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Sample records for two-component systems evolution

  1. The Evolution of Two-Component Systems in Bacteria RevealsDifferent Strategies for Niche Adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, Eric; Huang, Katherine; Arkin, Adam

    2006-09-13

    Two-component systems including histidine protein kinasesrepresent the primary signal transduction paradigm in prokaryoticorganisms. To understand how these systems adapt to allow organisms todetect niche-specific signals, we analyzed the phylogenetic distributionof nearly 5000 histidine protein kinases from 207 sequenced prokaryoticgenomes. We found that many genomes carry a large repertoire of recentlyevolved signaling genes, which may reflect selective pressure to adapt tonew environmental conditions. Both lineage-specific gene family expansionand horizontal gene transfer play major roles in the introduction of newhistidine kinases into genomes; however, there are differences in howthese two evolutionary forces act. Genes imported via horizontal transferare more likely to retain their original functionality as inferred from asimilar complement of signaling domains, while gene family expansionaccompanied by domain shuffling appears to be a major source of novelgenetic diversity. Family expansion is the dominantsource of newhistidine kinase genes in the genomes most enriched in signalingproteins, and detailed analysis reveals that divergence in domainstructure and changes in expression patterns are hallmarks of recentexpansions. Finally, while these two modes of gene acquisition arewidespread across bacterial taxa, there are clear species-specificpreferences for which mode is used.

  2. The fractional virial potential energy in two-component systems

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    Caimmi R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-component systems are conceived as macrogases, and the related equation of state is expressed using the virial theorem for subsystems, under the restriction of homeoidally striated density profiles. Explicit calculations are performed for a useful reference case and a few cases of astrophysical interest, both with and without truncation radius. Shallower density profiles are found to yield an equation of state, φ = φ(y, m, characterized (for assigned values of the fractional mass, m = Mj /Mi by the occurrence of two extremum points, a minimum and a maximum, as found in an earlier attempt. Steeper density profiles produce a similar equation of state, which implies that a special value of m is related to a critical curve where the above mentioned extremum points reduce to a single horizontal inflexion point, and curves below the critical one show no extremum points. The similarity of the isofractional mass curves to van der Waals' isothermal curves, suggests the possibility of a phase transition in a bell-shaped region of the (Oyφ plane, where the fractional truncation radius along a selected direction is y = Rj /Ri , and the fractional virial potential energy is φ = (Eji vir /(Eij vir . Further investigation is devoted to mass distributions described by Hernquist (1990 density profiles, for which an additional relation can be used to represent a sample of N = 16 elliptical galaxies (EGs on the (Oyφ plane. Even if the evolution of elliptical galaxies and their hosting dark matter (DM haloes, in the light of the model, has been characterized by equal fractional mass, m, and equal scaled truncation radius, or concentration, Ξu = Ru /r† , u = i, j, still it cannot be considered as strictly homologous, due to different values of fractional truncation radii, y, or fractional scaling radii, y† = r† /r† , deduced from sample objects.

  3. The Fractional Virial Potential Energy in Two-Component Systems

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    Caimmi, R.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-component systems are conceived as macrogases, and the related equation of state is expressed using the virial theorem for subsystems, under the restriction of homeoidally striated density profiles. Explicit calculations are performed for a useful reference case and a few cases of astrophysical interest, both with and without truncation radius. Shallower density profiles are found to yield an equation of state, $phi=phi(y,m$, characterized (for assigned values of the fractional mass, $m=M_j/ M_i$ by the occurrence of two extremum points, a minimum and a maximum, as found in an earlier attempt. Steeper density profiles produce a similar equation of state, which implies that a special value of $m$ is related to a critical curve where the above mentioned extremum points reduce to a single horizontal inflexion point, and curves below the critical one show no extremum points. The similarity of the isofractional mass curves to van der Waals' isothermal curves, suggests the possibility of a phase transition in a bell-shaped region of the $({sf O}yphi$ plane, where the fractional truncation radius along a selected direction is $y=R_j/R_i$, and the fractional virial potential energy is $phi=(E_{ji}_mathrm{vir}/(E_{ij}_mathrm{vir}$. Further investigation is devoted to mass distributions described by Hernquist (1990 density profiles, for which an additional relation can be used to represent a sample of $N=16$ elliptical galaxies (EGs on the $({sf O}yphi$ plane. Even if the evolution of elliptical galaxies and their hosting dark matter (DM haloes, in the light of the model, has been characterized by equal fractional mass, $m$, and equal scaled truncation radius, or concentration, $Xi_u=R_u/r_u^dagger$, $u=i,j$, still it cannot be considered as strictly homologous, due to different values of fractional truncation radii, $y$, or fractional scaling radii, $y^dagger=r_j^dagger/r_i^dagger$, deduced from sample objects.

  4. Two-component systems and toxinogenesis regulation in Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent toxins ever known. They are mostly produced by Clostridium botulinum but also by other clostridia. BoNTs associate with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes. Toxin production is highly regulated through complex networks of regulatory systems involving an alternative sigma factor, BotR, and at least 6 recently described two-component systems (TCSs). TCSs allow bacteria to sense environmental changes and to respond to various stimuli by regulating the expression of specific genes at a transcriptional level. Several environmental stimuli have been identified to positively or negatively regulate toxin synthesis; however, the link between environmental stimuli and TCSs is still elusive. This review aims to highlight the role of TCSs as a central point in the regulation of toxin production in C. botulinum. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient two-component relativistic method for large systems

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    Nakai, Hiromi [Department of Chemitsry and Biochemistry, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    This paper reviews a series of theoretical studies to develop efficient two-component (2c) relativistic method for large systems by the author’s group. The basic theory is the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (IODKH) method for many-electron Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. The local unitary transformation (LUT) scheme can effectively produce the 2c relativistic Hamiltonian, and the divide-and-conquer (DC) method can achieve linear-scaling of Hartree-Fock and electron correlation methods. The frozen core potential (FCP) theoretically connects model potential calculations with the all-electron ones. The accompanying coordinate expansion with a transfer recurrence relation (ACE-TRR) scheme accelerates the computations of electron repulsion integrals with high angular momenta and long contractions.

  6. Phosphatase activity tunes two-component system sensor detection threshold.

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    Landry, Brian P; Palanki, Rohan; Dyulgyarov, Nikola; Hartsough, Lucas A; Tabor, Jeffrey J

    2018-04-12

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the largest family of multi-step signal transduction pathways in biology, and a major source of sensors for biotechnology. However, the input concentrations to which biosensors respond are often mismatched with application requirements. Here, we utilize a mathematical model to show that TCS detection thresholds increase with the phosphatase activity of the sensor histidine kinase. We experimentally validate this result in engineered Bacillus subtilis nitrate and E. coli aspartate TCS sensors by tuning their detection threshold up to two orders of magnitude. We go on to apply our TCS tuning method to recently described tetrathionate and thiosulfate sensors by mutating a widely conserved residue previously shown to impact phosphatase activity. Finally, we apply TCS tuning to engineer B. subtilis to sense and report a wide range of fertilizer concentrations in soil. This work will enable the engineering of tailor-made biosensors for diverse synthetic biology applications.

  7. Two component systems: physiological effect of a third component.

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    Baldiri Salvado

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems mediate the response and adaptation of organisms to environmental changes. In prokaryotes, this signal transduction is often done through Two Component Systems (TCS. These TCS are phosphotransfer protein cascades, and in their prototypical form they are composed by a kinase that senses the environmental signals (SK and by a response regulator (RR that regulates the cellular response. This basic motif can be modified by the addition of a third protein that interacts either with the SK or the RR in a way that could change the dynamic response of the TCS module. In this work we aim at understanding the effect of such an additional protein (which we call "third component" on the functional properties of a prototypical TCS. To do so we build mathematical models of TCS with alternative designs for their interaction with that third component. These mathematical models are analyzed in order to identify the differences in dynamic behavior inherent to each design, with respect to functionally relevant properties such as sensitivity to changes in either the parameter values or the molecular concentrations, temporal responsiveness, possibility of multiple steady states, or stochastic fluctuations in the system. The differences are then correlated to the physiological requirements that impinge on the functioning of the TCS. This analysis sheds light on both, the dynamic behavior of synthetically designed TCS, and the conditions under which natural selection might favor each of the designs. We find that a third component that modulates SK activity increases the parameter space where a bistable response of the TCS module to signals is possible, if SK is monofunctional, but decreases it when the SK is bifunctional. The presence of a third component that modulates RR activity decreases the parameter space where a bistable response of the TCS module to signals is possible.

  8. Brazilian two-component TLD albedo neutron individual monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, M.M., E-mail: marcelo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mauricio, C.L.P., E-mail: claudia@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fonseca, E.S. da, E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, A.X. da, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia, COPPE/PEN Caixa Postal 68509, CEP: 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    Since 1983, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Brazil, uses a TLD one-component albedo neutron monitor, which has a single different calibration factor specifically for each installation type. In order to improve its energy response, a two-component albedo monitor was developed, which measure the thermal neutron component besides the albedo one. The two-component monitor has been calibrated in reference neutron fields: thermal, five accelerator-produced monoenergetic beams (70, 144, 565, 1200 and 5000 keV) and five radionuclide sources ({sup 252}Cf, {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O), {sup 241}Am-Be, {sup 241}Am-B and {sup 238}Pu-Be) at several distances. Since January 2008, mainly Brazilian workers who handle neutron sources at different distances and moderation, such as in well logging and calibration facilities are using it routinely.

  9. Inhomogeneity growth in two-component fermionic systems

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    Napolitani, P.; Colonna, M.

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of fermionic many-body systems is investigated in the framework of Boltzmann-Langevin (BL) stochastic one-body approaches. Within the recently introduced Boltzmann-Langevin one-body (BLOB) model, we examine the interplay between mean-field effects and two-body correlations, of stochastic nature, for nuclear matter at moderate temperature and in several density conditions, corresponding to stable or mechanically unstable situations. Numerical results are compared with analytic expectations for the fluctuation amplitude of isoscalar and isovector densities, probing the link to the properties of the employed effective interaction; namely, symmetry energy (for isovector modes) and incompressibility (for isoscalar modes). For unstable systems, clusterization is observed. The associated features are compared with analytical results for the typical length and timescales characterizing the growth of unstable modes in nuclear matter and for the isotopic variance of the emerging fragments. We show that the BLOB model is generally better suited than simplified approaches previously introduced to solve the BL equation, and it is therefore more advantageous in applications to open systems, such as heavy-ion collisions.

  10. TWO-COMPONENT GALACTIC BULGE PROBED WITH RENEWED GALACTIC CHEMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Bekki, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Results of recent observations of the Galactic bulge demand that we discard a simple picture of its formation, suggesting the presence of two stellar populations represented by two peaks of stellar metallicity distribution (MDF) in the bulge. To assess this issue, we construct Galactic chemical evolution models that have been updated in two respects: first, the delay time distribution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) recently revealed by extensive SN Ia surveys is incorporated into the models. Second, the nucleosynthesis clock, the s-processing in asymptotic giant branch stars, is carefully considered in this study. This novel model first shows that the Galaxy feature tagged by the key elements, Mg, Fe, and Ba, for the bulge as well as thin and thick disks is compatible with a short-delay SN Ia. We present a successful modeling of a two-component bulge including the MDF and the evolutions of [Mg/Fe] and [Ba/Mg], and reveal its origin as follows. A metal-poor component (([Fe/H]) ∼ –0.5) is formed with a relatively short timescale of ∼1 Gyr. These properties are identical to the thick disk's characteristics in the solar vicinity. Subsequently from its remaining gas mixed with a gas flow from the disk outside the bulge, a metal-rich component (([Fe/H]) ∼ +0.3) is formed with a longer timescale (∼4 Gyr) together with a top-heavy initial mass function that might be identified with the thin disk component within the bulge.

  11. Relativistic two-component jet evolutions in 2D and 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of astrophysical jets and theoretical arguments suggest a transverse stratification with two components induced by intrinsic features of the central engine (accretion disk + black hole). We study two-component jet dynamics for an inner fast low density jet, surrounded by a slower,

  12. Small-molecule inhibition of bacterial two-component systems to combat antibiotic resistance and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Roberta J; Blackledge, Meghan S; Melander, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are a considerable and increasing global problem. The development of new antibiotics is not keeping pace with the rapid evolution of resistance to almost all clinically available drugs, and novel strategies are required to fight bacterial infections. One such strategy is the control of pathogenic behaviors, as opposed to simply killing bacteria. Bacterial two-component system (TCS) signal transduction pathways control many pathogenic bacterial behaviors, such as virulence, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance and are, therefore, an attractive target for the development of new drugs. This review presents an overview of TCS that are potential targets for such a strategy, describes small-molecules inhibitors of TCS identified to date and discusses assays for the identification of novel inhibitors. The future perspective for the identification and use of inhibitors of TCS to potentially provide new therapeutic options for the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial infections is discussed.

  13. Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

    2013-07-09

    Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

  14. An intimate link: two-component signal transduction systems and metal transport systems in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various strategies to contend with high concentrations of environmental heavy metal ions for rapid, adaptive responses to maintain cell viability. Evidence gathered in the past two decades suggests that bacterial two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTSs) are intimately involved in monitoring cation accumulation, and can regulate the expression of related metabolic and virulence genes to elicit adaptive responses to changes in the concentration of these ions. Usi...

  15. Transcriptome analysis of all two-component regulatory system mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

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    Oshima, Taku; Aiba, Hirofumi; Masuda, Yasushi; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Sugiura, Masahito; Wanner, Barry L; Mori, Hirotada; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2002-10-01

    We have systematically examined the mRNA profiles of 36 two-component deletion mutants, which include all two-component regulatory systems of Escherichia coli, under a single growth condition. DNA microarray results revealed that the mutants belong to one of three groups based on their gene expression profiles in Luria-Bertani broth under aerobic conditions: (i) those with no or little change; (ii) those with significant changes; and (iii) those with drastic changes. Under these conditions, the anaeroresponsive ArcB/ArcA system, the osmoresponsive EnvZ/OmpR system and the response regulator UvrY showed the most drastic changes. Cellular functions such as flagellar synthesis and expression of the RpoS regulon were affected by multiple two-component systems. A high correlation coefficient of expression profile was found between several two-component mutants. Together, these results support the view that a network of functional interactions, such as cross-regulation, exists between different two-component systems. The compiled data are avail-able at our website (http://ecoli.aist-nara.ac.jp/xp_analysis/ 2_components).

  16. A novel two-component system involved in secretion stress response in Streptomyces lividans.

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    Sonia Gullón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolded proteins accumulating outside the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane can interfere with the secretory machinery, hence the existence of quality factors to eliminate these misfolded proteins is of capital importance in bacteria that are efficient producers of secretory proteins. These bacteria normally use a specific two-component system to respond to the stress produced by the accumulation of the misfolded proteins, by activating the expression of HtrA-like proteases to specifically eliminate the incorrectly folded proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overproduction of alpha-amylase in S. lividans causing secretion stress permitted the identification of a two-component system (SCO4156-SCO4155 that regulates three HtrA-like proteases which appear to be involved in secretion stress response. Mutants in each of the genes forming part of the two-genes operon that encodes the sensor and regulator protein components accumulated misfolded proteins outside the cell, strongly suggesting the involvement of this two-component system in the S. lividans secretion stress response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge this is the first time that a specific secretion stress response two-component system is found to control the expression of three HtrA-like protease genes in S. lividans, a bacterium that has been repeatedly used as a host for the synthesis of homologous and heterologous secretory proteins of industrial application.

  17. Temporal evolution of photon energy emitted from two-component advective flows: origin of time lag

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    Chatterjee, Arka; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Ghosh, Himadri

    2017-12-01

    X-ray time lag of black hole candidates contains important information regarding the emission geometry. Recently, study of time lags from observational data revealed very intriguing properties. To investigate the real cause of this lag behavior with energy and spectral states, we study photon paths inside a two-component advective flow (TCAF) which appears to be a satisfactory model to explain the spectral and timing properties. We employ the Monte Carlo simulation technique to carry out the Comptonization process. We use a relativistic thick disk in Schwarzschild geometry as the CENtrifugal pressure supported BOundary Layer (CENBOL) which is the Compton cloud. In TCAF, this is the post-shock region of the advective component. Keplerian disk on the equatorial plane which is truncated at the inner edge i.e. at the outer boundary of the CENBOL, acts as the soft photon source. Ray-tracing code is employed to track the photons to a distantly located observer. We compute the cumulative time taken by a photon during Comptonization, reflection and following the curved geometry on the way to the observer. Time lags between various hard and soft bands have been calculated. We study the variation of time lags with accretion rates, CENBOL size and inclination angle. Time lags for different energy channels are plotted for different inclination angles. The general trend of variation of time lag with QPO frequency and energy as observed in satellite data is reproduced.

  18. Role of Streptococcus mutans two-component systems in antimicrobial peptide resistance in the oral cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Summary Approximately 100 trillion microorganisms exist in the oral cavity. For the commensal bacteria of the oral cavity, it is important to adapt to environmental stimuli, including human- or bacteria-derived antimicrobial agents. Recently, bacterial-specific signal transduction regulatory systems, called two-component systems (TCSs), which appear to be focused on sensing and adapting to the environment, were discovered. Streptococcus mutans is an oral commensal bacteria and is also known a...

  19. Theoretical calculation of cryogenic distillation for two-component hydrogen isotope system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xiulong; Luo Yangming; Wang Heyi; Fu Zhonghua; Liu Jun; Han Jun; Gu Mei

    2005-10-01

    Cryogenic distillation model for single column was built to simulating hydrogen isotope separation system. Three two-component system H 2 /HD, H 2 /HT and D 2 /DT was studied. Both temperature and concentration distribution was obtained and the results show a clear separation characteristics. H 2 /HT has the best separation performance while D 2 /DT was the most difficult to separate. (authors)

  20. The Two Components of the Evolved Massive Binary LZ Cephei: Testing the Effects of Binarity on Stellar Evolution

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    Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouret, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We present an in-dep(h study of the two components of the binary system LZ Cep to constrain the effects of binarity on the evolution of massive stars. Methods. We analyzed a set of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra obtained over the orbital period of the system to perform a spectroscopic disentangling and derive an orbital solution. We subsequently determine the stellar properties of each component by means of an analysis with the CMFGEN atmosphere code. Finally, with the derived stellar parameters, we model the Hipparcos photometric light curve using the program NIGHTFALL to obtain the orbit inclination and the stellar masses. Results.LZ Cep is a O9III+ON9.7V binary. It is as a semi-detailed system in which either the primary or the secondary star almost fills up its Roche lobe. The dynamical masses are about 16.0 Stellar Mass (primary) and 6.5 Stellar Mass (secondary). The latter is lower than the typical mass of late-type O stars. The secondary component is chemically more evolved than the primary (which barely shows any sign of CNO processing), with strong helium and nitrogen enhancements as well as carbon and oxygen depletions. These properties (surface abundances and mass) are typical of Wolf-Rayet stars, although the spectral type is ON9.7V. The luminosity of the secondary is consistent with that of core He-burning objects. The preferred, tentative evolutionary scenario to explain abe observed properties involves mass transfer from the secondary - which was initially more massive- towards the primary. The secondary is now almost a core He-burning object, probably with only a thin envelope of H-rich and CNO processed material. A very inefficient mass transfer is necessary to explain the chemical appearance of the primary. Alternative scenarios are discussed but they are affected by greater uncertainties.

  1. Topological aspects in a two-component Bose condensed system in a neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Rong, Ren; Heng, Guo

    2009-01-01

    By making use of Duan–Ge's decomposition theory of gauge potential and the topological current theory proposed by Prof. Duan Yi–Shi, we study a two-component superfluid Bose condensed system, which is supposed to be realized in the interior of neutron stars in the form of the coexistence of a neutron superfluid and a protonic superconductor. We propose that this system possesses vortex lines. The topological charges of the vortex lines are characterized by the Hopf indices and the Brower degrees of ø-mapping. (the physics of elementary particles and fields)

  2. A novel two-component system involved in the transition to secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor.

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    Daniel Rozas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial two-component signal transduction regulatory systems are the major set of signalling proteins frequently mediating responses to changes in the environment. They typically consist of a sensor, a membrane-associated histidine kinase and a cytoplasmic response regulator. The membrane-associated sensor detects the environmental signal or stress, whereas the cytoplasmic regulatory protein controls the cellular response usually by gene transcription modulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPALFINDINGS: The Streptomyces coelicolor two genes operon SCO5784-SCO5785 encodes a two-component system, where SCO5784 encodes a histidine-kinase sensor and SCO5785 encodes a response regulator protein. When the expression level of the regulator gene decreases, the antibiotic synthesis and sporulation is delayed temporarily in addition to some ribosomal genes became up regulated, whereas the propagation of the regulatory gene in high copy number results in the earlier synthesis of antibiotics and sporulation, as well as the down regulation of some ribosomal genes and, moreover, in the overproduction of several extracellular proteins. Therefore, this two-component system in S. coelicolor seems to influence various processes characterised by the transition from primary to secondary metabolism, as determined by proteomic and transcriptomic analyses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Propagation of SCO5785 in multicopy enhances the production of antibiotics as well as secretory proteins. In particular, the increase in the expression level of secretory protein encoding genes, either as an artefactual or real effect of the regulator, could be of potential usefulness when using Streptomyces strains as hosts for homologous or heterologous extracellular protein production.

  3. The Two-Component Virial Theorem and the Physical Properties of Stellar Systems.

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    Dantas; Ribeiro; Capelato; de Carvalho RR

    2000-01-01

    Motivated by present indirect evidence that galaxies are surrounded by dark matter halos, we investigate whether their physical properties can be described by a formulation of the virial theorem that explicitly takes into account the gravitational potential term representing the interaction of the dark halo with the baryonic or luminous component. Our analysis shows that the application of such a "two-component virial theorem" not only accounts for the scaling relations displayed by, in particular, elliptical galaxies, but also for the observed properties of all virialized stellar systems, ranging from globular clusters to galaxy clusters.

  4. Evaluation of solution stability for two-component polydisperse systems by small-angle scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukova, A. E.; Konarev, P. V.; Volkov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    The article is devoted to the modelling of small-angle scattering data using the program MIXTURE designed for the study of polydisperse multicomponent mixtures. In this work we present the results of solution stability studies for theoretical small-angle scattering data sets from two-component models. It was demonstrated that the addition of the noise to the data influences the stability range of the restored structural parameters. The recommendations for the optimal minimization schemes that permit to restore the volume size distributions for polydisperse systems are suggested.

  5. Re-engineering the two-component systems as light-regulated in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Siya; Luo, Siwei; Wu, L I; Liang, Zhi; Wu, Jia-Rui

    2017-12-01

    Bacteria live in environments with dynamic changes. To sense and respond to different external stimuli, bacteria make use of various sensor-response circuits, called two-component systems (TCSs). A TCS comprises a histidine protein kinase (HK) sensing environmental stimuli and a response regulator protein (RR) regulating downstream genes. The two components are coupled via a phosphorylation control mechanism. In a recent study, we adopted an optogenetics approach to re-engineer the sensor HKs in Escherichia coli as a light-sensing fusion protein. We constructed a light-controllable HK by replacing the original signal-specific sensing domain of HK with the light-sensing domain of Cph1 from Cyanobacteria Synechocystis , so that HK can be investigated by red light. Here, we extended the study to other 16 HK-RR TCSs and constructed a library of light-responsible HK-Cph1 chimeras. By taking the NarX-NarL system as an example, we demonstrated the light responsiveness of the constructed chimera and investigated the frequency response of the NarXNarL system. The constructed library serves as a toolkit for future TCS study using optogenetics approach.

  6. A two-component system regulates hemin acquisition in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Jodie C Scott

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe associated with infection of the periodontia. The organism has a small number of two-component signal transduction systems, and after comparing genome sequences of strains W83 and ATCC 33277 we discovered that the latter was mutant in histidine kinase (PGN_0752, while the cognate response regulator (PGN_0753 remained intact. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling and ChIP-seq assays were carried out with an ATCC 33277 transconjugant containing the functional histidine kinase from strain W83 (PG0719. The data showed that the regulon of this signal transduction system contained genes that were involved in hemin acquisition, including gingipains, at least three transport systems, as well as being self-regulated. Direct regulation by the response regulator was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, the system appears to be activated by hemin and the regulator acts as both an activator and repressor.

  7. Two-Component Signal Transduction System SaeRS Positively Regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis Glucose Metabolism

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    Qiang Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  8. Bacillus subtilis Two-Component System Sensory Kinase DegS Is Regulated by Serine Phosphorylation in Its Input Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jers, Carsten; Kobir, Ahasanul; Søndergaard, Elsebeth Oline

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis two-component system DegS/U is well known for the complexity of its regulation. The cytosolic sensory kinase DegS does not receive a single predominant input signal like most two-component kinases, instead it integrates a wide array of metabolic inputs that modulate its activity......S phosphorylation at serine 76 and the level of DegU phosphorylation, establishing this post-translational modification as an additional trigger for this two-component system....

  9. TWO-COMPONENT SYSTEM: A MOLECULAR DIALOGUE BETWEEN RUMINAL BACTERIA AND FEED PARTICLES (FORAGE PLANTS

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    Monica Marcela Galicia Jimenez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to adapt rapidly to changes in the environment is one of the main characteristics of the bacterial cell. The rumen is a highly dynamic environment, and none of the changes are permanent due to the various microbial species found in the rumen. Signal transduction networks are information processing pathways that recognize various physical and chemical stimuli, amplification, signal processing, and trigger responses of the bacterial cell. The aim of the present review is to show the importance of these two component systems in rumen bacteria, because it is based on the knowledge of the principles governing the bacterial population communication, its main interactions and products of metabolism, we can approach the manipulation of Ruminal fermentation to improve animal health, productivity and food safety.

  10. Development and characterization of two-component albedo based neutron individual monitoring system using thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo Marques

    2008-01-01

    A TLD-albedo based two-component neutron individual monitoring system was developed and characterized in this work. The monitor consists of a black plastic holder, an incident neutron boron loaded shield, a moderator polyethylene body (to increase its response), two pairs of TLD-600 and TLD-700 (one pair to each component) and an adjustable belt. This monitoring system was calibrated in thermal neutron fields and in 70 keV, 144 keV, 565 keV, 1.2 MeV and 5 MeV monoenergetic neutron fields. In addition, it was calibrated in 252C f(D 2 O), 252 Cf, 241 Am-B, 241 Am-Be and 238 Pu-Be source fields. For the latter, the lower detection levels are, respectively, 0.009 mSv, 0.06 mSv, 0.12 mSv, 0.09 mSv and 0.08 mSv. The participation in an international intercomparison sponsored by IAEA with simulated workplace fields validated the system. The monitoring system was successfully characterized in the ISO 21909 standard and in an IRD - the Brazilian Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - technical regulation draft. Nowadays, the neutron individual system is in use by IRD for whole body individual monitoring of five institutions, which comprehend several activities. (author)

  11. Counterbalancing Regulation in Response Memory of a Positively Autoregulated Two-Component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rong; Godfrey, Katherine A; Sufian, Mahir A; Stock, Ann M

    2017-09-15

    Fluctuations in nutrient availability often result in recurrent exposures to the same stimulus conditions. The ability to memorize the past event and use the "memory" to make adjustments to current behaviors can lead to a more efficient adaptation to the recurring stimulus. A short-term phenotypic memory can be conferred via carryover of the response proteins to facilitate the recurrent response, but the additional accumulation of response proteins can lead to a deviation from response homeostasis. We used the Escherichia coli PhoB/PhoR two-component system (TCS) as a model system to study how cells cope with the recurrence of environmental phosphate (Pi) starvation conditions. We discovered that "memory" of prior Pi starvation can exert distinct effects through two regulatory pathways, the TCS signaling pathway and the stress response pathway. Although carryover of TCS proteins can lead to higher initial levels of transcription factor PhoB and a faster initial response in prestarved cells than in cells not starved, the response enhancement can be overcome by an earlier and greater repression of promoter activity in prestarved cells due to the memory of the stress response. The repression counterbalances the carryover of the response proteins, leading to a homeostatic response whether or not cells are prestimulated. A computational model based on sigma factor competition was developed to understand the memory of stress response and to predict the homeostasis of other PhoB-regulated response proteins. Our insight into the history-dependent PhoBR response may provide a general understanding of how TCSs respond to recurring stimuli and adapt to fluctuating environmental conditions. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cells in their natural environments experience scenarios that are far more complex than are typically replicated in laboratory experiments. The architectures of signaling systems and the integration of multiple adaptive pathways have evolved to deal with such complexity

  12. The Two-Component Signal Transduction System VxrAB Positively Regulates Vibrio cholerae Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschler, Jennifer K; Cheng, Andrew T; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2017-09-15

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), are the primary mechanism by which pathogenic bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. The pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae is no exception and harbors 52 RR genes. Using in-frame deletion mutants of each RR gene, we performed a systematic analysis of their role in V. cholerae biofilm formation. We determined that 7 RRs impacted the expression of an essential biofilm gene and found that the recently characterized RR, VxrB, regulates the expression of key structural and regulatory biofilm genes in V. cholerae vxrB is part of a 5-gene operon, which contains the cognate HK vxrA and three genes of unknown function. Strains carrying Δ vxrA and Δ vxrB mutations are deficient in biofilm formation, while the Δ vxrC mutation enhances biofilm formation. The overexpression of VxrB led to a decrease in motility. We also observed a small but reproducible effect of the absence of VxrB on the levels of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Our work reveals a new function for the Vxr TCS as a regulator of biofilm formation and suggests that this regulation may act through key biofilm regulators and the modulation of cellular c-di-GMP levels. IMPORTANCE Biofilms play an important role in the Vibrio cholerae life cycle, providing protection from environmental stresses and contributing to the transmission of V. cholerae to the human host. V. cholerae can utilize two-component systems (TCS), composed of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), to regulate biofilm formation in response to external cues. We performed a systematic analysis of V. cholerae RRs and identified a new regulator of biofilm formation, VxrB. We demonstrated that the VxrAB TCS is essential for robust biofilm formation and that this system may regulate biofilm formation via its regulation of key biofilm regulators and cyclic di-GMP levels. This research furthers

  13. A hybrid two-component system protein from Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was involved in chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhua; Tu, Ran; Wu, Lixian; Hong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Sanfeng

    2011-09-20

    We here report the sequence and functional analysis of org35 of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7, which was originally identified to be able to interact with NifA in yeast-two-hybrid system. The org35 encodes a hybrid two-component system protein, including N-terminal PAS domains, a histidine kinase (HPK) domain and a response regulator (RR) domain in C-terminal. To determine the function of the Org35, a deletion-insertion mutant in PAS domain [named Sp7353] and a complemental strain Sp7353C were constructed. The mutant had reduced chemotaxis ability compared to that of wild-type, and the complemental strain was similar to the wild-type strain. These data suggested that the A. brasilense org35 played a key role in chemotaxis. Variants containing different domains of the org35 were expressed, and the functions of these domains were studied in vitro. Phosphorylation assays in vitro demonstrated that the HPK domain of Org35 possessed the autokinase activity and that the phosphorylated HPK was able to transfer phosphate groups to the RR domain. The result indicated Org35 was a phosphorylation-communicating protein. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. A two component system is involved in acid adaptation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhua; Liu, Wei; Qu, Xiaojun; Chen, Zhangting; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Lanwei

    2012-05-20

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus is of vital importance to the food industry, especially to the dairy industry. Two component systems (TCSs) are one of the most important mechanisms for environmental sensing and signal transduction in the majority of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A typical TCS consists of a histidine protein kinase (HPK) and a cytoplasmic response regulator (RR). To investigate the functions of TCSs during acid adaptation in L. bulgaricus, we used quantitative PCR to reveal how TCSs expression changes during acid adaptation. Two TCSs (JN675228/JN675229 and JN675230/JN675231) and two HPKs (JN675236 and JN675240) were induced during acid adaptation. These TCSs were speculated to be related with the acid adaptation ability of L. bulgaricus. The mutants of JN675228/JN675229 were constructed in order to investigate the functions of JN675228/JN675229. The mutants showed reduced acid adaptation compared to that of wild type, and the complemented strains were similar to the wild-type strain. These observations suggested that JN675228 and JN675229 were involved in acid adaptation in L. bulgaricus. The interaction between JN675228 and JN675229 was identified by means of yeast two-hybrid system. The results indicated there is interaction between JN675228 and JN675229. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptome analysis of the Brucella abortus BvrR/BvrS two-component regulatory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Viadas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The two-component BvrR/BvrS system is essential for Brucella abortus virulence. It was shown previously that its dysfunction alters the expression of some major outer membrane proteins and the pattern of lipid A acylation. To determine the genes regulated by BvrR/BvrS, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis using B. abortus RNA obtained from wild type and bvrR mutant cells grown in the same conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 127 differentially expressed genes were found: 83 were over expressed and 44 were less expressed in the bvrR mutant. Two operons, the phosphotransferase system and the maltose transport system, were down-regulated. Several genes involved in cell envelope or outer membrane biogenesis were differentially expressed: genes for outer membrane proteins (omp25a, omp25d, lipoproteins, LPS and fatty acid biosynthesis, stress response proteins, chaperones, flagellar genes, and twelve genes encoding ABC transport systems. Ten genes related with carbon metabolism (pckA and fumB among others were up-regulated in the bvrR mutant, and denitrification genes (nirK, norC and nosZ were also regulated. Notably, seven transcriptional regulators were affected, including VjbR, ExoR and OmpR that were less expressed in the bvrR mutant. Finally, the expression of eleven genes which have been previously related with Brucella virulence was also altered. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All these data corroborate the impact of BvrR/BvrS on cell envelope modulation, confirm that this system controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and suggest a cross-talk among some regulators to adjust the Brucella physiology to the shift expected to occur during the transit from the extracellular to the intracellular niche.

  16. Adaptation to Environmental Stimuli within the Host: Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretl, Daniel J.; Demetriadou, Chrystalla; Zahrt, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pathogenic microorganisms encounter a variety of environmental stresses following infection of their respective hosts. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, is an unusual bacterial pathogen in that it is able to establish lifelong infections in individuals within granulomatous lesions that are formed following a productive immune response. Adaptation to this highly dynamic environment is thought to be mediated primarily through transcriptional reprogramming initiated in response to recognition of stimuli, including low-oxygen tension, nutrient depletion, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, altered pH, toxic lipid moieties, cell wall/cell membrane-perturbing agents, and other environmental cues. To survive continued exposure to these potentially adverse factors, M. tuberculosis encodes a variety of regulatory factors, including 11 complete two-component signal transduction systems (TCSSs) and several orphaned response regulators (RRs) and sensor kinases (SKs). This report reviews our current knowledge of the TCSSs present in M. tuberculosis. In particular, we discuss the biochemical and functional characteristics of individual RRs and SKs, the environmental stimuli regulating their activation, the regulons controlled by the various TCSSs, and the known or postulated role(s) of individual TCSSs in the context of M. tuberculosis physiology and/or pathogenesis. PMID:22126994

  17. Role of two-component systems in the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Yoshida, Yuuma; Nakamura, Norifumi; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) play important roles in the adaptation of bacteria to environmental changes and the regulation of virulence factor expression. In addition, the association of TCSs with susceptibility to antibacterial agents has been demonstrated in some bacterial species. Staphylococcus aureus, a major human pathogen that can cause serious problems due to nosocomial infections, possesses 16 TCSs. Here we report a TCS, designated BceRS (MW2 gene ID: MW2545-44), which is related to bacitracin susceptibility. We found that BceRS regulates the expression of two transporters that determine susceptibility to bacitracin. One of these, BceAB (MW2543-42), is located downstream of BceRS, while the other, VraDE (MW2620-21), is more distant. With regard to other TCSs, VraRS and Aps/GraRS are reportedly associated with susceptibility to cell wall synthesis inhibitors and cationic antibacterial agents, respectively. Therefore, S. aureus possesses at least three TCSs that are involved in mediating its resistance to antibacterial agents.

  18. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Pathogenic Bacteria As Targets for Antimicrobial Therapy: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Tiwari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial communities in a wide range of environmental niches sense and respond to numerous external stimuli for their survival. Primarily, a source they require to follow up this communication is the two-component signal transduction system (TCS, which typically comprises a sensor Histidine kinase for receiving external input signals and a response regulator that conveys a proper change in the bacterial cell physiology. For numerous reasons, TCSs have ascended as convincing targets for antibacterial drug design. Several studies have shown that TCSs are essential for the coordinated expression of virulence factors and, in some cases, for bacterial viability and growth. It has also been reported that the expression of antibiotic resistance determinants may be regulated by some TCSs. In addition, as a mode of signal transduction, phosphorylation of histidine in bacteria differs from normal serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation in higher eukaryotes. Several studies have shown the molecular mechanisms by which TCSs regulate virulence and antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. In this review, we list some of the characteristics of the bacterial TCSs and their involvement in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, this review lists and discusses inhibitors that have been reported to target TCSs in pathogenic bacteria.

  19. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Two-Component System Genes in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun He

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The two-component system (TCS, which comprises histidine kinases (HKs, phosphotransfers (HPs, and response regulator proteins (RRs, plays pivotal roles in regulating plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. TCS genes have been comprehensively identified and investigated in various crops but poorly characterized in tomato. In this work, a total of 65 TCS genes consisting of 20 HK(Ls, six HPs, and 39 RRs were identified from tomato genome. The classification, gene structures, conserved domains, chromosome distribution, phylogenetic relationship, gene duplication events, and subcellular localization of the TCS gene family were predicted and analyzed in detail. The amino acid sequences of tomato TCS family members, except those of type-B RRs, are highly conserved. The gene duplication events of the TCS family mainly occurred in the RR family. Furthermore, the expansion of RRs was attributed to both segment and tandem duplication. The subcellular localizations of the selected green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion proteins exhibited a diverse subcellular targeting, thereby confirming their predicted divergent functionality. The majority of TCS family members showed distinct organ- or development-specific expression patterns. In addition, most of TCS genes were induced by abiotic stresses and exogenous phytohormones. The full elucidation of TCS elements will be helpful for comprehensive analysis of the molecular biology and physiological role of the TCS superfamily.

  20. The essential YycFG two-component system controls cell wall metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisicchia, Paola; Noone, David; Lioliou, Efthimia

    2007-01-01

    Adaptation of bacteria to the prevailing environmental and nutritional conditions is often mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCS). The Bacillus subtilis YycFG TCS has attracted special attention as it is essential for viability and its regulon is poorly defined. Here we show...... that YycFG is a regulator of cell wall metabolism. We have identified five new members of the YycFG regulon: YycF activates expression of yvcE, lytE and ydjM and represses expression of yoeB and yjeA. YvcE(CwlO) and LytE encode endopeptidase-type autolysins that participate in peptidoglycan synthesis...... to lysozyme digestion and YdjM is also predicted to have a role in cell wall metabolism. A genetic analysis shows that YycFG essentiality is polygenic in nature, being a manifestation of disrupted cell wall metabolism caused by aberrant expression of a number of YycFG regulon genes....

  1. The Two-Component System ChtRS Contributes to Chlorhexidine Tolerance in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Prieto, Ana M; Wijngaarden, Jessica; Braat, Johanna C; Rogers, Malbert R C; Majoor, Eline; Brouwer, Ellen C; Zhang, Xinglin; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; van Schaik, Willem

    2017-05-01

    Enterococcus faecium is one of the primary causes of nosocomial infections. Disinfectants are commonly used to prevent infections with multidrug-resistant E. faecium in hospitals. Worryingly, E. faecium strains that exhibit tolerance to disinfectants have already been described. We aimed to identify and characterize E. faecium genes that contribute to tolerance to the disinfectant chlorhexidine (CHX). We used a transposon mutant library, constructed in a multidrug-resistant E. faecium bloodstream isolate, to perform a genome-wide screen to identify genetic determinants involved in tolerance to CHX. We identified a putative two-component system (2CS), composed of a putative sensor histidine kinase (ChtS) and a cognate DNA-binding response regulator (ChtR), which contributed to CHX tolerance in E. faecium Targeted chtR and chtS deletion mutants exhibited compromised growth in the presence of CHX. Growth of the chtR and chtS mutants was also affected in the presence of the antibiotic bacitracin. The CHX- and bacitracin-tolerant phenotype of E. faecium E1162 was linked to a unique, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in chtR Transmission electron microscopy showed that upon challenge with CHX, the Δ chtR and Δ chtS mutants failed to divide properly and formed long chains. Normal growth and cell morphology were restored when the mutations were complemented in trans Morphological abnormalities were also observed upon exposure of the Δ chtR and Δ chtS mutants to bacitracin. The tolerance to both chlorhexidine and bacitracin provided by ChtRS in E. faecium highlights the overlap between responses to disinfectants and antibiotics and the potential for the development of cross-tolerance for these classes of antimicrobials. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Two-Component Systems Involved in Susceptibility to Nisin A in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Arii, Kaoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Oogai, Yuichi; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Hasegawa, Tadao; Sonomoto, Kenji; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are regulatory systems in bacteria that play important roles in sensing and adapting to the environment. In this study, we systematically evaluated the roles of TCSs in the susceptibility of the group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) SF370 strain to several types of lantibiotics. Using individual TCS deletion mutants, we found that the deletion of srtRK (spy_1081-spy_1082) in SF370 increased the susceptibility to nisin A, which is produced by Lactococcus lactis ATCC 11454, but susceptibility to other types of lantibiotics (nukacin ISK-1, produced by Staphylococcus warneri, and staphylococcin C55, produced by Staphylococcus aureus) was not altered in the TCS mutants tested. The expression of srtFEG (spy_1085 to spy_1087), which is located downstream of srtRK and is homologous to ABC transporters, was increased in response to nisin A. However, srtEFG expression was not induced by nisin A in the srtRK mutant. The inactivation of srtFEG increased the susceptibility to nisin A. These results suggest that SrtRK controls SrtFEG expression to alter the susceptibility to nisin A. Further experiments showed that SrtRK is required for coexistence with L. lactis ATCC 11454, which produces nisin A. Our results elucidate the important roles of S. pyogenes TCSs in the interactions between different bacterial species, including bacteriocin-producing bacteria. In this study, we focused on the association of TCSs with susceptibility to bacteriocins in S. pyogenes SF370, which has no ability to produce bacteriocins, and reported two major new findings. We demonstrated that the SrtRK TCS is related to susceptibility to nisin A by controlling the ABC transporter SrtFEG. We also showed that S. pyogenes SrtRK is important for survival when the bacteria are cocultured with nisin A-producing Lactococcus lactis This report highlights the roles of TCSs in the colocalization of bacteriocin-producing bacteria and non-bacteriocin-producing bacteria. Our

  3. Characterization of an archaeal two-component system that regulates methanogenesis in Methanosaeta harundinacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs are a major mechanism used by bacteria in response to environmental changes. Although many sequenced archaeal genomes encode TCSs, they remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that a methanogenic archaeon, Methanosaeta harundinacea, encodes FilI, which synthesizes carboxyl-acyl homoserine lactones, to regulate transitions of cellular morphology and carbon metabolic fluxes. Here, we report that filI, the cotranscribed filR2, and the adjacent filR1 constitute an archaeal TCS. FilI possesses a cytoplasmic kinase domain (histidine kinase A and histidine kinase-like ATPase and its cognate response regulator. FilR1 carries a receiver (REC domain coupled with an ArsR-related domain with potential DNA-binding ability, while FilR2 carries only a REC domain. In a phosphorelay assay, FilI was autophosphorylated and specifically transferred the phosphoryl group to FilR1 and FilR2, confirming that the three formed a cognate TCS. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ChIP-qPCR using an anti-FilR1 antibody, FilR1 was shown to form in vivo associations with its own promoter and the promoter of the filI-filR2 operon, demonstrating a regulatory pattern common among TCSs. ChIP-qPCR also detected FilR1 associations with key genes involved in acetoclastic methanogenesis, acs4 and acs1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed the in vitro tight binding of FilR1 to its own promoter and those of filI-filR2, acs4, and mtrABC. This also proves the DNA-binding ability of the ArsR-related domain, which is found primarily in Archaea. The archaeal promoters of acs4, filI, acs1, and mtrABC also initiated FilR1-modulated expression in an Escherichia coli lux reporter system, suggesting that FilR1 can up-regulate both archaeal and bacterial transcription. In conclusion, this work identifies an archaeal FilI/FilRs TCS that regulates the methanogenesis of M. harundinacea.

  4. Morphology-tunable and photoresponsive properties in a self-assembled two-component gel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifeng; Xu, Miao; Yi, Tao; Xiao, Shuzhang; Zhou, Zhiguo; Li, Fuyou; Huang, Chunhui

    2007-01-02

    Photoresponsive C3-symmetrical trisurea self-assembling building blocks containing three azobenzene groups (LC10 and LC4) at the rim were designed and synthesized. By introducing a trisamide gelator (G18), which can self-aggregate through hydrogen bonds of acylamino moieties to form a fibrous network, the mixture of LC10 (or LC4) and G18 forms an organogel with coral-like supramolecular structure from 1,4-dioxane. The cooperation of hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic diversity between these components are the main contributions to the specific superstructure. The two-component gel exhibits reversible photoisomerization from trans to cis transition without breakage of the gel state.

  5. Cloning of a two-component signal transduction system of Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans strain BXPF65

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, JWYF; Maynard, Scott; Goodwin, PH

    1998-01-01

    A putative two-component signal transduction system was amplified and cloned from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans isolate BXPF65. The 620 bp amplified fragment was sequenced and analyzed with the BLAST Enhanced Alignment Utility (BEAUTY). BEAUTY ana...

  6. The YvfTU Two-component System is involved in plcR expression in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brillard, Julien; Susanna, Kim; Michaud, Caroline; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Gohar, Michel; Nielsen-Leroux, Christina; Ramarao, Nalini; Kolsto, Anne-Brit; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Lereclus, Didier; Broussolle, Veronique

    2008-01-01

    Background: Most extracellular virulence factors produced by Bacillus cereus are regulated by the pleiotropic transcriptional activator PlcR. Among strains belonging to the B. cereus group, the plcR gene is always located in the vicinity of genes encoding the YvfTU two-component system. The putative

  7. Study of the catalytic selectivity of an aqueous two-component polyurethane system by ftir spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Jakov V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty in formulating a two component waterborne polyurethane, is the isocyanate-water side reaction, which can lead to gassing/foaming, loss of isocyanate functionality, low gloss and a reduced pot life. To compensate for this side reaction, these formulations usually contain a large excess of isocyanate. Tin compounds, especially dibutyltin dilaurate, are widely used in coatings as catalysts for the isocyanate/hydroxyl reaction. Because of the high aquatic toxicity of some organotin compounds, there has been an attempt to ban organotin compounds from all coating applications. As a general rule, organotin catalysts are not selective, they catalyze the reaction of isocyanates with both hydroxyl groups and water and also catalyze the hydrolysis of ester groups. One novel approach to control the water side reaction is the use of catalysts which selectively catalyze the isocyanate-polyol reaction and not the isocyanate-water reaction. The selectivity of a variety of metal catalysts (metal octoates, metal acetylacetonates and mangan chelates with mixed ligands to catalyze the preferred reaction was measured using the FTIR method.

  8. Bioorthogonal, two-component delivery systems based on antibody and drug-loaded nanocarriers for enhanced internalization of nanotherapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Zhu, Wenlian; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    Nanocarriers play an important role in targeted cancer chemotherapy. The optimal nanocarrier delivery system should provide efficient and highly specific recognition of the target cells and rapid internalization of the therapeutic cargo to reduce systemic toxicity as well as to increase the cytotoxicity to cancer cells. To this end, we developed a two-step, two-component targeted delivery system based on antibody and drug-loaded nanocarrier that uses bioorthogonal click reactions for specific...

  9. Re-engineering the two-component systems as light-regulated in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siya Ma

    2017-10-20

    Oct 20, 2017 ... 2Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for. Biological ..... Biol. 210 551–559. Moir JWB and Wood NJ 2001 Nitrate and nitrite transport in bacteria. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 58 215–224. Nohno T, Noji S, Taniguchi S and Saito T 1989 The narX and narL.

  10. Phosphate sink containing two-component signaling systems as tunable threshold devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Munia; Kothamachu, Varun B; Feliu, Elisenda

    2014-01-01

    rapid signal termination, whereby one of the RRs acts as a phosphate sink towards the other RR (i.e. the output RR), but also implements a sigmoidal signal-response relationship. We identify two mathematical conditions on system parameters that are necessary for sigmoidal signal-response relationships...

  11. Re-engineering the two-component systems as light-regulated

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, we extended the study to other 16 HK-RR TCSs andconstructed a library of light-responsible HK-Cph1 chimeras. By taking the NarX-NarL system as an example, wedemonstrated the light responsiveness of the constructed chimera and investigated the frequency response of the NarXNarLsystem. The constructed ...

  12. Evolution of multidrug resistance during Staphylococcus aureus infection involves mutation of the essential two component regulator WalKR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Howden

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health threat, compounded by emergence of strains with resistance to vancomycin and daptomycin, both last line antimicrobials. Here we have performed high throughput DNA sequencing and comparative genomics for five clinical pairs of vancomycin-susceptible (VSSA and vancomycin-intermediate ST239 S. aureus (VISA; each pair isolated before and after vancomycin treatment failure. These comparisons revealed a frequent pattern of mutation among the VISA strains within the essential walKR two-component regulatory locus involved in control of cell wall metabolism. We then conducted bi-directional allelic exchange experiments in our clinical VSSA and VISA strains and showed that single nucleotide substitutions within either walK or walR lead to co-resistance to vancomycin and daptomycin, and caused the typical cell wall thickening observed in resistant clinical isolates. Ion Torrent genome sequencing confirmed no additional regulatory mutations had been introduced into either the walR or walK VISA mutants during the allelic exchange process. However, two potential compensatory mutations were detected within putative transport genes for the walK mutant. The minimal genetic changes in either walK or walR also attenuated virulence, reduced biofilm formation, and led to consistent transcriptional changes that suggest an important role for this regulator in control of central metabolism. This study highlights the dramatic impacts of single mutations that arise during persistent S. aureus infections and demonstrates the role played by walKR to increase drug resistance, control metabolism and alter the virulence potential of this pathogen.

  13. Bioorthogonal, two-component delivery systems based on antibody and drug-loaded nanocarriers for enhanced internalization of nanotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Zhu, Wenlian; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2014-02-01

    Nanocarriers play an important role in targeted cancer chemotherapy. The optimal nanocarrier delivery system should provide efficient and highly specific recognition of the target cells and rapid internalization of the therapeutic cargo to reduce systemic toxicity as well as to increase the cytotoxicity to cancer cells. To this end, we developed a two-step, two-component targeted delivery system based on antibody and drug-loaded nanocarrier that uses bioorthogonal click reactions for specific internalization of nanotherapeutics. The pretargeting component, anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, functionalized with azide groups labels cancer cells that overexpress HER2 surface receptors. The drug carrier component, dibenzylcyclooctyne substituted albumin conjugated with paclitaxel, reacts specifically with the pretargeting component. These two components form cross-linked clusters on the cell surface, which facilitates the internalization of the complex. This strategy demonstrated substantial cellular internalization of clusters consisted of HER2 receptors, modified trastuzumab and paclitaxel-loaded albumin nanocarriers, and subsequent significant cytotoxicity in HER2-positive BT-474 breast cancer cells. Our results show high efficacy of this strategy for targeted nanotherapeutics. We foresee to broaden the applications of this strategy using agents such as radionuclides, toxins, and interfering RNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The YvfTU Two-component System is involved in plcR expression in Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen-the Christophe

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most extracellular virulence factors produced by Bacillus cereus are regulated by the pleiotropic transcriptional activator PlcR. Among strains belonging to the B. cereus group, the plcR gene is always located in the vicinity of genes encoding the YvfTU two-component system. The putative role of YvfTU in the expression of the PlcR regulon was therefore investigated. Results Expression of the plcR gene was monitored using a transcriptional fusion with a lacZ reporter gene in a yvfTU mutant and in its B. cereus ATCC 14579 parental strain. Two hours after the onset of the stationary phase, a stage at which the PlcR regulon is highly expressed, the plcR expression in the yvfTU mutant was only 50% of that of its parental strain. In addition to the reduced plcR expression in the yvfTU mutant, a few members of the PlcR regulon showed a differential expression, as revealed by transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. The virulence of the yvfTU mutant in a Galleria mellonella insect model was slightly lower than that of the parental strain. Conclusion The YvfTU two-component system is not required for the expression of most of the virulence factors belonging to the PlcR regulon. However, YvfTU is involved in expression of plcR, a major regulator of virulence in B. cereus.

  15. An Overview of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems Implicated in Extra-Intestinal Pathogenic E. coli Infections

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    Erin J. Breland

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC infections are common in mammals and birds. The predominant ExPEC types are avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, neonatal meningitis causing E. coli/meningitis associated E. coli (NMEC/MAEC, and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. Many reviews have described current knowledge on ExPEC infection strategies and virulence factors, especially for UPEC. However, surprisingly little has been reported on the regulatory modules that have been identified as critical in ExPEC pathogenesis. Two-component systems (TCSs comprise the predominant method by which bacteria respond to changing environments and play significant roles in modulating bacterial fitness in diverse niches. Recent studies have highlighted the potential of manipulating signal transduction systems as a means to chemically re-wire bacterial pathogens, thereby reducing selective pressure and avoiding the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review begins by providing a brief introduction to characterized infection strategies and common virulence factors among APEC, NMEC, and UPEC and continues with a comprehensive overview of two-component signal transduction networks that have been shown to influence ExPEC pathogenesis.

  16. The YvfTU two-component system is involved in plcR expression in Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillard, Julien; Susanna, Kim; Michaud, Caroline; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Gohar, Michel; Nielsen-Leroux, Christina; Ramarao, Nalini; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Nguyen-the, Christophe; Lereclus, Didier; Broussolle, Véronique

    2008-10-16

    Most extracellular virulence factors produced by Bacillus cereus are regulated by the pleiotropic transcriptional activator PlcR. Among strains belonging to the B. cereus group, the plcR gene is always located in the vicinity of genes encoding the YvfTU two-component system. The putative role of YvfTU in the expression of the PlcR regulon was therefore investigated. Expression of the plcR gene was monitored using a transcriptional fusion with a lacZ reporter gene in a yvfTU mutant and in its B. cereus ATCC 14579 parental strain. Two hours after the onset of the stationary phase, a stage at which the PlcR regulon is highly expressed, the plcR expression in the yvfTU mutant was only 50% of that of its parental strain. In addition to the reduced plcR expression in the yvfTU mutant, a few members of the PlcR regulon showed a differential expression, as revealed by transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. The virulence of the yvfTU mutant in a Galleria mellonella insect model was slightly lower than that of the parental strain. The YvfTU two-component system is not required for the expression of most of the virulence factors belonging to the PlcR regulon. However, YvfTU is involved in expression of plcR, a major regulator of virulence in B. cereus.

  17. Genome-wide DNA binding pattern of two-component system response regulator RhpR in Pseudomonas syringae

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    Tianhong Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Pseudomonas syringae uses the two-component system RhpRS to modulate the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS genes and pathogenicity, the molecular mechanisms and the regulon of RhpRS have yet to be fully demonstrated. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of RhpR binding to DNA prepared from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in order to identify candidate direct targets of RhpR-mediated transcriptional regulation, as described in our recent article [1]. The data are available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE58533. Here we describe the detailed methods and data analyses of our RhpR ChIP-seq dataset.

  18. Mutational activation of the AmgRS two-component system in aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N; Poole, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The amgRS operon encodes a presumed membrane stress-responsive two-component system linked to intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genome sequencing of a lab isolate showing modest pan-aminoglycoside resistance, strain K2979, revealed a number of mutations, including a substitution in amgS that produced an R182C change in the AmgS sensor kinase product of this gene. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise wild-type strain recapitulated the resistance phenotype, while correcting the mutation in the resistant mutant abrogated the resistant phenotype, confirming that the amgS mutation is responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance of strain K2979. The amgSR182 mutation promoted an AmgR-dependent, 2- to 3-fold increase in expression of the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528, mirroring the impact of aminoglycoside exposure of wild-type cells on htpX and PA5528 expression. This suggests that amgSR182 is a gain-of-function mutation that activates AmgS and the AmgRS two-component system in promoting modest resistance to aminoglycosides. Screening of several pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa revealed three that showed elevated htpX and PA5528 expression and harbored single amino acid-altering mutations in amgS (V121G or D106N) and no mutations in amgR. Introduction of the amgSV121G mutation into wild-type P. aeruginosa generated a resistance phenotype reminiscent of the amgSR182 mutant and produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in htpX and PA5528 expression, confirming that it, too, is a gain-of-function aminoglycoside resistance-promoting mutation. These results highlight the contribution of amgS mutations and activation of the AmgRS two-component system to acquired aminoglycoside resistance in lab and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  19. ResDE Two-Component Regulatory System Mediates Oxygen Limitation-Induced Biofilm Formation by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9.

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    Zhou, Xuan; Zhang, Nan; Xia, Liming; Li, Qing; Shao, Jiahui; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2018-04-15

    Efficient biofilm formation and root colonization capabilities facilitate the ability of beneficial plant rhizobacteria to promote plant growth and antagonize soilborne pathogens. Biofilm formation by plant-beneficial Bacillus strains is triggered by environmental cues, including oxygen deficiency, but the pathways that sense these environmental signals and regulate biofilm formation have not been thoroughly elucidated. In this study, we showed that the ResDE two-component regulatory system in the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain SQR9 senses the oxygen deficiency signal and regulates biofilm formation. ResE is activated by sensing the oxygen limitation-induced reduction of the NAD + /NADH pool through its PAS domain, stimulating its kinase activity, and resulting in the transfer of a phosphoryl group to ResD. The phosphorylated ResD directly binds to the promoter regions of the qoxABCD and ctaCDEF operons to improve the biosynthesis of terminal oxidases, which can interact with KinB to activate biofilm formation. These results not only revealed the novel regulatory function of the ResDE two-component system but also contributed to the understanding of the complicated regulatory network governing Bacillus biofilm formation. This research may help to enhance the root colonization and the plant-beneficial efficiency of SQR9 and other Bacillus rhizobacteria used in agriculture. IMPORTANCE Bacillus spp. are widely used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and disease suppression. The exertion of their plant-beneficial functions is largely dependent on their root colonization, which is closely related to their biofilm formation capabilities. On the other hand, Bacillus is the model bacterium for biofilm study, and the process and molecular network of biofilm formation are well characterized (B. Mielich-Süss and D. Lopez, Environ Microbiol 17:555-565, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.12527; L. S. Cairns, L. Hobley, and

  20. Oxidative stress enhances cephalosporin resistance of Enterococcus faecalis through activation of a two-component signaling system.

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    Djorić, Dušanka; Kristich, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a low-GC Gram-positive bacterium, a normal resident of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and an important hospital-acquired pathogen. An important risk factor for hospital-acquired enterococcal infections is prior therapy with broad-spectrum cephalosporins, antibiotics that impair cell wall biosynthesis by inhibiting peptidoglycan cross-linking. Enterococci are intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins; however, environmental factors that modulate cephalosporin resistance have not been described. While searching for the genetic determinants of cephalosporin resistance in E. faecalis, we unexpectedly discovered that oxidative stress, whether from external sources or derived from endogenous metabolism, drives enhanced intrinsic resistance to cephalosporins. A particular source of oxidative stress, H2O2, activates signaling through the CroR-CroS two-component signaling system, a known determinant of cephalosporin resistance in E. faecalis. We find that CroR-CroS is required for adaptation to H2O2 stress and that H2O2 potentiates the activities of cephalosporins against E. faecalis when the CroR-CroS signaling system is nonfunctional. Rather than directly detecting H2O2, our data suggest that the CroR-CroS system responds to cell envelope damage caused by H2O2 exposure in order to promote cell envelope repair and enhanced cephalosporin resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Modification of CusSR bacterial two-component systems by the introduction of an inducible positive feedback loop.

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    Ravikumar, Sambandam; Pham, Van Dung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-06-01

    The CusSR two-component system (TCS) is a copper-sensing apparatus of E. coli that is responsible for regulating the copper-related homeostatic system. The dynamic characteristics of the CusSR network were modified by the introduction of a positive feedback loop. To construct the feedback loop, the CusR, which is activated by the cusC promoter, was cloned downstream of the cusC promoter and reporter protein. The feedback loop system, once activated by environmental copper, triggers the activation of the cusC promoter, which results in the amplification of a reporter protein and CusR expression. The threshold copper concentration for the activation of the modified CusSR TCS network was lowered from 2,476.5 μg/l to 247.7 μg/l, which indicates a tenfold increase in sensitivity. The intensity of the output signal was increased twofold, and was maintained for 16 h. The strategy proposed in this study can also be applied to modify the dynamic characteristics of other TCSs.

  2. Two-component regulatory systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an intricate network mediating fimbrial and efflux pump gene expression.

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    Sivaneson, Melissa; Mikkelsen, Helga; Ventre, Isabelle; Bordi, Christophe; Filloux, Alain

    2011-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for chronic and acute infections in humans. Chronic infections are associated with production of fimbriae and the formation of a biofilm. The two-component system Roc1 is named after its role in the regulation of cup genes, which encode components of a machinery allowing assembly of fimbriae. A non-characterized gene cluster, roc2, encodes components homologous to the Roc1 system. We show that cross-regulation occurs between the Roc1 and Roc2 signalling pathways. We demonstrate that the sensors RocS2 and RocS1 converge on the response regulator RocA1 to control cupC gene expression. This control is independent of the response regulator RocA2. Instead, we show that these sensors act via the RocA2 response regulator to repress the mexAB-oprM genes. These genes encode a multidrug efflux pump and are upregulated in the rocA2 mutant, which is less susceptible to antibiotics. It has been reported that in cystic fibrosis lungs, in which P. aeruginosa adopts the biofilm lifestyle, most isolates have an inactive MexAB-OprM pump. The concomitant RocS2-dependent upregulation of cupC genes (biofilm formation) and downregulation of mexAB-oprM genes (antibiotic resistance) is in agreement with this observation. It suggests that the Roc systems may sense the environment in the cystic fibrosis lung. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. The PhoBR two-component system regulates antibiotic biosynthesis in Serratia in response to phosphate

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    Everson Lee

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary metabolism in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (Serratia 39006 is controlled via a complex network of regulators, including a LuxIR-type (SmaIR quorum sensing (QS system. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism by which phosphate limitation controls biosynthesis of two antibiotic secondary metabolites, prodigiosin and carbapenem, in Serratia 39006. Results We demonstrate that a mutation in the high affinity phosphate transporter pstSCAB-phoU, believed to mimic low phosphate conditions, causes upregulation of secondary metabolism and QS in Serratia 39006, via the PhoBR two-component system. Phosphate limitation also activated secondary metabolism and QS in Serratia 39006. In addition, a pstS mutation resulted in upregulation of rap. Rap, a putative SlyA/MarR-family transcriptional regulator, shares similarity with the global regulator RovA (regulator of virulence from Yersina spp. and is an activator of secondary metabolism in Serratia 39006. We demonstrate that expression of rap, pigA-O (encoding the prodigiosin biosynthetic operon and smaI are controlled via PhoBR in Serratia 39006. Conclusion Phosphate limitation regulates secondary metabolism in Serratia 39006 via multiple inter-linked pathways, incorporating transcriptional control mediated by three important global regulators, PhoB, SmaR and Rap.

  4. A Two-Component Regulatory System Impacts Extracellular Membrane-Derived Vesicle Production in Group A Streptococcus

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    Ulrike Resch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Export of macromolecules via extracellular membrane-derived vesicles (MVs plays an important role in the biology of Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria have also recently been reported to produce MVs; however, the composition and mechanisms governing vesiculogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria remain undefined. Here, we describe MV production in the Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS, the etiological agent of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. M1 serotype GAS isolates in culture exhibit MV structures both on the cell wall surface and in the near vicinity of bacterial cells. A comprehensive analysis of MV proteins identified both virulence-associated protein substrates of the general secretory pathway in addition to “anchorless surface proteins.” Characteristic differences in the contents, distributions, and fatty acid compositions of specific lipids between MVs and GAS cell membrane were also observed. Furthermore, deep RNA sequencing of vesicular RNAs revealed that GAS MVs contained differentially abundant RNA species relative to bacterial cellular RNA. MV production by GAS strains varied in a manner dependent on an intact two-component system, CovRS, with MV production negatively regulated by the system. Modulation of MV production through CovRS was found to be independent of both GAS cysteine protease SpeB and capsule biosynthesis. Our data provide an explanation for GAS secretion of macromolecules, including RNAs, lipids, and proteins, and illustrate a regulatory mechanism coordinating this secretory response.

  5. The Two-Component Regulatory System VicRK is Important to Virulence of Streptococcus equi Subspecies equi.

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    Liu, Mengyao; McClure, Michael J; Zhu, Hui; Xie, Gang; Lei, Benfang

    2008-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the importance of the two-component regulatory system VicRK to virulence of the horse pathogen Streptococcus equi subspecies equi and the potential of a vicK mutant as a live vaccine candidate using mouse infection models. The vicK gene was deleted by gene replacement. The DeltavicK mutant is attenuated in virulence in both subcutaneous and intranasal infections in mice. DeltavicK grows less slowly than the parent strain but retains the ability of S. equi to resist to phagocytosis by polymorphoneuclear leukocytes, suggesting that the vicK deletion causes growth defect. DeltavicK infection protects mice against reinfection with a wild-type S. equi strain. Intranasal DeltavicK infection induces production of anti-SeM mucosal IgA and systemic IgG. These results indicate that VicRK is important to S. equi growth and virulence and suggest that DeltavicK has the potential to be developed as a live S. equi vaccine.

  6. The RpfCG two-component system negatively regulates the colonization of sugar cane stalks by Xanthomonas albilineans.

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    Rott, Philippe; Fleites, Laura A; Mensi, Imène; Sheppard, Lauren; Daugrois, Jean-Heinrich; Dow, J Maxwell; Gabriel, Dean W

    2013-06-01

    The genome of Xanthomonas albilineans, the causal agent of sugar cane leaf scald, carries a gene cluster encoding a predicted quorum sensing system that is highly related to the diffusible signalling factor (DSF) systems of the plant pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas campestris. In these latter pathogens, a cluster of regulation of pathogenicity factors (rpf) genes encodes the DSF system and is involved in control of various cellular processes. Mutation of Xanthomonas albilineans rpfF, encoding a predicted DSF synthase, in Florida strain XaFL07-1 resulted in a small reduction of disease severity (DS). Single-knockout mutations of rpfC and rpfG (encoding a predicted DSF sensor and regulator, respectively) had no effect on DS or swimming motility of the pathogen. However, capacity of the pathogen to cause disease was slightly reduced and swimming motility was severely affected when rpfG and rpfC were both deleted. Similar results were obtained when the entire rpfGCF region was deleted. Surprisingly, when the pathogen was mutated in rpfG or rpfC (single or double mutations) it was able to colonize sugar cane spatially more efficiently than the wild-type. Mutation in rpfF alone did not affect the degree of spatial invasion. We conclude that the DSF signal contributes to symptom expression but not to invasion of sugar cane stalks by Xanthomonas albilineans strain XaFL07-1, which is mainly controlled by the RpfCG two-component system.

  7. The two-component signal transduction system YvcPQ regulates the bacterial resistance to bacitracin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

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    Zhang, Shumeng; Li, Xinfeng; Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; He, Jin

    2016-10-01

    YvcPQ is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that respond to specific stimuli and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvcQ and a response regulator YvcP. In this study, through searching the consensus sequence recognized by YvcP, we found four YvcP-binding motifs in the promoter regions of genes yvcR (BMB171_C4100), BMB171_C4385, kapD (BMB171_C4525) and BMB171_C4835 in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 which is a representative of Bacillus cereus group, and confirmed that these genes are regulated by YvcP. We compared the sequence of yvcPQ and its downstream genes in genus Bacillus, and found two different kinds of yvc locus, one was the yvcPQ-RS in B. subtilis species and the other was the yvcPQ-R-S1S2 in B. cereus group. Furthermore, we found that YvcP activates the transcription of yvcS1S2 (downstream of yvcR) to promote bacterial resistance to bacitracin and deletion of either yvcPQ operon or yvcS1S2 operon renders the bacterial cells more sensitive to bacitracin. This study enriched our understanding of both the YvcPQ's function and the mechanism of bacterial resistance to bacitracin.

  8. The two-component system CBO2306/CBO2307 is important for cold adaptation of Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Isokallio, Marita; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a notorious foodborne pathogen. Its ability to adapt to and grow at low temperatures is of interest for food safety. Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to be involved in cold-shock and growth at low temperatures. Here we show the importance of TCS CBO2306/CBO2307 in the cold-shock response of C. botulinum ATCC 3502. The relative expression levels of the cbo2306 and cbo2307 were up to 4.4-fold induced in the cold-shocked cultures but negatively regulated in the late-log and stationary growth phase in relation to early logarithmic growth phase in non-shocked cultures. Importance of the CBO2306/CBO2307 in the cold stress was further demonstrated by impaired growth of insertional cbo2306 or cbo2307 knockout mutants in relation to the wild-type strain ATCC 3502. The results suggest that the TCS CBO2306/CBO2307 is important for cold-shock response and adaptation of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 to low temperature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Two-component systems are involved in the regulation of botulinum neurotoxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum type A strain Hall.

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    Chloé Connan

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum synthesizes a potent neurotoxin (BoNT which associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs to form complexes of various sizes. The bont and antp genes are clustered in two operons. In C. botulinum type A, bont/A and antp genes are expressed during the end of the exponential growth phase and the beginning of the stationary phase under the control of an alternative sigma factor encoded by botR/A, which is located between the two operons. In the genome of C. botulinum type A strain Hall, 30 gene pairs predicted to encode two-component systems (TCSs and 9 orphan regulatory genes have been identified. Therefore, 34 Hall isogenic antisense strains on predicted regulatory genes (29 TCSs and 5 orphan regulatory genes have been obtained by a mRNA antisense procedure. Two TCS isogenic antisense strains showed more rapid growth kinetics and reduced BoNT/A production than the control strain, as well as increased bacterial lysis and impairment of the bacterial cell wall structure. Three other TCS isogenic antisense strains induced a low level of BoNT/A and ANTP production. Interestingly, reduced expression of bont/A and antp genes was shown to be independent of botR/A. These results indicate that BoNT/A synthesis is under the control of a complex network of regulation including directly at least three TCSs.

  10. The YvqE two-component system controls biofilm formation and acid production in Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Maeyama, Jun-Ichi; Matsui, Hideyuki; Zhang, Yan; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-07-01

    In Streptococcus pyogenes, proteins involved in determining virulence are controlled by stand-alone response regulators and by two-component regulatory systems. Previous studies reported that, compared to the parental strain, the yvqE sensor knockout strain showed significantly reduced growth and lower virulence. To determine the function of YvqE, we performed biofilm analysis and pH assays on yvqE mutants, and site-directed mutagenesis of YvqE. The yvqE deletion mutant showed a slower acid production rate, indicating that YvqE regulates acid production from sugar fermentation. The mutant strain, in which the Asp(26) residue in YvqE was replaced with Asn, affected biofilm formation, suggesting that this amino acid senses hydrogen ions produced by fermentative sugar metabolism. Signals received by YvqE were directly or indirectly responsible for inducing pilus expression. This study shows that at low environmental pH, biofilm formation in S. pyogenes is mediated by YvqE and suggests that regulation of pilus expression by environmental acidification could be directly under the control of YvqE. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Two-component system response regulators involved in virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 in infective endocarditis.

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    My Trihn

    Full Text Available Streptococci resident in the oral cavity have been linked to infective endocarditis (IE. While other viridans streptococci are commonly studied in relation to IE, less research has been focused on Streptococcus pneumoniae. We established for the first time an animal model of S. pneumoniae IE, and examined the virulence of the TIGR4 strain in this model. We hypothesized that two-component systems (TCS may mediate S. pneumoniae TIGR4 strain virulence in IE and examined TCS response regulator (RR mutants of TIGR4 in vivo with the IE model. Thirteen of the 14 RR protein genes were mutagenized, excluding only the essential gene SP_1227. The requirement of the 13 RRs for S. pneumoniae competitiveness in the IE model was assessed in vivo through use of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and competitive index assays. Using real-time PCR, several RR mutants were detected at significantly lower levels in infected heart valves compared with a control strain suggesting the respective RRs are candidate virulence factors for IE. The virulence reduction of the ΔciaR mutant was further confirmed by competitive index assay. Our data suggest that CiaR is a virulence factor of S. pneumoniae strain TIGR4 for IE.

  12. The Role of CzcRS Two-Component Systems in the Heavy Metal Resistance of Pseudomonas putida X4

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    Pulin Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of different czcRS genes in metal resistance and the cross-link between czcRS and czcCBA in Pseudomonas putida X4 were studied to advance understanding of the mechanisms by which P. putida copes with metal stress. Similar to P. putida KT2440, two complete czcRS1 and czcRS2 two-component systems, as well as a czcR3 without the corresponding sensing component were amplified in P. putida X4. The histidine kinase genes czcS1 and czcS2 were inactivated and fused to lacZ by homologous recombination. The lacZ fusion assay revealed that Cd2+ and Zn2+ caused a decrease in the transcription of czcRS1, whereas Cd2+ treatment enhanced the transcription of czcRS2. The mutation of different czcRSs showed that all czcRSs are necessary to facilitate full metal resistance in P. putida X4. A putative gene just downstream of czcR3 is related to metal ion resistance, and its transcription was activated by Zn2+. Data from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR strongly suggested that czcRSs regulate the expression of czcCBA, and a cross-link exists between different czcRSs.

  13. The Role of CzcRS Two-Component Systems in the Heavy Metal Resistance of Pseudomonas putida X4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pulin; Chen, Xi; Huang, Qiaoyun; Chen, Wenli

    2015-07-27

    The role of different czcRS genes in metal resistance and the cross-link between czcRS and czcCBA in Pseudomonas putida X4 were studied to advance understanding of the mechanisms by which P. putida copes with metal stress. Similar to P. putida KT2440, two complete czcRS1 and czcRS2 two-component systems, as well as a czcR3 without the corresponding sensing component were amplified in P. putida X4. The histidine kinase genes czcS1 and czcS2 were inactivated and fused to lacZ by homologous recombination. The lacZ fusion assay revealed that Cd2+ and Zn2+ caused a decrease in the transcription of czcRS1, whereas Cd2+ treatment enhanced the transcription of czcRS2. The mutation of different czcRSs showed that all czcRSs are necessary to facilitate full metal resistance in P. putida X4. A putative gene just downstream of czcR3 is related to metal ion resistance, and its transcription was activated by Zn2+. Data from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) strongly suggested that czcRSs regulate the expression of czcCBA, and a cross-link exists between different czcRSs.

  14. Two-component regulatory system ActS/ActR is required for Sinorhizobium meliloti adaptation to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guirong; Wang, Sunjun; Lu, Dawei; Huang, Leqi; Li, Ningning; Luo, Li

    2017-05-01

    The two-component system ActS/ActR plays important roles in bacterial adaptation to abiotic stress, including acid tolerance and oxidant resistance. However, the underlying regulatory mechanism is not clear. In this study, we found that the ActS/ActR system is required for adaptation to oxidative stress by regulating the transcription of the genes actR, katB, gshA and gshB1. The actS and actR mutants were sensitive to low pH and oxidants such as H 2 O 2 , oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). The expression of actR by using a plasmid rescued the defect of SNP sensitivity for all actS and actR mutants. The expression of actS and actR were suppressed by treatment with H 2 O 2 . The expression of actS, actR, oxyR, katA and katB was required for ActS and ActR under normal conditions. The induction of katB, gshA and gshB1 depended on ActS and ActR during treatment with H 2 O 2 and SNP. Our findings revealed that the ActS/ActR system is a key redox regulator in S. meliltoi and provides a new cue to understanding Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome-wide survey of two-component signal transduction systems in the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum.

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    Borland, Stéphanie; Oudart, Anne; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2015-10-22

    Two-component systems (TCS) play critical roles in sensing and responding to environmental cues. Azospirillum is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium living in the rhizosphere of many important crops. Despite numerous studies about its plant beneficial properties, little is known about how the bacterium senses and responds to its rhizospheric environment. The availability of complete genome sequenced from four Azospirillum strains (A. brasilense Sp245 and CBG 497, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510) offers the opportunity to conduct a comprehensive comparative analysis of the TCS gene family. Azospirillum genomes harbour a very large number of genes encoding TCS, and are especially enriched in hybrid histidine kinases (HyHK) genes compared to other plant-associated bacteria of similar genome sizes. We gained further insight into HyHK structure and architecture, revealing an intriguing complexity of these systems. An unusual proportion of TCS genes were orphaned or in complex clusters, and a high proportion of predicted soluble HKs compared to other plant-associated bacteria are reported. Phylogenetic analyses of the transmitter and receiver domains of A. lipoferum 4B HyHK indicate that expansion of this family mainly arose through horizontal gene transfer but also through gene duplications all along the diversification of the Azospirillum genus. By performing a genome-wide comparison of TCS, we unraveled important 'genus-defining' and 'plant-specifying' TCS. This study shed light on Azospirillum TCS which may confer important regulatory flexibility. Collectively, these findings highlight that Azospirillum genomes have broad potential for adaptation to fluctuating environments.

  16. The CsrR/CsrS two-component system of group A Streptococcus responds to environmental Mg2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryllos, Ioannis; Levin, James C; Wessels, Michael R

    2003-04-01

    Group A streptococci control expression of key virulence determinants via the two-component sensorregulator system CsrRCsrS. The membrane-bound sensor CsrS is thought to respond to previously unknown environmental signal(s) by controlling phosphorylation of its cognate regulator component CsrR. Phosphorylation of CsrR increases its affinity for binding to the promoter regions of Csr-regulated genes to repress transcription. Here we show that environmental Mg(2+) concentration is a potent and specific stimulus for CsrRCsrS-mediated regulation. We studied the effect of divalent cations on expression of the Csr-regulated hyaluronic acid capsule genes (hasABC) by measuring chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in a reporter strain of group A Streptococcus carrying a has operon promoter-cat fusion. Addition of Mg(2+), but not of Ca(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+), repressed capsule gene expression by up to 80% in a dose-dependent fashion. The decrease in capsule gene transcription was associated with a marked reduction in cell-associated capsular polysaccharide. RNA hybridization analysis demonstrated reduced expression of the Csr-regulated hasABC operon, streptokinase (ska), and streptolysin S (sagA) during growth in the presence of 15 mM Mg(2+) for the wild-type strain 003CAT but not for an isogenic csrS mutant. We propose that Mg(2+) binds to CsrS to induce phosphorylation of CsrR and subsequent repression of virulence gene expression. The low concentration of Mg(2+) in extracellular body fluids predicts that the CsrRCsrS system is maintained in the inactive state during infection, thereby allowing maximal expression of critical virulence determinants in the human host.

  17. A copper-activated two-component system interacts with zinc and imipenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caille, Olivier; Rossier, Claude; Perron, Karl

    2007-07-01

    The effects of copper (Cu) on trace metal and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been investigated. Cu treatments induced resistance not only to this metal but also, surprisingly, to zinc (Zn). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that after Cu treatment the transcription of the czcRS two-component system (TCS) operon was enhanced as well as that of the czcCBA operon encoding an efflux pump specific for zinc, cadmium, and cobalt. Cu treatments at the same time caused a decrease in the production of OprD porin, resulting in resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic imipenem. The CzcR regulator was known to repress oprD. However, Cu was still able to decrease the production of OprD and induce imipenem resistance in a czcRS knockout mutant. This strongly suggested that another Cu-dependent regulatory system was acting negatively on oprD expression. TCS regulator genes copR-copS have been shown to be involved in Cu tolerance in P. aeruginosa. qRT-PCR showed that overproduction of the CopR or of the CzcR regulator resulted in increased transcription of the czcC gene as well as in a decrease in oprD gene transcription, either in the wild-type strain or in the czcRS knockout mutant. Overproduction experiments suggest that a metal-dependent mechanism operates at the posttranscriptional level to control the production of the CzcCBA efflux pump. This study shows that CopR is a new negative regulator of OprD porin and that it links Zn, Cu, and imipenem resistances by interacting with the CzcRS TCS.

  18. BarA-UvrY two-component system regulates virulence of uropathogenic E. coli CFT073.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyandi, Senthilkumar; Mitra, Arindam; Herren, Christopher D; Lockatell, C Virginia; Johnson, David E; Zhu, Xiaoping; Mukhopadhyay, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a member of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, cause ∼80% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) in humans. UPEC initiates its colonization in epithelial cells lining the urinary tract with a complicated life cycle, replicating and persisting in intracellular and extracellular niches. Consequently, UPEC causes cystitis and more severe form of pyelonephritis. To further understand the virulence characteristics of UPEC, we investigated the roles of BarA-UvrY two-component system (TCS) in regulating UPEC virulence. Our results showed that mutation of BarA-UvrY TCS significantly decreased the virulence of UPEC CFT073, as assessed by mouse urinary tract infection, chicken embryo killing assay, and cytotoxicity assay on human kidney and uroepithelial cell lines. Furthermore, mutation of either barA or uvrY gene reduced the production of hemolysin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8). The virulence phenotype was restored similar to that of wild-type by complementation of either barA or uvrY gene in trans. In addition, we discussed a possible link between the BarA-UvrY TCS and CsrA in positively and negatively controlling virulence in UPEC. Overall, this study provides the evidences for BarA-UvrY TCS regulates the virulence of UPEC CFT073 and may point to mechanisms by which virulence regulations are observed in different ways may control the long-term survival of UPEC in the urinary tract.

  19. A novel two-component signaling system facilitates uropathogenic Escherichia coli's ability to exploit abundant host metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentong Cai

    Full Text Available Two-component signaling systems (TCSs are major mechanisms by which bacteria adapt to environmental conditions. It follows then that TCSs would play important roles in the adaptation of pathogenic bacteria to host environments. However, no pathogen-associated TCS has been identified in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. Here, we identified a novel TCS, which we termed KguS/KguR (KguS: α-ketoglutarate utilization sensor; KguR: α-ketoglutarate utilization regulator in UPEC CFT073, a strain isolated from human pyelonephritis. kguS/kguR was strongly associated with UPEC but was found only rarely among other E. coli including commensal and intestinal pathogenic strains. An in vivo competition assay in a mouse UTI model showed that deletion of kguS/kguR in UPEC CFT073 resulted in a significant reduction in its colonization of the bladders and kidneys of mice, suggesting that KguS/KguR contributed to UPEC fitness in vivo. Comparative proteomics identified the target gene products of KguS/KguR, and sequence analysis showed that TCS KguS/KguR and its targeted-genes, c5032 to c5039, are encoded on a genomic island, which is not present in intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Expression of the target genes was induced by α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. These genes were further shown to be involved in utilization of α-KG as a sole carbon source under anaerobic conditions. KguS/KguR contributed to the regulation of the target genes with the direct regulation by KguR verified using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. In addition, oxygen deficiency positively modulated expression of kguS/kguR and its target genes. Taken altogether, this study describes the first UPEC-associated TCS that functions in controlling the utilization of α-ketoglutarate in vivo thereby facilitating UPEC adaptation to life inside the urinary tract.

  20. Extrusion foaming of thermoplastic cellulose acetate from renewable resources using a two-component physical blowing agent system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Windeck, C.; Hendriks, S.; Zepnik, S.; Wodke, T.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic cellulose acetate (CA) is a bio-based polymer with optical, mechanical and thermal properties comparable to those of polystyrene (PS). The substitution of the predominant petrol-based PS in applications like foamed food trays can lead to a more sustainable economic practice. However, CA is also suitable for more durable applications as the biodegradability rate can be controlled by adjusting the degree of substitutions. The extrusion foaming of CA still has to overcome certain challenges. CA is highly hydrophilic and can suffer from hydrolytic degradation if not dried properly. Therefore, the influence of residual moisture on the melt viscosity is rather high. Beyond, the surface quality of foam CA sheets is below those of PS due to the particular foaming behaviour. This paper presents results of a recent study on extrusion foamed CA, using a two-component physical blowing agent system compromising HFO 1234ze as blowing agent and organic solvents as co-propellant. Samples with different co-propellants are processed on a laboratory single screw extruder at IKV. Morphology and surface topography are investigated with respect to the blowing agent composition and the die pressure. In addition, relationships between foam density, foam morphology and the propellants are analysed. The choice of the co-propellant has a significant influence on melt-strength, foaming behaviour and the possible blow-up ratio of the sheet. Furthermore, a positive influence of the co-propellant on the surface quality can be observed. In addition, the focus is laid on the effect of external contact cooling of the foamed sheets after the die exit.

  1. Role of the SaeRS two-component regulatory system in Staphylococcus epidermidis autolysis and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) has emerged as one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. The SaeRS two-component signal transduction system (TCS) influences virulence and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. The deletion of saeR in S. epidermidis results in impaired anaerobic growth and decreased nitrate utilization. However, the regulatory function of SaeRS on biofilm formation and autolysis in S. epidermidis remains unclear. Results The saeRS genes of SE1457 were deleted by homologous recombination. The saeRS deletion mutant, SE1457ΔsaeRS, exhibited increased biofilm formation that was disturbed more severely (a 4-fold reduction) by DNase I treatment compared to SE1457 and the complementation strain SE1457saec. Compared to SE1457 and SE1457saec, SE1457ΔsaeRS showed increased Triton X-100-induced autolysis (approximately 3-fold) and decreased cell viability in planktonic/biofilm states; further, SE1457ΔsaeRS also released more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in the biofilms. Correlated with the increased autolysis phenotype, the transcription of autolysis-related genes, such as atlE and aae, was increased in SE1457ΔsaeRS. Whereas the expression of accumulation-associated protein was up-regulated by 1.8-fold in 1457ΔsaeRS, the expression of an N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase enzyme (encoded by icaA) critical for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) synthesis was not affected by the deletion of saeRS. Conclusions Deletion of saeRS in S. epidermidis resulted in an increase in biofilm-forming ability, which was associated with increased eDNA release and up-regulated Aap expression. The increased eDNA release from SE1457ΔsaeRS was associated with increased bacterial autolysis and decreased bacterial cell viability in the planktonic/biofilm states. PMID:21702925

  2. Role of the SaeRS two-component regulatory system in Staphylococcus epidermidis autolysis and biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Patrice

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE has emerged as one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. The SaeRS two-component signal transduction system (TCS influences virulence and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. The deletion of saeR in S. epidermidis results in impaired anaerobic growth and decreased nitrate utilization. However, the regulatory function of SaeRS on biofilm formation and autolysis in S. epidermidis remains unclear. Results The saeRS genes of SE1457 were deleted by homologous recombination. The saeRS deletion mutant, SE1457ΔsaeRS, exhibited increased biofilm formation that was disturbed more severely (a 4-fold reduction by DNase I treatment compared to SE1457 and the complementation strain SE1457saec. Compared to SE1457 and SE1457saec, SE1457ΔsaeRS showed increased Triton X-100-induced autolysis (approximately 3-fold and decreased cell viability in planktonic/biofilm states; further, SE1457ΔsaeRS also released more extracellular DNA (eDNA in the biofilms. Correlated with the increased autolysis phenotype, the transcription of autolysis-related genes, such as atlE and aae, was increased in SE1457ΔsaeRS. Whereas the expression of accumulation-associated protein was up-regulated by 1.8-fold in 1457ΔsaeRS, the expression of an N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase enzyme (encoded by icaA critical for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA synthesis was not affected by the deletion of saeRS. Conclusions Deletion of saeRS in S. epidermidis resulted in an increase in biofilm-forming ability, which was associated with increased eDNA release and up-regulated Aap expression. The increased eDNA release from SE1457ΔsaeRS was associated with increased bacterial autolysis and decreased bacterial cell viability in the planktonic/biofilm states.

  3. BarA-UvrY two-component system regulates virulence of uropathogenic E. coli CFT073.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Palaniyandi

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, a member of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, cause ∼80% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI in humans. UPEC initiates its colonization in epithelial cells lining the urinary tract with a complicated life cycle, replicating and persisting in intracellular and extracellular niches. Consequently, UPEC causes cystitis and more severe form of pyelonephritis. To further understand the virulence characteristics of UPEC, we investigated the roles of BarA-UvrY two-component system (TCS in regulating UPEC virulence. Our results showed that mutation of BarA-UvrY TCS significantly decreased the virulence of UPEC CFT073, as assessed by mouse urinary tract infection, chicken embryo killing assay, and cytotoxicity assay on human kidney and uroepithelial cell lines. Furthermore, mutation of either barA or uvrY gene reduced the production of hemolysin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6 and chemokine (IL-8. The virulence phenotype was restored similar to that of wild-type by complementation of either barA or uvrY gene in trans. In addition, we discussed a possible link between the BarA-UvrY TCS and CsrA in positively and negatively controlling virulence in UPEC. Overall, this study provides the evidences for BarA-UvrY TCS regulates the virulence of UPEC CFT073 and may point to mechanisms by which virulence regulations are observed in different ways may control the long-term survival of UPEC in the urinary tract.

  4. Polymyxin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phoQ mutants is dependent on additional two-component regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutu, Alina D; Sgambati, Nicole; Strasbourger, Pnina; Brannon, Mark K; Jacobs, Michael A; Haugen, Eric; Kaul, Rajinder K; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Høiby, Niels; Moskowitz, Samuel M

    2013-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin as a consequence of mutations in the PhoPQ regulatory system, mediated by covalent lipid A modification. Transposon mutagenesis of a polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutant defined 41 novel loci required for resistance, including two regulatory systems, ColRS and CprRS. Deletion of the colRS genes, individually or in tandem, abrogated the polymyxin resistance of a ΔphoQ mutant, as did individual or tandem deletion of cprRS. Individual deletion of colR or colS in a ΔphoQ mutant also suppressed 4-amino-L-arabinose addition to lipid A, consistent with the known role of this modification in polymyxin resistance. Surprisingly, tandem deletion of colRS or cprRS in the ΔphoQ mutant or individual deletion of cprR or cprS failed to suppress 4-amino-L-arabinose addition to lipid A, indicating that this modification alone is not sufficient for PhoPQ-mediated polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa. Episomal expression of colRS or cprRS in tandem or of cprR individually complemented the Pm resistance phenotype in the ΔphoQ mutant, while episomal expression of colR, colS, or cprS individually did not. Highly polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutants of P. aeruginosa isolated from polymyxin-treated cystic fibrosis patients harbored mutant alleles of colRS and cprS; when expressed in a ΔphoQ background, these mutant alleles enhanced polymyxin resistance. These results define ColRS and CprRS as two-component systems regulating polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa, indicate that addition of 4-amino-L-arabinose to lipid A is not the only PhoPQ-regulated biochemical mechanism required for resistance, and demonstrate that colRS and cprS mutations can contribute to high-level clinical resistance.

  5. A two-component regulatory system interconnects resistance to polymyxins, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and β-lactams in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Cédric; Plésiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy

    2011-03-01

    Constitutive overexpression of the active efflux system MexXY/OprM is a major cause of resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and cefepime in clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Upregulation of this pump often results from mutations occurring in mexZ, the local repressor gene of the mexXY operon. In this study, analysis of MexXY-overproducing mutants selected in vitro from reference strain PAO1Bes on amikacin (at a concentration 1.5-fold higher than the MIC) led to identification of a new class of mutants harboring an intact mexZ gene and exhibiting increased resistance to colistin and imipenem in addition to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and cefepime. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) experiments on a selected clone named PAOW2 demonstrated that mexXY overexpression was independent of mexZ and the PA5471 gene, which is required for drug-dependent induction of mexXY. Furthermore, the transcript levels of the oprD gene, which encodes the carbapenem-selective porin OprD, were found to be reduced drastically in PAOW2. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a single mutation resulting in an M59I substitution in the ParR protein, the response regulator of the ParRS two-component regulatory system (with ParS being the sensor kinase), which is required for adaptive resistance of P. aeruginosa to polycationic peptides such as colistin. The multidrug resistance phenotype was suppressed in PAOW2 by deletion of the parS and parRS genes and conferred to PAO1Bes by chromosomal insertion of the mutated parRS locus from PAOW2. As shown by transcriptomic analysis, only a very small number of genes were expressed differentially between PAOW2 and PAO1Bes, including the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification operon arnBCADTEF-ugd, responsible for resistance to polycationic agents. Exposure of wild-type PAO1Bes to different polycationic peptides, including colistin, was shown to result in increased mexY and repressed oprD expression via Par

  6. An Oxygen-Sensing Two-Component System in the Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulates Biofilm, Intracellular Invasion, and Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Schaefers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC, which is a group of bacteria that cause chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF and can be associated with outbreaks carrying high morbidity and mortality. While investigating the genomic diversity of B. dolosa strains collected from an outbreak among CF patients, we previously identified fixL as a gene showing signs of strong positive selection. This gene has homology to fixL of the rhizobial FixL/FixJ two-component system. The goals of this study were to determine the functions of FixLJ and their role in virulence in B. dolosa. We generated a fixLJ deletion mutant and complemented controls in B. dolosa strain AU0158. Using a fixK-lacZ reporter we found that FixLJ was activated in low oxygen in multiple BCC species. In a murine pneumonia model, the B. dolosa fixLJ deletion mutant was cleared faster from the lungs and spleen than wild-type B. dolosa strain AU0158 at 7 days post infection. Interestingly, the fixLJ deletion mutant made more biofilm, albeit with altered structure, but was less motile than strain AU0158. Using RNA-seq with in vitro grown bacteria, we found ~11% of the genome was differentially expressed in the fixLJ deletion mutant relative to strain AU0158. Multiple flagella-associated genes were down-regulated in the fixLJ deletion mutant, so we also evaluated virulence of a fliC deletion mutant, which lacks a flagellum. We saw no difference in the ability of the fliC deletion mutant to persist in the murine model relative to strain AU0158, suggesting factors other than flagella caused the phenotype of decreased persistence. We found the fixLJ deletion mutant to be less invasive in human lung epithelial and macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, B. dolosa fixLJ is a global regulator that controls biofilm formation, motility, intracellular invasion/persistence, and virulence.

  7. The ArcBA two-component system of Escherichia coli is regulated by the redox state of both the ubiquinone and the menaquinone pool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.; Alexeeva, S.; Laan, W.; Sawers, G.; Teixeira De Mattos, J.; Hellingwerf, K.

    2010-01-01

    ArcBA is a two-component regulatory system of Escherichia coli involved in sensing oxygen availability and the concomitant transcriptional regulation of oxidative and fermentative catabolism. Based on in vitro data, it has been postulated that the redox state of the ubiquinone pool is the

  8. Virulence control in group A Streptococcus by a two-component gene regulatory system: global expression profiling and in vivo infection modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Morag R; Smoot, Laura M; Migliaccio, Cristi A Lux; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Federle, Michael J; Adams, Gerald J; Scott, June R; Musser, James M

    2002-10-15

    Two-component gene regulatory systems composed of a membrane-bound sensor and cytoplasmic response regulator are important mechanisms used by bacteria to sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Group A Streptococcus, the causative agent of mild infections and life-threatening invasive diseases, produces many virulence factors that promote survival in humans. A two-component regulatory system, designated covRS (cov, control of virulence; csrRS), negatively controls expression of five proven or putative virulence factors (capsule, cysteine protease, streptokinase, streptolysin S, and streptodornase). Inactivation of covRS results in enhanced virulence in mouse models of invasive disease. Using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR, we found that CovR influences transcription of 15% (n = 271) of all chromosomal genes, including many that encode surface and secreted proteins mediating host-pathogen interactions. CovR also plays a central role in gene regulatory networks by influencing expression of genes encoding transcriptional regulators, including other two-component systems. Differential transcription of genes influenced by covR also was identified in mouse soft-tissue infection. This analysis provides a genome-scale overview of a virulence gene network in an important human pathogen and adds insight into the molecular mechanisms used by group A Streptococcus to interact with the host, promote survival, and cause disease.

  9. Geometrical Description of Chemical Equilibrium and Le Cha^telier's Principle: Two-Component Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor

    2018-01-01

    Chemical equilibrium is one of the most important concepts in chemistry. The changes in properties of the chemical system at equilibrium induced by variations in pressure, volume, temperature, and concentration are always included in classroom teaching and discussions. This work introduces a novel, geometrical approach to understanding the…

  10. A model system for pathogen detection using a two-component bacteriophage/bioluminescent signal amplification assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Nathan G.; Carroll, Richard J.; Applegate, Bruce M.

    2004-03-01

    Microbial contamination has become a mounting concern the last decade due to an increased emphasis of minimally processed food products specifically produce, and the recognition of foodborne pathogens such as Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. This research investigates a detection approach utilizing bacteriophage pathogen specificity coupled with a bacterial bioluminescent bioreporter utilizing the quorum sensing molecule from Vibrio fischeri, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). The 3-oxo-C6-HSL molecules diffuse out of the target cell after infection and induce bioluminescence from a population of 3-oxo-C6-HSL bioreporters (ROLux). E. coli phage M13, a well-characterized bacteriophage, offers a model system testing the use of bacteriophage for pathogen detection through cell-to-cell communication via a LuxR/3-oxo-C6-HSL system. Simulated temperate phage assays tested functionality of the ROLux reporter and production of 3-oxo-C6-HSL by various test strains. These assays showed detection limits of 102cfu after 24 hours in a varietry of detection formats. Assays incorporating the bacteriophage M13-luxI with the ROLux reporter and a known population of target cells were subsequently developed and have shown consistent detection limits of 105cfu target organisms. Measurable light response from high concentrations of target cells was almost immediate, suggesting an enrichment step to further improve detection limits and reduce assay time.

  11. Polymyxin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phoQ mutants is dependent on additional two-component regulatory systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutu, Alina D; Sgambati, Nicole; Strasbourger, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin as a consequence of mutations in the PhoPQ regulatory system, mediated by covalent lipid A modification. Transposon mutagenesis of a polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutant defined 41 novel loci required for resistance, including two regulatory s......, indicate that addition of 4-amino-L-arabinose to lipid A is not the only PhoPQ-regulated biochemical mechanism required for resistance, and demonstrate that colRS and cprS mutations can contribute to high-level clinical resistance....... with the known role of this modification in polymyxin resistance. Surprisingly, tandem deletion of colRS or cprRS in the ΔphoQ mutant or individual deletion of cprR or cprS failed to suppress 4-amino-L-arabinose addition to lipid A, indicating that this modification alone is not sufficient for Pho...

  12. The IRF5-TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottyan, Leah C; Zoller, Erin E; Bene, Jessica; Lu, Xiaoming; Kelly, Jennifer A; Rupert, Andrew M; Lessard, Christopher J; Vaughn, Samuel E; Marion, Miranda; Weirauch, Matthew T; Namjou, Bahram; Adler, Adam; Rasmussen, Astrid; Glenn, Stuart; Montgomery, Courtney G; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Xie, Gang; Coltescu, Catalina; Amos, Chris; Li, He; Ice, John A; Nath, Swapan K; Mariette, Xavier; Bowman, Simon; Rischmueller, Maureen; Lester, Sue; Brun, Johan G; Gøransson, Lasse G; Harboe, Erna; Omdal, Roald; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S; Vyse, Tim; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Brennan, Michael T; Lessard, James A; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Kvarnström, Marika; Illei, Gabor G; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Eriksson, Per; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L; Segal, Barbara M; Merrill, Joan T; James, Judith A; Guthridge, Joel M; Scofield, R Hal; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gilkeson, Gary; Kamen, Diane L; Jacob, Chaim O; Kimberly, Robert; Brown, Elizabeth; Edberg, Jeffrey; Alarcón, Graciela S; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Freedman, Barry I; Niewold, Timothy; Stevens, Anne M; Tsao, Betty P; Ying, Jun; Mayes, Maureen D; Gorlova, Olga Y; Wakeland, Ward; Radstake, Timothy; Martin, Ezequiel; Martin, Javier; Siminovitch, Katherine; Moser Sivils, Kathy L; Gaffney, Patrick M; Langefeld, Carl D; Harley, John B; Kaufman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-15

    Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5-TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5-TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10(-49); OR = 1.38-1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10(-27)-10(-32), OR = 1.7-1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5-TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5-TNPO3. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Unsteady fluid dynamics of several mechanical prosthetic heart valves using a two component laser Doppler anemometer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, T; Modi, V J

    1997-10-01

    Five typical mechanical heart valves (Starr-Edwards, Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (c-c), Björk-Shiley monostrut, Bicer-Val, and St. Jude Medical) were tested in the mitral position under the pulsatile flow condition. The test program included measurements of velocity and turbulent stresses at 5 downstream locations. The study was carried out using a sophisticated cardiac simulator in conjunction with a highly sensitive 2 component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) system. The continuous monitoring of parametric time histories revealed useful details about the complex flow and helped to establish the locations and times of the peak parameter values. Based upon the nondimensional presentation of data, the following general conclusions can be made. First, all the 5 valve designs created elevated turbulent stresses during the accelerating and peak flow phases, presenting the possibility of thromboembolism and perhaps hemolysis. Second, the difference in valve configuration seemed to affect the flow characteristics; third, the bileaflet design of the St. Jude valve appeared to create a lower turbulence stress level.

  14. Requirement of the CroRS Two-Component System for Resistance to Cell Wall-Targeting Antimicrobials in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Stephanie L; Little, Jaime L; Hoff, Jessica S; Kristich, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    Enterococci are serious opportunistic pathogens that are resistant to many cell wall-targeting antibiotics. The CroRS two-component signaling system responds to antibiotic-mediated cell wall stress and is critical for resistance to cell wall-targeting antibiotics in Enterococcus faecalis Here, we identify and characterize an orthologous two-component system found in Enterococcus faecium that is functionally equivalent to the CroRS system of E. faecalis Deletion of croRS in E. faecium resulted in marked susceptibility to cell wall-targeting agents including cephalosporins and bacitracin, as well as moderate susceptibility to ampicillin and vancomycin. As in E. faecalis , exposure to bacitracin and vancomycin stimulates signaling through the CroRS system in E. faecium Moreover, the CroRS system is critical in E. faecium for enhanced beta-lactam resistance mediated by overexpression of Pbp5. Expression of a Pbp5 variant that confers enhanced beta-lactam resistance cannot overcome the requirement for CroRS function. Thus, the CroRS system is a conserved signaling system that responds to cell wall stress to promote intrinsic resistance to important cell wall-targeting antibiotics in clinically relevant enterococci. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Extraction of chemical information of suspensions using radiative transfer theory to remove multiple scattering effects: application to a model two-component system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steponavicius, Raimundas; Thennadil, Suresh N

    2009-09-15

    An approach for removing multiple light scattering effects using the radiative transfer theory (RTE) in order to improve the performance of multivariate calibration models is proposed. This approach is then applied to the problem of building calibration models for predicting the concentration of a scattering (particulate) component. Application of this approach to a simulated four component system showed that it will lead to calibration models which perform appreciably better than when empirically scatter corrected measurements of diffuse transmittance (T(d)) or reflectance (R(d)) are used. The validity of the method was also tested experimentally using a two-component (polystyrene-water) system. While the proposed method led to a model that performed better than the one built using R(d), its performance was worse compared to when T(d) measurements were used. Analysis indicates that this is because the model built using T(d) benefits from the strong secondary correlation between particle concentration and path length traveled by the photons which occurs due to the system containing only two components. On the other hand, the model arising from the proposed methodology uses essentially only the chemical (polystyrene) signal. Thus, this approach can be expected to work better in multicomponent systems where the path length correlation would not exist.

  16. The Role of the Two-Component System BaeSR in Disposing Chemicals through Regulating Transporter Systems in Acinetobacter baumannii.

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    Ming-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Bacterial two-component regulatory systems (TCSs facilitate changes in gene expression in response to environmental stimuli. TCS BaeR regulons influence tigecycline susceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii through positively regulating the pump genes adeA and adeB. In this study, we demonstrate that an additional two transport systems, AdeIJK and MacAB-TolC, are also regulated by BaeSR. In the wild type and clinical tigecycline-resistant A. baumannii strains, gene expression of AdeIJK and MacAB-TolC increased after tigecycline induction, implicating their importance to tigecycline resistance in addition to AdeABC. Phenotypic microarray results showed that A. baumannii is vulnerable to certain chemicals, especially tannic acid, after deleting baeR, which was confirmed using the spot assay. The wild-type strain of A. baumannii also exhibited 1.6-fold and 4.4-fold increase in gene expression of adeJ and macB in the medium with 100 μg/mL tannic acid, but the increase was fully inhibited by baeR deletion. An electrophoretic motility shift assay based on an interaction between His-BaeR and the adeA, adeI and macA promoter regions did not demonstrate direct binding. In conclusion, A. baumannii can use the TCS BaeSR in disposing chemicals, such as tannic acid and tigecycline, through regulating the efflux pumps.

  17. Control of CydB and GltA1 expression by the SenX3 RegX3 two component regulatory system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Gretta Roberts

    Full Text Available Two component regulatory systems are used widely by bacteria to coordinate changes in global gene expression profiles in response to environmental signals. The SenX3-RegX3 two component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has previously been shown to play a role in virulence and phosphate-responsive control of gene expression. We demonstrate that expression of SenX3-RegX3 is controlled in response to growth conditions, although the absolute changes are small. Global gene expression profiling of a RegX3 deletion strain and wild-type strain in different culture conditions (static, microaerobic, anaerobic, as well as in an over-expressing strain identified a number of genes with changed expression patterns. Among those were genes previously identified as differentially regulated in aerobic culture, including ald (encoding alanine dehydrogenase cyd,encoding a subunit of the cytochrome D ubiquinol oxidase, and gltA1, encoding a citrate synthase. Promoter activity in the upstream regions of both cydB and gltA1 was altered in the RegX3 deletion strain. DNA-binding assays confirmed that RegX3 binds to the promoter regions of ald, cydB and gltA1 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Taken together these data suggest a direct role for the SenX-RegX3 system in modulating expression of aerobic respiration, in addition to its role during phosphate limitation.

  18. Systems level analysis of two-component signal transduction systems in Erwinia amylovora: Role in virulence, regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis and swarming motility

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    Sundin George W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTs, consisting of a histidine kinase (HK and a response regulator (RR, represent a major paradigm for signal transduction in prokaryotes. TCSTs play critical roles in sensing and responding to environmental conditions, and in bacterial pathogenesis. Most TCSTs in Erwinia amylovora have either not been identified or have not yet been studied. Results We used a systems approach to identify TCST and related signal transduction genes in the genome of E. amylovora. Comparative genomic analysis of TCSTs indicated that E. amylovora TCSTs were closely related to those of Erwinia tasmaniensis, a saprophytic enterobacterium isolated from apple flowers, and to other enterobacteria. Forty-six TCST genes in E. amylovora including 17 sensor kinases, three hybrid kinases, 20 DNA- or ligand-binding RRs, four RRs with enzymatic output domain (EAL-GGDEF proteins, and two kinases were characterized in this study. A systematic TCST gene-knockout experiment was conducted, generating a total of 59 single-, double-, and triple-mutants. Virulence assays revealed that five of these mutants were non-pathogenic on immature pear fruits. Results from phenotypic characterization and gene expression experiments indicated that several groups of TCST systems in E. amylovora control amylovoran biosynthesis, one of two major virulence factors in E. amylovora. Both negative and positive regulators of amylovoran biosynthesis were identified, indicating a complex network may control this important feature of pathogenesis. Positive (non-motile, EnvZ/OmpR, negative (hypermotile, GrrS/GrrA, and intermediate regulators for swarming motility in E. amylovora were also identified. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that TCSTs in E. amylovora played major roles in virulence on immature pear fruit and in regulating amylovoran biosynthesis and swarming motility. This suggested presence of regulatory networks governing

  19. A connecter-like factor, CacA, links RssB/RpoS and the CpxR/CpxA two-component system in Salmonella.

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    Kato, Akinori; Hayashi, Hironori; Nomura, Wataru; Emori, Haruka; Hagihara, Kei; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2012-10-02

    Bacteria integrate numerous environmental stimuli when generating cellular responses. Increasing numbers of examples describe how one two-component system (TCS) responds to signals detected by the sensor of another TCS. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly defined. Here, we report a connector-like factor that affects the activity of the CpxR/CpxA two-component system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We isolated a clone that induced the expression of a cpxP-lac gene fusion from a high-copy-number plasmid pool of random Salmonella genomic fragments. A 63-amino acid protein, CacA, was responsible for the CpxA/CpxR-dependent activation of the cpxP gene. The CpxR-activated genes cpxP and spy exhibited approximately 30% and 50% reductions in transcription, respectively, in a clean cacA deletion mutant strain in comparison to wild-type. From 33 response regulator (RR) deletion mutants, we identified that the RssB regulator represses cacA transcription. Substitution mutations in a conserved -10 region harboring the RNA polymerase recognition sequence, which is well conserved with a known RpoS -10 region consensus sequence, rendered the cacA promoter RpoS-independent. The CacA-mediated induction of cpxP transcription was affected in a trxA deletion mutant, which encodes thioredoxin 1, suggesting a role for cysteine thiol-disulfide exchange(s) in CacA-dependent Cpx activation. We identified CacA as an activator of the CpxR/CpxA system in the plasmid clone. We propose that CacA may integrate the regulatory status of RssB/RpoS into the CpxR/CpxA system. Future investigations are necessary to thoroughly elucidate how CacA activates the CpxR/CpxA system.

  20. A connecter-like factor, CacA, links RssB/RpoS and the CpxR/CpxA two-component system in Salmonella

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    Kato Akinori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria integrate numerous environmental stimuli when generating cellular responses. Increasing numbers of examples describe how one two-component system (TCS responds to signals detected by the sensor of another TCS. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly defined. Results Here, we report a connector-like factor that affects the activity of the CpxR/CpxA two-component system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We isolated a clone that induced the expression of a cpxP-lac gene fusion from a high-copy-number plasmid pool of random Salmonella genomic fragments. A 63-amino acid protein, CacA, was responsible for the CpxA/CpxR-dependent activation of the cpxP gene. The CpxR-activated genes cpxP and spy exhibited approximately 30% and 50% reductions in transcription, respectively, in a clean cacA deletion mutant strain in comparison to wild-type. From 33 response regulator (RR deletion mutants, we identified that the RssB regulator represses cacA transcription. Substitution mutations in a conserved -10 region harboring the RNA polymerase recognition sequence, which is well conserved with a known RpoS -10 region consensus sequence, rendered the cacA promoter RpoS-independent. The CacA-mediated induction of cpxP transcription was affected in a trxA deletion mutant, which encodes thioredoxin 1, suggesting a role for cysteine thiol-disulfide exchange(s in CacA-dependent Cpx activation. Conclusions We identified CacA as an activator of the CpxR/CpxA system in the plasmid clone. We propose that CacA may integrate the regulatory status of RssB/RpoS into the CpxR/CpxA system. Future investigations are necessary to thoroughly elucidate how CacA activates the CpxR/CpxA system.

  1. Quantum theory for the dynamic structure factor in correlated two-component systems in nonequilibrium: Application to x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorberger, J.; Chapman, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a quantum theory for the dynamic structure factors in nonequilibrium, correlated, two-component systems such as plasmas or warm dense matter. The polarization function, which is needed as the input for the calculation of the structure factors, is calculated in nonequilibrium based on a perturbation expansion in the interaction strength. To make our theory applicable for x-ray scattering, a generalized Chihara decomposition for the total electron structure factor in nonequilibrium is derived. Examples are given and the influence of correlations and exchange on the structure and the x-ray-scattering spectrum are discussed for a model nonequilibrium distribution, as often encountered during laser heating of materials, as well as for two-temperature systems.

  2. Quantum theory for the dynamic structure factor in correlated two-component systems in nonequilibrium: Application to x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorberger, J; Chapman, D A

    2018-01-01

    We present a quantum theory for the dynamic structure factors in nonequilibrium, correlated, two-component systems such as plasmas or warm dense matter. The polarization function, which is needed as the input for the calculation of the structure factors, is calculated in nonequilibrium based on a perturbation expansion in the interaction strength. To make our theory applicable for x-ray scattering, a generalized Chihara decomposition for the total electron structure factor in nonequilibrium is derived. Examples are given and the influence of correlations and exchange on the structure and the x-ray-scattering spectrum are discussed for a model nonequilibrium distribution, as often encountered during laser heating of materials, as well as for two-temperature systems.

  3. Structural features of the two-component system LisR/LisK suggests multiple responses for the adaptation and survival of Listeria monocytogenes

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    Nelson Enrique Arenas Suarez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we characterized the structure of the two-component regulatory system, LisR/LisK, in Listeria monocytogenes. To predict the structure of both proteins and the relationship between them, we employed several bioinformatic tools and databases. Based on our results, LisK protein is embedded in the cell membrane and its modular composition (HAMP, histidine kinase and ATPase domains is associated with its autophosphorylation (His-266. A stimulus-response likely determines the sequential signal propagation from the bacterial cell surface to its cytoplasmic components. According to our results, LisR is a cytoplasmic protein with a receptor domain (homologous to CheY that comprises a phosphoacceptor residue (Asp-52 and a DNA-binding domain, which may allow the transmission of a specific transcriptional response. LisR/LisK has been experimentally characterized both biochemically andfunctionally in other Bacilli pathophysiology; our structure-function approach may facilitate the design of suitable inhibitors.

  4. Construction of Methanol-SensingEscherichia coliby the Introduction of aParacoccus denitrificansMxaY-Based Chimeric Two-Component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Irisappan; Vidhya, Selvamani; Eom, Gyeong Tae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2017-06-28

    Escherichia coli was engineered to sense methanol by employing a chimeric two-component system (TCS) strategy. A chimeric MxaY/EnvZ (MxaYZ) TCS was constructed by fusing the Paracoccus denitrificans MxaY with the E. coli EnvZ. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis and GFP-based fluorescence analysis showed maximum transcription of ompC and the fluorescence at 0.01% of methanol, respectively. These results suggested that E. coli was successfully engineered to sense methanol by the introduction of chimeric MxaYZ. By using this strategy, various chimeric TCS-based bacterial biosensors can be constructed and used for the development of biochemical-producing recombinant microorganisms.

  5. The Two-Component System CprRS Senses Cationic Peptides and Triggers Adaptive Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Independently of ParRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Luca; Jenssen, Håvard; Bains, Manjeet

    2012-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides pass across the outer membrane by interacting with negatively charged lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to outer membrane permeabilization in a process termed self-promoted uptake. Resistance can be mediated by the addition of positively charged arabinosamine through...... ParRS. Here, we report the identification of a new two-component system, CprRS, which, upon exposure to a wide range of antimicrobial peptides, triggered the expression of the LPS modification operon. Thus, mutations in the cprRS operon blocked the induction of the arn operon in response to several...... antimicrobial peptides independently of ParRS but did not affect the response to low Mg2+. Distinct patterns of arn induction were identified. Thus, the responses to polymyxins were abrogated by either parR or cprR mutations, while responses to other peptides, including indolicidin, showed differential...

  6. Impact of the Staphylococcus epidermidis LytSR two-component regulatory system on murein hydrolase activity, pyruvate utilization and global transcriptional profile

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    Yu Fangyou

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as one of the most important nosocomial pathogens, mainly because of its ability to colonize implanted biomaterials by forming a biofilm. Extensive studies are focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation. The LytSR two-component regulatory system regulates autolysis and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. However, the role of LytSR played in S. epidermidis remained unknown. Results In the present study, we demonstrated that lytSR knock-out in S. epidermidis did not alter susceptibility to Triton X-100 induced autolysis. Quantitative murein hydrolase assay indicated that disruption of lytSR in S. epidermidis resulted in decreased activities of extracellular murein hydrolases, although zymogram showed no apparent differences in murein hydrolase patterns between S. epidermidis strain 1457 and its lytSR mutant. Compared to the wild-type counterpart, 1457ΔlytSR produced slightly more biofilm, with significantly decreased dead cells inside. Microarray analysis showed that lytSR mutation affected the transcription of 164 genes (123 genes were upregulated and 41 genes were downregulated. Specifically, genes encoding proteins responsible for protein synthesis, energy metabolism were downregulated, while genes involved in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, amino acid transporters were upregulated. Impaired ability to utilize pyruvate and reduced activity of arginine deiminase was observed in 1457ΔlytSR, which is consistent with the microarray data. Conclusions The preliminary results suggest that in S. epidermidis LytSR two-component system regulates extracellular murein hydrolase activity, bacterial cell death and pyruvate utilization. Based on the microarray data, it appears that lytSR inactivation induces a stringent response. In addition, LytSR may indirectly enhance biofilm formation by altering the metabolic status of the bacteria.

  7. A hybrid two-component system protein of a prominent human gut symbiont couples glycan sensing in vivo to carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Erica D; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Manchester, Jill K; Hansen, Elizabeth E; Chiang, Herbert C; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2006-06-06

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a prominent member of our normal adult intestinal microbial community and a useful model for studying the foundations of human-bacterial mutualism in our densely populated distal gut microbiota. A central question is how members of this microbiota sense nutrients and implement an appropriate metabolic response. B. thetaiotaomicron contains a large number of glycoside hydrolases not represented in our own proteome, plus a markedly expanded collection of hybrid two-component system (HTCS) proteins that incorporate all domains found in classical two-component environmental sensors into one polypeptide. To understand the role of HTCS in nutrient sensing, we used B. thetaiotaomicron GeneChips to characterize their expression in gnotobiotic mice consuming polysaccharide-rich or -deficient diets. One HTCS, BT3172, was selected for further analysis because it is induced in vivo by polysaccharides, and its absence reduces B. thetaiotaomicron fitness in polysaccharide-rich diet-fed mice. Functional genomic and biochemical analyses of WT and BT3172-deficient strains in vivo and in vitro disclosed that alpha-mannosides induce BT3172 expression, which in turn induces expression of secreted alpha-mannosidases. Yeast two-hybrid screens revealed that the cytoplasmic portion of BT3172's sensor domain serves as a scaffold for recruiting glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and dehydrogenase. These interactions are a unique feature of BT3172 and specific for the cytoplasmic face of its sensor domain. Loss of BT3172 reduces glycolytic pathway activity in vitro and in vivo. Thus, this HTCS functions as a metabolic reaction center, coupling nutrient sensing to dynamic regulation of monosaccharide metabolism. An expanded repertoire of HTCS proteins with diversified sensor domains may be one reason for B. thetaiotaomicron's success in our intestinal ecosystem.

  8. The CpxRA two-component system is involved in the maintenance of the integrity of the cell envelope in the rumen bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seulgi; Lee, Eun-Gyeong; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Shin, Jong Moon; Jung, Won Seok; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Lee, Sang Yup; Kwon, Ohsuk

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the CpxRA two-component signal transduction system of the rumen bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens. The truncated form of the CpxA sensor kinase protein without its transmembrane domain was able to autophosphorylate and transphosphorylate the CpxR response regulator protein in vitro. We identified 152 putative target genes for the Cpx system in M. succiniciproducens, which were differentially expressed by more than twofold upon overexpression of the CpxR protein. Genes of a putative 16-gene operon related to the cell wall and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were induced strongly upon CpxR overexpression. The promoter region of the first gene of this operon, wecC encoding UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronate dehydrogenase, was analyzed and found to contain a sequence homologous to the CpxR box of Escherichia coli. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that the phosphorylated CpxR proteins were able to bind specifically to PCR-amplified DNA fragments containing the promoter sequence of wecC. Furthermore, a cpxR-disrupted mutant strain exhibited increased envelope permeability compared with a wild-type strain. These results suggest that the Cpx system of M. succiniciproducens is involved in the maintenance of the integrity of the cell envelope.

  9. Identification of genes for small non-coding RNAs that belong to the regulon of the two-component regulatory system CiaRH in Streptococcus

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    Hakenbeck Regine

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional regulation by small RNAs (sRNAs in bacteria is now recognized as a wide-spread regulatory mechanism modulating a variety of physiological responses including virulence. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, the first sRNAs to be described were found in the regulon of the CiaRH two-component regulatory system. Five of these sRNAs were detected and designated csRNAs for cia-dependent small RNAs. CiaRH pleiotropically affects β-lactam resistance, autolysis, virulence, and competence development by yet to be defined molecular mechanisms. Since CiaRH is highly conserved among streptococci, it is of interest to determine if csRNAs are also included in the CiaRH regulon in this group of organisms consisting of commensal as well as pathogenic species. Knowledge on the participation of csRNAs in CiaRH-dependent regulatory events will be the key to define the physiological role of this important control system. Results Genes for csRNAs were predicted in streptococcal genomes and data base entries other than S. pneumoniae by searching for CiaR-activated promoters located in intergenic regions that are followed by a transcriptional terminator. 61 different candidate genes were obtained specifying csRNAs ranging in size from 51 to 202 nt. Comparing these genes among each other revealed 40 different csRNA types. All streptococcal genomes harbored csRNA genes, their numbers varying between two and six. To validate these predictions, S. mitis, S. oralis, and S. sanguinis were subjected to csRNA-specific northern blot analysis. In addition, a csRNA gene from S. thermophilus plasmid pST0 introduced into S. pneumoniae was also tested. Each of the csRNAs was detected on these blots and showed the anticipated sizes. Thus, the method applied here is able to predict csRNAs with high precision. Conclusions The results of this study strongly suggest that genes for small non-coding RNAs, csRNAs, are part of

  10. TceSR two-component regulatory system of Brucella melitensis 16M is involved in invasion, intracellular survival and regulated cytotoxicity for macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Fu, Q; Wang, Z; Li, T; Zhang, H; Guo, F; Wang, Y; Zhang, J; Chen, C

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms of invasion and intracellular survival of Brucella are still poorly understood. Previous studies showed that the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) play an important role in the intracellular survival of Brucella. To investigate if TCSs involve in the virulence and cytotoxicity of Brucella melitensis, we introduced a mutation into one of the TCSs in chromosome II in Br. melitensis 16M strain, and generated 16MΔTceSR, a mutant of Br. melitensis 16M strain. In vitro infection experiments using murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) showed that the survival of 16MΔTceSR mutant in macrophages decreased 0·91-log compared with that of wild type Br. melitensis 16M strain at 2 h postinfection, replication of 16MΔTceSR mutant in macrophages was 5·65-log, which was much lower than that wild type strain. Results of lactate dehydrogenase cytotoxicity assays in macrophages demonstrated high dose infection with wide type strain produced high level cytotoxicity to macrophages, but 16MΔTceSR mutant had very low level cytotoxicity, indicating mutation of TCSs impaired the cytotoxicity of Br. melitensis to macrophages. Animal experiments showed that the spleen colonization of 16MΔTceSR was significantly reduced compared with its wild type strains. The lower levels of survival of 16MΔTceSR in various stress conditions suggested that the mutation of the TCSs of Br. melitensis was the causative factor of its reduced resistance to stress conditions. Taken together, our results demonstrated TCS TceSR involves in the intracellular survival, virulence and cytotoxicity of Br. melitensis during its infection. Significance and impact of the study: Two-component systems (TCSs) are predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. The pathogenicity of Brucella is due to its ability to adapt to the intracellular environment including low levels of acidic pH, high-salt and heat shock. TCSs are designed to sense diverse stimuli, transfer signals and enact an

  11. Regulation of Inducible Potassium Transporter KdpFABC by the KdpD/KdpE Two-Component System in Mycobacterium smegmatis

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    Jin He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Kdp-ATPase is an inducible high affinity potassium uptake system that is widely distributed in bacteria, and is generally regulated by the KdpD/KdpE two-component system (TCS. In this study, conducted on Mycobacterium smegmatis, the kdpFABC (encoding Kdp-ATPase expression was found to be affected by low concentration of K+, high concentrations of Na+, and/or NH4+ of the medium. The KdpE was found to be a transcriptional regulator that bound to a specific 22-bp sequence in the promoter region of kdpFABC operon to positively regulate kdpFABC expression. The KdpE binding motif was highly conserved in the promoters of kdpFABC among the mycobacterial species. 5′-RACE data indicated a transcriptional start site (TSS of the kdpFABC operon within the coding sequence of MSMEG_5391, which comprised a 120-bp long 5′-UTR and an open reading frame of the 87-bp kdpF gene. The kdpE deletion resulted in altered growth rate under normal and low K+ conditions. Furthermore, under K+ limiting conditions, a single transcript (kdpFABCDE spanning kdpFABC and kdpDE operons was observed. This study provided the first insight into the regulation of kdpFABC operon by the KdpD/KdpE TCS in M. smegmatis.

  12. A putative Vibrio cholerae two-component system controls a conserved periplasmic protein in response to the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B.

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    Jyl S Matson

    Full Text Available The epidemic pathogen Vibrio cholerae senses and responds to different external stresses it encounters in the aquatic environment and in the human host. One stress that V. cholerae encounters in the host is exposure to antimicrobial peptides on mucosal surfaces. We used massively parallel cDNA sequencing (RNA-Seq to quantitatively identify the transcriptome of V. cholerae grown in the presence and absence of sub-lethal concentrations of the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B. We evaluated the transcriptome of both wild type V. cholerae and a mutant carrying a deletion of vc1639, a putative sensor kinase of an uncharacterized two-component system, under these conditions. In addition to many previously uncharacterized pathways responding with elevated transcript levels to polymyxin B exposure, we confirmed the predicted elevated transcript levels of a previously described LPS modification system in response to polymyxin B exposure. Additionally, we identified the V. cholerae homologue of visP (ygiW as a regulatory target of VC1639. VisP is a conserved periplasmic protein implicated in lipid A modification in Salmonellae. This study provides the first systematic analysis of the transcriptional response of Vibrio cholerae to polymyxin B, raising important questions for further study regarding mechanisms used by V. cholerae to sense and respond to envelope stress.

  13. The CasKR two-component system is required for the growth of mesophilic and psychrotolerant Bacillus cereus strains at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomandé, Sara Esther; Chamot, Stéphanie; Antolinos, Vera; Vasai, Florian; Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Bornard, Isabelle; Nguyen-the, Christophe; Broussolle, Véronique; Brillard, Julien

    2014-04-01

    The different strains of Bacillus cereus can grow at temperatures covering a very diverse range. Some B. cereus strains can grow in chilled food and consequently cause food poisoning. We have identified a new sensor/regulator mechanism involved in low-temperature B. cereus growth. Construction of a mutant of this two-component system enabled us to show that this system, called CasKR, is required for growth at the minimal temperature (Tmin). CasKR was also involved in optimal cold growth above Tmin and in cell survival below Tmin. Microscopic observation showed that CasKR plays a key role in cell shape during cold growth. Introducing the casKR genes in a ΔcasKR mutant restored its ability to grow at Tmin. Although it was first identified in the ATCC 14579 model strain, this mechanism has been conserved in most strains of the B. cereus group. We show that the role of CasKR in cold growth is similar in other B. cereus sensu lato strains with different growth temperature ranges, including psychrotolerant strains.

  14. Requirement of the Lactobacillus casei MaeKR two-component system for L-malic acid utilization via a malic enzyme pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete, José María; García-Haro, Luisa; Blasco, Amalia; Manzanares, Paloma; Berbegal, Carmen; Monedero, Vicente; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei can metabolize L-malic acid via malolactic enzyme (malolactic fermentation [MLF]) or malic enzyme (ME). Whereas utilization of L-malic acid via MLF does not support growth, the ME pathway enables L. casei to grow on L-malic acid. In this work, we have identified in the genomes of L. casei strains BL23 and ATCC 334 a cluster consisting of two diverging operons, maePE and maeKR, encoding a putative malate transporter (maeP), an ME (maeE), and a two-component (TC) system belonging to the citrate family (maeK and maeR). Homologous clusters were identified in Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus uberis. Our results show that ME is essential for L-malic acid utilization in L. casei. Furthermore, deletion of either the gene encoding the histidine kinase or the response regulator of the TC system resulted in the loss of the ability to grow on L-malic acid, thus indicating that the cognate TC system regulates and is essential for the expression of ME. Transcriptional analyses showed that expression of maeE is induced in the presence of L-malic acid and repressed by glucose, whereas TC system expression was induced by L-malic acid and was not repressed by glucose. DNase I footprinting analysis showed that MaeR binds specifically to a set of direct repeats [5'-TTATT(A/T)AA-3'] in the mae promoter region. The location of the repeats strongly suggests that MaeR activates the expression of the diverging operons maePE and maeKR where the first one is also subjected to carbon catabolite repression.

  15. Increasing l-isoleucine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum by overexpressing global regulator Lrp and two-component export system BrnFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L; Shi, F; Hu, X; Chen, C; Wang, X

    2013-05-01

    To increase the l-isoleucine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum by overexpressing the global regulator Lrp and the two-component export system BrnFE. The brnFE operon and the lrp gene were cloned into the shuttle vector pDXW-8 individually or in combination. The constructed plasmids were transformed into an l-isoleucine-producing strain C. glutamicum JHI3-156, and the l-isoleucine production in these different strains was analysed and compared. More l-isoleucine was produced when only Lrp was expressed than when only BrnFE was expressed. Significant increase in l-isoleucine production was observed when Lrp and BrnFE were expressed in combination. Compared to the control strain, l-isoleucine production in JHI3-156/pDXW-8-lrp-brnFE increased 63% in flask cultivation, and the specific yield of l-isoleucine increased 72% in fed-batch fermentation. Both Lrp and BrnFE are important to enhance the l-isoleucine production in C. glutamicum. The results provide useful information to enhance l-isoleucine or other branched-chain amino acid production in C. glutamicum. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Korkeala, Hannu; Dahlsten, Elias; Sahala, Elina; Heap, John T; Minton, Nigel P; Lindström, Miia

    2013-03-01

    Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  17. A conserved two-component regulatory system, PidS/PidR, globally regulates pigmentation and virulence-related phenotypes of Burkholderia glumae.

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    Karki, Hari Sharan; Barphagha, Inderjit Kaur; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2012-09-01

    Burkholderia glumae is a rice pathogenic bacterium that causes bacterial panicle blight. Some strains of this pathogen produce dark brown pigments when grown on casamino-acid peptone glucose (CPG) agar medium. A pigment-positive and highly virulent strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, was randomly mutagenized with mini-Tn5gus, and the resulting mini-Tn5gus derivatives showing altered pigmentation phenotypes were screened on CPG agar plates to identify the genetic elements governing the pigmentation of B. glumae. In this study, a novel two-component regulatory system (TCRS) composed of the PidS sensor histidine kinase and the PidR response regulator was identified as an essential regulatory factor for pigmentation. Notably, the PidS/PidR TCRS was also required for the elicitation of the hypersensitive response on tobacco leaves, indicating the dependence of the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III secretion system of B. glumae on this regulatory factor. In addition, B. glumae mutants defective in the PidS/PidR TCRS showed less production of the phytotoxin, toxoflavin, and less virulence on rice panicles and onion bulbs relative to the parental strain, 411gr-6. The presence of highly homologous PidS and PidR orthologues in other Burkholderia species suggests that PidS/PidR-family TCRSs may exert the same or similar functions in different Burkholderia species, including both plant and animal pathogens. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  18. Potentiation of Aminoglycoside Activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Targeting the AmgRS Envelope Stress-Responsive Two-Component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Keith; Gilmour, Christie; Farha, Maya A; Mullen, Erin; Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Brown, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    A screen for agents that potentiated the activity of paromomycin (PAR), a 4,5-linked aminoglycoside (AG), against wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa identified the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampin (RIF). RIF potentiated additional 4,5-linked AGs, such as neomycin and ribostamycin, but not the clinically important 4,6-linked AGs amikacin and gentamicin. Potentiation was absent in a mutant lacking the AmgRS envelope stress response two-component system (TCS), which protects the organism from AG-generated membrane-damaging aberrant polypeptides and, thus, promotes AG resistance, an indication that RIF was acting via this TCS in potentiating 4,5-linked AG activity. Potentiation was also absent in a RIF-resistant RNA polymerase mutant, consistent with its potentiation of AG activity being dependent on RNA polymerase perturbation. PAR-inducible expression of the AmgRS-dependent genes htpX and yccA was reduced by RIF, suggesting that AG activation of this TCS was compromised by this agent. Still, RIF did not compromise the membrane-protective activity of AmgRS, an indication that it impacted some other function of this TCS. RIF potentiated the activities of 4,5-linked AGs against several AG-resistant clinical isolates, in two cases also potentiating the activity of the 4,6-linked AGs. These cases were, in one instance, explained by an observed AmgRS-dependent expression of the MexXY multidrug efflux system, which accommodates a range of AGs, with RIF targeting of AmgRS undermining mexXY expression and its promotion of resistance to 4,5- and 4,6-linked AGs. Given this link between AmgRS, MexXY expression, and pan-AG resistance in P. aeruginosa, RIF might be a useful adjuvant in the AG treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase transcription by the CrbS/R two-component system is conserved in genetically diverse environmental pathogens.

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    Kristin Jacob

    Full Text Available The CrbS/R two-component signal transduction system is a conserved regulatory mechanism through which specific Gram-negative bacteria control acetate flux into primary metabolic pathways. CrbS/R governs expression of acetyl-CoA synthase (acsA, an enzyme that converts acetate to acetyl-CoA, a metabolite at the nexus of the cell's most important energy-harvesting and biosynthetic reactions. During infection, bacteria can utilize this system to hijack host acetate metabolism and alter the course of colonization and pathogenesis. In toxigenic strains of Vibrio cholerae, CrbS/R-dependent expression of acsA is required for virulence in an arthropod model. Here, we investigate the function of the CrbS/R system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas entomophila, and non-toxigenic V. cholerae strains. We demonstrate that its role in acetate metabolism is conserved; this system regulates expression of the acsA gene and is required for growth on acetate as a sole carbon source. As a first step towards describing the mechanism of signaling through this pathway, we identify residues and domains that may be critical for phosphotransfer. We further demonstrate that although CrbS, the putative hybrid sensor kinase, carries both a histidine kinase domain and a receiver domain, the latter is not required for acsA transcription. In order to determine whether our findings are relevant to pathogenesis, we tested our strains in a Drosophila model of oral infection previously employed for the study of acetate-dependent virulence by V. cholerae. We show that non-toxigenic V. cholerae strains lacking CrbS or CrbR are significantly less virulent than are wild-type strains, while P. aeruginosa and P. entomophila lacking CrbS or CrbR are fully pathogenic. Together, the data suggest that the CrbS/R system plays a central role in acetate metabolism in V. cholerae, P. aeruginosa, and P. entomophila. However, each microbe's unique environmental adaptations and pathogenesis

  20. The Conserved Actinobacterial Two-Component System MtrAB Coordinates Chloramphenicol Production with Sporulation in Streptomyces venezuelae NRRL B-65442

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    Nicolle F. Som

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces bacteria make numerous secondary metabolites, including half of all known antibiotics. Production of antibiotics is usually coordinated with the onset of sporulation but the cross regulation of these processes is not fully understood. This is important because most Streptomyces antibiotics are produced at low levels or not at all under laboratory conditions and this makes large scale production of these compounds very challenging. Here, we characterize the highly conserved actinobacterial two-component system MtrAB in the model organism Streptomyces venezuelae and provide evidence that it coordinates production of the antibiotic chloramphenicol with sporulation. MtrAB are known to coordinate DNA replication and cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where TB-MtrA is essential for viability but MtrB is dispensable. We deleted mtrB in S. venezuelae and this resulted in a global shift in the metabolome, including constitutive, higher-level production of chloramphenicol. We found that chloramphenicol is detectable in the wild-type strain, but only at very low levels and only after it has sporulated. ChIP-seq showed that MtrA binds upstream of DNA replication and cell division genes and genes required for chloramphenicol production. dnaA, dnaN, oriC, and wblE (whiB1 are DNA binding targets for MtrA in both M. tuberculosis and S. venezuelae. Intriguingly, over-expression of TB-MtrA and gain of function TB- and Sv-MtrA proteins in S. venezuelae also switched on higher-level production of chloramphenicol. Given the conservation of MtrAB, these constructs might be useful tools for manipulating antibiotic production in other filamentous actinomycetes.

  1. Gene expression analysis of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates show that two-component response systems enhance drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guohua; Cui, Zhenling; Sun, Xian; Peng, Jinfu; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Huang, Wenhua; Chu, Kaili; Zhang, Lu; Ge, Baoxue; Li, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Global analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays was performed between a reference strain H37Rv and two clinical extensively drug-resistant isolates in response to three anti-tuberculosis drug exposures (isoniazid, capreomycin, and rifampicin). A deep analysis was then conducted using a combination of genome sequences of the resistant isolates, resistance information, and related public microarray data. Certain known resistance-associated gene sets were significantly overrepresented in upregulated genes in the resistant isolates relative to that observed in H37Rv, which suggested a link between resistance and expression levels of particular genes. In addition, isoniazid and capreomycin response genes, but not rifampicin, either obtained from published works or our data, were highly consistent with the differentially expressed genes of resistant isolates compared to those of H37Rv, indicating a strong association between drug resistance of the isolates and genes differentially regulated by isoniazid and capreomycin exposures. Based on these results, 92 genes of the studied isolates were identified as candidate resistance genes, 10 of which are known resistance-related genes. Regulatory network analysis of candidate resistance genes using published networks and literature mining showed that three two-component regulatory systems and regulator CRP play significant roles in the resistance of the isolates by mediating the production of essential envelope components. Finally, drug sensitivity testing indicated strong correlations between expression levels of these regulatory genes and sensitivity to multiple anti-tuberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings may provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying the emergence and development of drug resistance in resistant tuberculosis isolates and useful clues for further studies on this issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

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    Zhen Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  3. Equation-free analysis of two-component system signalling model reveals the emergence of co-existing phenotypes in the absence of multistationarity.

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    Rebecca B Hoyle

    Full Text Available Phenotypic differences of genetically identical cells under the same environmental conditions have been attributed to the inherent stochasticity of biochemical processes. Various mechanisms have been suggested, including the existence of alternative steady states in regulatory networks that are reached by means of stochastic fluctuations, long transient excursions from a stable state to an unstable excited state, and the switching on and off of a reaction network according to the availability of a constituent chemical species. Here we analyse a detailed stochastic kinetic model of two-component system signalling in bacteria, and show that alternative phenotypes emerge in the absence of these features. We perform a bifurcation analysis of deterministic reaction rate equations derived from the model, and find that they cannot reproduce the whole range of qualitative responses to external signals demonstrated by direct stochastic simulations. In particular, the mixed mode, where stochastic switching and a graded response are seen simultaneously, is absent. However, probabilistic and equation-free analyses of the stochastic model that calculate stationary states for the mean of an ensemble of stochastic trajectories reveal that slow transcription of either response regulator or histidine kinase leads to the coexistence of an approximate basal solution and a graded response that combine to produce the mixed mode, thus establishing its essential stochastic nature. The same techniques also show that stochasticity results in the observation of an all-or-none bistable response over a much wider range of external signals than would be expected on deterministic grounds. Thus we demonstrate the application of numerical equation-free methods to a detailed biochemical reaction network model, and show that it can provide new insight into the role of stochasticity in the emergence of phenotypic diversity.

  4. A survey of HK, HPt, and RR domains and their organization in two-component systems and phosphorelay proteins of organisms with fully sequenced genomes

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    Baldiri Salvado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two Component Systems and Phosphorelays (TCS/PR are environmental signal transduction cascades in prokaryotes and, less frequently, in eukaryotes. The internal domain organization of proteins and the topology of TCS/PR cascades play an important role in shaping the responses of the circuits. It is thus important to maintain updated censuses of TCS/PR proteins in order to identify the various topologies used by nature and enable a systematic study of the dynamics associated with those topologies. To create such a census, we analyzed the proteomes of 7,609 organisms from all domains of life with fully sequenced and annotated genomes. To begin, we survey each proteome searching for proteins containing domains that are associated with internal signal transmission within TCS/PR: Histidine Kinase (HK, Response Regulator (RR and Histidine Phosphotranfer (HPt domains, and analyze how these domains are arranged in the individual proteins. Then, we find all types of operon organization and calculate how much more likely are proteins that contain TCS/PR domains to be coded by neighboring genes than one would expect from the genome background of each organism. Finally, we analyze if the fusion of domains into single TCS/PR proteins is more frequently observed than one might expect from the background of each proteome. We find 50 alternative ways in which the HK, HPt, and RR domains are observed to organize into single proteins. In prokaryotes, TCS/PR coding genes tend to be clustered in operons. 90% of all proteins identified in this study contain just one of the three domains, while 8% of the remaining proteins combine one copy of an HK, a RR, and/or an HPt domain. In eukaryotes, 25% of all TCS/PR proteins have more than one domain. These results might have implications for how signals are internally transmitted within TCS/PR cascades. These implications could explain the selection of the various designs in alternative circumstances.

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent and Phosphorylation-independent Regulation of Helicobacter pylori Acid Acclimation by the ArsRS Two-component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Elizabeth A; Sachs, George; Wen, Yi; Scott, David R

    2016-02-01

    The pH-sensitive Helicobacter pylori ArsRS two-component system (TCS) aids survival of this neutralophile in the gastric environment by directly sensing and responding to environmental acidity. ArsS is required for acid-induced trafficking of urease and its accessory proteins to the inner membrane, allowing rapid, urea-dependent cytoplasmic and periplasmic buffering. Expression of ArsR, but not its phosphorylation, is essential for bacterial viability. The aim of this study was to characterize the roles of ArsS and ArsR in the response of H. pylori to acid. Wild-type H. pylori and an arsR(D52N) phosphorylation-deficient strain were incubated at acidic or neutral pH. Gene and protein expression, survival, membrane trafficking of urease proteins, urease activity, and internal pH were studied. Phosphorylation of ArsR is not required for acid survival. ArsS-driven trafficking of urease proteins to the membrane in acid, required for recovery of internal pH, is independent of ArsR phosphorylation. ArsR phosphorylation increases expression of the urease gene cluster, and the loss of negative feedback in a phosphorylation-deficient mutant leads to an increase in total urease activity. ArsRS has a dual function in acid acclimation: regulation of urease trafficking to UreI at the cytoplasmic membrane, driven by ArsS, and regulation of urease gene cluster expression, driven by phosphorylation of ArsR. ArsS and ArsR work through phosphorylation-dependent and phosphorylation-independent regulatory mechanisms to impact acid acclimation and allow gastric colonization. Furthering understanding of the intricacies of acid acclimation will impact the future development of targeted, nonantibiotic treatment regimens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Involvement of the CasK/R two-component system in optimal unsaturation of the Bacillus cereus fatty acids during low-temperature growth.

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    Diomandé, Sara Esther; Nguyen-the, Christophe; Abee, Tjakko; Tempelaars, Marcel H; Broussolle, Véronique; Brillard, Julien

    2015-11-20

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is composed of a set of ubiquitous strains including human pathogens that can survive a range of food processing conditions, grow in refrigerated food, and sometimes cause food poisoning. We previously identified the two-component system CasK/R that plays a key role in cold adaptation. To better understand the CasK/R-controlled mechanisms that support low-temperature adaptation, we performed a transcriptomic analysis on the ATCC 14579 strain and its isogenic ∆casK/R mutant grown at 12°C. Several genes involved in fatty acid (FA) metabolism were downregulated in the mutant, including desA and desB encoding FA acyl-lipid desaturases that catalyze the formation of a double-bond on the FA chain in positions ∆5 and ∆10, respectively. A lower proportion of FAs presumably unsaturated by DesA was observed in the ΔcasK/R strain compared to the parental strain while no difference was found for FAs presumably unsaturated by DesB. Addition of phospholipids from egg yolk lecithin rich in unsaturated FAs, to growth medium, abolished the cold-growth impairment of ΔcasK/R suggesting that exogenous unsaturated FAs can support membrane-level modifications and thus compensate for the decreased production of these FAs in the B. cereus ∆casK/R mutant during growth at low temperature. Our findings indicate that CasK/R is involved in the regulation of FA metabolism, and is necessary for cold adaptation of B. cereus unless an exogenous source of unsaturated FAs is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The two-component signal transduction system ArlRS regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner.

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    Yang Wu

    Full Text Available Due to its ability to form biofilms on medical devices, Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a major pathogen of nosocomial infections. In this study, we investigated the role of the two-component signal transduction system ArlRS in regulating S. epidermidis biofilm formation. An ArlRS-deficient mutant, WW06, was constructed using S. epidermidis strain 1457 as a parental strain. Although the growth curve of WW06 was similar to that of SE1457, the mutant strain was unable to form biofilms in vitro. In a rabbit subcutaneous infection model, sterile disks made of polymeric materials were implanted subcutaneously followed with inoculation of WW06 or SE1457. The viable bacteria cells of WW06 recovered from biofilms on the embedded disks were much lower than that of SE1457. Complementation of arlRS genes expression from plasmid in WW06 restored biofilm-forming phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. WW06 maintained the ability to undergo initial attachment. Transcription levels of several genes involved in biofilm formation, including icaADBC, sigB, and sarA, were decreased in WW06, compared to SE1457; and icaR expression was increased in WW06, detected by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The biofilm-forming phenotype was restored by overexpressing icaADBC in WW06 but not by overexpressing sigB, indicating that ArlRS regulates biofilm formation through the regulation of icaADBC. Gel shift assay showed that ArlR can bind to the promoter region of the ica operon. In conclusion, ArlRS regulates S. epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner, distinct from its role in S. aureus.

  8. A Moraxella catarrhalis Two-Component Signal Transduction System Necessary for Growth in Liquid Media Affects Production of Two Lysozyme Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Stephanie N.; Pybus, Christine; Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Evans, Amanda S.; Attia, Ahmed S.; Brautigam, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    There are a paucity of data concerning gene products that could contribute to the ability of Moraxella catarrhalis to colonize the human nasopharynx. Inactivation of a gene (mesR) encoding a predicted response regulator of a two-component signal transduction system in M. catarrhalis yielded a mutant unable to grow in liquid media. This mesR mutant also exhibited increased sensitivity to certain stressors, including polymyxin B, SDS, and hydrogen peroxide. Inactivation of the gene (mesS) encoding the predicted cognate sensor (histidine) kinase yielded a mutant with the same inability to grow in liquid media as the mesR mutant. DNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analyses indicated that several genes previously shown to be involved in the ability of M. catarrhalis to persist in the chinchilla nasopharynx were upregulated in the mesR mutant. Two other open reading frames upregulated in the mesR mutant were shown to encode small proteins (LipA and LipB) that had amino acid sequence homology to bacterial adhesins and structural homology to bacterial lysozyme inhibitors. Inactivation of both lipA and lipB did not affect the ability of M. catarrhalis O35E to attach to a human bronchial epithelial cell line in vitro. Purified recombinant LipA and LipB fusion proteins were each shown to inhibit human lysozyme activity in vitro and in saliva. A lipA lipB deletion mutant was more sensitive than the wild-type parent strain to killing by human lysozyme in the presence of human apolactoferrin. This is the first report of the production of lysozyme inhibitors by M. catarrhalis. PMID:25312959

  9. Role of the two component signal transduction system CpxAR in conferring cefepime and chloramphenicol resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044.

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    Vijaya Bharathi Srinivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Klebsiella pneumoniae is a gram-negative, non-motile, facultative anaerobe belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family of the γ-Proteobacteria class in the phylum Proteobacteria. Multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae have caused major therapeutic problems worldwide due to emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing strains. Two-component systems serve as a basic stimulus-response coupling mechanism to allow organisms to sense and respond to changes in many different environmental conditions including antibiotic stress. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we investigated the role of an uncharacterized cpxAR operon in bacterial physiology and antimicrobial resistance by generating isogenic mutant (ΔcpxAR deficient in the CpxA/CpxR component derived from the hyper mucoidal K1 strain K. pneumoniae NTUH-K2044. The behaviour of ΔcpxAR was determined under hostile conditions, reproducing stresses encountered in the gastrointestinal environment and deletion resulted in higher sensitivity to bile, osmotic and acid stresses. The ΔcpxAR was more susceptible to β-lactams and chloramphenicol than the wild-type strain, and complementation restored the altered phenotypes. The relative change in expression of acrB, acrD, eefB efflux genes were decreased in cpxAR mutant as evidenced by qRT-PCR. Comparison of outer membrane protein profiles indicated a conspicuous difference in the knock out background. Gel shift assays demonstrated direct binding of CpxR(KP to promoter region of ompC(KP in a concentration dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The Cpx envelope stress response system is known to be activated by alterations in pH, membrane composition and misfolded proteins, and this systematic investigation reveals its direct involvement in conferring antimicrobial resistance against clinically significant antibiotics for the very first time. Overall results displayed in this report reflect the pleiotropic role of the Cpx

  10. The impact of ColRS two-component system and TtgABC efflux pump on phenol tolerance of Pseudomonas putida becomes evident only in growing bacteria

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    Kivisaar Maia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found that Pseudomonas putida deficient in ColRS two-component system is sensitive to phenol and displays a serious defect on solid glucose medium where subpopulation of bacteria lyses. The latter phenotype is significantly enhanced by the presence of phenol in growth medium. Here, we focused on identification of factors affecting phenol tolerance of the colR-deficient P. putida. Results By using transposon mutagenesis approach we identified a set of phenol-tolerant derivatives of colR-deficient strain. Surprisingly, half of independent phenol tolerant clones possessed miniTn5 insertion in the ttgABC operon. However, though inactivation of TtgABC efflux pump significantly enhanced phenol tolerance, it did not affect phenol-enhanced autolysis of the colR mutant on glucose medium indicating that phenol- and glucose-caused stresses experienced by the colR-deficient P. putida are not coupled. Inactivation of TtgABC pump significantly increased the phenol tolerance of the wild-type P. putida as well. Comparison of phenol tolerance of growing versus starving bacteria revealed that both ColRS and TtgABC systems affect phenol tolerance only under growth conditions and not under starvation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that phenol strongly inhibited cell division and to some extent also caused cell membrane permeabilization to propidium iodide. Single cell analysis of populations of the ttgC- and colRttgC-deficient strains revealed that their membrane permeabilization by phenol resembles that of the wild-type and the colR mutant, respectively. However, cell division of P. putida with inactivated TtgABC pump seemed to be less sensitive to phenol than that of the parental strain. At the same time, cell division appeared to be more inhibited in the colR-mutant strain than in the wild-type P. putida. Conclusions ColRS signal system and TtgABC efflux pump are involved in the phenol tolerance of P. putida. However, as

  11. The impact of ColRS two-component system and TtgABC efflux pump on phenol tolerance of Pseudomonas putida becomes evident only in growing bacteria.

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    Putrins, Marta; Ilves, Heili; Lilje, Liisa; Kivisaar, Maia; Hõrak, Rita

    2010-04-14

    We have recently found that Pseudomonas putida deficient in ColRS two-component system is sensitive to phenol and displays a serious defect on solid glucose medium where subpopulation of bacteria lyses. The latter phenotype is significantly enhanced by the presence of phenol in growth medium. Here, we focused on identification of factors affecting phenol tolerance of the colR-deficient P. putida. By using transposon mutagenesis approach we identified a set of phenol-tolerant derivatives of colR-deficient strain. Surprisingly, half of independent phenol tolerant clones possessed miniTn5 insertion in the ttgABC operon. However, though inactivation of TtgABC efflux pump significantly enhanced phenol tolerance, it did not affect phenol-enhanced autolysis of the colR mutant on glucose medium indicating that phenol- and glucose-caused stresses experienced by the colR-deficient P. putida are not coupled. Inactivation of TtgABC pump significantly increased the phenol tolerance of the wild-type P. putida as well. Comparison of phenol tolerance of growing versus starving bacteria revealed that both ColRS and TtgABC systems affect phenol tolerance only under growth conditions and not under starvation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that phenol strongly inhibited cell division and to some extent also caused cell membrane permeabilization to propidium iodide. Single cell analysis of populations of the ttgC- and colRttgC-deficient strains revealed that their membrane permeabilization by phenol resembles that of the wild-type and the colR mutant, respectively. However, cell division of P. putida with inactivated TtgABC pump seemed to be less sensitive to phenol than that of the parental strain. At the same time, cell division appeared to be more inhibited in the colR-mutant strain than in the wild-type P. putida. ColRS signal system and TtgABC efflux pump are involved in the phenol tolerance of P. putida. However, as they affect phenol tolerance of growing bacteria only, this

  12. The Two-Component System CpxRA Negatively Regulates the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Involving σ(32) and Lon protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Miguel A; Morgan, Jason K; Ares, Miguel A; Yáñez-Santos, Jorge A; Riordan, James T; Girón, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a significant cause of serious human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. EHEC strains contain a pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which encodes virulence factors responsible for damaging the gut mucosa. The Cpx envelope stress response of E. coli is controlled by a two-component system (TCS) consisting of a sensor histidine kinase (CpxA) and a cytoplasmic response regulator (CpxR). In this study, we investigated the role of CpxRA in the expression of LEE-encoded virulence factors of EHEC. We found that a mutation in cpxA significantly affected adherence of EHEC to human epithelial cells. Analysis of this mutant revealed the presence of high levels of CpxR which repressed transcription of grlA and ler, the main positive virulence regulators of the LEE, and influenced negatively the production of the type 3 secretion system-associated EspABD translocator proteins. It is known that CpxR activates rpoH (Sigma factor 32), which in turns activates transcription of the lon protease gene. We found that transcription levels of ler and grlA were significantly increased in the lon and cpxA lon mutants suggesting that lon is involved in down-regulating LEE genes. In addition, the Galleria mellonella model of infection was used to analyze the effect of the loss of the cpx and lon genes in EHEC's ability to kill the larvae. We found that the cpxA mutant was significantly deficient at killing the larvae however, the cpxA lon mutant which overexpresses LEE genes in vitro, was unable to kill the larvae, suggesting that virulence in the G. mellonella model is T3SS independent and that CpxA modulates virulence through a yet unknown EHEC-specific factor. Our data provides new insights and broadens our scope into the complex regulatory network of the LEE in which the CpxA sensor kinase plays an important role in a cascade involving both global and virulence regulators.

  13. Relationship of the CreBC two-component regulatory system and inner membrane protein CreD with swimming motility in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

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    Hsin-Hui Huang

    Full Text Available The CreBC two-component system (TCS is a conserved regulatory system found in Escherichia coli, Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. In this study, we determined how CreBC TCS regulates secreted protease activities and swimming motility using creB, creC, and creBC in-frame deletion mutants (KJΔCreB, KJΔCreC, and KJΔBC of S. maltophilia KJ. Compared to wild-type KJ, KJΔCreB had a comparable secreted protease activity; however, the secreted protease activities were obviously reduced in KJΔCreC and KJΔBC, suggesting that CreC works together with another unidentified response regulator (not CreB to regulate secreted protease activity. Single gene inactivation of creB or creC resulted in mutants with an enhanced swimming motility, and this phenotype was exacerbated in a double mutant KJΔBC. To elucidate the underlying mechanism responsible for the ΔcreBC-mediated swimming enhancement, flagella morphology observation, RNA-seq based transcriptome assay, qRT-PCR, and membrane integrity and potential assessment were performed. Flagella morphological observation ruled out the possibility that swimming enhancement was due to altered flagella morphology. CreBC inactivation upregulated the expression of creD and flagella-associated genes encoding the basal body- and motor-associated proteins. Furthermore, KJΔBC had an increased membrane susceptibility to Triton X-100 and CreD upregulation in KJΔBC partially alleviated the compromise of membrane integrity. The impact of creBC TCS on bacterial membrane potential was assessed by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine (CCCP50 concentration at which 50% of bacterial swimming is inhibited. CCCP50 of wild-type KJ increased when creBC was deleted, indicating an association between the higher membrane potential of KJΔBC cells and enhanced motility. Upregulation of the basal body- and motor-associated genes of flagella in KJΔBC cells may explain the increased

  14. High temperature two component explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  15. The two-component system CpxRA negatively regulates the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli involving sigma 32 and Lon protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIGUEL A. eDE LA CRUZ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC is a significant cause of serious human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. EHEC strains contain a pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE, which encodes virulence factors responsible for damaging the gut mucosa. The Cpx envelope stress response of E. coli is controlled by a two-component system consisting of a sensor histidine kinase (CpxA and a cytoplasmic response regulator (CpxR. In this study, we investigated the role of CpxRA in the expression of LEE-encoded virulence factors of EHEC. We found that a mutation in cpxA significantly affected adherence of EHEC to human epithelial cells. Analysis of this mutant revealed the presence of high levels of CpxR which repressed transcription of grlA and ler, the main positive virulence regulators of the LEE, and influenced negatively the production of the type 3 secretion system–associated EspABD translocator proteins. It is known that CpxR activates rpoH (Sigma factor 32, which in turns activates transcription of the lon protease gene. We found that transcription levels of ler and grlA were significantly increased in the lon and cpxA lon mutants suggesting that lon is involved in down-regulating LEE genes. In addition, the Galleria mellonella model of infection was used to analyze the effect of the loss of the cpx and lon genes in EHEC’s ability to kill the larvae. We found that the cpxA mutant was significantly deficient at killing the larvae however, the cpxA lon mutant which overexpresses LEE genes in vitro, was unable to kill the larvae, suggesting that virulence in the G. mellonella model is T3SS independent and that CpxA modulates virulence through a yet unknown EHEC-specific factor. Our data provides new insights and broadens our scope into the complex regulatory network of the LEE in which the CpxA sensor kinase plays an important role in a cascade involving both global and virulence regulators.

  16. Two component theory and electron magnetic moment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The two-component formulation of quantum electrodynamics is studied. The relation with the usual Dirac formulation is exhibited, and the Feynman rules for the two-component form of the theory are presented in terms of familiar objects. The transformation from the Dirac theory to the two-component

  17. CesRK, a two-component signal transduction system in Listeria monocytogenes, responds to the presence of cell wall-acting antibiotics and affects beta-lactam resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, Birgitte H; Ingmer, Hanne; Gahan, Cormac G

    2003-01-01

    of a putative two-component signal transduction system that plays a role in the virulence and ethanol tolerance of L. monocytogenes. Here we present evidence that the response regulator, CesR, and a histidine protein kinase, CesK, which is encoded by the gene downstream from cesR, are involved in the ability...

  18. Correlation between ceftriaxone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and expression of outer membrane proteins OmpW and Ail/OmpX-like protein, which are regulated by BaeR of a two-component system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wensi S; Li, Pei-Chuan; Cheng, Chao-Yin

    2005-09-01

    Mutant 7F2 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has a transposon inserted in the regulator gene baeR of a two-component system and showed a more-than-fourfold reduction in resistance to ceftriaxone. Complementation analysis suggested an association among the outer membrane proteins OmpW and STM3031, ceftriaxone resistance, and baeR.

  19. Structural characterization of the heme-based oxygen sensor, AfGcHK, its interactions with the cognate response regulator, and their combined mechanism of action in a bacterial two-component signaling system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stráňava, M.; Martínek, V.; Man, Petr; Fojtíková, V.; Kavan, Daniel; Vaněk, O.; Shimizu, T.; Martínková, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 10 (2016), s. 1375-1389 ISSN 1097-0134 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : heme-based oxygen sensor * histidine kinase * two-component signal transduction system Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  20. Novel Predators Reshape Holozoan Phylogeny and Reveal the Presence of a Two-Component Signaling System in the Ancestor of Animals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hehenberger, A.; Tikhonenkov, D. V.; Kolísko, Martin; del Campo, J.; Esaulov, A. S.; Mylnikov, A. P.; Keeling, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 13 (2017), s. 2043-2050 ISSN 0960-9822 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : transcription factor family * RNA-seq * unicellular opisthokonts * evolution * alignment * origins * genome * tool * adhesion * domain Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 8.851, year: 2016

  1. Systemic antibody responses induced by a two-component Clostridium difficile toxoid vaccine protect against C. difficile-associated disease in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Natalie G; Brown, Anna M; Li, Lu; Liu, Nana; Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Mehta, Hersh; Kleanthous, Harry

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been identified as the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis associated with antibiotic therapy. Recent epidemiological changes as well as increases in the number of outbreaks of strains associated with increased virulence and higher mortality rates underscore the importance of identifying alternatives to antibiotics to manage this important disease. Animal studies have clearly demonstrated the roles that toxins A and B play in gut inflammation as well as diarrhoea; therefore it is not surprising that serum anti-toxin A and B IgG are associated with protection against recurrent CDI. In humans, strong humoral toxin-specific immune responses elicited by natural C. difficile infection is associated with recovery and lack of disease recurrence, whereas insufficient humoral responses are associated with recurrent CDI. The first generation of C. difficile vaccine that contained inactivated toxin A and B was found to be completely protective against death and diarrhoea in the hamster C. difficile challenge model. When tested in young healthy volunteers in Phase I clinical trials, this investigational vaccine was shown to be safe and immunogenic. Moreover, in a separate study this vaccine was able to prevent further relapses in three out of three patients who had previously suffered from chronic relapsing C. difficile-associated diarrhoea. Herein we examined the immunogenicity and protective activity of a next-generation Sanofi Pasteur two-component highly purified toxoid vaccine in a C. difficile hamster model. This model is widely recognized as a stringent and relevant choice for the evaluation of novel treatment strategies against C. difficile and was used in preclinical testing of the first-generation vaccine candidate. Intramuscular (i.m.) immunizations with increasing doses of this adjuvanted toxoid vaccine protected hamsters from mortality and disease symptoms in a dose-dependent manner. ELISA

  2. Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

  3. A 3D visualization of the substituent effect : A brief analysis of two components of the operational formula of dual descriptor for open-shell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge I; Yepes, Diana; Jaque, Pablo

    2017-12-27

    Six organometallic compounds coming from a basic Mo-based complex were analyzed from the perspective of the dual descriptor in order to detect subtle influences that a substituent group could exert on the reactive core at a long range. Since the aforementioned complexes are open-shell systems, the used operational formula for the dual descriptor is that one defined for those aforementioned systems, which was then compared with spin density. In addition, dual descriptor was decomposed into two terms, each of which was also applied on every molecular system. The obtained results indicated that components of dual descriptor could become more useful than the operational formula of dual descriptor because differences exerted by the substituents at the para position were better detected by components of dual descriptor rather than the dual descriptor by itself.

  4. Monoclonal antibody heterogeneity analysis and deamidation monitoring with high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing using simple, two component buffer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xuezhen; Kutzko, Joseph P; Hayes, Michael L; Frey, Douglas D

    2013-03-29

    The use of either a polyampholyte buffer or a simple buffer system for the high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing of monoclonal antibodies is demonstrated for the case where the pH gradient is produced entirely inside the column and with no external mixing of buffers. The simple buffer system used was composed of two buffering species, one which becomes adsorbed onto the column packing and one which does not adsorb, together with an adsorbed ion that does not participate in acid-base equilibrium. The method which employs the simple buffer system is capable of producing a gradual pH gradient in the neutral to acidic pH range that can be adjusted by proper selection of the starting and ending pH values for the gradient as well as the buffering species concentration, pKa, and molecular size. By using this approach, variants of representative monoclonal antibodies with isoelectric points of 7.0 or less were separated with high resolution so that the approach can serve as a complementary alternative to isoelectric focusing for characterizing a monoclonal antibody based on differences in the isoelectric points of the variants present. Because the simple buffer system used eliminates the use of polyampholytes, the method is suitable for antibody heterogeneity analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The method can also be used at the preparative scale to collect highly purified isoelectric variants of an antibody for further study. To illustrate this, a single isoelectric point variant of a monoclonal antibody was collected and used for a stability study under forced deamidation conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The IRF5–TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottyan, Leah C.; Zoller, Erin E.; Bene, Jessica; Lu, Xiaoming; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Rupert, Andrew M.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Vaughn, Samuel E.; Marion, Miranda; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Namjou, Bahram; Adler, Adam; Rasmussen, Astrid; Glenn, Stuart; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Xie, Gang; Coltescu, Catalina; Amos, Chris; Li, He; Ice, John A.; Nath, Swapan K.; Mariette, Xavier; Bowman, Simon; Rischmueller, Maureen; Lester, Sue; Brun, Johan G.; Gøransson, Lasse G.; Harboe, Erna; Omdal, Roald; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S.; Vyse, Tim; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Brennan, Michael T.; Lessard, James A.; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Kvarnström, Marika; Illei, Gabor G.; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Eriksson, Per; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Segal, Barbara M.; Merrill, Joan T.; James, Judith A.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Hal Scofield, R.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Gilkeson, Gary; Kamen, Diane L.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kimberly, Robert; Brown, Elizabeth; Edberg, Jeffrey; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Freedman, Barry I.; Niewold, Timothy; Stevens, Anne M.; Tsao, Betty P.; Ying, Jun; Mayes, Maureen D.; Gorlova, Olga Y.; Wakeland, Ward; Radstake, Timothy; Martin, Ezequiel; Martin, Javier; Siminovitch, Katherine; Moser Sivils, Kathy L.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5–TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5–TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10−49; OR = 1.38–1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10−27–10−32, OR = 1.7–1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5–TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5–TNPO3. PMID:25205108

  6. Two-Component Signaling System VgrRS Directly Senses Extracytoplasmic and Intracellular Iron to Control Bacterial Adaptation under Iron Depleted Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both iron starvation and excess are detrimental to cellular life, especially for animal and plant pathogens since they always live in iron-limited environments produced by host immune responses. However, how organisms sense and respond to iron is incompletely understood. Herein, we reveal that in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, VgrS (also named ColS is a membrane-bound receptor histidine kinase that senses extracytoplasmic iron limitation in the periplasm, while its cognate response regulator, VgrR (ColR, detects intracellular iron excess. Under iron-depleted conditions, dissociation of Fe3+ from the periplasmic sensor region of VgrS activates the VgrS autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphotransfer to VgrR, an OmpR-family transcription factor that regulates bacterial responses to take up iron. VgrR-VgrS regulon and the consensus DNA binding motif of the transcription factor VgrR were dissected by comparative proteomic and ChIP-seq analyses, which revealed that in reacting to iron-depleted environments, VgrR directly or indirectly controls the expressions of hundreds of genes that are involved in various physiological cascades, especially those associated with iron-uptake. Among them, we demonstrated that the phosphorylated VgrR tightly represses the transcription of a special TonB-dependent receptor gene, tdvA. This regulation is a critical prerequisite for efficient iron uptake and bacterial virulence since activation of tdvA transcription is detrimental to these processes. When the intracellular iron accumulates, the VgrR-Fe2+ interaction dissociates not only the binding between VgrR and the tdvA promoter, but also the interaction between VgrR and VgrS. This relieves the repression in tdvA transcription to impede continuous iron uptake and avoids possible toxic effects of excessive iron accumulation. Our results revealed a signaling system that directly senses both extracytoplasmic and intracellular

  7. Spin-excited oscillations in two-component fermion condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Bertsch, George F.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate collective spin excitations in two-component fermion condensates with special consideration of unequal populations of the two components. The frequencies of monopole and dipole modes are calculated using Thomas-Fermi theory and the scaling approximation. As the fermion-fermion coupling is varied, the system shows various phases of the spin configuration. We demonstrate that spin oscillations have more sensitivity to the spin phase structures than the density oscillations

  8. The Ca2+ induced two-component system, CvsSR regulates the Type III secretion system and the extracytoplasmic function sigma-factor AlgU in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Maxwell R; Zhang, Johnson; Bronstein, Philip A; Stodghill, Paul; Filiatrault, Melanie J

    2017-12-20

    Two-component systems (TCSs) of bacteria regulate many different aspects of the bacterial life cycle including pathogenesis. Most TCSs remain uncharacterized with no information about the signal(s) or regulatory targets and/or role in bacterial pathogenesis. Here, we characterized a TCS in the plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 ( Pto ) composed of the histidine kinase, CvsS, and the response regulator, CvsR. CvsSR is necessary for virulence of Pto , since ΔcvsS and ΔcvsR strains produced fewer symptoms and demonstrated reduced growth on multiple hosts as compared to WT. We discovered that expression of cvsSR is induced by Ca 2+ concentrations found in leaf apoplastic fluid. Thus, Ca 2+ can be added to the list of signals that promote pathogenesis of Pto during host colonization. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) and global transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq) we discerned the CvsR regulon. CvsR directly activated expression of the type III secretion system regulators, hrpR and hrpS , that regulates Pto virulence in a type III secretion system dependent manner. CvsR also indirectly repressed transcription of the extracytoplasmic sigma factor algU and production of alginate. Phenotypic analysis determined that CvsSR inversely regulated biofilm formation, swarming motility, and cellulose production in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner. Overall, our results show that CvsSR is a key regulatory hub critical for interaction with host plants. Importance Pathogenic bacteria must be able to react and respond to the surrounding environment, make use of available resources, and avert or counter host immune responses. Often, these abilities rely on two-component systems (TCSs) composed of interacting proteins that modulate gene expression. We identified a TCS in the plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae that responds to the presence of calcium, which is an important signal during the plant

  9. Characterization of the CrbS/R Two-Component System in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveals a New Set of Genes under Its Control and a DNA Motif Required for CrbR-Mediated Transcriptional Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Sepulveda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The CrbS/R system is a two-component signal transduction system that regulates acetate utilization in Vibrio cholerae, P. aeruginosa, and P. entomophila. CrbS is a hybrid histidine kinase that belongs to a recently identified family, in which the signaling domain is fused to an SLC5 solute symporter domain through aSTAC domain. Upon activation by CrbS, CrbR activates transcription of the acs gene, which encodes an acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS, and the actP gene, which encodes an acetate/solute symporter. In this work, we characterized the CrbS/R system in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. Through the quantitative proteome analysis of different mutants, we were able to identify a new set of genes under its control, which play an important role during growth on acetate. These results led us to the identification of a conserved DNA motif in the putative promoter region of acetate-utilization genes in the Gammaproteobacteria that is essential for the CrbR-mediated transcriptional activation of genes under acetate-utilizing conditions. Finally, we took advantage of the existence of a second SLC5-containing two-component signal transduction system in P. fluorescens, CbrA/B, to demonstrate that the activation of the response regulator by the histidine kinase is not dependent on substrate transport through the SLC5 domain.

  10. Two component plasma vortex approach to fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1978-09-01

    Two component operation of the field reversed theta pinch plasma by injection of the energetic ion beam with energy of the order of 1 MeV is considered. A possible trapping scheme of the ion beam in the plasma is discussed in detail. (author)

  11. Variability and Evolution in Systems of Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetz Botterweck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this position paper (1 we discuss two particular aspects of Systems of Systems, i.e., variability and evolution. (2 We argue that concepts from Product Line Engineering and Software Evolution are relevant to Systems of Systems Engineering. (3 Conversely, concepts from Systems of Systems Engineering can be helpful in Product Line Engineering and Software Evolution. Hence, we argue that an exchange of concepts between the disciplines would be beneficial.

  12. Exposure of a 23F Serotype Strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Cigarette Smoke Condensate Is Associated with Selective Upregulation of Genes Encoding the Two-Component Regulatory System 11 (TCS11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Jenny A.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Dickens, Caroline; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in whole genome expression profiles following exposure of the pneumococcus (strain 172, serotype 23F) to cigarette smoke condensate (160 μg/mL) for 15 and 60 min have been determined using the TIGR4 DNA microarray chip. Exposure to CSC resulted in the significant (P < 0.014–0.0006) upregulation of the genes encoding the two-component regulatory system 11 (TCS11), consisting of the sensor kinase, hk11, and its cognate response regulator, rr11, in the setting of increased biofilm formation. These effects of cigarette smoke on the pneumococcus may contribute to colonization of the airways by this microbial pathogen. PMID:25013815

  13. Exposure of a 23F Serotype Strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Cigarette Smoke Condensate Is Associated with Selective Upregulation of Genes Encoding the Two-Component Regulatory System 11 (TCS11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riana Cockeran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in whole genome expression profiles following exposure of the pneumococcus (strain 172, serotype 23F to cigarette smoke condensate (160 μg/mL for 15 and 60 min have been determined using the TIGR4 DNA microarray chip. Exposure to CSC resulted in the significant (P<0.014–0.0006 upregulation of the genes encoding the two-component regulatory system 11 (TCS11, consisting of the sensor kinase, hk11, and its cognate response regulator, rr11, in the setting of increased biofilm formation. These effects of cigarette smoke on the pneumococcus may contribute to colonization of the airways by this microbial pathogen.

  14. Development and characterization of two-component albedo based neutron individual monitoring system using thermoluminescent detectors; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao de um sistema de monitoracao individual de neutrons tipo albedo de duas componentes usando detectores termoluminescentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcelo Marques

    2008-07-01

    A TLD-albedo based two-component neutron individual monitoring system was developed and characterized in this work. The monitor consists of a black plastic holder, an incident neutron boron loaded shield, a moderator polyethylene body (to increase its response), two pairs of TLD-600 and TLD-700 (one pair to each component) and an adjustable belt. This monitoring system was calibrated in thermal neutron fields and in 70 keV, 144 keV, 565 keV, 1.2 MeV and 5 MeV monoenergetic neutron fields. In addition, it was calibrated in {sup 252C}f(D{sub 2}O), {sup 252}Cf, {sup 241}Am-B, {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 238}Pu-Be source fields. For the latter, the lower detection levels are, respectively, 0.009 mSv, 0.06 mSv, 0.12 mSv, 0.09 mSv and 0.08 mSv. The participation in an international intercomparison sponsored by IAEA with simulated workplace fields validated the system. The monitoring system was successfully characterized in the ISO 21909 standard and in an IRD - the Brazilian Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - technical regulation draft. Nowadays, the neutron individual system is in use by IRD for whole body individual monitoring of five institutions, which comprehend several activities. (author)

  15. Collective behaviors of two-component swarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sang Koo; Kwon, Dae Hyuk; Park, Yong-ik; Kim, Sun Myong; Chung, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Chul Koo

    2009-12-07

    We present a particle-based simulation study on two-component swarms where there exist two different types of groups in a swarm. Effects of different parameters between the two groups are studied systematically based on Langevin's equation. It is shown that the mass difference can introduce a protective behavior for the lighter members of the swarm in a vortex state. When the self-propelling strength is allowed to differ between two groups, it is observed that the swarm becomes spatially segregated and finally separated into two components at a certain critical value. We also investigate effects of different preferences for shelters on their collective decision making. In particular, it is found that the probability of selecting a shelter from the other varies sigmoidally as a function of the number ratio. The model is shown to describe the dynamics of the shelter choosing process of the cockroach-robot mixed group satisfactorily. It raises the possibility that the present model can be applied to the problems of pest control and fishing using robots and decoys.

  16. Anaerobic expression of the gadE-mdtEF multidrug efflux operon is primarily regulated by the two-component system ArcBA through antagonizing the H-NS mediated repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ziqing; Shan, Yue; Pan, Qing; Gao, Xiang; Yan, Aixin

    2013-01-01

    The gadE-mdtEF operon encodes a central acid resistance regulator GadE and two multidrug efflux proteins MdtEF. Although transcriptional regulation of gadE in the context of acid resistance under the aerobic growth environment of Escherichia coli has been extensively studied, regulation of the operon under the physiologically relevant environment of anaerobic growth and its effect on the expression of the multidrug efflux proteins MdtEF in the operon has not been disclosed. Our previous study revealed that anaerobic induction of the operon was dependent on ArcA, the response regulator of the ArcBA two-component system, in the M9 glucose minimal medium. However, the detailed regulatory mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we showed that anaerobic activation of mdtEF was driven by the 798 bp unusually long gadE promoter. Deletion of evgA, ydeO, rpoS, and gadX which has been shown to activate the gadE expression during acid stresses under aerobic condition did not have a significant effect on the anaerobic activation of the operon. Rather, anaerobic activation of the operon was largely dependent on the global regulator ArcA and a GTPase MnmE. Under aerobic condition, transcription of gadE was repressed by the global DNA silencer H-NS in M9 minimal medium. Interestingly, under anaerobic condition, while ΔarcA almost completely abolished transcription of gadE-mdtEF, further deletion of hns in ΔarcA mutant restored the transcription of the full-length PgadE-lacZ, and P1- and P3-lacZ fusions, suggesting an antagonistic effect of ArcA on the H-NS mediated repression. Taken together, we conclude that the anaerobic activation of the gadE-mdtEF was primarily mediated by the two-component system ArcBA through antagonizing the H-NS mediated repression.

  17. Anaerobic expression of the gadE-mdtEF multidrug efflux operon is primarily regulated by the two-component system ArcBA through antagonizing the H-NS mediated repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqing eDeng

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The gadE-mdtEF operon encodes a central acid resistance regulator GadE and two multidrug efflux proteins MdtEF. Although transcriptional regulation of gadE in the context of acid resistance under the aerobic growth environment of E. coli has been extensively studied, regulation of the operon under the physiologically relevant environment of anaerobic growth and its effect on the expression of the multidrug efflux proteins MdtEF has not been disclosed. Our previous study revealed that anaerobic induction of the operon was dependent on ArcA, the response regulator of the ArcBA two-component system, in the M9 glucose minimal medium. However, the detailed regulatory mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we showed that anaerobic activation of mdtEF was driven by the 798bp unusually long gadE promoter. Deletion of evgA, ydeO, rpoS, and gadX which has been shown to activate the gadE expression during acid stresses under aerobic condition did not have a significant effect on the anaerobic activation of the operon. Rather, anaerobic activation of the operon was largely dependent on the global regulator ArcA and a GTPase MnmE. Under aerobic condition, transcription of gadE was repressed by the global DNA silencer H-NS in M9 minimal medium. Interestingly, under anaerobic condition, while ΔarcA almost completely abolished transcription of gadE-mdtEF, further deletion of hns in ΔarcA mutant restored the transcription of the full length PgadE-lacZ, and P1- and P3-lacZ fusions, suggesting an antagonistic effect of ArcA on the H-NS mediated repression. Taken together, we conclude that the anaerobic activation of the gadE-mdtEF was primarily mediated by the two-component system ArcBA through antagonizing the H-NS mediated repression.

  18. Primordial two-component maximally symmetric inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Quirós, M.; Kounnas, C.

    1985-12-01

    We propose a two-component inflation model, based on maximally symmetric supergravity, where the scales of reheating and the inflation potential at the origin are decoupled. This is possible because of the second-order phase transition from SU(5) to SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1) that takes place when φ≅φcinflation at the global minimum, and leads to a reheating temperature TR≅(1015-1016) GeV. This makes it possible to generate baryon asymmetry in the conventional way without any conflict with experimental data on proton lifetime. The mass of the gravitinos is m3/2≅1012 GeV, thus avoiding the gravitino problem. Monopoles are diluted by residual inflation in the broken phase below the cosmological bounds if φcUSA.

  19. Two component-theory and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wideroee, R.

    1990-01-01

    The two component theory which describes the biological effect of X-ray and particle irradiation divides radiation into densely ionizing radiation (ion density in water greater than four ions per 100 A, i.e. LET>12 keV/μm) und loosely ionizing radiation with low ion densities. In case of densely ionizing radiation, the ions can produce breaks of both cords of DNA thus causing the death of the cell (α effect). Lower ion densities will produce only slight damages which are possibly lethal but can be partly repaired (β effect). If the cell parameters are known (L. Cohen 1983), the number of surviving cells after an irradiation can be calculated. The surviving lung cells and tumor cells (squamous cell carcinoma) have been calculated for a pulmonary irradiation with 30 MeV electrons and 200 keV X-rays (single doses of 2 and 5 Gy), respectively. The electron irradiation with single doses of 5 Gy turned out to be the most favorable therapy sparing the greatest number of lung cells and reducing the tumor cells in the most effective way (down to 1.6x10 -10 ). (orig.) [de

  20. The PorX Response Regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY Two-Component System Does Not Directly Regulate the Type IX Secretion Genes but Binds the PorL Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Maxence S.; Durand, Eric; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion or cell surface exposition of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY, and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS) sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN, and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we demonstrate that PorX does not bind T9SS gene promoters and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS. PMID:27630829

  1. The PorX response regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY two-component system does not directly regulate the Type IX secretion genes but binds the PorL subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxence S Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Type IX secretion system (T9SS is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion of surface attachment of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of the porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we showed that PorX does not bind and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS.

  2. Complement-mediated opsonization of invasive group A Streptococcus pyogenes strain AP53 is regulated by the bacterial two-component cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovRS) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, Garima; Liang, Zhong; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Balsara, Rashna D; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2013-09-20

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) strain AP53 is a primary isolate from a patient with necrotizing fasciitis. These AP53 cells contain an inactivating mutation in the sensor component of the cluster of virulence (cov) responder (R)/sensor (S) two-component gene regulatory system (covRS), which enhances the virulence of the primary strain, AP53/covR(+)S(-). However, specific mechanisms by which the covRS system regulates the survival of GAS in humans are incomplete. Here, we show a key role for covRS in the regulation of opsonophagocytosis of AP53 by human neutrophils. AP53/covR(+)S(-) cells displayed potent binding of host complement inhibitors of C3 convertase, viz. Factor H (FH) and C4-binding protein (C4BP), which concomitantly led to minimal C3b deposition on AP53 cells, further showing that these plasma protein inhibitors are active on GAS cells. This resulted in weak killing of the bacteria by human neutrophils and a corresponding high death rate of mice after injection of these cells. After targeted allelic alteration of covS(-) to wild-type covS (covS(+)), a dramatic loss of FH and C4BP binding to the AP53/covR(+)S(+) cells was observed. This resulted in elevated C3b deposition on AP53/covR(+)S(+) cells, a high level of opsonophagocytosis by human neutrophils, and a very low death rate of mice infected with AP53/covR(+)S(+). We show that covRS is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes directing AP53 killing by neutrophils and regulates the levels of the receptors for FH and C4BP, which we identify as the products of the fba and enn genes, respectively.

  3. Evolution of semantic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Küppers, Bernd-Olaf; Artmann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Complex systems in nature and society make use of information for the development of their internal organization and the control of their functional mechanisms. Alongside technical aspects of storing, transmitting and processing information, the various semantic aspects of information, such as meaning, sense, reference and function, play a decisive part in the analysis of such systems.With the aim of fostering a better understanding of semantic systems from an evolutionary and multidisciplinary perspective, this volume collects contributions by philosophers and natural scientists, linguists, i

  4. Evolution of information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    This article offers a dynamic view of continuously changes in a specific informational system illustrated through a case study in a small network company. Central aspects of the evolutionary process will be identified and framed in relation to the informational system change. It will be argued...... that an evolutionary transformation of informational systems are preferable for small network organisations because of their need to adapt rapidly and easily to new business conditions. The IS will only be flexible if both human and technology are prepared and willing/proper configured. Changes are due to altered...

  5. Signaling mechanism by the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system LytSR: role of acetyl phosphate in bypassing the cell membrane electrical potential sensor LytS [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Patel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The two-component system LytSR has been linked to the signal transduction of cell membrane electrical potential perturbation and is involved in the adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to cationic antimicrobial peptides. It consists of a membrane-bound histidine kinase, LytS, which belongs to the family of multiple transmembrane-spanning domains receptors, and a response regulator, LytR, which belongs to the novel family of non-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain proteins. LytR regulates the expression of cidABC and lrgAB operons, the gene products of which are involved in programmed cell death and lysis. In vivo studies have demonstrated involvement of two overlapping regulatory networks in regulating the lrgAB operon, both depending on LytR. One regulatory network responds to glucose metabolism and the other responds to changes in the cell membrane potential. Herein, we show that LytS has autokinase activity and can catalyze a fast phosphotransfer reaction, with 50% of its phosphoryl group lost within 1 minute of incubation with LytR. LytS has also phosphatase activity. Notably, LytR undergoes phosphorylation by acetyl phosphate at a rate that is 2-fold faster than the phosphorylation by LytS. This observation is significant in lieu of the in vivo observations that regulation of the lrgAB operon is LytR-dependent in the presence of excess glucose in the medium. The latter condition does not lead to perturbation of the cell membrane potential but rather to the accumulation of acetate in the cell. Our study provides insights into the molecular basis for regulation of lrgAB in a LytR-dependent manner under conditions that do not involve sensing by LytS.

  6. Two Component Injection Moulding for Moulded Interconnect Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The moulded interconnect devices (MIDs) contain huge possibilities for many applications in micro electro-mechanical-systems because of their potential in reducing the number of components, process steps and finally in miniaturization of the product. Among the available MID process chains, two...... component (2k) injection moulding is one of the most industrially adaptive processes. However, the use of two component injection moulding for MID fabrication, with circuit patterns in sub-millimeter range, is still a big challenge. This book searches for the technical difficulties associated...... which can effectively control the quality of 2k moulded parts and metallized MIDs. This book presents documented knowledge about MID process chains, 2k moulding and selective metallization which can be valuable source of information for both academic and industrial users....

  7. Evolution of safeguards systems design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, J.P.; Christensen, E.L.; Dietz, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Safeguards systems play a vital detection and deterrence role in current nonproliferation policy. These safeguards systems have developed over the past three decades through the evolution of three essential components: the safeguards/process interface, safeguards performance criteria, and the technology necessary to support effective safeguards. This paper discusses the background and history of this evolutionary process, its major developments and status, and the future direction of safeguards system design

  8. SND DAQ system evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanchkov, G. A.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Tekutiev, A. I.; Usov, Yu V.

    2017-10-01

    The spherical neutral detector (SND) takes data at the e+e- collider VEPP-2000 in Novosibirsk. We present here recent upgrades of the SND DAQ system which are mainly aimed to handle the enhanced events rate load after the collider modernization. To maintain acceptable events selection quality the electronics throughput and computational power should be increased. These goals are achieved with the new fast digitizing electronics and distributed data taking. The data flow for the most congested detector subsystems is distributed and processed separately. We describe the new distributed SND DAQ software architecture, its computational and network infrastructure.

  9. Two-component multistep direct reactions: A microscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1998-03-01

    The authors present two principal advances in multistep direct theory: (1) A two-component formulation of multistep direct reactions, where neutron and proton excitations are explicitly accounted for in the evolution of the reaction, for all orders of scattering. While this may at first seem to be a formidable task, especially for multistep processes where the many possible reaction pathways becomes large in a two-component formalism, the authors show that this is not so -- a rather simple generalization of the FKK convolution expression 1 automatically generates these pathways. Such considerations are particularly relevant when simultaneously analyzing both neutron and proton emission spectra, which is always important since these processes represent competing decay channels. (2) A new, and fully microscopic, method for calculating MSD cross sections which does not make use of particle-hole state densities but instead directly calculates cross sections for all possible particle-hole excitations (again including an exact book-keeping of the neutron/proton type of the particle and hole at all stages of the reaction) determined from a simple non-interacting shell model. This is in contrast to all previous numerical approaches which sample only a small number of such states to estimate the DWBA strength, and utilize simple analytical formulae for the partial state density, based on the equidistant spacing model. The new approach has been applied, along with theories for multistep compound, compound, and collective reactions, to analyze experimental emission spectra for a range of targets and energies. The authors show that the theory correctly accounts for double-differential nucleon spectra

  10. Two component micro injection moulding for moulded interconnect devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    2008-01-01

    is to explore and overcome the challenges associated with MID production by two component injection moulding. Fabrication of micro scale MIDs by two component injection moulding, calls for plastic materials suitable for two component micro injection moulding and requires optimization in injection moulding...... component injection moulding is one of the most industrially adaptive processes. However, the use of two component injection moulding for MID fabrication, with circuit patterns in the sub-millimeter range, is still a big challenge at the present state of technology. The scope of the current Ph.D. project...... and selective metallization. Integrated knowledge about the materials, tooling, process conditions and product development is needed. The main issues to be taken into account for two component injection moulded MIDs are: • Two component injection moulding with a sharp interface between the two polymers...

  11. Collective and static properties of model two-component plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Askaruly, A.; Davletov, A. E.; Meirkanova, G. M.; Ballester, D.; Tkachenko, I. M.

    2007-01-01

    Classical MD data on the charge-charge dynamic structure factor of two-component plasmas (TCP) modeled in Phys. Rev. A 23, 2041 (1981) are analyzed using the sum rules and other exact relations. The convergent power moments of the imaginary part of the model system dielectric function are expressed in terms of its partial static structure factors, which are computed by the method of hypernetted chains using the Deutsch effective potential. High-frequency asymptotic behavior of the dielectric function is specified to include the effects of inverse bremsstrahlung. The agreement with the MD data is improved, and important statistical characteristics of the model TCP, such as the probability to find both electron and ion at one point, are determined

  12. Normal-mode diagonalization for two-component topological kinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boya, L.J.; Casahorran, J.

    1989-01-01

    We present a linear-stability analysis for the kink solutions of a two-component nonlinear scalar model in (1+1) dimensions. The study follows the traditional approaches which directly treat the normal-mode problem

  13. Two component micro injection moulding for moulded interconnect devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Among the available MID process chains, two component (2k) injection moulding with subsequent selective metallization is one of the most industrially adaptive processes. However the use of two component injection moulding for MID fabrication, with circuit patterns in the sub-millimeter range, is ......, is a challenge for industrial MID production. This research work demonstrates the feasibilities and challenges of MID fabrication by 2k moulding for highly precise and technically challenging applications......Among the available MID process chains, two component (2k) injection moulding with subsequent selective metallization is one of the most industrially adaptive processes. However the use of two component injection moulding for MID fabrication, with circuit patterns in the sub-millimeter range...

  14. Manual communication systems: evolution and variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfau, R.; Pfau, R.; Steinbach, M.; Woll, B.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter addresses issues in the evolution and typology of manual communication systems. From a language evolution point of view, sign languages are interesting because it has been suggested that oral language may have evolved from gestural (proto)language. As far as typology is concerned, two

  15. Dynamical evolution of spherical stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamical effect of heavy mass stars formed out of successive mergers among tidally captured binaries of evolution of spherical stellar systems is investigated. To maximize such effect assumed all tidally captured systems become mergers. Stellar evolution is simulated by computing mean age of mass group and applying death rate as function of mean age. For stellar systems with N = 10 5-6 , combined effect of three body binary heating among heavy mass stars and stellar evolution provides energy to drive post collapse expansion; long-term evolution is dominated by stellar evolution. Long-term behavior of clusters is similar to tidally captured binaries assuming no merger. Observed chemical inhomogeneities among stars in globular clusters may also be explained by stellar mergers. Three-body heating is important in small-N systems, while stellar evolution dominates evolution of large N systems. The effect of primordial degenerate stars is investigated in the second study. Very hard binaries composed of degenerate-normal pair form via tidal capture process and moderately hard degenerate-degenerate binaries form via three-body process. If initial degenerate population is large, initial core-collapse phase may be approximated as collapse of degenerate star. Three-body binaries among degenerate stars eventually provide enough energy to stop collapse and cause reexpansion

  16. Two-component micro injection moulding for hearing aid applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Marhöfer, David Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    Two-component (2k) injection moulding is an important process technique at the present state of technology, and it is growing rapidly in the field of precision micro moulding. Besides combining different material properties in the same product, two-component moulding can eliminate many assembly...... parts. An intensive search for suitable 2k materials is made and few combinations of plastic materials are presented in the paper which can be used for highly demanding application areas like hearing aids. By using these material combinations, a demonstrator 2k micro part has been fabricated...

  17. Effective one-component description of two-component Bose-Einstein condensate dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, Zachary; Clark, Charles W.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate dynamics in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in the context of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations and derive results for the evolution of the total density fluctuations. Using these results, we show how, in many cases of interest, the dynamics can be accurately described with an effective one-component Gross-Pitaevskii equation for one of the components, with the trap and interaction coefficients determined by the relative differences in the scattering lengths. We discuss the model in various regimes, where it predicts breathing excitations, and the formation of vector solitons. An effective nonlinear evolution is predicted for some cases of current experimental interest. We then apply the model to construct quasistationary states of two-component condensates

  18. Molecular Mechanism of the Two-Component Suicidal Weapon of Neocapritermes taracua Old Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, Thomas; Šobotník, Jan; Brabcová, Jana; Sillam-Dussès, David; Buček, Aleš; Krasulová, Jana; Vytisková, Blahoslava; Demianová, Zuzana; Mareš, Michael; Roisin, Yves; Vogel, Heiko

    2016-03-01

    In termites, as in many social insects, some individuals specialize in colony defense, developing diverse weaponry. As workers of the termite Neocapritermes taracua (Termitidae: Termitinae) age, their efficiency to perform general tasks decreases, while they accumulate defensive secretions and increase their readiness to fight. This defensive mechanism involves self-sacrifice through body rupture during which an enzyme, stored as blue crystals in dorsal pouches, converts precursors produced by the labial glands into highly toxic compounds. Here, we identify both components of this activated defense system and describe the molecular basis responsible for the toxicity of N. taracua worker autothysis. The blue crystals are formed almost exclusively by a specific protein named BP76. By matching N. taracua transcriptome databases with amino acid sequences, we identified BP76 to be a laccase. Following autothysis, the series of hydroquinone precursors produced by labial glands get mixed with BP76, resulting in the conversion of relatively harmless hydroquinones into toxic benzoquinone analogues. Neocapritermes taracua workers therefore rely on a two-component activated defense system, consisting of two separately stored secretions that can react only after suicidal body rupture, which produces a sticky and toxic cocktail harmful to opponents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. TWO-COMPONENT JETS AND THE FANAROFF-RILEY DICHOTOMY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.; Sauty, C.

    2010-01-01

    Transversely stratified jets are observed in many classes of astrophysical objects, ranging from young stellar objects, mu-quasars, to active galactic nuclei and even in gamma-ray bursts. Theoretical arguments support this transverse stratification of jets with two components induced by intrinsic

  20. Two component injection moulding: Present and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    Two component injection moulding has widespread industrial applications. Still the technology is yet to gain its full potential in highly demanding and technically challenging applications areas. The smart use of this technology can open the doors for cost effective and convergent manufacturing...

  1. Two component permeation through thin zeolite MFI membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, K.; Burggraaf, A.J.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Verweij, H.

    1998-01-01

    Two component permeation measurements have been performed by the Wicke-Kallenbach method on a thin (3 μm) zeolite MFI (Silicalite-1) membrane with molecules of different kinetic diameters, d(k). The membrane was supported by a flat porous α-Al2O3 substrate. The results obtained could be classified

  2. On the partition dimension of two-component graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D O Haryeni

    2017-11-17

    Nov 17, 2017 ... Abstract. In this paper, we continue investigating the partition dimension for disconnected graphs. We determine the partition dimension for some classes of disconnected graphs G consisting of two components. If G = G1 ∪ G2, then we give the bounds of the partition dimension of G for G1 = Pn or G1 = Cn ...

  3. Bacitracin Resistance of Streptococcus mutans Regulated by Two Component System

    OpenAIRE

    北河, 憲雄

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus mutansは、主要なう蝕の原因細菌であり、バシトラシンに耐性を持つことが知られている。本研究では、この耐性メカニズムを解明するため、バシトラシン存在下で顕著に発現誘導される遺伝子をマイクロアレイを用いて探索した。4 倍以上発現誘導されていた8 つの遺伝子のうち、耐性に主に関与していたのは ABC トランスポーターをコードすると推定される 2 つの遺伝子、mbrA、mbrB であった。以前の研究から、mbrABCD 遺伝子群はバシトラシン耐性に関与することが分かっているが mbrABCD 遺伝子群による耐性のメカニズムの詳細は判明していない。アミノ酸配列のホモロジーより mbrCD は 二成分制御系 (TCS) の遺伝子と推測されており、mbrC、mbrD それぞれの欠損株を作製して検討したところ、推測通り、 mbrCD が mbrA の発現を制御していた。また、ゲルシフトアッセイにより MbrC はmbrA の発現調節領域と推定される部位と特異的に結合すること、及びリン酸化部位と予測される 54 番目のアスパラギン酸をアスパラギンに置換した変異 Mb...

  4. A two-component NZRI metamaterial based rectangular cloak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikder Sunbeam Islam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new two-component, near zero refractive index (NZRI metamaterial is presented for electromagnetic rectangular cloaking operation in the microwave range. In the basic design a pi-shaped, metamaterial was developed and its characteristics were investigated for the two major axes (x and z-axis wave propagation through the material. For the z-axis wave propagation, it shows more than 2 GHz bandwidth and for the x-axis wave propagation; it exhibits more than 1 GHz bandwidth of NZRI property. The metamaterial was then utilized in designing a rectangular cloak where a metal cylinder was cloaked perfectly in the C-band area of microwave regime. The experimental result was provided for the metamaterial and the cloak and these results were compared with the simulated results. This is a novel and promising design for its two-component NZRI characteristics and rectangular cloaking operation in the electromagnetic paradigm.

  5. On the partition dimension of two-component graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we continue investigating the partition dimension for disconnected graphs. We determine the partition dimension for some classes of disconnected graphs G consisting of two components. If G = G 1 ∪ G 2 , then we give the bounds of the partition dimension of G for G 1 = P n or G 1 = C n and also for p ...

  6. Two-component gravitational instability in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, A. A.; Sotnikova, N. Y.

    2018-04-01

    We applied a criterion of gravitational instability, valid for two-component and infinitesimally thin discs, to observational data along the major axis for seven spiral galaxies of early types. Unlike most papers, the dispersion equation corresponding to the criterion was solved directly without using any approximation. The velocity dispersion of stars in the radial direction σR was limited by the range of possible values instead of a fixed value. For all galaxies, the outer regions of the disc were analysed up to R ≤ 130 arcsec. The maximal and sub-maximal disc models were used to translate surface brightness into surface density. The largest destabilizing disturbance stars can exert on a gaseous disc was estimated. It was shown that the two-component criterion differs a little from the one-fluid criterion for galaxies with a large surface gas density, but it allows to explain large-scale star formation in those regions where the gaseous disc is stable. In the galaxy NGC 1167 star formation is entirely driven by the self-gravity of the stars. A comparison is made with the conventional approximations which also include the thickness effect and with models for different sound speed cg. It is shown that values of the effective Toomre parameter correspond to the instability criterion of a two-component disc Qeff < 1.5-2.5. This result is consistent with previous theoretical and observational studies.

  7. Evolution of the radiation protection system; L'evolution du systeme de protection radiologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, R.H. [International Commission on Radiological Protection, Stockholm (Sweden); Schieber, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S. [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Brechignac, F. [CEA Cadarache, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection de l' Environnement, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2003-07-01

    The evolution of the system of radiological protection: justification for new ICRP recommendations, thoughts of the SFRP work group about the evolution of the system of radiation protection proposed by the ICRP, protection of environment against ionizing radiations seen by the ICRP are the three parts of this chapter. (N.C.)

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Two Component Alloy Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Salomeh

    Alloying is an old trick used to produce new materials by synergistically combining at least two components. New developments in nanoscience have enabled new degrees of freedom, such as size, solubility and concentration of the alloying element to be utilized in the design of the physical properties of alloy nanoparticles (ANPs). ANPs as multi-functional materials have applications in catalysis, biomedical technologies and electronics. Phase diagrams of ANPs are very little known and may not represent that of bulk picture, furthermore, ANPs with different crystallite orientation and compositions could remain far from equilibrium. Here, we studied the synthesis and stability of Au-Sn and Ag-Ni ANPs with chemical reduction method at room temperature. Due to the large difference in the redox potentials of Au and Sn, co-reduction is not a reproducible method. However, two step successive reductions was found to be more reliable to generate Au-Sn ANPs which consists of forming clusters in the first step (either without capping agent or with weakly coordinated surfactant molecules) and then undergoing a second reduction step in the presence of another metal salt. Our observation also showed that capping agents (Cetrimonium bromide or (CTAB)) and Polyacrylic acid (PAA)) play a key role in the alloying process and shorter length capping agent (PAA) may facilitate the diffusion of individual components and thus enabling better alloying. Different molar ratios of Sn and Au precursors were used to study the effect of alloying elements on the melting point and the crystalline structures and melting points were determined by various microscopy and spectroscopy techniques and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A significant depression (up to150°C) in the melting transition was observed for the Au-Sn ANPs compared to the bulk eutectic point (Tm 280°C) due to the size and shape effect. Au-Sn ANPs offer a unique set of advantages as lead-free solder material which can

  9. The ATLAS Production System Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The second generation of the ATLAS Production System called ProdSys2 is a distributed workload manager that runs daily hundreds of thousands of jobs, from dozens of different ATLAS-specific workflows, across more than a hundred heterogeneous sites. It achieves high utilization by combining dynamic job definition based upon many criteria, such as input and output size, memory requirements and CPU consumption, with manageable scheduling policies and by supporting different kinds of computational resources, such as GRID, clouds, supercomputers and volunteer computers. The system dynamically assigns a group of jobs (task) to a group of geographically distributed computing resources. Dynamic assignment and resource utilization is one of the major features of the system. The Production System has a sophisticated job fault recovery mechanism, which efficiently allows running multi-terabyte tasks without human intervention. We have implemented new features which allow automatic task submission and chaining of differe...

  10. Domain Walls and Textured Vortices in a Two-Component Ginzburg-Landau Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Peder; Gaididei, Yu. B.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2005-01-01

    We look for domain wall and textured vortex solutions in a two-component Ginzburg-Landau model inspired by two-band superconductivity. The two-dimensional two-component model, with equal coherence lengths and no magnetic field, shows some interesting properties. In the absence of a Josephson type...... coupling between the two order parameters a ''textured vortex'' is found by analytical and numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equations. With a Josephson type coupling between the two order parameters we find the system to split up in two domains separated by a domain wall, where the order parameter...

  11. A two-component rain model for the prediction of attenuation statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    A two-component rain model has been developed for calculating attenuation statistics. In contrast to most other attenuation prediction models, the two-component model calculates the occurrence probability for volume cells or debris attenuation events. The model performed significantly better than the International Radio Consultative Committee model when used for predictions on earth-satellite paths. It is expected that the model will have applications in modeling the joint statistics required for space diversity system design, the statistics of interference due to rain scatter at attenuating frequencies, and the duration statistics for attenuation events.

  12. Evolution of Linux operating system network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guanping; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Haoqin

    2017-01-01

    Linux operating system (LOS) is a sophisticated man-made system and one of the most ubiquitous operating systems. However, there is little research on the structure and functionality evolution of LOS from the prospective of networks. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the LOS network. 62 major releases of LOS ranging from versions 1.0 to 4.1 are modeled as directed networks in which functions are denoted by nodes and function calls are denoted by edges. It is found that the size of the LOS network grows almost linearly, while clustering coefficient monotonically decays. The degree distributions are almost the same: the out-degree follows an exponential distribution while both in-degree and undirected degree follow power-law distributions. We further explore the functionality evolution of the LOS network. It is observed that the evolution of functional modules is shown as a sequence of seven events (changes) succeeding each other, including continuing, growth, contraction, birth, splitting, death and merging events. By means of a statistical analysis of these events in the top 4 largest components (i.e., arch, drivers, fs and net), it is shown that continuing, growth and contraction events occupy more than 95% events. Our work exemplifies a better understanding and describing of the dynamics of LOS evolution.

  13. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan); Gabdullin, M. T. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, NNLOT, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  14. Two-component microinjection moulding for MID fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2010-01-01

    Moulded interconnect devices (MIDs) are plastic substrates with electrical infrastructure. The fabrication of MIDs is usually based on injection moulding, and different process chains may be identified from this starting point. The use of MIDs has been driven primarily by the automotive sector......-component injection moulding and subsequent metallisation. This technology promises cost effective and convergent manufacturing approaches for both macro- and microapplications. This paper presents the results of industrial MID production based on two-component injection moulding and discusses the important issues...

  15. Two component micro injection molding for MID fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    Molded Interconnect Devices (MIDs) are plastic substrates with electrical infrastructure. The fabrication of MIDs is usually based on injection molding and different process chains may be identified from this starting point. The use of MIDs has been driven primarily by the automotive sector......, but recently the medical sector seems more and more interested. In particular the possibility of miniaturization of 3D components with electrical infrastructure is attractive. The paper describes possible manufacturing routes and challenges of miniaturized MIDs based on two component micro injection molding...

  16. Scalar perturbations in regular two-component bouncing cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bozza, V

    2005-01-01

    We consider a two-component regular cosmology bouncing from contraction to expansion, where, in order to include both scalar fields and perfect fluids as particular cases, the dominant component is allowed to have an intrinsic isocurvature mode. We show that the spectrum of the growing mode of the Bardeen potential in the pre-bounce is never transferred to the dominant mode of the post-bounce. The latter acquires at most a dominant isocurvature component, depending on the relative properties of the two fluids. Our results imply that several claims in the literature need substantial revision.

  17. Nonthermal effects in two component DT fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, T.A.; Chu, T.C.

    1975-01-01

    Net energy generation rates and f-factors are calculated for a variety of two component DT reactor configurations using a computer code that follows the energy distributions of the reactants and products explicitly, utilizing the Fokker--Planck approximation for low-angle Coulomb scattering and a transfer matrix for high-angle Coulomb, nuclear, and radiative processes. The relative importance of such non-thermal effects as alpha particle deposition, non-Maxwellian energy distributions for the target tritons and electrons, and the influence of high-angle Coulomb and nuclear scattering on the energy loss rate of the injected deuterons is explicitly assessed

  18. Light Responsive Two-Component Supramolecular Hydrogel: A Sensitive Platform for Humidity Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Samai, Suman

    2016-02-15

    The supramolecular assembly of anionic azobenzene dicarboxylate and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) formed a stimuli responsive hydrogel with a critical gelation concentration (CGC) of 0.33 wt%. This self-sustainable two-component system was able to repair damage upon light irradiation. Moreover, it was successfully employed in the fabrication of highly sensitive humidity sensors for the first time.

  19. The chemistry of two-component fluoride crystalline optical media for heavy, fast, radiation hard scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, B.P.; Krivandina, E.A.; Fedorov, P.P.; Vasilchenko, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    Prospects for preparation of two-component dense optical materials for scintillators are shown, using data on phase diagrams of about 300 MF m - RF n (m, n ≤ 4) type systems, formed by metal fluorides. Primary characteristics (decay time and light output of luminescence, radiation hardness, etc.) of some multicomponent crystals are reported

  20. Comparing numerical and analytical approaches to strongly interacting two-component mixtures in one dimensional traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellotti, Filipe Furlan; Salami Dehkharghani, Amin; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We investigate one-dimensional harmonically trapped two-component systems for repulsive interaction strengths ranging from the non-interacting to the strongly interacting regime for Fermi-Fermi mixtures. A new and powerful mapping between the interaction strength parameters from a continuous...

  1. Evolution of genetic systems in filamentous ascomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    A great variety of genetic systems exist in filamentous ascomycetes. The transmission of genetic material does not only occur by (sexual or asexual) reproduction, but it can also follow vegetative fusion of different strains. In this thesis the evolution of this variability is studied,

  2. Evolution of toxicology information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassom, J.S.; Lu, P.Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Society today is faced with new health risk situations that have been brought about by recent scientific and technical advances. Federal and state governments are required to assess the many potential health risks to exposed populations from the products (chemicals) and by-products (pollutants) of these advances. Because a sound analysis of any potential health risk should be based on the use of relevant information, it behooves those individuals responsible for making the risk assessments to know where to obtain needed information. This paper reviews the origins of toxicology information systems and explores the specialized information center concept that was proposed in 1963 as a means of providing ready access to scientific and technical information. As a means of illustrating this concept, the operation of one specialized information center (the Environmental Mutagen Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will be discussed. Insights into how toxicological information resources came into being, their design and makeup, will be of value to those seeking to acquire information for risk assessment purposes. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. Bond strength of two component injection moulded MID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2006-01-01

    Most products of the future will require industrially adapted, cost effective production processes and on this issue two-component (2K) injection moulding is a potential candidate for MID manufacturing. MID based on 2k injection moulded plastic part with selectively metallised circuit tracks allows...... the two different plastic materials in the MID structure require good bonding between them. This paper finds suitable combinations of materials for MIDs from both bond strength and metallisation view-point. Plastic parts were made by two-shot injection moulding and the effects of some important process...... the integration of electrical and mechanical functionalities in a real 3D structure. If 2k injection moulding is applied with two polymers, of which one is plateable and the other is not, it will be possible to make 3D electrical structures directly on the component. To be applicable in the real engineering field...

  4. Partial delocalization of two-component condensates in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, H A; Brazhnyi, V A; Konotop, V V

    2008-01-01

    We study management of localized modes in two-component (spinor) Bose-Einstein condensates embedded in optical lattices by means of changing interspecies interactions. By numerical integration of the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations, we find three different regimes of the delocalizing transition: (i) the partial delocalization when the chemical potential of one of the components collapses with a gap edge and the respective component transforms into a Bloch state, while the other component remains localized; (ii) the partial delocalization as a consequence of instability of one of the components; and (iii) the situation where a vector soliton reaches the limits of the existence domain. It is shown that there exists a critical value for the interspecies scattering length, below which solutions can be manipulated and above which one of the components is irreversibly destroyed

  5. Macroscopic structural coherence in two-component superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Yam, Y.

    1991-01-01

    In two-component theory pairing arises from localized negative-U states and mobility arises from extended single particle states. A small hybridization of localized and extended states enables mobility and pairing to provide a high Tc. RPA analysis of the ''normal'' state implies uncondensed charged pairs carry current, while long lived single particle excitations are neutral electron-hole hybrids. At Tc pairs condense and single particle states undergo Cooper pairing. In the superconducting state pair-pair excitations exist in the BCS-like fermionic gap. Signatures of this theory range from distintive Tc, Δ, H c , ξ, conductance anomalies in sound and bulk modulii at Tc, linear temperature dependence of normal state resistivity, 2e charge carriers in the normal state, linear voltage dependence in normal-state-tunneling conductance, and finite zero-bias conductance in superconducting state tunneling. Quantitative comparisons with superconducting properties of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 were presented. A distinctive signature is the prediction of dynamical structural correlations which are local above Tc and macroscopic below Tc. Experiments provide direct evidence for such dynamical correlations: neutron diffraction ''thermal ovals'', channeling experiment cross section changes as a function of temperature near Tc, pair-distribution-function neutron diffraction including inelastic and elastic scattering showing direct evidence for dynamic correlations which change at Tc, and EXAFS showing a large dynamical displacement of oxygen atoms tunneling between sites separated by 0.13A. In two-component theory strong lattice coupling is consistent with low isotope shifts since tunneling occurs by a virtual Franck-Condon transition. Predictions for the dynamical structure factor are presented. (orig.)

  6. Vortices of a rotating two-component dipolar Bose–Einstein condensate in an optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Xue [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710600 (China); Dong, Biao; Chen, Guang-Ping [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710600 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Han, Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710600 (China); Shi, Yu-Ren, E-mail: shiyr@nwnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Zhang, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xfzhang@ntsc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710600 (China)

    2016-01-28

    We consider a two-component Bose–Einstein condensate, which consists of both dipolar and scalar bosonic atoms, in a confinement that is composed of a harmonic oscillator and an underlying optical lattice set rotation. When the dipoles are polarized along the symmetry axis of the harmonic potential, the ground-state density distributions of such a system are investigated as a function of the relative strength between the dipolar and contact interactions, and of the rotation frequency. Our results show that the number of vortices and its related vortex structures of such a system depend strongly on such system parameters. The special two-component system considered here opens up alternate ways for exploring the rich physics of dipolar quantum gases. - Highlights: • Only one component possesses dipole moment. • Spin-dependent optical lattices support exotic vortex structures. • Both the dipole–dipole interaction and rotation frequency are discussed in detail.

  7. Density profiles and collective excitations of a trapped two-component Fermi vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoruso, M.; Meccoli, I.; Minguzzi, A.; Tosi, M.P.

    1999-08-01

    We discuss the ground state and the small-amplitude excitations of a degenerate vapour of fermionic atoms placed in two hyperfine states inside a spherical harmonic trap. An equations-of-motion approach is set up to discuss the hydrodynamic dissipation processes from the interactions between the two components of the fluid beyond mean-field theory and to emphasize analogies with spin dynamics and spin diffusion in a homogeneous Fermi liquid. The conditions for the establishment of a collisional regime via scattering against cold-atom impurities are analyzed. The equilibrium density profiles are then calculated for a two-component vapour of 40 K atoms: they are little modified by the interactions for presently relevant values of the system parameters, but spatial separation of the two components will spontaneously arise as the number of atoms in the trap is increased. The eigenmodes of collective oscillation in both the total particle number density and the concentration density are evaluated analytically in the special case of a symmetric two-component vapour in the collisional regime. The dispersion relation of the surface modes for the total particle density reduces in this case to that of a one-component Fermi vapour, whereas the frequencies of all other modes are shifted by the interactions. (author)

  8. Tidal instability in exoplanetary systems evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Gal P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new element is proposed to play a role in the evolution of extrasolar planetary systems: the tidal (or elliptical instability. It comes from a parametric resonance and takes place in any rotating fluid whose streamlines are (even slightly elliptically deformed. Based on theoretical, experimental and numerical works, we estimate the growth rate of the instability for hot-jupiter systems, when the rotation period of the star is known. We present the physical process, its application to stars, and preliminary results obtained on a few dozen systems, summarized in the form of a stability diagram. Most of the systems are trapped in the so-called "forbidden zone", where the instability cannot grow. In some systems, the tidal instability is able to grow, at short timescales compared to the system evolution. Implications are discussed in the framework of misaligned transiting systems, as the rotational axis of the star would be unstable in systems where this elliptical instability grows.

  9. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnov, Konstantin A; Yungelson, Lev R

    2014-01-01

    We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  10. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A. Postnov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  11. Evolution of tsunami warning systems and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Eddie; Titov, Vasily

    2015-10-28

    Each year, about 60 000 people and $4 billion (US$) in assets are exposed to the global tsunami hazard. Accurate and reliable tsunami warning systems have been shown to provide a significant defence for this flooding hazard. However, the evolution of warning systems has been influenced by two processes: deadly tsunamis and available technology. In this paper, we explore the evolution of science and technology used in tsunami warning systems, the evolution of their products using warning technologies, and offer suggestions for a new generation of warning products, aimed at the flooding nature of the hazard, to reduce future tsunami impacts on society. We conclude that coastal communities would be well served by receiving three standardized, accurate, real-time tsunami warning products, namely (i) tsunami energy estimate, (ii) flooding maps and (iii) tsunami-induced harbour current maps to minimize the impact of tsunamis. Such information would arm communities with vital flooding guidance for evacuations and port operations. The advantage of global standardized flooding products delivered in a common format is efficiency and accuracy, which leads to effectiveness in promoting tsunami resilience at the community level. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. Evolution of tsunami warning systems and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Eddie; Titov, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Each year, about 60 000 people and $4 billion (US$) in assets are exposed to the global tsunami hazard. Accurate and reliable tsunami warning systems have been shown to provide a significant defence for this flooding hazard. However, the evolution of warning systems has been influenced by two processes: deadly tsunamis and available technology. In this paper, we explore the evolution of science and technology used in tsunami warning systems, the evolution of their products using warning technologies, and offer suggestions for a new generation of warning products, aimed at the flooding nature of the hazard, to reduce future tsunami impacts on society. We conclude that coastal communities would be well served by receiving three standardized, accurate, real-time tsunami warning products, namely (i) tsunami energy estimate, (ii) flooding maps and (iii) tsunami-induced harbour current maps to minimize the impact of tsunamis. Such information would arm communities with vital flooding guidance for evacuations and port operations. The advantage of global standardized flooding products delivered in a common format is efficiency and accuracy, which leads to effectiveness in promoting tsunami resilience at the community level. PMID:26392620

  13. A minimal model for two-component dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, Sonja; Klasen, Michael; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    We propose and study a new minimal model for two-component dark matter. The model contains only three additional fields, one fermion and two scalars, all singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Two of these fields, one fermion and one scalar, are odd under a Z 2 symmetry that renders them simultaneously stable. Thus, both particles contribute to the observed dark matter density. This model resembles the union of the singlet scalar and the singlet fermionic models but it contains some new features of its own. We analyze in some detail its dark matter phenomenology. Regarding the relic density, the main novelty is the possible annihilation of one dark matter particle into the other, which can affect the predicted relic density in a significant way. Regarding dark matter detection, we identify a new contribution that can lead either to an enhancement or to a suppression of the spin-independent cross section for the scalar dark matter particle. Finally, we define a set of five benchmarks models compatible with all present bounds and examine their direct detection prospects at planned experiments. A generic feature of this model is that both particles give rise to observable signals in 1-ton direct detection experiments. In fact, such experiments will be able to probe even a subdominant dark matter component at the percent level.

  14. Light-front QCD. II. Two-component theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Harindranath, A.

    1993-01-01

    The light-front gauge A a + =0 is known to be a convenient gauge in practical QCD calculations for short-distance behavior, but there are persistent concerns about its use because of its ''singular'' nature. The study of nonperturbative field theory quantizing on a light-front plane for hadronic bound states requires one to gain a priori systematic control of such gauge singularities. In the second paper of this series we study the two-component old-fashioned perturbation theory and various severe infrared divergences occurring in old-fashioned light-front Hamiltonian calculations for QCD. We also analyze the ultraviolet divergences associated with a large transverse momentum and examine three currently used regulators: an explicit transverse cutoff, transverse dimensional regularization, and a global cutoff. We discuss possible difficulties caused by the light-front gauge singularity in the applications of light-front QCD to both old-fashioned perturbative calculations for short-distance physics and upcoming nonperturbative investigations for hadronic bound states

  15. Analyzing endocrine system conservation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonett, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing variation in rates of evolution can provide important insights into the factors that constrain trait evolution, as well as those that promote diversification. Metazoan endocrine systems exhibit apparent variation in evolutionary rates of their constituent components at multiple levels, yet relatively few studies have quantified these patterns and analyzed them in a phylogenetic context. This may be in part due to historical and current data limitations for many endocrine components and taxonomic groups. However, recent technological advancements such as high-throughput sequencing provide the opportunity to collect large-scale comparative data sets for even non-model species. Such ventures will produce a fertile data landscape for evolutionary analyses of nucleic acid and amino acid based endocrine components. Here I summarize evolutionary rate analyses that can be applied to categorical and continuous endocrine traits, and also those for nucleic acid and protein-based components. I emphasize analyses that could be used to test whether other variables (e.g., ecology, ontogenetic timing of expression, etc.) are related to patterns of rate variation and endocrine component diversification. The application of phylogenetic-based rate analyses to comparative endocrine data will greatly enhance our understanding of the factors that have shaped endocrine system evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Weak separation limit of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Sourdis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies of the behaviour of the wave functions of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate in the case of weak segregation. This amounts to the study of the asymptotic behaviour of a heteroclinic connection in a conservative Hamiltonian system of two coupled second order ODE's, as the strength of the coupling tends to its infimum. For this purpose, we apply geometric singular perturbation theory.

  17. Dynamic system evolution and markov chain approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick V. Nicholas Melnik

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper computational aspects of the mathematical modelling of dynamic system evolution have been considered as a problem in information theory. The construction of mathematical models is treated as a decision making process with limited available information.The solution of the problem is associated with a computational model based on heuristics of a Markov Chain in a discrete space–time of events. A stable approximation of the chain has been derived and the limiting cases are discussed. An intrinsic interconnection of constructive, sequential, and evolutionary approaches in related optimization problems provides new challenges for future work.

  18. Controversies regarding evolution of Tax Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Gabriela DUȚĂ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Originally designed purely to meet the state's financial targets, which were subsequently added as a result of the evolution of human society, a series of economic and social objectives, the tax system is the result of thought, decision and action of the human factor, “expression of the political will of a organized human community, set in a particular territory and having sufficient autonomy to be able, through the bodies they represent, to equip itself with a whole series of legal rules and, in particular tax” .

  19. Phase separation and dynamics of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kean Loon; Jørgensen, Nils Byg; Liu, I-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The miscibility of two interacting quantum systems is an important testing ground for the understanding of complex quantum systems. Two-component Bose-Einstein condensates enable the investigation of this scenario in a particularly well controlled setting. In a homogeneous system, the transition...... critically on atom numbers. We demonstrate how monitoring of damping rates and frequencies of dipole oscillations enables the experimental mapping of the phase diagram by numerical implementation of a fully self-consistent finite-temperature kinetic theory for binary condensates. The change in damping rate...

  20. Rotation and toroidal magnetic field effects on the stability of two-component jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millas, Dimitrios; Keppens, Rony; Meliani, Zakaria

    2017-09-01

    Several observations of astrophysical jets show evidence of a structure in the direction perpendicular to the jet axis, leading to the development of 'spine and sheath' models of jets. Most studies focus on a two-component jet consisting of a highly relativistic inner jet and a slower - but still relativistic - outer jet surrounded by an unmagnetized environment. These jets are believed to be susceptible to a relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability, depending on the effective inertia ratio of the two components. We extend previous studies by taking into account the presence of a non-zero toroidal magnetic field. Different values of magnetization are examined to detect possible differences in the evolution and stability of the jet. We find that the toroidal field, above a certain level of magnetization σ, roughly equal to 0.01, can stabilize the jet against the previously mentioned instabilities and that there is a clear trend in the behaviour of the average Lorentz factor and the effective radius of the jet when we continuously increase the magnetization. The simulations are performed using the relativistic MHD module from the open source, parallel, grid adaptive, mpi-amrvac code.

  1. Brand Equity Evolution: a System Dynamics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Crescitelli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in brand management lies in monitoring brand equity over time. This paper aimsto present a simulation model able to represent this evolution. The model was drawn on brand equity concepts developed by Aaker and Joachimsthaler (2000, using the system dynamics methodology. The use ofcomputational dynamic models aims to create new sources of information able to sensitize academics and managers alike to the dynamic implications of their brand management. As a result, an easily implementable model was generated, capable of executing continuous scenario simulations by surveying casual relations among the variables that explain brand equity. Moreover, the existence of a number of system modeling tools will allow extensive application of the concepts used in this study in practical situations, both in professional and educational settings

  2. The two-component physics in cuprates in the real space and in the momentum representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, L. P.; Teitel'Baum, G. B.

    2008-03-01

    Gradual evolution of two phase coexistence between dynamical and static regimes in cuprates is first investigated in the real space by making use of available neutron scattering, NMR and μSR data. Analyses of the Hall effect and the ARPES spectra reveals the presence of two groups of charge carriers in LSCO. The T-dependent component is due to the thermal activation of bound electron-hole structures seen near antinodal points in the Brillouin zone, thus introducing the two component physics also for the momentum representation. Interpretation of so-called 'van Hove bands' undergoes drastic changes. Importance of the findings for pseudo-gap physics is stressed. Relation to some recent STM and STS results is discussed.

  3. The two-component physics in cuprates in the real space and in the momentum representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gor' kov, L P [NHMFL, Florida State University, 1800 E P. Dirac Dr., Tallahassee FL 32310 (United States); Teitel' baum, G B [E.K.Zavoiskii Institute for Technical Physics of the RAS, Sibirskii Trakt 10/7, Kazan 420029 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: gorkov@magnet.fsu.edu, E-mail: grteit@yahoo.com

    2008-03-15

    Gradual evolution of two phase coexistence between dynamical and static regimes in cuprates is first investigated in the real space by making use of available neutron scattering, NMR and {mu}SR data. Analyses of the Hall effect and the ARPES spectra reveals the presence of two groups of charge carriers in LSCO. The T-dependent component is due to the thermal activation of bound electron-hole structures seen near antinodal points in the Brillouin zone, thus introducing the two component physics also for the momentum representation. Interpretation of so-called 'van Hove bands' undergoes drastic changes. Importance of the findings for pseudo-gap physics is stressed. Relation to some recent STM and STS results is discussed.

  4. Mapping the Two-Component Atomic Fermi Gas to the Nuclear Shell-Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, C.; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2014-01-01

    of the external potential becomes important. A system of two-species fermionic cold atoms with an attractive zero-range interaction is analogous to a simple model of nucleus in which neutrons and protons interact only through a residual pairing interaction. In this article, we discuss how the problem of a two......-component atomic fermi gas in a tight external trap can be mapped to the nuclear shell model so that readily available many-body techniques in nuclear physics, such as the Shell Model Monte Carlo (SMMC) method, can be directly applied to the study of these systems. We demonstrate an application of the SMMC method...

  5. Cosmology in one dimension: A two-component model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Yui; Miller, Bruce N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Constructed the first one-dimensional toy universe model with both conservative (dark) matter and dissipative (luminous) matter. • Simulated bottom-up structure formation with rich multifractal structures, a robust feature of 1-D models. • Demonstrated that mass-oriented multifractal analyses can be employed to investigate the evolution of a hierarchical clustering process. • Found a significant difference in the generalized fractal dimensions for each type of matter demonstrating distribution bias within clusters. - Abstract: We investigate structure formation in a one dimensional model of a matter-dominated universe using a quasi-Newtonian formulation. In addition to dissipation-free dark matter, dissipative luminous matter is introduced to examine the potential bias in the distributions. We use multifractal analysis techniques to identify scale-dependent structures, including clusters and voids. Both dark matter and luminous matter exhibit multifractal geometry over a finite range as the universe evolves in time. We present the results for the generalized dimensions computed on various scales for each matter distribution which clearly supports the bottom-up structure formation scenario. We compare and contrast the multifractal dimensions of two types of matter for the first time and show how dynamical considerations cause them to differ.

  6. Precambrian evolution of the climate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J C

    1990-01-01

    Climate is an important environmental parameter of the early Earth, likely to have affected the origin and evolution of life, the composition and mineralogy of sedimentary rocks, and stable isotope ratios in sedimentary minerals. There is little observational evidence constraining Precambrian climates. Most of our knowledge is at present theoretical. Factors that must have affected the climate include reduced solar luminosity, enhanced rotation rate of the Earth, an area of land that probably increased with time, and biological evolution, particularly as it affected the composition of the atmosphere and the greenhouse effect. Cloud cover is a major uncertainty about the early Earth. Carbon dioxide and its greenhouse effect are the factors that have been most extensively studied. This paper presents a new examination of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon as they may have changed between an Archean Earth deficient in land, sedimentary rocks, and biological activity, and a Proterozoic Earth much like the modern Earth, but lacking terrestrial life and carbonate-secreting plankton. Results of a numerical simulation of this transition show how increasing biological activity could have drawn down atmospheric carbon dioxide by extracting sedimentary organic carbon from the system. Increasing area of continents could further have drawn down carbon dioxide by encouraging the accumulation of carbonate sediments. An attempt to develop a numerical simulation of the carbon cycles of the Precambrian raises questions about sources and sinks of marine carbon and alkalinity on a world without continents. More information is needed about sea-floor weathering processes.

  7. Time evolution of a small reactive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Badiali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the irreversible evolution of a small system in which a chemical reaction takes place. We have two main goals: the first requires to find an equation to produce a time-irreversible behavior,the second consists in introducing a simple exactly solvable model in order to understand basic facts in chemical kinetics. Our basic tool is the transition function counting the number of paths joining two points in the reactive coordinates system. An exact quantum Smoluchowski equation is derived for the reactive system in vacuum, in presence of a solvent in equilibrium at any time with the reactive system a new Smoluchowski equation is obtained. The transition from a quantum regime to a classical one is discussed. The case of a reactive system not in equilibrium with its neighborhood is investigated in terms of path integral and via a partial differential function. Memory effects and closure assumptions are discussed. Using a simple potential model the chemical rate constant is calculated exactly and questions such as the meaning of the activation energy or the physical content of the so-called prefactor are investigated.

  8. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-02-15

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers - features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine - consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems evolved

  9. Method of estimating changes in vapor concentrations continuously generated from two-component organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hajime; Ishidao, Toru; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo

    2010-12-01

    We measured vapor concentrations continuously evaporated from two-component organic solvents in a reservoir and proposed a method to estimate and predict the evaporation rate or generated vapor concentrations. Two kinds of organic solvents were put into a small reservoir made of glass (3 cm in diameter and 3 cm high) that was installed in a cylindrical glass vessel (10 cm in diameter and 15 cm high). Air was introduced into the glass vessel at a flow rate of 150 ml/min, and the generated vapor concentrations were intermittently monitored for up to 5 hours with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. The solvent systems tested in this study were the methanoltoluene system and the ethyl acetate-toluene system. The vapor concentrations of the more volatile component, that is, methanol in the methanol-toluene system and ethyl acetate in the ethyl acetate-toluene system, were high at first, and then decreased with time. On the other hand, the concentrations of the less volatile component were low at first, and then increased with time. A model for estimating multicomponent organic vapor concentrations was developed, based on a theory of vapor-liquid equilibria and a theory of the mass transfer rate, and estimated values were compared with experimental ones. The estimated vapor concentrations were in relatively good agreement with the experimental ones. The results suggest that changes in concentrations of two-component organic vapors continuously evaporating from a liquid reservoir can be estimated by the proposed model.

  10. Effect of intersubsystem couplings on the evolution of composite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, X.X.; Cui, H.T.; Lin, Y.H.; Song, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of intersubsystem coupling on the adiabaticity of composite systems and that of its subsystems is investigated. Similar to the adiabatic evolution defined for pure states, nontransitional evolution for mixed states is introduced; conditions for the nontransitional evolution are derived and discussed. An example that describes two coupled qubits is presented to detail the general presentation. The effects due to nonadiabatic evolution on the geometric phase are also presented and discussed

  11. Open system evolution and 'memory dressing'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knezevic, Irena; Ferry, David K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to recent advances in quantum information, as well as in mesoscopic and nanoscale physics, the interest in the theory of open systems and decoherence has significantly increased. In this paper, we present an interesting approach to solving a time-convolutionless equation of motion for the open system reduced density matrix beyond the limit of weak coupling with the environment. Our approach is based on identifying an effective, memory-containing interaction in the equations of motion for the representation submatrices of the evolution operator (these submatices are written in a special basis, adapted for the 'partial-trace-free' approach, in the system+environment Liouville space). We then identify the 'memory dressing', a quantity crucial for solving the equation of motion for the reduced density matrix, which separates the effective from the real physical interaction. The memory dressing obeys a self-contained nonlinear equation of motion, which we solve exactly. The solution can be represented in a diagrammatic fashion after introducing an 'information exchange propagator', a quantity that describes the transfer of information to and from the system, so the cumulative effect of the information exchange results in the memory dressing. In the case of weak system-environment coupling, we present the expansion of the reduced density matrix in terms of the physical interaction up to the third order. However, our approach is capable of going beyond the weak-coupling limit, and we show how short-time behavior of an open system can be analyzed for arbitrary coupling strength. We illustrate the approach with a simple numerical example of single-particle level broadening for a two-particle interacting system on short time scales. Furthermore, we point out a way to identify the structure of decoherence-free subspaces using the present approach

  12. Rational Design of Inhibitors of VirA-VirG Two-Component Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresh, Justin; Zhang, Jin; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Goodman, Nora A; Lynn, David G

    2010-01-01

    VirA-VirG two-component system regulates the vir (virulence) operon in response specific host factors (xenognosins) in the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens. Using whole cell assays, stable inhibitors inspired by the labile natural benzoxazinone inhibitor HDMBOA are developed. It is found that aromatic aldehydes represent a minimal structural unit for activity. In particular, 3-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxy-3H-isobenzofuran-1-one (HDI) was found to have the highest activity, making it the most potent developed inhibitor of virulence gene expression in Agrobacterium. PMID:17470391

  13. Evolution of the system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    One of the main challenges facing radiological protection experts is how to integrate radiological protection within modern concepts of and approaches to risk governance. It is within this context that the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) decided to develop new general recommendations to replace its Publication 60 recommendations of 1990. In the process of developing these new recommendations, the views of the ICRP have evolved significantly, largely due to stakeholder involvement that has been actively solicited by the ICRP. In this regard, it was upheld during the First Asian Regional Conference organised by the NEA in October 2002 that the implementation of the new system must allow for regional, societal and cultural differences. In order to ensure appropriate consideration of these differences, the NEA organised the Second Asian Regional Conference on the Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection. Held in Tokyo on 28-29 July 2004, the conference included presentations by the ICRP Chair as well as by radiological experts from Australia, China, Japan and Korea. Within their specific cultural and socio-political milieu, Asia-Pacific and western ways of thought on how to improve the current system of radiological protection were presented and discussed. These ways of thinking, along with a summary of the conference results, are described in these proceedings. (author)

  14. Intelligent system to study demographic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. de Fatima; Ramos, Carlos; Henriques, Pedro R.

    1999-02-01

    With three centuries of existence, the study of population's behavior implies the manipulation of large amounts of incomplete and imprecise data with high dimensionality. By virtue of its multidisciplinary character, the work in demography involves at least historicists, statisticians and computer scientists/programmers. Moreover, successful demographic analysis requires qualified experts, who have succeeded in analysing data through many views and relate different sources of information, including their personal knowledge of the epoch or regions under study. In this paper, we present an intelligent system to study demographic evolution (ISSDE). This system has a module based on on-line analytical processing (OLAP), which permits conducting multiple analysis, combining many data dimensions. It has a deductive database system, which allows the execution of elaborated queries through the database. It has another module for date treatment (generalization and/or reduction); and, at last, a data mining module to discover nontrivial relations hidden within data. We discover the data treatment procedure with two phases: data generalization and data reduction. In data generalization, utilizing knowledge about concept hierarchies and relevance of data, aggregation of attribute values is performed. In the data reduction phase, rough set theory is applied to compute the minimal attribute set. We highlight the advantages of combining attribute value generalization with rough set theory, to find a subset of attributes that lets the mining process discover more useful patterns, by providing results from the application of the C5.0 algorithm in a demographic relational database.

  15. Enterprise Framework for the Disciplined Evolution of Legacy Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bergey, John

    1997-01-01

    .... This report describes an enterprise framework that characterizes the global environment in which system evolution takes place and provides insight into the activities, processes, and work products...

  16. The unstable modes of a two-component electron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, P.; McClements, K. G.

    1988-12-01

    The linear generation of electrostatic waves in a homogeneous, collisionless, unmagnetized plasma with two Maxwellian electron components, one drifting with respect to the other, is investigated. It is shown that such a system may be unstable to a beam mode rather than the well-known Langmuir mode if the drifting electron component is sufficiently dense and has a sufficiently low temperature. The dispersion characteristics of this 'electron-beam instability' and the Langmuir instability at the critical drift velocity for wave growth are determined for a wide range of parameters. The results are applied to electron beams producing hard X-ray emission in solar flares, and it is argued that such beams may be unstable to the generation of electrostatic waves at frequencies below the electron plasma frequency.

  17. Mapping the Two-component Regulatory Networks in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric; Dehal, Paramvir; Joachimiak, Marcin; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    D. vulgaris Hildenborough has 72 response regulators. The Desulfovibrio are sulfate reducing bacteria that are important in the sulfur and carbon cycles in anoxic habitats. Its large number of two componenent systems are probably critical to its ability to sense and respond to its environment. Our goal is to map these RRs to the genes they regulate using a DNA-affinity-purification-chip (DAP-chip) protocol. First target determined usuing EMSA. A positive target was determined for as many RRs as possible using EMSA. Targets were selected based on gene proximity, regulon predictions and/or predicted sigma54 dependent promoters. qPCR was used to ensure that the target was enriched from sheared genomic DNA before proceeding to the DAP-chip.

  18. Binding between two-component bosons in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempfli, Emmerich; Zoellner, Sascha; Schmelcher, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the ground state of one-dimensional few-atom Bose-Bose mixtures under harmonic confinement throughout the crossover from weak to strong inter-species attraction. The calculations are based on the numerically exact multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method. For repulsive components, we detail the condition for the formation of a molecular Tonks-Girardeau gas in the regime of intermediate inter-species interactions, and the formation of a molecular condensate for stronger coupling. Beyond a critical inter-species attraction, the system collapses to an overall bound state. Different pathways emerge for unequal particle numbers and intra-species interactions. In particular, for mixtures with one attractive component, this species can be viewed as an effective potential dimple in the trap center for the other, repulsive component.

  19. The Evolution of the DARWIN System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joan D.; Filman, Robert E.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    DARWIN is a web-based system for presenting the results of wind-tunnel testing and computational model analyses to aerospace designers. DARWIN captures the data, maintains the information, and manages derived knowledge (e.g. visualizations, etc.) of large quantities of aerospace data. In addition, it provides tools and an environment for distributed collaborative engineering. We are currently constructing the third version of the DARWIN software system. DARWN's development history has, in some sense, tracked the development of web applications. The 1995 DARWIN reflected the latest web technologies--CGI scripts, Java applets and a three-layer architecture--available at that time. The 1997 version of DARWIN expanded on this base, making extensive use of a plethora of web technologies, including Java/JavaScript and Dynamic HTML. While more powerful, this multiplicity has proven to be a maintenance and development headache. The year 2000 version of DARWIN will provide a more stable and uniform foundation environment, composed primarily of Java mechanisms. In this paper, we discuss this evolution, comparing the strengths and weaknesses of the various architectural approaches and describing the lessons learned about building complex web applications.

  20. Evolution of the system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The development of new radiological protection recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) continues to be a strategically important undertaking, both nationally and internationally. With the growing recognition of the importance of stakeholder aspects in radiological protection decision making, regional and cultural aspects have also emerged as having potentially significant influence on how protection of the public, workers and the environment are viewed. Differing cultural aspects should therefore be considered by the ICRP in its development of new recommendations. Based on this assumption, the NEA organised the Asian Regional Conference on the Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection to express and explore views from the Far East. Held in Tokyo on 24-25 October 2002, the conference included presentations by the ICRP Chair as well as by radiological protection experts from Japan, the Republic of Korea, China and Australia. The distinct views and needs of these countries were discussed in the context of their regional and cultural heritages. These views, along with a summary of the conference results, are presented in these proceedings. (author)

  1. Characterization of a two-component thermoluminescent albedo dosemeter according to ISO 21909

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, M.M., E-mail: marcelo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende s/n, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mauricio, C.L.P., E-mail: claudia@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende s/n, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, W.W., E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende s/n, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, A.X. da, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia, COPPE/PEN Caixa Postal 68509, CEP 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    A two-component thermoluminescent albedo neutron monitoring system was developed at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Brazil. As there is no Brazilian regulation for neutron individual monitoring service, the system was tested according to the ISO 21909 standard. This standard provides performance and test requirements for determining the acceptability of personal neutron dosemeters to be used for the measurement of personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(10), in neutron fields with energies ranging from thermal to 20 MeV. Up to 40 dosemeters were used in order to accomplish satisfactorily the requirements of some tests. Despite operational difficulties, this albedo system passed all ISO 21909 performance requirements. The results and problems throughout this characterization are discussed in this paper.

  2. Radiology system evolution in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauert, R C

    2001-01-01

    For many decades the practice of radiology grew slowly in America and was largely a secondary function under the control of hospitals. In more recent times it has vastly expanded its array of diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic abilities. There is increasing consumer logic for direct access. Motivations have grown to create large independent entities with broadly diverse capabilities in order to succeed in the new millennium. Most regional markets are evolving rapidly in terms of managed care penetration, health system formation, physician practice consolidation and aggressive purchaser behavior by employers and consumers. To understand the enormity of healthcare evolution, it is useful to look at the industry's paradigm shifts in recent decades. Virtually every aspect of organizational infrastructure, delivery approaches, and the business environment has evolved markedly during the past fifty years. These changes will accelerate. To succeed financially, radiology groups must strengthen their market positions, technical capabilities, continuums of care and geographic dominance. Equally important is the wisdom of diversifying incomes into related services and businesses that provide additional related revenues. Key factors for successful development include facility market growth, full coverage of managed care contracts, high efficiency and aggressive diversification. A fully evolved system generates significant revenues and profitability by protecting and strengthening its financial position in this environment. That is accomplished through the development of strategically located radiology groups, aggressive alliances with medical practices in allied disciplines, and managed radiology departments and facilities for partner health systems. Organizational success ultimately depends on the ability to accept capitated payments under risk-bearing arrangements. The strategic business plan should be organized with the appropriate levels of detail needed to

  3. The two-component virial theorem and the acceleration-discrepancy relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Christine C.; Ribeiro, André L. B.; Capelato, Hugo V.

    2018-02-01

    We revisit the `two-component virial theorem' (2VT) in the light of recent theoretical and observational results related to the `dark matter problem'. This modification of the virial theorem offers a physically meaningful framework to investigate possible dynamical couplings between the baryonic and dark matter components of extragalactic systems. In particular, we examine the predictions of the 2VT with respect to the `acceleration-discrepancy relation' (ADR). Considering the combined data (composed of systems supported by rotation and by velocity dispersion), we find the following: (i) The overall behaviour of the 2VT is consistent with the ADR. (ii) The 2VT predicts a nearly constant behaviour in the lower acceleration regime, as suggested in recent data on dwarf spheroidals. We also briefly comment on possible differentiations between the 2VT and some modified gravity theories.

  4. Two-component hybrid time-dependent density functional theory within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühn, Michael [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstraße 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weigend, Florian, E-mail: florian.weigend@kit.edu [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstraße 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-01-21

    We report the implementation of a two-component variant of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for hybrid functionals that accounts for spin-orbit effects within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) for closed-shell systems. The influence of the admixture of Hartree-Fock exchange on excitation energies is investigated for several atoms and diatomic molecules by comparison to numbers for pure density functionals obtained previously [M. Kühn and F. Weigend, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 9, 5341 (2013)]. It is further related to changes upon switching to the local density approximation or using the full TDDFT formalism instead of TDA. Efficiency is demonstrated for a comparably large system, Ir(ppy){sub 3} (61 atoms, 1501 basis functions, lowest 10 excited states), which is a prototype molecule for organic light-emitting diodes, due to its “spin-forbidden” triplet-singlet transition.

  5. Viscous Growth in Spinodal Decomposition of the Two-component Lennard-Jones Model in Two Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laradji, M.; Toxvaerd, S.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of phase separation of a two-component Lennard-Jones model in three dimensions is investigated by means of large scale molecular dynamics simulation. A systematic study over a wide range of quench temperatures within the coexistence region shows that the binary system reaches...

  6. Differences in two-component signal transduction proteins among the genus Brucella: implications for host preference and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binnewies, Tim Terence; Ussery, David; Lavín, JL

    2010-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. Species of the genus Brucella are genetically highly related and differ mainly in mammalian host adaptation and pathogenesis. In this study, TCS proteins encoded in the available genome sequences of Brucell...

  7. Discrete Boltzmann modeling of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in two-component compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuandong; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Luo, Kai Hong; Li, Yingjun

    2017-11-01

    A discrete Boltzmann model (DBM) is proposed to probe the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in two-component compressible flows. Each species has a flexible specific-heat ratio and is described by one discrete Boltzmann equation (DBE). Independent discrete velocities are adopted for the two DBEs. The collision and force terms in the DBE account for the molecular collision and external force, respectively. Two types of force terms are exploited. In addition to recovering the modified Navier-Stokes equations in the hydrodynamic limit, the DBM has the capability of capturing detailed nonequilibrium effects. Furthermore, we use the DBM to investigate the dynamic process of the RTI. The invariants of tensors for nonequilibrium effects are presented and studied. For low Reynolds numbers, both global nonequilibrium manifestations and the growth rate of the entropy of mixing show three stages (i.e., the reducing, increasing, and then decreasing trends) in the evolution of the RTI. On the other hand, the early reducing tendency is suppressed and even eliminated for high Reynolds numbers. Relevant physical mechanisms are analyzed and discussed.

  8. A distributed snow-evolution modeling system (SnowModel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen E. Liston; Kelly. Elder

    2006-01-01

    SnowModel is a spatially distributed snow-evolution modeling system designed for application in landscapes, climates, and conditions where snow occurs. It is an aggregation of four submodels: MicroMet defines meteorological forcing conditions, EnBal calculates surface energy exchanges, SnowPack simulates snow depth and water-equivalent evolution, and SnowTran-3D...

  9. Deliberate Evolution in Multi-Agent Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brazier, F.M.; Jonker, C.M.; Treur, J.; Wijngaards, N.J.E.; Gabbay, D.

    2001-01-01

    Evolution in societies of agents is a challenging phenomenon, both from a fundamental perspective and from an applied perspective. In the literature often genetic programming approaches are used and relatively simple agents are considered, which have no deliberate influence on the direction of the

  10. Tent map as an abstract model of open system evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usychenko, V. G.

    2011-06-01

    The irreversible equations of thermodynamic transport phenomena are changed to tent mapping. It is shown that a tent map may serve as a model of an open system capable of self-organization and evolution.

  11. The redshift number density evolution of Mg II absorption systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhi-Fu

    2013-01-01

    We make use of the recent large sample of 17 042 Mg II absorption systems from Quider et al. to analyze the evolution of the redshift number density. Regardless of the strength of the absorption line, we find that the evolution of the redshift number density can be clearly distinguished into three different phases. In the intermediate redshift epoch (0.6 ≲ z ≲ 1.6), the evolution of the redshift number density is consistent with the non-evolution curve, however, the non-evolution curve over-predicts the values of the redshift number density in the early (z ≲ 0.6) and late (z ≳ 1.6) epochs. Based on the invariant cross-section of the absorber, the lack of evolution in the redshift number density compared to the non-evolution curve implies the galaxy number density does not evolve during the middle epoch. The flat evolution of the redshift number density tends to correspond to a shallow evolution in the galaxy merger rate during the late epoch, and the steep decrease of the redshift number density might be ascribed to the small mass of halos during the early epoch.

  12. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungelson, Lev R.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Binary NSs and BHs are thought to be the primary astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs within the frequency band of ground-based detectors, while compact binaries of WDs are important sources of GWs at lower frequencies to be covered by space interferometers (LISA. Major uncertainties in the current understanding of properties of NSs and BHs most relevant to the GW studies are discussed, including the treatment of the natal kicks which compact stellar remnants acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution. We discuss the coalescence rates of binary NSs and BHs and prospects for their detections, the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations. Special attention is given to AM CVn-stars -- compact binaries in which the Roche lobe is filled by another WD or a low-mass partially degenerate helium-star, as these stars are thought to be the best LISA verification binary GW sources.

  13. Relevance of the two-component sensor protein CiaH to acid and oxidative stress responses in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isaka, Masanori; Okada, Ryo; Zhang, Yan; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2014-03-28

    The production of virulence proteins depends on environmental factors, and two-component regulatory systems are involved in sensing these factors. We previously established knockout strains in all suspected two-component regulatory sensor proteins of the emm1 clinical strain of S. pyogenes and examined their relevance to acid stimuli in a natural atmosphere. In the present study, their relevance to acid stimuli was re-examined in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2. The spy1236 (which is identical to ciaHpy) sensor knockout strain showed significant growth reduction compared with the parental strain in broth at pH 6.0, suggesting that the Spy1236 (CiaHpy) two-component sensor protein is involved in acid response of S. pyogenes. CiaH is also conserved in Streptococcus pneumoniae, and it has been reported that deletion of the gene for its cognate response regulator (ciaRpn) made the pneumococcal strains more sensitive to oxidative stress. In this report, we show that the spy1236 knockout mutant of S. pyogenes is more sensitive to oxidative stress than the parental strain. These results suggest that the two-component sensor protein CiaH is involved in stress responses in S. pyogenes.

  14. Earth evolution as a thermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C.

    2014-12-01

    After fifty years of plate-tectonic theory, the reasons why earth sometime freezed as a snowball or sometime became lethally hot resulting in mass extinction remain enigmatic. This article proposes a new hypothesis on Earth evolution. The unbalance of heat between the input and output is considered as the driving force for the Earth evolution, the lithospheric expansion and associated uplift are the triggers, the self-organized progressive failure leading to collapse of the Earth are the amplifier, and the global scale response in terms of volcanism and magmatism is the globalizer. This shallow process of lithosphere may reach a critical state with a positive feedback loop, and result in the formation of no-plume original Large Igneous Provinces (NPOLIP) in a top-down pattern. Endothermic phase changes during de-compressive melting remove heat from and cool their surroundings, including the upper parts of the lithosphere. The huge loss of Earth's heat during eruption of LIPs, together with the endothermic cooling, may put the thermal cycle to an end and a new start of the cycle initiates. In summary, Earth drives itself to evolve in terms of thermal cycles. Global cooling and warming are the two stages of the many cycles during the Earth evolution. Glaciations are the extreme result of global cooling, whereas the LIPs, sometime accompanied with remarkable sea level dropping, are the extreme result of global warming, with a long recovering age, the interglacialstage, between them. They come and go as thermal cycle evolves, with climate warming, being caused by Earth itself rather than by external forces or human activities, as the most attractive prediction.

  15. Identification of bilinear systems using differential evolution algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, a novel identification method based on differential evolu- tion algorithm has been applied to bilinear systems and its performance has been compared to that of genetic algorithm. Box–Jenkins system and different type bilinear systems have been identified using differential evolution and genetic ...

  16. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition by the Two-Component Response Regulator RcsB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Ekaterina V; Zemaitaitis, Bozena; Aung, Theint; Wolfe, Alan J; Anderson, Wayne F

    2018-02-27

    RcsB is a highly conserved transcription regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, a complex two-component signal transduction system (N. Majdalani and S. Gottesman, Annu Rev Microbiol 59:379-405, 2005; A. J. Wolfe, Curr Opin Microbiol 13:204-209, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2010.01.002; D. J. Clarke, Future Microbiol 5:1173-1184, 2010, https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.10.83). RcsB plays an important role in virulence and pathogenicity in human hosts by regulating biofilm formation. RcsB can regulate transcription alone or together with its auxiliary transcription regulators by forming heterodimers. This complexity allows RcsB to regulate transcription of more than 600 bacterial genes in response to different stresses (D. Wang et al., Mol Plant Microbe Interact 25:6-17, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-08-11-0207). Despite increasing knowledge of RcsB importance, molecular mechanisms that drive the ability of RcsB to control transcription of a large number of genes remain unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of unphosphorylated RcsB in complex with the consensus DNA-binding sequence of 22-mer (DNA22) and 18-mer (DNA18) of the flhDC operon from Escherichia coli determined at 3.15- and 3.37-Å resolution, respectively. The results of our structural analysis combined with the results of in vitro binding assays provide valuable insights to the protein regulatory mechanism, demonstrate how RcsB recognizes target DNA sequences, and reveal a unique oligomeric state that allows RcsB to form homo- and heterodimers. This information will help us understand the complex mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by RcsB in bacteria. IMPORTANCE RcsB is a well-studied two-component response regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, conserved within the family Enterobacteriaceae , which includes many pathogens. It is a global regulator, controlling more than 5% of bacterial genes associated with capsule biosynthesis, flagellar biogenesis, cell wall biosynthesis

  17. The evolution of the serotonergic nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2000-01-01

    Anatomy, serotonergic nervous system, neurons, invertebrates, phylogeny, development, apical ganglion......Anatomy, serotonergic nervous system, neurons, invertebrates, phylogeny, development, apical ganglion...

  18. Adaptive evolution of sexual systems in pedunculate barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusa, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Mai; Kitaura, Jun

    2012-01-01

    to mating in small groups. Within the pedunculate barnacle phylogeny, dwarf males and females have evolved repeatedly. Females are more likely to evolve in androdioecious than hermaphroditic populations, suggesting that evolution of dwarf males has preceded that of females in pedunculates. Both dwarf males...... and females are associated with a higher proportion of solitary individuals in the population, corroborating the hypothesis that limited mating opportunities have favoured evolution of these diverse sexual systems, which have puzzled biologists since Darwin....

  19. Tecnatom's operation system interfaces and their evolution in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, Pedro

    1998-01-01

    The author comments the evolution of operation system interfaces produced by the Tecnatom Company, notably for the support in the construction of the Spanish nuclear power plants. A system can typically be divided into a data acquisition system, a central processing system, and a graphical system. The author discusses and comments the main functional applications which are: real time data displays, data analysis functions, and other utilities (file management, data storing, file reloading)

  20. Thermodynamics of two component gaseous and solid state plasmas at any degeneracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraeft, W.D.; Stolzmann, W.; Fromhold-Treu, I.; Rother, T.

    1988-10-01

    We give the results of thermodynamical calculations for two component plasmas which are of interest for dense hydrogen, noble gas and alkali plasmas and for electron hole plasmas in optically excited semiconductors as well. 25 refs, 4 figs

  1. Nonlinear evolution of stellar spherical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyachenko, V.L. (AN SSSR, Irkutsk. Sibirskij Inst. Zemnogo Magnetizma Ionosfery i Rasprostraneniya Radiovoln)

    1981-03-01

    A universal method for computer realization of collisionless models according to a given distribution function is suggested. By employing this method it is shown that the development of instabilities in spherically-symmetric systems with nearly radial trajectories of the system constituents leads to a distinct elliptical deformation of the system.

  2. Evolution of control systems for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley-Milling, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The author reviews the development of control systems for accelerators. After an historical survey and a general introduction the hardware and software of such systems is described. As example the control system of the CERN SP5 is considered. Finally an outlook is given to future developments with special regards to the LEP storage ring. (HSI)

  3. The graphic representations for the one-dimensional solutions of problem from elastic mechanic deformations of two-component mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghenadie Bulgac

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we find the analytical solution of simple one-dimensional unsteady elastic problem of two-component mixture using Laplace integral transformation. The integral transformations simplify the initial motion systems for finding analytical solutions. The analytical solutions are represented as the graphic on time dependence in the fixed point of medium, and the graphic on the horizontal coordinate at the fixed time.

  4. Competitive Adsorption of a Two-Component Gas on a Deformable Adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Usenko, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the competitive adsorption of a two-component gas on the surface of an adsorbent whose adsorption properties vary in adsorption due to the adsorbent deformation. The essential difference of adsorption isotherms for a deformable adsorbent both from the classical Langmuir adsorption isotherms of a two-component gas and from the adsorption isotherms of a one-component gas taking into account variations in adsorption properties of the adsorbent in adsorption is obtained. We establi...

  5. Evolution paths of a general control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speckert, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    Large systems are built by teams of people who communicate through a set of design tools to produce an information model which describes the system. The model can be analyzed for consistency and completeness. A system building methodology based upon this information model can be used for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the system. Operational procedure knowledge derived from operating experience can be used for autonomous operation. Advancing computer technology is improving the engineering tools available in each of these areas. A unified set of such tools provides the maximum amount of computer assistance to the system builders

  6. Evolution of the LBT Telemetry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, K.; Biddick, C.; De La Peña, M. D.; Summers, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Telescope Control System (TCS) records about 10GB of telemetry data per night. Additionally, the vibration monitoring system records about 9GB of telemetry data per night. Through 2013, we have amassed over 6TB of Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) files and almost 9TB in a MySQL database of TCS and vibration data. The LBT telemetry system, in its third major revision since 2004, provides the mechanism to capture and store this data. The telemetry system has evolved from a simple HDF file system with MySQL stream definitions within the TCS, to a separate system using a MySQL database system for the definitions and data, and finally to no database use at all, using HDF5 files.

  7. Effect of weld line positions on the tensile deformation of two-component metal injection moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manonukul, Anchalee; Songkuea, Sukrit; Moonchaleanporn, Pongporn; Tange, Makiko

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of the mechanical properties of two-component parts is critical for engineering functionally graded components. In this study, mono- and two-component tensile test specimens were metal injection moulded. Three different weld line positions were generated in the two-component specimens. Linear shrinkage of the two-component specimens was greater than that of the mono-component specimens because the incompatibility of sintering shrinkage of both materials causes biaxial stresses and enhances sintering. The mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel were affected by the addition of a coloured pigment used to identify the weld line position after injection moulding. For the two-component specimens, the yield stress and ultimate tensile stress were similar to those of 316L stainless steel. Because 316L and 630 (also known as 17-4PH) stainless steels were well-sintered at the interface, the mechanical properties of the weaker material (316L stainless steel) were dominant. However, the elongations of the two-component specimens were lower than those of the mono-component specimens. An interfacial zone with a microstructure that differed from those of the mono-material specimens was observed; its different microstructure was attributed to the gradual diffusion of nickel and copper.

  8. The evolution of a distributed operating system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Renesse, Robbert; Tanenbaum, Andrew S.; Mullender, Sape J.; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Wolfgang

    AMOEBA is a research project to build a true distributed operating system using the object model. Under the COST11-ter MANDIS project this work was extended to cover wide-area networks. Besides describing the system, this paper discusses the successive versions in the implementation of its model,

  9. Evolution, Complex Systems and the Dialectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Knapp

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The status of large scale historical macro-theories is contested both in world-systems theory and in sociology as a whole. I distinguish three types of such dynamic models: evolutionary models, systems models and dialectical models. I define dialectical models as a family of complex systems models characterized by positive feedback (self-reinforcement or auto-catalysis. Such models lead to processes of accumulation and polarization, leading to system crisis. The games of Monopoly and Risk provide popular examples. This paper investigates the dynamic properties of three examples of such models: Myrdal's model of cumulative causation; Collins's models of Marxian transformations and geopolitics; and Chaso-Dunn and Hall's iterative model of world-systems transformations. A combination of evolutionary, complex systems and dialectical analyses has consideralble overlap with chaotic, far-from-equilibrium types of models and with analyses of complex adaptive systems. Such discontinuous, nonlinear dynamic models show great potential for solving problems of dynamic analysis both within world-systems theory and within sociology as a whole.

  10. Nuclear civil liability international system. Evolution prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper sets out the necessity of a special system of international conventions in the scope of nuclear civil liability. Then the main principles of the conventions in Paris and Vienna are described. Recently, works have been carried out in order to improve and modernize the civil liability system. (TEC). 4 tabs

  11. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PhoP, a Two-Component Response Regulator, Involved in Antimicrobial Susceptibilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Che Liu

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a gram-negative bacterium, has increasingly emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. It is well-known for resistance to a variety of antimicrobial agents including cationic antimicrobial polypeptides (CAPs. Resistance to polymyxin B, a kind of CAPs, is known to be controlled by the two-component system PhoPQ. To unravel the role of PhoPQ in polymyxin B resistance of S. maltophilia, a phoP mutant was constructed. We found MICs of polymyxin B, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin and spectinomycin decreased 2-64 fold in the phoP mutant. Complementation of the phoP mutant by the wild-type phoP gene restored all of the MICs to the wild type levels. Expression of PhoP was shown to be autoregulated and responsive to Mg2+ levels. The polymyxin B and gentamicin killing tests indicated that pretreatment of low Mg2+ can protect the wild-type S. maltophilia from killing but not phoP mutant. Interestingly, we found phoP mutant had a decrease in expression of SmeZ, an efflux transporter protein for aminoglycosides in S. maltophilia. Moreover, phoP mutant showed increased permeability in the cell membrane relative to the wild-type. In summary, we demonstrated the two-component regulator PhoP of S. maltophilia is involved in antimicrobial susceptibilities and low Mg2+ serves as a signal for triggering the pathway. Both the alteration in membrane permeability and downregulation of SmeZ efflux transporter in the phoP mutant contributed to the increased drug susceptibilities of S. maltophilia, in particular for aminoglycosides. This is the first report to describe the role of the Mg2+-sensing PhoP signaling pathway of S. maltophilia in regulation of the SmeZ efflux transporter and in antimicrobial susceptibilities. This study suggests PhoPQ TCS may serve as a target for development of antimicrobial agents against multidrug-resistant S. maltophilia.

  12. Research on System Coherence Evolution of Different Environmental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Qi; Lu, Jing-Bin; Li, Hong; Liu, Ji-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Ru; Liu, Han; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Wu, Xiang-Yao

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we have studied the evolution curve of two-level atomic system that the initial state is excited state. At the different of environmental reservoir models, which include the single Lorentzian, ideal photon band-gap, double Lorentzian and square Lorentzian reservoir, we researched the influence of these environmental reservoir models on the evolution of energy level population. At static no modulation, comparing the four environmental models, the atomic energy level population oscillation of square Lorentzian reservoir model is fastest, and the atomic system decoherence is slowest. Under dynamic modulation, comparing the photon band-gap model with the single Lorentzian reservoir model, no matter what form of dynamic modulation, the time of atoms decay to the ground state is longer for the photonic band-gap model. These conclusions make the idea of using the environmental change to modulate the coherent evolution of atomic system become true.

  13. Solar System Evolution through Planetesmial Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trierweiler, Isabella; Laughlin, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Understanding planet formation is crucial to unraveling the history of our Solar System. Refining our theory of planet formation has become particularly important as the discovery of exoplanet systems through missions like Kepler have indicated that our system is incredibly unique. Compared to other systems around Sun-like stars, we are missing a significant amount of mass in the inner region of our solar system.A leading explanation for the low mass of the terrestrial planets is Jupiter’s Grand Tack. In this theory, the existence of the rocky planets is thought to be the result of the migration of Jupiter through the inner solar system. This migration could spark a collisional cascade of planetesimals, allowing planetesimals to drift inwards and shepherd an original set of massive planets into the Sun, thus explaining the absence of massive planets in our current system. The remnants of the planetesimals would them become the building blocks for a new generation of smaller, rocky planets.Using the N-body simulator REBOUND, we investigate the dynamics of the Grand Tack. We focus in particular on collisional cascades, which are thought to cause the inward planetesimal drift. We first modify the simulator to account for fragmentation outcomes in planetesimal collisions. Modeling disks of varying initial conditions, we then characterize the disk conditions needed to begin a cascade and shed light on the solar system’s dynamics just prior to the formation of the terrestrial planets.

  14. Trauma Systems: Origins, Evolution, and Current Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigneri, Danielle A; Beldowicz, Brian; Jurkovich, Gregory J

    2017-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death among patients 46 years or younger, and having a system in place for the care of the injured is of paramount importance to the health of a community. The growth and development of civilian trauma systems has not been an easy process. The concept of regionalized health care that the trauma system models has been emulated by other specialized and time-sensitive areas of medicine, notably stroke and acute cardiac events. Continued process improvement, public education, support and involvement, a sound infrastructure, and integrated technology should remain our focus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vapour-mediated sensing and motility in two-component droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, N. J.; Benusiglio, A.; Prakash, M.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the wetting behaviour of liquids on surfaces is important for a variety of industrial applications such as water-repellent coatings and lubrication. Liquid behaviour on a surface can range from complete spreading, as in the `tears of wine' effect, to minimal wetting as observed on a superhydrophobic lotus leaf. Controlling droplet movement is important in microfluidic liquid handling, on self-cleaning surfaces and in heat transfer. Droplet motion can be achieved by gradients of surface energy. However, existing techniques require either a large gradient or a carefully prepared surface to overcome the effects of contact line pinning, which usually limit droplet motion. Here we show that two-component droplets of well-chosen miscible liquids such as propylene glycol and water deposited on clean glass are not subject to pinning and cause the motion of neighbouring droplets over a distance. Unlike the canonical predictions for these liquids on a high-energy surface, these droplets do not spread completely but exhibit an apparent contact angle. We demonstrate experimentally and analytically that these droplets are stabilized by evaporation-induced surface tension gradients and that they move in response to the vapour emitted by neighbouring droplets. Our fundamental understanding of this robust system enabled us to construct a wide variety of autonomous fluidic machines out of everyday materials.

  16. Planetary ring systems properties, structures, and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Carl D

    2018-01-01

    Planetary rings are among the most intriguing structures of our solar system and have fascinated generations of astronomers. Collating emerging knowledge in the field, this volume reviews our current understanding of ring systems with reference to the rings of Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and more. Written by leading experts, the history of ring research and the basics of ring–particle orbits is followed by a review of the known planetary ring systems. All aspects of ring system science are described in detail, including specific dynamical processes, types of structures, thermal properties and their origins, and investigations using computer simulations and laboratory experiments. The concluding chapters discuss the prospects of future missions to planetary rings, the ways in which ring science informs and is informed by the study of other astrophysical disks, and a perspective on the field's future. Researchers of all levels will benefit from this thorough and engaging presentation.

  17. The evolution of dopamine systems in chordates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei eYamamoto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS is found throughout chordates, and its emergence predates the divergence of chordates. Many of the molecular components of DA systems, such as biosynthetic enzymes, transporters and receptors, are shared with those of other monoamine systems, suggesting the common origin of these systems. In the mammalian CNS, the DA neurotransmitter systems are diversified and serve for visual and olfactory perception, sensory-motor programming, motivation, memory, emotion, and endocrine regulations. Some of the functions are conserved among different vertebrate groups, while others are not, and this is reflected in the anatomical aspects of DA systems in the forebrain and midbrain. Recent findings concerning a second tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH2 revealed new populations of DA synthesizing cells, as evidenced in the periventricular hypothalamic zones of teleost fish. It is likely that the ancestor of vertebrates possessed TH2 DA-synthesizing cells, and the TH2 gene has been lost secondarily in placental mammals. All the vertebrates possess DA cells in the olfactory bulb, retina and in the diencephalon. Midbrain DA cells are abundant in amniotes while absent in some groups, e.g. teleosts. Studies of protochordate DA cells suggest that the diencephalic DA cells were present before the divergence of the chordate lineage. In contrast, the midbrain cell populations have probably emerged in the vertebrate lineage following the development of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary. The functional flexibility of the DA systems, and the evolvability provided by duplication of the corresponding genes permitted a large diversification of these systems. These features were instrumental in the adaptation of brain functions to the very variable way of life of vertebrates.

  18. Evolution of the racetrack microtron control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, E.R.; Schneider, C.M.; Martinez, V.A.; Trout, R.E.; Gritzo, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Ultimately, the true measure of a control system lies in how well initial decisions allow for exigencies, as the overall machine evolves and requirements solidify. Recognizing that advances in electronic technology virtually guarantee that any system will be technologically out of date by the time it is operational, the criteria really do not involve the state of the technological advancement, but instead legitimately ask whether the control-system design can adjust to the inevitable machine-design changes, whether the operators can use it to control the machine in a reasonable manner, whether it was built within budget constraints, or - in short - whether it works. On these bases, our initial decisions on the racetrack microtron (RTM) control system have been increasingly vindicated as the system has evolved, and we feel that our experiences have shed some light on just which criteria are of real importance, and which are merely a part of the lore of popular misinformation. Unless the basic requirements are met, technical elegance is no virtue, and when they are met, design simplicity is no vice

  19. Evolution of the racetrack microtron control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, E.R.; Schneider, C.M.; Martinez, V.A.; Trout, R.E.; Gritzo, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Ultimately, the true measure of a control system lies in how well initial decisions allow for exigencies, as the overall machine evolves and requirements solidify. Recognizing that advances in electronic technology virtually guarantee that any system will be technologically out of date by the time it is operational, the criteria really do not involve the state of the technological advancement, but instead legitimately ask whether the control-system design can adjust to the inevitable machine-design changes, whether the operators can use it to control the machine in a reasonable manner, whether it was built within budget constraints, or, in short, whether it works. On these bases, our initial decisions on the racetrack microtron (RTM) control system have been increasingly vindicated as the system has evolved, and we feel that our experiences have shed some light on just which criteria are of real importance, and which are merely a part of the lore of popular misinformation. Unless the basic requirements are met, technical elegance is no virtue, and when they are met, design simplicity is no vice

  20. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    CERN Document Server

    Undrus, A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Builds and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, test...

  1. Evolution and classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Makarova, Kira; H. Haft, Daniel; Barrangou, Rodolphe; J. J. Brouns, Stan; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Horvath, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain; J. M. Mojica, Francisco; I. Wolf, Yuri; Yakunin, Alexander F.; van der Oost, John; V. Koonin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–CRISPR-associated proteins) modules are adaptive immunity systems that are present in many archaea and bacteria. These defence systems are encoded by operons that have an extraordinarily diverse architecture and a high rate of evolution for both the cas genes and the unique spacer content. Here, we provide an updated analysis of the evolutionary relationships between CRISPR–Cas systems and Cas proteins. Three major types of CRISPR–Cas system are delineated, with a further division into several subtypes and a few chimeric variants. Given the complexity of the genomic architectures and the extremely dynamic evolution of the CRISPR–Cas systems, a unified classification of these systems should be based on multiple criteria. Accordingly, we propose a `polythetic' classification that integrates the phylogenies of the most common cas genes, the sequence and organization of the CRISPR repeats and the architecture of the CRISPR–cas loci. PMID:21552286

  2. Communications and Tracking Distributed Systems Evolution Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, William

    1990-01-01

    The Communications and Tracking (C & T) techniques and equipment to support evolutionary space station concepts are being analyzed. Evolutionary space station configurations and operational concepts are used to derive the results to date. A description of the C & T system based on future capability needs is presented. Included are the hooks and scars currently identified to support future growth.

  3. The evolution of Jefferson Lab's control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. S. White; M. Bickley; W. Watson

    1999-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (Jefferson Lab) accelerator controls were initially implemented as a proprietary in-house system. During machine commissioning, problems were encountered leading to a decision to migrate to the Experimental Physics and Industrial Controls System (EPICS). Since then, the accelerator and all other laboratory controls have been successfully converted. In addition to implementing Jefferson Lab's controls using EPICS, new data visualization tools have been developed and existing programs have been enhanced with new capabilities. In order to provide a more generic interface for high level applications development, a device abstraction layer, called Common DEVice (CDEV), was implemented. These additions have been made available to other laboratories and are in use at many sites, including some that do not use EPICS. Control System development is not limited to computer scientists; operators, engineers and physicists frequently add capabilities using EPICS, CDEV, Tel/tk, and other tools. These contributions have tailored the control system for many different types of customers. For the future, the authors envision more intelligent processing and more capable tools for data storage, retrieval and visualization

  4. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undrus, A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Build and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, testing, and creation of distribution kits. The ATN testing framework of the Nightly System runs unit and integration tests in parallel suites, fully utilizing the resources of multi-core machines, and provides the first results even before compilations complete. The NICOS error detection system is based on several techniques and classifies the compilation and test errors according to their severity. It is periodically tuned to place greater emphasis on certain software defects by highlighting the problems on NICOS web pages and sending automatic e-mail notifications to responsible developers. These and other recent developments will be presented and future plans will be described.

  5. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undrus, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Build and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, testing, and creation of distribution kits. The ATN testing framework of the Nightly System runs unit and integration tests in parallel suites, fully utilizing the resources of multi-core machines, and provides the first results even before compilations complete. The NICOS error detection system is based on several techniques and classifies the compilation and test errors according to their severity. It is periodically tuned to place greater emphasis on certain software defects by highlighting the problems on NICOS web pages and sending automatic e-mail notifications to responsible developers. These and other recent developments will be presented and future plans will be described.

  6. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  7. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezzi, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section

  8. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    CERN Document Server

    Undrus, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    For over 10 years of development the ATLAS Nightly Build System has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The numerous branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains ~2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by ~1000 developers. The nightly releases lead up to stable releases used for data processing and analysis worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on the ATLAS Build Farm. The ATN testing framework runs unit and integration tests for the nightly releases.

  9. The Evolution of an Online Acquisitions System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenko Lukac

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available About two years ago a home-grown online acquisitions system was developed and implemented at Pacific University. The program, written in BASIC for the Data General Nova Computer, perform sall the necessary functions such as ordering ,receiving, fund accounting, etc. Thisprogram was offered to the library community ,and about one hundred libraries from around the world have availed themselves of it.

  10. TMX-U computer system in evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, T.A.; Bell, H.; Brown, M.; Gorvad, M.; Jenkins, S.; Meyer, W.; Moller, J.; Perkins, D.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past three years, the total TMX-U diagnsotic data base has grown to exceed 10 megabytes from over 1300 channels; roughly triple the originally designed size. This acquisition and processing load has resulted in an experiment repetition rate exceeding 10 minutes per shot using the five original Hewlett-Packard HP-1000 computers with their shared disks. Our new diagnostics tend to be multichannel instruments, which, in our environment, can be more easily managed using local computers. For this purpose, we are using HP series 9000 computers for instrument control, data acquisition, and analysis. Fourteen such systems are operational with processed format output exchanged via a shared resource manager. We are presently implementing the necessary hardware and software changes to create a local area network allowing us to combine the data from these systems with our main data archive. The expansion of our diagnostic system using the paralled acquisition and processing concept allows us to increase our data base with a minimum of impact on the experimental repetition rate

  11. Systematic dissection and trajectory-scanning mutagenesis of the molecular interface that ensures specificity of two-component signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Capra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems enable bacteria to sense and respond to a wide range of environmental stimuli. Sensor histidine kinases transmit signals to their cognate response regulators via phosphorylation. The faithful transmission of information through two-component pathways and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk require exquisite specificity of histidine kinase-response regulator interactions to ensure that cells mount the appropriate response to external signals. To identify putative specificity-determining residues, we have analyzed amino acid coevolution in two-component proteins and identified a set of residues that can be used to rationally rewire a model signaling pathway, EnvZ-OmpR. To explore how a relatively small set of residues can dictate partner selectivity, we combined alanine-scanning mutagenesis with an approach we call trajectory-scanning mutagenesis, in which all mutational intermediates between the specificity residues of EnvZ and another kinase, RstB, were systematically examined for phosphotransfer specificity. The same approach was used for the response regulators OmpR and RstA. Collectively, the results begin to reveal the molecular mechanism by which a small set of amino acids enables an individual kinase to discriminate amongst a large set of highly-related response regulators and vice versa. Our results also suggest that the mutational trajectories taken by two-component signaling proteins following gene or pathway duplication may be constrained and subject to differential selective pressures. Only some trajectories allow both the maintenance of phosphotransfer and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk.

  12. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition by the Two-Component Response Regulator RcsB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina V. Filippova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available RcsB is a highly conserved transcription regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, a complex two-component signal transduction system (N. Majdalani and S. Gottesman, Annu Rev Microbiol 59:379–405, 2005; A. J. Wolfe, Curr Opin Microbiol 13:204–209, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2010.01.002; D. J. Clarke, Future Microbiol 5:1173–1184, 2010, https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.10.83. RcsB plays an important role in virulence and pathogenicity in human hosts by regulating biofilm formation. RcsB can regulate transcription alone or together with its auxiliary transcription regulators by forming heterodimers. This complexity allows RcsB to regulate transcription of more than 600 bacterial genes in response to different stresses (D. Wang et al., Mol Plant Microbe Interact 25:6–17, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-08-11-0207. Despite increasing knowledge of RcsB importance, molecular mechanisms that drive the ability of RcsB to control transcription of a large number of genes remain unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of unphosphorylated RcsB in complex with the consensus DNA-binding sequence of 22-mer (DNA22 and 18-mer (DNA18 of the flhDC operon from Escherichia coli determined at 3.15- and 3.37-Å resolution, respectively. The results of our structural analysis combined with the results of in vitro binding assays provide valuable insights to the protein regulatory mechanism, demonstrate how RcsB recognizes target DNA sequences, and reveal a unique oligomeric state that allows RcsB to form homo- and heterodimers. This information will help us understand the complex mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by RcsB in bacteria.

  13. Two component injection moulding: an interface quality and bond strength dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2008-01-01

    on quality parameters of the two component parts. Most engineering applications of two component injection moulding calls for high bond strength between the two polymers, on the other hand a sharp and well-defined interface between the two polymers are required for applications like selective metallization...... of polymers, parts for micro applications and also for the aesthetic purpose of the final product. The investigation presented in this paper indicates a dilemma between obtaining reasonably good bond strength and at the same time keeping the interface quality suitable for applications. The required process...... conditions for a sharp and well-defined interface are exactly the opposite of what is congenial for higher bond strength. So in the production of two component injection moulded parts, there is a compromise to make between the interface quality and the bond strength of the two polymers. Also the injection...

  14. Two components in charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Bylinkin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Transverse momentum spectra of charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions are considered in terms of a recently introduced Two Component parameterization combining exponential (“soft” and power-law (“hard” functional forms. The charged hadron densities calculated separately for them are plotted versus number of participating nucleons, Npart. The obtained dependences are discussed and the possible link between the two component parameterization introduced by the authors and the two component model historically used for the case of heavy-ion collisions is established. Next, the variations of the parameters of the introduced approach with the center of mass energy and centrality are studied using the available data from RHIC and LHC experiments. The spectra shapes are found to show universal dependences on Npart for all investigated collision energies.

  15. EIA systems in Nigeria: evolution, current practice and shortcomings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunba, Olusegun A.

    2004-01-01

    Amidst mounting criticism of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) carried out in Nigeria under the three independent EIA systems--the EIA Decree 86 (1992), the Town and Country Planning Decree 88 (1992) and the Petroleum Act (1969)--the paper traces the evolution of Nigeria's systems and appraises current practice and shortcomings. The path of development of the systems was traced within the framework of Gibson's model of EIA evolution [Impact Assess. Proj. Apprais., 20 (3) 2002, 151-159], while current practice and shortcomings were explored in random interview surveys of consultant firms, approval authorities and the academia. It was seen that Gibson's four-stage model is not exactly representative of the Nigerian situation, and a more appropriate six-stage model was developed. It was also established that the current practices of the three EIA systems were at different stages of evolution: one of the EIA schemes (the Town and Country Planning Decree) has not evolved satisfactorily, while the other two EIA systems have produced intricate legislations and guidelines, but fall short of first-rate practice. The other discovery was that the simultaneous use of three independent systems creates unnecessary duplication of EIA preparation with considerable time and money costs. The paper advises that Nigeria can make substantial progress along the evolutionary path through a correction of observed system shortcomings and a merger of the three systems

  16. Evolution of a Waste Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speed, D.

    2009-01-01

    Managing information has become a pervasive task in our society and business activities. This is especially true in the arena of government facilities and nuclear materials. Accomplishing the required tasks is not sufficient in the new millennium; plans are made, reviewed and approved, specifications for materials are developed, materials are procured and delivered, inspected, invoices are audited and paid. Activities are conducted to procedures with embedded quality checks and a final turn-over inspection is performed. In order to make the most efficient use of our human capital, we turn to machines to assist us in managing the information flood. How best to address this task? This is new territory - there was no prior art at this level. The challenge is to exercise an appropriate level of control, and at the same time, add value. The key to accomplishing this goal is having a good team with a carefully engineered processes applying an appropriate level of automation. At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), information is managed about the facility, its performance (environmental monitoring), mining operations, facility services, cyber security, human resources, business processes, and waste information. This paper addresses experience gained with the management of waste information over the first decade of operation. The WIPP Waste Information System (WWIS) was created to fill both a gatekeeper function to screen waste for disposal at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the official record of the properties of the waste contained in the WIPP transuranic waste repository. The WWIS has been a very successful system as the monitor of waste acceptance criteria and data integrity; it is an integral part of the success of the WIPP operation. The WWIS is now in its thirteenth year of operation. This period has included close regulatory scrutiny as a part of determining facility readiness for initial waste acceptance, and more than 40 significant software revisions

  17. MODELING THERMAL DUST EMISSION WITH TWO COMPONENTS: APPLICATION TO THE PLANCK HIGH FREQUENCY INSTRUMENT MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales

  18. MODELING THERMAL DUST EMISSION WITH TWO COMPONENTS: APPLICATION TO THE PLANCK HIGH FREQUENCY INSTRUMENT MAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P., E-mail: ameisner@fas.harvard.edu, E-mail: dfinkbeiner@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales.

  19. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission with Two Components: Application to the Planck High Frequency Instrument Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales.

  20. The plant vascular system: Evolution, development and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Lucas; Andrew Groover; Raffael Lichtenberger; Kaori Furuta; Shri-Ram Yadav; Yka Helariutta; Xin-Qiang He; Hiroo Fukuda; Julie Kang; Siobhan M. Brady; John W. Patrick; John Sperry; Akiko Yoshida; Ana-Flor Lopez-Millan; Michael A. Grusak; Pradeep Kachroo

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the tracheophyte-based vascular system of land plants had major impacts on the evolution of terrestrial biology, in general, through its role in facilitating the development of plants with increased stature, photosynthetic output, and ability to colonize a greatly expanded range of environmental habitats. Recently, considerable progress has been made...

  1. The evolution of sex ratios and sex-determining systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uller, Tobias; Pen, Ido; Wapstra, Erik; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Komdeur, Jan

    Sex determination is a fundamental process governed by diverse mechanisms. Sex ratio selection is commonly implicated in the evolution of sex-determining systems, although formal models are rare. Here, we argue that, although sex ratio selection can induce shifts in sex determination, genomic

  2. Compact stars and the evolution of binary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar limit is of key importance for the evolution of white dwarfs in binary systems and for the formation of neutron stars and black holes in binaries. Mass transfer can drive a white dwarf in a binary over the Chandrasekhar limit, which may lead to a Type Ia supernova (in case of a CO

  3. Anisotropic properties of phase separation in two-component dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jinbin

    2018-03-01

    Using Crank-Nicolson method, we calculate ground state wave functions of two-component dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) and show that, due to dipole-dipole interaction (DDI), the condensate mixture displays anisotropic phase separation. The effects of DDI, inter-component s-wave scattering, strength of trap potential and particle numbers on the density profiles are investigated. Three types of two-component profiles are present, first cigar, along z-axis and concentric torus, second pancake (or blood cell), in xy-plane, and two non-uniform ellipsoid, separated by the pancake and third two dumbbell shapes.

  4. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  5. The Evolution and Challenges of the Danish Civil Service System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Balle

    2013-01-01

    In this article a descriptive analysis of the evolution and current challenges of the Danish civil service system is given. The focus is on the state administration. Theories of path-dependency and the transnational diffusion of ideas inform the empirical analysis. The broad features of the long......-term history of the Danish civil service system are analyzed. The basic characteristics of the current internal labor market of the civil service are analyzed as well as some recent changes in the system. Issues of politicization of the civil service are discussed and public opinion concerning the civil...... service is examined. The Danish civil service system has been characterized by long-term gradual evolution and adoption of many of the prevailing institutions in medieval and modern European state administration. This adaptation to prevailing trends has been predominantly characterized by integration...

  6. Physical and petrologic evidence for a two component mantle MORB source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H.; Standish, J.; Snow, J.; Michael, P.; Salters, V.

    2003-04-01

    Study of ultra-slow spreading sections of the Southwest Indian and Gakkel Ridges support a two-component (veined?) mantle source for MORB. At both the Southwest Indian and Gakkel Ridges, mantle upwelling slows continuously over long sections of the ridge system due to changing ridge geometry and position with respect to the pole of rotation. For a simple peridotitic mantle this predicts steadily decreasing crustal production due to conductive heat loss depressing the top of the mantle-melting column. Instead, at 16 degrees E on the Southwest Indian Ridge and at 3 degrees E on the Gakkel, seafloor spreading abruptly goes from magmatic to amagmatic, with peridotite instead of basalt emplaced to the sea floor for long distances. As the mantle upwelling rate continues to decrease, however, volcanism reappears on both ridges at point source volcanoes and at large long-lived cross-axis volcanic highs, with intervening amagmatic segments. Such low levels of crustal production show that mantle melting is limited, and that abyssal peridotites there must have compositions close to unmelted mantle. However, significant areas of the amagmatic sections of the SW Indian and Gakkel Ridges appear to be floored dominantly by harzburgite, while other regions predominantly expose lherzolite. This poses a problem for modeling the MORB source as simply peridotite; as harzburgite is too depleted too generate MORB. The limited melt production during ultra-slow spreading also makes it difficult to produce the harzburgite during the axial mantle-melting event from lherzolite. In this case there is likely another mantle component contributing to MORB generation. Basalts over the transition from slow to ultra-slow spreading show a regular compositional gradient over 1000 km. Helium isotopes range from only 7.3 RA to 6.3 RA across this region, suggesting that while there is a chemical gradient in the mantle, there is not an abrupt change in the mantle source at the 16 degree E discontinuity

  7. Remote control systems evolution in the new open energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglioni, L.

    2001-01-01

    Considering new energy market in Italy, the new role of remote control applications is discussed. In the open market the whole electric process is managed by several different actors; common protocol scheme and additional sharing data policies are necessaries facing the increased communications requirements due to deregulation. Remote control systems evolution then will lead from process oriented to data management oriented systems; related methodologies and solutions are described [it

  8. Structural studies of the activation of the two component receiver domain NTRC by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohaile, Michael James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the N-terminal domain of the transcriptional enhancer NTRC (NiTrogen Regulatory protein C). This domain belongs to the family of receiver domains of two-component regulatory systems involved in signal transduction. Phosphorylation of NTRC at D54 leads to an activated form of the molecule which stimulates transcription of genes involved in nitrogen regulation. Three and four dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine an intermediate resolution structure of the unphosphorylated, inactive form of the N-terminal domain of NTRC. The structure is comprised of five α-helices and a five-stranded β-sheet in a (β/α)5 topology. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of NTRC indicate that helix 4 and strand 5 are significantly more flexible than the rest of the secondary structure of the protein and that the loops making up the active site are flexible. The short lifetime of phospho-NTRC hampers the study of this form. However, conditions for determining the resonance assignments and, possibly, the three dimensional structure of phosphorylated NTRC have been obtained. Tentative assignments of the phosphorylated form indicate that the majority of the changes that NTRC experiences upon phosphorylation occur in helix 3, strand 4, helix 4, strand 5, and the loop between strand 5 and helix 5 (the 3445 face of NTRC) as well as near the site of phosphorylation. In order to examine a stable, activated form of the protein, constitutively active mutants of NTRC were investigated.

  9. Intracavity Rayleigh/Mie Scattering for Multipoint, Two-Component Velocity Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Danehy, Paul M.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2006-01-01

    A simultaneous multi-point two-component Doppler velocimeter is described. The system uses two optical cavities: a Fabry-Perot etalon and an optical cavity for collecting and re-circulating the Rayleigh/Mie scattered light that is collected from the measurement volume in two parallel, but opposite directions. Single-pulse measurements of two orthogonal components of the velocity vector in a supersonic free jet were performed to demonstrate the technique. The re-circulation of the light rejected by the interferometer input mirror also increased the signal intensity by a factor of 3.5. 2005 Optical Society of America Interferometric Rayleigh scattering has previously been used for single-point velocity measurements in unseeded gas flow. However, this past work has generally been limited to probing with continuous-wave lasers resulting in time-averaged measurements of velocity. Multiple velocity components have been measured simultaneously by separate instruments.1,2 It has also been demonstrated that two orthogonal velocity components can be measured simultaneously at one point using one interferometer by reflecting back the probing laser beam, although this approach results in directional ambiguity of the flow velocity vector.3 This measurement ambiguity was removed by prior knowledge of the approximate magnitude and sign of the velocity components. Furthermore, it was shown that multiple points could be measured simultaneously with a Rayleigh scattering interferometric approach, but only one component of velocity was measured.4 Another method of performing multiple component velocity measurements with Rayleigh scattering uses a pair of cameras to image the flow, one of which views the flow through an iodine gas filter. This iodine-filter technique has the advantage of allowing high-resolution velocity imaging, but it generally has a lower dynamic range.

  10. Axial velocity distribution of a two-component plasma in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we investigate the combined effects of channel indentation and presence of neutral gas (impurities) on the flow of a two-component plasma gas through a magnetized cylinder with indentation. For small indentation, expressed in e, analytic solutions are obtained for the axial velocities, induced magnetic fields, ...

  11. Transport of a two-component mixture in one-dimensional channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borman, VD; Tronin, VN; Tronin, [No Value; Troyan, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    The transport of a two-component gas mixture in subnanometer channels is investigated theoretically for an arbitrary filling of channels. Special attention is paid to consistent inclusion of density effects, which are associated both with the interaction and with a finite size of particles. The

  12. A two-component dark matter model with real singlet scalars ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-05

    Jan 5, 2016 ... We propose a two-component dark matter (DM) model, each component of which is a real singlet scalar, to explain results from both direct and indirect detection experiments. We put the constraints on the model parameters from theoretical bounds, PLANCK relic density results and direct DM experiments.

  13. Susceptor-assisted induction curing behaviour of a two component epoxy paste adhesive for aerospace applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severijns, C.; Teixeira De Freitas, S.; Poulis, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The curing behaviour and the mechanical behaviour of susceptor-assisted induction-cured adhesively bonded joints has been investigated. Induction Heating (IH) was established by mixing Iron particles into a two component epoxy paste adhesive. The effect of different process parameters, such as

  14. Some problems of evolution of the solar system. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolczek, O.

    1974-01-01

    The size of the solar system and forces responsible for its evolution are discussed. Contemporary and primary distribution of matter in the solar system are described. Some pecularities of the process of organization of matter in the primary circumsolar nebula are mentioned. Formation of aggregates from dispersed matter are shown. Results of the recent experiments and investigations of surface material from the moon are presented. The role of solar wind and magnetic field in the early solar system and time of formation of planets are shown. Coupling between planetary masses and orbits and problem of longevity of planetary orbits and of the whole solar system are discussed. (author)

  15. Echinoderm systems for gene regulatory studies in evolution and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Maria Ina; Andrikou, Carmen; Annunziata, Rossella

    2016-08-01

    One of the main challenges in Evolutionary Developmental Biology is to understand to which extent developmental changes are driven by regulatory alterations in the genomic sequence. In the recent years, the focus of comparative developmental studies has moved towards a systems biology approach providing a better understanding of the evolution of gene interactions that form the so called Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN). Echinoderms provide a powerful system to reveal regulatory mechanisms and within the past decade, due to the latest technological innovations, a great number of studies have provided valuable information for comparative GRN analyses. In this review we describe recent advances in evolution of GRNs arising from echinoderm systems, focusing on the properties of conserved regulatory kernels, circuit co-option events and GRN topological rearrangements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Meta-Data Objects as the Basis for System Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Estrella, Florida; Tóth, N; Kovács, Z; Le Goff, J M; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Toth, Norbert; Kovacs, Zsolt; Goff, Jean-Marie Le

    2001-01-01

    One of the main factors driving object-oriented software development in the Web- age is the need for systems to evolve as user requirements change. A crucial factor in the creation of adaptable systems dealing with changing requirements is the suitability of the underlying technology in allowing the evolution of the system. A reflective system utilizes an open architecture where implicit system aspects are reified to become explicit first-class (meta-data) objects. These implicit system aspects are often fundamental structures which are inaccessible and immutable, and their reification as meta-data objects can serve as the basis for changes and extensions to the system, making it self- describing. To address the evolvability issue, this paper proposes a reflective architecture based on two orthogonal abstractions - model abstraction and information abstraction. In this architecture the modeling abstractions allow for the separation of the description meta-data from the system aspects they represent so that th...

  17. Evolution of the mating system in colonizing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, John R

    2015-05-01

    Colonization is likely to be more successful for species with an ability to self-fertilize and thus to establish new populations as single individuals. As a result, self-compatibility should be common among colonizing species. This idea, labelled 'Baker's law', has been influential in discussions of sexual-system and mating-system evolution. However, its generality has been questioned, because models of the evolution of dispersal and the mating system predict an association between high dispersal rates and outcrossing rather than selfing, and because of many apparent counter examples to the law. The contrasting predictions made by models invoking Baker's law versus those for the evolution of the mating system and dispersal urges a reassessment of how we should view both these traits. Here, I review the literature on the evolution of mating and dispersal in colonizing species, with a focus on conceptual issues. I argue for the importance of distinguishing between the selfing or outcrossing rate and a simple ability to self-fertilize, as well as for the need for a more nuanced consideration of dispersal. Colonizing species will be characterized by different phases in their life pattern: dispersal to new habitat, implying an ecological sieve on dispersal traits; establishment and a phase of growth following colonization, implying a sieve on reproductive traits; and a phase of demographic stasis at high density, during which new trait associations can evolve through local adaptation. This dynamic means that the sorting of mating-system and dispersal traits should change over time, making simple predictions difficult. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evolution of an open system as a continuous measurement of this system by its environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensky, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    The restricted-path-integral (RPI) description of a continuous quantum measurement is rederived starting from the description of an open system by the Feynman-Vernon influence functional. For this end the total evolution operator of the compound system consisting of the open system and its environment is decomposed into the sum of partial evolution operators. Accordingly, the influence functional of the open system is decomposed into the integral of partial influence functionals (PIF). If the partial evolution operators or PIF are chosen in such a way that they decohere (do not interfere with each other), then the formalism of RPI effectively arises. The evolution of the open system may then be interpreted as a continuous measurement of this system by its environment. This is possible if the environment is macroscopic or mesoscopic

  19. Quantifying adaptive evolution in the Drosophila immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Obbard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that a large proportion of amino acid substitutions in Drosophila have been fixed by natural selection, and as organisms are faced with an ever-changing array of pathogens and parasites to which they must adapt, we have investigated the role of parasite-mediated selection as a likely cause. To quantify the effect, and to identify which genes and pathways are most likely to be involved in the host-parasite arms race, we have re-sequenced population samples of 136 immunity and 287 position-matched non-immunity genes in two species of Drosophila. Using these data, and a new extension of the McDonald-Kreitman approach, we estimate that natural selection fixes advantageous amino acid changes in immunity genes at nearly double the rate of other genes. We find the rate of adaptive evolution in immunity genes is also more variable than other genes, with a small subset of immune genes evolving under intense selection. These genes, which are likely to represent hotspots of host-parasite coevolution, tend to share similar functions or belong to the same pathways, such as the antiviral RNAi pathway and the IMD signalling pathway. These patterns appear to be general features of immune system evolution in both species, as rates of adaptive evolution are correlated between the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. In summary, our data provide quantitative estimates of the elevated rate of adaptive evolution in immune system genes relative to the rest of the genome, and they suggest that adaptation to parasites is an important force driving molecular evolution.

  20. Time evolution of pore system in lime - Pozzolana composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleželová, Magdaléna; Čáchová, Monika; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Keppert, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The lime - pozzolana mortars and plasters are used in restoration works on building cultural heritage but these materials are also following the trend of energy - efficient solutions in civil engineering. Porosity and pore size distribution is one of crucial parameters influencing engineering properties of porous materials. The pore size distribution of lime based system is changing in time due to chemical processes occurring in the material. The present paper describes time evolution of pore system in lime - pozzolana composites; the obtained results are useful in prediction of performance of lime - pozzolana systems in building structures.

  1. A Generalized Evolution Criterion in Nonequilibrium Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyanagi, Masakazu; Nisizima, Kunisuke

    1989-04-01

    A general evolution criterion, applicable to transport processes such as the conduction of heat and mass diffusion, is obtained as a direct version of the Le Chatelier-Braun principle for stationary states. The present theory is not based on any radical departure from the conventional one. The generalized theory is made determinate by proposing the balance equations for extensive thermodynamic variables which will reflect the character of convective systems under the assumption of local equilibrium. As a consequence of the introduction of source terms in the balance equations, there appear additional terms in the expression of the local entropy production, which are bilinear in terms of the intensive variables and the sources. In the present paper, we show that we can construct a dissipation function for such general cases, in which the premises of the Glansdorff-Prigogine theory are accumulated. The new dissipation function permits us to formulate a generalized evolution criterion for convective systems.

  2. Time evolution of a system of two alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baye, D.; Herschkowitz, D.

    1996-01-01

    Motivated by interpretations of a broad structure at 32.5 MeV in the 12 C( 12 C, 12 C(0 + 2 )) 12 C(0 + 2 ) doubly inelastic scattering cross sections in terms of linear chains of α particles, we study in a microscopic model with an exact account of antisymmetrization the time evolution of a system of two α clusters. The evolution of the system is obtained from a time-dependent variational principle and visualized with matter densities. Even in the most favourable case, an initial two-cluster structure completely disappears in less than 2.10 -22 s. This result casts doubts on the observability of longer α chains. (orig.)

  3. Formal Definitions of Unbounded Evolution and Innovation Reveal Universal Mechanisms for Open-Ended Evolution in Dynamical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alyssa; Zenil, Hector; Davies, Paul C W; Walker, Sara Imari

    2017-04-20

    Open-ended evolution (OEE) is relevant to a variety of biological, artificial and technological systems, but has been challenging to reproduce in silico. Most theoretical efforts focus on key aspects of open-ended evolution as it appears in biology. We recast the problem as a more general one in dynamical systems theory, providing simple criteria for open-ended evolution based on two hallmark features: unbounded evolution and innovation. We define unbounded evolution as patterns that are non-repeating within the expected Poincare recurrence time of an isolated system, and innovation as trajectories not observed in isolated systems. As a case study, we implement novel variants of cellular automata (CA) where the update rules are allowed to vary with time in three alternative ways. Each is capable of generating conditions for open-ended evolution, but vary in their ability to do so. We find that state-dependent dynamics, regarded as a hallmark of life, statistically out-performs other candidate mechanisms, and is the only mechanism to produce open-ended evolution in a scalable manner, essential to the notion of ongoing evolution. This analysis suggests a new framework for unifying mechanisms for generating OEE with features distinctive to life and its artifacts, with broad applicability to biological and artificial systems.

  4. A hybrid two-component Bose–Einstein condensate interferometer for measuring magnetic field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Fei [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Jiahao, E-mail: hjiahao@mail2.sysu.edu.cn [TianQin Research Center & School of Physics and Astronomy, Sun Yat-Sen University, SYSU Zhuhai Campus, Zhuhai 519082 (China); Liu, Quan [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2017-03-03

    Highlights: • A scheme for detecting magnetic field gradients via a double-well two-component Bose–Einstein condensate interferometer. • The magnetic field gradient can be extracted by either the spin population or the external state. • Our proposal is potentially sensitive to weak magnetic field inhomogeneity due to its small sensor size. - Abstract: We have proposed a scheme to detect magnetic field gradients via an interferometer based on a double-well two-component Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC). Utilizing a sequence of quantum control operations on both external and internal degree of the BEC, one can extract the magnetic field gradients by measuring either the population in one component or the fidelity between the final external state and the initial ground state. Our scheme can be implemented by current experimental techniques of manipulating ultracold atoms.

  5. Geotail observations of temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the dusk plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Nishino

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In search for clues towards the understanding of the cold plasma sheet formation under northward IMF, we study the temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the plasma sheet near the dusk low-latitude boundary observed by the Geotail spacecraft. The two-component protons result from mixing of the cold component from the solar wind and the hot component of the magnetospheric origin, and may be the most eloquent evidence for the transport process across the magnetopause. The cold component occasionally has a strong anisotropy in the dusk flank, and the sense of the anisotropy depends on the observed locations: the parallel temperature is enhanced in the tail flank while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. The hot component is nearly isotropic in the tail while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. We discuss possible mechanism that can lead to the observed temperature anisotropies.

  6. Fingering instabilities and pattern formation in a two-component dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Kui-Tian; Byrnes, Tim; Saito, Hiroki

    2018-02-01

    We study fingering instabilities and pattern formation at the interface of an oppositely polarized two-component Bose-Einstein condensate with strong dipole-dipole interactions in three dimensions. It is shown that the rotational symmetry is spontaneously broken by fingering instability when the dipole-dipole interactions are strengthened. Frog-shaped and mushroom-shaped patterns emerge during the dynamics due to the dipolar interactions. We also demonstrate the spontaneous density modulation and domain growth of a two-component dipolar BEC in the dynamics. Bogoliubov analyses in the two-dimensional approximation are performed, and the characteristic lengths of the domains are estimated analytically. Patterns resembling those in magnetic classical fluids are modulated when the number ratio of atoms, the trap ratio of the external potential, or tilted polarization with respect to the z direction is varied.

  7. Preventive effect of two-component chemical radioprotector and variability in its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambov, V.; Metodiev, S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the radioprotective efficiency of two-component radioprotective schema consisting of the chemically synthesized radioprotector WR-2721 (OK-79) and a new glycoside pigment obtained from melanoidine CL. The application of melanoidine 7-21 days before WR-2721 significantly increases the radioprotective efficiency of the chemically obtained product and enhances the 30-day survival of hybrid mice treated with 15 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. The effect of potentiated radioprotection is not observed when the interval between the application of the two agents is reduced to 24 h. It is suggested that the observed enhancement of the radioprotective efficiency in the two-component schema is due to the antioxidant and immuno modulating properties of the pigment product, observed and described in our previous investigations. (author)

  8. Two-component injection moulding simulation of ABS-POM micro structured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Islam, Aminul

    2013-01-01

    Multi-component micro injection moulding (μIM) processes such as two-component (2k) μIM are the key technologies for the mass fabrication of multi-material micro products. 2k-μIM experiments involving a miniaturized test component with micro features in the sub-mm dimensional range and moulding a...... process. Flow front predictions are compared with experimental results using the short shots technique over the whole miniaturized component and within the surface micro structures....

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  10. Two-component bond for coating materials coming into contact with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, L.; Fajfr, K.

    1989-01-01

    The two-component bonding agent consists of an epoxy resin of the diane-bis-glycidyl ether type and an amine hardener containing benzyl alcohol and bis-2-ethylhexyl phthalate. The claimed bond features high radiation stability and very good decontaminability. Thanks to low viscosity of the bond, pigmented reactor-plastics can be prepared. The procedure is described of applying the bond onto a concrete surface. (E.S.)

  11. A two-component generalized extreme value distribution for precipitation frequency analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rulfová, Zuzana; Buishand, A.; Roth, M.; Kyselý, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 534, March (2016), s. 659-668 ISSN 0022-1694 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-18675S Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : precipitation extremes * two-component extreme value distribution * regional frequency analysis * convective precipitation * stratiform precipitation * Central Europe Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.483, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022169416000500

  12. Two components of Na emission in sonoluminescence spectrum from surfactant aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Choi, Pak-Kon

    2015-03-01

    Sonoluminescence from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) aqueous solutions exhibits Na emission. The spectrum of Na emission was measured as a function of sonication time for a total of 30 min at an ultrasonic frequency of 148 kHz. The spectral line profiles changed with the sonication time, suggesting that the Na emission consists of two components: broadened lines, which are shifted from the original D lines, and unshifted narrow lines. The intensity of the unshifted narrow lines decreased at a greater rate than that of the broadened lines with increasing sonication time. This effect was enhanced at a higher acoustic power. The shifted broadened lines remained after sonication for 30 min. We propose that these quenching effects are caused by the accumulation of gases decomposed from SDS molecules inside bubbles. The CO₂ gas dependence of Na emission in NaCl aqueous solutions showed a similar change in the line profiles to that in SDS aqueous solutions, which supported this proposition. The unshifted narrow lines are easily affected by foreign gases. The results suggest that the two components originate from different environments around the emitting species, although both of them originate from the gas phase inside bubbles. The generation mechanisms of the two components are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Umov effect in application to an optically thin two-component cloud of cosmic dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Videen, Gorden; Zubko, Nataliya; Shkuratov, Yuriy

    2018-04-01

    The Umov effect is an inverse correlation between linear polarization of the sunlight scattered by an object and its geometric albedo. The Umov effect has been observed in particulate surfaces, such as planetary regoliths, and recently it also was found in single-scattering small dust particles. Using numerical modeling, we study the Umov effect in a two-component mixture of small irregularly shaped particles. Such a complex chemical composition is suggested in cometary comae and other types of optically thin clouds of cosmic dust. We find that the two-component mixtures of small particles also reveal the Umov effect regardless of the chemical composition of their end-member components. The interrelation between log(Pmax) and log(A) in a two-component mixture of small irregularly shaped particles appears either in a straight linear form or in a slightly curved form. This curvature tends to decrease while the index n in a power-law size distribution r-n grows; at n > 2.5, the log(Pmax)-log(A) diagrams are almost straight linear in appearance. The curvature also noticeably decreases with the packing density of constituent material in irregularly shaped particles forming the mixture. That such a relation exists suggest the Umov effect may also be observed in more complex mixtures.

  14. Dynamical evolution of small bodies in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2012-05-01

    This thesis explores the dynamical evolution of small bodies in the Solar System. It focuses on the asteroid population but parts of the theory can be applied to other systems such as comets or Kuiper Belt objects. Small is a relative term that refers to bodies whose dynamics can be significantly perturbed by non-gravitational forces and tidal torques on timescales less than their lifetimes (for instance the collisional timescale in the Main Belt asteroid population or the sun impact timescale for the near-Earth asteroid population). Non-gravitational torques such as the YORP effect can result in the active endogenous evolution of asteroid systems; something that was not considered more than twenty years ago. This thesis is divided into three independent studies. The first explores the dynamics of a binary systems immediately after formation from rotational fission. The rotational fission hypothesis states that a rotationally torqued asteroid will fission when the centrifugal accelerations across the body exceed gravitational attraction. Asteroids must have very little or no tensile strength for this to occur, and are often referred to as "rubble piles.'' A more complete description of the hypothesis and the ensuing dynamics is provided there. From that study a framework of asteroid evolution is assembled. It is determined that mass ratio is the most important factor for determining the outcome of a rotational fission event. Each observed binary morphology is tied to this evolutionary schema and the relevant timescales are assessed. In the second study, the role of non-gravitational and tidal torques in binary asteroid systems is explored. Understanding the competition between tides and the YORP effect provides insight into the relative abundances of the different binary morphologies and the effect of planetary flybys. The interplay between tides and the BYORP effect creates dramatic evolutionary pathways that lead to interesting end states including stranded

  15. The ecology and evolution of avian alarm call signaling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Alexis Chandon

    Communication is often set up as a simple dyadic exchange between one sender and one receiver. However, in reality, signaling systems have evolved and are used with many forms and types of information bombarding multiple senders, who in turn send multiple signals of different modalities, through various environmental spaces, finally reaching multiple receivers. In order to understand both the ecology and evolution of a signaling system, we must examine all the facets of the signaling system. My dissertation focused on the alarm call signaling system in birds. Alarm calls are acoustic signals given in response to danger or predators. My first two chapters examine how information about predators alters alarm calls. In chapter one I found that chickadees make distinctions between predators of different hunting strategies and appear to encode information about predators differently if they are heard instead of seen. In my second chapter, I test these findings more robustly in a non-model bird, the Steller's jay. I again found that predator species matters, but that how Steller's jays respond if they saw or heard the predator depends on the predator species. In my third chapter, I tested how habitat has influenced the evolution of mobbing call acoustic structure. I found that habitat is not a major contributor to the variation in acoustic structure seen across species and that other selective pressures such as body size may be more important. In my fourth chapter I present a new framework to understand the evolution of multimodal communication across species. I identify a unique constraint, the need for overlapping sensory systems, thresholds and cognitive abilities between sender and receiver in order for different forms of interspecific communication to evolve. Taken together, these chapters attempt to understand a signaling system from both an ecological and evolutionary perspective by examining each piece of the communication scheme.

  16. Long-term evolution and stability of planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juric, Mario

    This dissertation studies the dynamical evolution and stability of planetary systems over long time spans (10 8 -10 9 years). I investigated the dynamical evolution of few-planet systems by simulating ensembles of systems consisting of hundreds to thousands of randomly constructed members. I looked at ways to classify the systems according to their dynamical activity, and found the median Hill separation of an ensemble to be a sufficiently good criterion for separation into active (those exhibiting frequent planetary close encounters, collisions or ejections) and inactive ensembles. I examined the evolution of dynamical parameters in active systems. I found that in ensembles of dynamically active (initially unstable) systems the eccentricity distribution evolves towards the same equilibrium form, irrespective of the distribution it began with. Furthermore, this equilibrium distribution is indistinguishable, within observational errors, from the distribution found in extrasolar planets. This is to my knowledge the first successful detailed theoretical reproduction of the form of observed exoplanet eccentricity distribution. I further looked for quantities that can be used as indicators of long-term stability of planetary systems, specifically the angular momentum deficit (AMD) as originally proposed by Laskar. I found that the quantity Q , defined as the ratio of minimum AMD required for a planetary collision to occur in secular theory and the total AMD of the system, may be used to predict the likelihood of decay of a planetary system. Qualitatively, the decay in systems having Q [Special characters omitted.] 1 is highly probable, while systems with Q [Special characters omitted.] 1 were found to be stable. To conduct the above investigations, I developed a new integrator package (VENUS), and the HYBRID/EE integration scheme designed for nearly-symplectic long-term integrations. VENUS implements integration algorithms for few-body planetary system integrations

  17. Mosaic and concerted evolution in the visual system of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Moore, Bret A; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban; Corfield, Jeremy R; Krilow, Justin M; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Wylie, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    Two main models have been proposed to explain how the relative size of neural structures varies through evolution. In the mosaic evolution model, individual brain structures vary in size independently of each other, whereas in the concerted evolution model developmental constraints result in different parts of the brain varying in size in a coordinated manner. Several studies have shown variation of the relative size of individual nuclei in the vertebrate brain, but it is currently not known if nuclei belonging to the same functional pathway vary independently of each other or in a concerted manner. The visual system of birds offers an ideal opportunity to specifically test which of the two models apply to an entire sensory pathway. Here, we examine the relative size of 9 different visual nuclei across 98 species of birds. This includes data on interspecific variation in the cytoarchitecture and relative size of the isthmal nuclei, which has not been previously reported. We also use a combination of statistical analyses, phylogenetically corrected principal component analysis and evolutionary rates of change on the absolute and relative size of the nine nuclei, to test if visual nuclei evolved in a concerted or mosaic manner. Our results strongly indicate a combination of mosaic and concerted evolution (in the relative size of nine nuclei) within the avian visual system. Specifically, the relative size of the isthmal nuclei and parts of the tectofugal pathway covary across species in a concerted fashion, whereas the relative volume of the other visual nuclei measured vary independently of one another, such as that predicted by the mosaic model. Our results suggest the covariation of different neural structures depends not only on the functional connectivity of each nucleus, but also on the diversity of afferents and efferents of each nucleus.

  18. Evolution of Planetary Ice-Ocean Systems: Effects of Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allu Peddinti, D.; McNamara, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary oceanography is enjoying renewed attention thanks to not only the detection of several exoplanetary ocean worlds but also due to the expanding family of ocean worlds within our own star system. Our solar system is now believed to host about nine ocean worlds including Earth, some dwarf planets and few moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Amongst them, Europa, like Earth is thought to have an ice Ih-liquid water system. However, the thickness of the Europan ice-ocean system is much larger than that of the Earth. The evolution of this system would determine the individual thicknesses of the ice shell and the ocean. In turn, these thicknesses can alter the course of evolution of the system. In a pure H2O system, the thickness of the ice shell would govern if heat loss occurs entirely by conduction or if the shell begins to convect as it attains a threshold thickness. This switch between conduction-convection regimes could determine the longevity of the subsurface ocean and hence define the astrobiological potential of the planetary body at any given time. In reality, however, the system is not pure water ice. The detected induced magnetic field infers a saline ocean layer. Salts are expected to act as an anti-freeze allowing a subsurface ocean to persist over long periods but the amount of salts would determine the extent of that effect. In our current study, we use geodynamic models to examine the effect of salinity on the evolution of ice-ocean system. An initial ocean with different salinities is allowed to evolve. The effect of salinity on thickness of the two layers at any time is examined. We also track how salinity controls the switch between conductive-convective modes. The study shows that for a given time period, larger salinities can maintain a thick vigorously convecting ocean while the smaller salinities behave similar to a pure H2O system leading to a thick convecting ice-shell. A range of salinities identified can potentially predict the current state

  19. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  20. Digital logic circuit based on two component molecular systems of BSA and salen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai-Bin, Lin; Feng, Chen; Hong-Xu, Guo

    2018-02-01

    A new fluorescent molecular probe 1 was designed and constructed by combining bovine serum albumin (BSA) and N,N‧-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine (salen). Stimulated by Zn2 +, tris, or EDTAH2Na2, the distance between BSA and salen was regulated, which was accompanied by an obvious change in the fluorescence intensity at 350 or 445 nm based on Förster resonance energy transfer. Moreover, based on the encoding binary digits in these inputs and outputs applying positive logic conventions, a monomolecular circuit integrating one OR, three NOT, and three YES gates, was successfully achieved.

  1. The two-component system ChtRS contributes to chlorhexidine tolerance in Enterococcus faecium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzmán Prieto, Ana M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413649903; Wijngaarden, Jessica; Braat, Johanna C.; Rogers, Malbert R.C.; Majoor, Eline; Brouwer, Ellen C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815667; Zhang, Xinglin; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313070555; Bonten, Marc J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; Willems, Rob J.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/106866370; Van Schaik, Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/279958846

    2017-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium is one of the primary causes of nosocomial infections. Disinfectants are commonly used to prevent infections with multidrugresistant E. faecium in hospitals. Worryingly, E. faecium strains that exhibit tolerance to disinfectants have already been described. We aimed to identify

  2. How insects overcome two-component plant chemical defence: plant β-glucosidases as the main target for herbivore adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentzold, Stefan; Zagrobelny, Mika; Rook, Fred; Bak, Søren

    2014-08-01

    Insect herbivory is often restricted by glucosylated plant chemical defence compounds that are activated by plant β-glucosidases to release toxic aglucones upon plant tissue damage. Such two-component plant defences are widespread in the plant kingdom and examples of these classes of compounds are alkaloid, benzoxazinoid, cyanogenic and iridoid glucosides as well as glucosinolates and salicinoids. Conversely, many insects have evolved a diversity of counteradaptations to overcome this type of constitutive chemical defence. Here we discuss that such counter-adaptations occur at different time points, before and during feeding as well as during digestion, and at several levels such as the insects’ feeding behaviour, physiology and metabolism. Insect adaptations frequently circumvent or counteract the activity of the plant β-glucosidases, bioactivating enzymes that are a key element in the plant’s two-component chemical defence. These adaptations include host plant choice, non-disruptive feeding guilds and various physiological adaptations as well as metabolic enzymatic strategies of the insect’s digestive system. Furthermore, insect adaptations often act in combination, may exist in both generalists and specialists, and can act on different classes of defence compounds. We discuss how generalist and specialist insects appear to differ in their ability to use these different types of adaptations: in generalists, adaptations are often inducible, whereas in specialists they are often constitutive. Future studies are suggested to investigate in detail how insect adaptations act in combination to overcome plant chemical defences and to allow ecologically relevant conclusions.

  3. INFLUENCE OF THE ENVIRONMENT CHARACTERISTICS ON INDUSTRY SYSTEM EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markov L. S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the constructed evolutionary model in relation to branch of production of steam coals its structural transformation at taking note of various environmental characteristics is considered: endogenous competition, antimonopoly and anti-recessionary regulation. As an indicator of evolution of system it is offered to consider its structural change (Herfindahl-Hirschman index. The executed modeling showed that the speed of evolution of system, more intensive processes of concentration is in direct dependence on a price factor and in inverse relationship from rigidity of criteria of a dominant position. Frequency of transformation of system grows at increase in sensitivity of market price to a ratio of supply and demand and at cancellation of restrictions on the maximum volume, and decreases at liberalization of anti-recessionary regulation. It is shown that actions of antimonopoly and antirecessionary regulation can make sense in the short-term period, but in long-term prospect they lead to braking of development of system.

  4. Rapid evolution of manifold CRISPR systems for plant genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Qi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced CRISPR-Cas9 based technologies first validated in mammalian cell systems are quickly being adapted for use in plants. These new technologies increase CRISPR-Cas9’s utility and effectiveness by diversifying cellular capabilities through expression construct system evolution and enzyme orthogonality, as well as enhanced efficiency through delivery and expression mechanisms. Here, we review the current state of advanced CRISPR-Cas9 and Cpf1 capabilities in plants and cover the rapid evolution of these tools from first generation inducers of double strand breaks for basic genetic manipulations to second and third generation multiplexed systems with myriad functionalities, capabilities and specialized applications. We offer perspective on how to utilize these tools for currently untested research endeavors and analyze strengths and weaknesses of novel CRISPR systems in plants. Advanced CRISPR functionalities and delivery options demonstrated in plants are primarily reviewed but new technologies just coming to the forefront of CRISPR development, or those on the horizon, are briefly discussed. Topics covered are focused on the expansion of expression and delivery capabilities for CRISPR-Cas9 components and broadening targeting range through orthogonal Cas9 and Cpf1 proteins.

  5. Rapid Evolution of Manifold CRISPR Systems for Plant Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Levi; Malzahn, Aimee; Qi, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Advanced CRISPR-Cas9 based technologies first validated in mammalian cell systems are quickly being adapted for use in plants. These new technologies increase CRISPR-Cas9's utility and effectiveness by diversifying cellular capabilities through expression construct system evolution and enzyme orthogonality, as well as enhanced efficiency through delivery and expression mechanisms. Here, we review the current state of advanced CRISPR-Cas9 and Cpf1 capabilities in plants and cover the rapid evolution of these tools from first generation inducers of double strand breaks for basic genetic manipulations to second and third generation multiplexed systems with myriad functionalities, capabilities, and specialized applications. We offer perspective on how to utilize these tools for currently untested research endeavors and analyze strengths and weaknesses of novel CRISPR systems in plants. Advanced CRISPR functionalities and delivery options demonstrated in plants are primarily reviewed but new technologies just coming to the forefront of CRISPR development, or those on the horizon, are briefly discussed. Topics covered are focused on the expansion of expression and delivery capabilities for CRISPR-Cas9 components and broadening targeting range through orthogonal Cas9 and Cpf1 proteins.

  6. Observing the evolution of a quantum system that does not evolve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Liberato, Simone

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the problem of gathering information on the time evolution of a single metastable quantum system whose evolution is impeded by the quantum Zeno effect. It has been found it is in principle possible to obtain some information on the time evolution and, depending on the specific system, even to measure its average decay rate, even if the system does not undergo any evolution at all

  7. Detecting and Interpreting the Dynamical Evolution of Transiting Multiplanet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sean Martin

    The dynamical interactions of our Solar System have been studied in depth since Isaac Newton recognized that the planets may not be stable to each other's gravitational perturbations. Recently, the discovery of exoplanet systems, including approximately a thousand planet candidates in systems of more than two bodies, has opened an extremely vast and diverse laboratory for planetary dynamics. In this dissertation, I describe techniques for measuring the dynamical, post-Keplerian interactions of planetary systems. Such signals often require numerical N-body analysis and photodynamic techniques combined with Bayesian statistics to correctly determine the properties of the planetary systems causing them. By simultaneously fitting the entire lightcurve data set at once, I am able to extract low signal-to-noise effects such as the resonance dynamics of a very faint system (Kepler-223), the slow orbital precession of a giant planet system (Kepler-108), and transit timing variations among very small and low mass planets (Kepler-444). I use these analyses to gain physical insight into the system's history, such as Kepler-108's potentially chaotic, violent past. Kepler-223's present structure indicates a migration origin for at least some close-in, sub-Neptune planets, which I explore in terms of tidal dissipation, smooth and stochastic migration, and secular evolution. I also analyze circumbinary systems including the newly discovered KIC 10753734. Taken together, these results provide insight into planetary formation in a broad array of environments for planet from compact sub-Neptune systems to Jupiters and circumbinary planets.

  8. Three-wave interaction in two-component quadratic nonlinear lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konotop, V. V.; Cunha, M. D.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1999-01-01

    We investigate a two-component lattice with a quadratic nonlinearity and find with the multiple scale technique that integrable three-wave interaction takes place between plane wave solutions when these fulfill resonance conditions. We demonstrate that. energy conversion and pulse propagation known...... from three-wave interaction is reproduced in the lattice and that exact phase matching of parametric processes can be obtained in non-phase-matched lattices by tilting the interacting plane waves with respect to each other. [S1063-651X(99)15110-9]....

  9. Disorder-Induced Order in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederberger, A.; Schulte, T.; Wehr, J.; Lewenstein, M.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Sacha, K.

    2008-01-01

    We propose and analyze a general mechanism of disorder-induced order in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates, analogous to corresponding effects established for XY spin models. We show that a random Raman coupling induces a relative phase of π/2 between the two BECs and that the effect is robust. We demonstrate it in one, two, and three dimensions at T=0 and present evidence that it persists at small T>0. Applications to phase control in ultracold spinor condensates are discussed

  10. Correlation inequalities for two-component hypercubic /varreverse arrowphi/4 models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    A collection of new and already known correlation inequalities is found for a family of two-component hypercubic /varreverse arrowphi/ 4 models, using techniques of duplicated variables, rotated correlation inequalities, and random walk representation. Among the interesting new inequalities are: rotated very special Dunlop-Newman inequality 2 ; /varreverse arrowphi//sub 1z/ 2 + /varreverse arrowphi//sub 2z/ 2 ≥ 0, rotated Griffiths I inequality 2 - /varreverse arrowphi//sub 2z/ 2 > ≥ 0, and anti-Lebowitz inequality u 4 1111 ≥ 0

  11. Two-component Thermal Dust Emission Model: Application to the Planck HFI Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2014-06-01

    We present full-sky, 6.1 arcminute resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature derived by fitting the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component dust emission model to the Planck HFI and IRAS 100 micron maps. This parametrization of the far infrared thermal dust SED as the sum of two modified blackbodies serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single modified blackbody dust emission model. We expect our Planck-based maps of dust temperature and optical depth to form the basis for a next-generation, high-resolution extinction map which will additionally incorporate small-scale detail from WISE imaging.

  12. Self-duality for the two-component asymmetric simple exclusion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belitsky, V. [Instituto de Matemática e Estátistica, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, 1010, CEP 05508-090 São Paulo-SP (Brazil); Schütz, G. M. [Institute of Complex Systems II, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    We study a two-component asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) that is equivalent to the ASEP with second-class particles. We prove self-duality with respect to a family of duality functions which are shown to arise from the reversible measures of the process and the symmetry of the generator under the quantum algebra U{sub q}[gl{sub 3}]. We construct all invariant measures in explicit form and discuss some of their properties. We also prove a sum rule for the duality functions.

  13. The oligomeric assembly of the novel haem-degrading protein HbpS is essential for interaction with its cognate two-component sensor kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Bogel, Gabriele; Zou, Peijian; Groves, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    HbpS, a novel protein of previously unknown function from Streptomyces reticuli, is up-regulated in response to haemin- and peroxide-based oxidative stress and interacts with the SenS/SenR two-component signal transduction system. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structures (2.2

  14. A two-component model of host–parasitoid interactions: determination of the size of inundative releases of parasitoids in biological pest contro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Herwaarden, van O.A.; Hemerik, L.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2001-01-01

    A two-component differential equation model is formulated for a host–parasitoid interaction. Transient dynamics and population crashes of this system are analysed using differential inequalities. Two different cases can be distinguished: either the intrinsic growth rate of the host population is

  15. Cloud System Evolution in the Trades—CSET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, B. A.; Zuidema, P.; Bretherton, C. S.; Wood, R.; Ghate, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET) study was designed to describe and explain the evolution of the boundary layer aerosol, cloud, and thermodynamic structures along trajectories within the north-Pacific trade-winds. The observational component of this study centered on 7 round-trips made by the NSF NCAR Gulfstream V (GV) between Sacramento, CA and Kona, Hawaii between 1 July and 15 August 2015. The CSET observing strategy used a Lagrangian approach to sample aerosol, cloud, and boundary layer properties upwind from the transition zone over the North Pacific and to resample these areas two days later. GFS forecast trajectories were used to plan the outbound flight to Hawaii and then updated forecast trajectories helped set the return flight plan two days later. Two key elements of the CSET observing system were the newly developed HIAPER Cloud Radar (HCR) and the HIAPER Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). Together they provided unprecedented characterizations of aerosol, cloud and precipitation structures. A full suite of probes on the aircraft were used for in situ measurements of aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and turbulence properties during the low-level aircraft profiling portions of the flights. A wide range of boundary layer structures and aerosol, cloud, and precipitation conditions were observed during CSET. The cloud systems sampled included solid stratocumulus infused with smoke from Canadian wildfires, mesoscale (100-200 km) cloud-precipitation complexes, and patches of shallow cumuli in environments with accumulation mode aerosol concentrations of less than 50 cm-3. Ultra clean layers (UCLs with accumulation mode concentrations of less than 10 cm-3) were observed frequently near the top of the boundary layer and were often associated with shallow, gray (optically thin) layered clouds—features that are the subject of focused investigations by the CSET science team. The extent of aerosol, cloud, drizzle and boundary layer sampling that was

  16. Star-planet interactions and dynamical evolution of exoplanetary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiani Cilia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical evolution of planetary systems, after the evaporation of the accretion disk, is the result of the competition between tidal dissipation and the net angular momentum loss of the system. The description of the diversity of orbital configurations, and correlations between parameters of the observed system (e.g. in the case of hot jupiters, is still limited by our understanding of the transport of angular momentum within the stars, and its effective loss by magnetic braking. After discussing the challenges of modelling tidal evolution for exoplanets, I will review recent results showing the importance of tidal interactions to test models of planetary formation. This kind of studies rely on the determination of stellar radii, masses and ages. Major advances will thus be obtained with the results of the PLATO 2.0 mission, selected as the next M-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision plan, that will allow the complete characterisation of host stars using asteroseismology.

  17. Meteorites and the Evolution of Our Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The study of meteorites has long been of intense interest ever since these objects were discovered to be of extraterrestrial origin. Meteorite research contributes to unraveling the mysteries in understanding the formation and evolution processes of our solar system. Meteorites, of which there are a variety of widely diverse types of chemical and mineralogical compositions, are the most ancient of solar system objects that can be studied in the laboratory. They preserve a unique historical record of the astronomical and astrophysical events of our solar system. This record is being discerned by a host of ever evolving analytical laboratory methods. Recent discoveries of what are believed to be Martian meteorites, lunar meteorites, a meteorite containing indigenous water, and the recovery from the Cretaceous layer of a small meteorite fragment thought to be from the dinosaur-killing asteroid have fueled additional excitement for studying meteorites.

  18. Approximate singly excited states from a two-component Hartree-Fock reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goings, Joshua J; Ding, Feizhi; Davidson, Ernest R; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-10-14

    For many molecules, relaxing the spin symmetry constraint on the wave function results in the lowest energy mean-field solution. The two-component Hartree-Fock (2cHF) method relaxes all spin symmetry constraints, and the wave function is no longer an eigenfunction of the total spin, spin projection, or time-reversal symmetry operators. For ground state energies, 2cHF is a superior mean-field method for describing spin-frustrated molecules. For excited states, the utility of 2cHF is uncertain. Here, we implement the 2cHF extensions of two single-reference excited state methods, the two-component configuration interaction singles and time-dependent Hartree-Fock. We compare the results to the analogous methods based off of the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation, as well as the full configuration interaction for three small molecules with distinct 2cHF solutions, and discuss the nature of the 2cHF excited state solutions.

  19. Numerical analysis of a non equilibrium two-component two-compressible flow in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed

    2013-09-01

    We propose and analyze a finite volume scheme to simulate a non equilibrium two components (water and hydrogen) two phase flow (liquid and gas) model. In this model, the assumption of local mass non equilibrium is ensured and thus the velocity of the mass exchange between dissolved hydrogen and hydrogen in the gas phase is supposed finite. The proposed finite volume scheme is fully implicit in time together with a phase-by-phase upwind approach in space and it is discretize the equations in their general form with gravity and capillary terms We show that the proposed scheme satisfies the maximum principle for the saturation and the concentration of the dissolved hydrogen. We establish stability results on the velocity of each phase and on the discrete gradient of the concentration. We show the convergence of a subsequence to a weak solution of the continuous equations as the size of the discretization tends to zero. At our knowledge, this is the first convergence result of finite volume scheme in the case of two component two phase compressible flow in several space dimensions.

  20. Shape-persistent two-component 2D networks with atomic-size tunability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Jie-Yu; Pei, Jian; Stang, Peter J; Wan, Li-Jun

    2011-09-05

    Over the past few years, two-dimensional (2D) nanoporous networks have attracted great interest as templates for the precise localization and confinement of guest building blocks, such as functional molecules or clusters on the solid surfaces. Herein, a series of two-component molecular networks with a 3-fold symmetry are constructed on graphite using a truxenone derivative and trimesic acid homologues with carboxylic-acid-terminated alkyl chains. The hydrogen-bonding partner-recognition-induced 2D crystallization of alkyl chains makes the flexible alkyl chains act as rigid spacers in the networks to continuously tune the pore size with an accuracy of one carbon atom per step. The two-component networks were found to accommodate and regulate the distribution and aggregation of guest molecules, such as COR and CuPc. This procedure provides a new pathway for the design and fabrication of molecular nanostructures on solid surfaces. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Regularity for 3D Navier-Stokes equations in terms of two components of the vorticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadek Gala

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We establish regularity conditions for the 3D Navier-Stokes equation via two components of the vorticity vector. It is known that if a Leray-Hopf weak solution $u$ satisfies $$ ilde{omega}in L^{2/(2-r}(0,T;L^{3/r}(mathbb{R}^3quad hbox{with }0two components of the vorticity, $omega =operatorname{curl}u$, then $u$ becomes the classical solution on $(0,T]$ (see [5]. We prove the regularity of Leray-Hopf weak solution $u$ under each of the following two (weaker conditions: $$displaylines{ ilde{omega}in L^{2/(2-r}(0,T;dot {mathcal{M}}_{2, 3/r}(mathbb{R}^3quad hbox{for }0

  2. Determination of two-dimensional correlation lengths in an anisotropic two-component flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, O.

    1994-05-01

    Former studies have shown that correlation methods can be used for determination of various two-component flow parameters, among these the correlation length. In cases where the flow can be described as a mixture, in which the minority component forms spatially limited perturbations within the majority component, this parameter gives a good indication of the maximum extension of these perturbations. In the former studies, spherical symmetry of the perturbations has been assumed, and the correlation length has been measured in the direction of the flow (axially) only. However, if the flow structure is anisotropic, the correlation length will be different in different directions. In the present study, the method has been developed further, allowing also measurements perpendicular to the flow direction (radially). The measurements were carried out using laser beams and the two-component flows consisted of either glass beads and air or air and water. In order to make local measurements of both the axial and radial correlation length simultaneously, it is necessary to use 3 laser beams and to form the triple cross-covariance. This lead to some unforeseen complications, due to the character of this function. The experimental results are generally positive and size determinations with an accuracy of better than 10% have been achieved in most cases. Less accurate results appeared only for difficult conditions (symmetrical signals), when 3 beams were used. 5 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Two component WIMP-FImP dark matter model with singlet fermion, scalar and pseudo scalar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta Banik, Amit; Pandey, Madhurima; Majumdar, Debasish [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, HBNI, Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology Division, Kolkata (India); Biswas, Anirban [Harish Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad (India)

    2017-10-15

    We explore a two component dark matter model with a fermion and a scalar. In this scenario the Standard Model (SM) is extended by a fermion, a scalar and an additional pseudo scalar. The fermionic component is assumed to have a global U(1){sub DM} and interacts with the pseudo scalar via Yukawa interaction while a Z{sub 2} symmetry is imposed on the other component - the scalar. These ensure the stability of both dark matter components. Although the Lagrangian of the present model is CP conserving, the CP symmetry breaks spontaneously when the pseudo scalar acquires a vacuum expectation value (VEV). The scalar component of the dark matter in the present model also develops a VEV on spontaneous breaking of the Z{sub 2} symmetry. Thus the various interactions of the dark sector and the SM sector occur through the mixing of the SM like Higgs boson, the pseudo scalar Higgs like boson and the singlet scalar boson. We show that the observed gamma ray excess from the Galactic Centre as well as the 3.55 keV X-ray line from Perseus, Andromeda etc. can be simultaneously explained in the present two component dark matter model and the dark matter self interaction is found to be an order of magnitude smaller than the upper limit estimated from the observational results. (orig.)

  4. Open System Models of Isotopic Evolution in Earth's Silicate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, S.; Paul, D.; Stracke, A.

    2016-12-01

    The present-day elemental and isotopic composition of Earth's terrestrial reservoirs can be used as geochemical constraints to study evolution of the crust-mantle system. A flexible open system evolutionary model of the Earth, comprising continental crust (CC), upper depleted mantle (UM) -source of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB), and lower mantle (LM) reservoir with an isolated reservoir-source of ocean island basalts (OIB), and incorporating key radioactive isotope systematics (Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and U-Th-Pb), is solved numerically at 1 Ma time step for 4.55 Ga, the age of the Earth. The best possible model-derived solution is the one that produces the present-day concentrations as well as isotopic ratios in terrestrial reservoirs, constrained from published data. Various crustal growth scenarios (continuous versus episodic and early versus late) and its effect on the evolution of isotope systematics in the silicate reservoirs have been evaluated. Modeling results suggest that a whole mantle that is compositionally similar to the present-day MORB source is not consistent with observational constraints. However, a heterogeneous mantle model, in which the present-day UM is 60% of the total mantle mass and a lower non-chondritic mantle, reproduces the estimated isotopic ratios and abundances in Earth's silicate reservoirs. Our results shows that mode of crustal growth strongly affects isotopic evolution of silicate Earth; only an exponential crustal growth pattern satisfactorily explains the chemical and isotopic evolution of the crust-mantle system. One notable feature of successful models is an early depletion of incompatible elements (and a rapid decrease in Th/U ratio, κ, in the UM) by the initial 500 Ma, as a result of early formation of continental crust. Assuming a slightly younger age of the Earth (4.45 Ga), our model better satisfies the Pb-isotope systematics in the respective silicate reservoirs, particularly in the UM, and explains the origin of several OIBs

  5. The hydrothermal evolution of the Kawerau geothermal system, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milicich, S. D.; Chambefort, I.; Wilson, C. J. N.; Charlier, B. L. A.; Tepley, F. J.

    2018-03-01

    Hydrothermal alteration zoning and processes provide insights into the evolution of heat source(s) and fluid compositions associated with geothermal systems. Traditional petrological techniques, combined with hydrothermal alteration studies, stable isotope analyses and geochronology can resolve the nature of the fluids involved in hydrothermal processes and their changes through time. We report here new findings along with previous unpublished works on alteration patterns, fluid inclusion measurements and stable isotope data to provide insights into the thermal and chemical evolution of the Kawerau geothermal system, New Zealand. These data indicate the presence of two hydrothermal events that can be coupled with chronological data. The earlier period of hydrothermal activity was initiated at 400 ka, with the heat driving the hydrothermal system inferred to be from the magmatic system that gave rise to rhyolite lavas and sills of the Caxton Formation. Isotopic data fingerprint fluids attributed to this event as meteoric, indicating that the magma primarily served as a heat source driving fluid circulation, and was not releasing magmatic fluids in sufficient quantity to affect the rock mineralogy and thus inferred fluid compositions. The modern Kawerau system was initiated at 16 ka with hydrothermal eruptions linked to shallow intrusion of magma at the onset of activity that gave rise to the Putauaki andesite cone. Likely associated with this later event was a pulse of magmatic CO2, resulting in large-scale deposition of hydrothermal calcite enriched in 18O. Meteoric water-dominated fluids subsequently overwhelmed the magmatic fluids associated with this 18O-rich signature, and both the fluid inclusion microthermometry and stable isotope data reflect a change to the present-day fluid chemistry of low salinity, meteoric-dominated waters.

  6. Evolution and Structure of Neuromuscular Systems in Spiralian Meiofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekkouche, Nicolas Tarik

    difficult to resolve and understand. The present thesis focuses on spiralian meiofauna to i) reconstruct the phylogeny of this clade using transcriptomics and place enigmatic meiofaunal taxa and ii) resolve the morphology of three important taxa, mainly employing confocal laser scanning microscopy...... representatives, that Gnathifera is the sister group of remaining Spiralia, that Gastrotricha+Platyhelminthes branches off next and that Lobatocerebrum is an Annelida. The morphological surveys of the musculature, nervous system, glands, and ciliation on three phylogenetically distinct taxa yield more insight...... such as the ciliary pattern or a system of pharyngeal canals of possible importance for future comparative approaches. These different studies show that information on rare and phylogenetically isolated animals with their unique combination of neural and muscular characters are necessary to understand the evolution...

  7. Two-component energy spectrum of cuprates in the pseudogap phase and its evolution with temperature and at charge ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P.; Teitel'Baum, Gregory B.

    2015-02-01

    In the search for mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity it is critical to know the electronic spectrum in the pseudogap phase from which superconductivity evolves. The lack of angle-resolved photoemission data for every cuprate family precludes an agreement as to its structure, doping and temperature dependence and the role of charge ordering. Here we show that, in the entire Fermi-liquid-like regime that is ubiquitous in underdoped cuprates, the spectrum consists of holes on the Fermi arcs and an electronic pocket. We argue that experiments on the Hall coefficient identify the latter as a permanent feature at doped hole concentration x > 0.08-0.10, in contrast to the idea of the Fermi surface reconstruction via charge ordering. The longstanding issue of the origin of the negative Hall coefficient in YBCO and Hg1201 at low temperature is resolved: the electronic contribution prevails as mobility of the latter (evaluated by the Dingle temperature) becomes temperature independent, while the mobility of holes scattered by the short-wavelength charge density waves decreases.

  8. Landforms of Romania – The system of geochronologic evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAI IELENICZ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The corroborationof geomorphological, tectonic and paleoclimatic data led to a geomorphological system with two stages and subdivis ions. The pre-Carpathian stage (Proterozoic-Lower Mesozoic, belonging to Vorland is characterized by: completing the platform units (E, S and the Paleozoic rigid geotectonic system of Northen Dobruja; levelling stages resulting in pe diplains which were subsequently fragmented and fossilized almost entirely (Central and Northen Dobruja sectors. The Carpathian stage is defined by: completing the Carpathian orogenic system (between Jurassic and Quaternary in labile edge sectors of the Eastern European plate in which the evolution of some regional rifts (in Jurassic – Cret aceous and the moving of some rigid blocks (Moessic, Pannonian and Transylvanian created sequ entially tectonic basins where the accumulated materials were folded, faulted and overt hrusted, or mountain systems resulted by lifting (the upper Cretaceous and Miocene; creating tectonic depressions filled with sedimentary formations; reactivating some deep fractures accomp anied by volcanic eruption phases and creating a specific relief; the tectonic movements in the upper Pliocene – Quaternary raised differently all geographic units representing the c urrent orostructural system by Carpathians’s emersion and join to the adjacent regions; the clim ate change from savanna (Paleogene to subtropical (Mio – Pliocene, then temperate and gl acial (late Pleistocene and so on, led to a succession of morphogenetic systems that have gener ated landforms among which the most representative were preserved mainly as steps, erosi on surfaces areas and levels, or terraces from many morphogenetic phases.

  9. Farming System Evolution and Adaptive Capacity: Insights for Adaptation Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jami L. Dixon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of climate impacts on agriculture and adaptation often provide current or future assessments, ignoring the historical contexts farming systems are situated within. We investigate how historical trends have influenced farming system adaptive capacity in Uganda using data from household surveys, semi-structured interviews, focus-group discussions and observations. By comparing two farming systems, we note three major findings: (1 similar trends in farming system evolution have had differential impacts on the diversity of farming systems; (2 trends have contributed to the erosion of informal social and cultural institutions and an increasing dependence on formal institutions; and (3 trade-offs between components of adaptive capacity are made at the farm-scale, thus influencing farming system adaptive capacity. To identify the actual impacts of future climate change and variability, it is important to recognize the dynamic nature of adaptation. In practice, areas identified for further adaptation support include: shift away from one-size-fits-all approach the identification and integration of appropriate modern farming method; a greater focus on building inclusive formal and informal institutions; and a more nuanced understanding regarding the roles and decision-making processes of influential, but external, actors. More research is needed to understand farm-scale trade-offs and the resulting impacts across spatial and temporal scales.

  10. The evolution of real-time control systems at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodyear, A.; Dorling, S.; Felton, R.

    2001-01-01

    Real-time feedback control of the JET experiment is based upon a collection of diagnostics providing signals which are processed by various controllers that manipulate actuator parameters for plasma current, shape and heating. The real-time data network (RTDN) connects the diagnostic, controller and actuator systems to form a flexible feedback and protection system for plasma monitoring and control. The controllers are mainly VME systems based on the Motorola 680X0 (68K) processor with some computationally intensive systems utilising Texas Instruments TMS320C40 (C40) digital signal processors (DSP), though lately there has been a move towards PowerPC 750 based processors. The majority of 68K VME systems use VxWorks, a hard real time operating system. There is an ongoing requirement to improve the efficiency of the real-time control systems at JET. This is driven by a desire to either add more input signals, reduce the feedback cycle time or increase algorithm complexity. New technology has a major role to play in the upgrade of the real-time control systems but the novel redeployment of existing equipment can also be used to enhance performance. This paper examines the configuration of existing systems, both hardware and software, and how new technology can be gradually integrated without jeopardising the current functionality. The adoption of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) as the connection medium for the RTDN is key to the evolutional development of the control systems. The ATM network is extremely flexible to configure and benefits from low message latency and deterministic delivery time, essential properties for a real-time network. (author)

  11. Measuring two-phase and two-component mixtures by radiometric technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackuliak, D.; Rajniak, I.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility was tried of the application of the radiometric method in measuring steam water content. The experiments were carried out in model conditions where steam was replaced with the two-component mixture of water and air. The beta radiation source was isotope 204 Tl (Esub(max)=0.765 MeV) with an activity of 19.35 MBq. Measurements were carried out within the range of the surface density of the mixture from 0.119 kg.m -2 to 0.130 kg.m -2 . Mixture speed was 5.1 m.s -1 to 7.1 m.s -1 . The observed dependence of relative pulse frequency on the specific water content in the mixture was approximated by a linear regression. (B.S.)

  12. Plasma oscillations and sound waves in collision-dominated two-component plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.; Sjoegren, L.

    1982-01-01

    Charge, mass, and electron density fluctuation spectra of strongly correlated, fully ionized two-component plasmas within the framework of the Mori--Zwanzig memory function formalism are analyzed. All dynamical correlation functions are expressed in terms of the memory functions of the ion and electron velocity autocorrelation functions by a generalized effective field approximation which preserves the exact initial values (i.e., static correlations). The theory reduces correctly to the mean field (or collisionless Vlasov) results in the weak coupling limit, and yields charge density fluctuation spectra in good agreement with available computer simulation data, as well as reasonable estimates of the transport coefficients. The collisional damping and frequency shift of the plasma oscillation mode are sizeable, even in the long wavelength limit. The theory also predicts the propagation of well-defined sound waves in dense plasmas in thermal equilibrium

  13. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  14. Evolution Into Contact of the Low Mass Close Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, M. J.; Fedorova, A. V.

    1989-06-01

    We investigated the effect of mass accretion on the secondary components in close binomy systems (M total ≤ 2.5 M ⊙ M 2,0 ≤ 0.75 M ⊙) exchanging mass in the case A. The evolution of the low-mass close binary systems (M total ≤ 2.5 M ⊙) exchanging the mass in the case A depends on the three main factors: -the initial mass ratio (q 0 = M 2,0/M 1,0), which determines the rate of mass transfer between components; -the inital mass of the secondary component (M 2,0) and -the effectiveness of the heating of the photosphere of the secondary component, by infalling matter. The second factor allows to divide all systems into two essentially different groups: a) systems in which the secondary component is a star with a radiative envelope, or with a thin convection zone in the uppermost layers; b) and systems in which secondary component has a thick convective envelope or is fully convective. The systems from the first group evolve into contact in a characteristic time scale 105 107 years, and reach contact after transfering of 0.03 0.3 M ⊙. The mass exchange proceeds only in a thermal time scale. For the systems from the group b the effectiveness of the heating of the stellar surface is the most important. In the case when the entropy of the newly accreted matter is the same as the surface entropy of the secondary, a convective star should shrink upon accretion. Then contact binaries are not formed. In the case when the entropy of the infalling matter is greater then that on the surface, the reaction of the secondary is different. The radius of the secondary component grows rapidly in response to accretion, and the systems reaches contact after the 103 3 106 years, and after transfer of 0.002 0.2. M ⊙. The reaction of the secondary is determined by the formation of the temperature inversion layer below the stellar surface. Full references in: Sarna, M.J. and Fedorova, A.V. (1988) “Evolutionary status of W UMa-type Binaries — Evolution into contact

  15. The role of the nervous system in fish evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Hofmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system plays an important role in the evolution and adaptation of animals. All sensory and motor functions as well as cognitive abilities are organized in the brain and spinal cord. Volumetric measurements of different brain regions were made in more than 150 species of ray finned fishes as well as in several outgroups. In Actanthopterygii, the hypothalamus shows greatest enlargement most likely due to an enormous visual input via the nucleus glomerulosos. The telencephalon is highly differentiated in many acanthopterygii, mostly coral reef species, but its relative size is not much effected. There is, however, a clear shift from olfactory to visual functions in ray finned fishes. In species with a highly differentiated telencephalon, the area where place memory may be located is very prominent. In basal ray finned fishes, lungfish, amphibia and elasmobranchs, the olfactory bulb is relatively large and the ratio of the olfactory bulb and telencephalon large as well. This holds also for elopomorpha and spiny eels, but in most other groups vision dominates. Apart from differences between larger clades, variation in brain architecture are also seen in closely related species and even between sexes of the same species. Profound differences are present in the cerebellum between male and female swordtails and in the telencephalon of sticklebacks. Morphometric analysis of brain architecture turned out to be an important tool to study the evolution and adaptations of the brain in fishes.

  16. Evolution of the Generic Lock System at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brian Bevins; Yves Roblin

    2003-01-01

    The Generic Lock system is a software framework that allows highly flexible feedback control of large distributed systems. It allows system operators to implement new feedback loops between arbitrary process variables quickly and with no disturbance to the underlying control system. Several different types of feedback loops are provided and more are being added. This paper describes the further evolution of the system since it was first presented at ICALEPCS 2001 and reports on two years of successful use in accelerator operations. The framework has been enhanced in several key ways. Multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) lock types have been added for accelerator orbit and energy stabilization. The general purpose Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) locks can now be tuned automatically. The generic lock server now makes use of the Proxy IOC (PIOC) developed at Jefferson Lab to allow the locks to be monitored from any EPICS Channel Access aware client. (Previously clients had to be Cdev aware.) The dependency on the Qt XML parser has been replaced with the freely available Xerces DOM parser from the Apache project

  17. Rechtsgeschichte – Geschichte der Evolution eines sozialen Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Theres Fögen

    2002-01-01

    theories have barely been acknowledged to date. This is quite remarkable, given that history and evolution are fundamentally related through "time". "Evolutionary biology is a historical science" (Ernst Mayr. Perhaps it is also true to claim the opposite, that the science of history is also a science of evolution - not only of biological systems, but also of social systems. What might be the theoretical framework for a legal history that perceives itself as the history of a social system (5-10? What would be the consequences and the differences with regard to other forms of legal history (11-17? 5. Anyone wishing to examine the evolution of law has to decide which aspect item to observe. This might mean choosing between "dogmatics", "litigation", "lawyers", "legislation", "jurisprudence". Yet law is not just about "dogmatics" or "litigation", and to study "lawyers" in this way would mean entering the realms of the history of evolution of a certain as it applies to the human species - just as legislation would correspond to the field of politics or jurisprudence to the History of Science. What is more, there has been and there still is law without jurisprudence, even law without laws and without dogma and even without trained lawyers. What is needed, then, is a unit of "law" that is not dependent on historically changeable contingencies. 6. "Communication" that is geared towards the basic difference between right and wrong lends itself as such a unit. After all, law exists wherever there is communication about right and wrong, irrespective of whether there are court buildings or trained lawyers or jurisprudence. Communication is based on specific "information" selected from the general background cacophony of the world. In order to become communication, information has to be conveyed, either in the form of oral or written language, or through actions, gestures, sounds or images. Only once the message has reached others, and has been "understood" -- or even misunderstood

  18. Reconstruction of the evolution of microbial defense systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigbò, Pere; Makarova, Kira S; Kristensen, David M; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-04-04

    Evolution of bacterial and archaeal genomes is a highly dynamic process that involves intensive loss of genes as well as gene gain via horizontal transfer, with a lesser contribution from gene duplication. The rates of these processes can be estimated by comparing genomes that are linked by an evolutionary tree. These estimated rates of genome dynamics events substantially differ for different functional classes of genes. The genes involved in defense against viruses and other invading DNA are among those that are gained and lost at the highest rates. We employed a stochastic birth-and-death model to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the rates of gain and loss of defense genes in 35 groups of closely related bacterial genomes and one group of archaeal genomes. We find that on average, the defense genes experience 1.4 fold higher flux than the rest of microbial genes. This excessive flux of defense genes over the genomic mean is consistent across diverse microbial groups. The few exceptions include intracellular parasites with small, degraded genomes that possess few defense systems which are more stable than in other microbes. Generally, defense genes follow the previously established pattern of genome dynamics, with gene family loss being about 3 times more common than gain and an order of magnitude more common than expansion or contraction of gene families. Case by case analysis of the evolutionary dynamics of defense genes indicates frequent multiple events in the same locus and widespread involvement of mobile elements in the gain and loss of defense genes. Evolution of microbial defense systems is highly dynamic but, notwithstanding the host-parasite arms race, generally follows the same trends that have been established for the rest of the genes. Apart from the paucity and the low flux of defense genes in parasitic bacteria with deteriorating genomes, there is no clear connection between the evolutionary regime of defense systems and microbial life style.

  19. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 3: EVA/Manned Systems/Fluid Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution 16-19 Jan. 1990 in Dallas, Texas. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 3 consists of the technology discipline sections for Extravehicular Activity/Manned Systems and the Fluid Management System. For each technology discipline, there is a Level 3 subsystem description, along with the papers.

  20. The evolution of the laser: A systems perspective on science, technology and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deruiter, Willem

    The evolution of laser technology is addressed, and an attempt is made to correlate this evolution to the macrosociological theory of Juergen Habermas. The economic and social consequences of innovations are evaluated. Different laser applications are described. The evolution of the semiconductor laser is discussed. The evolution of optical telecommunication systems is outlined. The Habermas theory of communicative action, focussing on the theoretical distinction between 'system' and 'lifeworld,' is treated. The modified theory of Habermas is applied to the evolution of the laser. The embedding of a number of laser applications in the social context is discussed: laser isotope separation, compact disc players, and the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  1. Quantum brachistochrone evolution of systems of two identical particles: The role of entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borras, A.; Plastino, A. R.; Casas, M.; Plastino, A.

    2008-11-01

    Entanglement plays a fundamental role in the brachistochrone evolution of composite quantum systems. In the case of composite systems with distinguishable subsystems quantum brachistochrone evolutions cannot be implemented without entanglement, excepting trivial cases in which only one of the subsystems evolves. Here we explore the connection between entanglement and time-optimal quantum evolution for systems of two identical particles, elucidating its dependence on the type of statistics obeyed by the particles.

  2. Evolution of conjugation and type IV secretion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmini, Julien; de la Cruz, Fernando; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2013-02-01

    Genetic exchange by conjugation is responsible for the spread of resistance, virulence, and social traits among prokaryotes. Recent works unraveled the functioning of the underlying type IV secretion systems (T4SS) and its distribution and recruitment for other biological processes (exaptation), notably pathogenesis. We analyzed the phylogeny of key conjugation proteins to infer the evolutionary history of conjugation and T4SS. We show that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) conjugation, while both based on a key AAA(+) ATPase, diverged before the last common ancestor of bacteria. The two key ATPases of ssDNA conjugation are monophyletic, having diverged at an early stage from dsDNA translocases. Our data suggest that ssDNA conjugation arose first in diderm bacteria, possibly Proteobacteria, and then spread to other bacterial phyla, including bacterial monoderms and Archaea. Identifiable T4SS fall within the eight monophyletic groups, determined by both taxonomy and structure of the cell envelope. Transfer to monoderms might have occurred only once, but followed diverse adaptive paths. Remarkably, some Firmicutes developed a new conjugation system based on an atypical relaxase and an ATPase derived from a dsDNA translocase. The observed evolutionary rates and patterns of presence/absence of specific T4SS proteins show that conjugation systems are often and independently exapted for other functions. This work brings a natural basis for the classification of all kinds of conjugative systems, thus tackling a problem that is growing as fast as genomic databases. Our analysis provides the first global picture of the evolution of conjugation and shows how a self-transferrable complex multiprotein system has adapted to different taxa and often been recruited by the host. As conjugation systems became specific to certain clades and cell envelopes, they may have biased the rate and direction of gene transfer by conjugation within prokaryotes.

  3. Short-term geomorphological evolution of proglacial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Heckmann, Tobias

    2017-06-01

    Proglacial systems are amongst the most rapidly changing landscapes on Earth, as glacier mass loss, permafrost degradation and more episodes of intense rainfall progress with climate change. This review addresses the urgent need to quantitatively define proglacial systems not only in terms of spatial extent but also in terms of functional processes. It firstly provides a critical appraisal of prevailing conceptual models of proglacial systems, and uses this to justify compiling data on rates of landform change in terms of planform, horizontal motion, elevation changes and sediment budgets. These data permit us to produce novel summary conceptual diagrams that consider proglacial landscape evolution in terms of a balance of longitudinal and lateral water and sediment fluxes. Throughout, we give examples of newly emerging datasets and data processing methods because these have the potential to assist with the issues of: (i) a lack of knowledge of proglacial systems within high-mountain, arctic and polar regions, (ii) considerable inter- and intra-catchment variability in the geomorphology and functioning of proglacial systems, (iii) problems with the magnitude of short-term geomorphological changes being at the threshold of detection, (iv) separating short-term variability from longer-term trends, and (v) of the representativeness of plot-scale field measurements for regionalisation and for upscaling. We consider that understanding of future climate change effects on proglacial systems requires holistic process-based modelling to explicitly consider feedbacks and linkages, especially between hillslope and valley-floor components. Such modelling must be informed by a new generation of repeated distributed topographic surveys to detect and quantify short-term geomorphological changes.

  4. Role of system characteristics in evolution of pump hydraulic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walia, Mohinder; Misri, Vijay; Sharma, A.K.; Bapat, C.N.

    1994-01-01

    Primary heat transport (PHT) main circuit provides the means for transferring the heat produced in the fuel by circulating heavy water in the main circuit loop by primary coolant pumps (PCPs). The procurement specification of PCPs for 500 MWe pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) was prepared based upon the first order hydraulic analysis of the primary heat transport system and accordingly duty point was fixed. With this specification the manufacturer carried out model testing to arrive at optimum size of the impeller followed by determination of pump characteristics curves using full scale impeller during type testing. The duty point thus obtained was higher than specified necessitating the trimming of impeller. However, in order to make use of available higher duty point from system considerations, the duty point was redefined for production of subsequent pumps within specified tolerances governed by manufacturing limitations. PHT main system sizing (piping and feeders) was carried out based upon pump (delivering maximum flow) characteristics curve. Pressure profiles of PHT system at various operating modes were drawn and corresponding power drawn by motor was calculated. The interfacing of reactor coolant main system with hydraulic characteristics of PCP plays a significant role in establishing the requisite capability and capacity of PHT system in performing its intended functions. Therefore the paper traces the evolution of design parameters for PCP and subsequent generation of pressure profiles commensurate with the changes made in power profile including their impact on feeder sizing. The paper also highlights the scope of interaction between process designer and pump manufacturer in formulating a mutually acceptable and efficient hydraulic performance for PCP. (author). 3 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Evolution of the reproductive endocrine system in chordates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubokawa, Kaoru; Tando, Yukiko; Roy, Sonali

    2010-07-01

    The cephalochordate, amphioxus, is phylogenetically placed at the most primitive position in the chordate clade. Despite many studies on the endocrine system of amphioxus, definitive evidence has not been reported for the presence an endocrine system comparable to the pituitary-gonadal axis, which is important in the regulation of reproduction in vertebrates. Recent genome analyses in the amphioxus, Branchiostoma floridae, showed that it does not have any pituitary hormone genes except the thyrostimulin gene. Thyrostimulin is a heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone consisting of α and β subunits, and is present in various organs of vertebrates. Analyses of a phylogenetic tree and a synteny suggest that amphioxus' thyrostimulin is an ancestral type of the glycoprotein hormones in chordates. In addition, genes for sex steroidogenic enzymes belonging to the CYP family were found in the genome sequences. The conversion pathway of sex steroids from cholesterol to estrogen, androgen, and major sex steroids was also identified in the gonads of amphioxus in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated the expression of genes encoding thyrostimulin and sex steroidogenic enzymes by an in situ hybridization technique. Here, we discuss the evolution of hormones and reproductive functions in the neuroendocrine control system of chordates. © The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. ACOUSTIC WAVES EMISSION IN THE TWO-COMPONENT HEREDITARY-ELASTIC MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Polenov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. On the dynamics of two-component media a number of papers, which address the elastic waves in a homogeneous, unbounded fluid-saturated porous medium. In other studies address issues of dissipative processes in harmonic deformation hereditary elastic medium. In the article the dissipative processes of the viscoelastic porous medium, which hereditary properties are described by the core relaxation fractional exponential function U.N. Rabotnova integro-differential Boltzmann-Volterr ratio, harmonic deformation by the straining saturated incompressible liquid are investigated. Speed of wave propagation, absorption coefficient, mechanical loss tangent, logarithmic decrement, depending on fractional parameter γ, determining formulas received. The frequency logarithm and temperature graph dependences with the goal fractional parameter are constructed. Shows the dependences velocity and attenuation coefficient of the tangent of the phase angle of the logarithm of the temperature, and the dependence of the attenuation coefficient of the logarithm of the frequency. Dependencies the speed and the tangent of the phase angle of the frequency identical function of the logarithm of temperature.

  7. Two-component mixture cure rate model with spline estimated nonparametric components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Du, Pang; Liang, Hua

    2012-09-01

    In some survival analysis of medical studies, there are often long-term survivors who can be considered as permanently cured. The goals in these studies are to estimate the noncured probability of the whole population and the hazard rate of the susceptible subpopulation. When covariates are present as often happens in practice, to understand covariate effects on the noncured probability and hazard rate is of equal importance. The existing methods are limited to parametric and semiparametric models. We propose a two-component mixture cure rate model with nonparametric forms for both the cure probability and the hazard rate function. Identifiability of the model is guaranteed by an additive assumption that allows no time-covariate interactions in the logarithm of hazard rate. Estimation is carried out by an expectation-maximization algorithm on maximizing a penalized likelihood. For inferential purpose, we apply the Louis formula to obtain point-wise confidence intervals for noncured probability and hazard rate. Asymptotic convergence rates of our function estimates are established. We then evaluate the proposed method by extensive simulations. We analyze the survival data from a melanoma study and find interesting patterns for this study. © 2011, The International Biometric Society.

  8. Short and medium range order in two-component silica glasses by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Kataoka, H.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of chemical composition on the average sizes of subnanometer-scale intrinsic structural open spaces surrounded by glass random networks in two-component silica-based glasses was investigated systematically using positronium (Ps) confined in the open spaces. The average sizes of the open spaces for SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 and SiO 2 -GeO 2 glasses are only slightly dependent on the chemical compositions because the B 2 O 3 and GeO 2 are glass network formers that are incorporated into the glass network of the base SiO 2 . However, the open space sizes for all SiO 2 -R 2 O (R = Li, Na, K) glasses, where R 2 O is a glass network modifier that occupies the open spaces, decrease rapidly with an increase in the R 2 O concentration. Despite the large difference in the ionic radii of the alkali metal (R) atoms, the open space sizes decrease similarly for all the alkali metal atoms studied. This dependence of the chemical composition on the open space sizes in SiO 2 -R 2 O observed by Ps shows that the alkali metal atoms do not randomly occupy the structural open spaces, but filling of the open spaces by R 2 O proceeds selectively from the larger to the smaller open spaces as the R 2 O concentrations are increased.

  9. Calibration of the IRD two-component TLD albedo neutron dosemeter in some moderated neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Bruno M.; Silva, Ademir X. da

    2015-01-01

    In some stray neutron fields, like those found in practices involving the handling of radionuclide sources, the neutron calibration factor for albedo neutron dosemeter can vary widely compared to the factor for bare sources. This is the case for well logging, which is the area with the largest number of workers exposed to neutrons in Brazil. The companies employ routinely 241 Am-Be neutron sources. The albedo response variation is mainly due to the presence of scattered and moderated neutrons. This paper studies the response variation of the two-component TLD albedo neutron dosemeter used in the neutron individual monitoring service of Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, in different radionuclide neutron source beams. The neutron spectra were evaluated applying a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6 LiI(Eu) detector in the Brazilian National Metrology Neutron Laboratory. Standard neutron sources of 241 Am-Be and 252 Cf were employed, besides 238 Pu-Be. Measurements were also made with scattered and moderated neutron beams, including 252 Cf(D 2 O) reference spectrum, 241 Am-Be moderated with paraffin and silicone and a thermal neutron flux facility. New neutron calibration factors, as a function of the incident to albedo neutron ratio, were proposed for use in the albedo algorithm for occupational fields where the primary neutron beam is one of those studied sources. (author)

  10. Nonstationary Frequency Analysis of Extreme Floods Using the Time-varying Two-component Mixture Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L.; Xiong, L.; Liu, D.; Hu, T.; Xu, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The basic IID assumption of the traditional flood frequency analysis has been challenged by nonstationarity. The most popular practice for analyzing nonstationarity of flood series is to use a fixed single-type probability distribution incorporated with the time-varying moments. However, the type of probability distribution could be both complex because of distinct flood populations and time-varying under changing environments. To allow the investigation of this complex nature, the time-varying two-component mixture distributions (TTMD) method is proposed in this study by considering the time variations of not only the moments of its component distributions but also the weighting coefficients. Having identified the existence of mixed flood populations based on circular statistics, the proposed TTMD was applied to model the annual maximum flood series (AMFS) of two stations in the Weihe River basin (WRB), with the model parameters calibrated by the meta-heuristic maximum likelihood (MHML) method. The performance of TTMD was evaluated by different diagnostic plots and indexes and compared with stationary single-type distributions, stationary mixture distributions and time-varying single-type distributions. The results highlighted the advantages of using TTMD models and physically-based covariates in nonstationary flood frequency analysis. Besides, the optimal TTMD models were considered to be capable of settling the issue of nonstationarity and capturing the mixed flood populations satisfactorily. It is concluded that the TTMD model is a good alternative in the nonstationary frequency analysis and can be applied to other regions with mixed flood populations.

  11. PLA and two components silicon rubber blends aiming for frozen foods packaging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utai Meekum

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Designing of PLA and two components silicone rubber blends was studies. Frozen food packaging application is the main ultimate aim. The statistical method using 23 DOE was conducted. The standard testing methods, in particular impact testing at sub-zero temperature, were performed. The preliminary blend formula comprised 1.0 phr of silane and polyester polyols, respectively, was initially resolved. Then, the optimize the silicone portion in the blends was determined. Blending formula using 8.0 phr of silicone with respect to PLA matrix gave rise to the overall satisfactory properties. 3. TETA was used as the silicone curing agent and reactively blended onto the ingredients. TETA at 0.4 phr, with respect to the silicone, enhanced the mechanical properties, especially flexibility and toughness, of the PLA/silicone blend. Exceeding the optimal TETA loading would cause the chain scission and also the dilution effects. Hence, marginal inferior properties of the blends were be experienced. The preliminary biodegradability investigation found that the PLA/silicone blend initially triggered at the second week. Its degradation rate was likely to be faster than neat PLA. Keywords: PLA/silicone blends, Mechanical properties, Sub-zero impact strength

  12. Two-component relativistic coupled-cluster methods using mean-field spin-orbit integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junzi; Shen, Yue; Asthana, Ayush; Cheng, Lan

    2018-01-01

    A novel implementation of the two-component spin-orbit (SO) coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method and the CCSD augmented with the perturbative inclusion of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] method using mean-field SO integrals is reported. The new formulation of SO-CCSD(T) features an atomic-orbital-based algorithm for the particle-particle ladder term in the CCSD equation, which not only removes the computational bottleneck associated with the large molecular-orbital integral file but also accelerates the evaluation of the particle-particle ladder term by around a factor of 4 by taking advantage of the spin-free nature of the instantaneous electron-electron Coulomb interaction. Benchmark calculations of the SO splittings for the thallium atom and a set of diatomic 2Π radicals as well as of the bond lengths and harmonic frequencies for a set of closed-shell diatomic molecules are presented. The basis-set and core-correlation effects in the calculations of these properties have been carefully analyzed.

  13. Two-Component Noncollinear Time-Dependent Spin Density Functional Theory for Excited State Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Franco; Sun, Shichao; Goings, Joshua J; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J; Li, Xiaosong

    2017-06-13

    We present a linear response formalism for the description of the electronic excitations of a noncollinear reference defined via Kohn-Sham spin density functional methods. A set of auxiliary variables, defined using the density and noncollinear magnetization density vector, allows the generalization of spin density functional kernels commonly used in collinear DFT to noncollinear cases, including local density, GGA, meta-GGA and hybrid functionals. Working equations and derivations of functional second derivatives with respect to the noncollinear density, required in the linear response noncollinear TDDFT formalism, are presented in this work. This formalism takes all components of the spin magnetization into account independent of the type of reference state (open or closed shell). As a result, the method introduced here is able to afford a nonzero local xc torque on the spin magnetization while still satisfying the zero-torque theorem globally. The formalism is applied to a few test cases using the variational exact-two-component reference including spin-orbit coupling to illustrate the capabilities of the method.

  14. PLA and two components silicon rubber blends aiming for frozen foods packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekum, Utai; Khiansanoi, Apichart

    2018-03-01

    Designing of PLA and two components silicone rubber blends was studies. Frozen food packaging application is the main ultimate aim. The statistical method using 23 DOE was conducted. The standard testing methods, in particular impact testing at sub-zero temperature, were performed. The preliminary blend formula comprised 1.0 phr of silane and polyester polyols, respectively, was initially resolved. Then, the optimize the silicone portion in the blends was determined. Blending formula using 8.0 phr of silicone with respect to PLA matrix gave rise to the overall satisfactory properties. 3. TETA was used as the silicone curing agent and reactively blended onto the ingredients. TETA at 0.4 phr, with respect to the silicone, enhanced the mechanical properties, especially flexibility and toughness, of the PLA/silicone blend. Exceeding the optimal TETA loading would cause the chain scission and also the dilution effects. Hence, marginal inferior properties of the blends were be experienced. The preliminary biodegradability investigation found that the PLA/silicone blend initially triggered at the second week. Its degradation rate was likely to be faster than neat PLA.

  15. A two-component Matched Interface and Boundary (MIB) regularization for charge singularity in implicit solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Weihua; Zhao, Shan

    2017-12-01

    We present a new Matched Interface and Boundary (MIB) regularization method for treating charge singularity in solvated biomolecules whose electrostatics are described by the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. In a regularization method, by decomposing the potential function into two or three components, the singular component can be analytically represented by the Green's function, while other components possess a higher regularity. Our new regularization combines the efficiency of two-component schemes with the accuracy of the three-component schemes. Based on this regularization, a new MIB finite difference algorithm is developed for solving both linear and nonlinear PB equations, where the nonlinearity is handled by using the inexact-Newton's method. Compared with the existing MIB PB solver based on a three-component regularization, the present algorithm is simpler to implement by circumventing the work to solve a boundary value Poisson equation inside the molecular interface and to compute related interface jump conditions numerically. Moreover, the new MIB algorithm becomes computationally less expensive, while maintains the same second order accuracy. This is numerically verified by calculating the electrostatic potential and solvation energy on the Kirkwood sphere on which the analytical solutions are available and on a series of proteins with various sizes.

  16. Experimental investigation of the factors influencing the polymer-polymer bond strength during two-component injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bondo, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Two-component injection moulding is a commercially important manufacturing process and a key technology for combining different material properties in a single plastic product. It is also one of most industrially adaptive process chain for manufacturing so-called moulded interconnect devices (MIDs...... and environmental conditions were done based on the suitability of MID production, but the results could be useful for two-component polymer processing for a wide range of industrial applications. The results and discussion presented in this paper are only valid for the two-component plastic parts moulded by over...

  17. The plant vascular system: evolution, development and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, William J; Groover, Andrew; Lichtenberger, Raffael; Furuta, Kaori; Yadav, Shri-Ram; Helariutta, Ykä; He, Xin-Qiang; Fukuda, Hiroo; Kang, Julie; Brady, Siobhan M; Patrick, John W; Sperry, John; Yoshida, Akiko; López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Grusak, Michael A; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of the tracheophyte-based vascular system of land plants had major impacts on the evolution of terrestrial biology, in general, through its role in facilitating the development of plants with increased stature, photosynthetic output, and ability to colonize a greatly expanded range of environmental habitats. Recently, considerable progress has been made in terms of our understanding of the developmental and physiological programs involved in the formation and function of the plant vascular system. In this review, we first examine the evolutionary events that gave rise to the tracheophytes, followed by analysis of the genetic and hormonal networks that cooperate to orchestrate vascular development in the gymnosperms and angiosperms. The two essential functions performed by the vascular system, namely the delivery of resources (water, essential mineral nutrients, sugars and amino acids) to the various plant organs and provision of mechanical support are next discussed. Here, we focus on critical questions relating to structural and physiological properties controlling the delivery of material through the xylem and phloem. Recent discoveries into the role of the vascular system as an effective long-distance communication system are next assessed in terms of the coordination of developmental, physiological and defense-related processes, at the whole-plant level. A concerted effort has been made to integrate all these new findings into a comprehensive picture of the state-of-the-art in the area of plant vascular biology. Finally, areas important for future research are highlighted in terms of their likely contribution both to basic knowledge and applications to primary industry. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. The Role and Evolution of NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the three strategic goals of NASA is to Advance understanding of Earth and develop technologies to improve the quality of life on our home planet (NASA strategic plan 2014). NASA's Earth Science Data System (ESDS) Program directly supports this goal. NASA has been launching satellites for civilian Earth observations for over 40 years, and collecting data from various types of instruments. Especially since 1990, with the start of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program, which was a part of the Mission to Planet Earth, the observations have been significantly more extensive in their volumes, variety and velocity. Frequent, global observations are made in support of Earth system science. An open data policy has been in effect since 1990, with no period of exclusive access and non-discriminatory access to data, free of charge. NASA currently holds nearly 10 petabytes of Earth science data including satellite, air-borne, and ground-based measurements and derived geophysical parameter products in digital form. Millions of users around the world are using NASA data for Earth science research and applications. In 2014, over a billion data files were downloaded by users from NASAs EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS), a system with 12 Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) across the U. S. As a core component of the ESDS Program, EOSDIS has been operating since 1994, and has been evolving continuously with advances in information technology. The ESDS Program influences as well as benefits from advances in Earth Science Informatics. The presentation will provide an overview of the role and evolution of NASAs ESDS Program.

  19. Two-component laser Doppler anemometer for measurement of velocity and turbulent shear stress near prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Y R; Yoganathan, A P

    1985-01-01

    The velocity and turbulent shear stress measured in the immediate vicinity of prosthetic heart valves play a vital role in the design and evaluation of these devices. In the past hot wire/film and one-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) systems were used extensively to obtain these measurements. Hot wire/film anemometers, however, have some serious disadvantages, including the inability to measure the direction of the flow, the disturbance of the flow field caused by the probe, and the need for frequent calibration. One-component LDA systems do not have these problems, but they cannot measure turbulent shear stresses directly. Since these measurements are essential and are not available in the open literature, a two-component LDA system for measuring velocity and turbulent shear stress fields under pulsatile flow conditions was assembled under an FDA contract. The experimental methods used to create an in vitro data base of velocity and turbulent shear stress fields in the immediate vicinity of prosthetic heart valves of various designs in current clinical use are also discussed.

  20. The origins and evolution of "controlled" drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Allan S

    2008-12-18

    This paper describes the earliest days when the "controlled drug delivery" (CDD) field began, the pioneers who launched this exciting and important field, and the key people who came after them. It traces the evolution of the field from its origins in the 1960s to (a) the 1970s and 1980s, when numerous macroscopic "controlled" drug delivery (DD) devices and implants were designed for delivery as mucosal inserts (e.g., in the eye or vagina), as implants (e.g., sub-cutaneous or intra-muscular), as ingestible capsules (e.g., in the G-I tract), as topical patches (e.g., on the skin), and were approved for clinical use, to (b) the 1980s and 1990s when microscopic degradable polymer depot DD systems (DDS) were commercialized, and to (c) the currently very active and exciting nanoscopic era of targeted nano-carriers, in a sense bringing to life Ehrlich's imagined concept of the "Magic Bullet". The nanoscopic era began with systems proposed in the 1970s, that were first used in the clinic in the 1980s, and which came of age in the 1990s, and which are presently evolving into many exciting and clinically successful products in the 2000s. Most of these have succeeded because of the emergence of three key technologies: (1) PEGylation, (2) active targeting to specific cells by ligands conjugated to the DDS, or passive targeting to solid tumors via the EPR effect. The author has been personally involved in the origins and evolution of this field for the past 38 years (see below), and this review includes information that was provided to him by many researchers in this field about the history of various developments. Thus, this paper is based on his own personal involvements in the CDD field, along with many historical anecdotes provided by the key pioneers and researchers in the field. Because of the huge literature of scientific papers on CDD systems, this article attempts to limit examples to those that have been approved for clinical use, or are currently in clinical trials

  1. Fatal evolution of systemic lupus erythematosus associated with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEBLI Júlio M. Fonseca

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the case of a young Brazilian woman who was treated of ileocolonic Crohn's disease sparing rectum, as confirmed by colonoscopy and histopathological examination. After a 4-year course of sulfasalazine treatment, she presented with skin facial lesions in vespertilio, fever, arthralgias and high titers of anti-ANA and LE cells. A sulfasalazine-induced lupus syndrome was diagnosed, because after sulfasalazine withdrawal and a short course of prednisone, the clinical symptoms disappeared and the laboratory tests returned to normal. Mesalazine 3 g/day was started and the patient remained well for the next 3 years, when she was again admitted with fever, weakness, arthralgias, diplopy, strabismus and hypoaesthesia in both hands and feet, microhematuria, haematic casts, hypocomplementemia and high titers of autoimmune antibodies. A diagnosis of associated systemic lupus erythematosus was made. Although a pulsotherapy with methylprednisolone was started, no improvement was noticed. A cyclophosphamide trial was tried and again no positive results occurred. The patient evolved to severe clinical manifestations of general vasculitis affecting the central and peripheral nervous system and lungs, having a fatal evolution after 2 weeks. Although uncommon, the association of both disease may occur, and the authors call attention to this possibility, making a brief review of literature.

  2. The protection system of nuclear reactors. Example of a very high reliability system. Its evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.

    1980-06-01

    The present state of reactor protection is described and mention is made of certain evolutionary trends towards completely automated systems which either help the operator to take decisions in the event of an accident or take and execute these decisions for him. To do so, the use of models and recourse to complex data processing systems is necessary. This ensemble reflects an evolution of the reliability of the equipment towards that of the software [fr

  3. Two-component jets from 3-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic jet simulations of disk winds at sub-parsec scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staff Jan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We explore the effect of large scale magnetic field on the formation of two-component jets in magnetohydrodynamic disk winds simulations. Our simulations show a one-component and two-component jets develop depending on the magnetic field distribution along the surface of the accretion disk. Magnetic field configurations with the least steep gradient along the disk lead to a well defined two-component jet with the self-similar (Blandford-Payne configuration separating the two regimes. Our results have direct implications to jets models of AGN and GRBs if indeed two-component jets emanate directly from the accretion disk. Our findings imply that a three-component jets may exist in AGN jets if one takes into account a Blandford-Znajek component in the innermost, relativistic, regions.

  4. Dopamine reward prediction-error signalling: a two-component response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Environmental stimuli and objects, including rewards, are often processed sequentially in the brain. Recent work suggests that the phasic dopamine reward prediction-error response follows a similar sequential pattern. An initial brief, unselective and highly sensitive increase in activity unspecifically detects a wide range of environmental stimuli, then quickly evolves into the main response component, which reflects subjective reward value and utility. This temporal evolution allows the dopamine reward prediction-error signal to optimally combine speed and accuracy. PMID:26865020

  5. Phase separation and near-critical fluctuations in two-component lipid membranes: Monte Carlo simulations on experimentally relevant scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrig, Jens; Petrov, Eugene P; Schwille, Petra

    2011-01-01

    By means of lattice-based Monte Carlo simulations, we address the properties of two-component lipid membranes on the experimentally relevant spatial scales of the order of a micrometer and time intervals of the order of 1 s, using DMPC/DSPC lipid mixtures as a model system. Our large-scale simulations allowed us to obtain important results not reported previously in simulation studies of lipid membranes. We find that, for a certain range of lipid compositions, the phase transition from the fluid phase to the fluid-gel phase coexistence proceeds via near-critical fluctuations, whereas for other lipid compositions this phase transition has a quasi-abrupt character. In the presence of near-critical fluctuations, transient subdiffusion of lipid molecules is observed. These features of the system are stable with respect to perturbations in lipid interaction parameters used in our simulations. The line tension characterizing lipid domains in the fluid-gel coexistence region is found to be in the pN range. On approaching the critical point, the line tension, the inverse correlation length of fluid-gel spatial fluctuations and the corresponding inverse order parameter susceptibility of the membrane vanish. All these results are in agreement with recent experimental findings for model lipid membranes. Our analysis of the domain coarsening dynamics after an abrupt quench of the membrane to the fluid-gel coexistence region reveals that lateral diffusion of lipids plays an important role in the fluid-gel phase separation process.

  6. Functionalization of PDMS modified and plasma activated two-component polyurethane coatings by surface attachment of enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, Alexej; Richter, Katharina; Sell, Stephan; Fenske, Mandus; Tornow, Christian; Stenzel, Volkmar; Grunwald, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new strategy for coupling the enzyme horseradish peroxidase to a two-component polyurethane (2C-PUR) coating. A stable polymer conjugate was achieved by combining the enzyme and the 2C-PUR coating which was modified with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), located at the surface. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet system was used to convert alkyl groups from the PDMS into polar silanol functionalities. This conversion was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the stability of the activated 2C-PUR surface containing silanol groups was determined by measuring the contact angle as a function of time. Compared to the non-modified 2C-PUR systems the one with PDMS displayed a higher stability over a time period over 28 h. In a silanization process the coating was treated with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane and the enzyme was subsequently immobilized to the coating via the cross linker glutaraldehyde to receive new biomimetic catalytic/enzymatic functions. The chemical immobilization (chemisorption) of the enzyme to the surface showed statistically significant higher biological activity as compared to references samples without using a cross linker (physisorption). The presented technique offers the opportunity to design new and smart multifunctional surface coatings which employ biomimetic capabilities.

  7. Analysis of water hammer in two-component two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, H.; Marzouk, E.; Ibrahim, S.

    1989-01-01

    The water hammer phenomena caused by a sudden valve closure in air-water two-phase flows must be clarified for the safety analysis of LOCA in reactors and further for the safety of boilers, chemical plants, pipe transport of fluids such as petroleum and natural gas. In the present work water hammer phenomena caused by sudden valve closure in two-component two-phase flows are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The phenomena are more complicated than in single phase-flows due to the fact of the presence of compressible component. Basic partial differential equations based on a one-dimensional homogeneous flow model are solved by the method of characteristic. The analysis is extended to include friction in a two-phase mixture depending on the local flow pattern. The profiles of the pressure transients, the propagation velocity of pressure waves and the effect of valve closure on the transient pressure are found. Different two-phase flow pattern and frictional pressure drop correlations were used including Baker, Chesholm and Beggs and Bril correlations. The effect of the flow pattern on the characteristic of wave propagation is discussed primarily to indicate the effect of void fraction on the velocity of wave propagation and on the attenuation of pressure waves. Transient pressure in the mixture were recorded at different air void fractions, rates of uniform valve closure and liquid flow velocities with the aid of pressure transducers, transient wave form recorders interfaced with an on-line pc computer. The results are compared with computation, and good agreement was obtained within experimental accuracy

  8. Two-Component Fitting of Coronal-Hole and Quiet-Sun He I 1083 Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harrison P.; Malanushenko, Elena V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present reduction techniques and first results for detailed fitting of solar spectra obtained with the NASA/National Solar Observatory Spectromagnetograph (NASA/NSO SPM over a 2 nm bandpass centered on the He 1 1083 nm line. The observation for this analysis was a spectra-spectroheliogram obtained at the NSO/Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope (KPVT) on 00 Apr 17 at 21:46 UT spanning an area of 512 x 900 arc-seconds; the field of view included a coronal hole near disk center as well as surrounding quiet sun. Since the He I line is very weak and blended with nearby solar and telluric lines, accurate determination of the continuum intensity as a function of wavelength is crucial. We have modified the technique of Malanushenko {\\it et al.) (1992; {\\it AA) (\\bf 259), 567) to tie regions of continuua and the wings of spectral lines which show little variation over the image to standard reference spectra such as the NSO Fourier Transform Spectrometer atlas (Wallace {\\it et al). 1993; NSO Tech Report \\#93-001). We performed detailed least-squares fits of spectra from selected areas, accounting for all the known telluric and solar absorbers in the spectral bandpass. The best physically consistent fits to the Helium lines were obtained with Gaussian profiles from two components (one ''cool'', characteristic of the upper chromosphere; one ''hot'', representing the cool transition region at 2-3 x 10$^{4)$ K). In the coronal hole, the transition-region component, shifted by 6-7 km/s to the blue, is mildly dominant, consistent with mass outflow as suggested by Dupree {\\it et all. (1996; {\\it Ap. J.}-{\\bf 467), 121). In quiet-sun spectra there is less evidence of outward flow, and the chromospheric component is more important. All our fitted spectra show a very weak unidentified absorption feature at 1082.880 nm in the red wing of the nearby Si I line.

  9. Large-scale Models Reveal the Two-component Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jarosch

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive explanation of striated muscle mechanics and contraction on the basis of filament rotations. Helical proteins, particularly the coiled-coils of tropomyosin, myosin and α-actinin, shorten their H-bonds cooperatively and produce torque and filament rotations when the Coulombic net-charge repulsion of their highly charged side-chains is diminished by interaction with ions. The classical “two-component model” of active muscle differentiated a “contractile component” which stretches the “series elastic component” during force production. The contractile components are the helically shaped thin filaments of muscle that shorten the sarcomeres by clockwise drilling into the myosin cross-bridges with torque decrease (= force-deficit. Muscle stretch means drawing out the thin filament helices off the cross-bridges under passive counterclockwise rotation with torque increase (= stretch activation. Since each thin filament is anchored by four elastic α-actinin Z-filaments (provided with forceregulating sites for Ca2+ binding, the thin filament rotations change the torsional twist of the four Z-filaments as the “series elastic components”. Large scale models simulate the changes of structure and force in the Z-band by the different Z-filament twisting stages A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Stage D corresponds to the isometric state. The basic phenomena of muscle physiology, i. e. latency relaxation, Fenn-effect, the force-velocity relation, the length-tension relation, unexplained energy, shortening heat, the Huxley-Simmons phases, etc. are explained and interpreted with the help of the model experiments.

  10. Temporal Evolution of Design Principles in Engineering Systems: Analogies with Human Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deb, Kalyanmoy; Bandaru, Sunith; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    portray certain common design principles. In this paper, we consider a 14-variable bi-objective design optimization of a MEMS device and identify a number of such common design principles through a recently proposed automated innovization procedure. Although these design principles are found to exist...... among near-Paretooptimal solutions, the main crux of this paper lies in a demonstration of temporal evolution of these principles during the course of optimization. The results reveal that certain important design principles start to evolve early on, whereas some detailed design principles get...... constructed later during optimization. Interestingly, there exists a simile between evolution of design principles with that of human evolution. Such information about the hierarchy of key design principles should enable designers to have a deeper understanding of their problems....

  11. EVOLUTION OF THE BINARY FRACTION IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fregeau, John M.; Ivanova, Natalia; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2009-01-01

    Using our recently improved Monte Carlo evolution code, we study the evolution of the binary fraction in globular clusters. In agreement with previous N-body simulations, we find generally that the hard binary fraction in the core tends to increase with time over a range of initial cluster central densities for initial binary fractions ∼<90%. The dominant processes driving the evolution of the core binary fraction are mass segregation of binaries into the cluster core and preferential destruction of binaries there. On a global scale, these effects and the preferential tidal stripping of single stars tend to roughly balance, leading to overall cluster binary fractions that are roughly constant with time. Our findings suggest that the current hard binary fraction near the half-mass radius is a good indicator of the hard primordial binary fraction. However, the relationship between the true binary fraction and the fraction of main-sequence stars in binaries (which is typically what observers measure) is nonlinear and rather complicated. We also consider the importance of soft binaries, which not only modify the evolution of the binary fraction, but can also drastically change the evolution of the cluster as a whole. Finally, we briefly describe the recent addition of single and binary stellar evolution to our cluster evolution code.

  12. Two-component HLMC-gas flow instability and inhomogeneity phenomena in open-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergey I Shcherbakov

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Consideration is being given to two-component gas-liquid flows with inhomogeneous gas content. The inhomogeneity of gas content over flow space can be caused by local mixing of gas and liquid, gas injection, gas-containing liquid jet penetration into the bulk of liquid without gas. The paper presents the computational results obtained using the direct non-stationary calculation with the TURBO-FLOW computer code. The results refer to flows near the liquid level, flows in downcomer gaps, collectors, elements with varying geometry (jet outlet into space, flow turn) for the pool-type reactors and experimental models. The following processes have been shown and discussed: formation of new liquid levels, entrainment of gas from the level, change in density composition of gas, flow stratification, effect of gas emergence rate and density convection on flow pattern. At gas phase transfer by liquid, two phenomena governing this transfer proceed: gas slip in liquid and density convection of non-uniformly aerated liquid. In horizontal flows, a vertical stratification of gas content always occurs. If the flow changes its direction to an upward one (collector at core inlet), the gas content maximum would be observed in channels nearest to the inlet. At the liquid level, the processes of gas separation from liquid and gas entrainment take place. The separation is a self-sustained process due to circulations arising near the level. The rate of gas entrainment is proportional to the rate of overflow and inversely proportional to the height of liquid level. At the downcomer region in case of its expansion, there occurs the instability of flow resulting in formation of liquid level and falling jet. The level is lower the more the gas content at inlet. The accumulation of gas occurs at sharp turns, encumbered regions (tube bundle), at all regions with upper (ceiling) constraints of flow. The flow instability being often observed in gas-liquid flows

  13. Evolution of the Mariana Convergent Plate Margin System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Patricia

    1996-02-01

    The Mariana convergent plate margin system of the western Pacific provides opportunities for studying the tectonic and geochemical processes of intraoceanic plate subduction without the added complexities of continental geology. The system's relative geologic simplicity and the well-exposed sections of lithosphere in each of its tectonic provinces permit in situ examination of processes critical to understanding subduction tectonics. Its general history provides analogs to ancient convergent margin terranes exposed on land and helps to explain the chemical mass balance in convergent plate margins. The Mariana convergent margin's long history of sequential formation of volcanic arcs and extensional back arc basins has created a series of volcanic arcs at the eastern edge of the Philippine Sea plate. The trenchward edge of the overriding plate has a relatively sparse sediment cover. Rocks outcropping on the trench's inner slope are typical of the early formed suprasubduction zone's lithosphere and have been subjected to various processes related to its tectonic history. Pervasive forearc faulting has exposed crust and upper mantle lithosphere. Many large serpentinized peridotite seamounts are within 100 km of the trench axis. From these we can learn the history of regional metamorphism and observe and sample active venting of slab fluids. Ocean drilling recovered suprasubduction zone lava sequences erupted since the Eocene that suggest that the forearc region remains volcanologically dynamic. Seismic studies and seafloor mapping show evidence of deformation throughout forearc evolution. Large portions of uplifted southern forearc are exposed at the larger islands. Active volcanoes at the base of the eastern boundary fault of the Mariana Trough vary in size and composition along strike and record regional differences in source composition. Their locations along strike of the arc are controlled in part by cross-arc structures that also facilitate formation of submarine

  14. Tectono-thermal evolution of the Atlas system - SW Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, G.; Negro, F.; Babault, J.; Foeken, J.; Stuart, F.; Kober, F.; Ivy-Ochs, S.

    2009-04-01

    In Morocco, the High and Middle Atlas of Morocco are intra-continental fold-thrust belts situated in the southern foreland of the Rif orogen. The High Atlas and its eastern continuation in Algeria and Tunisia is an ENE-WSW to E-W trending belt about 2000kms long and 100kms wide. It is a key natural laboratory because it 1) is the southern and westernmost expression of Alpine-Himalayan orogeny, and 2) encompasses Pre-Cambrian to recent evolution of the region. Phases of shortening and exhumation of this orogen remain however ill constrained and the few available quantitative, data do not allow the present-day high topography (over 4000m) to be explained. In order to put constrains on the recent orogenic growth of the Atlas system, we investigated the temperature-time history of rocks combining extensive low-temperature thermochronological analysis (Fission tracks and (U-Th)/He on zircon and apatite), and sub-recent denudation rates using cosmogenic Neon and Beryllium analysis. The target area is a NE-SW oriented transect between Marrakech and Igherm crossing the different structural segments of the western Atlas away from present-day fault systems. Results are much contrasted from one domain to the other: Pre-Cambrian bedrocks from the Anti-Atlas domain yield old Fission-Track ages on zircon (380-300 Ma), apatite (180-120 Ma) but also U-Th/He (150-110 Ma) still on apatite that are discussed in another contribution. U-Th/He ages on apatite are many from the High-Atlas (#>20) and much younger ranging between ~35 and 5 Ma. We performed a detailed vertical profile in the axial zone of the High-Atlas. Age-elevation relationship suggests that exhumation increased towards 1.0 km/my by the Late Miocene (~13-12 Ma). Further, continental series of Cretaceous age from the adjacent Sub-Atlas domains indicate total resetting to temperatures greater than 80°C suggesting that a post Cretaceous sedimentary pile of at least 3 kilometres in thickness is missing. The timing of the

  15. Transient MutS-Based Hypermutation System for Adaptive Evolution of Lactobacillus casei to Low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, Tom J; Welker, Dennis L; Hughes, Joanne E; Steele, James L; Broadbent, Jeff R

    2017-10-15

    This study explored transient inactivation of the gene encoding the DNA mismatch repair enzyme MutS as a tool for adaptive evolution of Lactobacillus casei MutS deletion derivatives of L. casei 12A and ATCC 334 were constructed and subjected to a 100-day adaptive evolution process to increase lactic acid resistance at low pH. Wild-type parental strains were also subjected to this treatment. At the end of the process, the Δ mutS lesion was repaired in representative L. casei 12A and ATCC 334 Δ mutS mutant isolates. Growth studies in broth at pH 4.0 (titrated with lactic acid) showed that all four adapted strains grew more rapidly, to higher cell densities, and produced significantly more lactic acid than untreated wild-type cells. However, the adapted Δ mutS derivative mutants showed the greatest increases in growth and lactic acid production. Further characterization of the L. casei 12A-adapted Δ mutS derivative revealed that it had a significantly smaller cell volume, a rougher cell surface, and significantly better survival at pH 2.5 than parental L. casei 12A. Genome sequence analysis confirmed that transient mutS inactivation decreased DNA replication fidelity in both L. casei strains, and it identified genetic changes that might contribute to the lactic acid-resistant phenotypes of adapted cells. Targeted inactivation of three genes that had acquired nonsense mutations in the adapted L. casei 12A Δ mutS mutant derivative showed that NADH dehydrogenase ( ndh ), phosphate transport ATP-binding protein PstB ( pstB ), and two-component signal transduction system (TCS) quorum-sensing histidine protein kinase ( hpk ) genes act in combination to increase lactic acid resistance in L. casei 12A. IMPORTANCE Adaptive evolution has been applied to microorganisms to increase industrially desirable phenotypes, including acid resistance. We developed a method to increase the adaptability of Lactobacillus casei 12A and ATCC 334 through transient inactivation of the DNA

  16. On integrability of the Yao–Zeng two-component short-pulse equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelli, J.C.; Sakovich, S.

    2012-01-01

    We show how the Yao–Zeng system of coupled short-pulse equations is related to the original short-pulse equation and obtain the correct zero-curvature representation of the Yao–Zeng system via this relationship.

  17. Experimental investigation of the factors influencing the polymer-polymer bond strength during two component injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2007-01-01

    Two component injection moulding is a commercially important manufacturing process and a key technology for Moulded Interconnect Devices (MIDs). Many fascinating applications of two component or multi component polymer parts are restricted due to the weak interfacial adhesion of the polymers....... A thorough understanding of the factors that influence the bond strength of polymers is necessary for multi component polymer processing. This paper investigates the effects of the process and material parameters on the bond strength of two component polymer parts and identifies the factors which can...... effectively control the adhesion between two polymers. The effects of environmental conditions on the bond strength after moulding are also investigated. The material selections and environmental conditions were chosen based on the suitability of MID production, but the results and discussion presented...

  18. Exact traveling wave solutions for system of nonlinear evolution equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamruzzaman; Akbar, M Ali; Arnous, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    In this work, recently deduced generalized Kudryashov method is applied to the variant Boussinesq equations, and the (2 + 1)-dimensional breaking soliton equations. As a result a range of qualitative explicit exact traveling wave solutions are deduced for these equations, which motivates us to develop, in the near future, a new approach to obtain unsteady solutions of autonomous nonlinear evolution equations those arise in mathematical physics and engineering fields. It is uncomplicated to extend this method to higher-order nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics. And it should be possible to apply the same method to nonlinear evolution equations having more general forms of nonlinearities by utilizing the traveling wave hypothesis.

  19. Functional pleiotropy and mating system evolution in plants: frequency-independent mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Crispin Y; Otto, Sarah P

    2012-04-01

    Mutations that alter the morphology of floral displays (e.g., flower size) or plant development can change multiple functions simultaneously, such as pollen export and selfing rate. Given the effect of these various traits on fitness, pleiotropy may alter the evolution of both mating systems and floral displays, two characters with high diversity among angiosperms. The influence of viability selection on mating system evolution has not been studied theoretically. We model plant mating system evolution when a single locus simultaneously affects the selfing rate, pollen export, and viability. We assume frequency-independent mating, so our model characterizes prior selfing. Pleiotropy between increased viability and selfing rate reduces opportunities for the evolution of pure outcrossing, can favor complete selfing despite high inbreeding depression, and notably, can cause the evolution of mixed mating despite very high inbreeding depression. These results highlight the importance of pleiotropy for mating system evolution and suggest that selection by nonpollinating agents may help explain mixed mating, particularly in species with very high inbreeding depression. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Study on the Plastic Bottle Recycling Based on Evolution Tree for Technical System

    OpenAIRE

    Yuedong Xiong; Huadong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Technical system theory of evolution tree was used in the study of the plastic bottle recycling, and established the evolutionary line of plastic bottle recycling on the basis of the analysis of plastic bottle recycling recovery evolution tree, and summed up a new smart plastic bottle recycling program. The new recovery recovers and smashes the plastic bottles through technical system, and communicates with users through automatically reward system and rewards the latter. The experimental pro...

  1. A principle of corresponding states for two-component, self-gravitating fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrogases are defined as two-component, large-scale celestial objects where the subsystems interact only via gravitation. The macrogas equation of state is formulated and compared to the van der Waals (VDW equation of state for ordinary gases. By analogy, it is assumed that real macroisothermal curves in macrogases occur as real isothermal curves in ordinary gases, where a phase transition (vapour-liquid observed in ordinary gases and gas-stars assumed in macrogases takes place along a horizontal line in the macrovolume-macropressure (O, Xv, Xp plane. The intersections between real and theoretical (deduced from the equation of state macroisothermal curves, make two regions of equal surface as for ordinary gases obeying the VDW equation of state. A numerical algorithm is developed for determining the following points of a selected theoretical macroisothermal curve on the (O, Xv, Xp plane: the three intersections with the related real macroisothermal curve, and the two extremum points (one maximum and one minimum. Different kinds of macrogases are studied in detail: UU, where U density profiles are flat, to be conceived as a simple guidance case; HH, where H density profiles obey the Hernquist (1990 law, which satisfactorily fits the observed spheroidal components of galaxies; HN/NH, where N density profiles obey the Navarro-Frenk-White (1995, 1996, 1997 law, which satisfactorily fits the simulated nonbaryonic dark matter haloes. A different trend is shown by theoretical macroisothermal curves on the (O/XV/Xp plane, according to whether density profiles are sufficiently mild (UU or sufficiently steep (HH, HN/NH. In the former alternative, no critical macroisothermal curve exists, below or above which the trend is monotonous. In the latter alternative, a critical macroisothermal curve exists, as shown by VDW gases, where the critical point may be defined as the horizontal inflexion point. In any case, by analogy with VDW gases, the first quadrant

  2. A Principle of Corresponding States for Two-Component, Self-Gravitating Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi, R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrogases are defined as two-component,large-scale celestial objects where the subsystems interact only via gravitation.The macrogas equation of state is formulated and compared to the van der Waals (VDWequation of state for ordinary gases.By analogy, it is assumed that real macroisothermal curves in macrogases occur as real isothermal curves in ordinary gases, where a phase transition(vapour-liquid observed in ordinary gases and gas-stars assumed in macrogases takesplace along a horizontal linein the macrovolume-macropressure{small $({sf O}sX_mathrm{V}sX_mathrm{p}$} plane.The intersections between real and theoretical(deduced from the equation of state macro isothermalcurves, make two regions of equal surface as for ordinary gases obeying the VDW equation of state.A numerical algorithm is developed for determining the following points of a selected theoretical macroisothermal curve on the {small $({sf O}sX_mathrm{V}sX_mathrm{p}$} plane:the three intersections with the related real macroisothermal curve,and the two extremum points (one maximum and one minimum. Different kinds of macrogases are studied in detail: UU, where U density profiles are flat, to be conceived as a simple guidance case; HH, where H density profiles obey the Hernquist (1990 law, which satisfactorily fits the observed spheroidal components of galaxies; HN/NH, where N density profiles obey the Navarro-Frenk-White (1995,1996, 1997 law, which satisfactorily fits the simulated nonbaryonic dark matter haloes.A different trend is shown by theoretical macroisothermal curves on the{small $({sf O}sX_mathrm{V}sX_mathrm{p}$} plane,according to whether density profiles are sufficiently mild (UU or sufficiently steep (HH, HN/NH.In the former alternative, no critical macroisothermal curve exists, below or above which the trend is monotonous. In the latter alternative, a critical macroisothermal curve exists, as shown by VDW gases, where the critical point may be defined as the horizontal

  3. Engineering bright solitons to enhance the stability of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, R.; Vinayagam, P. S.; Sudharsan, J. B.; Liu, Wu-Ming; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-12-01

    We consider a system of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equations describing a binary quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with intrinsic time-dependent attractive interactions, placed in a time-dependent expulsive parabolic potential, in a special case when the system is integrable (a deformed Manakov's system). Since the nonlinearity in the integrable system which represents binary attractive interactions exponentially decays with time, solitons are also subject to decay. Nevertheless, it is shown that the robustness of bright solitons can be enhanced in this system, making their respective lifetime longer, by matching the time dependence of the interaction strength (adjusted with the help of the Feshbach-resonance management) to the time modulation of the strength of the parabolic potential. The analytical results, and their stability, are corroborated by numerical simulations. In particular, we demonstrate that the addition of random noise does not impact the stability of the solitons.

  4. Fourth Way in Action? The Evolution of Singapore's Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinathan, Saravanan

    2012-01-01

    Hargreaves and Shirley's "The Fourth Way" offers a valuable framework for considering the challenges and dilemmas that confront education change practitioners. In this article, I consider how well their framework fits the evolution and more recent changes in Singapore education. History, context culture and aspirations are seen as…

  5. Designing a Resource Evolution Support System for Open Knowledge Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianmin; Yu, Shengquan

    2015-01-01

    The continuous generation and evolution of digital learning resources is important for promoting open learning and meeting the personalized needs of learners. In the Web 2.0 era, open and collaborative authoring is becoming a popular method by which to create vast personalized learning resources in open knowledge communities (OKCs). However, the…

  6. Computation of a long-time evolution in a Schroedinger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, R.; Kroeger, H.; Labelle, P.; Bajzer, Z.

    1988-01-01

    We compare different techniques for the computation of a long-time evolution and the S matrix in a Schroedinger system. As an application we consider a two-nucleon system interacting via the Yamaguchi potential. We suggest computation of the time evolution for a very short time using Pade approximants, the long-time evolution being obtained by iterative squaring. Within the technique of strong approximation of Moller wave operators (SAM) we compare our calculation with computation of the time evolution in the eigenrepresentation of the Hamiltonian and with the standard Lippmann-Schwinger solution for the S matrix. We find numerical agreement between these alternative methods for time-evolution computation up to half the number of digits of internal machine precision, and fairly rapid convergence of both techniques towards the Lippmann-Schwinger solution

  7. Dispersion calculation method based on S-transform and coordinate rotation for Love channel waves with two components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lei; Zhang, Yugui

    2017-08-01

    Dispersion analysis is an important part of in-seam seismic data processing, and the calculation accuracy of the dispersion curve directly influences pickup errors of channel wave travel time. To extract an accurate channel wave dispersion curve from in-seam seismic two-component signals, we proposed a time-frequency analysis method based on single-trace signal processing; in addition, we formulated a dispersion calculation equation, based on S-transform, with a freely adjusted filter window width. To unify the azimuth of seismic wave propagation received by a two-component geophone, the original in-seam seismic data undergoes coordinate rotation. The rotation angle can be calculated based on P-wave characteristics, with high energy in the wave propagation direction and weak energy in the vertical direction. With this angle acquisition, a two-component signal can be converted to horizontal and vertical directions. Because Love channel waves have a particle vibration track perpendicular to the wave propagation direction, the signal in the horizontal and vertical directions is mainly Love channel waves. More accurate dispersion characters of Love channel waves can be extracted after the coordinate rotation of two-component signals.

  8. The dynamics of a tri-trophic food chain with two-component populations from a biochemical perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanegraaf, P.P.F.; Kooi, B.W.

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical considerations and curve fitting of data support the proposition that models for heterotrophic organisms are more realistic when individuals consist of two components: reserves and structure. Predators that prey on a population of such individuals can choose to assimilate the reserves or

  9. ‘Forcing the issue’ - Aromatic tuning facilitates stimulus-independent modulation of a two-component signaling circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Morten; von Heijne, Gunnar; Draheim, Roger R.

    2014-01-01

    Two-component signaling circuits allow bacteria to detect and respond to external stimuli. Unfortunately, the input stimulus remains unidentified for the majority of these circuits. Therefore, development of a synthetic method for stimulus-independent modulation of these circuits is highly desira...

  10. Ketones as electrophiles in two component Baylis-Hillman reaction: a facile one-pot synthesis of substituted indolizines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaiah, Deevi; Veeraraghavaiah, Gorre; Badsara, Satpal Singh

    2014-03-14

    2-Alkanoyl(aroyl)-pyridines have been successfully used for coupling with alkyl vinyl ketones under the influence of TMSOTf providing a facile protocol for the synthesis of substituted indolizines, thus demonstrating the application of ketones as electrophiles in a two component Baylis-Hillman reaction.

  11. Engineering bright solitons to enhance the stability of two-component Bose–Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, R., E-mail: radha_ramaswamy@yahoo.com [Centre for Nonlinear Science, PG and Research Dept. of Physics, Govt. College for Women (Autonomous), Kumbakonam 612001 (India); Vinayagam, P.S.; Sudharsan, J.B. [Centre for Nonlinear Science, PG and Research Dept. of Physics, Govt. College for Women (Autonomous), Kumbakonam 612001 (India); Liu, Wu-Ming, E-mail: wmliu@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing-100190 (China); Malomed, Boris A., E-mail: malomed@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2015-12-04

    We consider a system of coupled Gross–Pitaevskii (GP) equations describing a binary quasi-one-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) with intrinsic time-dependent attractive interactions, placed in a time-dependent expulsive parabolic potential, in a special case when the system is integrable (a deformed Manakov's system). Since the nonlinearity in the integrable system which represents binary attractive interactions exponentially decays with time, solitons are also subject to decay. Nevertheless, it is shown that the robustness of bright solitons can be enhanced in this system, making their respective lifetime longer, by matching the time dependence of the interaction strength (adjusted with the help of the Feshbach-resonance management) to the time modulation of the strength of the parabolic potential. The analytical results, and their stability, are corroborated by numerical simulations. In particular, we demonstrate that the addition of random noise does not impact the stability of the solitons. - Highlights: • We formulate a versatile mechanism to enhance the lifetime of vectorial condensates employing Feshbach Resonance. • Vectorial condensates in a transient harmonic trap are more long lived compared to their counterpart in a time independent harmonic trap. • Corroborate the exact analytical results with numerical simulations. • Addition of random noise does not impact the stability of vector BECs.

  12. Engineering bright solitons to enhance the stability of two-component Bose–Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, R.; Vinayagam, P.S.; Sudharsan, J.B.; Liu, Wu-Ming; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a system of coupled Gross–Pitaevskii (GP) equations describing a binary quasi-one-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) with intrinsic time-dependent attractive interactions, placed in a time-dependent expulsive parabolic potential, in a special case when the system is integrable (a deformed Manakov's system). Since the nonlinearity in the integrable system which represents binary attractive interactions exponentially decays with time, solitons are also subject to decay. Nevertheless, it is shown that the robustness of bright solitons can be enhanced in this system, making their respective lifetime longer, by matching the time dependence of the interaction strength (adjusted with the help of the Feshbach-resonance management) to the time modulation of the strength of the parabolic potential. The analytical results, and their stability, are corroborated by numerical simulations. In particular, we demonstrate that the addition of random noise does not impact the stability of the solitons. - Highlights: • We formulate a versatile mechanism to enhance the lifetime of vectorial condensates employing Feshbach Resonance. • Vectorial condensates in a transient harmonic trap are more long lived compared to their counterpart in a time independent harmonic trap. • Corroborate the exact analytical results with numerical simulations. • Addition of random noise does not impact the stability of vector BECs.

  13. Evolution of System Safety at NASA as Related to Defense-in-Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Homayoon

    2015-01-01

    Presentation given at the Defense-in-Depth Inter-Agency Workshop on August 26, 2015 in Rockville, MD by Homayoon Dezfuli. The presentation addresses the evolution of system safety at NASA as related to Defense-in-Depth.

  14. Evolution of intelligent transportation systems for mobility management and coordination serving California's rural frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the evolution, development, and lessons learned while attempting to identify, modify, and deploy Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) and advanced technology tools to facilitate coordination of public transit and social (huma...

  15. Immune genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes in Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McTaggart Seanna J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding which parts of the genome have been most influenced by adaptive evolution remains an unsolved puzzle. Some evidence suggests that selection has the greatest impact on regions of the genome that interact with other evolving genomes, including loci that are involved in host-parasite co-evolutionary processes. In this study, we used a population genetic approach to test this hypothesis by comparing DNA sequences of 30 putative immune system genes in the crustacean Daphnia pulex with 24 non-immune system genes. Results In support of the hypothesis, results from a multilocus extension of the McDonald-Kreitman (MK test indicate that immune system genes as a class have experienced more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes. However, not all immune system genes show evidence of adaptive evolution. Additionally, we apply single locus MK tests and calculate population genetic parameters at all loci in order to characterize the mode of selection (directional versus balancing in the genes that show the greatest deviation from neutral evolution. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that immune system genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes, possibly as a result of host-parasite arms races. The results of these analyses highlight several candidate loci undergoing adaptive evolution that could be targeted in future studies.

  16. Biological evolution of replicator systems: towards a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Osmel; Horvath, J E

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to study the features of a simple replicator chemical model of the relation between kinetic stability and entropy production under the action of external perturbations. We quantitatively explore the different paths leading to evolution in a toy model where two independent replicators compete for the same substrate. To do that, the same scenario described originally by Pross (J Phys Org Chem 17:312-316, 2004) is revised and new criteria to define the kinetic stability are proposed. Our results suggest that fast replicator populations are continually favored by the effects of strong stochastic environmental fluctuations capable to determine the global population, the former assumed to be the only acting evolution force. We demonstrate that the process is continually driven by strong perturbations only, and that population crashes may be useful proxies for these catastrophic environmental fluctuations. As expected, such behavior is particularly enhanced under very large scale perturbations, suggesting a likely dynamical footprint in the recovery patterns of new species after mass extinction events in the Earth's geological past. Furthermore, the hypothesis that natural selection always favors the faster processes may give theoretical support to different studies that claim the applicability of maximum principles like the Maximum Metabolic Flux (MMF) or Maximum Entropy Productions Principle (MEPP), seen as the main goal of biological evolution.

  17. A fuzzy simulated evolution algorithm for integrated manufacturing system design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mutingi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Integrated cell formation and layout (CFLP is an extended application of the group technology philosophy in which machine cells and cell layout are addressed simultaneously. The aim of this technological innovation is to improve both productivity and flexibility in modern manufacturing industry. However, due to its combinatorial complexity, the cell formation and layout problem is best solved by heuristic and metaheuristic approaches. As CFLP is prevalent in manufacturing industry, developing robust and efficient solution methods for the problem is imperative. This study seeks to develop a fuzzy simulated evolution algorithm (FSEA that integrates fuzzy-set theoretic concepts and the philosophy of constructive perturbation and evolution. Deriving from the classical simulated evolution algorithm, the search efficiency of the major phases of the algorithm is enhanced, including initialization, evaluation, selection and reconstruction. Illustrative computational experiments based on existing problem instances from the literature demonstrate the utility and the strength of the FSEA algorithm developed in this study. It is anticipated in this study that the application of the algorithm can be extended to other complex combinatorial problems in industry.

  18. SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS AFFECTING EVOLUTION OF ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC SYSTEM IN EGYPTIAN MANUFACTURING FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim MAMDOUH ABBAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to determine the factors affecting evolution of Activity Based Costing (ABC system in Egyptian case. The study used the survey method to describe and analyze these factors in some Egyptian firms. The population of the study is Egyptian manufacturing firms. Accordingly, the number of received questionnaires was 392 (23 Egyptian manufacturing firms in the first half of 2013. Finally, the study stated some influencing factors for evolution this system (ABC in Egyptian manufacturing firms.

  19. Evolution of the Chinese Industry-University-Research Collaborative Innovation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyu Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to reveal the mechanism of the Chinese industry-university-research collaborative innovation (IURCI and interactions between the elements in the system and find issues that exist in the collaborative innovation process. Based on the theoretical perspective of innovation and complexity science, we summarized the elements of the IURCI as innovation capability, research and development (R&D configuration, and knowledge transfer and established a theoretical model to describe the evolution of the IURCI system. We used simulation technology to determine the interactions among variables and the evolution trend of the system. The results showed that the R&D configuration can promote the evolution of innovation capability and knowledge transfer and that innovation capacity is the current dominant factor in the evolution of the Chinese IURCI system and is highly positively correlated with R&D configuration. The evolutionary trend of knowledge transfer was gentler, and its contribution to the evolution of the Chinese IURCI system was less than that of R&D configuration. When innovation, R&D configuration, and knowledge transfer are relatively balanced, the collaborative innovation system can achieve high speed and stable evolution.

  20. Evolution of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.; Behnke, Jeanne; Sofinowski, Edwin; Lowe, Dawn; Esfandiari, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    One of the strategic goals of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is to "Develop a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics consistent with the redirection of the human spaceflight program to focus on exploration". An important sub-goal of this goal is to "Study Earth from space to advance scientific understanding and meet societal needs." NASA meets this subgoal in partnership with other U.S. agencies and international organizations through its Earth science program. A major component of NASA s Earth science program is the Earth Observing System (EOS). The EOS program was started in 1990 with the primary purpose of modeling global climate change. This program consists of a set of space-borne instruments, science teams, and a data system. The instruments are designed to obtain highly accurate, frequent and global measurements of geophysical properties of land, oceans and atmosphere. The science teams are responsible for designing the instruments as well as scientific algorithms to derive information from the instrument measurements. The data system, called the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS), produces data products using those algorithms as well as archives and distributes such products. The first of the EOS instruments were launched in November 1997 on the Japanese satellite called the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the last, on the U.S. satellite Aura, were launched in July 2004. The instrument science teams have been active since the inception of the program in 1990 and have participation from Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, Netherlands, United Kingdom and U.S. The development of EOSDIS was initiated in 1990, and this data system has been serving the user community since 1994. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the history and evolution of EOSDIS since its beginnings to the present and indicate how it continues to evolve into the future. this chapter is organized as follows. Sect

  1. Nonlinear evolution equations and solving algebraic systems: the importance of computer algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdt, V.P.; Kostov, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper we study the application of computer algebra to solve the nonlinear polynomial systems which arise in investigation of nonlinear evolution equations. We consider several systems which are obtained in classification of integrable nonlinear evolution equations with uniform rank. Other polynomial systems are related with the finding of algebraic curves for finite-gap elliptic potentials of Lame type and generalizations. All systems under consideration are solved using the method based on construction of the Groebner basis for corresponding polynomial ideals. The computations have been carried out using computer algebra systems. 20 refs

  2. Spatially resolved imaging of the two-component η Crv debris disk with Herschel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchêne, G.; Arriaga, P.; Kalas, P. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wyatt, M.; Kennedy, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Sibthorpe, B. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Lisse, C. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Holland, W. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Wisniewski, J. [H.L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Clampin, M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 681, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pinte, C. [UMI-FCA, CNRS/INSU, France (UMI 3386) (France); Wilner, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Booth, M. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Horner, J. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Matthews, B. [National Research Council of Canada Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Greaves, J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    We present far-infrared and submillimeter images of the η Crv debris disk system obtained with Herschel and SCUBA-2, as well as Hubble Space Telescope visible and near-infrared coronagraphic images. In the 70 μm Herschel image, we clearly separate the thermal emission from the warm and cold belts in the system, find no evidence for a putative dust population located between them, and precisely determine the geometry of the outer belt. We also find marginal evidence for azimuthal asymmetries and a global offset of the outer debris ring relative to the central star. Finally, we place stringent upper limits on the scattered light surface brightness of the outer ring. Using radiative transfer modeling, we find that it is impossible to account for all observed properties of the system under the assumption that both rings contain dust populations with the same properties. While the outer belt is in reasonable agreement with the expectations of steady-state collisional cascade models, albeit with a minimum grain size that is four times larger than the blow-out size, the inner belt appears to contain copious amounts of small dust grains, possibly below the blow-out size. This suggests that the inner belt cannot result from a simple transport of grains from the outer belt and rather supports a more violent phenomenon as its origin. We also find that the emission from the inner belt has not declined over three decades, a much longer timescale than its dynamical timescale, which indicates that the belt is efficiently replenished.

  3. Transient two-phase two-component water-steam-air flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model of a transient one-dimensional two-phase flow consisting of water, steam, and air is described. In the general case, a system of four partial differential equations of hyperbolic type was derived. The expression obtained for the velocity of sound is in good agreement with the results of the experiment. There is also good agreement with existing theories for the limiting cases of a missing phase or component. A numerical example demonstrating the application of the theory is shown

  4. Multi Groups Cooperation based Symbiotic Evolution for TSK-type Neuro-Fuzzy Systems Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Chang; Hsu, Yung-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fuu

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a TSK-type neuro-fuzzy system with multi groups cooperation based symbiotic evolution method (TNFS-MGCSE) is proposed. The TNFS-MGCSE is developed from symbiotic evolution. The symbiotic evolution is different from traditional GAs (genetic algorithms) that each chromosome in symbiotic evolution represents a rule of fuzzy model. The MGCSE is different from the traditional symbiotic evolution; with a population in MGCSE is divided to several groups. Each group formed by a set of chromosomes represents a fuzzy rule and cooperate with other groups to generate the better chromosomes by using the proposed cooperation based crossover strategy (CCS). In this paper, the proposed TNFS-MGCSE is used to evaluate by numerical examples (Mackey-Glass chaotic time series and sunspot number forecasting). The performance of the TNFS-MGCSE achieves excellently with other existing models in the simulations.

  5. Development of instrumentation for measurements of two components of velocity with a single sensing element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C. P.; Fu, M. K.; Fan, Y.; Hultmark, M.

    2018-02-01

    A novel method of obtaining two orthogonal velocity components with high spatial and temporal resolution is investigated. Both components are obtained utilizing a single sensing nanoribbon by combining the two independent operating modes of classic hot wire anemometry and the newly discovered elastic filament velocimetry (EFV). In contrast to hot wire anemometry, EFV measures fluid velocity through correlating the fluid forcing with the internal strain of the wire. In order to utilize both modes of operation, a system that switches between the two operating modes is built and characterized, and the theoretically predicted sensing response time in water is compared to experimental results. The sensing system is capable of switching between the two modes of operation at a frequency of 100 kHz with minimal attenuation with an uncompensated repetition rate up to 3 kHz or up to 10 kHz utilizing modest signal compensation. While further characterization of the sensor performance in air is needed, this methodology enables a technique for obtaining well-resolved yet cost-efficient directional measurements of flow velocities which, for example, can be used for distributed measurements of velocity or measurements of turbulent stresses with excellent spatial resolution.

  6. FRAN and RBF-PSO as two components of a hyper framework to recognize protein folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Elham; Ghatee, Mehdi; Shiri, M E

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an intelligent hyper framework is proposed to recognize protein folds from its amino acid sequence which is a fundamental problem in bioinformatics. This framework includes some statistical and intelligent algorithms for proteins classification. The main components of the proposed framework are the Fuzzy Resource-Allocating Network (FRAN) and the Radial Bases Function based on Particle Swarm Optimization (RBF-PSO). FRAN applies a dynamic method to tune up the RBF network parameters. Due to the patterns complexity captured in protein dataset, FRAN classifies the proteins under fuzzy conditions. Also, RBF-PSO applies PSO to tune up the RBF classifier. Experimental results demonstrate that FRAN improves prediction accuracy up to 51% and achieves acceptable multi-class results for protein fold prediction. Although RBF-PSO provides reasonable results for protein fold recognition up to 48%, it is weaker than FRAN in some cases. However the proposed hyper framework provides an opportunity to use a great range of intelligent methods and can learn from previous experiences. Thus it can avoid the weakness of some intelligent methods in terms of memory, computational time and static structure. Furthermore, the performance of this system can be enhanced throughout the system life-cycle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sex-determination systems and their evolution: Mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorado Garzon, Fredy A; Matta Camacho, Nubia E; Sanchez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Sex-determination methods are very diverse as they have become an enduring research field, understanding the causes of gonadal development and elucidating the main factors involved in sex-determination of offspring required relating information from far-ranging areas such as cytology, embryology, morphology, molecular biology and even ecology and evolution. This article presents an overview of sex-determination in placental mammals, encompassing several levels of biological organization. The importance of the underlying molecular tools in the context of sex-determination assays and their implications in conservation genetics is also discussed.

  8. Investigating Exoplanet Orbital Evolution Around Binary Star Systems with Mass Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid A. Rahoma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A planet revolving around binary star system is a familiar system. Studies of these systems are important because they provide precise knowledge of planet formation and orbit evolution. In this study, a method to determine the evolution of an exoplanet revolving around a binary star system using different rates of stellar mass loss will be introduced. Using a hierarchical triple body system, in which the outer body can be moved with the center of mass of the inner binary star as a two-body problem, the long period evolution of the exoplanet orbit is determined depending on a Hamiltonian formulation. The model is simulated by numerical integrations of the Hamiltonian equations for the system over a long time. As a conclusion, the behavior of the planet orbital elements is quite affected by the rate of the mass loss from the accompanying binary star.

  9. Quantum phases of two-component bosons with spin-orbit coupling in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Spielman, I. B.; Sá de Melo, C. A. R.

    2017-12-01

    Ultracold bosons in optical lattices are one of the few systems where bosonic matter is known to exhibit strong correlations. Here we push the frontier of our understanding of interacting bosons in optical lattices by adding synthetic spin-orbit coupling, and show that new kinds of density and chiral orders develop. The competition between the optical lattice period and the spin-orbit coupling length—which can be made comparable in experiments—along with the spin hybridization induced by a transverse field (i.e., Rabi coupling) and interparticle interactions create a rich variety of quantum phases including uniform, nonuniform, and phase-separated superfluids, as well as Mott insulators. The spontaneous symmetry-breaking phenomena at the transitions between them are explained by a two-order-parameter Ginzburg-Landau model with multiparticle umklapp processes. Finally, in order to characterize each phase, we calculated their experimentally measurable crystal momentum distributions.

  10. A comparative experimental evaluation of uncertainty estimation methods for two-component PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boomsma, Aaron; Troolin, Dan; Pothos, Stamatios; Bhattacharya, Sayantan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification in planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement is critical for proper assessment of the quality and significance of reported results. New uncertainty estimation methods have been recently introduced generating interest about their applicability and utility. The present study compares and contrasts current methods, across two separate experiments and three software packages in order to provide a diversified assessment of the methods. We evaluated the performance of four uncertainty estimation methods, primary peak ratio (PPR), mutual information (MI), image matching (IM) and correlation statistics (CS). The PPR method was implemented and tested in two processing codes, using in-house open source PIV processing software (PRANA, Purdue University) and Insight4G (TSI, Inc.). The MI method was evaluated in PRANA, as was the IM method. The CS method was evaluated using DaVis (LaVision, GmbH). Utilizing two PIV systems for high and low-resolution measurements and a laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) system, data were acquired in a total of three cases: a jet flow and a cylinder in cross flow at two Reynolds numbers. LDV measurements were used to establish a point validation against which the high-resolution PIV measurements were validated. Subsequently, the high-resolution PIV measurements were used as a reference against which the low-resolution PIV data were assessed for error and uncertainty. We compared error and uncertainty distributions, spatially varying RMS error and RMS uncertainty, and standard uncertainty coverages. We observed that qualitatively, each method responded to spatially varying error (i.e. higher error regions resulted in higher uncertainty predictions in that region). However, the PPR and MI methods demonstrated reduced uncertainty dynamic range response. In contrast, the IM and CS methods showed better response, but under-predicted the uncertainty ranges. The standard coverages (68% confidence interval) ranged from

  11. A new pair of hard-soft plastic combination for precision manufacturing of two component plastic parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Marhöfer, David Maximilian

    2011-01-01

    Two component (2k) injection moulding is growing rapidly even in the field of precision micro moulding. Besides combining different material properties in the same product, two component moulding can eliminate many assembly steps in manufacturing process chain. One of the biggest technical...... and functional properties of the materials proved to be suitable for precision hearing aid applications. Replication quality of the 2k parts was investigated by visual and microscopic investigation. The adhesion of the two plastic materials was characterized by moulding 2k tensile bar test specimens by both...... sequential and simultaneous injection of two materials and afterwards by using a precision tensile testing machine. To characterize the sealing properties of the sealing ring material, a sealing test device was developed. It could provide hydraulic pressure inside the socket house and precisely detect...

  12. Recovering four-component solutions by the inverse transformation of the infinite-order two-component wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barysz, Maria; Mentel, Lukasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    The two-component Hamiltonian of the infinite-order two-component (IOTC) theory is obtained by a unitary block-diagonalizing transformation of the Dirac-Hamiltonian. Once the IOTC spin orbitals are calculated, they can be back transformed into four-component solutions. The transformed four component solutions are then used to evaluate different moments of the electron density distribution. This formally exact method may, however, suffer from certain approximations involved in its numerical implementation. As shown by the present study, with sufficiently large basis set of Gaussian functions, the Dirac values of these moments are fully recovered in spite of using the approximate identity resolution into eigenvectors of the p 2 operator.

  13. Ubiquitous transient stagnant domain formation during thermal convection in a well-mixed two component fluid with large viscosity difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U; Kurita, Rei

    2017-10-11

    The formation of a transient stagnant domain in the presence of thermal convection was previously reported near the sol-gel transition temperature of a gelatin solution. The transient stagnant domain is observed near a critical Rayleigh number where a "roll" pattern is usually stable. It is important to understand the origin of the transient stagnant domain formation since it induces a large deformation of convection patterns; the nature of the formation of the transient stagnant domain remains unclear. Here, we observe thermal convection using several different fluids and find that stagnant domain formation is ubiquitous in two component mixtures. In addition, we find that difference in viscosity between the two components is crucial for transient stagnant domain formation, more so than the concentration gradient induced by the temperature gradient.

  14. Two-component self-assembly with solvent leading to "wet" and microcrystalline organogel fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfman, Miika; Lahtinen, Manu; Rissanen, Kari; Sievänen, Elina

    2015-01-15

    The microcrystalline fibers of N-(2-aminoethyl)-3α-hydroxy-5β-cholan-24-amide 1 provided a useful model system for studying the complex relationship between morphology, experimental parameters, solvent, and the phenomenon of organogelation. The presence of solvents in the solid forms of 1 along with crystallization behavior suggested solvate formation and polymorphic behavior. Forty solid state- and xerogel samples of 1 formed in organic solvents and in three categories of experimental conditions were analyzed with single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman microscopy, and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR). Two polymorphs and four isostructural aromatic solvates of 1 were found among some unknown forms in the samples. Single crystal X-ray structures of one polymorph and bromobenzene solvate were obtained, the latter from a xerogel. Multiple crystal forms could be present in a sample, and their contributions to gelation were estimated taking the experimental conditions into account. Gelator 1 could act as a variable component gelator, either alone or in combination with an aromatic solvent. The research brings new insight into the structures of microcrystalline organogel fibers, linking solvate/inclusion crystal formation with microcrystalline fibers of an organogelator for the first time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A two-component, multimeric endolysin encoded by a single gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Daniela; Velours, Christophe; Leandro, Clara; Garcia, Miguel; Pimentel, Madalena; São-José, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Bacteriophage endolysins are bacterial cell wall degrading enzymes whose potential to fight bacterial infections has been intensively studied. Endolysins from Gram-positive systems are typically described as monomeric and as having a modular structure consisting of one or two N-terminal catalytic domains (CDs) linked to a C-terminal region responsible for cell wall binding (CWB). We show here that expression of the endolysin gene lys170 of the enterococcal phage F170/08 results in two products, the expected full length endolysin (Lys170FL) and a C-terminal fragment corresponding to the CWB domain (CWB170). The latter is produced from an in-frame, alternative translation start site. Both polypeptides interact to form the fully active endolysin. Biochemical data strongly support a model where Lys170 is made of one monomer of Lys170FL associated with up to three CWB170 subunits, which are responsible for efficient endolysin binding to its substrate. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that similar secondary translation start signals may be used to produce and add independent CWB170-like subunits to different enzymatic specificities. The particular configuration of endolysin Lys170 uncovers a new mode of increasing the number of CWB motifs associated to CD modules, as an alternative to the tandem repetition typically found in monomeric cell wall hydrolases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Crossover between integer and fractional vortex lattices in coherently coupled two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Cipriani, Mattia; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-01-01

    We study effects of the internal coherent (Rabi) coupling in vortex lattices in two-component BECs under rotation. We find how the vortex lattices without the Rabi coupling known before are connected to the Abrikosov lattice of integer vortices with increasing the Rabi coupling. We find that 1) for small Rabi couplings, fractional vortices in triangular or square lattice for small or large inter-component coupling constitute hexamers or tetramers, namely multi-dimer bound states made of six o...

  17. Fitting a Two-Component Scattering Model to Polarimetric SAR Data from Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Two simple scattering mechanisms are fitted to polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations of forests. The mechanisms are canopy scatter from a reciprocal medium with azimuthal symmetry and a ground scatter term that can represent double-bounce scatter from a pair of orthogonal surfaces with different dielectric constants or Bragg scatter from a moderately rough surface, which is seen through a layer of vertically oriented scatterers. The model is shown to represent the behavior of polarimetric backscatter from a tropical forest and two temperate forest sites by applying it to data from the National Aeronautic and Space Agency/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) system. Scattering contributions from the two basic scattering mechanisms are estimated for clusters of pixels in polarimetric SAR images. The solution involves the estimation of four parameters from four separate equations. This model fit approach is justified as a simplification of more complicated scattering models, which require many inputs to solve the forward scattering problem. The model is used to develop an understanding of the ground-trunk double-bounce scattering that is present in the data, which is seen to vary considerably as a function of incidence angle. Two parameters in the model fit appear to exhibit sensitivity to vegetation canopy structure, which is worth further exploration. Results from the model fit for the ground scattering term are compared with estimates from a forward model and shown to be in good agreement. The behavior of the scattering from the ground-trunk interaction is consistent with the presence of a pseudo-Brewster angle effect for the air-trunk scattering interface. If the Brewster angle is known, it is possible to directly estimate the real part of the dielectric constant of the trunks, a key variable in forward modeling of backscatter from forests. It is also shown how, with a priori knowledge of the forest height, an estimate for the

  18. Issue Evolution and the Remaking of Partisan Alignments in a European Multiparty System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Christoph

    Issue evolution has become a well-established theoretical perspective in the analysis of long-term electoral behavior and partisan alignments in the U.S. after the emergence of the cultural wars. Outside the U.S., however, this perspective has been rarely used to analyze electoral behavior...... and partisan (re-)alignments. This paper applies the issue evolution perspective to a European multiparty system. I find that the evolution of issues such as immigration or crime has reshaped partisan alignments in Denmark as polarization of new issues on the elite level reshapes partisan alignments. Unlike...

  19. Quantization of systems with temporally varying discretization. II. Local evolution moves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höhn, Philipp A.

    2014-01-01

    Several quantum gravity approaches and field theory on an evolving lattice involve a discretization changing dynamics generated by evolution moves. Local evolution moves in variational discrete systems (1) are a generalization of the Pachner evolution moves of simplicial gravity models, (2) update only a small subset of the dynamical data, (3) change the number of kinematical and physical degrees of freedom, and (4) generate a dynamical (or canonical) coarse graining or refining of the underlying discretization. To systematically explore such local moves and their implications in the quantum theory, this article suitably expands the quantum formalism for global evolution moves, constructed in Paper I [P. A. Höhn, “Quantization of systems with temporally varying discretization. I. Evolving Hilbert spaces,” J. Math. Phys. 55, 083508 (2014); e-print http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1401.6062 [gr-qc

  20. Genuine tripartite entanglement in quantum brachistochrone evolution of a three-qubit system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bao-Kui; Deng, Fu-Guo; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Zhou, Hong-Yu

    2009-11-01

    We explore the connection between quantum brachistochrone (time-optimal) evolution of a three-qubit system and its residual entanglement called three-tangle. The result shows that the entanglement between two qubits is not required for some brachistochrone evolutions of a three-qubit system. However, the evolution between two distinct states cannot be implemented without its three-tangle, except for the trivial cases in which less than three qubits attend evolution. Although both the probability density function of the time-averaged three-tangle and that of the time-averaged squared concurrence between two subsystems become more and more uniform with the decrease in angles of separation between an initial state and a final state, the features of their most probable values exhibit a different trend.

  1. Is the Evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Linked to Restriction-Modification Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are highly diverse foodborne pathogens that are subdivided into more than 1,500 serovars. The diversity is believed to result from mutational evolution, as well as intra- and interspecies recombination that potentially could be influenced by restriction-modification (RM) systems. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RM systems were linked to the evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica. The study included 221 Salmonella enterica genomes, of which 68 were de novo sequenced and 153 were public available genomes from ENA. The data set covered 97 different serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica and an additional five genomes from four other Salmonella subspecies as an outgroup for constructing the phylogenetic trees. The phylogenetic trees were constructed based on multiple alignment of core genes, as well as the presence or absence of pangenes. The topology of the trees was compared to the presence of RM systems, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes, Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs), and plasmid replicons. We did not observe any correlation between evolution and the RM systems in S. enterica subsp. enterica. However, sublineage correlations and serovar-specific patterns were observed. Additionally, we conclude that plasmid replicons, SPIs, and AMR were all better correlated to serovars than to RM systems. This study suggests a limited influence of RM systems on the evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, which could be due to the conjugational mode of horizontal gene transfer in Salmonella. Thus, we conclude that other factors must be involved in shaping the evolution of bacteria. IMPORTANCE The evolution of bacterial pathogens, their plasticity and ability to rapidly change and adapt to new surroundings are crucial for understanding the epidemiology and public health. With the application of genomics, it became clear that horizontal gene transfer played a key role in

  2. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - Many Mechanisms for On-Going Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System has been serving a broad user community since August 1994. As a long-lived multi-mission system serving multiple scientific disciplines and a diverse user community, EOSDIS has been evolving continuously. It has had and continues to have many forms of community input to help with this evolution. Early in its history, it had inputs from the EOSDIS Advisory Panel, benefited from the reviews by various external committees and evolved into the present distributed architecture with discipline-based Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), Science Investigator-led Processing Systems and a cross-DAAC search and data access capability. EOSDIS evolution has been helped by advances in computer technology, moving from an initially planned supercomputing environment to SGI workstations to Linux Clusters for computation and from near-line archives of robotic silos with tape cassettes to RAID-disk-based on-line archives for storage. The network capacities have increased steadily over the years making delivery of data on media almost obsolete. The advances in information systems technologies have been having an even greater impact on the evolution of EOSDIS. In the early days, the advent of the World Wide Web came as a game-changer in the operation of EOSDIS. The metadata model developed for the EOSDIS Core System for representing metadata from EOS standard data products has had an influence on the Federal Geographic Data Committee's metadata content standard and the ISO metadata standards. The influence works both ways. As ISO 19115 metadata standard has developed in recent years, EOSDIS is reviewing its metadata to ensure compliance with the standard. Improvements have been made in the cross-DAAC search and access of data using the centralized metadata clearing house (EOS Clearing House - ECHO) and the client Reverb. Given the diversity of the Earth science disciplines served by the DAACs, the DAACs have developed a

  3. Cosmological Evolution of the Universe Neutral Gas Mass Measured by Quasar Absorption Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Peroux, Celine; McMahon, Richard G.; Irwin, Mike; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J.

    2001-01-01

    The cosmological evolution of neutral hydrogen is an efficient way of tracing structure formation with redshift. It indicates the rate of evolution of gas into stars and hence the gas consumption and rate star formation history of the Universe. In measuring HI, quasar absorbers have proven to be an ideal tool and we use observations from a recent survey for high-redshift quasar absorption systems together with data gathered from the literature to measure the cosmological comoving mass density...

  4. Biopharmaceutical Innovation System in China: System Evolution and Policy Transitions (Pre-1990s-2010s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Chung, Chao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: This article sets up the initial discussion of the evolution of biopharmaceutical innovation in China through the perspective of sectoral innovation system (SIS). Methods: Two data sources including archival documentary data and field interviews were used in this study. Archival documentary data was collected from China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). In addition, industrial practitioners and leading researchers in academia were interviewed. Results: Biopharmaceutical in China was established through international knowledge transfer. The firms played more active role in commercializing biopharmaceutical in China though universities and research institutes were starting to interact with local firms and make contribution to biopharmaceutical industrialization. The transition of the Chinese government’s policies continuously shapes the evolution of biopharmaceutical sector. Policies have been dramatic changes before and after 1980s to encourage developing biopharmaceutical as a competitive industry for China. Conclusion: A SIS for biopharmaceutical has been shaped in China. However, currently biopharmaceutical is still a small sector in China, and for the further growth of the industry more synthetic policies should be implemented. Not only the policy supports towards the research and innovation of biopharmaceuticals in the early stage of development should be attended, but also commercialization of biopharmaceutical products in the later stage of sales. PMID:26673466

  5. The evolution of a LIMS [laboratory information management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the world and United Kingdom markets for nuclear fuels during the 1990s have prompted British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) to maximise cost effectiveness in its Chemical and Metallurgical Services department. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) was introduced in order to keep records of analytical techniques and equipment up to date by coordinating various computer systems. Wherever possible automated systems have replaced traditional, labour intensive techniques. So successful has the LIMS system been, that the team now hopes to expand into expert systems. (UK)

  6. Dynamical effects of successive mergers on the evolution of spherical stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical investigations are carried out to study the dynamical effects of high-mass stars formed out of successive mergers among tidally captured binaries on the evolution of spherical stellar systems. It is assumed that all tidally captured systems become mergers in order to maximize these effects. Stellar systems with N greater than about 10 to the 7th are susceptible to merger instability which may lead to the formation of a central black hole. It is shown that globular clusters are likely to achieve postcollapse expansion due to three-body binary heating and stellar evolution, while galactic nuclei can easily be overcome by the merger instability in the core. 25 references

  7. Development of international organizations in the context of evolution of global political system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Kaverin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses general regularities of development of international organizations. Dynamics of international organizations is described with the equation of biological populations’ growth and is related to the evolution of international multilateral law and world development parameters. As the result of the research, the evolution of global political system is represented with the system of international governance based on the multilateral mechanisms and the model of social structures’ types. The transformations in the system of international organizations partially confirm the hypothesis of emerging World-organism.

  8. The Evolution of Embedded Small Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Sori, F.

    1996-01-01

    A young open cluster is a 2-phase system: an ensemble of stars move in a gaseous medium (the mother molecular cloud). The dynamics and thermodynamics of the system, and so its evolution and final fate (is it stable or unstable?), strongly depends on the mutual feedback between gas and stars. We present an approach which consists in a (simplified) model where stars (N-bodies) move within a gaseous spherical molecular cloud. The two components influence each other through gravity and mass loss....

  9. Stepwise Evolution of Nonliving to Living Chemical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Paul A.

    2004-08-01

    Steps by which a nonliving chemical system could have transformed into a living system are described and discussed, assuming general features of Wächtershäuser's chemo-autotrophic surface theory of the origin of life. Environmental species such as CO2 and H2S are proposed to have reacted to form a quasi-steady state metal-bound intermediate (CH3-M) that slowly decayed into waste (CH4). Unpredictable dispersive reactions expanded the system to include surface-bound forms of the citric acid cycle intermediates (oxaloacetate --> citrate). Further reaction yielded an autocatalytic system in which raw materials are converted into the system at exponential rates. Combinatorial dispersive reactions that improved the performance of this system were automatically selected and incorporated into it. Systems evolved critical features of living systems (proteins, membranes, proteins, nucleic acids, etc.) using two related mechanisms called grafting and waste-conversion. Such living systems were transformed from less recognizable types (characterized by autocatalytic spreading, decentralization, poorly defined boundaries, etc.) into more recognizable ones (encapsulated by membranes, controlled by single-molecule genomes, etc.) that self-replicated by a cell division cycle and could evolve by the standard gene-based Darwinian mechanism. The resulting systems are viewed as having an autocatalytic network composed of three linked autocatalytic subreactions.

  10. The Evolution of Power System Planning with High Levels of Variable Renewable Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Jessica [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Milligan, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid. This document, part of the Greening the Grid introduces the evolution of power system planning with high levels of variable renewable generation.

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopy of 57Fe and the evolution of the solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The article starts with a brief review of ideas on the origin of the solar system, with emphasis on the cosmic history of the element iron. Some examples of the application of Moessbauer spectroscopy to the study of iron compounds from various types of meteorites, which represent different stages of the evolution of the planetary system, then follow. (orig.)

  12. The Diplomatic System of the European Union: Evolution, Change and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, M.; Keukeleire, S.; Vanhoonacker, S.M.R.L.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five years, the EU has established a new system of diplomacy centred on the European External Action Service (EEAS) and the High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. This new system reflects a process of evolution in a changing context, and has been faced by major

  13. The evolution of educational information systems and nurse faculty roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ramona; Meyers, Linda; Rizzolo, Mary Anne; Rutar, Pamela; Proto, Marcia B; Newbold, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are purchasing and/or designing sophisticated administrative information systems to manage such functions as the application, admissions, and registration process, grants management, student records, and classroom scheduling. Although faculty also manage large amounts of data, few automated systems have been created to help faculty improve teaching and learning through the management of information related to individual students, the curriculum, educational programs, and program evaluation. This article highlights the potential benefits that comprehensive educational information systems offer nurse faculty.

  14. Marketing Management Support Systems: evolution, adoption and effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Wierenga, Berend; Bruggen, Gerrit

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA Marketing Management Support Systems can be defined as any device combining (i) information technology, (ii) marketing data and/ or knowledge, and (iii) analytical capabilities, made available to one or more marketing decision-makers with the objective to improve the quality of marketing decision-making. In this paper we present a categorization scheme for marketing management support systems. Three types of MMSS, developed so far, can be identified: marketing information system...

  15. CWDM/GbE metro network system evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Hsien; Sheu, Tien-Jey; Wang, Chi-Yi; Lin, Sheng-Fwu; Fang, Yih; Chien, Wei-Shyan; Chuang, Hsiu-Jung; Tsai, Fu-Yuan

    2002-08-01

    A laboratory experiment was evaluated on the CWDM/GbE Metro Network System. The system is configuration with the optical fiber Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing (CWDM) devices that are designed for Metropolitan and Access Area Network. CWDM devices can support 8 channels over a single fiber either a uni- directional or bi-directional mode, and can increase fiber capacity from 2 to 16 times transmission capacity. The system performance was evaluated using the network performance analyzer by measuring the characteristics of throughput and latency. The systems test results showed that this CWDM based Gigabits Ethernet have good transmission performance through the distance to 50 Km.

  16. Biological information systems: Evolution as cognition-based information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William B

    2018-05-01

    An alternative biological synthesis is presented that conceptualizes evolutionary biology as an epiphenomenon of integrated self-referential information management. Since all biological information has inherent ambiguity, the systematic assessment of information is required by living organisms to maintain self-identity and homeostatic equipoise in confrontation with environmental challenges. Through their self-referential attachment to information space, cells are the cornerstone of biological action. That individualized assessment of information space permits self-referential, self-organizing niche construction. That deployment of information and its subsequent selection enacted the dominant stable unicellular informational architectures whose biological expressions are the prokaryotic, archaeal, and eukaryotic unicellular forms. Multicellularity represents the collective appraisal of equivocal environmental information through a shared information space. This concerted action can be viewed as systematized information management to improve information quality for the maintenance of preferred homeostatic boundaries among the varied participants. When reiterated in successive scales, this same collaborative exchange of information yields macroscopic organisms as obligatory multicellular holobionts. Cognition-Based Evolution (CBE) upholds that assessment of information precedes biological action, and the deployment of information through integrative self-referential niche construction and natural cellular engineering antecedes selection. Therefore, evolutionary biology can be framed as a complex reciprocating interactome that consists of the assessment, communication, deployment and management of information by self-referential organisms at multiple scales in continuous confrontation with environmental stresses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolution of regulatory complexes: a many-body system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouemohammad, Armita; Laessig, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In eukaryotes, many genes have complex regulatory input, which is encoded by multiple transcription factor binding sites linked to a common function. Interactions between transcription factors and site complexes on DNA control the production of protein in cells. Here, we present a quantitative evolutionary analysis of binding site complexes in yeast. We show that these complexes have a joint binding phenotype, which is under substantial stabilizing selection and is well conserved within Saccharomyces paradoxus populations and between three species of Saccharomyces. At the same time, individual low-affinity sites evolve near-neutrally and show considerable affinity variation even within one population. Thus, functionality of and selection on regulatory complexes emerge from the entire cloud of sites, but cannot be pinned down to individual sites. Our method is based on a biophysical model, which determines site occupancies and establishes a joint affinity phenotype for binding site complexes. We infer a fitness landscape depending on this phenotype using yeast whole-genome polymorphism data and a new method of quantitative trait analysis. Our fitness landscape predicts the amount of binding phenotype conservation, as well as ubiquitous compensatory changes between sites in the cloud. Our results open a new avenue to understand the regulatory ``grammar'' of eukaryotic genomes based on quantitative evolution models. Carl-Icahn Laboratory, Washington Road, Princeton 08544 NJ

  18. Periodic Pattern of Genetic and Fitness Diversity during Evolution of an Artificial Cell-Like System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Aita, Takuyo; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Genetic and phenotypic diversity are the basis of evolution. Despite their importance, however, little is known about how they change over the course of evolution. In this study, we analyzed the dynamics of the adaptive evolution of a simple evolvable artificial cell-like system using single-molecule real-time sequencing technology that reads an entire single artificial genome. We found that the genomic RNA population increases in fitness intermittently, correlating with a periodic pattern of genetic and fitness diversity produced by repeated diversification and domination. In the diversification phase, a genomic RNA population spreads within a genetic space by accumulating mutations until mutants with higher fitness are generated, resulting in an increase in fitness diversity. In the domination phase, the mutants with higher fitness dominate, decreasing both the fitness and genetic diversity. This study reveals the dynamic nature of genetic and fitness diversity during adaptive evolution and demonstrates the utility of a simplified artificial cell-like system to study evolution at an unprecedented resolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Microcomputer Intelligence for Technical Training (MITT): The evolution of an intelligent tutoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Jeffrey E.; Wiederholt, Bradley J.; Johnson, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Microcomputer Intelligence for Technical Training (MITT) uses Intelligent Tutoring System (OTS) technology to deliver diagnostic training in a variety of complex technical domains. Over the past six years, MITT technology has been used to develop training systems for nuclear power plant diesel generator diagnosis, Space Shuttle fuel cell diagnosis, and message processing diagnosis for the Minuteman missile. Presented here is an overview of the MITT system, describing the evolution of the MITT software and the benefits of using the MITT system.

  20. A Novel Differential Evolution Invasive Weed Optimization Algorithm for Solving Nonlinear Equations Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongquan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the traditional numerical method to solve the nonlinear equations exist is sensitive to initial value and the higher accuracy of defects. This paper presents an invasive weed optimization (IWO algorithm which has population diversity with the heuristic global search of differential evolution (DE algorithm. In the iterative process, the global exploration ability of invasive weed optimization algorithm provides effective search area for differential evolution; at the same time, the heuristic search ability of differential evolution algorithm provides a reliable guide for invasive weed optimization. Based on the test of several typical nonlinear equations and a circle packing problem, the results show that the differential evolution invasive weed optimization (DEIWO algorithm has a higher accuracy and speed of convergence, which is an efficient and feasible algorithm for solving nonlinear systems of equations.

  1. The Evolution of a distributed operating system (Amoeba)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Renesse, Robbert; Tanenbaum, Andrew S.; Mullender, Sape J.

    1989-01-01

    AMOEBA is a research project to build a true distributed operating system using the object model. Under the COST11-ter MANDIS project this work was extended to cover wide-area networks. Besides describing the system, this paper discusses the successive versions in the implementation of its model,

  2. Evolution of uni- and bifactorial sexual compatibility systems in fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, B.P.S.; Billiard, S.; Vuilleumier, S.; Petit, E.; Hood, M.E.; Giraud, T.

    2013-01-01

    Mating systems, that is, whether organisms give rise to progeny by selfing, inbreeding or outcrossing, strongly affect important ecological and evolutionary processes. Large variations in mating systems exist in fungi, allowing the study of their origin and consequences. In fungi, sexual

  3. Evolution and classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makarova, K.S.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) modules are adaptive immunity systems that are present in many archaea and bacteria. These defence systems are encoded by operons that have an extraordinarily diverse architecture and a high rate of

  4. An ensemble approach to the evolution of complex systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-15

    Mar 15, 2014 ... pattern formation in biological systems, as well as being ap- plied to specific biological systems, either at the cell and tissue level or at much more macroscopic ecological scales. 3. Null models for the genesis of complex gene regulatory interactions. Let us now turn to some higher-level biological ...

  5. Trends Regarding the Evolution of the Romanian Pension System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balteș Nicolae

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The pension system, together with the social assistance services form the social security system is recognized worldwide throughout the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights for the purpose of insured person compensation for damages regarding some inherent risks as: permanent or temporary inability of work, old age or unemployment. The main objectives of a pension system are decreasing poverty regarding the lower income persons throughout the conditions of limitation of the working capacity which are financially vulnerable. In this article we provide a qualitative and quantitative overview regarding the Romanian pension system structure and mechanism. The conclusions of this article highlight the need for a more comprehensive reform of this system in order to strengthen it for the new challenges still to come in the near future.

  6. The ATLAS PanDA Monitoring System and its Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Klimentov, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Potekhin, M; Wenaus, T

    2010-01-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) Workload Management System is used for ATLAS distributed production and analysis worldwide. The needs of ATLAS global computing imposed challenging requirements on PanDA design in areas such as scalability, robustness, automation, diagnostics, and usability for both production shifters and analysis users. Important to meeting these and other requirements is a comprehensive monitoring system. Through a system-wide job database, the PanDA monitor provides a comprehensive and coherent view of the system and job execution, from high level summaries to detailed drill-down job diagnostics. It is (like the rest of PanDA) an Apache-based Python application backed by Oracle. The presentation layer is HTML code generated on the fly in the Python application which is also responsible for managing database queries. However, this approach is lacking in user interface flexibility, simplicity of communication with external systems, and ease of maintenance. We decided to migrat...

  7. The ATLAS PanDA Monitoring System and its Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Klimentov, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Potekhin, M; Wenaus, T

    2011-01-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) Workload Management System is used for ATLAS distributed production and analysis worldwide. The needs of ATLAS global computing imposed challenging requirements on PanDA design in areas such as scalability, robustness, automation, diagnostics, and usability for both production shifters and analysis users. Important to meeting these and other requirements is a comprehensive monitoring system. Through a system-wide job database, the PanDA monitor provides a comprehensive and coherent view of the system and job execution, from high level summaries to detailed drill-down job diagnostics. It is (like the rest of PanDA) an Apache-based Python application backed by Oracle. The presentation layer is HTML code generated on the fly in the Python application which is also responsible for managing database queries. However, this approach is lacking in user interface flexibility, simplicity of communication with external systems, and ease of maintenance. We decided to migrat...

  8. Raman-shifted eye-safe aerosol lidar (REAL) in 2010: instrument status and two-component wind measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Shane D.

    2010-10-01

    This paper and corresponding seminar given on 20 September 2010 at the 16th International School for Quantum Electronics in Nesebar, Bulgaria, will describe the key hardware aspects of the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and recent advances in extracting two-component wind vector fields from the images it produces. The REAL is an eye-safe, ground-based, scanning, elastic aerosol backscatter lidar operating at 1.54 microns wavelength. Operation at this wavelength offers several advantages compared to other laser wavelengths including: (1) maximum eye-safety, (2) invisible beam, (3) superior performance photodetectors compared with those used at longer wavelengths, (4) low atmospheric molecular scattering when compared with operation at shorter wavelengths, (5) good aerosol backscattering, (6) atmospheric transparency, and (7) availability of optical and photonic components used in the modern telecommunations industry. A key issue for creating a high-performance direct-detection lidar at 1.5 microns is the use of InGaAs avalanche photodetectors that have active areas of at most 200 microns in diameter. The small active area imposes a maximum limitation on the field-of-view of the receiver (about 0.54 mrad full-angle for REAL). As a result, a key requirement is a transmitter that can produce a pulsed (>10 Hz) beam with low divergence (150 mJ), and short pulse-duration (Doppler lidars in that two components of motion can be sensed. (Doppler lidars can sense only the radial component of flow.) Two-component velocity estimation is done by computing two-dimensional cross-correlation functions (CCFs) and noting the displacement of the peak of the CCF with respect to the origin. Motion vectors derived from this method are compared with coincident sonic anemometer measurements at 1.6 km range. Preliminary results indicate the method performs best when the atmosphere is stable with light winds.

  9. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: an overview and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    LEE, CJ; The ATLAS collaboration; BOGDANCHIKOV, A; BRASOLIN, F; CONTESCU, AC; DARLEA, GL; KOROL, A; SCANNICCHIO, DA; TWOMEY, M; VALSAN, ML

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The system processes the direct data readout from ~100 million channels on the detector through three trigger levels, selecting interesting events for analysis with a factor of 10^7 reduction on the data rate with a latency of less than a few seconds. Most of the functionality is implemented on ~3000 servers composing the online farm. Due to the critical functionality of the system a sophisticated computing environment is maintained, covering the online farm and ATLAS control rooms, as well as a number of development and testing labs. The specificity of the system required the development of dedicated applications (e.g. ConfDB, BWM) for system configuration and maintenance; in parallel other Open Source tools (Puppet and Quattor) are used to centrally configure the operating systems. The health monitoring of the TDAQ system h...

  10. Evolution of an integrated public health surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Derek A; Ford, Nancy; Tlusty, Susan; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing recognition in maternal and child health of the importance of social, behavioral, biological, and genetic factors across the entire life course. Unfortunately, most state maternal and child health surveillance systems are not designed to readily address longitudinal research questions or track and follow children across multiple programs over time. The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) recently integrated its birth defects registry, newborn hearing screening tracking and management system, and electronic birth certificate (EBC) into a robust, Web-based surveillance system called the Virginia Vital Events and Screening Tracking System (VVESTS). Completely redesigning the existing birth defects and newborn hearing screening system (the Virginia Infant Screening and Infant Tracking System--VISITS I) with minimal disruption of ongoing reporting presented a number of challenges. Because VVESTS had different requirements such as required fields and data validations, extensive data preparation was required to ensure that existing VISITS I data would be included in the new system (VISITS II). Efforts included record deduplication, conversion of free text fields into discrete variables, dealing with missing/invalid data, and linkage with birth certificate data. VISITS II serves multiple program needs; improves data quality and security; automates linkages within families, across programs, and over time; and improves the ability of VDH to provide children with birth defects and their families necessary follow-up services and enhanced care coordination.

  11. Classification of the ground states and topological defects in a rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Peter [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC Paris 06, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, UMR 7190 CNRS-UPMC, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Aftalion, Amandine [CNRS and Universite Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Laboratoire de Mathematiques de Versailles, CNRS UMR 8100, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, F-78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    We classify the ground states and topological defects of a rotating two-component condensate when varying several parameters: the intracomponent coupling strengths, the intercomponent coupling strength, and the particle numbers. No restriction is placed on the masses or trapping frequencies of the individual components. We present numerical phase diagrams which show the boundaries between the regions of coexistence, spatial separation, and symmetry breaking. Defects such as triangular coreless vortex lattices, square coreless vortex lattices, and giant skyrmions are classified. Various aspects of the phase diagrams are analytically justified thanks to a nonlinear {sigma} model that describes the condensate in terms of the total density and a pseudo-spin representation.

  12. Two-component relativistic density functional theory modeling of the adsorption of element 114(eka-lead) on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsevskii, Andréi; van Wüllen, Christoph; Rykova, Elena A; Titov, Anatoly V

    2010-04-28

    A cluster modeling of the interaction of an eka-Pb atom with the stable Au(111) surface using accurate small-core relativistic pseudopotentials and two-component non-collinear DFT is reported. The results obtained with two different types of exchange-correlation functionals (generalized-gradient and hybrid) are generally consistent and give rise to E114/Au(111) adsorption energy estimates within the range 0.4-0.5 eV. Substantial differences between the E114-Au and Pb-Au interactions are further corroborated.

  13. Mating system evolution and worker caste diversity in Pheidole ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming H; Wheeler, Diana E; Fjerdingstad, Else J

    2013-04-01

    The efficiency of social groups is generally optimized by a division of labour, achieved through behavioural or morphological diversity of members. In social insects, colonies may increase the morphological diversity of workers by recruiting standing genetic variance for size and shape via multiply mated queens (polyandry) or multiple-breeding queens (polygyny). However, greater worker diversity in multi-lineage species may also have evolved due to mutual worker policing if there is worker reproduction. Such policing reduces the pressure on workers to maintain reproductive morphologies, allowing the evolution of greater developmental plasticity and the maintenance of more genetic variance for worker size and shape in populations. Pheidole ants vary greatly in the diversity of worker castes. Also, their workers lack ovaries and are thus invariably sterile regardless of the queen mating frequency and numbers of queens per colony. This allowed us to perform an across-species study examining the genetic effects of recruiting more patrilines on the developmental diversity of workers in the absence of confounding effects from worker policing. Using highly variable microsatellite markers, we found that the effective mating frequency of the soldier-polymorphic P. rhea (avg. meN = 2.65) was significantly higher than that of the dimorphic P. spadonia (avg. meN = 1.06), despite a significant paternity skew in P. rhea (avg. B = 0.10). Our findings support the idea that mating strategies of queens may co-evolve with selection to increase the diversity of workers. We also detected patriline bias in the production of different worker sizes, which provides direct evidence for a genetic component to worker polymorphism. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The (R) evolution and future of banking system and commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Neusa Pinto, Daniel Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Treball Final de Grau. Grau en Finances i Comptabilitat. Codi: FC1049. Curs acadèmic 2016-2017 The aim of this paper is providing information giving an overview about a new age in the financial field. Financial Technology (Fintech) industry is growing faster than other industries and it is changing the way we know the financial markets, customer’s behavior, banking system, payments and, in general, the interaction between financial clients and the financial system. Banks are on...

  15. Sensor Open System Architecture (SOSA) evolution for collaborative standards development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Charles Patrick; Lipkin, Ilya; Davidson, Steven A.; Baldwin, Rusty; Orlovsky, Michael C.; Ibrahim, Tim

    2017-04-01

    The Sensor Open System Architecture (SOSA) is a C4ISR-focused technical and economic collaborative effort between the Air Force, Navy, Army, the Department of Defense (DoD), Industry, and other Governmental agencies to develop (and incorporate) a technical Open Systems Architecture standard in order to maximize C4ISR sub-system, system, and platform affordability, re-configurability, and hardware/software/firmware re-use. The SOSA effort will effectively create an operational and technical framework for the integration of disparate payloads into C4ISR systems; with a focus on the development of a modular decomposition (defining functions and behaviors) and associated key interfaces (physical and logical) for common multi-purpose architecture for radar, EO/IR, SIGINT, EW, and Communications. SOSA addresses hardware, software, and mechanical/electrical interfaces. The modular decomposition will produce a set of re-useable components, interfaces, and sub-systems that engender reusable capabilities. This, in effect, creates a realistic and affordable ecosystem enabling mission effectiveness through systematic re-use of all available re-composed hardware, software, and electrical/mechanical base components and interfaces. To this end, SOSA will leverage existing standards as much as possible and evolve the SOSA architecture through modification, reuse, and enhancements to achieve C4ISR goals. This paper will present accomplishments over the first year of SOSA initiative.

  16. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: an overview and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    LEE, CJ; The ATLAS collaboration; BOGDANCHIKOV, A; BRASOLIN, F; CONTESCU, AC; DARLEA, G-L; KOROL, A; SCANNICCHIO, DA; TWOMEY, M; VALSAN, ML

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The system processes the direct data readout from ~100 million channels on the detector through multiple trigger levels, selecting interesting events for analysis with a factor of $10^{7}$ reduction on the data rate with a latency of less than a few seconds. Most of the functionality is implemented on ~3000 servers composing the online farm. Due to the critical functionality of the system a sophisticated computing environment is maintained, covering the online farm and ATLAS control rooms, as well as a number of development and testing labs. The specificity of the system required the development of dedicated applications (e.g. ConfDB, BWM) for system configuration and maintenance; in parallel other Open Source tools (Puppet and Quattor) are used to centrally configure the operating systems. The health monitoring of the TDAQ s...

  17. High lability of sexual system over 250 million years of evolution in morphologically conservative tadpole shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Thomas C; Hammond, Robert L; Jenner, Ronald A; Zierold, Thorid; Hänfling, Bernd; Gómez, Africa

    2013-02-05

    Sexual system is a key factor affecting the genetic diversity, population structure, genome structure and the evolutionary potential of species. The sexual system androdioecy - where males and hermaphrodites coexist in populations - is extremely rare, yet is found in three crustacean groups, barnacles, a genus of clam shrimps Eulimnadia, and in the order Notostraca, the tadpole shrimps. In the ancient crustacean order Notostraca, high morphological conservatism contrasts with a wide diversity of sexual systems, including androdioecy. An understanding of the evolution of sexual systems in this group has been hampered by poor phylogenetic resolution and confounded by the widespread occurrence of cryptic species. Here we use a multigene supermatrix for 30 taxa to produce a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of Notostraca. Based on this phylogenetic reconstruction we use character mapping techniques to investigate the evolution of sexual systems. We also tested the hypothesis that reproductive assurance has driven the evolution of androdioecy in Notostraca. Character mapping analysis showed that sexual system is an extremely flexible trait within Notostraca, with repeated shifts between gonochorism and androdioecy, the latter having evolved a minimum of five times. In agreement with the reproductive assurance hypothesis androdioecious notostracans are found at significantly higher latitudes than gonochoric ones indicating that post glacial re-colonisation may have selected for the higher colonisation ability conferred by androdioecy. In contrast to their conserved morphology, sexual system in Notostraca is highly labile and the rare reproductive mode androdioecy has evolved repeatedly within the order. Furthermore, we conclude that this lability of sexual system has been maintained for at least 250 million years and may have contributed to the long term evolutionary persistence of Notostraca. Our results further our understanding of the evolution of androdioecy

  18. High lability of sexual system over 250 million years of evolution in morphologically conservative tadpole shrimps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathers Thomas C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual system is a key factor affecting the genetic diversity, population structure, genome structure and the evolutionary potential of species. The sexual system androdioecy – where males and hermaphrodites coexist in populations – is extremely rare, yet is found in three crustacean groups, barnacles, a genus of clam shrimps Eulimnadia, and in the order Notostraca, the tadpole shrimps. In the ancient crustacean order Notostraca, high morphological conservatism contrasts with a wide diversity of sexual systems, including androdioecy. An understanding of the evolution of sexual systems in this group has been hampered by poor phylogenetic resolution and confounded by the widespread occurrence of cryptic species. Here we use a multigene supermatrix for 30 taxa to produce a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of Notostraca. Based on this phylogenetic reconstruction we use character mapping techniques to investigate the evolution of sexual systems. We also tested the hypothesis that reproductive assurance has driven the evolution of androdioecy in Notostraca. Results Character mapping analysis showed that sexual system is an extremely flexible trait within Notostraca, with repeated shifts between gonochorism and androdioecy, the latter having evolved a minimum of five times. In agreement with the reproductive assurance hypothesis androdioecious notostracans are found at significantly higher latitudes than gonochoric ones indicating that post glacial re-colonisation may have selected for the higher colonisation ability conferred by androdioecy. Conclusions In contrast to their conserved morphology, sexual system in Notostraca is highly labile and the rare reproductive mode androdioecy has evolved repeatedly within the order. Furthermore, we conclude that this lability of sexual system has been maintained for at least 250 million years and may have contributed to the long term evolutionary persistence of Notostraca. Our

  19. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: evolution and re-design

    CERN Document Server

    Ballestrero, Sergio; The ATLAS collaboration; Brasolin, Franco; Contescu, Alexandru Cristian; Dubrov, Sergei; Fazio, Daniel; Korol, Aleksandr; Lee, Christopher Jon; Scannicchio, Diana; Twomey, Matthew Shaun

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data, streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The online farm is composed of $\\sim 3000$ servers, processing the data readout from $\\sim 100$ million detector channels through multiple trigger levels. During the two years of the first Long Shutdown (LS1) there has been a tremendous amount of work done by the ATLAS TDAQ System Administrators, implementing numerous new software applications, upgrading the OS and the hardware, changing some design philosophies and exploiting the High Level Trigger farm with different purposes. The OS version has been upgraded to SLC6; for the largest part of the farm, which is composed by net booted nodes, this required a completely new design of the net booting system. In parallel, the migration to Puppet of the Configuration Management systems has been completed for both net booted and local booted hosts; the Post-Boot Scripts system and...

  20. The evolution of risk and bailout strategy in banking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caux, Robert; McGroarty, Frank; Brede, Markus

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we analyse the long-term costs and benefits of bailout strategies in models of networked banking systems. Unlike much of the current literature on financial contagion that focuses on systemic risk at one point in time, we consider adaptive banks that adjust risk taking in response to internal system dynamics and regulatory intervention, allowing us to analyse the potentially crucial moral hazard aspect associated with frequent bailouts. We demonstrate that whereas bailout generally serves as an effective tool to limit the size of bankruptcy cascades in the short term, inappropriate intervention strategies can encourage risk-taking and thus be inefficient and detrimental to long term system stability. We analyse points of long-term optimal bailout and discuss their dependence on the structure of the banking network. In the second part of the paper, we demonstrate that bailout efficiency can be improved by taking into account information about the topology of and risk allocation on the banking network, and demonstrate that finely tuned intervention strategies aimed at bailing out banks in configurations with some degree of anti-correlated risk have superior performance. These results demonstrate that a suitable intervention policy may be a useful tool for driving the banking system towards a more robust structure.