc VI measurement reveals a pA level threshold transport accompanied by resistivity oscillations, indicating the coexistence of a pinned quantum WC with discrete edge filaments of unpinned carriers. NSF DMR 1105183

  5. Two-dimensional Tissue Image Reconstruction Based on Magnetic Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dedkova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces new possibilities within two-dimensional reconstruction of internal conductivity distribution. In addition to the electric field inside the given object, the injected current causes a magnetic field which can be measured either outside the object by means of a Hall probe or inside the object through magnetic resonance imaging. The Magnetic Resonance method, together with Electrical impedance tomography (MREIT, is well known as a bio-imaging modality providing cross-sectional conductivity images with a good spatial resolution from the measurements of internal magnetic flux density produced by externally injected currents. A new algorithm for the conductivity reconstruction, which utilizes the internal current information with respect to corresponding boundary conditions and the external magnetic field, was developed. A series of computer simulations has been conducted to assess the performance of the proposed algorithm within the process of estimating electrical conductivity changes in the lungs, heart, and brain tissues captured in two-dimensional piecewise homogeneous chest and head models. The reconstructed conductivity distribution using the proposed method is compared with that using a conventional method based on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. The acquired experience is discussed and the direction of further research is proposed.

  6. X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J., E-mail: jlu@pppl.gov [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J. [Inrad Optics, 181 Legrand Avenue, Northvale, New Jersey 07647 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 μm validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten Lα1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 μm. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

  7. X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J.

    2014-11-01

    A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 μm validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten Lα1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 μm. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

  8. Comparison of alternative spatial resolutions in the application of a spatially distributed biogeochemical model over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D.P.; Dodson, R.; Marks, D.

    1996-01-01

    Spatially distributed biogeochemical models may be applied over grids at a range of spatial resolutions, however, evaluation of potential errors and loss of information at relatively coarse resolutions is rare. In this study, a georeferenced database at the 1-km spatial resolution was developed to initialize and drive a process-based model (Forest-BGC) of water and carbon balance over a gridded 54976 km2 area covering two river basins in mountainous western Oregon. Corresponding data sets were also prepared at 10-km and 50-km spatial resolutions using commonly employed aggregation schemes. Estimates were made at each grid cell for climate variables including daily solar radiation, air temperature, humidity, and precipitation. The topographic structure, water holding capacity, vegetation type and leaf area index were likewise estimated for initial conditions. The daily time series for the climatic drivers was developed from interpolations of meteorological station data for the water year 1990 (1 October 1989-30 September 1990). Model outputs at the 1-km resolution showed good agreement with observed patterns in runoff and productivity. The ranges for model inputs at the 10-km and 50-km resolutions tended to contract because of the smoothed topography. Estimates for mean evapotranspiration and runoff were relatively insensitive to changing the spatial resolution of the grid whereas estimates of mean annual net primary production varied by 11%. The designation of a vegetation type and leaf area at the 50-km resolution often subsumed significant heterogeneity in vegetation, and this factor accounted for much of the difference in the mean values for the carbon flux variables. Although area wide means for model outputs were generally similar across resolutions, difference maps often revealed large areas of disagreement. Relatively high spatial resolution analyses of biogeochemical cycling are desirable from several perspectives and may be particularly important in the

  9. Breast density estimation from high spectral and spatial resolution MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Weiss, William A; Medved, Milica; Abe, Hiroyuki; Newstead, Gillian M; Karczmar, Gregory S; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-10-01

    A three-dimensional breast density estimation method is presented for high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MR imaging. Twenty-two patients were recruited (under an Institutional Review Board--approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant protocol) for high-risk breast cancer screening. Each patient received standard-of-care clinical digital x-ray mammograms and MR scans, as well as HiSS scans. The algorithm for breast density estimation includes breast mask generating, breast skin removal, and breast percentage density calculation. The inter- and intra-user variabilities of the HiSS-based density estimation were determined using correlation analysis and limits of agreement. Correlation analysis was also performed between the HiSS-based density estimation and radiologists' breast imaging-reporting and data system (BI-RADS) density ratings. A correlation coefficient of 0.91 ([Formula: see text]) was obtained between left and right breast density estimations. An interclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 ([Formula: see text]) indicated high reliability for the inter-user variability of the HiSS-based breast density estimations. A moderate correlation coefficient of 0.55 ([Formula: see text]) was observed between HiSS-based breast density estimations and radiologists' BI-RADS. In summary, an objective density estimation method using HiSS spectral data from breast MRI was developed. The high reproducibility with low inter- and low intra-user variabilities shown in this preliminary study suggest that such a HiSS-based density metric may be potentially beneficial in programs requiring breast density such as in breast cancer risk assessment and monitoring effects of therapy.

  10. Auditory spatial resolution in horizontal, vertical, and diagonal planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, D Wesley; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y; Erpenbeck, Eric A

    2003-08-01

    Minimum audible angle (MAA) and minimum audible movement angle (MAMA) thresholds were measured for stimuli in horizontal, vertical, and diagonal (60 degrees) planes. A pseudovirtual technique was employed in which signals were recorded through KEMAR's ears and played back to subjects through insert earphones. Thresholds were obtained for wideband, high-pass, and low-pass noises. Only 6 of 20 subjects obtained wideband vertical-plane MAAs less than 10 degrees, and only these 6 subjects were retained for the complete study. For all three filter conditions thresholds were lowest in the horizontal plane, slightly (but significantly) higher in the diagonal plane, and highest for the vertical plane. These results were similar in magnitude and pattern to those reported by Perrott and Saberi [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 87, 1728-1731 (1990)] and Saberi and Perrott [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 2639-2644 (1990)], except that these investigators generally found that thresholds for diagonal planes were as good as those for the horizontal plane. The present results are consistent with the hypothesis that diagonal-plane performance is based on independent contributions from a horizontal-plane system (sensitive to interaural differences) and a vertical-plane system (sensitive to pinna-based spectral changes). Measurements of the stimuli recorded through KEMAR indicated that sources presented from diagonal planes can produce larger interaural level differences (ILDs) in certain frequency regions than would be expected based on the horizontal projection of the trajectory. Such frequency-specific ILD cues may underlie the very good performance reported in previous studies for diagonal spatial resolution. Subjects in the present study could apparently not take advantage of these cues in the diagonal-plane condition, possibly because they did not externalize the images to their appropriate positions in space or possibly because of the absence of a patterned visual field.

  11. Two-dimensional thick-slice MR digital subtraction angiography for assessment of cerebrovascular occlusive diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, S.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hori, M.; Ishigame, K.; Nambu, A.; Kumagai, H.; Araki, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Yamanashi Medical Univ. (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    Although spatial resolution of current MR angiography is excellent, temporal resolution has remained unsatisfactory. We evaluated clinical applicability of 2D thick-slice, contrast-enhanced subtraction MR angiography (2D-MR digital subtraction angiography) with sub-second temporal resolution in cerebrovascular occlusive diseases. Twenty-five patients with cerebrovascular occlusive diseases (8 moyamoya diseases, 10 proximal internal carotid occlusions, and 2 sinus thromboses) were studied with a 1.5-T MR unit. The MR digital subtraction angiography (MRDSA) was performed per 0.97 s continuously just after a bolus injection of 15 ml of gadolinium chelates up to 40 s in sagittal (covering hemisphere) or coronal planes. Subtraction images were generated at a workstation. We evaluated imaging quality and hemodynamic information of MRDSA in comparison with those of routine MR imaging, non-contrast MR angiography, and X-ray intra-arterial DSA. Major cerebral arteries, all of the venous sinuses, and most tributaries were clearly visualized with 2D MRDSA. Also, pure arterial phases were obtained in all cases. The MRDSA technique demonstrated prolonged circulation in sinus thromboses, distal patent lumen of proximal occlusion, and some collateral circulation. Such hemodynamic information was comparable to that of intra-arterial DSA. Two-dimensional thick-slice MRDSA with high temporal resolution has a unique ability to demonstrate cerebral hemodynamics equivalent to that of intra-arterial DSA and may play an important role for evaluation of cerebrovascular occlusive diseases. (orig.)

  12. Weakly disordered two-dimensional Frenkel excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukahil, A.; Zettili, Nouredine

    2004-03-01

    We report the results of studies of the optical properties of weakly disordered two- dimensional Frenkel excitons in the Coherent Potential Approximation (CPA). An approximate complex Green's function for a square lattice with nearest neighbor interactions is used in the self-consistent equation to determine the coherent potential. It is shown that the Density of States is very much affected by the logarithmic singularities in the Green's function. Our CPA results are in excellent agreement with previous investigations by Schreiber and Toyozawa using the Monte Carlo simulation.

  13. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  14. Theory of two-dimensional transformations

    OpenAIRE

    Kanayama, Yutaka J.; Krahn, Gary W.

    1998-01-01

    The article of record may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/70.720359 Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on This paper proposes a new "heterogeneous" two-dimensional (2D) transformation group ___ to solve motion analysis/planning problems in robotics. In this theory, we use a 3×1 matrix to represent a transformation as opposed to a 3×3 matrix in the homogeneous formulation. First, this theory is as capable as the homogeneous theory, Because of the minimal size, its implement...

  15. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    CERN Document Server

    Zhirov, A O; Shepelyansky, D L

    2010-01-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists {\\it ab aeterno}. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. We analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  16. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Haifeng; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon scattering was theoretically studied with the deformation potential theory. Based on Boltzmann equation with relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was deduced, which shows that the influence of effective mass to the mobility anisotropy is larger than that of deformation potential constant and elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic 2D materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC$_2$N, MXene, TiS$_3$, GeCH$_3$) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio was overestimated in the past.

  17. Sums of two-dimensional spectral triples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Ivan, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    construct a sum of two dimensional modules which reflects some aspects of the topological dimensions of the compact metric space, but this will only give the metric back approximately. At the end we make an explicit computation of the last module for the unit interval in. The metric is recovered exactly......, the Dixmier trace induces a multiple of the Lebesgue integral but the growth of the number of eigenvalues is different from the one found for the standard differential operator on the unit interval....

  18. Binding energy of two-dimensional biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jai; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko;

    1996-01-01

    Using a model structure for a two-dimensional (2D) biexciton confined in a quantum well, it is shown that the form of the Hamiltonian of the 2D biexciton reduces into that of an exciton. The binding energies and Bohr radii of a 2D biexciton in its various internal energy states are derived...... analytically using the fractional dimension approach. The ratio of the binding energy of a 2D biexciton to that of a 2D exciton is found to be 0.228, which agrees very well with the recent experimental value. The results of our approach are compared with those of earlier theories....

  19. Dynamics of film. [two dimensional continua theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The general theory of films as two-dimensional continua are elaborated upon. As physical realizations of such a model this paper examines: inextensible films, elastic films, and nets. The suggested dynamic equations have enabled us to find out the characteristic speeds of wave propagation of the invariants of external and internal geometry and formulate the criteria of instability of their shape. Also included herein is a detailed account of the equation describing the film motions beyond the limits of the shape stability accompanied by the formation of wrinkles. The theory is illustrated by examples.

  20. JT-60U Thomson scattering system with multiple ruby laser and high spatial resolution for high electron temperature plasma measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Naito, Osamu; Yamashita, Osamu; Kitamura, Shigeru; Hatae, Takaki; Nagashima, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-11-01

    This article describes the design and operation of a 60 spatial channel Thomson scattering system as of 1996 with multiple ruby lasers to measure the electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} profiles of the JT-60U plasmas. The wide spectral range (403-683 nm) of the spectrometer and newly developed two-dimensional detector (high repetition photodiode array) has enabled this system to measure the high electron temperature plasma (5 keV or more) formed at the plasma core during negative magnetic shear discharge with high precision and reliability. The high spatial resolution (8 mm) have provided the precise measurement of steep electron temperature and density gradients formed at the plasma edge and in the scrape-off layer during H-mode discharge. The multilaser operation with the minimum time interval of 2 ms has provided an essential tool for the transient phenomenon measurement like the formation process of edge transport barrier during L- to H-mode transition and internal transport barrier during discharge with negative magnetic shear, the relaxation process of pellet injected plasma and so on. Measurement examples of recent JT-60U T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles are also presented. (author)

  1. Selecting a spatial resolution for estimation of per-field green leaf area index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Paul J.; Williamson, H. Dawn

    1988-01-01

    For any application of multispectral scanner (MSS) data, a user is faced with a number of choices concerning the characteristics of the data; one of these is their spatial resolution. A pilot study was undertaken to determine the spatial resolution that would be optimal for the per-field estimation of green leaf area index (GLAI) in grassland. By reference to empirically-derived data from three areas of grassland, the suitable spatial resolution was hypothesized to lie in the lower portion of a 2-18 m range. To estimate per-field GLAI, airborne MSS data were collected at spatial resolutions of 2 m, 5 m and 10 m. The highest accuracies of per-field GLAI estimation were achieved using MSS data with spatial resolutions of 2 m and 5 m.

  2. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-11-14

    Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions--native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level--and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  3. An effect of spatial resolution of remotely sensed data for vegetation analysis over an arid zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Y.; Tsuchiya, K.; Setoguchi, R.

    1997-05-01

    One of the recent trends in the development of an optical sensor of earth observation satellite is a great importance of spatial resolution and the order of 1 - 2 meter resolution sensor is under development. To cope with this trend analyses are made on the effect of extremely fine spatial resolution of land cover classification accuracy utilizing spatial resolution of 20 cm and 1 meter aerial multi-sensor data of an arid reddish land where desertification is taking place in small spatial scale. Applied methods are supervised classification with combination of multi-level slice(pallarelpiped classification) and the Mahalanobis distance. The result of analysis indicates that the difference is within several percentage for 3 categories of bare land, vegetation and shadow. It was also found that small dried sparse grass land which can be recognized in 20 cm resolution image is difficult to extract in 1 meter resolution image.

  4. Two-dimensional visualization of cluster beams by microchannel plates

    CERN Document Server

    Khoukaz, Alfons; Grieser, Silke; Hergemöller, Ann-Katrin; Köhler, Esperanza; Täschner, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    An advanced technique for a two-dimensional real time visualization of cluster beams in vacuum as well as of the overlap volume of cluster beams with particle accelerator beams is presented. The detection system consists of an array of microchannel plates (MCP) in combination with a phosphor screen which is read out by a CCD camera. This setup together with the ionization of a cluster beam by an electron or ion beam allows for spatial resolved investigations of the cluster beam position, size, and intensity. Moreover, since electrically uncharged clusters remain undetected, the operation in an internal beam experiment opens the way to monitor the overlap region and thus the position and size of an accelerator beam crossing an originally electrically neutral cluster jet. The observed intensity distribution of the recorded image is directly proportional to the convolution of the spatial ion beam and cluster beam intensities and is by this a direct measure of the two-dimensional luminosity distribution. This inf...

  5. Two-dimensional gauge theoretic supergravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangemi, D.; Leblanc, M.

    1994-05-01

    We investigate two-dimensional supergravity theories, which can be built from a topological and gauge invariant action defined on an ordinary surface. One is the N = 1 supersymmetric extension of the Jackiw-Teitelboim model presented by Chamseddine in a superspace formalism. We complement the proof of Montano, Aoaki and Sonnenschein that this extension is topological and gauge invariant, based on the graded de Sitter algebra. Not only do the equations of motion correspond to the supergravity ones and do gauge transformations encompass local supersymmetries, but we also identify the ∫-theory with the superfield formalism action written by Chamseddine. Next, we show that the N = 1 supersymmetric extension of string-inspired two-dimensional dilaton gravity put forward by Park and Strominger cannot be written as a ∫-theory. As an alternative, we propose two topological and gauge theories that are based on a graded extension of the extended Poincaré algebra and satisfy a vanishing-curvature condition. Both models are supersymmetric extensions of the string-inspired dilaton gravity.

  6. Two-Dimensional Theory of Scientific Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yaghmaie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific representation is an interesting topic for philosophers of science, many of whom have recently explored it from different points of view. There are currently two competing approaches to the issue: cognitive and non-cognitive, and each of them claims its own merits over the other. This article tries to provide a hybrid theory of scientific representation, called Two-Dimensional Theory of Scientific Representation, which has the merits of the two accounts and is free of their shortcomings. To do this, we will argue that although scientific representation needs to use the notion of intentionality, such a notion is defined and realized in a simply structural form contrary to what cognitive approach says about intentionality. After a short introduction, the second part of the paper is devoted to introducing theories of scientific representation briefly. In the third part, the structural accounts of representation will be criticized. The next step is to introduce the two-dimensional theory which involves two key components: fixing and structural fitness. It will be argued that fitness is an objective and non-intentional relation, while fixing is intentional.

  7. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G.; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices.

  8. Improving spatial resolution of high stopping power X- and gamma-ray cameras:. fibers or slat-structured detectors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenmayer, J.-L.

    2000-11-01

    For medical imaging applications, the earliness of the detection is an essential factor to increase chances of recovery; in the field of industrial imaging, nondestructive testing with lower detectivity threshold to ensure quality and safe conduct. Accordingly, in all areas using the up-to-date compact (much less-expensive facilities) high-energy pulsed electron accelerators (HF or induction linac, Marx generator) to produce energetic photons (bremsstrahlung), such as industrial and medical numerical imaging, flash radiography, radiotherapy positioning, computed tomography, detection of small- or low-contrasted details require two-dimensional (2D) detectors with an even more improved combination of sensitivity (which implies high stopping power), spatial resolution (millimetric or sub-millimetric) and speed, working in integrating mode (i.e. dose measurement) because bremsstrahlung X-ray sources provide short pulses. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the issues involved in the development of high-performance position-sensitive X- and gamma-ray cameras for high-energy flash imaging. The basic idea is that, examining in detail the energy deposition and its statistics (quantum noise), we shall be able to determine in real detectors the following features, such as detectors composition and pixel size, which can simultaneously lead to good detection efficiency and good spatial resolution. In general, conclusions can be transposed to other particle imaging detectors as neutron imagers (changing "dense" metal by "high energy transfer" material). There are, of course, challenges to get such detectors, although new technologies have already provided some prototypes offering more than 30% stopping power and less than 2 mm spatial resolution (blur) for 50 ns long 5 MeV X-ray pulses. There are various detector-segmentation methods that can be applied in order to improve the stopping power (macroscopic cross-section) and reduce the effect of the lateral energy

  9. Existence and Stability of Two-Dimensional Compact-Like Discrete Breathers in Discrete Two-Dimensional Monatomic Square Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; TIAN Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers in discrete two-dimensional monatomic square lattices are investigated by discussing a generafized discrete two-dimensional monatomic model.It is proven that the twodimensional compact-like discrete breathers exist not only in two-dimensional soft Ф4 potentials but also in hard two-dimensional Ф4 potentials and pure two-dimensional K4 lattices.The measurements of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breather cores in soft and hard two-dimensional Ф4 potential are determined by coupling parameter K4,while those in pure two-dimensional K4 lattices have no coupling with parameter K4.The stabilities of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers correlate closely to the coupling parameter K4 and the boundary condition of lattices.

  10. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelliccione, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Sciambi, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  11. Optimal excitation of two dimensional Holmboe instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Navid C

    2010-01-01

    Highly stratified shear layers are rendered unstable even at high stratifications by Holmboe instabilities when the density stratification is concentrated in a small region of the shear layer. These instabilities may cause mixing in highly stratified environments. However these instabilities occur in tongues for a limited range of parameters. We perform Generalized Stability analysis of the two dimensional perturbation dynamics of an inviscid Boussinesq stratified shear layer and show that Holmboe instabilities at high Richardson numbers can be excited by their adjoints at amplitudes that are orders of magnitude larger than by introducing initially the unstable mode itself. We also determine the optimal growth that obtains for parameters for which there is no instability. We find that there is potential for large transient growth regardless of whether the background flow is exponentially stable or not and that the characteristic structure of the Holmboe instability asymptotically emerges for parameter values ...

  12. Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-03-06

    The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific understanding and technological applications of graphene and related materials. Here, we use density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and the functionalized derivatives graphane and fluorographene. In all these materials, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes keep dominating over Umklapp scattering well-above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel regimes emerge, with Poiseuille and Ziman hydrodynamics, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, characterizing transport at ordinary conditions. Most remarkably, several of these two-dimensional materials admit wave-like heat diffusion, with second sound present at room temperature and above in graphene, boron nitride and graphane.

  13. Probabilistic Universality in two-dimensional Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubich, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we continue to explore infinitely renormalizable H\\'enon maps with small Jacobian. It was shown in [CLM] that contrary to the one-dimensional intuition, the Cantor attractor of such a map is non-rigid and the conjugacy with the one-dimensional Cantor attractor is at most 1/2-H\\"older. Another formulation of this phenomenon is that the scaling structure of the H\\'enon Cantor attractor differs from its one-dimensional counterpart. However, in this paper we prove that the weight assigned by the canonical invariant measure to these bad spots tends to zero on microscopic scales. This phenomenon is called {\\it Probabilistic Universality}. It implies, in particular, that the Hausdorff dimension of the canonical measure is universal. In this way, universality and rigidity phenomena of one-dimensional dynamics assume a probabilistic nature in the two-dimensional world.

  14. Two-dimensional heterostructures for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials provide slit-shaped ion diffusion channels that enable fast movement of lithium and other ions. However, electronic conductivity, the number of intercalation sites, and stability during extended cycling are also crucial for building high-performance energy storage devices. While individual 2D materials, such as graphene, show some of the required properties, none of them can offer all properties needed to maximize energy density, power density, and cycle life. Here we argue that stacking different 2D materials into heterostructured architectures opens an opportunity to construct electrodes that would combine the advantages of the individual building blocks while eliminating the associated shortcomings. We discuss characteristics of common 2D materials and provide examples of 2D heterostructured electrodes that showed new phenomena leading to superior electrochemical performance. We also consider electrode fabrication approaches and finally outline future steps to create 2D heterostructured electrodes that could greatly expand current energy storage technologies.

  15. Rationally synthesized two-dimensional polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, John W; Dichtel, William R

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic polymers exhibit diverse and useful properties and influence most aspects of modern life. Many polymerization methods provide linear or branched macromolecules, frequently with outstanding functional-group tolerance and molecular weight control. In contrast, extending polymerization strategies to two-dimensional periodic structures is in its infancy, and successful examples have emerged only recently through molecular framework, surface science and crystal engineering approaches. In this Review, we describe successful 2D polymerization strategies, as well as seminal research that inspired their development. These methods include the synthesis of 2D covalent organic frameworks as layered crystals and thin films, surface-mediated polymerization of polyfunctional monomers, and solid-state topochemical polymerizations. Early application targets of 2D polymers include gas separation and storage, optoelectronic devices and membranes, each of which might benefit from predictable long-range molecular organization inherent to this macromolecular architecture.

  16. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  17. Local doping of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dillon; Velasco, Jr, Jairo; Ju, Long; Kahn, Salman; Lee, Juwon; Germany, Chad E.; Zettl, Alexander K.; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F.

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to locally doping two-dimensional (2D) materials. In one aspect, an assembly including a substrate, a first insulator disposed on the substrate, a second insulator disposed on the first insulator, and a 2D material disposed on the second insulator is formed. A first voltage is applied between the 2D material and the substrate. With the first voltage applied between the 2D material and the substrate, a second voltage is applied between the 2D material and a probe positioned proximate the 2D material. The second voltage between the 2D material and the probe is removed. The first voltage between the 2D material and the substrate is removed. A portion of the 2D material proximate the probe when the second voltage was applied has a different electron density compared to a remainder of the 2D material.

  18. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-10-25

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  19. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-09-03

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  20. FACE RECOGNITION USING TWO DIMENSIONAL LAPLACIAN EIGENMAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jiangfeng; Yuan Baozong; Pei Bingnan

    2008-01-01

    Recently,some research efforts have shown that face images possibly reside on a nonlinear sub-manifold. Though Laplacianfaces method considered the manifold structures of the face images,it has limits to solve face recognition problem. This paper proposes a new feature extraction method,Two Dimensional Laplacian EigenMap (2DLEM),which especially considers the manifold structures of the face images,and extracts the proper features from face image matrix directly by using a linear transformation. As opposed to Laplacianfaces,2DLEM extracts features directly from 2D images without a vectorization preprocessing. To test 2DLEM and evaluate its performance,a series of ex-periments are performed on the ORL database and the Yale database. Moreover,several experiments are performed to compare the performance of three 2D methods. The experiments show that 2DLEM achieves the best performance.

  1. Equivalency of two-dimensional algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Gildemar Carneiro dos; Pomponet Filho, Balbino Jose S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Let us consider a vector z = xi + yj over the field of real numbers, whose basis (i,j) satisfy a given algebra. Any property of this algebra will be reflected in any function of z, so we can state that the knowledge of the properties of an algebra leads to more general conclusions than the knowledge of the properties of a function. However structural properties of an algebra do not change when this algebra suffers a linear transformation, though the structural constants defining this algebra do change. We say that two algebras are equivalent to each other whenever they are related by a linear transformation. In this case, we have found that some relations between the structural constants are sufficient to recognize whether or not an algebra is equivalent to another. In spite that the basis transform linearly, the structural constants change like a third order tensor, but some combinations of these tensors result in a linear transformation, allowing to write the entries of the transformation matrix as function of the structural constants. Eventually, a systematic way to find the transformation matrix between these equivalent algebras is obtained. In this sense, we have performed the thorough classification of associative commutative two-dimensional algebras, and find that even non-division algebra may be helpful in solving non-linear dynamic systems. The Mandelbrot set was used to have a pictorial view of each algebra, since equivalent algebras result in the same pattern. Presently we have succeeded in classifying some non-associative two-dimensional algebras, a task more difficult than for associative one. (author)

  2. Anomalous scaling law for noise variance and spatial resolution in differential phase contrast computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Qi, Zhihua; Bevins, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    In conventional absorption based x-ray computed tomography (CT), the noise variance in reconstructed CT images scales with spatial resolution following an inverse cubic relationship. Without reconstruction, in x-ray absorption radiography, the noise variance scales as an inverse square with spatial resolution. In this letter we report that while the inverse square relationship holds for differential phase contrast projection imaging, there exists an anomalous scaling law in differential phase contrast CT, where the noise variance scales with spatial resolution following an inverse linear relationship. The anomalous scaling law is theoretically derived and subsequently validated with phantom results from an experimental Talbot-Lau interferometer system.

  3. Analysis of axial spatial resolution in a variable resolution x-ray cone beam CT (VRX-CBCT) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahi, Bahram; Keyes, Gary S.; Rendon, David A.; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2008-03-01

    The Variable Resolution X-ray (VRX) technique has been successfully used in a Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) system to increase the spatial resolution of CT images in the transverse plane. This was achieved by tilting the Flat Panel Detector (FPD) to smaller vrx y angles in a VRX Cone Beam CT (VRX-CBCT) system. In this paper, the effect on the axial spatial resolution of CT images created by the VRX-CBCT system is examined at different vrx x angles, where vrx x is the tilting angle of the FPD about its x-axis. An amorphous silicon FPD with a CsI scintillator is coupled with a micro-focus x-ray tube to form a CBCT. The FPD is installed on a rotating frame that allows rotation of up to 90° about x and y axes of the FPD. There is no rotation about the z-axis (i.e. normal to the imaging surface). Tilting the FPD about its x-axis (i.e. decreasing the vrx x angle) reduces both the width of the line-spread function and the sampling distance by a factor of sin vrx x, thereby increasing the theoretical detector pre-sampling spatial resolution proportionately. This results in thinner CT slices that in turn help increase the axial spatial resolution of the CT images. An in-house phantom is used to measure the MTF of the reconstructed CT images at different vrx x angles.

  4. Spatial resolution of proton tomography. Methods, initial phase space and object thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Uwe [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Vetsuisse Faculty; Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland). Hirslanden Medical Center; Pedroni, Eros; Lomax, Tony [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy; Hartmann, Matthias; Besserer, Juergen [Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland). Hirslanden Medical Center

    2012-07-01

    Proton radiography and tomography was investigated since the early 1970s because of its low radiation dose, high density resolution and ability to image directly proton stopping power. However, spatial resolution is still a limiting factor and as a consequence experimental methods and image reconstruction should be optimized to improve position resolution. Methods: Spatial resolution of proton radiography and tomography is given by multiple Coloumb scattering (MCS) of the protons in the patient. In this paper we employ an improved MCS model to study the impact of various proton tomographic set-ups on the spatial resolution, such as different combinations of entrance and exit coordinate and angle measurements, respectively, initial particle energy and angular confusion of the incident proton field. Results: It was found that best spatial resolution is obtained by measuring in addition to the entrance and exit coordinates also the entrance and exit angles. However, by applying partial backprojection and by using a perfect proton fan beam a sufficient spatial resolution can be achieved with less experimental complexity (measuring only exit angles). It was also shown that it is essential to use the most probable proton trajectory to improve spatial resolution. A simple straight line connection for image reconstruction results in a spatial resolution which is not clinically sufficient. The percentage deterioration of spatial resolution due to the angular confusion of the incident proton field is less than the phase space in mrad. A clinically realistic proton beam with 10 mrad angular confusion results in a less than 10% loss of spatial resolution. Conclusions: Clinically sufficient spatial resolution can be either achieved with a full measurement of entrance and exit coordinates and angles, but also by using a fan beam with small angular confusion and an exit angle measurement. It is necessary to use the most probable proton path for image reconstruction. A simple

  5. Image Resolution Enhancement using DWT and Spatial Domain Interpolation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. G. Padma Priya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Image Resolution is one of the important quality metrics of images. Images with high resolution are required in many fields. In this paper, a new resolution enhancement technique is proposed based on the interpolation of four sub band images generated by Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT and the original Low Resolution (LR input image. In this technique, the four sub band images generated by DWT and the input LR image are interpolated with scaling factor, α and then performed inverse DWT to obtain the intermediate High Resolution (HR Image. The difference between the intermediate HR image and the interpolated LR input image is added to the intermediate HR image to obtain final output HR Image. Lanczos interpolation is used in this technique. The proposed technique is tested on well known bench mark images. The quantitative and visual results shows the superiority of the proposed technique over the conventional and state of art image resolution enhancement techniques in wavelet domain using haar wavelet filter.

  6. Using remote sensing products to classify landscape. A multi-spatial resolution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Llamas, Paula; Calvo, Leonor; Álvarez-Martínez, José Manuel; Suárez-Seoane, Susana

    2016-08-01

    The European Landscape Convention encourages the inventory and characterization of landscapes for environmental management and planning actions. Among the range of data sources available for landscape classification, remote sensing has substantial applicability, although difficulties might arise when available data are not at the spatial resolution of operational interest. We evaluated the applicability of two remote sensing products informing on land cover (the categorical CORINE map at 30 m resolution and the continuous NDVI spectral index at 1 km resolution) in landscape classification across a range of spatial resolutions (30 m, 90 m, 180 m, 1 km), using the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain) as study case. Separate landscape classifications (using topography, urban influence and land cover as inputs) were accomplished, one per each land cover dataset and spatial resolution. Classification accuracy was estimated through confusion matrixes and uncertainty in terms of both membership probability and confusion indices. Regarding landscape classifications based on CORINE, both typology and number of landscape classes varied across spatial resolutions. Classification accuracy increased from 30 m (the original resolution of CORINE) to 90m, decreasing towards coarser resolutions. Uncertainty followed the opposite pattern. In the case of landscape classifications based on NDVI, the identified landscape patterns were geographically structured and showed little sensitivity to changes across spatial resolutions. Only the change from 1 km (the original resolution of NDVI) to 180 m improved classification accuracy. The value of confusion indices increased with resolution. We highlight the need for greater effort in selecting data sources at the suitable spatial resolution, matching regional peculiarities and minimizing error and uncertainty.

  7. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sandra; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2016-09-09

    The pioneering work by Patrick H. O'Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry1975, 250, 4007-4021). The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O'Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  8. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  9. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Murphy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pioneering work by Patrick H. O’Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry 1975, 250, 4007–4021. The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O’Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  10. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of solid aluminum targets at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous-wave, Ti:Sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the continuous-wave laser at one transition. Time-delayed and gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate the resonantly-excited fluorescence emission from the thermally-excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable continuous-wave laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultra-high resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing continuous-wave laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods.

  11. An evaluation for spatial resolution, using a single target on a medical image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Sung [Dept. of Radiotechnology, Cheju Halla University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Hitherto, spatial resolution has commonly been evaluated by test patterns or phantoms built on some specific distances (from close to far) between two objects (or double targets). This evaluation method's shortcoming is that resolution is restricted to target distances of phantoms made for test. Therefore, in order to solve the problem, this study proposes and verifies a new method to efficiently test spatial resolution with a single target. For the research I used PSF and JND to propose an idea to measure spatial resolution. After that, I made experiments by commonly used phantoms to verify my new evaluation hypothesis inferred from the above method. To analyse the hypothesis, I used LabVIEW program and got a line pixel from digital image. The result was identical to my spatial-resolution hypothesis inferred from a single target. The findings of the experiment proves only a single target can be enough to relatively evaluate spatial resolution on a digital image. In other words, the limit of the traditional spatial-resolution evaluation method, based on double targets, can be overcome by my new evaluation one using a single target.

  12. Investigation of spatial resolution characteristics of an in vivo microcomputed tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Muhammad U. [Center for Biomedical engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Zhou, Zhongxing [Center for Biomedical engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); School of Precision and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ren, Liqiang; Wong, Molly; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin [Center for Biomedical engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Yang, Kai [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Biomedical engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    The spatial resolution characteristics of an in vivo microcomputed tomography (CT) system was investigated in the in-plane (x–y), cross plane (z) and projection imaging modes. The microCT system utilized in this study employs a flat panel detector with a 127 µm pixel pitch, a microfocus x-ray tube with a focal spot size ranging from 5–30 µm, and accommodates three geometric magnifications (M) of 1.72, 2.54 and 5.10. The in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) curves were measured as a function of the number of projections, geometric magnification (M), detector binning and reconstruction magnification (M{sub Recon}). The in plane cutoff frequency (10% MTF) ranged from 2.31 lp/mm (M=1.72, 2×2 binning) to 12.56 lp/mm (M=5.10, 1×1 binning) and a bar pattern phantom validated those measurements. A slight degradation in the spatial resolution was observed when comparing the image reconstruction with 511 and 918 projections, whose effect was visible at the lower frequencies. Small value of M{sub Recon} has little or no impact on the in-plane spatial resolution owning to a stable system. Large value of M{sub Recon} has implications on the spatial resolution and it was evident when comparing the bar pattern images reconstructed with M{sub Recon}=1.25 and 2.5. The cross plane MTF curves showed that the spatial resolution increased as the slice thickness decreased. The cutoff frequencies in the projection imaging mode yielded slightly higher values as compared to the in-plane and cross plane modes at all the geometric magnifications (M). At M=5.10, the cutoff resolution of the projection and cross plane on an ultra-high contrast resolution bar chip phantom were 14.9 lp/mm and 13–13.5 lp/mm. Due to the finite focal spot size of the x-ray tube, the detector blur and the reconstruction kernel functions, the system's spatial resolution does not reach the limiting spatial resolution as defined by the Nyquist's detector criteria with an ideal point source

  13. On numerical evaluation of two-dimensional phase integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessow, H.; Rusch, W.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    1975-01-01

    The relative advantages of several common numerical integration algorithms used in computing two-dimensional phase integrals are evaluated.......The relative advantages of several common numerical integration algorithms used in computing two-dimensional phase integrals are evaluated....

  14. A nanoporous two-dimensional polymer by single-crystal-to-single-crystal photopolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Patrick; Murray, Daniel J; Wulftange, William J; Catalano, Vincent J; King, Benjamin T

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the wide number and variety of available synthetic routes to conventional linear polymers, the synthesis of two-dimensional polymers and unambiguous proof of their structure remains a challenge. Two-dimensional polymers-single-layered polymers that form a tiling network in exactly two dimensions-have potential for use in nanoporous membranes and other applications. Here, we report the preparation of a fluorinated hydrocarbon two-dimensional polymer that can be exfoliated into single sheets, and its characterization by high-resolution single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The procedure involves three steps: preorganization in a lamellar crystal of a rigid monomer bearing three photoreactive arms, photopolymerization of the crystalline monomers by [4 + 4] cycloaddition, and isolation of individual two-dimensional polymer sheets. This polymer is a molecularly thin (~1 nm) material that combines precisely defined monodisperse pores of ~9 Å with a high pore density of 3.3 × 10(13) pores cm(-2). Atomic-resolution single-crystal X-ray structures of the monomer, an intermediate dimer and the final crystalline two-dimensional polymer were obtained and prove the single-crystal-to-single-crystal nature and molecular precision of the two-dimensional photopolymerization.

  15. Modelling and Interpreting The Effects of Spatial Resolution on Solar Magnetic Field Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Leka, KD

    2011-01-01

    Different methods for simulating the effects of spatial resolution on magnetic field maps are compared, including those commonly used for inter-instrument comparisons. The investigation first uses synthetic data, and the results are confirmed with {\\it Hinode}/SpectroPolarimeter data. Four methods are examined, one which manipulates the Stokes spectra to simulate spatial-resolution degradation, and three "post-facto" methods where the magnetic field maps are manipulated directly. Throughout, statistical comparisons of the degraded maps with the originals serve to quantify the outcomes. Overall, we find that areas with inferred magnetic fill fractions close to unity may be insensitive to optical spatial resolution; areas of sub-unity fill fractions are very sensitive. Trends with worsening spatial resolution can include increased average field strength, lower total flux, and a field vector oriented closer to the line of sight. Further-derived quantities such as vertical current density show variations even in ...

  16. High spatial resolution zonal wavefront reconstruction with improved initial value determination scheme for lateral shearing interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fengzhao; Tang, Feng; Wang, Xiangzhao; Sasaki, Osami; Zhang, Min

    2013-06-10

    In a recent paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 29, 2038 (2012)], we proposed a generalized high spatial resolution zonal wavefront reconstruction method for lateral shearing interferometry. The test wavefront can be reconstructed with high spatial resolution by using linear interpolation on a subgrid for initial values estimation. In the current paper, we utilize the difference between the Zernike polynomial fitting method and linear interpolation in determining the subgrid initial values. The validity of the proposed method is investigated through comparison with the previous high spatial resolution zonal method. Simulation results show that the proposed method is more accurate and more stable to shear ratios compared with the previous method. A comprehensive comparison of the properties of the proposed method, the previous high spatial resolution zonal method, and the modal method is performed.

  17. An evaluation of spatial resolution of a prototype proton CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Tia E; Bashkirov, V; Giacometti, V; Hurley, R F; Johnson, R P; Piersimoni, P; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schulte, R W; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the spatial resolution of proton CT using both a prototype proton CT scanner and Monte Carlo simulations. A custom cylindrical edge phantom containing twelve tissue-equivalent inserts with four different compositions at varying radial displacements from the axis of rotation was developed for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a prototype proton CT scanner. Two scans of the phantom, centered on the axis of rotation, were obtained with a 200 MeV, low-intensity proton beam: one scan with steps of 4°, and one scan with the phantom continuously rotating. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the phantom scan were performed using scanners idealized to various degrees. The data were reconstructed using an iterative projection method with added total variation superiorization based on individual proton histories. Edge spread functions in the radial and azimuthal directions were obtained using the oversampling technique. These were then used to obtain the modulation transfer functions. The spatial resolution was defined by the 10% value of the modulation transfer function (MTF10%) in units of line pairs per centimeter (lp/cm). Data from the simulations were used to better understand the contributions of multiple Coulomb scattering in the phantom and the scanner hardware, as well as the effect of discretization of proton location. The radial spatial resolution of the prototype proton CT scanner depends on the total path length, W, of the proton in the phantom, whereas the azimuthal spatial resolution depends both on W and the position, u-, at which the most-likely path uncertainty is evaluated along the path. For protons contributing to radial spatial resolution, W varies with the radial position of the edge, whereas for protons contributing to azimuthal spatial resolution, W is approximately constant. For a pixel size of 0.625 mm, the radial spatial resolution of the image reconstructed from the fully idealized simulation data ranged between

  18. Multiwavelength fiber lasers based on spatial mode beating for high resolution linear and angular displacement sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan-Kuang; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Cheng, Wood-Hi; Guo, Tuan; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate multiwavelength fiber lasers by incorporating the micro Michelson interferometer with spatial mode beating phenomenon, which comes from the interferences among cladding modes, into ring cavity for high resolution linear and angular displacement sensing.

  19. Improving spatial resolution in fiber Raman distributed temperature sensor by using deconvolution algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang; Xue Feng; Wei Zhang; Xiaoming Liu

    2009-01-01

    The deconvolution algorithm is adopted on the fiber Raman distributed temperature sensor (FRDTS) to improve the spatial resolution without reducing the pulse width of the light source. Numerical simulation shows that the spatial resolution is enhanced by four times using the frequency-domain deconvolution algorithm with high temperature accuracy. In experiment, a spatial resolution of 15 m is realized using a master oscillator power amplifier light source with 300-ns pulse width. In addition, the dispersion-induced limitation of the minimum spatial resolution achieved by deconvolution algorithm is analyzed. The results indicate that the deconvolution algorithm is a beneficial complement for the FRDTS to realize accurate locating and temperature monitoring for sharp temperature variations.

  20. Single-acquisition method for simultaneous determination of extrinsic gamma-camera sensitivity and spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.A.M. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil do Porto, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: a.miranda@portugalmail.pt; Sarmento, S. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil do Porto, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Alves, P.; Torres, M.C. [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Bastos, A.L. [Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil do Porto, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Ponte, F. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil do Porto, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)

    2008-01-15

    A new method for measuring simultaneously both the extrinsic sensitivity and spatial resolution of a gamma-camera in a single planar acquisition was implemented. A dual-purpose phantom (SR phantom; sensitivity/resolution) was developed, tested and the results compared with other conventional methods used for separate determination of these two important image quality parameters. The SR phantom yielded reproducible and accurate results, allowing an immediate visual inspection of the spatial resolution as well as the quantitative determination of the contrast for six different spatial frequencies. It also proved to be useful in the estimation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the image formation collimator/detector system at six different frequencies and can be used to estimate the spatial resolution as function of the direction relative to the digital matrix of the detector.

  1. Doubling the resolution of spatial-light-modulator-based differential interference contrast microscopy by structured illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianling; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2013-09-01

    Recently developed spatial light modulator (SLM)-based differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy [Opt. Lett. 34, 2988 (2009)] reveals flexibility on the implementation of DIC imaging. However, its numerical aperture (spatial resolution) is limited to maintain sufficient interference contrast, because it requires two beams to interfere. We present a structured illumination (SI) SLM-based DIC microscopy to effectively improve the lateral resolution of the SLM-based DIC microscopy. The SI field is generated and controlled by an adjustable grating displayed on an SLM. The SI SLM-based DIC expands the bandwidth of the coherent transfer function of the SLM-based DIC imaging system, thus improving the spatial resolution. The reconstructed SI SLM-based DIC image exhibits lateral resolution of approximately 208 nm, doubling that of the common SLM-based DIC image (approximately 415 nm). SI SLM-based DIC microscopy has the potential for achieving high-resolution quantitative phase images.

  2. Passive Standoff Super Resolution Imaging using Spatial-Spectral Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    with a Fourier transform spectrometer, requiring the FTAS system to operate in the near - infrared , which need only effect the coatings and FPE...A. Cook, and J. Hair, “ System analysis of a tilted field-widened Michelson interferometer for high spectral resolution lidar ”, Opt. Expr. Vol. 20, No...General Fabry-Perot System ................................................ 48 2.6 Tolerancing and Aberrations

  3. Perspective: Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in complex systems. The 2DRR method can leverage electronic resonance enhancement to selectively probe chromophores embedded in complex environments (e.g., a cofactor in a protein). In addition, correlations between the two dimensions of the 2DRR spectrum reveal information that is not available in traditional Raman techniques. For example, distributions of reactant and product geometries can be correlated in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this perspective article, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide and myoglobin. We also address key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies. Most notably, it has been shown that these two techniques are subject to a tradeoff between sensitivity to anharmonicity and susceptibility to artifacts. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest great potential for the future of the technique.

  4. Janus spectra in two-dimensional flows

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    In theory, large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows and other two-dimensional flows may host two distinct types of turbulent energy spectra---in one, $\\alpha$, the spectral exponent of velocity fluctuations, equals $3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the small scales, and in the other, $\\alpha=5/3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the large scales---but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed $\\alpha = 3$. Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which $\\alpha$ has transitioned from $3$ to $5/3$ for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to $3$ for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows...

  5. Comparative Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Doreen; König, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional comparative fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) uses an internal standard to increase the reproducibility of coordinate assignment for protein spots visualized on 2D polyacrylamide gels. This is particularly important for samples, which need to be compared without the availability of replicates and thus cannot be studied using differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE). CoFGE corrects for gel-to-gel variability by co-running with the sample proteome a standardized marker grid of 80-100 nodes, which is formed by a set of purified proteins. Differentiation of reference and analyte is possible by the use of two fluorescent dyes. Variations in the y-dimension (molecular weight) are corrected by the marker grid. For the optional control of the x-dimension (pI), azo dyes can be used. Experiments are possible in both vertical and horizontal (h) electrophoresis devices, but hCoFGE is much easier to perform. For data analysis, commercial software capable of warping can be adapted.

  6. Two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors beyond graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-12-01

    The rapid and successful development of the research on graphene and graphene-based nanostructures has been substantially enlarged to include many other two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors (THS): phosphorene, silicene, germanene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2 as well as the van der Waals heterostructures of various THSs (including graphene). The present article is a review of recent works on THSs beyond graphene and van der Waals heterostructures composed of different pairs of all THSs. One among the priorities of new THSs compared to graphene is the presence of a non-vanishing energy bandgap which opened up the ability to fabricate a large number of electronic, optoelectronic and photonic devices on the basis of these new materials and their van der Waals heterostructures. Moreover, a significant progress in the research on TMDCs was the discovery of valley degree of freedom. The results of research on valley degree of freedom and the development of a new technology based on valley degree of freedom-valleytronics are also presented. Thus the scientific contents of the basic research and practical applications os THSs are very rich and extremely promising.

  7. Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals: Disorder Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Markus R; Graczykowski, Bartlomiej; Reparaz, Juan Sebastian; El Sachat, Alexandros; Sledzinska, Marianna; Alzina, Francesc; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M

    2016-09-14

    The design and fabrication of phononic crystals (PnCs) hold the key to control the propagation of heat and sound at the nanoscale. However, there is a lack of experimental studies addressing the impact of order/disorder on the phononic properties of PnCs. Here, we present a comparative investigation of the influence of disorder on the hypersonic and thermal properties of two-dimensional PnCs. PnCs of ordered and disordered lattices are fabricated of circular holes with equal filling fractions in free-standing Si membranes. Ultrafast pump and probe spectroscopy (asynchronous optical sampling) and Raman thermometry based on a novel two-laser approach are used to study the phononic properties in the gigahertz (GHz) and terahertz (THz) regime, respectively. Finite element method simulations of the phonon dispersion relation and three-dimensional displacement fields furthermore enable the unique identification of the different hypersonic vibrations. The increase of surface roughness and the introduction of short-range disorder are shown to modify the phonon dispersion and phonon coherence in the hypersonic (GHz) range without affecting the room-temperature thermal conductivity. On the basis of these findings, we suggest a criteria for predicting phonon coherence as a function of roughness and disorder.

  8. Two-dimensional topological photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Chen; He, Cheng; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Shi-Ning; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-09-01

    The topological phase of matter, originally proposed and first demonstrated in fermionic electronic systems, has drawn considerable research attention in the past decades due to its robust transport of edge states and its potential with respect to future quantum information, communication, and computation. Recently, searching for such a unique material phase in bosonic systems has become a hot research topic worldwide. So far, many bosonic topological models and methods for realizing them have been discovered in photonic systems, acoustic systems, mechanical systems, etc. These discoveries have certainly yielded vast opportunities in designing material phases and related properties in the topological domain. In this review, we first focus on some of the representative photonic topological models and employ the underlying Dirac model to analyze the edge states and geometric phase. On the basis of these models, three common types of two-dimensional topological photonic systems are discussed: 1) photonic quantum Hall effect with broken time-reversal symmetry; 2) photonic topological insulator and the associated pseudo-time-reversal symmetry-protected mechanism; 3) time/space periodically modulated photonic Floquet topological insulator. Finally, we provide a summary and extension of this emerging field, including a brief introduction to the Weyl point in three-dimensional systems.

  9. Radiation effects on two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R.C. II; Robinson, J.A. [Department of Materials Science, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Center for Two-Dimensional Layered Materials, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Shi, T. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Silva, E.C. [GlobalFoundries, Malta, NY (United States); Jovanovic, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The effects of electromagnetic and particle irradiation on two-dimensional materials (2DMs) are discussed in this review. Radiation creates defects that impact the structure and electronic performance of materials. Determining the impact of these defects is important for developing 2DM-based devices for use in high-radiation environments, such as space or nuclear reactors. As such, most experimental studies have been focused on determining total ionizing dose damage to 2DMs and devices. Total dose experiments using X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, protons, and heavy ions are summarized in this review. We briefly discuss the possibility of investigating single event effects in 2DMs based on initial ion beam irradiation experiments and the development of 2DM-based integrated circuits. Additionally, beneficial uses of irradiation such as ion implantation to dope materials or electron-beam and helium-beam etching to shape materials have begun to be used on 2DMs and are reviewed as well. For non-ionizing radiation, such as low-energy photons, we review the literature on 2DM-based photo-detection from terahertz to UV. The majority of photo-detecting devices operate in the visible and UV range, and for this reason they are the focus of this review. However, we review the progress in developing 2DMs for detecting infrared and terahertz radiation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Photodetectors based on two dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lou; Zhongzhu, Liang; Guozhen, Shen

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with unique properties have received a great deal of attention in recent years. This family of materials has rapidly established themselves as intriguing building blocks for versatile nanoelectronic devices that offer promising potential for use in next generation optoelectronics, such as photodetectors. Furthermore, their optoelectronic performance can be adjusted by varying the number of layers. They have demonstrated excellent light absorption, enabling ultrafast and ultrasensitive detection of light in photodetectors, especially in their single-layer structure. Moreover, due to their atomic thickness, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and large breaking strength, these materials have been of great interest for use in flexible devices and strain engineering. Toward that end, several kinds of photodetectors based on 2D materials have been reported. Here, we present a review of the state-of-the-art in photodetectors based on graphene and other 2D materials, such as the graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and so on. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61377033, 61574132, 61504136) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Asymptotics for Two-dimensional Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Phan Thanh; Portmann, Fabian; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E^{\\TF}(\\lambd......We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E......^{\\TF}(\\lambda)$ is given by a Thomas-Fermi type variational problem and $c^{\\rm H}\\approx -2.2339$ is an explicit constant. We also show that the radius of a two-dimensional neutral atom is unbounded when $Z\\to \\infty$, which is contrary to the expected behavior of three-dimensional atoms....

  12. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics.

  13. Large scale instabilities in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta; Celani; Prandi

    2000-04-01

    The stability of a sheared magnetic field is analyzed in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with resistive and viscous dissipation. Using a multiple-scale analysis, it is shown that at large enough Reynolds numbers the basic state describing a motionless fluid and a layered magnetic field, becomes unstable with respect to large scale perturbations. The exact expressions for eddy-viscosity and eddy-resistivity are derived in the nearby of the critical point where the instability sets in. In this marginally unstable case the nonlinear phase of perturbation growth obeys to a Cahn-Hilliard-like dynamics characterized by coalescence of magnetic islands leading to a final new equilibrium state. High resolution numerical simulations confirm quantitatively the predictions of multiscale analysis.

  14. Equation of State of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Eugenio; Miller, Luke A.; Drewes, Jan H.; Koschorreck, Marco; Pertot, Daniel; Brennecke, Ferdinand; Köhl, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The subtle interplay between kinetic energy, interactions, and dimensionality challenges our comprehension of strongly correlated physics observed, for example, in the solid state. In this quest, the Hubbard model has emerged as a conceptually simple, yet rich model describing such physics. Here we present an experimental determination of the equation of state of the repulsive two-dimensional Hubbard model over a broad range of interactions 0 ≲U /t ≲20 and temperatures, down to kBT /t =0.63 (2 ) using high-resolution imaging of ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices. We show density profiles, compressibilities, and double occupancies over the whole doping range, and, hence, our results constitute benchmarks for state-of-the-art theoretical approaches.

  15. Spatial Resolution and Detectability Limits in Thin-Film X-Ray Microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Lyman, C. E.; Zhang, Jing

    1990-01-01

    The major advantages of performing x-ray microanalysis in the analytical electron microscope (AEM) are the high compositional spatial resolution and the elemental analysis sensitivity. Unfortunately, there is usually a trade-off between these two advantages. This paper discusses the factors involved in the optimization of both spatial resolution and sensitivity during x-ray microanalysis and shows the results of such optimization experiments for several AEM instruments.

  16. Optimizing spatial resolution with the mechanical design of an X-ray computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lowell D.; Bernardi, Richard T.; Hughes, Simon H. C.; Slocum, Robert E.

    The most important factor limiting spatial resolution in a well-designed CT scanner - the width of the X-ray beam as it passes through the object being examined - is described. The Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS), a second-generation CT scanner that has a variable geometry to allow a wide variety of objects to be scanned at peak spatial resolution, even with different radiation sources, is described.

  17. Symmetry breaking of solitons in two-dimensional complex potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jianke

    2014-01-01

    Symmetry breaking is reported for continuous families of solitons in the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with a two-dimensional complex potential. This symmetry-breaking bifurcation is forbidden in generic complex potentials. However, for a special class of partially parity-time-symmetric potentials, such symmetry breaking is allowed. At the bifurcation point, two branches of asymmetric solitons bifurcate out from the base branch of symmetry-unbroken solitons. Stability of these solitons near the bifurcation point are also studied, and two novel stability properties for the bifurcated asymmetric solitons are revealed. One is that at the bifurcation point, zero and simple imaginary linear-stability eigenvalues of asymmetric solitons can move directly into the complex plane and create oscillatory instability. The other is that the two bifurcated asymmetric solitons, even though having identical powers and being related to each other by spatial mirror reflection, can possess different types of unstable eigenval...

  18. Dielectric-barrier discharges in two-dimensional lattice potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Josiah

    2011-01-01

    We use a pin-grid electrode to introduce a corrugated electrical potential into a planar dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) system, so that the amplitude of the applied electric field has the profile of a two-dimensional square lattice. The lattice potential provides a template for the spatial distribution of plasma filaments in the system and has pronounced effects on the patterns that can form. The positions at which filaments become localized within the lattice unit cell vary with the width of the discharge gap. The patterns that appear when filaments either overfill or under-fill the lattice are reminiscent of those observed in other physical systems involving 2d lattices. We suggest that the connection between lattice-driven DBDs and other areas of physics may benefit from the further development of models that treat plasma filaments as interacting particles.

  19. Approaches to verification of two-dimensional water quality models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butkus, S.R. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (USA). Water Quality Dept.)

    1990-11-01

    The verification of a water quality model is the one procedure most needed by decision making evaluating a model predictions, but is often not adequate or done at all. The results of a properly conducted verification provide the decision makers with an estimate of the uncertainty associated with model predictions. Several statistical tests are available for quantifying of the performance of a model. Six methods of verification were evaluated using an application of the BETTER two-dimensional water quality model for Chickamauga reservoir. Model predictions for ten state variables were compared to observed conditions from 1989. Spatial distributions of the verification measures showed the model predictions were generally adequate, except at a few specific locations in the reservoir. The most useful statistics were the mean standard error of the residuals. Quantifiable measures of model performance should be calculated during calibration and verification of future applications of the BETTER model. 25 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Two-dimensional wave propagation in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Quezada de Luna, Manuel

    2014-09-16

    We study two-dimensional wave propagation in materials whose properties vary periodically in one direction only. High order homogenization is carried out to derive a dispersive effective medium approximation. One-dimensional materials with constant impedance exhibit no effective dispersion. We show that a new kind of effective dispersion may arise in two dimensions, even in materials with constant impedance. This dispersion is a macroscopic effect of microscopic diffraction caused by spatial variation in the sound speed. We analyze this dispersive effect by using highorder homogenization to derive an anisotropic, dispersive effective medium. We generalize to two dimensions a homogenization approach that has been used previously for one-dimensional problems. Pseudospectral solutions of the effective medium equations agree to high accuracy with finite volume direct numerical simulations of the variable-coeffi cient equations.

  1. Scaling Effect of Area-Averaged NDVI: Monotonicity along the Spatial Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Yoshioka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the spatial distributions of vegetation across the globe are routinely monitored by satellite remote sensing, in which the reflectance spectra over land surface areas are measured with spatial and temporal resolutions that depend on the satellite instrumentation. The use of multiple synchronized satellite sensors permits long-term monitoring with high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, differences in the spatial resolution of images collected by different sensors can introduce systematic biases, called scaling effects, into the biophysical retrievals. This study investigates the mechanism by which the scaling effects distort normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI. This study focused on the monotonicity of the area-averaged NDVI as a function of the spatial resolution. A monotonic relationship was proved analytically by using the resolution transform model proposed in this study in combination with a two-endmember linear mixture model. The monotonicity allowed the inherent uncertainties introduced by the scaling effects (error bounds to be explicitly determined by averaging the retrievals at the extrema of theresolutions. Error bounds could not be estimated, on the other hand, for non-monotonic relationships. Numerical simulations were conducted to demonstrate the monotonicity of the averaged NDVI along spatial resolution. This study provides a theoretical basis for the scaling effects and develops techniques for rectifying the scaling effects in biophysical retrievals to facilitate cross-sensor calibration for the long-term monitoring of vegetation dynamics.

  2. Position dependent spatial and spectral resolution measurement of distributed readout superconducting imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Verhoeve, P.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Martin, D. D. E.; Wigmore, J. K.; Jerjen, I.; Venn, R.; Groot, P. J.

    2008-04-01

    We present direct measurements of spatial and spectral resolution of cryogenic distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs). The spatial and spectral resolutions have been experimentally determined by scanning a 10μm spot of monochromatic visible light across the detector. The influences of the photon energy, bias voltage, and absorber length and width on the spatial and spectral resolutions have been examined. The confinement of quasiparticles in the readout sensors (superconducting tunnel junctions) as well as the detector's signal amplitude can be optimized by tuning the bias voltage, thereby improving both the spatial and spectral resolutions. Changing the length of the absorber affects the spatial and spectral resolutions in opposite manner, making it an important parameter to optimize the DROID for the application at hand. The results have been used to test expressions for photon energy, position, and spatial and spectral resolutions which have been derived by using an existing one-dimensional model. The model is found to accurately describe the experimental data, but some limitations have been identified. In particular, the model's assumption that the two sensors have identical response characteristics and noise, the approximation of the detailed quasiparticle dynamics in the sensors by border conditions, and the use of a one-dimensional diffusion process is not always adequate.

  3. Calculation of the spatial resolution in two-photon absorption spectroscopy applied to plasma diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011-Valladolid (Spain); Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Óptica “Daza de Valdés,” CSIC, 28006-Madrid (Spain); Fuentes, L. M. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011-Valladolid (Spain); Grützmacher, K.; Pérez, C., E-mail: concha@opt.uva.es; Rosa, M. I. de la [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011-Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-10-07

    We report a detailed characterization of the spatial resolution provided by two-photon absorption spectroscopy suited for plasma diagnosis via the 1S-2S transition of atomic hydrogen for optogalvanic detection and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). A precise knowledge of the spatial resolution is crucial for a correct interpretation of measurements, if the plasma parameters to be analysed undergo strong spatial variations. The present study is based on a novel approach which provides a reliable and realistic determination of the spatial resolution. Measured irradiance distribution of laser beam waists in the overlap volume, provided by a high resolution UV camera, are employed to resolve coupled rate equations accounting for two-photon excitation, fluorescence decay and ionization. The resulting three-dimensional yield distributions reveal in detail the spatial resolution for optogalvanic and LIF detection and related saturation due to depletion. Two-photon absorption profiles broader than the Fourier transform-limited laser bandwidth are also incorporated in the calculations. The approach allows an accurate analysis of the spatial resolution present in recent and future measurements.

  4. Enhancing effect of phase coherence factor for improvement of spatial resolution in ultrasonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Spatial resolution is one of the important factors that determines ultrasound image quality. In the present study, methods using the phase variance of ultrasonic echoes received by individual transducer elements have been examined for improvement of spatial resolution. An imaging method, i.e., phase coherence imaging, which uses the phase coherence factor (PCF) obtained from the phase variance of received ultrasonic echoes, was recently proposed. Spatial resolution is improved by weighting ultrasonic RF signals obtained by delay-and-sum (DAS) beam forming using PCF. In the present study, alternative PCFs, i.e., exponential PCF, harmonic PCF, and Gaussian PCF, have been proposed and examined for further improvement of spatial resolution. Spatial resolutions realized by the proposed PCFs were evaluated by an experiment using a phantom. The full widths at half maxima of the lateral profiles of an echo from a string phantom were 2.61 mm (DAS only), 1.46 mm (conventional PCF), and 0.48-0.62 mm (proposed PCFs). The PCFs newly proposed in the present study showed better spatial resolutions than the conventional PCF. The proposed PCFs also realized better visualization of echoes from a diffuse scattering medium than the conventional PCF.

  5. The spatial resolution of silicon-based electron detectors in {beta}-autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabello, Jorge; Wells, Kevin [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jcabello@ific.uv.es, E-mail: k.wells@surrey.ac.uk

    2010-03-21

    Thin tissue autoradiography is an imaging modality where ex-vivo tissue sections are placed in direct contact with autoradiographic film. These tissue sections contain a radiolabelled ligand bound to a specific biomolecule under study. This radioligand emits {beta} - or {beta}+ particles ionizing silver halide crystals in the film. High spatial resolution autoradiograms are obtained using low energy radioisotopes, such as {sup 3}H where an intrinsic 0.1-1 {mu}m spatial resolution can be achieved. Several digital alternatives have been presented over the past few years to replace conventional film but their spatial resolution has yet to equal film, although silicon-based imaging technologies have demonstrated higher sensitivity compared to conventional film. It will be shown in this work how pixel size is a critical parameter for achieving high spatial resolution for low energy uncollimated beta imaging. In this work we also examine the confounding factors impeding silicon-based technologies with respect to spatial resolution. The study considers charge diffusion in silicon and detector noise, and this is applied to a range of radioisotopes typically used in autoradiography. Finally an optimal detector geometry to obtain the best possible spatial resolution for a specific technology and a specific radioisotope is suggested.

  6. SU-E-T-415: An Ionization Chamber Array with High Spatial Resolution for External Beam Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togno, M [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck (Germany); Wilkens, J [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Menichelli, D [IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize an ionization chamber array technology with high spatial resolution and high charge collection efficiency for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers developed by IBA Dosimetry, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5mm spatial resolution and 4mm{sup 3} sensitive volume. The detector was characterized in a plastic phantom with {sup 60} Co radiation and MV X-rays from an ELEKTA Agility LINAC (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Bias voltage was varied in order to evaluate charge collection efficiency. A commercial array of ionization chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration were used as references. Results: Repeatability (0.4%) and stability under continuous gamma irradiation (0.3%) are very good, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200pC/Gy). Charge collection efficiency is higher than 99% already at 150V with ∼2mGy dose per pulse, leading to a ±1.1% sensitivity change with dose per pulse in the range 0.09-2mGy (covering all flattened and unflattened applications). Measured dose profiles are in agreement with MatriXX for fields larger than 2×2cm{sup 2}, in which case the linear array offers a much better characterization of the penumbra region. Down to 1×1cm{sup 2}, measured profiles are in very good agreement with the flat panel. Conclusion: The array represents a valuable tool for the characterization of treatment fields in which high spatial resolution is required, together with the dosimetric performance of air vented ionization chambers. Such a technology would be particularly valuable in association with advanced treatment modalities such as rotational radiotherapy, stereotactic treatments (even with unflattened beam qualities) and proton therapy, due to the insensitivity of the chambers on dose per pulse. In the future, a two dimensional prototype based on this

  7. Two-dimensional Talbot self-imaging via Electromagnetically induced lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Wang, Wei; Ahmed, Irfan; Wang, Hongxing; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng; Mahesar, Abdul Rasheed; Xiao, Min

    2017-02-01

    We propose a lensless optical method for imaging two-dimensional ultra-cold atoms (or molecules) in which the image can be non-locally observed by coincidence recording of entangled photon pairs. In particular, we focus on the transverse and longitudinal resolutions of images under various scanning methods. In addition, the role of the induced nonmaterial lattice on the image contrast is investigated. Our work shows a non-destructive and lensless way to image ultra-cold atoms or molecules that can be further used for two-dimensional atomic super-resolution optical testing and sub-wavelength lithography.

  8. Modelling the soil microclimate: does the spatial or temporal resolution of input parameters matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of predicting future impacts of environmental change on vulnerable populations is advancing the development of spatially explicit habitat models. Continental-scale climate and microclimate layers are now widely available. However, most terrestrial organisms exist within microclimate spaces that are very small, relative to the spatial resolution of those layers. We examined the effects of multi-resolution, multi-extent topographic and climate inputs on the accuracy of hourly soil temperature predictions for a small island generated at a very high spatial resolution (<1 m2 using the mechanistic microclimate model in NicheMapR. Achieving an accuracy comparable to lower-resolution, continental-scale microclimate layers (within about 2–3°C of observed values required the use of daily weather data as well as high resolution topographic layers (elevation, slope, aspect, horizon angles, while inclusion of site-specific soil properties did not markedly improve predictions. Our results suggest that large-extent microclimate layers may not provide accurate estimates of microclimate conditions when the spatial extent of a habitat or other area of interest is similar to or smaller than the spatial resolution of the layers themselves. Thus, effort in sourcing model inputs should be focused on obtaining high resolution terrain data, e.g., via LiDAR or photogrammetry, and local weather information rather than in situ sampling of microclimate characteristics.

  9. Impact of spatial resolution of ocean models in depicting climate change patterns of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Nikesh; Klein, Birgit; Mathis, Moritz; Klein, Holger; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The impact of enhanced spatial resolution of models in simulating large scale climate change has been of interest for the modeling community for quite some time. It has been noticed in previous studies that the pattern of Sea Surface Temperature anomalies are better captured by higher resolution models. Significant changes in simulating sea-ice loss associated with global warming was also noticed when the spatial resolution of climate models were enhanced. Spatial resolution is a particular important issue in climate change scenarios of shelf seas such as the North Sea. The North Sea is strongly influenced by its water mass exchanges with North Atlantic to the west and north and Baltic Sea to east. Furthermore, local forcing and changes in advected water masses significantly affect the thermodynamics and stratification patterns in the North Sea, making it a challenging area to study. Under the newly started RACE2 project we are looking at global simulations of Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios 4.5 and 8.5 at lower and higher resolutions, performed using the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPIESM). The model resolution is non uniform and achieves the highest resolution over the European Seas by shifting the model poles over Chicago and Central Europe. In the high resolution run, the grid reaches up to a spatial resolution of up to 4 km in part of the German Bight and close to 20 km in the Northern part of North Sea. The placement of model poles at specific locations enables the global model to obtain higher resolution at regional scales (North Sea), without the inherent complications of open boundary conditions. High and low resolution simulations will be compared to determine differences in spatial and temporal pattern of temperature anomalies, fresh water intrusion from the Baltic Sea to North Sea etc. Also taken into consideration will be the changes in simulating local sea level change and response to basin scale oscillations like NAO.

  10. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm{sup 3} uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (2 mm){sup 3} in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (9 mm){sup 3}. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm){sup 3} even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm){sup 3} cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial

  11. Impact of precipitation spatial resolution on the hydrological response of an integrated distributed water resources model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Suhua; Sonnenborg, Torben; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2011-01-01

    was analyzed in the Alergaarde catchment in Denmark. Six different precipitation spatial resolutions were used as inputs to a physically based, distributed hydrological model, the MIKE SHE model. The results showed that the resolution of precipitation input had no apparent effect on annual water balance...

  12. Spatial resolution of the HRRT PET scanner using 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild;

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) dedicated brain PET scanner installed at Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet) was measured using a point-source phantom with high statistics. Further, it was demonstrated how the newly developed 3D-OSEM PSF...

  13. Whole-animal functional and developmental imaging with isotropic spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav K; Amat, Fernando; Wan, Yinan; Höckendorf, Burkhard; Lemon, William C; Keller, Philipp J

    2015-12-01

    Imaging fast cellular dynamics across large specimens requires high resolution in all dimensions, high imaging speeds, good physical coverage and low photo-damage. To meet these requirements, we developed isotropic multiview (IsoView) light-sheet microscopy, which rapidly images large specimens via simultaneous light-sheet illumination and fluorescence detection along four orthogonal directions. Combining these four views by means of high-throughput multiview deconvolution yields images with high resolution in all three dimensions. We demonstrate whole-animal functional imaging of Drosophila larvae at a spatial resolution of 1.1-2.5 μm and temporal resolution of 2 Hz for several hours. We also present spatially isotropic whole-brain functional imaging in Danio rerio larvae and spatially isotropic multicolor imaging of fast cellular dynamics across gastrulating Drosophila embryos. Compared with conventional light-sheet microscopy, IsoView microscopy improves spatial resolution at least sevenfold and decreases resolution anisotropy at least threefold. Compared with existing high-resolution light-sheet techniques, IsoView microscopy effectively doubles the penetration depth and provides subsecond temporal resolution for specimens 400-fold larger than could previously be imaged.

  14. Spatial resolution is dependent on image content for SPECT with iterative reconstruction incorporating distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Daniel; Barnden, Leighton

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the dependence of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) spatial resolution on the content of images for iterative reconstruction with distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction. An experiment was performed using a perturbation technique to measure change in resolution of line sources in simple and complex images with iterative reconstruction with increasing iteration. Projections of the line sources were reconstructed alone and again after the addition of projections of a uniform flood or a complex phantom. An alternative experiment used images of a realistic brain phantom and evaluated an effective spatial resolution by matching the images to the digital version of the phantom convolved with 3D Gaussian kernels. The experiments were performed using ordered subset expectation maximisation iterative reconstruction with and without the use of DDR correction. The results show a significant difference in reconstructed resolution between images of line sources depending on the content of the added image. The full width at half maximum of images of a line source reconstructed using DDR correction increased by 20-30 % when the added image was complex. Without DDR this difference was much smaller and disappeared with increasing iteration. Reported SPECT resolution should be taken as indicative only with regard to clinical imaging if the measurement is made using a point or line source alone and an iterative reconstruction algorithm is used.

  15. Spatial covariance reconstructive (SCORE) super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Sun, Mingzhai; Lin, Pei-Hui; Ma, Jianjie; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful tool to resolve structural information that is not accessible to traditional diffraction-limited imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) are promising super-resolution techniques due to their relative ease of implementation and instrumentation on standard microscopes. However, the application of STORM is critically limited by its long sampling time. Several recent works have been focused on improving the STORM imaging speed by making use of the information from emitters with overlapping point spread functions (PSF). In this work, we present a fast and efficient algorithm that takes into account the blinking statistics of independent fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging. Our method is insensitive to background and can be applied to different types of fluorescence sources, including but not limited to the organic dyes and quantum dots that we demonstrate in this work.

  16. Spatial covariance reconstructive (SCORE super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Deng

    Full Text Available Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful tool to resolve structural information that is not accessible to traditional diffraction-limited imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM and photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM are promising super-resolution techniques due to their relative ease of implementation and instrumentation on standard microscopes. However, the application of STORM is critically limited by its long sampling time. Several recent works have been focused on improving the STORM imaging speed by making use of the information from emitters with overlapping point spread functions (PSF. In this work, we present a fast and efficient algorithm that takes into account the blinking statistics of independent fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging. Our method is insensitive to background and can be applied to different types of fluorescence sources, including but not limited to the organic dyes and quantum dots that we demonstrate in this work.

  17. Super Resolution from Hyperview Image Stack by Spatial Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2016-09-01

    An image stack for a hyperview representation could contain millions of different perspective views with extreme image similarity. The recording of all views from a computational 3d model implicates a lateral displacement of the virtual camera. Because of the huge number of views, the offset in between two adjoining camera positions can be very minor. If such a virtual setup reproduces a real hyperview screen setup, the offset can be below the wavelength of the visible light. But even with such small changes, there is an intrinsic probability for a measurable difference in between two neighbour images. Such image dissimilarity can be proofed successfully also in very basic 3d scenes. By using a quantity of juxtapositional images from the hyperview image stack, the resolution of the rendered images can be considerably improved, which is commonly known as super resolution. The utilisation of super resolution images in hyperview could cut the necessity of full frame computing and will reduce the effective render time.

  18. Interaction of two-dimensional magnetoexcitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumanov, E. V.; Podlesny, I. V.; Moskalenko, S. A.; Liberman, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    We study interaction of the two-dimensional magnetoexcitons with in-plane wave vector k→∥ = 0 , taking into account the influence of the excited Landau levels (ELLs) and of the external electric field perpendicular to the surface of the quantum well and parallel to the external magnetic field. It is shown that the account of the ELLs gives rise to the repulsion between the spinless magnetoexcitons with k→∥ = 0 in the Fock approximation, with the interaction constant g decreasing inverse proportional to the magnetic field strength B (g (0) ∼ 1 / B) . In the presence of the perpendicular electric field the Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC), Zeeman splitting (ZS) and nonparabolicity of the heavy-hole dispersion law affect the Landau quantization of the electrons and holes. They move along the new cyclotron orbits, change their Coulomb interactions and cause the interaction between 2D magnetoexcitons with k→∥ = 0 . The changes of the Coulomb interactions caused by the electrons and by the holes moving with new cyclotron orbits are characterized by some coefficients, which in the absence of the electric field turn to be unity. The differences between these coefficients of the electron-hole pairs forming the magnetoexcitons determine their affinities to the interactions. The interactions between the homogeneous, semihomogeneous and heterogeneous magnetoexcitons forming the symmetric states with the same signs of their affinities are attractive whereas in the case of different sign affinities are repulsive. In the heterogeneous asymmetric states the interactions have opposite signs in comparison with the symmetric states. In all these cases the interaction constant g have the dependence g (0) 1 /√{ B} .

  19. Two-dimensional materials and their prospects in transistor electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwierz, F; Pezoldt, J; Granzner, R

    2015-05-14

    During the past decade, two-dimensional materials have attracted incredible interest from the electronic device community. The first two-dimensional material studied in detail was graphene and, since 2007, it has intensively been explored as a material for electronic devices, in particular, transistors. While graphene transistors are still on the agenda, researchers have extended their work to two-dimensional materials beyond graphene and the number of two-dimensional materials under examination has literally exploded recently. Meanwhile several hundreds of different two-dimensional materials are known, a substantial part of them is considered useful for transistors, and experimental transistors with channels of different two-dimensional materials have been demonstrated. In spite of the rapid progress in the field, the prospects of two-dimensional transistors still remain vague and optimistic opinions face rather reserved assessments. The intention of the present paper is to shed more light on the merits and drawbacks of two-dimensional materials for transistor electronics and to add a few more facets to the ongoing discussion on the prospects of two-dimensional transistors. To this end, we compose a wish list of properties for a good transistor channel material and examine to what extent the two-dimensional materials fulfill the criteria of the list. The state-of-the-art two-dimensional transistors are reviewed and a balanced view of both the pros and cons of these devices is provided.

  20. Highly confined, enhanced surface fluorescence imaging with two-dimensional silver nanoparticle sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usukura, Eiji; Shinohara, Shuhei; Okamoto, Koichi; Tamada, Kaoru, E-mail: tamada@ms.ifoc.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Lim, Jaehoon; Char, Kookheon [The National Creative Research Center for Intelligent Hybrid, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-24

    A method of obtaining highly confined, enhanced surface fluorescence imaging is proposed using two-dimensional (2D) silver nanoparticle (AgMy) sheets. This technique is based on the localized surface plasmon resonance excited homogeneously on a 2D silver nanoparticle sheet. The AgMy sheets are fabricated at the air–water interface by self-assembly and transferred onto hydrophobic glass substrates. These sheets can enhance the fluorescence only when the excitation wavelength overlaps with the plasmon resonance wavelength. To confirm the validity of this technique, two separate test experiments are performed. One is the epifluorescence microscope imaging of a quantum dot 2D sheet on the AgMy 2D sheet with a SiO{sub 2} spacer layer, where the fluorescence is maximized with the 20 nm SiO{sub 2} layer, determined by the Förster resonance energy transfer distances. The second experiment is the imaging of a single fluorescence bead with a total internal reflection fluorescent microscope. We confirmed that the AgMy sheet provides a 4-fold increase in fluorescence with a 160-nm spatial resolution at 30 ms/frame snapshot. The AgMy sheet will be a powerful tool for high sensitivity and high-resolution real time bioimaging at nanointerfaces.

  1. Experimental determination of two-dimensional critical current density distribution in YBCO coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki; Shinkai, Yoshichika [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama (Japan); Iijima, Yasuhiro; Kakimoto, Kazuomi; Takeda, Kaoru [Materials Research Laboratory, Fujikura Ltd., Kiba, Koto, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    The critical current density (J{sub c}) distribution in YBCO coated conductors is attracting interest from the viewpoint of its influence on their AC loss characteristics as well as from material science and process engineering. A two-dimensional J{sub c} distribution in a YBCO coated conductor made by the IBAD (ion-beam assisted deposition) and the PLD (pulse-laser deposition) method can be determined by the magnetic-knife method with spatial resolutions of 0.2 mm lateral and 10 mm longitudinal directions, respectively. In an up-to-date 80A-class YBCO coated conductor, the J{sub c} is relatively uniform in the central part and reaches mbox{l_brace}7$x$10{sup 9} A m{sup -2}, {r_brace} while the J{sub c} fluctuates spatially in the central part of a tape fabricated earlier and with less critical current. Near the edges of the tapes, the J{sub c} is higher or lower than in the central part and the experimentally determined J{sub c} distributions are far from uniform. This suggests that a presumption of a uniform J{sub c} for AC loss estimations is not always reasonable and can lead to a large error in the estimated AC losses. (author)

  2. Two-dimensional point spread matrix of layered metal-dielectric imaging elements

    CERN Document Server

    Kotynski, Rafal; Krol, Karol; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2010-01-01

    We describe the change of the spatial distribution of the state of polarisation occurring during two-dimensional imaging through a multilayer and in particular through a layered metallic flat lens. Linear or circular polarisation of incident light is not preserved due to the difference in the amplitude transfer functions for the TM and TE polarisations. In effect, the transfer function and the point spread function that characterize 2D imaging through a multilayer both have a matrix form and cross-polarisation coupling is observed for spatially modulated beams with a linear or circular incident polarisation. The point spread function in a matrix form is used to characterise the resolution of the superlens for different polarisation states. We demonstrate how the 2D PSF may be used to design a simple diffractive nanoelement consisting of two radial slits. The structure assures the separation of non-diffracting radial beams originating from two slits in the mask and exhibits an interesting property of a backwar...

  3. A neurodynamical model of visual attention: feedback enhancement of spatial resolution in a hierarchical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deco, G; Zihl, J

    2001-01-01

    Human beings have the capacity to recognize objects in natural visual scenes with high efficiency despite the complexity of such scenes, which usually contain multiple objects. One possible mechanism for dealing with this problem is selective attention. Psychophysical evidence strongly suggests that selective attention can enhance the spatial resolution in the input region corresponding to the focus of attention. In this work we adopt a computational neuroscience perspective to analyze the attentional enhancement of spatial resolution in the area containing the objects of interest. We extend and apply the computational model of Deco and Schürmann (2000), which consists of several modules with feedforward and feedback interconnections describing the mutual links between different areas of the visual cortex. Each module analyses the visual input with different spatial resolution and can be thought of as a hierarchical predictor at a given level of resolution. Moreover, each hierarchical predictor has a submodule that consists of a group of neurons performing a biologically based 2D Gabor wavelet transformation at a given resolution level. The attention control decides in which local regions the spatial resolution should be enhanced in a serial fashion. In this sense, the scene is first analyzed at a coarse resolution level, and the focus of attention enhances iteratively the resolution at the location of an object until the object is identified. We propose and simulate new psychophysical experiments where the effect of the attentional enhancement of spatial resolution can be demonstrated by predicting different reaction time profiles in visual search experiments where the target and distractors are defined at different levels of resolution.

  4. Note: spatial resolution of Fuji BAS-TR and BAS-SR imaging plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G; Marshall, F J; Mileham, C; Stoeckl, C

    2012-08-01

    The spatial resolution of two types of imaging plates, Fuji BAS-TR and Fuji BAS-SR, has been measured using a knife-edge x-ray source of 8-keV Cu K(α) radiation. The values for the spatial resolution, defined as the distance between 10% and 90% levels of the edge spread function, are 94 μm and 109 μm, respectively. The resolution values are important for quantitative analysis of x-ray and particle imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics.

  5. Study and optimization of the spatial resolution for detectors with binary readout

    CERN Document Server

    Yonamine, Ryo; De Lentdecker, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Using simulations and analytical approaches, we have studied single hit resolutions obtained with a binary readout, which is often proposed for high granularity detectors to reduce the generated data volume. Our simulations considering several parameters (e.g. strip pitch) show that the detector geometry and an electronics parameter of the binary readout chips could be optimized for binary readout to offer an equivalent spatial resolution to the one with an analogue readout. To understand the behavior as a function of simulation parameters, we developed analytical models that reproduce simulation results with a few parameters. The models can be used to optimize detector designs and operation conditions with regard to the spatial resolution.

  6. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  7. Influence of low spatial resolution a priori data on tropospheric NO2 satellite retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Burrows

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The retrieval of tropospheric columns of NO2 and other trace gases from satellite observations of backscattered solar radiation relies on the use of accurate a priori information. The spatial resolution of current space sensors is often significantly higher than that of the a priori datasets used, introducing uncertainties from spatial misrepresentation. In this study, the effect of spatial under-sampling of a priori data on the retrieval of NO2 columns was studied for a typical coastal area (around San Francisco. High-resolution (15 × 15 km2 NO2 a priori data from the WRF-Chem model in combination with high-resolution MODIS surface reflectance and aerosol data were used to investigate the uncertainty introduced by applying a priori data at typical global chemical transport model resolution. The results show that the relative uncertainties can be large (more than a factor of 2 if all a priori data used is at the coarsest resolution for individual measurements, mainly due to spatial variations in NO2 profile and surface albedo, with smaller contributions from aerosols and surface height changes. Similar sensitivities are expected for other coastal regions and localised sources such as power plants, highlighting the need for high-resolution a priori data in quantitative analysis of the spatial patterns retrieved from satellite observations of tropospheric pollution.

  8. Hyperspectral imagery super-resolution by compressive sensing inspired dictionary learning and spatial-spectral regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Hongyi; Wei, Zhihui

    2015-01-19

    Due to the instrumental and imaging optics limitations, it is difficult to acquire high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery (HSI). Super-resolution (SR) imagery aims at inferring high quality images of a given scene from degraded versions of the same scene. This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral imagery super-resolution (HSI-SR) method via dictionary learning and spatial-spectral regularization. The main contributions of this paper are twofold. First, inspired by the compressive sensing (CS) framework, for learning the high resolution dictionary, we encourage stronger sparsity on image patches and promote smaller coherence between the learned dictionary and sensing matrix. Thus, a sparsity and incoherence restricted dictionary learning method is proposed to achieve higher efficiency sparse representation. Second, a variational regularization model combing a spatial sparsity regularization term and a new local spectral similarity preserving term is proposed to integrate the spectral and spatial-contextual information of the HSI. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recover spatial information and better preserve spectral information. The high spatial resolution HSI reconstructed by the proposed method outperforms reconstructed results by other well-known methods in terms of both objective measurements and visual evaluation.

  9. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Manabe, T; Kajita, S; Ohno, N; Takagi, M; Tsuchiya, H; Morisaki, T

    2014-09-01

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ~4 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  10. Investigating spatial resolutions of imagery for intertidal sediment characterization using geostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Elsy; Adam, Stefanie; De Wever, Aaike; Govaerts, Annelies; Vervoort, Andre; Monbaliu, Jaak

    2014-08-01

    To investigate bio-chemical processes of intertidal sediments, variations in sediment properties such as moisture content, mud content, and chlorophyll a content need to be understood. Remote sensing has been an efficient alternative to traditional data collection methods for such properties. Yet, with the availability of various types of useful sensors, choosing a suitable spatial resolution is challenging, especially that each type has its own cost, availability, and data specifications. This paper investigates the losses in spatial information of sediment properties on the Molenplaat, an intertidal flat on the Western-Scheldt estuary, upon the use of various resolutions. This was carried out using a synergy between remote sensing and geostatistics. The results showed that for the Molenplaat, chlorophyll a content can be well represented by low to medium resolutions. Yet, for moisture and mud content, spatial structures would be lost upon any decrease of resolution from a 4 m×4 m pixel size.

  11. Detecting Changes Between Optical Images of Different Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: a Fusion-Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraris, Vinicius; Wei, Qi; Chabert, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Change detection is one of the most challenging issues when analyzing remotely sensed images. Comparing several multi-date images acquired through the same kind of sensor is the most common scenario. Conversely, designing robust, flexible and scalable algorithms for change detection becomes even more challenging when the images have been acquired by two different kinds of sensors. This situation arises in case of emergency under critical constraints. This paper presents, to the best of authors' knowledge, the first strategy to deal with optical images characterized by dissimilar spatial and spectral resolutions. Typical considered scenarios include change detection between panchromatic or multispectral and hyperspectral images. The proposed strategy consists of a 3-step procedure: i) inferring a high spatial and spectral resolution image by fusion of the two observed images characterized one by a low spatial resolution and the other by a low spectral resolution, ii) predicting two images with respectively the...

  12. Virtual electrode design for increasing spatial resolution in retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizos, Kyle; Cela, Carlos; Marc, Robert; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    Retinal prostheses systems are currently used to restore partial vision to patients blinded by degenerative diseases by electrically stimulating surviving retinal cells. To obtain likely maximum resolution, electrode size is minimised, allowing for a large quantity on an array and localised stimulation regions. Besides the small size leading to fabrication difficulties and higher electrochemical charge density, there are challenges associated with the number of drivers needed for a large electrode count as well as the strategies to deliver sufficient power to these drivers wirelessly. In hopes to increase electrode resolution while avoiding these issues, the authors propose a new 'virtual electrode' design to increase locations of likely stimulation. Passive metallisation strategically placed between disk electrodes, combined with alternating surrounding stimuli, channel current into a location between electrodes, producing a virtual stimulation site. A computational study was conducted to optimise the passive metal element geometry, quantify the expected current density output, and simulate retinal ganglion cell activity due to virtual electrode stimulation. Results show that this procedure leads to array geometry that focuses injected current and achieves retinal ganglion cell stimulation in a region beneath the 'virtual electrode,' creating an alternate stimulation site without additional drivers.

  13. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  14. Ultrafast two dimensional infrared chemical exchange spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The method of ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is described. Three ultrashort IR pulses tuned to the frequencies of the vibrational transitions of interest are directed into the sample. The interaction of these pulses with the molecular vibrational oscillators produces a polarization that gives rise to a fourth pulse, the vibrational echo. The vibrational echo pulse is combined with another pulse, the local oscillator, for heterodyne detection of the signal. For fixed time between the second and third pulses, the waiting time, the first pulse is scanned. Two Fourier transforms of the data yield a 2D IR spectrum. The waiting time is increased, and another spectrum is obtained. The change in the 2D IR spectra with increased waiting time provides information on the time evolution of the structure of the molecular system under observation. In a 2D IR chemical exchange experiment, two species A and B, are undergoing chemical exchange. A's are turning into B's, and B's are turning into A's, but the overall concentrations of the species are not changing. The kinetics of the chemical exchange on the ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions can be obtained 2D IR spectroscopy. A vibration that has a different frequency for the two species is monitored. At very short time, there will be two peaks on the diagonal of the 2D IR spectrum, one for A and one for B. As the waiting time is increased, chemical exchange causes off-diagonal peaks to grow in. The time dependence of the growth of these off-diagonal peaks gives the chemical exchange rate. The method is applied to organic solute-solvent complex formation, orientational isomerization about a carbon-carbon single bond, migration of a hydrogen bond from one position on a molecule to another, protein structural substate interconversion, and water hydrogen bond switching between ions and water molecules. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific

  15. On the assessment of spatial resolution of PET systems with iterative image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kuang; Cherry, Simon R; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-03-07

    Spatial resolution is an important metric for performance characterization in PET systems. Measuring spatial resolution is straightforward with a linear reconstruction algorithm, such as filtered backprojection, and can be performed by reconstructing a point source scan and calculating the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) along the principal directions. With the widespread adoption of iterative reconstruction methods, it is desirable to quantify the spatial resolution using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. However, the task can be difficult because the reconstruction algorithms are nonlinear and the non-negativity constraint can artificially enhance the apparent spatial resolution if a point source image is reconstructed without any background. Thus, it was recommended that a background should be added to the point source data before reconstruction for resolution measurement. However, there has been no detailed study on the effect of the point source contrast on the measured spatial resolution. Here we use point source scans from a preclinical PET scanner to investigate the relationship between measured spatial resolution and the point source contrast. We also evaluate whether the reconstruction of an isolated point source is predictive of the ability of the system to resolve two adjacent point sources. Our results indicate that when the point source contrast is below a certain threshold, the measured FWHM remains stable. Once the contrast is above the threshold, the measured FWHM monotonically decreases with increasing point source contrast. In addition, the measured FWHM also monotonically decreases with iteration number for maximum likelihood estimate. Therefore, when measuring system resolution with an iterative reconstruction algorithm, we recommend using a low-contrast point source and a fixed number of iterations.

  16. On the assessment of spatial resolution of PET systems with iterative image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kuang; Cherry, Simon R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-03-01

    Spatial resolution is an important metric for performance characterization in PET systems. Measuring spatial resolution is straightforward with a linear reconstruction algorithm, such as filtered backprojection, and can be performed by reconstructing a point source scan and calculating the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) along the principal directions. With the widespread adoption of iterative reconstruction methods, it is desirable to quantify the spatial resolution using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. However, the task can be difficult because the reconstruction algorithms are nonlinear and the non-negativity constraint can artificially enhance the apparent spatial resolution if a point source image is reconstructed without any background. Thus, it was recommended that a background should be added to the point source data before reconstruction for resolution measurement. However, there has been no detailed study on the effect of the point source contrast on the measured spatial resolution. Here we use point source scans from a preclinical PET scanner to investigate the relationship between measured spatial resolution and the point source contrast. We also evaluate whether the reconstruction of an isolated point source is predictive of the ability of the system to resolve two adjacent point sources. Our results indicate that when the point source contrast is below a certain threshold, the measured FWHM remains stable. Once the contrast is above the threshold, the measured FWHM monotonically decreases with increasing point source contrast. In addition, the measured FWHM also monotonically decreases with iteration number for maximum likelihood estimate. Therefore, when measuring system resolution with an iterative reconstruction algorithm, we recommend using a low-contrast point source and a fixed number of iterations.

  17. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-07-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 microm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 microm x 50 microm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 microm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  18. Downscaling of coarse resolution LAI products to achieve both high spatial and temporal resolution for regions of interest

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2015-11-12

    This paper presents a flexible tool for spatio-temporal enhancement of coarse resolution leaf area index (LAI) products, which is readily adaptable to different land cover types, landscape heterogeneities and cloud cover conditions. The framework integrates a rule-based regression tree approach for estimating Landsat-scale LAI from existing 1 km resolution LAI products, and the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) to intelligently interpolate the downscaled LAI between Landsat acquisitions. Comparisons against in-situ records of LAI measured over corn and soybean highlights its utility for resolving sub-field LAI dynamics occurring over a range of plant development stages.

  19. Advanced Extraction of Spatial Information from High Resolution Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, T.; Burian, J.; Miřijovský, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper authors processed five satellite image of five different Middle-European cities taken by five different sensors. The aim of the paper was to find methods and approaches leading to evaluation and spatial data extraction from areas of interest. For this reason, data were firstly pre-processed using image fusion, mosaicking and segmentation processes. Results going into the next step were two polygon layers; first one representing single objects and the second one representing city blocks. In the second step, polygon layers were classified and exported into Esri shapefile format. Classification was partly hierarchical expert based and partly based on the tool SEaTH used for separability distinction and thresholding. Final results along with visual previews were attached to the original thesis. Results are evaluated visually and statistically in the last part of the paper. In the discussion author described difficulties of working with data of large size, taken by different sensors and different also thematically.

  20. Intercomparison of snow density measurements: bias, precision and spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Density is a fundamental property of porous media such as snow. A wide range of snow properties and physical processes are linked to density, but few studies have addressed the uncertainty in snow density measurements. No study has yet considered the recent advances in snow measurement methods such as micro-computed tomography (CT. During the MicroSnow Davos 2014 workshop different approaches to measure snow density were applied in a controlled laboratory environment and in the field. Overall, the agreement between CT and gravimetric methods (density cutters was 5 to 9 %, with a bias of −5 to 2 %, expressed as percentage of the mean CT density. In the field, the density cutters tend to overestimate (1 to 6 % densities below and underestimate (1 to 6 % densities above 296 to 350 kg m−3, respectively, depending on the cutter type. Using the mean per layer of all measurement methods applied in the field (CT, box, wedge and cylinder cutter and ignoring ice layers, the variation of layer density between the methods was 2 to 5 % with a bias of −1 to 1 %. In general, our result suggests that snow densities measured by different methods agree within 9 %. However, the density profiles resolved by the measurement methods differed considerably. In particular, the millimeter scale density variations revealed by the high resolution CT contrasted the thick layers with sharp boundaries introduced by the observer. In this respect, the unresolved variation, i.e. the density variation within a layer, which is lost by sampling with lower resolution or layer aggregation, is critical when snow density measurements are used as boundary or initial conditions in numerical simulations.

  1. Practical Considerations for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M; Boyden, K; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; DeHope, B; Frank, A M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F; Kim, J S; King, W E; LaGrange, T B; Pyke, B J; Reed, B W; Shuttlesworth, R M; Stuart, B C; Torralva, B R

    2006-05-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5 x 10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  2. A novel approach for structure analysis of two-dimensional membrane protein crystals using x-ray powder diffraction data

    CERN Document Server

    Dilanian, Ruben A; Varghese, Jose N; Wilkins, Steve W; Oka, Toshihiko; Yagi, Naoto; Quiney, Harry M; Nugent, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    The application of powder diffraction methods in two-dimensional crystallography is regarded as intractable because of the uncertainties associated with overlapping reflections. Here, we report an approach that resolves these ambiguities and provides reliable low-resolution phase information directly from powder diffraction data. We apply our method to the recovery of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) molecule to a resolution of 7 angstroms using only powder diffraction data obtained from two-dimensional purple membrane (PM) crystals.

  3. Two dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a high latitude braided river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, E.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are a fundamental resource to physical, ecologic and human systems, yet quantification of river flow in high-latitude environments remains limited due to the prevalence of complex morphologies, remote locations and sparse in situ monitoring equipment. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing technology allow us to address questions such as: How well can two-dimensional models simulate a flood wave in a highly 3-dimensional braided river environment, and how does the structure of such a flood wave differ from flow down a similar-sized single-channel river? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate flood waves, discharge, water surface height, and velocity measurements over a ~70 km reach of the Tanana River in Alaska. In order to use LISFLOOD-FP a digital elevation model (DEM) fused with detailed bathymetric data is required. During summer 2013, we surveyed 220,000 bathymetric points along the study reach using an echo sounder system connected to a high-precision GPS unit. The measurements are interpolated to a smooth bathymetric surface, using Topo to Raster interpolation, and combined with an existing five meter DEM (Alaska IfSAR) to create a seamless river terrain model. Flood waves are simulated using varying complexities in model solvers, then compared to gauge records and water logger data to assess major sources of model uncertainty. Velocity and flow direction maps are also assessed and quantified for detailed analysis of braided channel flow. The most accurate model output occurs with using the full two-dimensional model structure, and major inaccuracies appear to be related to DEM quality and roughness values. Future work will intercompare model outputs with extensive ground measurements and new data from AirSWOT, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  4. Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2011-03-23

    We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

  5. Peripheral Vasculature: High-Temporal- and High-Spatial-Resolution Three-dimensional Contrast-enhanced MR Angiography1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Glockner, James F.; Stanson, Anthony W.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of performing high-spatial-resolution (1-mm isotropic) time-resolved three-dimensional (3D) contrast material–enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography of the peripheral vasculature with Cartesian acquisition with projection-reconstruction–like sampling (CAPR) and eightfold accelerated two-dimensional (2D) sensitivity encoding (SENSE). Materials and Methods: All studies were approved by the institutional review board and were HIPAA compliant; written informed consent was obtained from all participants. There were 13 volunteers (mean age, 41.9; range, 27–53 years). The CAPR sequence was adapted to provide 1-mm isotropic spatial resolution and a 5-second frame time. Use of different receiver coil element sizes for those placed on the anterior-to-posterior versus left-to-right sides of the field of view reduced signal-to-noise ratio loss due to acceleration. Results from eight volunteers were rated independently by two radiologists according to prominence of artifact, arterial to venous separation, vessel sharpness, continuity of arterial signal intensity in major arteries (anterior and posterior tibial, peroneal), demarcation of origin of major arteries, and overall diagnostic image quality. MR angiographic results in two patients with peripheral vascular disease were compared with their results at computed tomographic angiography. Results: The sequence exhibited no image artifact adversely affecting diagnostic image quality. Temporal resolution was evaluated to be sufficient in all cases, even with known rapid arterial to venous transit. The vessels were graded to have excellent sharpness, continuity, and demarcation of the origins of the major arteries. Distal muscular branches and the communicating and perforating arteries were routinely seen. Excellent diagnostic quality rating was given for 15 (94%) of 16 evaluations. Conclusion: The feasibility of performing high-diagnostic-quality time-resolved 3D

  6. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-07-18

    This poster is based on the paper of the same name, presented at the IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting, July18, 2016. Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions - native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level - and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  7. Impact of spatial resolution on correlation between segmentation evaluation metrics and forest classification accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švab Lenarčič, Andreja; Ritlop, Klemen; Äńurić, Nataša.; Čotar, Klemen; Oštir, Krištof

    2015-10-01

    Slovenia is one of the most forested countries in Europe. Its forest management authorities need information about the forest extent and state, as their responsibility lies in forest observation and preservation. Together with appropriate geographic information system mapping methods the remotely sensed data represent essential tool for an effective and sustainable forest management. Despite the large data availability, suitable mapping methods still present big challenge in terms of their speed which is often affected by the huge amount of data. The speed of the classification method could be maximised, if each of the steps in object-based classification was automated. However, automation is hard to achieve, since segmentation requires choosing optimum parameter values for optimal classification results. This paper focuses on the analysis of segmentation and classification performance and their correlation in a range of segmentation parameter values applied in the segmentation step. In order to find out which spatial resolution is still suitable for forest classification, forest classification accuracies obtained by using four images with different spatial resolutions were compared. Results of this study indicate that all high or very high spatial resolutions are suitable for optimal forest segmentation and classification, as long as appropriate scale and merge parameters combinations are used in the object-based classification. If computation interval includes all segmentation parameter combinations, all segmentation-classification correlations are spatial resolution independent and are generally high. If computation interval includes over- or optimal-segmentation parameter combinations, most segmentation-classification correlations are spatial resolution dependent.

  8. Spatial resolution of a μPIC-based neutron imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.D., E-mail: jparker@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Harada, M. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hattori, K.; Iwaki, S.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kurosawa, S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Miuchi, K.; Mizumoto, T.; Nishimura, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Oku, T. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sawano, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shinohara, T.; Suzuki, J. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Ueno, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-10-21

    We present a detailed study of the spatial resolution of our time-resolved neutron imaging detector utilizing a new neutron position reconstruction method that improves both spatial resolution and event reconstruction efficiency. Our prototype detector system, employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber (μPIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system, combines 100μm-level spatial and sub-μs time resolutions with excellent gamma rejection and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. From data taken at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility within the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), the spatial resolution was found to be approximately Gaussian with a sigma of 103.48±0.77μm (after correcting for beam divergence). This is a significant improvement over that achievable with our previous reconstruction method (334±13μm), and compares well with conventional neutron imaging detectors and with other high-rate detectors currently under development. Further, a detector simulation indicates that a spatial resolution of less than 60μm may be possible with optimization of the gas characteristics and μPIC structure. We also present an example of imaging combined with neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy. -- Highlights: • Neutron imaging detector with micro-pattern gaseous detector and {sup 3}He was developed. • Detector combines imaging with energy by time-of-flight and high-rate capability. • Detector features 18% efficiency, 0.6μs time resolution, and γ sensitivity <10{sup −12}. • New analysis method with template fit achieves spatial resolution of nearly 100μm. • Simulation study indicates improvement to ∼60μm after optimization.

  9. Pushing the boundaries of diagnostic CT systems for high spatial resolution imaging tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Bastida, Juan P.; Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Garrett, John W.; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Ke

    2017-03-01

    In a previous work [Cruz-Bastida et al Med. Phys. 43, 2399 (2016)], the spatial resolution performance of a new High-Resolution (Hi-Res) multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scan mode and the associated High Definition (HD) reconstruction kernels was systematically characterized. The purpose of the present work was to study the noise properties of the Hi-Res scan mode and the joint impact of spatial resolution and noise characteristics on high contrast and high spatial resolution imaging tasks. Using a physical phantom and a diagnostic MDCT system, equipped with both Hi-Res and conventional scan modes, noise power spectrum (NPS) measurements were performed at 8 off-centered positions (0 to 14 cm with an increment of 2 cm) for 8 non-HD kernels and 7 HD kernels. An in vivo rabbit experiment was then performed to demonstrate the potential clinical value of the Hi-Res scan mode. Without the HD kernels, the Hi-Res scan mode preserved the shape of the NPS and slightly increased noise magnitude across all object positions. The combined use of the Hi-Res scan mode and HD kernels led to a greater noise increase and pushed the NPS towards higher frequencies, particularly for those edge-preserving or edge-enhancing HD kernels. Results of the in vivo rabbit study demonstrate important trade-offs between spatial resolution and noise characteristics. Overall, for a given high contrast and high spatial resolution imaging task (bronchi imaging), the benefit of spatial resolution improvement introduced by the Hi-Res scan mode outweighs the potential noise amplification, leading to better overall imaging performance for both centered and off-centered positions.

  10. High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature estimation over urban areas with uncertainty indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitraka, Zina; Lazzarini, Michele; Doxani, Georgia; Del Frate, Fabio; Ghedira, Hosni

    2014-05-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable for studying land surface processes and interactions with the atmosphere and it is listed in the Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) identified by international organizations like Global Climate Observing System. It is a valuable source of information for a range of topics in earth sciences and essential for urban climatology studies. Detailed, frequent and accurate LST mapping may support various urban applications, like the monitoring of urban heat island. Currently, no spaceborne instruments provide frequent thermal imagery at high spatial resolution, thus there is a need for synergistic algorithms that combine different kinds of data for LST retrieval. Moreover, knowing the confidence level of any satellite-derived product is highly important to the users, especially when referred to the urban environment, which is extremely heterogenic. The developed method employs spatial-spectral unmixing techniques for improving the spatial resolution of thermal measurements, combines spectral library information for emissivity estimation and applies a split-window algorithm to estimate LST with an uncertainty estimation inserted in the final product. A synergistic algorithm that utilizes the spatial information provided by visible and near-infrared measurements with more frequent low resolution thermal measurements provides excellent means for high spatial resolution LST estimation. Given the low spatial resolution of thermal infrared sensors, the measured radiation is a combination of radiances of different surface types. High spatial resolution information is used to quantify the different surface types in each pixel and then the measured radiance of each pixel is decomposed. The several difficulties in retrieving LST from space measurements, mainly related to the temperature-emissivity coupling and the atmospheric contribution to the thermal measurements, and the measurements themselves, introduce uncertainties in the final

  11. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  12. Study of spatial resolution of coordinate detectors based on Gas Electron Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Maltsev, T. V.; Shekhtman, L. I.

    2017-02-01

    Spatial resolution of GEM-based tracking detectors is determined in the simulation and measured in the experiments. The simulation includes GEANT4 implemented transport of high energy electrons with careful accounting of atomic relaxation processes including emission of fluorescent photons and Auger electrons and custom post-processing with accounting of diffusion, gas amplification fluctuations, distribution of signals on readout electrodes, electronics noise and particular algorithm of final coordinate calculation (center of gravity). The simulation demonstrates that the minimum of spatial resolution of about 10 μm can be achieved with a gas mixture of Ar -CO2 (75-25 %) at a strips pitch from 250 μm to 300 μm. At a larger pitch the resolution quickly degrades reaching 80-100 μm at a pitch of 460-500 μm. Spatial resolution of low-material triple-GEM detectors for the DEUTERON facility at the VEPP-3 storage ring is measured at the extracted beam facility of the VEPP-4 M collider. One-coordinate resolution of the DEUTERON detector is measured with electron beam of 500 MeV, 1 GeV and 3.5 GeV energies. The determined value of spatial resolution varies in the range from approximately 35 μm to 50 μm for orthogonal tracks in the experiments.

  13. ADVANCED EXTRACTION OF SPATIAL INFORMATION FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper authors processed five satellite image of five different Middle-European cities taken by five different sensors. The aim of the paper was to find methods and approaches leading to evaluation and spatial data extraction from areas of interest. For this reason, data were firstly pre-processed using image fusion, mosaicking and segmentation processes. Results going into the next step were two polygon layers; first one representing single objects and the second one representing city blocks. In the second step, polygon layers were classified and exported into Esri shapefile format. Classification was partly hierarchical expert based and partly based on the tool SEaTH used for separability distinction and thresholding. Final results along with visual previews were attached to the original thesis. Results are evaluated visually and statistically in the last part of the paper. In the discussion author described difficulties of working with data of large size, taken by different sensors and different also thematically.

  14. Progressive refining of spatial and temporal resolutions in a hydrological model: how far should we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lavenne, Alban; Ficchi, Andrea; Goullet, Julien

    2017-04-01

    Choosing a modelling resolution for an hydrological model is an important preliminary question. However, it is quite often arbitrary determined by the modeller experience according to the objective, the model capacity or the available measurements. The hydrological literature provides numerous studies which focus on the effect of refining either spatial resolution or (sometimes) temporal resolution in order to better catch hydrological response. In this study, we investigate the impact of changing simultaneously both resolutions on hydrological model performance. The idea is that these resolutions are linked and should be considered together. Thus, we look for the combination of spatial and temporal resolutions fitting at best each catchment behaviour and type of rainfall events. A large data set of 240 catchments scattered all around France is used, and in particular, we benefit from a high-resolution precipitation database (ANTILOPE, Météo-France) that describes hourly precipitation at 1 km2 resolution. Data were aggregated at different time steps (1h, 3h, 6h, 12h and 24h). Streamflow simulations are performed at these different time steps using the GR5 model in its lumped and semi-distributed version (GRSD, de Lavenne et al. (2016)), with a mesh grid of 500, 250, 100 and 50 km2. Ten different indices are used to describe spatio-temporal characteristics of rainfall events, in order to analyse in which contexts refined resolutions are needed to improve the performance of the model. These indices characterise the spatial variability, localisation, movement, intensity and temporal variability of rainfall events. In addition to some indices already reported in the hydrological literature, we propose some new indices like an indice usually applied in economics. This analysis at different time steps, events and catchments demonstrates the limits for some of them and allows to propose some corrections (Goullet J., 2016). Model performances are shown to be

  15. A true order recursive algorithm for two-dimensional mean squared error linear prediction and filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glentis, George-Othon; Slump, Cornelis H.; Hermann, Otto E.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a novel algorithm is presented for the efficient two-dimensional (2-D), mean squared error (MSE), FIR filtering and system identification. Filter masks of general boundaries are allowed. Efficient order updating recursions are developed by exploiting the spatial shift invariance

  16. Macro and micro full field x-ray fluorescence with an X-ray pinhole camera presenting high energy and high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco Paolo; Caliri, Claudia; Cosentino, Luigi; Gammino, Santo; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Pappalardo, Lighea; Rizzo, Francesca; Taccetti, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    This work describes a tabletop (50 cm × 25 cm × 25 cm) full field X-ray pinhole camera (FF-XPC) presenting high energy- and high spatial-resolution. The FF-XPC consists of a conventional charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled, in a coaxial geometry, to a pinhole collimator of small diameter. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is induced on the samples with an external low-power X-ray tube. The use of the CCD as an energy dispersive X-ray detector was obtained by adopting a multi-image acquisition in single photon counting and by developing a processing algorithm to be applied in real-time to each of the acquired image-frames. This approach allowed the measurement of X-ray spectra with an energy resolution down to 133 eV at the reference value of 5.9 keV. The detection of the X-ray fluorescence through the pinhole-collimator allowed the two-dimensional elemental mapping of the irradiated samples. Two magnifications (M), determined by the relative sample-pinhole-CCD distances, are used in the present setup. A low value of M (equal to 0.35×) allows the macro-FF-XRF of large area samples (up to 4 × 4 cm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 140 μm; a large magnification (M equal to 6×) is used for the micro-FF-XRF of small area samples (2.5 × 2.5 mm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 30 μm.

  17. The convolution theorem for two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG CHI

    2013-01-01

    In this paper , application of two -dimensional continuous wavelet transform to image processes is studied. We first show that the convolution and correlation of two continuous wavelets satisfy the required admissibility and regularity conditions ,and then we derive the convolution and correlation theorem for two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform. Finally, we present numerical example showing the usefulness of applying the convolution theorem for two -dimensional continuous wavelet transform to perform image restoration in the presence of additive noise.

  18. Grammatical complexity for two-dimensional maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Ryouichi; Shudo, Akira [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-Ohsawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2004-11-05

    We calculate the grammatical complexity of the symbol sequences generated from the Henon map and the Lozi map using the recently developed methods to construct the pruning front. When the map is hyperbolic, the language of symbol sequences is regular in the sense of the Chomsky hierarchy and the corresponding grammatical complexity takes finite values. It is found that the complexity exhibits a self-similar structure as a function of the system parameter, and the similarity of the pruning fronts is discussed as an origin of such self-similarity. For non-hyperbolic cases, it is observed that the complexity monotonically increases as we increase the resolution of the pruning front.

  19. Two-dimensional performance of MIPAS observation modes in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carlotti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the performance of the three MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding observation modes that sound the Upper-Troposphere/Lower-Stratosphere (UT/LS region. The two-dimensional (2-D tomographic retrieval approach is assumed to derive the atmospheric field of geophysical parameters. For each observation mode we have calculated the 2-D distribution of the information load quantifier relative to the main MIPAS targets. The performance of the observation modes has been evaluated in terms of strength and spatial coverage of the information-load distribution along the full orbit. The indications of the information-load analysis has been validated with simulated retrievals based on the observational parameters of real orbits. In the simulation studies we have assessed the precision and the spatial (both horizontal and vertical resolution of the retrieval products. The performance of the three observation modes has been compared for the MIPAS main products in both the UT/LS and the extended altitude range. This study shows that the two observation modes that were specifically designed for the UT/LS region are actually competitive with the third one, designed for the whole stratosphere, up to altitudes that far exceed the UT/LS. In the UT/LS the performance of the two specific observation modes is comparable even if the best performance in terms of horizontal resolution is provided by the observation mode that was excluded by the European Space Agency (ESA from the current MIPAS duty cycle. This paper reports the first application of the information-load analysis and highlights the worthiness of this approach to make qualitative considerations about retrieval potential and selection of retrieval grid.

  20. Improvement of range spatial resolution of medical ultrasound imaging by element-domain signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki

    2017-07-01

    The range spatial resolution is an important factor determining the image quality in ultrasonic imaging. The range spatial resolution in ultrasonic imaging depends on the ultrasonic pulse length, which is determined by the mechanical response of the piezoelectric element in an ultrasonic probe. To improve the range spatial resolution without replacing the transducer element, in the present study, methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimation and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) were proposed. The proposed methods were applied to echo signals received by individual transducer elements in an ultrasonic probe. The basic experimental results showed that the axial half maximum of the echo from a string phantom was improved from 0.21 mm (conventional method) to 0.086 mm (ML) and 0.094 mm (MUSIC).

  1. Exoplanet transits enable high-resolution spectroscopy across spatially resolved stellar surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dravins, Dainis; Dahlén, Erik; Pazira, Hiva

    2016-01-01

    Observations of stellar surfaces - except for the Sun - are hampered by their tiny angular extent, while observed spectral lines are smeared by averaging over the stellar surface, and by stellar rotation. Exoplanet transits can be used to analyze stellar atmospheric structure, yielding high-resolution spectra across spatially highly resolved stellar surfaces, free from effects of spatial smearing and the rotational wavelength broadening present in full-disk spectra. During a transit, stellar surface portions successively become hidden, and differential spectroscopy between various transit phases provides spectra of those surface segments then hidden behind the planet. The small area subtended by even a large planet (about 1% of a main-sequence star) offers high spatial resolution but demands very precise observations. We demonstrate the reconstruction of photospheric FeI line profiles at a spectral resolution R=80,000 across the surface of the solar-type star HD209458. Any detailed understanding of stellar at...

  2. High spatial resolution sensing by using stepped pump light and its experimental validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Guo; Ningsheng Yu

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of conventional distributed fiber optic sensors is 1 m at best,which is inadequate to locate the damage precisely.We adopt an improved sensing technique based on the Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA).The stepped pump light is input to stimulate the phonon so that the spatial resolution earl be increased to centimeter order and the strain accuracy of 25 micro-strains is obtained.The feasibility of this sensing technique is demonstrated through strain measurement of three concrete box-girders in bending.Experimental results show that the improved BOTDA measurement can provide a comprehensive description on the strain distribution of steel rebar or concrete.Compared with the conventional strain gauges,the improved BOTDA measurement is more stable.By virtue of higher spatial resolution and better measurement accuracy,it has become possible to perform crack detection and localization for concrete structures.

  3. Design and Implementation of a High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Image Intelligent Interpretation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng-Kui Mo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Very high spatial resolution remote sensing images have applications in many fields. However, research on the intelligent interpretation of such images is insufficient partly because of their the complexity and large size. In this study, a high spatial resolution remote sensing image intelligent interpretation system (HSR-RSIIIs was designed with image segmentation, a geographical information system, and a data-mining algorithm. Some key methods such as image segmentation, feature extraction, feature selection, and classification algorithm for interpreting high spatial resolution remote sensing image have been studied. A land cover classification experiment was performed in the Zhuzhou area using a Quickbird multi-spectral image. The classification results were consistent with the visual interpretation results. In additional, the proposed interpretation method was compared with the traditional pixel-based method. The results indicate that the method proposed in the literature is more effective and intelligent than that used previously.

  4. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  5. Sensitivity of ecosystem models to the spatial resolution of the NCAR Community Climate Model CCM2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciret, C. [Macquarie Univ., Sydney (Australia). Climate Impacts Centre; Henderson-Sellers, A. [Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne (Australia)

    1998-06-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of ecosystem models to changes in the horizontal resolution of version 2 of the national centre for atmospheric research community climate model (CCM2). A previous study has shown that the distributions of natural ecosystems predicted by vegetation models using coarse resolution present-day climate simulations are poorly simulated. It is usually assumed that increasing the spatial resolution of general circulation models (GCMs) will improve the simulation of climate, and hence will increase our level of confidence in the use of GCM output for impacts studies. The principal goals of this study is to investigate this hypothesis and to identify which biomes are more affected by the changes in spatial resolution of the forcing climate. The ecosystem models used are the BIOME-1 model and a version of the Holdridge scheme. The climate simulations come from a set of experiments in which CCM2 was run with increasing horizontal resolutions. The biome distributions predicted using CCM2 climates are compared against biome distributions predicted using observed climate datasets. Results show that increasing the resolution of CCM2 produces a significant improvement of the global-scale vegetation prediction, indicating that a higher level of confidence can be vested in the global-scale prediction of natural ecosystems using medium and high resolution GCMs. However, not all biomes are equally affected by the increased spatial resolution, and although certain biome distributions are improved (e.g. hot desert, tropical seasonal forest), others remain globally poorly predicted even at high resolution (e.g. grasses and xerophytic woods). In addition, these results show that some climatic biases are enhanced with increasing resolution (e.g. in mountain ranges), resulting in the inadequate prediction of biomes. (orig.) With 16 figs., 5 tabs., 37 refs.

  6. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    The practice of diagnostic x-ray imaging has been transformed with the emergence of digital detector technology. Although digital systems offer many practical advantages over conventional film-based systems, their spatial resolution performance can be a limitation. The authors present a Monte Carlo study to determine fundamental resolution limits caused by x-ray interactions in four converter materials: Amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium, cesium iodide, and lead iodide. The "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined for each material and compared in terms of the 50% MTF spatial frequency and Wagner's effective aperture for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. Several conclusions can be drawn from their Monte Carlo study. (i) In low-Z (a-Si) converters, reabsorption of Compton scatter x rays limits spatial resolution with a sharp MTF drop at very low spatial frequencies (x rays plays a dominant role, resulting in a mid-frequency (1-5 cycles/mm) MTF drop. (ii) Coherent scatter plays a minor role in the x-ray interaction MTF. (iii) The spread of energy due to secondary electron (e.g., photoelectrons) transport is significant only at very high spatial frequencies. (iv) Unlike the spread of optical light in phosphors, the spread of absorbed energy from x-ray interactions does not significantly degrade spatial resolution as converter thickness is increased. (v) The effective aperture results reported here represent fundamental spatial resolution limits of the materials tested and serve as target benchmarks for the design and development of future digital x-ray detectors.

  7. Non-linear excitation of quantum emitters in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Schell, Andreas W; Takashima, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Shigeki; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon absorption is an important non-linear process employed for high resolution bio-imaging and non-linear optics. In this work we realize two-photon excitation of a quantum emitter embedded in a two-dimensional material. We examine defects in hexagonal boron nitride and show that the emitters exhibit similar spectral and quantum properties under one-photon and two-photon excitation. Furthermore, our findings are important to deploy two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride for quantum non-linear photonic applications.

  8. Grammatical complexity for two-dimensional maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Ryouichi; Shudo, Akira

    2004-11-01

    We calculate the grammatical complexity of the symbol sequences generated from the Hénon map and the Lozi map using the recently developed methods to construct the pruning front. When the map is hyperbolic, the language of symbol sequences is regular in the sense of the Chomsky hierarchy and the corresponding grammatical complexity takes finite values. It is found that the complexity exhibits a self-similar structure as a function of the system parameter, and the similarity of the pruning fronts is discussed as an origin of such self-similarity. For non-hyperbolic cases, it is observed that the complexity monotonically increases as we increase the resolution of the pruning front.

  9. Spatial resolution of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy - DFT assessment of the chemical effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Federico; Kupfer, Stephan; Bocklitz, Thomas; Kinzel, Daniel; Trautmann, Steffen; Gräfe, Stefanie; Deckert, Volker

    2016-05-21

    Experimental evidence of extremely high spatial resolution of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has been recently demonstrated. Here, we present a full quantum chemical description (at the density functional level of theory) of the non-resonant chemical effects on the Raman spectrum of an adenine molecule mapped by a tip, modeled as a single silver atom or a small silver cluster. We show pronounced changes in the Raman pattern and its intensities depending on the conformation of the nanoparticle-substrate system, concluding that the spatial resolution of the chemical contribution of TERS can be in the sub-nm range.

  10. Electron-Beam Mapping of Vibrational Modes with Nanometer Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C.; Aoki, T.; Rez, P.; Chang, S. L. Y.; Lovejoy, T. C.; Krivanek, O. L.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that a focused beam of high-energy electrons can be used to map the vibrational modes of a material with a spatial resolution of the order of one nanometer. Our demonstration is performed on boron nitride, a polar dielectric which gives rise to both localized and delocalized electron-vibrational scattering, either of which can be selected in our off-axial experimental geometry. Our experimental results are well supported by our calculations, and should reconcile current controversy regarding the spatial resolution achievable in vibrational mapping with focused electron beams.

  11. Large-scale proton radiography with micrometer spatial resolution using femtosecond petawatt laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F., E-mail: bfshen@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Zhang, H.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yu, L. H.; Chu, Y. X.; Li, Y. Y.; Xu, T. J.; Zhang, H.; Zhai, S. H.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z., E-mail: zzxu@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-10-15

    An image of dragonfly with many details is obtained by the fundamental property of the high-energy proton source on a femtosecond petawatt laser system. Equal imaging of the dragonfly and high spatial resolution on the micrometer scale are simultaneously obtained. The head, wing, leg, tail, and even the internal tissue structures are clearly mapped in detail by the proton beam. Experiments show that image blurring caused by multiple Coulomb scattering can be reduced to a certain extent and the spatial resolution can be increased by attaching the dragonfly to the RCFs, which is consistent with theoretical assumptions.

  12. Iterative algorithm for reconstructing rotationally asymmetric surface deviation with pixel-level spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Haiyang; Wu, Fan; Hou, Xi

    2015-10-01

    New method for reconstructing rotationally asymmetric surface deviation with pixel-level spatial resolution is proposed. It is based on basic iterative scheme and accelerates the Gauss-Seidel method by introducing an acceleration parameter. This modified Successive Over-relaxation (SOR) is effective for solving the rotationally asymmetric components with pixel-level spatial resolution, without the usage of a fitting procedure. Compared to the Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel method, the modified SOR method with an optimal relaxation factor converges much faster and saves more computational costs and memory space without reducing accuracy. It has been proved by real experimental results.

  13. Coding/decoding two-dimensional images with orbital angular momentum of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jiaqi; Li, Xuefeng; Smithwick, Quinn; Chu, Daping

    2016-04-01

    We investigate encoding and decoding of two-dimensional information using the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light. Spiral phase plates and phase-only spatial light modulators are used in encoding and decoding of OAM states, respectively. We show that off-axis points and spatial variables encoded with a given OAM state can be recovered through decoding with the corresponding complimentary OAM state.

  14. Single-exposure two-dimensional superresolution in digital holography using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Luis; Zalevsky, Zeev; Micó, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    We present a new implementation capable of producing two-dimensional (2D) superresolution (SR) imaging in a single exposure by aperture synthesis in digital lensless Fourier holography when using angular multiplexing provided by a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array. The system performs the recording in a single CCD snapshot of a multiplexed hologram coming from the incoherent addition of multiple subholograms, where each contains information about a different 2D spatial frequency band of the object's spectrum. Thus, a set of nonoverlapping bandpass images of the input object can be recovered by Fourier transformation (FT) of the multiplexed hologram. The SR is obtained by coherent addition of the information contained in each bandpass image while generating an enlarged synthetic aperture. Experimental results demonstrate improvement in resolution and image quality.

  15. Detection efficiency, spatial and timing resolution of thermal and cold neutron counting MCP detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Hull, J. S.; Feller, W. B.; Lehmann, E.

    2009-06-01

    Neutron counting detectors with boron or gadolinium doped microchannel plates (MCPs) have very high detection efficiency, spatial and temporal resolution, and have a very low readout noise. In this paper we present the results of both theoretical predictions and experimental evaluations of detection efficiency and spatial resolution measured at cold and thermal neutron beamlines. The quantum detection efficiency of a detector (not fully optimized) was measured to be 43% and 16% for the cold and thermal beamlines, respectively. The experiments also demonstrate that the spatial resolution can be better than 15 μm—highest achievable with the particular MCP pore dimension used in the experiment, although more electronics development is required in order to increase the counting rate capabilities of those <15 μm resolution devices. The timing accuracy of neutron detection is on the scale of few μs and is limited by the neutron absorption depth in the detector. The good agreement between the predicted and measured performance allows the optimization of the detector parameters in order to achieve the highest spatial resolution and detection efficiency in future devices.

  16. Simulations of the temporal and spatial resolution for a compact time-resolved electron diffractometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2016-02-01

    A novel compact electron gun for use in time-resolved gas electron diffraction experiments has recently been designed and commissioned. In this paper we present and discuss the extensive simulations that were performed to underpin the design in terms of the spatial and temporal qualities of the pulsed electron beam created by the ionisation of a gold photocathode using a femtosecond laser. The response of the electron pulses to a solenoid lens used to focus the electron beam has also been studied. The simulated results show that focussing the electron beam affects the overall spatial and temporal resolution of the experiment in a variety of ways, and that factors that improve the resolution of one parameter can often have a negative effect on the other. A balance must, therefore, be achieved between spatial and temporal resolution. The optimal experimental time resolution for the apparatus is predicted to be 416 fs for studies of gas-phase species, while the predicted spatial resolution of better than 2 nm-1 compares well with traditional time-averaged electron diffraction set-ups.

  17. Exploring the Spatial Resolution of the Photothermal Beam Deflection Technique in the Infrared Region

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    In photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy (PTBD) generating and detection of thermal waves occur generally in the sub-millimeter length scale. Therefore, PTBD provides spatial information about the surface of the sample and permits imaging and/or microspectrometry. Recent results of PTBD experiments are presented with a high spatial resolution which is near the diffraction limit of the infrared pump beam (CLIO-FEL). We investigated germanium substrates showing restricted O+-doped regions with an infrared absorption line at a wavelength around 11.6 microns. The spatial resolution was obtained by strongly focusing the probe beam (i.e. a HeNe laser) on a sufficiently small spot. The strong divergence makes it necessary to refocus the probe beam in front of the position detector. The influence of the focusing elements on spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio is discussed. In future studies we expect an enhanced spatial resolution due to an extreme focusing of the probe beam leading to a highly sensitive...

  18. The effect of spatial resolution on water scarcity estimates in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Anouk; Veldkamp, Ted; van Dijk, Albert; Ward, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Water scarcity is an important global issue with severe socio-economic consequences, and its occurrence is likely to increase in many regions due to population growth, economic development and climate change. This has prompted a number of global and regional studies to identify areas that are vulnerable to water scarcity and to determine how this vulnerability will change in the future. A drawback of these studies, however, is that they typically have coarse spatial resolutions. Here, we studied the effect of increasing the spatial resolution of water scarcity estimates in Australia, and the Murray-Darling Basin in particular. This was achieved by calculating the water stress index (WSI), an indicator showing the ratio of water use to water availability, at 0.5 and 0.05 degree resolution for the period 1990-2010. Monthly water availability data were based on outputs of the Australian Water Resources Assessment Landscape model (AWRA-L), which was run at both spatial resolutions and at a daily time scale. Water use information was obtained from a monthly 0.5 degree global dataset that distinguishes between water consumption for irrigation, livestock, industrial and domestic uses. The data were downscaled to 0.05 degree by dividing the sectoral water uses over the areas covered by relevant land use types using a high resolution ( 0.5km) land use dataset. The monthly WSIs at high and low resolution were then used to evaluate differences in the patterns of water scarcity frequency and intensity. In this way, we assess to what extent increasing the spatial resolution can improve the identification of vulnerable areas and thereby assist in the development of strategies to lower this vulnerability. The results of this study provide insight into the scalability of water scarcity estimates and the added value of high resolution water scarcity information in water resources management.

  19. High-resolution observations of the spatial and velocity distribution of cometary hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael E.; Spinrad, Hyron

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained high velocity and spatial resolution long-slit H alpha spectra of comets Austin (1989c1) and Levy (1990c). Spectra of both comets clearly show the existence of a low velocity thermalized component of hydrogen gas. The amount of slow hydrogen is estimated for comet Austin. The Levy spectrum shows an unusual high-velocity spatially-confined blob of hydrogen emission of unknown origin.

  20. The Role of Shallow Convection in Tropical Climate via Impacts of the Model Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, H. X.; Chou, C.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the role of shallow convection in tropical climate, using different spatial resolutions as sensitivity studies. After examining the vertical structure and spatial distribution of tropical convection, we found that a coarser resolution produces less partition of shallow convection, while a finer resolution tends to produce greater one in convective regions. We further examine the influence of shallow convection strength on precipitation by comparing the western and eastern Pacific ITCZ. In the western Pacific ITCZ, where is dominated by deep convection, the variation of precipitation among the spatial-resolution experiments is mainly due to the contribution of thermodynamic processes. The warmer climate found in coarser resolutions enhances precipitation frequency and intensity, and then the corresponding precipitation amount. In the eastern Pacific ITCZ, which has more shallow convection, shallow convection becomes the dominant factor to determine the variation of precipitation. More partition of shallow convection found in finer resolutions tends to enhance precipitation frequency and intensity, and the total precipitation amount. This provides potential evidence that shallow convection first affects the occurrence and intensity of precipitation, and then the total amount of precipitation in the region.

  1. Spatial perception of sound fields recorded by spherical microphone arrays with varying spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Amir; Ahrens, Jens; Geier, Matthias; Spors, Sascha; Wierstorf, Hagen; Rafaely, Boaz

    2013-05-01

    The area of sound field synthesis has significantly advanced in the past decade, facilitated by the development of high-quality sound-field capturing and re-synthesis systems. Spherical microphone arrays are among the most recently developed systems for sound field capturing, enabling processing and analysis of three-dimensional sound fields in the spherical harmonics domain. In spite of these developments, a clear relation between sound fields recorded by spherical microphone arrays and their perception with a re-synthesis system has not yet been established, although some relation to scalar measures of spatial perception was recently presented. This paper presents an experimental study of spatial sound perception with the use of a spherical microphone array for sound recording and headphone-based binaural sound synthesis. Sound field analysis and processing is performed in the spherical harmonics domain with the use of head-related transfer functions and simulated enclosed sound fields. The effect of several factors, such as spherical harmonics order, frequency bandwidth, and spatial sampling, are investigated by applying the repertory grid technique to the results of the experiment, forming a clearer relation between sound-field capture with a spherical microphone array and its perception using binaural synthesis regarding space, frequency, and additional artifacts. The experimental study clearly shows that a source will be perceived more spatially sharp and more externalized when represented by a binaural stimuli reconstructed with a higher spherical harmonics order. This effect is apparent from low spherical harmonics orders. Spatial aliasing, as a result of sound field capturing with a finite number of microphones, introduces unpleasant artifacts which increased with the degree of aliasing error.

  2. Displaying a high-resolution digital hologram on a low-resolution spatial light modulator with the same resolution obtained from the hologram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C; Zhou, C

    2013-07-29

    In this paper, a fast method for displaying a digital, real and off-axis Fresnel hologram on a lower resolution device is reported. Preserving the original resolution of the hologram upon display is one of the important attributes of the proposed method. Our method can be divided into 3 stages. First, a digital hologram representing a given three dimensional (3D) object is down-sampled based on a fix, jitter down-sampling lattice. Second, the down-sampled hologram is interpolated, through pixel duplication, into a low resolution hologram that can be displayed with a low-resolution spatial light modulator (SLM). Third, the SLM is overlaid with a grating which is generated based on the same jitter down-sampling lattice that samples the hologram. The integration of the grating and the low-resolution hologram results in, to a good approximation, the resolution of the original hologram. As such, our proposed method enables digital holograms to be displayed with lower resolution SLMs, paving the way for the development of low-cost holographic video display.

  3. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography and its application in traditional Chinese medicine analysis and metabonomic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Kai; Guo, Meng-zhe; Tang, Dao-quan

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional liquid chromatography has become an attractive analytical tool for the separation of complex samples due to its enhanced selectivity, peak capacity, and resolution compared with one-dimensional liquid chromatography. Recently, more attention has been drawn on the application of this separation technique in studies concerning traditional Chinese medicines, metabonomes, proteomes, and other complex mixtures. In this review, we aim to examine the application of two-dimensional liquid chromatography in traditional Chinese medicine analysis and metabonomic investigation. The classification and evaluation indexes were first introduced. Then, various switching methods were summarized when used in an on-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography system. Finally, the applications of this separation technique in traditional Chinese medicine analysis and metabonomic investigation were discussed on the basis of specific studies.

  4. The Chandrasekhar's Equation for Two-Dimensional Hypothetical White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    De, Sanchari

    2014-01-01

    In this article we have extended the original work of Chandrasekhar on the structure of white dwarfs to the two-dimensional case. Although such two-dimensional stellar objects are hypothetical in nature, we strongly believe that the work presented in this article may be prescribed as Master of Science level class problem for the students in physics.

  5. Beginning Introductory Physics with Two-Dimensional Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2009-01-01

    During the session on "Introductory College Physics Textbooks" at the 2007 Summer Meeting of the AAPT, there was a brief discussion about whether introductory physics should begin with one-dimensional motion or two-dimensional motion. Here we present the case that by starting with two-dimensional motion, we are able to introduce a considerable…

  6. Spatiotemporal surface solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Dumitru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Lederer, Falk; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2007-11-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal light localization in truncated two-dimensional photonic lattices and demonstrate the existence of two-dimensional surface light bullets localized in the lattice corners or the edges. We study the families of the spatiotemporal surface solitons and their properties such as bistability and compare them with the modes located deep inside the photonic lattice.

  7. Explorative data analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, J.; Gottlieb, D.M.; Petersen, Marianne Kjerstine;

    2004-01-01

    Methods for classification of two-dimensional (2-DE) electrophoresis gels based on multivariate data analysis are demonstrated. Two-dimensional gels of ten wheat varieties are analyzed and it is demonstrated how to classify the wheat varieties in two qualities and a method for initial screening...

  8. Mechanics of Apparent Horizon in Two Dimensional Dilaton Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we give a definition of apparent horizon in a two dimensional general dilaton gravity theory. With this definition, we construct the mechanics of the apparent horizon by introducing a quasi-local energy of the theory. Our discussion generalizes the apparent horizons mechanics in general spherically symmetric spactimes in four or higher dimensions to the two dimensional dilaton gravity case.

  9. Topological aspect of disclinations in two-dimensional crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Wei-Kai; Zhu Tao; Chen Yong; Ren Ji-Rong

    2009-01-01

    By using topological current theory, this paper studies the inner topological structure of disclinations during the melting of two-dimensional systems. From two-dimensional elasticity theory, it finds that there are topological currents for topological defects in homogeneous equation. The evolution of disclinations is studied, and the branch conditions for generating, annihilating, crossing, splitting and merging of disclinations are given.

  10. Asymmetrical interference effects between two-dimensional geometric shapes and their corresponding shape words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturz, Bradley R; Edwards, Joshua E; Boyer, Ty W

    2014-01-01

    Nativists have postulated fundamental geometric knowledge that predates linguistic and symbolic thought. Central to these claims is the proposal for an isolated cognitive system dedicated to processing geometric information. Testing such hypotheses presents challenges due to difficulties in eliminating the combination of geometric and non-geometric information through language. We present evidence using a modified matching interference paradigm that an incongruent shape word interferes with identifying a two-dimensional geometric shape, but an incongruent two-dimensional geometric shape does not interfere with identifying a shape word. This asymmetry in interference effects between two-dimensional geometric shapes and their corresponding shape words suggests that shape words activate spatial representations of shapes but shapes do not activate linguistic representations of shape words. These results appear consistent with hypotheses concerning a cognitive system dedicated to processing geometric information isolated from linguistic processing and provide evidence consistent with hypotheses concerning knowledge of geometric properties of space that predates linguistic and symbolic thought.

  11. Observation of mesoscopic crystalline structures in a two-dimensional Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Schauß, Peter; Endres, Manuel; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Hild, Sebastian; Omran, Ahmed; Pohl, Thomas; Gross, Christian; Kuhr, Stefan; Bloch, Immanuel

    2012-01-01

    The ability to control and tune interactions in ultracold atomic gases has paved the way towards the realization of new phases of matter. Whereas experiments have so far achieved a high degree of control over short-ranged interactions, the realization of long-range interactions would open up a whole new realm of many-body physics and has become a central focus of research. Rydberg atoms are very well-suited to achieve this goal, as the van der Waals forces between them are many orders of magnitude larger than for ground state atoms. Consequently, the mere laser excitation of ultracold gases can cause strongly correlated many-body states to emerge directly when atoms are transferred to Rydberg states. A key example are quantum crystals, composed of coherent superpositions of different spatially ordered configurations of collective excitations. Here we report on the direct measurement of strong correlations in a laser excited two-dimensional atomic Mott insulator using high-resolution, in-situ Rydberg atom imag...

  12. Two-dimensional DOA Estimation with High Accuracy for MIMO Radar Using Cross Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the estimation of the Two-Dimensional (2D Direction Of Arrival (DOA in monostatic multiple-input–multiple-output radar with cross array and propose a novel, highly accurate DOA estimation method based on unitary transformation. First, we design a new unitary matrix using the central symmetry of a cross array at transmit and receive sites. Then, the rotational invariance relationships of these arrays with long and short baselines can be transformed into a real-value field via unitary transformation. In addition, non-ambiguous and highly accurate 2D DOA estimations can be obtained using a unitary dual-resolution ESPRIT algorithm. Simulations show that the proposed method can estimate 2D highly accurate spatial angles using automatic pairing without incurring the expense of array aperture and peak searching. Compared with traditional unitary transformation, the steering vectors of transmit and receive arrays can be transformed into real-value fields via the unitary matrix and the transformation method of our scheme, respectively. This effectively overcomes the problem of shift invariance factors in real-value fields that cannot be extracted using traditional algorithms. Therefore, the proposed method can absolutely compute eigenvalue decomposition and estimate parameters in a real-value field, resulting in lower computational complexity compared with traditional methods. Simulation results verify both the correctness of our theoretical analysis and the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Anisotropic characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, E A

    2015-01-01

    Statistical characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade for two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence are numerically studied (with spatial resolution $8192\\times 8192$) in the presence of pumping and viscous-like damping. It is shown that quasi-shocks of vorticity and their Fourier partnerships in the form of jets introduce an essential influence in turbulence leading to strong angular dependencies for correlation functions. The energy distribution as a function of modulus $k$ for each angle in the inertial interval has the Kraichnan behavior, $\\sim k^{-4}$, and simultaneously a strong dependence on angles. However, angle average provides with a high accuracy the Kraichnan turbulence spectrum $E_k=C_K\\eta^{2/3} k^{-3}$ where $\\eta$ is enstrophy flux and the Kraichnan constant $C_K\\simeq 1.3$, in correspondence with the previous simulations. Familiar situation takes place for third-order velocity structure function $S_3^L$ which, as for the isotropic turbulence, gives the same scaling with respect to separa...

  14. Holographic and time-resolving ability of pulse-pair two-dimensional velocity interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, David J., E-mail: erskine1@llnl.gov; Smith, R. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bolme, C. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ali, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Previous velocity interferometers used at research laboratories for shock physics experiments measured target motion at a point or many points on a line on the target. Recently, a two-dimensional (2d) version (2d-velocity interferometer system for any reflector) has been demonstrated using a pair of ultrashort (3 ps) pulses for illumination, separated by 268 ps. We have discovered new abilities for this instrument, by treating the complex output image as a hologram. For data taken in an out of focus configuration, we can Fourier process to bring narrow features such as cracks into sharp focus, which are otherwise completely blurred. This solves a practical problem when using high numerical aperture optics having narrow depth of field to observe moving surface features such as cracks. Furthermore, theory predicts that the target appearance (position and reflectivity) at two separate moments in time are recorded by the main and conjugate images of the same hologram, and are partially separable during analysis for narrow features. Hence, for the cracks we bring into refocus, we can make a two-frame movie with a subnanosecond frame period. Longer and shorter frame periods are possible with different interferometer delays. Since the megapixel optical detectors we use have superior spatial resolution over electronic beam based framing cameras, this technology could be of great use in studying microscopic three-dimensional-behavior of targets at ultrafast times scales. Demonstrations on shocked silicon are shown.

  15. Improvement of spatial resolution in confocal microscope with shifted-focus phase filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangdong; Xiang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chongyang

    2015-02-01

    A spatial super-resolution method is proposed based on the multiplicative character of confocal microscope's amplitude point-spread functions. The axial resolution can be greatly improved by introducing a shifted-focus phase filters in illumination part of a confocal microscope. However, this improvement is accompanied by a decrease of transversal resolution. Thus, a super-Gaussian phase filter is optimized to control the focal shift and transversal intensity distribution in a confocal microscope. Numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed method is useful to obtain a significant improvement in the optical sectioning capacity.

  16. Estimation of the high-spatial-resolution variability in extreme wind speeds for forestry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venäläinen, Ari; Laapas, Mikko; Pirinen, Pentti; Horttanainen, Matti; Hyvönen, Reijo; Lehtonen, Ilari; Junila, Päivi; Hou, Meiting; Peltola, Heli M.

    2017-07-01

    The bioeconomy has an increasing role to play in climate change mitigation and the sustainable development of national economies. In Finland, a forested country, over 50 % of the current bioeconomy relies on the sustainable management and utilization of forest resources. Wind storms are a major risk that forests are exposed to and high-spatial-resolution analysis of the most vulnerable locations can produce risk assessment of forest management planning. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of the wind multiplier approach for downscaling of maximum wind speed, using 20 m spatial resolution CORINE land-use dataset and high-resolution digital elevation data. A coarse spatial resolution estimate of the 10-year return level of maximum wind speed was obtained from the ERA-Interim reanalyzed data. Using a geospatial re-mapping technique the data were downscaled to 26 meteorological station locations to represent very diverse environments. Applying a comparison, we find that the downscaled 10-year return levels represent 66 % of the observed variation among the stations examined. In addition, the spatial variation in wind-multiplier-downscaled 10-year return level wind was compared with the WAsP model-simulated wind. The heterogeneous test area was situated in northern Finland, and it was found that the major features of the spatial variation were similar, but in some locations, there were relatively large differences. The results indicate that the wind multiplier method offers a pragmatic and computationally feasible tool for identifying at a high spatial resolution those locations with the highest forest wind damage risks. It can also be used to provide the necessary wind climate information for wind damage risk model calculations, thus making it possible to estimate the probability of predicted threshold wind speeds for wind damage and consequently the probability (and amount) of wind damage for certain forest stand configurations.

  17. Invariant Subspaces of the Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Evolution Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunrong Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop the symmetry-related methods to study invariant subspaces of the two-dimensional nonlinear differential operators. The conditional Lie–Bäcklund symmetry and Lie point symmetry methods are used to construct invariant subspaces of two-dimensional differential operators. We first apply the multiple conditional Lie–Bäcklund symmetries to derive invariant subspaces of the two-dimensional operators. As an application, the invariant subspaces for a class of two-dimensional nonlinear quadratic operators are provided. Furthermore, the invariant subspace method in one-dimensional space combined with the Lie symmetry reduction method and the change of variables is used to obtain invariant subspaces of the two-dimensional nonlinear operators.

  18. Two-Dimensional Electron-Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Jack H.

    2000-03-01

    The extension of the concepts of 2D-NMR to ESR posed significant technological challenges, especially for liquids. ESR relaxation times are very short, as low as 10-15 ns. for T_2's. Spectral bandwidths are 100-250 MHz for nitroxide spin labels. Adequate coverage is obtained with 3-5 ns. π/2 (9-17 GHz) microwave pulses into a small low Q resonator. Dead-times are currently 25-30 ns. Additional requirements are rapid phase shifting for phase cycling, nsec. data acquisition, and fast repetition rates (10-100 kHz). 2D-ELDOR (electron-electron double resonance), which is a 3-pulse 2D-exchange experiment, takes about 30 minutes with just 0.5 nanomole spin-probe in solution (SNR 200). 2D-ELDOR is very useful in studies of molecular dynamics and local structure in complex fluids. For such media, the slow rotational dynamics requires a theory based upon the stochastic Liouville equation which enables quantitative interpretation of 2D-ELDOR experiments. In studies of spin-probes in a liquid crystal new insights could be obtained on the dynamic structure in different phases. One obtains, in addition to ordering and reorientation rates of the probes, details of the local dynamic cage: its orienting potential and (slow) relaxation rate. 2D-ELDOR overcomes the loss of resolution resulting from microscopically ordered but macroscopically disordered complex fluids. This is illustrated by studies of the dynamic structure of lipid membrane vesicles, and the effects of adding a peptide. The short dead times enable the observation of both the bulk lipids and the more immobilized lipids that coat (or are trapped) by the (aggregates of) peptides. Also, new developments of multi-quantum (2D) FT-ESR from nitroxide spin labels interacting by dipolar interactions show considerable promise in measuring distances of ca. 15-70A in macromolecules.

  19. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Ahlinder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  20. Fast Vascular Ultrasound Imaging With Enhanced Spatial Resolution and Background Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Solomon, Oren; Adam, Dan; Eldar, Yonina C

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound super-localization microscopy techniques presented in the last few years enable non-invasive imaging of vascular structures at the capillary level by tracking the flow of ultrasound contrast agents (gas microbubbles). However, these techniques are currently limited by low temporal resolution and long acquisition times. Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a fluorescence microscopy technique enabling sub-diffraction limit imaging with high temporal resolution by calculating high order statistics of the fluctuating optical signal. The aim of this work is to achieve fast acoustic imaging with enhanced resolution by applying the tools used in SOFI to contrast-enhance ultrasound (CEUS) plane-wave scans. The proposed method was tested using numerical simulations and evaluated using two in-vivo rabbit models: scans of healthy kidneys and VX-2 tumor xenografts. Improved spatial resolution was observed with a reduction of up to 50% in the full width half max of the point spread function. In addition, substantial reduction in the background level was achieved compared to standard mean amplitude persistence images, revealing small vascular structures within tumors. The scan duration of the proposed method is less than a second while current super-localization techniques require acquisition duration of several minutes. As a result, the proposed technique may be used to obtain scans with enhanced spatial resolution and high temporal resolution, facilitating flow-dynamics monitoring. Our method can also be applied during a breath-hold, reducing the sensitivity to motion artifacts.

  1. Two-dimensional state in driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Barbara; Galtier, Sébastien

    2011-02-01

    The dynamics of the two-dimensional (2D) state in driven three-dimensional (3D) incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is investigated through high-resolution direct numerical simulations and in the presence of an external magnetic field at various intensities. For such a flow the 2D state (or slow mode) and the 3D modes correspond, respectively, to spectral fluctuations in the plane k(∥)=0 and in the area k(∥)>0. It is shown that if initially the 2D state is set to zero it becomes nonnegligible in few turnover times, particularly when the external magnetic field is strong. The maintenance of a large-scale driving leads to a break for the energy spectra of 3D modes; when the driving is stopped, the previous break is removed and a decay phase emerges with Alfvénic fluctuations. For a strong external magnetic field the energy at large perpendicular scales lies mainly in the 2D state, and in all situations a pinning effect is observed at small scales.

  2. Conformal QED in two-dimensional topological insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Menezes, N; Smith, C Morais

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown recently that local four-fermion interactions on the edges of two-dimensional time-reversal-invariant topological insulators give rise to a new non-Fermi-liquid phase, called helical Luttinger liquid (HLL). In this work, we provide a first-principle derivation of this non-Fermi-liquid phase based on the gauge-theory approach. Firstly, we derive a gauge theory for the edge states by simply assuming that the interactions between the Dirac fermions at the edge are mediated by a quantum dynamical electromagnetic field. Here, the massless Dirac fermions are confined to live on the one-dimensional boundary, while the (virtual) photons of the U(1) gauge field are free to propagate in all the three spatial dimensions that represent the physical space where the topological insulator is embedded. We then determine the effective 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) given by the conformal quantum electrodynamics (CQED). By integrating out the gauge field in the corresponding partition function, ...

  3. Dynamic Properties of Two-Dimensional Polydisperse Granular Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We propose a two-dimensional model of polydisperse granular mixtures with a power-law size distribution in the presence of stochastic driving. A fractal dimension D is introduced as a measurement of the inhomogeneity of the size distribution of particles. We define the global and partial granular temperatures of the multi-component mixture. By direct simulation Monte Carlo, we investigate how the inhomogeneity of the size distribution influences the dynamic properties of the mixture, focusing on the granular temperature, dissipated energy, velocity distribution, spatial clusterization, and collision time. We get the following results: a single granular temperature does not characterize a multi-component mixture and each species attains its own "granular temperature"; The velocity deviation from Gaussian distribution becomes more and more pronounced and the partial density of the assembly is more inhomogeneous with the increasing value of the fractal dimension D; The global granular temperature decreases and average dissipated energy per particle increases as the value of D augments.

  4. Quantifying leaf venation patterns: two-dimensional maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland-Lagan, Anne-Gaëlle; Amin, Mira; Pakulska, Malgosia

    2009-01-01

    The leaf vasculature plays crucial roles in transport and mechanical support. Understanding how vein patterns develop and what underlies pattern variation between species has many implications from both physiological and evolutionary perspectives. We developed a method for extracting spatial vein pattern data from leaf images, such as vein densities and also the sizes and shapes of the vein reticulations. We used this method to quantify leaf venation patterns of the first rosette leaf of Arabidopsis thaliana throughout a series of developmental stages. In particular, we characterized the size and shape of vein network areoles (loops), which enlarge and are split by new veins as a leaf develops. Pattern parameters varied in time and space. In particular, we observed a distal to proximal gradient in loop shape (length/width ratio) which varied over time, and a margin-to-center gradient in loop sizes. Quantitative analyses of vein patterns at the tissue level provide a two-way link between theoretical models of patterning and molecular experimental work to further explore patterning mechanisms during development. Such analyses could also be used to investigate the effect of environmental factors on vein patterns, or to compare venation patterns from different species for evolutionary studies. The method also provides a framework for gathering and overlaying two-dimensional maps of point, line and surface morphological data.

  5. DISCRETE MODELLING OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL LIQUID FOAMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qicheng Sun

    2003-01-01

    Liquid foam is a dense random packing of gas or liquid bubbles in a small amount of immiscible liquid containing surfactants. The liquid within the Plateau borders, although small in volume, causes considerable difficulties to the investigation of the spatial structure and physical properties of foams, and the situation becomes even more complicated as the fluid flows. To solve these problems, a discrete model of two-dimensional liquid foams on the bubble scale is proposed in this work. The bubble surface is represented with finite number of nodes, and the liquid within Plateau borders is discretized into lattice particles. The gas in bubbles is treated as ideal gas at constant temperatures. This model is tested by choosing an arbitrary shape bubble as the initial condition. This then automatically evolves into a circular shape, which indicates that the surface energy minimum routine is obeyed without calling external controlling conditions. Without inserting liquid particle among the bubble channels, periodic ordered and disordered dry foams are both simulated, and the fine foam structures are developed. Wet foams are also simulated by inserting fluid among bubble channels. The calculated coordination number, as a function of liquid fractions, agrees well with the standard values.

  6. Two-dimensional model for circulating fluidized-bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, H.; Kruse, M.; Werther, J. [Technical Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Circulating fluidized bed reactors are widely used for the combustion of coal in power stations as well as for the cracking of heavy oil in the petroleum industry. A two-dimensional reactor model for circulating fluidized beds (CFB) was studied based on the assumption that at every location within the riser, a descending dense phase and a rising lean phase coexist. Fluid mechanical variables may be calculated from one measured radial solids flux profile (upward and downward). The internal mass-transfer behavior is described on the basis of tracer gas experiments. The CFB reactor model was tested against data from ozone decomposition experiments in a CFB cold flow model (15.6-m height, 0.4-m ID) operated in the ranges 2.5--4.5 m/s and 9--45 kg/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s) of superficial gas velocity and solids mass flux, respectively. Based on effective reaction rate constants determined from the ozone exit concentration, the model was used to predict the spatial reactant distribution within the reactor. Model predictions agreed well with measurements.

  7. Magnetoconductivity of two-dimensional electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnel, Frank Oliver

    density fluctuations. Due to this field, spatial diffusion of electrons in a (comparatively strong) random potential of defects gives rise to energy diffusion of each individual electron, with a diffusion coefficient Depsilon = gammae2h/mo c. In combination with the known power-law asymptotic of the single-electron conductivity for sigmase(o) for o → 0, this allows us to find the static many-electron conductivity sigma me.

  8. Spatial resolution influence on the identification of land cover classes in the Amazon environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PONZONI FLÁVIO J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the role played by the spatial resolution in distinguishing land cover classes in the Amazon region, different levels of spatial resolution (60, 100, 120, 200 and 250 meters were simulated from a Landsat_5 Thematic Mapper (TM image. Thematic maps were produced by visual interpretation from the original (30 x 30 meters and simulated set of images. The map legend included primary forest, old and young woody secondary succession, and non-forest. The results indicated that for the discrimination between primary forest and non-forest, spatial resolution did not have great influence for pixel size equal or lower than 200 meters. The contrary was verified for the identification of old and young woody secondary vegetation due to their occurrence in small polygons. To avoid significant changes in the calculated area of these land cover types, a spatial resolution better than 100 meters is required. This result is an indication that the use of the future Brazilian remote sensing satellite (SSR-1 for secondary succession identification may be unreliable, especially for latitudes between S10degrees and S15degrees where critical areas of deforestation are located and pixel size is expected to vary within the same scene from 100 meters (S10degrees to 200 meters (S15degrees.

  9. Spatial resolution of a {\\mu}PIC-based neutron imaging detector

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Joseph D; Hattori, Kaori; Iwaki, Satoru; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Hironobu; Oku, Takayuki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the spatial resolution of our time-resolved neutron imaging detector utilizing a new neutron position reconstruction method that improves both spatial resolution and event reconstruction efficiency. Our prototype detector system, employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system, combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with excellent gamma rejection and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. From data taken at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility within the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), the spatial resolution was found to be approximately Gaussian with a sigma of 103.48 +/- 0.77 {\\mu}m (after correcting for beam divergence). This is a significant improvement over that achievable with our previous reconstruction method (334 +/...

  10. Physical Simulator of Infrared Spectroradiometer with Spatial Resolution Enhancement Using Subpixel Image Registration and Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyalko, V.І.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical and physical models of the new frame infrared spectroradiometer based on microbolometer array sensor with subpixel image registration are presented. It is planned to include the radiometer into onboard instrumentation of the future «Sich» satellite system for the land surface physical characterization by enhanced spatial resolution infrared space imagery.

  11. PET investigation of a fluidized particle : spatial and temporal resolution and short term motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, AC; Dechsiri, C; van de Wiel, F; Dehling, HG

    2005-01-01

    The motion of a single particle in a fluidized bed has been followed with high temporal and spatial resolution using an ECAT EXACT HR+ PET camera. An account is given of the analysis of the output from the camera, and the calculation of the particle position. The particle position was determined wit

  12. SPATIALLY SCALABLE RESOLUTION IMAGE CODING METHOD WITH MEMORY OPTIMIZATION BASED ON WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Na; Zhang Li; Zhou Xiao'an; Jia Chuanying; Li Xia

    2005-01-01

    This letter exploits fundamental characteristics of a wavelet transform image to form a progressive octave-based spatial resolution. Each wavelet subband is coded based on zeroblock and quardtree partitioning ordering scheme with memory optimization technique. The method proposed in this letter is of low complexity and efficient for Internet plug-in software.

  13. Beam hardening correction for a cone-beam CT system and its effect on spatial resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; WEI Long; YU Zhong-Qiang; FU Guo-Tao; SUN Cui-Li; WANG Yan-Fang; WEI Cun-Feng; CAO Da-Quan; QUE Jie-Min; TANG Xiao; SHI Rong-Jian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we present a beam hardening correction (BHC) method in three-dimension space for a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system in a mono-material case and investigate its effect on the spatial resolution.Due to the polychromatic character of the X-ray spectrum used,cupping and streak artifacts called beam hardening artifacts arise in the reconstructed CT images,causing reduced image quality.In addition,enhanced edges are introduced in the reconstructed CT images because of the beam hardening effect.The spatial resolution of the CBCT system is calculated from the edge response function (ERF) on different planes in space.Thus,in the CT images with beam hardening artifacts,enhanced ERFs will be extracted to calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF),obtaining a better spatial resolution that deviates from the real value.Reasonable spatial resolution can be obtained after reducing the artifacts.The 10% MTF value and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function with and without BHC are presented.

  14. Classification of high spatial resolution imagery using optimal Gabor-filters-based texture features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yindi; Wu, Bo

    2007-06-01

    Texture analysis has received great attention in the interpretation of high-resolution satellite images. This paper aims to find optimal filters for discriminating between residential areas and other land cover types in high spatial resolution satellite imagery. Moreover, in order to reduce the blurring border effect, inherent in texture analysis and which introduces important errors in the transition areas between different texture units, a classification procedure is designed for such high spatial resolution satellite images as follows. Firstly, residential areas are detected using Gabor texture features, and two clusters, one a residential area and the other not, are detected using the fuzzy C-Means algorithm, in the frequency space based on Gabor filters. Sequentially, a mask is generated to eliminate residential areas so that other land-cover types would be classified accurately, and not interfered with the spectrally heterogeneous residential areas. Afterwards, other objects are classified using spectral features by the MAP (maximum a posterior) - ICM (iterated conditional mode) classification algorithm designed to enforce the spatial constraints into classification. Experimental results on high spatial resolution remote sensing data confirm that the proposed algorithm provide remarkably better detection accuracy than conventional approaches in terms of both objective measurements and visual evaluation.

  15. High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan P. Dandois; Erle C. Ellis

    2013-01-01

    High spatial resolution three-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental management. However, substantial economic and logistical costs limit this application, especially for observing phenological dynamics in ecosystem structure and spectral traits. Here we demonstrate a new aerial remote sensing...

  16. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  17. Effect of predictor-corrector filtering on the stability and spatial resolution of iterative PIV interrogation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijer, F.F.J.; Scarano, F.

    2008-01-01

    The stability and resolution of iterative PIV image analysis methods is investigated. The study focuses on the effects of stabilization by means of spatial filtering when implemented into the iterative process. Two filtering approaches are studied: predictor and corrector filtering respectively. A

  18. Array diagnostics, spatial resolution, and filtering of undesired radiation with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pivnenko, Sergey; Jørgensen, E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three important features of the 3D reconstruction algorithm of DIATOOL: the identification of array elements improper functioning and failure, the obtainable spatial resolution of the reconstructed fields and currents, and the filtering of undesired radiation and scattering...

  19. A method for estimating spatial resolution of real image in the Fourier domain

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Takekoshi, Susumu; Inomoto, Chie; Nakamura, Naoya; Itokawa, Masanari; Arai, Makoto; Oshima, Kenichi; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Spatial resolution is a fundamental parameter in structural sciences. In crystallography, the resolution is determined from the detection limit of high-angle diffraction in reciprocal space. In electron microscopy, correlation in the Fourier domain is used for estimating the resolution. In this paper, we report a method for estimating the spatial resolution of real images from a logarithmic intensity plot in the Fourier domain. The logarithmic intensity plots of test images indicated that the full width at half maximum of a Gaussian point-spread function can be estimated from the images. The spatial resolution of imaging X-ray microtomography using Fresnel zone-plate optics was also estimated with this method. A cross section of a test object visualized with the imaging microtomography indicated that square-wave patterns up to 120-nm pitch were resolved. The logarithmic intensity plot was calculated from a tomographic cross section of brain tissue. The full width at half maximum of the point spread function e...

  20. Electrophysiological measures of temporal resolution, contrast sensitivity and spatial resolving power in sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Laura A; Hemmi, Jan M; Collin, Shaun P; Hart, Nathan S

    2017-03-01

    In most animals, vision plays an important role in detecting prey, predators and conspecifics. The effectiveness of vision in assessing cues such as motion and shape is influenced by the ability of the visual system to detect changes in contrast in both space and time. Understanding the role vision plays in shark behaviour has been limited by a lack of knowledge about their temporal resolution, contrast sensitivity and spatial resolution. In this study, an electrophysiological approach was used to compare these measures across five species of sharks: Chiloscyllium punctatum, Heterodontus portusjacksoni, Hemiscyllium ocellatum, Mustelus mustelus and Haploblepharus edwardsii. All shark species were highly sensitive to brightness contrast and were able to detect contrast differences as low as 1.6%. Temporal resolution of flickering stimuli ranged from 28 to 44 Hz. Species that inhabit brighter environments were found to have higher temporal resolution. Spatial resolving power was estimated in C. punctatum, H. portusjacksoni and H. ocellatum and ranged from 0.10 to 0.35 cycles per degree, which is relatively low compared to other vertebrates. These results suggest that sharks have retinal adaptations that enhance contrast sensitivity at the expense of temporal and spatial resolution, which is beneficial for vision in dimly lit and/or low contrast aquatic environments.

  1. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  2. Using High Spatial Resolution Satellite Imagery to Map Forest Burn Severity Across Spatial Scales in a Pine Barrens Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ran; Wu, Jin; Schwager, Kathy L.; Zhao, Feng; Dennison, Philip E.; Cook, Bruce D.; Brewster, Kristen; Green, Timothy M.; Serbin, Shawn P.

    2017-01-01

    As a primary disturbance agent, fire significantly influences local processes and services of forest ecosystems. Although a variety of remote sensing based approaches have been developed and applied to Landsat mission imagery to infer burn severity at 30 m spatial resolution, forest burn severity have still been seldom assessed at fine spatial scales (less than or equal to 5 m) from very-high-resolution (VHR) data. We assessed a 432 ha forest fire that occurred in April 2012 on Long Island, New York, within the Pine Barrens region, a unique but imperiled fire-dependent ecosystem in the northeastern United States. The mapping of forest burn severity was explored here at fine spatial scales, for the first time using remotely sensed spectral indices and a set of Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) fraction images from bi-temporal - pre- and post-fire event - WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery at 2 m spatial resolution. We first evaluated our approach using 1 m by 1 m validation points at the sub-crown scale per severity class (i.e. unburned, low, moderate, and high severity) from the post-fire 0.10 m color aerial ortho-photos; then, we validated the burn severity mapping of geo-referenced dominant tree crowns (crown scale) and 15 m by 15 m fixed-area plots (inter-crown scale) with the post-fire 0.10 m aerial ortho-photos and measured crown information of twenty forest inventory plots. Our approach can accurately assess forest burn severity at the sub-crown (overall accuracy is 84% with a Kappa value of 0.77), crown (overall accuracy is 82% with a Kappa value of 0.76), and inter-crown scales (89% of the variation in estimated burn severity ratings (i.e. Geo-Composite Burn Index (CBI)). This work highlights that forest burn severity mapping from VHR data can capture heterogeneous fire patterns at fine spatial scales over the large spatial extents. This is important since most ecological processes associated with fire effects vary at the less than 30 m scale and

  3. Two-dimensional DNA displays for comparisons of bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malloff Chad

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed two whole genome-scanning techniques to aid in the discovery of polymorphisms as well as horizontally acquired genes in prokaryotic organisms. First, two-dimensional bacterial genomic display (2DBGD was developed using restriction enzyme fragmentation to separate genomic DNA based on size, and then employing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE in the second dimension to exploit differences in sequence composition. This technique was used to generate high-resolution displays that enable the direct comparison of > 800 genomic fragments simultaneously and can be adapted for the high-throughput comparison of bacterial genomes. 2DBGDs are capable of detecting acquired and altered DNA, however, only in very closely related strains. If used to compare more distantly related strains (e.g. different species within a genus numerous small changes (i.e. small deletions and point mutations unrelated to the interesting phenotype, would encumber the comparison of 2DBGDs. For this reason a second method, bacterial comparative genomic hybridization (BCGH, was developed to directly compare bacterial genomes to identify gain or loss of genomic DNA. BCGH relies on performing 2DBGD on a pooled sample of genomic DNA from 2 strains to be compared and subsequently hybridizing the resulting 2DBGD blot separately with DNA from each individual strain. Unique spots (hybridization signals represent foreign DNA. The identification of novel DNA is easily achieved by excising the DNA from a dried gel followed by subsequent cloning and sequencing. 2DBGD and BCGH thus represent novel high resolution genome scanning techniques for directly identifying altered and/or acquired DNA.

  4. Spatial resolution on a small animal RPC-PET prototype operating under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, A. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: alberto@coimbra.lip.pt; Carolino, N. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Correia, C.M.B.A. [CEI, Centro de Electronica e Instrumentacao, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Fazendeiro, L. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira, Nuno C. [IBILI, Instituto Biomedico de Investigacao de Luz e Imagem, Faculty of Medicine, 3000-548, Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira Marques, M.F. [ICEMS, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira Marques, R. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516, Coimbra (Portugal); Fonte, P. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); ISEC, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Quinta da Nora, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Gil, C. [ICEMS, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Macedo, M.P. [CEI, Centro de Electronica e Instrumentacao, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); ISEC, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Quinta da Nora, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2006-08-15

    It has been demonstrated in previous work that the RPC-PET technology is able to deliver radioisotope image resolutions approaching the physical limits of the PET principle. Here we study, by simulation, the effect of the magnetic field on the positron range to evaluate whether the spatial resolution of the RPC-PET could be improved by using an intense magnetic field. Six positron emitters of interest to small animal PET imaging ({sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 15}O, {sup 68}G, {sup 62}Cu and {sup 86}Y) are considered. Results suggest that a three-fold improvement on the spatial resolution may be obtained under a magnetic field of 10 T for the higher energy radioisotopes like {sup 86}Y or {sup 62}Cu, and by about 20% for the lower energy ones, like {sup 18}F or {sup 11}C.

  5. Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-05-26

    The advent of bottom-up atomic manipulation heralded a new horizon for attainable information density, as it allowed a bit of information to be represented by a single atom. The discrete spacing between atoms in condensed matter has thus set a rigid limit on the maximum possible information density. While modern technologies are still far from this scale, all theoretical downscaling of devices terminates at this spatial limit. Here, however, we break this barrier with electronic quantum encoding scaled to subatomic densities. We use atomic manipulation to first construct open nanostructures - 'molecular holograms' - which in turn concentrate information into a medium free of lattice constraints: the quantum states of a two-dimensional degenerate Fermi gas of electrons. The information embedded in the holograms is transcoded at even smaller length scales into an atomically uniform area of a copper surface, where it is densely projected into both two spatial degrees of freedom and a third holographic dimension mapped to energy. In analogy to optical volume holography, this requires precise amplitude and phase engineering of electron wavefunctions to assemble pages of information volumetrically. This data is read out by mapping the energy-resolved electron density of states with a scanning tunnelling microscope. As the projection and readout are both extremely near-field, and because we use native quantum states rather than an external beam, we are not limited by lensing or collimation and can create electronically projected objects with features as small as {approx}0.3 nm. These techniques reach unprecedented densities exceeding 20 bits/nm{sup 2} and place tens of bits into a single fermionic state.

  6. Internetwork magnetic field as revealed by two-dimensional inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilovic, S.; van Noort, M.; Rempel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Properties of magnetic field in the internetwork regions are still fairly unknown because of rather weak spectropolarimetric signals. Aims: We address the matter by using the two-dimensional (2D) inversion code, which is able to retrieve the information on smallest spatial scales up to the diffraction limit, while being less susceptible to noise than most of the previous methods used. Methods: Performance of the code and the impact of various effects on the retrieved field distribution is tested first on the realistic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The best inversion scenario is then applied to the real data obtained by Spectropolarimeter (SP) on board Hinode. Results: Tests on simulations show that: (1) the best choice of node position ensures a decent retrieval of all parameters; (2) the code performs well for different configurations of magnetic field; (3) slightly different noise levels or slightly different defocus included in the spatial point spread function (PSF) produces no significant effect on the results; and (4) temporal integration shifts the field distribution to a stronger, more horizontally inclined field. Conclusions: Although the contribution of the weak field is slightly overestimated owing to noise, 2D inversions are able to recover well the overall distribution of the magnetic field strength. Application of the 2D inversion code on the Hinode SP internetwork observations reveals a monotonic field strength distribution. The mean field strength at optical depth unity is ~ 130 G. At higher layers, field strength drops as the field becomes more horizontal. Regarding the distribution of the field inclination, tests show that we cannot directly retrieve it with the observations and tools at hand, however, the obtained distributions are consistent with those expected from simulations with a quasi-isotropic field inclination after accounting for observational effects.

  7. Robust Fusion of Multi-Band Images with Different Spatial and Spectral Resolutions for Change Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraris, Vinicius; Wei, Qi; Chabert, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Archetypal scenarios for change detection generally consider two images acquired through sensors of the same modality. However, in some specific cases such as emergency situations, the only images available may be those acquired through different kinds of sensors. More precisely, this paper addresses the problem of detecting changes between two multi-band optical images characterized by different spatial and spectral resolutions. This sensor dissimilarity introduces additional issues in the context of operational change detection. To alleviate these issues, classical change detection methods are applied after independent preprocessing steps (e.g., resampling) used to get the same spatial and spectral resolutions for the pair of observed images. Nevertheless, these preprocessing steps tend to throw away relevant information. Conversely, in this paper, we propose a method that more effectively uses the available information by modeling the two observed images as spatial and spectral versions of two (unobserved)...

  8. Study on validation method of visible imagery spatial resolution of imager on geostationary platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Guo

    2006-01-01

    @@ Based on the analysis for the main elements of the total modulation transfer function (MTF) of imager on geostationary platform, the precise evaluation for its low spatial frequency spectrum has been achieved.Meanwhile, it is pointed out that the main cause of imagery spatial resolution lower than the designed value is the "slight defocus" of imager focal plane array (FPA). The validation method for visible imagery spatial resolution is proposed based on the analysis of defocused optical system model and edge-spread-function (ESF), the relative error is less than 7% after alleviating stray light effects. This method has been applied in the in-orbit ground testing of FY-2C geostationary meteorological satellite successfully.

  9. Two-dimensional discrete gap breathers in a two-dimensional discrete diatomic Klein-Gordon lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; QIANG Tian

    2009-01-01

    We study the existence and stability of two-dimensional discrete breathers in a two-dimensional discrete diatomic Klein-Gordon lattice consisting of alternating light and heavy atoms, with nearest-neighbor harmonic coupling.Localized solutions to the corresponding nonlinear differential equations with frequencies inside the gap of the linear wave spectrum, i.e. two-dimensional gap breathers, are investigated numerically. The numerical results of the corresponding algebraic equations demonstrate the possibility of the existence of two-dimensional gap breathers with three types of symmetries, i.e., symmetric, twin-antisymmetric and single-antisymmetric. Their stability depends on the nonlinear on-site potential (soft or hard), the interaction potential (attractive or repulsive)and the center of the two-dimensional gap breather (on a light or a heavy atom).

  10. On the sensitivity of urban hydrodynamic modelling to rainfall spatial and temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bruni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cities are increasingly vulnerable to floods generated by intense rainfall, because of their high degree of imperviousness, implementation of infrastructures, and changes in precipitation patterns due to climate change. Accurate information of convective storm characteristics at high spatial and temporal resolution is a crucial input for urban hydrological models to be able to simulate fast runoff processes and enhance flood prediction. In this paper, a detailed study of the sensitivity of urban hydrological response to high resolution radar rainfall was conducted. Rainfall rates derived from X-band dual polarimetric weather radar for four rainstorms were used as input into a detailed hydrodynamic sewer model for an urban catchment in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Dimensionless parameters were derived to compare results between different storm conditions and to describe the effect of rainfall spatial resolution in relation to storm and hydrodynamic model properties: rainfall sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. storm size, catchment sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. catchment size, runoff and sewer sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. runoff and sewer model resolution respectively. Results show catchment smearing effect for rainfall resolution approaching half the catchment size, i.e. for catchments sampling numbers greater than 0.5 averaged rainfall volumes decrease about 20%. Moreover, deviations in maximum water depths, form 10 to 30% depending on the storm, occur for rainfall resolution close to storm size, describing storm smearing effect due to rainfall coarsening. Model results also show the sensitivity of modelled runoff peaks and maximum water depths to the resolution of the runoff areas and sewer density respectively. Sensitivity to temporal resolution of rainfall input seems low compared to spatial resolution, for the storms analysed in this study. Findings are in agreement with previous studies on natural catchments

  11. Effects of Spatial and Spectral Resolutions on Fractal Dimensions in Forested Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Quattrochi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that more research is needed in applying fractal analysis to multi-resolution remote sensing data for landscape characterization. The purpose of this study was to closely examine the impacts that spatial and spectral resolutions have on fractal dimensions using real-world multi-resolution remotely sensed data as opposed to the more conventional single resolution and aggregation approach. The study focused on fractal analysis of forested landscapes in the southeastern United States and Central America. Initially, the effects of spatial resolution on the computed fractal dimensions were examined using data from three instruments with different spatial resolutions. Based on the criteria of mean value and variation within the accepted ranges of fractal dimensions, it was determined that 30-m Landsat TM data were best able to capture the complexity of a forested landscape in Central America compared to 4-m IKONOS data and 250-m MODIS data. Also, among the spectral bands of Landsat TM images of four national forests in the southeastern United States, tests showed that the spatial indices of fractal dimensions are much more distinguishable in the visible bands than they are in the near-mid infrared bands. Thus, based solely on the fractal analysis, the fractal dimensions could have relatively higher chances to distinguish forest characteristics (e.g., stand sizes and species in the Landsat TM visible wavelength bands than in the near-mid infrared bands. This study has focused on a relative comparison between visible and near-mid infrared wavelength bands; however it will be important to study in the future the effect of a combination of those bands such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI on fractal dimensions of forested landscapes.

  12. Spatially adaptive probabilistic computation of a sub-kilometre resolution lightning climatology for New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherington, Thomas R.; Perry, George L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Lightning is a key component of the Earth's atmosphere and climate systems, and there is a potential positive feedback between a warming climate and increased lightning activity. In the biosphere, lightning is important as the main natural ignition source for wildfires and because of its contribution to the nitrogen cycle. Therefore, it is important to develop lightning climatologies to characterise and monitor lightning activity. While traditional methods for constructing lightning climatologies are suitable for examining lightning's influence on atmospheric processes, they are less well suited for examining questions about biosphere-lightning interactions. For example, examining the interaction between lightning and wildfires requires linking atmospheric processes to finer scale terrestrial processes and patterns. Most wildfires ignited by lightning are less than one hectare in size, and so require lightning climatologies at a comparable spatial resolution. However, such high resolution lightning climatologies cannot be derived using the traditional cell-count methodology. Here we present a novel geocomputational approach for analysing lightning data at high spatial resolutions. Our approach is based on probabilistic computational methods and is capable of producing a sub-kilometre lightning climatology that honours the spatial accuracy of the strike locations and is adaptive to underlying spatial patterns. We demonstrate our methods by applying them to the mid-latitude oceanic landmass of New Zealand, an area with geographic conditions that are under-represented in existing lightning climatologies. Our resulting lightning climatology has unparalleled spatial resolution, and the spatial and temporal patterns we observe in it are consistent with other continental and tropical lightning climatologies. To encourage further use and development of our probabilistic approach, we provide Python scripts that demonstrate the method alongside our resulting New Zealand

  13. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    necessarily found in areas of higher MAGT. Active layer thickness does not appear to be correlated to mean annual air temperature but rather is a function of summer air temperature or thawing degree-days. While the refreezing of the active layer initiated at nearly the same time for all locations and polygons, we find differences in the proportion of top-down versus bottom-up freezing and the length of time required to complete the refreezing process. Examination of the daily temperature dynamics using interpolated two-dimensional temperature fields reveal that during the summer, the predominate temperature gradient is vertical while the isotherms tend to follow the topography. However, as the active layer begins to refreeze and snow accumulates, the thermal regime diverges. The fall shows an increased temperature gradient horizontally with landscape positions containing higher soil moisture and/or snow depth (low centers and troughs) cooling more slowly than the adjacent ground (rims and high centers). This two-dimensional effect is greatest as the active layer refreezes and persists until mid-winter, by which time the temperature gradients are again mostly vertical and the isotherms follow the topography. Our findings demonstrate the complexity and two-dimensionality of the temperature dynamics in these landscapes.

  14. Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 2 -2 0 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway C oa st al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at...distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-12-20 September 2012 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway Stephen H. Scott, Jeremy A...A two-dimensional Adaptive Hydraulics (AdH) hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate the Moose Creek Floodway. The Floodway is located

  15. RESEARCH ON TWO-DIMENSIONAL LDA FOR FACE RECOGNITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Ke; Zhu Xiuchang

    2006-01-01

    The letter presents an improved two-dimensional linear discriminant analysis method for feature extraction. Compared with the current two-dimensional methods for feature extraction, the improved two-dimensional linear discriminant analysis method makes full use of not only the row and the column direction information of face images but also the discriminant information among different classes. The method is evaluated using the Nanjing University of Science and Technology (NUST) 603 face database and the Aleix Martinez and Robert Benavente (AR) face database. Experimental results show that the method in the letter is feasible and effective.

  16. ONE-DIMENSIONAL AND TWO-DIMENSIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Stefanović

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to motivate their group members to perform certain tasks, leaders use different leadership styles. These styles are based on leaders' backgrounds, knowledge, values, experiences, and expectations. The one-dimensional styles, used by many world leaders, are autocratic and democratic styles. These styles lie on the two opposite sides of the leadership spectrum. In order to precisely define the leadership styles on the spectrum between the autocratic leadership style and the democratic leadership style, leadership theory researchers use two dimensional matrices. The two-dimensional matrices define leadership styles on the basis of different parameters. By using these parameters, one can identify two-dimensional styles.

  17. Spatially detailed retrievals of spring phenology from single-season high-resolution image time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieling, Anton; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Wang, Tiejun; Meroni, Michele; Ens, Bruno J.; Oosterbeek, Kees; O'Connor, Brian; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Heurich, Marco; Shepherd, Anita; Paganini, Marc

    2017-07-01

    Vegetation indices derived from satellite image time series have been extensively used to estimate the timing of phenological events like season onset. Medium spatial resolution (≥250 m) satellite sensors with daily revisit capability are typically employed for this purpose. In recent years, phenology is being retrieved at higher resolution (≤30 m) in response to increasing availability of high-resolution satellite data. To overcome the reduced acquisition frequency of such data, previous attempts involved fusion between high- and medium-resolution data, or combinations of multi-year acquisitions in a single phenological reconstruction. The objectives of this study are to demonstrate that phenological parameters can now be retrieved from single-season high-resolution time series, and to compare these retrievals against those derived from multi-year high-resolution and single-season medium-resolution satellite data. The study focuses on the island of Schiermonnikoog, the Netherlands, which comprises a highly-dynamic saltmarsh, dune vegetation, and agricultural land. Combining NDVI series derived from atmospherically-corrected images from RapidEye (5 m-resolution) and the SPOT5 Take5 experiment (10m-resolution) acquired between March and August 2015, phenological parameters were estimated using a function fitting approach. We then compared results with phenology retrieved from four years of 30 m Landsat 8 OLI data, and single-year 100 m Proba-V and 250 m MODIS temporal composites of the same period. Retrieved phenological parameters from combined RapidEye/SPOT5 displayed spatially consistent results and a large spatial variability, providing complementary information to existing vegetation community maps. Retrievals that combined four years of Landsat observations into a single synthetic year were affected by the inclusion of years with warmer spring temperatures, whereas adjustment of the average phenology to 2015 observations was only feasible for a few pixels

  18. High-spatial-resolution microwave and related observations as diagnostics of coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1986-01-01

    High spatial resolution microwave observations of coronal loops, together with theoretical models for the loop emission, can provide detailed information about the temperature, density, and magnetic field within the loop, as well as the environment around the loop. The capability for studying magnetic fields is particularly important, since there is no comparable method for obtaining direct information about coronal magnetic fields. Knowledge of the magnetic field strength and structure in coronal loops is important for understanding both coronal heating and flares. With arc-second-resolution microwave observations from the Very Large Array (VLA), supplemental high-spectral-resolution microwave data from a facility such as the Owens Valley frequency-agile interferometer, and the ability to obtain second-of-arc resolution EUV aor soft X ray images, the capability already exists for obtaining much more detailed information about coronal plasma and magnetic structures than is presently available. This capability is discussed.

  19. Super-resolution imaging in digital holography by using dynamic grating with a spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiaowen; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Rong, Lu; Chang, Shifeng

    2015-03-01

    A super-resolution imaging method using dynamic grating based on liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) is developed to improve the resolution of a digital holographic system. The one-dimensional amplitude cosine grating is loaded on the SLM, which is placed between the object and hologram plane in order to collect more high-frequency components towards CCD plane. The point spread function of the system is given to confirm the separation condition of reconstructed images for multiple diffraction orders. The simulation and experiments are carried out for a standard resolution test target as a sample, which confirms that the imaging resolution is improved from 55.7 μm to 31.3 μm compared with traditional lensless Fourier transform digital holography. The unique advantage of the proposed method is that the period of the grating can be programmably adjusted according to the separation condition.

  20. Long-distance super-resolution imaging assisted by enhanced spatial Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Heng-He; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2015-09-07

    A new gradient-index (GRIN) lens that can realize enhanced spatial Fourier transform (FT) over optically long distances is demonstrated. By using an anisotropic GRIN metamaterial with hyperbolic dispersion, evanescent wave in free space can be transformed into propagating wave in the metamaterial and then focused outside due to negative-refraction. Both the results based on the ray tracing and the finite element simulation show that the spatial frequency bandwidth of the spatial FT can be extended to 2.7k(0) (k(0) is the wave vector in free space). Furthermore, assisted by the enhanced spatial FT, a new long-distance (in the optical far-field region) super-resolution imaging scheme is also proposed and the super resolved capability of λ/5 (λ is the wavelength in free space) is verified. The work may provide technical support for designing new-type high-speed microscopes with long working distances.

  1. A High Spatial Resolution Depth Sensing Method Based on Binocular Structured Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huimin; Ge, Chenyang; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2017-04-08

    Depth information has been used in many fields because of its low cost and easy availability, since the Microsoft Kinect was released. However, the Kinect and Kinect-like RGB-D sensors show limited performance in certain applications and place high demands on accuracy and robustness of depth information. In this paper, we propose a depth sensing system that contains a laser projector similar to that used in the Kinect, and two infrared cameras located on both sides of the laser projector, to obtain higher spatial resolution depth information. We apply the block-matching algorithm to estimate the disparity. To improve the spatial resolution, we reduce the size of matching blocks, but smaller matching blocks generate lower matching precision. To address this problem, we combine two matching modes (binocular mode and monocular mode) in the disparity estimation process. Experimental results show that our method can obtain higher spatial resolution depth without loss of the quality of the range image, compared with the Kinect. Furthermore, our algorithm is implemented on a low-cost hardware platform, and the system can support the resolution of 1280 × 960, and up to a speed of 60 frames per second, for depth image sequences.

  2. High spatial resolution imaging for structural health monitoring based on virtual time reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian; Shi, Lihua; Yuan, Shenfang; Shao, Zhixue

    2011-05-01

    Lamb waves are widely used in structural health monitoring (SHM) of plate-like structures. Due to the dispersion effect, Lamb wavepackets will be elongated and the resolution for damage identification will be strongly affected. This effect can be automatically compensated by the time reversal process (TRP). However, the time information of the compensated waves is also removed at the same time. To improve the spatial resolution of Lamb wave detection, virtual time reversal (VTR) is presented in this paper. In VTR, a changing-element excitation and reception mechanism (CERM) rather than the traditional fixed excitation and reception mechanism (FERM) is adopted for time information conservation. Furthermore, the complicated TRP procedure is replaced by simple signal operations which can make savings in the hardware cost for recording and generating the time-reversed Lamb waves. After the effects of VTR for dispersive damage scattered signals are theoretically analyzed, the realization of VTR involving the acquisition of the transfer functions of damage detecting paths under step pulse excitation is discussed. Then, a VTR-based imaging method is developed to improve the spatial resolution of the delay-and-sum imaging with a sparse piezoelectric (PZT) wafer array. Experimental validation indicates that the damage scattered wavepackets of A0 mode in an aluminum plate are partly recompressed and focalized with their time information preserved by VTR. Both the single damage and the dual adjacent damages in the plate can be clearly displayed with high spatial resolution by the proposed VTR-based imaging method.

  3. The method of improving the spatial resolution of the matrix spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, Yury; Beliaev, Boris; Katkovsky, Leonid

    2014-10-01

    The videospectral system (VSS) intended for ecological space experiment on board of the International Space Station (ISS) has been developed by the Aerospace Researches Department of the Institute of Applied Physical Problems of the Belarusian State University. The system comprises three matrix spectrometers MP-15. The polychromator of each spectrometer includes the imaging fiber, the entrance slit, concave holographic diffraction grating, and a CCD array detector. The array photodetector measures the spectral radiation distribution in rows, and the spatial distribution (image) in columns. Astigmatism is a typical aberration of polychromators based on concave spherical gratings - rays in tangential and sagittal planes are focused at different points. This degrades as for spectral and spatial resolution along the entrance slit. The proposed method of obtaining high spatial resolution without spectral resolution loss consists in the displacement of the output end of the imaging fiber along the optical axis at a specified distance from the entrance slit. After that the rays in the tangential and sagittal planes focus at one point. The entrance slit operates as a one-dimensional aperture to obtain high spectral resolution.

  4. Compressed sensing for super-resolution spatial and temporal laser detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Schertzer, Stephane; Christnacher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    In the past decades, laser aided electro-optical sensing has reached high maturity and several commercial systems are available at the market for various but specific applications. These systems can be used for detection i.e. imaging as well as ranging. They cover laser scanning devices like LiDAR and staring full frame imaging systems like laser gated viewing or LADAR. The sensing capabilities of these systems is limited by physical parameter (like FPA array size, temporal band width, scanning rate, sampling rate) and is adapted to specific applications. Change of system parameter like an increase of spatial resolution implies the setup of a new sensing device with high development cost or the purchase and installation of a complete new sensor unit. Computational imaging approaches can help to setup sensor devices with flexible or adaptable sensing capabilities. Especially, compressed sensing is an emerging computational method which is a promising candidate to realize super-resolution sensing with the possibility to adapt its performance to various sensing tasks. It is possible to increase sensing capabilities with compressed sensing to gain either higher spatial and/or temporal resolution. Then, the sensing capabilities depend no longer only on the physical performance of the device but also on the computational effort and can be adapted to the application. In this paper, we demonstrate and discuss laser aided imaging using CS for super-resolution tempo-spatial imaging and ranging.

  5. Spatial resolution effect on the simulated results of watershed scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelde, Ane; Antiguedad, Iñaki; Brito, David; Jauch, Eduardo; Neves, Ramiro; Sauvage, Sabine; Sánchez-Pérez, José Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models are useful tools for water resources planning, development and management. Currently, their use is being spread and more complex modeling systems are being employed for these purposes. The adding of complexity allows the simulation of water quality related processes. Nevertheless, this implies a considerable increase on the computational requirements, which usually is compensated on the models by a decrease on their spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the models is known to affect the simulation of hydrological processes and therefore, also the nutrient exportation and cycling processes. However, the implication of the spatial resolution on the simulated results is rarely assessed. In this study, we examine the effect of the change in the grid size on the integrated and distributed results of the Alegria River watershed model (Basque Country, Northern Spain). Variables such as discharge, water table level, relative water content of soils, nitrogen exportation and denitrification are analyzed in order to quantify the uncertainty involved in the spatial discretization of the watershed scale models. This is an aspect that needs to be carefully considered when numerical models are employed in watershed management studies or quality programs.

  6. How to get spatial resolution inside probe volumes of commercial 3D LDA systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strunck, V.; Sodomann, T.; Mueller, H.; Dopheide, D. [Section of Fluid Flow Measuring Techniques, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    In laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) it is often the aim to determine the velocity profile for a given fluid flow. The spatial resolution of such velocity profiles is limited in principal by the size of the probe volume. The method of using time of flight data from two probe volumes allows improvements of the spatial resolution by at least one order of magnitude and measurements of small-scale velocity profiles inside the measuring volume along the optical axis of commercial available 3D anemometers without moving the probe. No change of the optical set-up is necessary. An increased spatial resolution helps to acquire more precise data in areas where the flow velocity changes rapidly as shown in the vicinity of the stagnation point of a cuboid. In the overlapping region of three measuring volumes a spatially resolved 3D velocity vector profile is obtained in the direction of the optical axis in near plane flow conditions. In plane laminar flows the probe volume is extended by a few millimetres. The limitation of the method to a plane flow is that it would require a two-component LDA in a very special off-axis arrangement, but this arrangement is available in most commercial 3D systems. (orig.)

  7. A comparison of two downscaling procedures to increase the spatial resolution of mapping actual evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahour, Milad; Tolpekin, Valentyn; Stein, Alfred; Sharifi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    This research addressed the effects of downscaling cokriging Land Surface Temperature (LST) on estimation of Actual Evapotranspiration (AET) from remote sensing images. Two procedures were followed. We first applied downscaling cokriging to a coarse resolution LST product of MODIS at 1000 m. With its outcome, daily AET of a medium spatial resolution (250 m) was obtained using the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS). Second, we downscaled a coarse AET map to medium spatial resolution (250 m). For both procedures, the 250 m resolution MODIS NDVI product was used as a co-variable. Validation was carried out using Landsat 8 images, from which LST was derived from the thermal bands. The two procedures were applied to an agricultural area with a traditional irrigation network in Iran. We obtained an average LST value of 305.8 K as compared to a downscaled LST value of 307.0 K. Reference AET estimated with SEBS using Landsat 8 data was equal to 5.756 mm day-1, as compared with a downscaled AET value of 5.571 mm day-1. The RMSE between reference AET and downscaled AET was equal to 1.26 mm day-1 (r = 0.49) and between reference and downscaled LST to 3.67 K (r = 0.48). The study showed that AET values obtained with the two downscaling procedures were similar to each other, but that AET showed a higher spatial variability if obtained with downscaled LST. We concluded that LST had a large effect on producing AET maps from Remote Sensing (RS) images, and that downscaling cokriging was helpful to provide daily AET maps at medium spatial resolution.

  8. Structural information in two-dimensional patterns: entropy convergence and excess entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, David P; Crutchfield, James P

    2003-05-01

    We develop information-theoretic measures of spatial structure and pattern in more than one dimension. As is well known, the entropy density of a two-dimensional configuration can be efficiently and accurately estimated via a converging sequence of conditional entropies. We show that the manner in which these conditional entropies converge to their asymptotic value serves as a measure of global correlation and structure for spatial systems in any dimension. We compare and contrast entropy convergence with mutual-information and structure-factor techniques for quantifying and detecting spatial structure.

  9. A study of two-dimensional magnetic polaron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; ZHANG; Huaihong; FENG; Mang; WANG; Kelin

    2006-01-01

    By using the variational method and anneal simulation, we study in this paper the self-trapped magnetic polaron (STMP) in two-dimensional anti-ferromagnetic material and the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) in ferromagnetic material. Schwinger angular momentum theory is applied to changing the problem into a coupling problem of carriers and two types of Bosons. Our calculation shows that there are single-peak and multi-peak structures in the two-dimensional STMP. For the ferromagnetic material, the properties of the two-dimensional BMP are almost the same as that in one-dimensional case; but for the anti-ferromagnetic material, the two-dimensional STMP structure is much richer than the one-dimensional case.

  10. UPWIND DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL NEUTRON TRANSPORT EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁光伟; 沈智军; 闫伟

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the upwind discontinuous Galerkin methods with triangle meshes for two dimensional neutron transport equations will be studied.The stability for both of the semi-discrete and full-discrete method will be proved.

  11. Two-Dimensionally-Modulated, Magnetic Structure of Neodymium Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Bak, P.

    1979-01-01

    The incipient magnetic order of dhcp Nd is described by a two-dimensional, incommensurably modulated structure ("triple-q" structure). The ordering is accompanied by a lattice distortion that forms a similar pattern....

  12. Entanglement Entropy for time dependent two dimensional holographic superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Mazhari, N S; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Myrzakulov, R

    2016-01-01

    We studied entanglement entropy for a time dependent two dimensional holographic superconductor. We showed that the conserved charge of the system plays the role of the critical parameter to have condensation.

  13. Decoherence in a Landau Quantized Two Dimensional Electron Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGill Stephen A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the dynamics of a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas as a function of temperature. The presence of satellite reflections in the sample and magnet can be modeled in the time-domain.

  14. Quantization of Two-Dimensional Gravity with Dynamical Torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M

    1999-01-01

    We consider two-dimensional gravity with dynamical torsion in the Batalin - Vilkovisky and Batalin - Lavrov - Tyutin formalisms of gauge theories quantization as well as in the background field method.

  15. Spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Dumitru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Lederer, Falk; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-11-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices in the presence of gain and loss. In the framework of the continuous-discrete cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau model, we demonstrate the existence of novel classes of two-dimensional spatiotemporal dissipative lattice solitons, which also include surface solitons located in the corners or at the edges of the truncated two-dimensional photonic lattice. We find the domains of existence and stability of such spatiotemporal dissipative solitons in the relevant parameter space, for both on-site and intersite lattice solitons. We show that the on-site solitons are stable in the whole domain of their existence, whereas most of the intersite solitons are unstable. We describe the scenarios of the instability-induced dynamics of dissipative solitons in two-dimensional lattices.

  16. Bound states of two-dimensional relativistic harmonic oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wen-Chao

    2004-01-01

    We give the exact normalized bound state wavefunctions and energy expressions of the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations with equal scalar and vector harmonic oscillator potentials in the two-dimensional space.

  17. A two-dimensional polymer prepared by organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Patrick; Erni, Rolf; Schweizer, W Bernd; Rossell, Marta D; King, Benjamin T; Bauer, Thomas; Götzinger, Stephan; Schlüter, A Dieter; Sakamoto, Junji

    2012-02-05

    Synthetic polymers are widely used materials, as attested by a production of more than 200 millions of tons per year, and are typically composed of linear repeat units. They may also be branched or irregularly crosslinked. Here, we introduce a two-dimensional polymer with internal periodicity composed of areal repeat units. This is an extension of Staudinger's polymerization concept (to form macromolecules by covalently linking repeat units together), but in two dimensions. A well-known example of such a two-dimensional polymer is graphene, but its thermolytic synthesis precludes molecular design on demand. Here, we have rationally synthesized an ordered, non-equilibrium two-dimensional polymer far beyond molecular dimensions. The procedure includes the crystallization of a specifically designed photoreactive monomer into a layered structure, a photo-polymerization step within the crystal and a solvent-induced delamination step that isolates individual two-dimensional polymers as free-standing, monolayered molecular sheets.

  18. Second invariant for two-dimensional classical super systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Mishra; Roshan Lal; Veena Mishra

    2003-10-01

    Construction of superpotentials for two-dimensional classical super systems (for ≥ 2) is carried out. Some interesting potentials have been studied in their super form and also their integrability.

  19. High spatial resolution remote sensing imagery improves GPP predictions in disturbed, semi-arid woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krofcheck, D. J.; Eitel, J.; Vierling, L. A.; Schulthess, U.; Litvak, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate across the globe is changing and consequently the productivity of terrestrial vegetation is changing with it. Gross primary productivity (GPP) is an integral part of the carbon cycle, yet challenging to measure everywhere, all the time. Efforts to estimate GPP in the context of climate change are becoming continually more salient of the need for models sensitive to the heterogeneous nature of drought and pest induced disturbance. Given the increased availability of high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, their use in ecosystem scale GPP estimation is becoming increasingly viable. We used a simple linear model with inputs derived from RapidEye time series data (5 meter spatial resolution) as compared to MODIS inputs (250 meter spatial resolution) to estimate GPP in intact and girdled PJ woodland to simulate drought and pest induced disturbance. An area equal to the MODIS pixels measured was aggregated using RapidEye data centered on the flux towers for comparison purposes. We generated four model runs, two using only MODIS or RapidEye spectral vegetation indices (VIs) and two using MODIS and RapidEye VIs combined at both the control and disturbed tower site. Our results suggest that for undisturbed regions, MODIS derived VIs perform better than the higher spatial resolution RapidEye VIs when a moisture sensitive index is incorporated into the model (RMSE of 17.51for MODIS vs. 22.71 for RapidEye). Modeling GPP in disturbed regions however benefits from the inclusion of high spatial resolution data (RMSE of 14.83 for MODIS vs. 14.70 for RapidEye). This discrepancy may have to do with the disparate scale of a MODIS pixel and the size of the tower fetch. Our results suggest that the best source of VI's for the modeling GPP in semi-arid woodlands depends on the level of disturbance in the landscape. Given that the rate and extent of drought and insect induced mortality events in terrestrial forests are projected to increase with our changing climate

  20. Extreme paths in oriented two-dimensional percolation

    OpenAIRE

    Andjel, E. D.; Gray, L. F.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; A useful result about leftmost and rightmost paths in two dimensional bond percolation is proved. This result was introduced without proof in \\cite{G} in the context of the contact process in continuous time. As discussed here, it also holds for several related models, including the discrete time contact process and two dimensional site percolation. Among the consequences are a natural monotonicity in the probability of percolation between different sites and a somewha...