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Sample records for two-component response regulator

  1. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of two-component response regulators in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Zhou, Lei; Yang, Liu; Zeng, Xianfei; Danzheng, Jiacuo; Zheng, Qing; Liu, Jiayun; Liu, Feng; Xin, Yijuan; Cheng, Xiaodong; Su, Mingquan; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2015-07-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to exhibit a sensing and responding role under drug stress that induces drug resistance in several bacterial species. However, the relationship between TCSs and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been comprehensively analysed to date. In this study, 90 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates were analysed using 15-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU)-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting. The results showed that all of the isolates were of the Beijing lineage, and strains with a drug-susceptible phenotype had not diverged into similar genotype clusters. Expression analysis of 13 response regulators of TCSs using real-time PCR and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) proteomic analysis demonstrated that four response regulator genes (devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143) were significantly upregulated in multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains compared with the laboratory strain H37Rv as well as drug-susceptible and isoniazid-monoresistant strains (PMycobacterium bovis BCG did not alter its sensitivity to the four antitubercular drugs. This suggests that upregulation of devR, which is common in MDR-TB strains, might be induced by drug stress and hypoxic adaptation following the acquisition of multidrug resistance.

  2. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PhoP, a Two-Component Response Regulator, Involved in Antimicrobial Susceptibilities.

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    Ming-Che Liu

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a gram-negative bacterium, has increasingly emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. It is well-known for resistance to a variety of antimicrobial agents including cationic antimicrobial polypeptides (CAPs. Resistance to polymyxin B, a kind of CAPs, is known to be controlled by the two-component system PhoPQ. To unravel the role of PhoPQ in polymyxin B resistance of S. maltophilia, a phoP mutant was constructed. We found MICs of polymyxin B, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin and spectinomycin decreased 2-64 fold in the phoP mutant. Complementation of the phoP mutant by the wild-type phoP gene restored all of the MICs to the wild type levels. Expression of PhoP was shown to be autoregulated and responsive to Mg2+ levels. The polymyxin B and gentamicin killing tests indicated that pretreatment of low Mg2+ can protect the wild-type S. maltophilia from killing but not phoP mutant. Interestingly, we found phoP mutant had a decrease in expression of SmeZ, an efflux transporter protein for aminoglycosides in S. maltophilia. Moreover, phoP mutant showed increased permeability in the cell membrane relative to the wild-type. In summary, we demonstrated the two-component regulator PhoP of S. maltophilia is involved in antimicrobial susceptibilities and low Mg2+ serves as a signal for triggering the pathway. Both the alteration in membrane permeability and downregulation of SmeZ efflux transporter in the phoP mutant contributed to the increased drug susceptibilities of S. maltophilia, in particular for aminoglycosides. This is the first report to describe the role of the Mg2+-sensing PhoP signaling pathway of S. maltophilia in regulation of the SmeZ efflux transporter and in antimicrobial susceptibilities. This study suggests PhoPQ TCS may serve as a target for development of antimicrobial agents against multidrug-resistant S. maltophilia.

  3. Conformational transition of response regulator RR468 in a two-component system signal transduction process.

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    Banerjee, Rahul; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2014-05-08

    Signal transduction can be accomplished via a two-component system (TCS) consisting of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). In this work, we simulate the response regulator RR468 from Thermotoga maritima, in which phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of a conserved aspartate residue acts as a switch via a large conformational change concentrated in three proximal loops. A detailed view of the conformational transition is obscured by the lack of stability of the intermediate states, which are difficult to detect using common structural biology techniques. Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of the inactive and active conformations were run, and show that the inactive (or active) trajectories do not exhibit sampling of the active (or inactive) conformations on this time scale. Targeted MD (TMD) was used to generate trajectories that span the inactive and active conformations and provide a view of how a localized event like phosphorylation can lead to conformational changes elsewhere in the protein, especially in the three proximal loops. The TMD trajectories are clustered to identify stages along the transition path. Residue interaction networks are identified that point to key residues having to rearrange in the process of transition. These are identified using both hydrogen bond analysis and residue interaction strength measurements. Potentials of mean force are generated for key residue rearrangements to ascertain their free energy barriers. We introduce methods that attempt to extrapolate from one conformation to the other and find that the most fluctuating proximal loop can transit part way from one to the other, suggesting that this conformational information is embedded in the sequence.

  4. Phylogenetic Classification Of Bartonella Species By Comparing The Two-Component System Response Regulator Feup Sequences

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    Mhamad Abou-Hamdan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bacterial genus Bartonella is classified in the alpha-2 Proteobacteria on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence comparison. The Bartonella two-component system feuPQ is found in nearly all bacterial species. We investigated the usefulness of the response regulator feuP gene sequence in the classification of 18 well characterized Bartonella species. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using parsimony neighbour-joining and maximum-likelihood methods. Reliable classifications of most of the studied species were obtained. Bartonella were divided into two supported clades containing two supported clusters each. These results were similar to our previous data obtained with groEL ftsZ and ribC genes sequences. The wide range of feuP DNA sequence similarity 78.6 to 96.5 among Bartonella species makes it a promising candidate for multi-locus sequence typing MLST of clinical isolates. This is the first report proving the usefulness of feuP sequences in bartonellae classification at the species level.

  5. Arabidopsis ethylene-response gene ETR1: Similiarity of product to two-component regulators

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    Chang, C.; Kwok, S.F.; Bleecker, A.B.; Meyerowitz, E.M. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1993-10-22

    Ethylene behaves as a hormone in plants, regulating such aspects of growth and development as fruit ripening, flower senescence, and abscission. Ethylene insensitivity is conferred by dominant mutations in the ETR1 gene early in the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Arabidopsis thaliana. The ETR1 gene was cloned by the method of chromosome walking. Each of the four known etr1 mutant alleles contains a missense mutation near the amino terminus of the predicted protein. Although the sequence of the amino-terminal half of the deduced ETR1 protein appears to be novel, the carboxyl-terminal half is similar in sequence to both components of the prokaryotic family of signal transducers known as the two-component systems. Thus, an early step in ethylene signal transduction in plants may involve transfer of phosphate as in prokaryotic two-component systems. The dominant etr1-1 mutant gene conferred ethylene insensitivity to wild-type Arabidopsis plants when introduced by transformation.

  6. Connecting two-component regulatory systems by a protein that protects a response regulator from dephosphorylation by its cognate sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Akinori; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental question in signal transduction is how an organism integrates multiple signals into a cellular response. Here we report the mechanism by which the Salmonella PmrA/PmrB two-component system responds to the signal controlling the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system. We establish that the PhoP-activated PmrD protein binds to the phosphorylated form of the response regulator PmrA, preventing both its intrinsic dephosphorylation and that promoted by its cognate sensor kinase PmrB. This re...

  7. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium BaeSR two-component system positively regulates sodA in response to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, P; Collao, B; Álvarez, R; Salinas, H; Morales, E H; Calderón, I L; Saavedra, C P; Gil, F

    2013-10-01

    In response to antibiotics, bacteria activate regulatory systems that control the expression of genes that participate in detoxifying these compounds, like multidrug efflux systems. We previously demonstrated that the BaeSR two-component system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) participates in the detection of ciprofloxacin, a bactericidal antibiotic, and in the positive regulation of mdtA, an efflux pump implicated in antibiotic resistance. In the present work, we provide further evidence for a role of the S. Typhimurium BaeSR two-component system in response to ciprofloxacin treatment and show that it regulates sodA expression. We demonstrate that, in the absence of BaeSR, the transcript levels of sodA and the activity of its gene product are lower. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusions, we demonstrate that BaeR regulates sodA by a direct interaction with the promoter region.

  8. A novel two-component response regulator links rpf with biofilm formation and virulence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

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    Tzu-Pi Huang

    Full Text Available Citrus bacterial canker caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a serious disease that impacts citrus production worldwide, and X. axonopodis pv. citri is listed as a quarantine pest in certain countries. Biofilm formation is important for the successful development of a pathogenic relationship between various bacteria and their host(s. To understand the mechanisms of biofilm formation by X. axonopodis pv. citri strain XW19, the strain was subjected to transposon mutagenesis. One mutant with a mutation in a two-component response regulator gene that was deficient in biofilm formation on a polystyrene microplate was selected for further study. The protein was designated as BfdR for biofilm formation defective regulator. BfdR from strain XW19 shares 100% amino acid sequence identity with XAC1284 of X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306 and 30-100% identity with two-component response regulators in various pathogens and environmental microorganisms. The bfdR mutant strain exhibited significantly decreased biofilm formation on the leaf surfaces of Mexican lime compared with the wild type strain. The bfdR mutant was also compromised in its ability to cause canker lesions. The wild-type phenotype was restored by providing pbfdR in trans in the bfdR mutant. Our data indicated that BfdR did not regulate the production of virulence-related extracellular enzymes including amylase, lipase, protease, and lecithinase or the expression of hrpG, rfbC, and katE; however, BfdR controlled the expression of rpfF in XVM2 medium, which mimics cytoplasmic fluids in planta. In conclusion, biofilm formation on leaf surfaces of citrus is important for canker development in X. axonopodis pv. citri XW19. The process is controlled by the two-component response regulator BfdR via regulation of rpfF, which is required for the biosynthesis of a diffusible signal factor.

  9. Signal integration by the two-component signal transduction response regulator CpxR.

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    Wolfe, Alan J; Parikh, Niyati; Lima, Bruno P; Zemaitaitis, Bozena

    2008-04-01

    The CpxAR two-component signal transduction system in Escherichia coli and other pathogens senses diverse envelope stresses and promotes the transcription of a variety of genes that remedy these stresses. An important member of the CpxAR regulon is cpxP. The CpxA-dependent transcription of cpxP has been linked to stresses such as misfolded proteins and alkaline pH. It also has been proposed that acetyl phosphate, the intermediate of the phosphotransacetylase (Pta)-acetate kinase (AckA) pathway, can activate the transcription of cpxP in a CpxA-independent manner by donating its phosphoryl group to CpxR. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the transcription of cpxP using mutants with mutations in the CpxAR pathway, mutants with mutations in the Pta-AckA pathway, and mutants with a combination of both types of mutations. From this epistasis analysis, we learned that CpxR integrates diverse stimuli. The stimuli that originate in the envelope depend on CpxA, while those associated with growth and central metabolism depend on the Pta-AckA pathway. While CpxR could receive a phosphoryl group from acetyl phosphate, this global signal was not the primary trigger for CpxR activation associated with the Pta-AckA pathway. On the strength of these results, we contend that the interactions between central metabolism and signal transduction can be quite complex and that successful investigations of such interactions must include a complete epistatic analysis.

  10. Structure of the response regulator ChrA in the haem-sensing two-component system of Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

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    Doi, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hiro; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sugimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    ChrA is a response regulator (RR) in the two-component system involved in regulating the degradation and transport of haem (Fe-porphyrin) in the pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Here, the crystal structure of full-length ChrA is described at a resolution of 1.8 Å. ChrA consists of an N-terminal regulatory domain, a long linker region and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain. A structural comparison of ChrA with other RRs revealed substantial differences in the relative orientation of the two domains and the conformation of the linker region. The structural flexibility of the linker could be an important feature in rearrangement of the domain orientation to create a dimerization interface to bind DNA during haem-sensing signal transduction.

  11. Structural dynamics of the two-component response regulator RstA in recognition of promoter DNA element

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    Li, Yi-Chuan; Chang, Chung-ke; Chang, Chi-Fon; Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Fang, Pei-Ju; Yu, Tsunai; Chen, Sheng-Chia; Li, Yi-Ching; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Huang, Tai-huang

    2014-01-01

    The RstA/RstB system is a bacterial two-component regulatory system consisting of the membrane sensor, RstB and its cognate response regulator (RR) RstA. The RstA of Klebsiella pneumoniae (kpRstA) consists of an N-terminal receiver domain (RD, residues 1–119) and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD, residues 130–236). Phosphorylation of kpRstA induces dimerization, which allows two kpRstA DBDs to bind to a tandem repeat, called the RstA box, and regulate the expression of downstream genes. Here we report the solution and crystal structures of the free kpRstA RD, DBD and DBD/RstA box DNA complex. The structure of the kpRstA DBD/RstA box complex suggests that the two protomers interact with the RstA box in an asymmetric fashion. Equilibrium binding studies further reveal that the two protomers within the kpRstA dimer bind to the RstA box in a sequential manner. Taken together, our results suggest a binding model where dimerization of the kpRstA RDs provides the platform to allow the first kpRstA DBD protomer to anchor protein–DNA interaction, whereas the second protomer plays a key role in ensuring correct recognition of the RstA box. PMID:24990372

  12. Two-component system cross-regulation integrates Bacillus anthracis response to heme and cell envelope stress.

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    Laura A Mike

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signaling systems (TCSs are one of the mechanisms that bacteria employ to sense and adapt to changes in the environment. A prototypical TCS functions as a phosphorelay from a membrane-bound sensor histidine kinase (HK to a cytoplasmic response regulator (RR that controls target gene expression. Despite significant homology in the signaling domains of HKs and RRs, TCSs are thought to typically function as linear systems with little to no cross-talk between non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Here we have identified several cell envelope acting compounds that stimulate a previously uncharacterized Bacillus anthracis TCS. Furthermore, this TCS cross-signals with the heme sensing TCS HssRS; therefore, we have named it HssRS interfacing TCS (HitRS. HssRS reciprocates cross-talk to HitRS, suggesting a link between heme toxicity and cell envelope stress. The signaling between HssRS and HitRS occurs in the parental B. anthracis strain; therefore, we classify HssRS-HitRS interactions as cross-regulation. Cross-talk between HssRS and HitRS occurs at both HK-RR and post-RR signaling junctions. Finally, HitRS also regulates a previously unstudied ABC transporter implicating this transporter in the response to cell envelope stress. This chemical biology approach to probing TCS signaling provides a new model for understanding how bacterial signaling networks are integrated to enable adaptation to complex environments such as those encountered during colonization of the vertebrate host.

  13. Two-component system response regulators involved in virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 in infective endocarditis.

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    My Trihn

    Full Text Available Streptococci resident in the oral cavity have been linked to infective endocarditis (IE. While other viridans streptococci are commonly studied in relation to IE, less research has been focused on Streptococcus pneumoniae. We established for the first time an animal model of S. pneumoniae IE, and examined the virulence of the TIGR4 strain in this model. We hypothesized that two-component systems (TCS may mediate S. pneumoniae TIGR4 strain virulence in IE and examined TCS response regulator (RR mutants of TIGR4 in vivo with the IE model. Thirteen of the 14 RR protein genes were mutagenized, excluding only the essential gene SP_1227. The requirement of the 13 RRs for S. pneumoniae competitiveness in the IE model was assessed in vivo through use of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and competitive index assays. Using real-time PCR, several RR mutants were detected at significantly lower levels in infected heart valves compared with a control strain suggesting the respective RRs are candidate virulence factors for IE. The virulence reduction of the ΔciaR mutant was further confirmed by competitive index assay. Our data suggest that CiaR is a virulence factor of S. pneumoniae strain TIGR4 for IE.

  14. Two-component system response regulators involved in virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 in infective endocarditis.

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    Trihn, My; Ge, Xiuchun; Dobson, Alleson; Kitten, Todd; Munro, Cindy L; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Streptococci resident in the oral cavity have been linked to infective endocarditis (IE). While other viridans streptococci are commonly studied in relation to IE, less research has been focused on Streptococcus pneumoniae. We established for the first time an animal model of S. pneumoniae IE, and examined the virulence of the TIGR4 strain in this model. We hypothesized that two-component systems (TCS) may mediate S. pneumoniae TIGR4 strain virulence in IE and examined TCS response regulator (RR) mutants of TIGR4 in vivo with the IE model. Thirteen of the 14 RR protein genes were mutagenized, excluding only the essential gene SP_1227. The requirement of the 13 RRs for S. pneumoniae competitiveness in the IE model was assessed in vivo through use of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and competitive index assays. Using real-time PCR, several RR mutants were detected at significantly lower levels in infected heart valves compared with a control strain suggesting the respective RRs are candidate virulence factors for IE. The virulence reduction of the ΔciaR mutant was further confirmed by competitive index assay. Our data suggest that CiaR is a virulence factor of S. pneumoniae strain TIGR4 for IE.

  15. Screening for compounds that affect the interaction between bacterial two-component signal transduction response regulator protein and cognate promoter DNA.

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    Erickson, Matthew G; Ulijasz, Andrew T; Weisblum, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial signal transduction systems can be used as drug targets. The signal transduction targets fall into two groups--sensor kinases and response regulators. Previously reported studies describe hits that were thought to inactivate sensor kinases but on closer examination were found to act elsewhere instead; a possible reason for this is that full-length sensor kinases are integral membrane proteins whose activity might reflect interaction with the cell membrane or with membrane components. We describe a model system that instead is based on the interaction between a test compound and a response regulator in a homogeneous phase reaction. In this system, response regulator-DNA complex formation and its inhibition by a test compound are measured by fluorescence polarization. The model system should be readily adaptable to drug discovery based on other bacterial two-component s transduction systems.

  16. OmpR, a response regulator of the two-component signal transduction pathway, influences inv gene expression in Yersinia enterocolitica O9

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    Marta eBrzóstkowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The environmental control of invasin expression in Yersinia enterocolitica is mediated by a regulatory network composed of negative and positive regulators of inv gene transcription. Previously, we demonstrated that OmpR, a response regulator of the two-component signal transduction pathway EnvZ/OmpR, negatively regulates invasin gene expression in Y. enterocolitica O9 by direct interaction with the inv promoter region. This study was undertaken to clarify the role of OmpR in the inv regulatory circuit in which RovA protein has been shown to positively regulate inv transcription. Using ompR, rovA and ompR rovA Y. enterocolitica mutant backgrounds we showed that the inhibitory effect of OmpR on inv transcription may be observed only when RovA is present/active in Y. enterocolitica cells. To extend our research on inv regulation we examined the effect of OmpR on rovA gene expression. Analysis of rovA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in Y. enterocolitica wild-type and ompR background indicated that OmpR does not influence rovA expression. Thus, our results indicate that OmpR influences invasin expression directly via binding to the inv promoter, but not through modulation of rovA expression.

  17. OmpR, a response regulator of the two-component signal transduction pathway, influences inv gene expression in Yersinia enterocolitica O9.

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    Brzóstkowska, Marta; Raczkowska, Adrianna; Brzostek, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    The environmental control of invasin (inv) expression in Yersinia enterocolitica is mediated by a regulatory network composed of negative and positive regulators of inv gene transcription. Previously, we demonstrated that OmpR, a response regulator of the two-component signal transduction pathway EnvZ/OmpR, negatively regulates inv gene expression in Y. enterocolitica O9 by direct interaction with the inv promoter region. This study was undertaken to clarify the role of OmpR in the inv regulatory circuit in which RovA protein has been shown to positively regulate inv transcription. Using ompR, rovA, and ompR rovA Y. enterocolitica mutant backgrounds we showed that the inhibitory effect of OmpR on inv transcription may be observed only when RovA is present/active in Y. enterocolitica cells. To extend our research on inv regulation we examined the effect of OmpR on rovA gene expression. Analysis of rovA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in Y. enterocolitica wild-type and ompR background indicated that OmpR does not influence rovA expression. Thus, our results indicate that OmpR influences inv expression directly via binding to the inv promoter, but not through modulation of rovA expression.

  18. A proteomic analysis of the regulon of the NarP two-component regulatory system response regulator in the bovine pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica A1

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    Inamoto Ichiro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response of the NarQP two-component signal transduction system regulon in response to the presence of nitrate for the bovine pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica A1 was investigated by proteomic analysis. Total proteins from a narP mutant and the parent SH1217 grown with or without NaNO3 supplement were examined by ISO-DALT 2D electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results Seventeen proteins were differentially expressed in the parent strain SH1217 in response to the addition of NaNO3 to the growth media. These responses were absent in the narP mutant, indicating that the altered production of these proteins is mediated by NarPMh. Interestingly, NarPMh mediated the increased production of some proteins which are not generally associated with nitrate respiration, such as the iron transporters FbpA and YfeA. The increased production of proteins such as superoxide dismutase, SodA, and GAPDH were also observed. The increased production of these iron-regulated proteins by NarPMh is thought to enhance the swift establishment of the nitrate respiration mechanism of M. haemolytica during pathogenesis. Conclusion The data suggested NarPMh acts as an important regulator which regulates the expression of a small set of proteins in response to nitrate availability. This may contribute to the prevalence of M. haemolytica A1 in its host during pathogenesis of BPP, through enhancing the effectiveness of nitrate respiration either directly or indirectly.

  19. The identification of response regulator-specific binding sites reveals new roles of two-component systems in Bacillus cereus and closely related low-GC Gram-positives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, de M.W.H.J.; Bart, M.J.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.; Francke, C.

    2008-01-01

    In bacteria, environmental challenges are often translated into a transcriptional response via the cognate response regulators (RRs) of specialized two-component systems (TCSs). A phylogenetic footprinting/shadowing approach was designed and used to identify many novel RR-specific operators for

  20. Two-component systems and toxinogenesis regulation in Clostridium botulinum.

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    Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent toxins ever known. They are mostly produced by Clostridium botulinum but also by other clostridia. BoNTs associate with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes. Toxin production is highly regulated through complex networks of regulatory systems involving an alternative sigma factor, BotR, and at least 6 recently described two-component systems (TCSs). TCSs allow bacteria to sense environmental changes and to respond to various stimuli by regulating the expression of specific genes at a transcriptional level. Several environmental stimuli have been identified to positively or negatively regulate toxin synthesis; however, the link between environmental stimuli and TCSs is still elusive. This review aims to highlight the role of TCSs as a central point in the regulation of toxin production in C. botulinum.

  1. Preliminary Crystallographic Studies of the Regulatory Domain of Response Regulator YycF from an Essential Two-Component Signal Transduction System

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    Zhao, H.; Heroux, A; Sequeira, R; Tang, L

    2009-01-01

    YycGF is a crucial signal transduction system for the regulation of cell-wall metabolism in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria, which include many important human pathogens. The response regulator YycF receives signals from its cognate histidine kinase YycG through a phosphotransfer reaction and elicits responses through regulation of gene expression. The N-terminal regulatory domain of YycF from Bacillus subtilis was overproduced and purified. The protein was crystallized and X-ray data were collected to 1.95 A resolution with a completeness of 97.7% and an overall Rmerge of 7.7%. The crystals belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.50, c = 79.06 A.

  2. Sucrose synthesis in the nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is controlled by the two-component response regulator OrrA.

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    Ehira, Shigeki; Kimura, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Shogo; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2014-09-01

    The filamentous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 accumulates sucrose as a compatible solute against salt stress. Sucrose-phosphate synthase activity, which is responsible for the sucrose synthesis, is increased by salt stress, but the mechanism underlying the regulation of sucrose synthesis remains unknown. In the present study, a response regulator, OrrA, was shown to control sucrose synthesis. Expression of spsA, which encodes a sucrose-phosphate synthase, and susA and susB, which encode sucrose synthases, was induced by salt stress. In the orrA disruptant, salt induction of these genes was completely abolished. The cellular sucrose level of the orrA disruptant was reduced to 40% of that in the wild type under salt stress conditions. Moreover, overexpression of orrA resulted in enhanced expression of spsA, susA, and susB, followed by accumulation of sucrose, without the addition of NaCl. We also found that SigB2, a group 2 sigma factor of RNA polymerase, regulated the early response to salt stress under the control of OrrA. It is concluded that OrrA controls sucrose synthesis in collaboration with SigB2.

  3. Dual control of Sinorhizobium meliloti RpoE2 sigma factor activity by two PhyR-type two-component response regulators.

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    Bastiat, Bénédicte; Sauviac, Laurent; Bruand, Claude

    2010-04-01

    RpoE2 is an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor involved in the general stress response of Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the legume plant alfalfa. RpoE2 orthologues are widely found among alphaproteobacteria, where they play various roles in stress resistance and/or host colonization. In this paper, we report a genetic and biochemical investigation of the mechanisms of signal transduction leading to S. meliloti RpoE2 activation in response to stress. We showed that RpoE2 activity is negatively controlled by two paralogous anti-sigma factors, RsiA1 (SMc01505) and RsiA2 (SMc04884), and that RpoE2 activation by stress requires two redundant paralogous PhyR-type response regulators, RsiB1 (SMc01504) and RsiB2 (SMc00794). RsiB1 and RsiB2 do not act at the level of rpoE2 transcription but instead interact with the anti-sigma factors, and we therefore propose that they act as anti-anti-sigma factors to relieve RpoE2 inhibition in response to stress. This model closely resembles a recently proposed model of activation of RpoE2-like sigma factors in Methylobacterium extorquens and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, but the existence of two pairs of anti- and anti-anti-sigma factors in S. meliloti adds an unexpected level of complexity, which may allow the regulatory system to integrate multiple stimuli.

  4. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Prasol, Melanie S; Perchuk, Barrett S; Biondi, Emanuele G; Laub, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals...

  5. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma] inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

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    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2012-05-09

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  6. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma];#963; inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2012-03-30

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  7. In the Staphylococcus aureus Two-Component System sae, the Response Regulator SaeR Binds to a Direct Repeat Sequence and DNA Binding Requires Phosphorylation by the Sensor Kinase SaeS ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Fei; Li, Chunling; Jeong, Dowon; Sohn, Changmo; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the SaeRS two-component system to control the expression of many virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin and coagulase; however, the molecular mechanism of this signaling has not yet been elucidated. Here, using the P1 promoter of the sae operon as a model target DNA, we demonstrated that the unphosphorylated response regulator SaeR does not bind to the P1 promoter DNA, while its C-terminal DNA binding domain alone does. The DNA binding activity of full-length Sae...

  8. The PorX Response Regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY Two-Component System Does Not Directly Regulate the Type IX Secretion Genes but Binds the PorL Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Maxence S.; Durand, Eric; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion or cell surface exposition of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY, and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS) sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN, and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we demonstrate that PorX does not bind T9SS gene promoters and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS. PMID:27630829

  9. The PorX response regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY two-component system does not directly regulate the Type IX secretion genes but binds the PorL subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxence S Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Type IX secretion system (T9SS is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion of surface attachment of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of the porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we showed that PorX does not bind and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS.

  10. The PorX Response Regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY Two-Component System Does Not Directly Regulate the Type IX Secretion Genes but Binds the PorL Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Maxence S; Durand, Eric; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion or cell surface exposition of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY, and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS) sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN, and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we demonstrate that PorX does not bind T9SS gene promoters and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS.

  11. Characterization of Streptococcus thermophilus two-component systems: In silico analysis, functional analysis and expression of response regulator genes in pure or mixed culture with its yogurt partner, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenard, Benoît; Rasoava, Niriaina; Fourcassié, Pascal; Monnet, Véronique; Boyaval, Patrick; Rul, Françoise

    2011-12-02

    The lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (S. thermophilus) is widely used in the dairy industry. As a food bacterium, it has to cope with changing environments such as milk, yogurt, as well as the digestive tract, after the product has been ingested. In bacteria, two-component systems (TCS) are one of the most prevalent mechanisms to sense and respond appropriately to a wide range of signals. They are typically composed of a sensor kinase (HK) that detects a stimulus and a response regulator (RR) which acts as a transcriptional regulator. Our objective was to make an inventory of the TCS present in S. thermophilus LMD-9 and investigate the contribution of each TCS to LMD-9 growth in milk. For that purpose, we performed in silico, transcriptomic as well as functional analysis. The LMD-9 genome presented 6 complete TCS with both HK and RR (TCS 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 9) and 2 orphan RRs (RR01 and 08) with truncated HK. Our in silico analysis revealed that for 5 TCS out of the 8, orthologs with known functions were found in other bacterial species whereas for TCS02, 4 and 6 the function of the orthologs are unidentified. Transcriptomic studies (using quantitative PCR) revealed that all S. thermophilus LMD-9 response regulator genes were expressed in milk; they were expressed at different levels and with different profiles during growth. In mixed culture with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus), the S. thermophilus partner in yogurt, the expression of four S. thermophilus LMD-9 response regulator increased; two of them, rr02 and rr09, increased by a factor of 6. These results indicate that the presence of L. bulgaricus induces regulatory changes in S. thermophilus. We also demonstrated that a response regulator (rr02) can exert its regulatory function on its target genes even when expressed at very low levels. We showed that RR05-an ortholog of Bacillus subtilis YycF or Staphylococcus aureus WalR-was essential for the growth of S

  12. A two-component system regulates hemin acquisition in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Jodie C Scott

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe associated with infection of the periodontia. The organism has a small number of two-component signal transduction systems, and after comparing genome sequences of strains W83 and ATCC 33277 we discovered that the latter was mutant in histidine kinase (PGN_0752, while the cognate response regulator (PGN_0753 remained intact. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling and ChIP-seq assays were carried out with an ATCC 33277 transconjugant containing the functional histidine kinase from strain W83 (PG0719. The data showed that the regulon of this signal transduction system contained genes that were involved in hemin acquisition, including gingipains, at least three transport systems, as well as being self-regulated. Direct regulation by the response regulator was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, the system appears to be activated by hemin and the regulator acts as both an activator and repressor.

  13. A novel two-component system involved in secretion stress response in Streptomyces lividans.

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    Sonia Gullón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolded proteins accumulating outside the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane can interfere with the secretory machinery, hence the existence of quality factors to eliminate these misfolded proteins is of capital importance in bacteria that are efficient producers of secretory proteins. These bacteria normally use a specific two-component system to respond to the stress produced by the accumulation of the misfolded proteins, by activating the expression of HtrA-like proteases to specifically eliminate the incorrectly folded proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overproduction of alpha-amylase in S. lividans causing secretion stress permitted the identification of a two-component system (SCO4156-SCO4155 that regulates three HtrA-like proteases which appear to be involved in secretion stress response. Mutants in each of the genes forming part of the two-genes operon that encodes the sensor and regulator protein components accumulated misfolded proteins outside the cell, strongly suggesting the involvement of this two-component system in the S. lividans secretion stress response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge this is the first time that a specific secretion stress response two-component system is found to control the expression of three HtrA-like protease genes in S. lividans, a bacterium that has been repeatedly used as a host for the synthesis of homologous and heterologous secretory proteins of industrial application.

  14. In the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system sae, the response regulator SaeR binds to a direct repeat sequence and DNA binding requires phosphorylation by the sensor kinase SaeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Li, Chunling; Jeong, Dowon; Sohn, Changmo; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2010-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the SaeRS two-component system to control the expression of many virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin and coagulase; however, the molecular mechanism of this signaling has not yet been elucidated. Here, using the P1 promoter of the sae operon as a model target DNA, we demonstrated that the unphosphorylated response regulator SaeR does not bind to the P1 promoter DNA, while its C-terminal DNA binding domain alone does. The DNA binding activity of full-length SaeR could be restored by sensor kinase SaeS-induced phosphorylation. Phosphorylated SaeR is more resistant to digestion by trypsin, suggesting conformational changes. DNase I footprinting assays revealed that the SaeR protection region in the P1 promoter contains a direct repeat sequence (GTTAAN(6)GTTAA [where N is any nucleotide]). This sequence is critical to the binding of phosphorylated SaeR. Mutational changes in the repeat sequence greatly reduced both the in vitro binding of SaeR and the in vivo function of the P1 promoter. From these results, we concluded that SaeR recognizes the direct repeat sequence as a binding site and that binding requires phosphorylation by SaeS.

  15. The Two-Component Signal Transduction System VxrAB Positively Regulates Vibrio cholerae Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschler, Jennifer K; Cheng, Andrew T; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2017-09-15

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), are the primary mechanism by which pathogenic bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. The pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae is no exception and harbors 52 RR genes. Using in-frame deletion mutants of each RR gene, we performed a systematic analysis of their role in V. cholerae biofilm formation. We determined that 7 RRs impacted the expression of an essential biofilm gene and found that the recently characterized RR, VxrB, regulates the expression of key structural and regulatory biofilm genes in V. choleraevxrB is part of a 5-gene operon, which contains the cognate HK vxrA and three genes of unknown function. Strains carrying ΔvxrA and ΔvxrB mutations are deficient in biofilm formation, while the ΔvxrC mutation enhances biofilm formation. The overexpression of VxrB led to a decrease in motility. We also observed a small but reproducible effect of the absence of VxrB on the levels of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Our work reveals a new function for the Vxr TCS as a regulator of biofilm formation and suggests that this regulation may act through key biofilm regulators and the modulation of cellular c-di-GMP levels.IMPORTANCE Biofilms play an important role in the Vibrio cholerae life cycle, providing protection from environmental stresses and contributing to the transmission of V. cholerae to the human host. V. cholerae can utilize two-component systems (TCS), composed of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), to regulate biofilm formation in response to external cues. We performed a systematic analysis of V. cholerae RRs and identified a new regulator of biofilm formation, VxrB. We demonstrated that the VxrAB TCS is essential for robust biofilm formation and that this system may regulate biofilm formation via its regulation of key biofilm regulators and cyclic di-GMP levels. This research furthers our

  16. The Role of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Andreas F; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2016-01-05

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile, opportunistic human pathogen that can asymptomatically colonize a human host but can also cause a variety of cutaneous and systemic infections. The ability of S. aureus to adapt to such diverse environments is reflected in the presence of complex regulatory networks fine-tuning metabolic and virulence gene expression. One of the most widely distributed mechanisms is the two-component signal transduction system (TCS) which allows a pathogen to alter its gene expression profile in response to environmental stimuli. The simpler TCSs consist of only a transmembrane histidine kinase (HK) and a cytosolic response regulator. S. aureus encodes a total of 16 conserved pairs of TCSs that are involved in diverse signalling cascades ranging from global virulence gene regulation (e.g. quorum sensing by the Agr system), the bacterial response to antimicrobial agents, cell wall metabolism, respiration and nutrient sensing. These regulatory circuits are often interconnected and affect each other's expression, thus fine-tuning staphylococcal gene regulation. This manuscript gives an overview of the current knowledge of staphylococcal environmental sensing by TCS and its influence on virulence gene expression and virulence itself. Understanding bacterial gene regulation by TCS can give major insights into staphylococcal pathogenicity and has important implications for knowledge-based drug design and vaccine formulation.

  17. Structural characterization of the heme-based oxygen sensor, AfGcHK, its interactions with the cognate response regulator, and their combined mechanism of action in a bacterial two-component signaling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranava, Martin; Martínek, Václav; Man, Petr; Fojtikova, Veronika; Kavan, Daniel; Vaněk, Ondřej; Shimizu, Toru; Martinkova, Marketa

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen sensor histidine kinase AfGcHK from the bacterium Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw 109-5 forms a two-component signal transduction system together with its cognate response regulator (RR). The binding of oxygen to the heme iron of its N-terminal sensor domain causes the C-terminal kinase domain of AfGcHK to autophosphorylate at His183 and then transfer this phosphate to Asp52 or Asp169 of the RR protein. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that AfGcHK and the RR protein form a complex with 2:1 stoichiometry. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) suggested that the most flexible part of the whole AfGcHK protein is a loop that connects the two domains and that the heme distal side of AfGcHK, which is responsible for oxygen binding, is the only flexible part of the sensor domain. HDX-MS studies on the AfGcHK:RR complex also showed that the N-side of the H9 helix in the dimerization domain of the AfGcHK kinase domain interacts with the helix H1 and the β-strand B2 area of the RR protein's Rec1 domain, and that the C-side of the H8 helix region in the dimerization domain of the AfGcHK protein interacts mostly with the helix H5 and β-strand B6 area of the Rec1 domain. The Rec1 domain containing the phosphorylable Asp52 of the RR protein probably has a significantly higher affinity for AfGcHK than the Rec2 domain. We speculate that phosphorylation at Asp52 changes the overall structure of RR such that the Rec2 area containing the second phosphorylation site (Asp169) can also interact with AfGcHK. Proteins 2016; 84:1375-1389. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Gene Regulation by the LiaSR Two-Component System in Streptococcus mutans.

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    Manoharan Shankar

    Full Text Available The LiaSR two-component signal transduction system regulates cellular responses to several environmental stresses, including those that induce cell envelope damages. Downstream regulons of the LiaSR system have been implicated in tolerance to acid, antibiotics and detergents. In the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans, the LiaSR system is necessary for tolerance against acid, antibiotics, and cell wall damaging stresses during growth in the oral cavity. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which LiaSR regulates gene expression, we created a mutant LiaR in which the conserved aspartic acid residue (the phosphorylation site, was changed to alanine residue (D58A. As expected, the LiaR-D58A variant was unable to acquire the phosphate group and bind to target promoters. We also noted that the predicted LiaR-binding motif upstream of the lia operon does not appear to be well conserved. Consistent with this observation, we found that LiaR was unable to bind to the promoter region of lia; however, we showed that LiaR was able to bind to the promoters of SMU.753, SMU.2084 and SMU.1727. Based on sequence analysis and DNA binding studies we proposed a new 25-bp conserved motif essential for LiaR binding. Introducing alterations at fully conserved positions in the 25-bp motif affected LiaR binding, and the binding was dependent on the combination of positions that were altered. By scanning the S. mutans genome for the occurrence of the newly defined LiaR binding motif, we identified the promoter of hrcA (encoding a key regulator of the heat shock response that contains a LiaR binding motif, and we showed that hrcA is negatively regulated by the LiaSR system. Taken together our results suggest a putative role of the LiaSR system in heat shock responses of S. mutans.

  19. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems That Regulate the Temporal and Spatial Expression of Myxococcus xanthus Sporulation Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Zaara; Garza, Anthony G

    2015-09-14

    When starved for nutrients, Myxococcus xanthus produces a biofilm that contains a mat of rod-shaped cells, known as peripheral rods, and aerial structures called fruiting bodies, which house thousands of dormant and stress-resistant spherical spores. Because rod-shaped cells differentiate into spherical, stress-resistant spores and spore differentiation occurs only in nascent fruiting bodies, many genes and multiple levels of regulation are required. Over the past 2 decades, many regulators of the temporal and spatial expression of M. xanthus sporulation genes have been uncovered. Of these sporulation gene regulators, two-component signal transduction circuits, which typically contain a histidine kinase sensor protein and a transcriptional regulator known as response regulator, are among the best characterized. In this review, we discuss prototypical two-component systems (Nla6S/Nla6 and Nla28S/Nla28) that regulate an early, preaggregation phase of sporulation gene expression during fruiting body development. We also discuss orphan response regulators (ActB and FruA) that regulate a later phase of sporulation gene expression, which begins during the aggregation stage of fruiting body development. In addition, we summarize the research on a complex two-component system (Esp) that is important for the spatial regulation of sporulation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. A Conserved Two-Component Signal Transduction System Controls the Response to Phosphate Starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez-Martin, P.; Fernandez, M.; O'Connell-Motherway, M.; O'Connell, K.J.; Sauvageot, N.; Fitzgerald, G.F.; Macsharry, J.; Zomer, A.L.; Sinderen, D. van

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the identification and molecular characterization of the two-component regulatory system (2CRS) PhoRP, which controls the response to inorganic phosphate (P(i)) starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. The response regulator PhoP was shown to bind to the promoter region of

  1. Regulation of acid resistance by connectors of two-component signal transduction systems in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Yoko; Ishii, Eiji; Hata, Kensuke; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2011-03-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), utilized extensively by bacteria and archaea, are involved in the rapid adaptation of the organisms to fluctuating environments. A typical TCS transduces the signal by a phosphorelay between the sensor histidine kinase and its cognate response regulator. Recently, small-sized proteins that link TCSs have been reported and are called "connectors." Their physiological roles, however, have remained elusive. SafA (sensor associating factor A) (formerly B1500), a small (65-amino-acid [65-aa]) membrane protein, is among such connectors and links Escherichia coli TCSs EvgS/EvgA and PhoQ/PhoP. Since the activation of the EvgS/EvgA system induces acid resistance, we examined whether the SafA-activated PhoQ/PhoP system is also involved in the acid resistance induced by EvgS/EvgA. Using a constitutively active evgS1 mutant for the activation of EvgS/EvgA, we found that SafA, PhoQ, and PhoP all contributed to the acid resistance phenotype. Moreover, EvgS/EvgA activation resulted in the accumulation of cellular RpoS in the exponential-phase cells in a SafA-, PhoQ-, and PhoP-dependent manner. This RpoS accumulation was caused by another connector, IraM, expression of which was induced by the activation of the PhoQ/PhoP system, thus preventing RpoS degradation by trapping response regulator RssB. Acid resistance assays demonstrated that IraM also participated in the EvgS/EvgA-induced acid resistance. Therefore, we propose a model of a signal transduction cascade proceeding from EvgS/EvgA to PhoQ/PhoP and then to RssB (connected by SafA and IraM) and discuss its contribution to the acid resistance phenotype.

  2. Two-component signal transduction system SaeRS positively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qiang; Qi, Yijun; Ma, Yuanfang; Qu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  3. A two-component regulatory system in transcriptional control of photosystem stoichiometry: redox-dependent and sodium ion-dependent phosphoryl transfer from cyanobacterial histidine kinase Hik2 to response regulators Rre1 and RppA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskander Mohamed Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available I hereby submit the above-titled manuscript for publication in Frontiers in Plant Science. The research reported is original and novel. No part of it is submitted for publication elsewhere.We report on regulation and interactions of a unique histidine sensor kinase, Hik2. Hik2 is found in all known cyanobacteria, but has no previously identified functional response regulator. Here we show that it transfers phosphate rapidly, in vitro, to two response regulators, termed Rre1 and RppA. Hik2 is of special importance in being indispensable to cyanobacteria, and in being the closest cyanobacterial homologue of the uniquely conserved Chloroplast Sensor Kinase (CSK, which couples photosynthetic electron transport to gene transcription. Hik2 function is so important that it has survived the transition from cyanobacterium to eukaryotic sub-cellular organelle. Hik2 is likely to be a redox sensor involved in adjustment of the stoichiometry of photosystems I and II of oxygenic photosynthesis. We show that Hik2 also responds to the specific presence of sodium ions. These regulatory controls and the bifurcated signal transduction pathway indicated by two response regulators lead to a proposal for integration of photosynthetic light-acclimation with response to salt stress.

  4. Characterization of an archaeal two-component system that regulates methanogenesis in Methanosaeta harundinacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs are a major mechanism used by bacteria in response to environmental changes. Although many sequenced archaeal genomes encode TCSs, they remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that a methanogenic archaeon, Methanosaeta harundinacea, encodes FilI, which synthesizes carboxyl-acyl homoserine lactones, to regulate transitions of cellular morphology and carbon metabolic fluxes. Here, we report that filI, the cotranscribed filR2, and the adjacent filR1 constitute an archaeal TCS. FilI possesses a cytoplasmic kinase domain (histidine kinase A and histidine kinase-like ATPase and its cognate response regulator. FilR1 carries a receiver (REC domain coupled with an ArsR-related domain with potential DNA-binding ability, while FilR2 carries only a REC domain. In a phosphorelay assay, FilI was autophosphorylated and specifically transferred the phosphoryl group to FilR1 and FilR2, confirming that the three formed a cognate TCS. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ChIP-qPCR using an anti-FilR1 antibody, FilR1 was shown to form in vivo associations with its own promoter and the promoter of the filI-filR2 operon, demonstrating a regulatory pattern common among TCSs. ChIP-qPCR also detected FilR1 associations with key genes involved in acetoclastic methanogenesis, acs4 and acs1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed the in vitro tight binding of FilR1 to its own promoter and those of filI-filR2, acs4, and mtrABC. This also proves the DNA-binding ability of the ArsR-related domain, which is found primarily in Archaea. The archaeal promoters of acs4, filI, acs1, and mtrABC also initiated FilR1-modulated expression in an Escherichia coli lux reporter system, suggesting that FilR1 can up-regulate both archaeal and bacterial transcription. In conclusion, this work identifies an archaeal FilI/FilRs TCS that regulates the methanogenesis of M. harundinacea.

  5. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Skerker

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein-protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK-CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this

  6. Two-Component Signal Transduction Pathways Regulating Growth and Cell Cycle Progression in a Bacterium: A System-Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Prasol, Melanie S; Perchuk, Barrett S; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2005-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein–protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK–CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this system

  7. Light Responsive Two-Component Supramolecular Hydrogel: A Sensitive Platform for Humidity Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Samai, Suman

    2016-02-15

    The supramolecular assembly of anionic azobenzene dicarboxylate and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) formed a stimuli responsive hydrogel with a critical gelation concentration (CGC) of 0.33 wt%. This self-sustainable two-component system was able to repair damage upon light irradiation. Moreover, it was successfully employed in the fabrication of highly sensitive humidity sensors for the first time.

  8. A novel "four-component" two-component signal transduction mechanism regulates developmental progression in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Sakthimala; Mann, Petra; Schink, Christian W; Higgs, Penelope I

    2009-08-07

    Histidine-aspartate phosphorelays are employed by two-component signal transduction family proteins to mediate responses to specific signals or stimuli in microorganisms and plants. The RedCDEF proteins constitute a novel signaling system in which four two-component proteins comprising a histidine kinase, a histidine-kinase like protein, and two response regulators function together to regulate progression through the elaborate developmental program of Myxococcus xanthus. A combination of in vivo phenotypic analyses of in-frame deletions and non-functional point mutations in each gene as well as in vitro autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer analyses of recombinant proteins indicate that the RedC histidine kinase protein autophosphorylates and donates a phosphoryl group to the single domain response regulator, RedF, to repress progression through the developmental program. To relieve this developmental repression, RedC instead phosphorylates RedD, a dual receiver response regulator protein. Surprisingly, RedD transfers the phosphoryl group to the histidine kinase-like protein RedE, which itself appears to be incapable of autophosphorylation. Phosphorylation of RedE may render RedE accessible to RedF, where it removes the phosphoryl group from RedF-P, which is otherwise an unusually stable phosphoprotein. These analyses reveal a novel "four-component" signaling mechanism that has probably arisen to temporally coordinate signals controlling the developmental program in M. xanthus. The RedCDEF signaling system provides an important example of how the inherent plasticity and modularity of the basic two-component signaling domains comprise a highly adaptable framework well suited to expansion into complex signaling mechanisms.

  9. Two-Component Signal Transduction System SaeRS Positively Regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  10. Reciprocal Regulation as a Source of Ultrasensitivity in Two-Component Systems with a Bifunctional Sensor Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, where the phosphorylation state of a regulator protein is modulated by a sensor kinase, are common in bacteria and other microbes. In many of these systems, the sensor kinase is bifunctional catalyzing both, the phosphorylation and the dephosphorylation of the regulator protein in response to input signals. Previous studies have shown that systems with a bifunctional enzyme can adjust the phosphorylation level of the regulator protein independently of the total protein concentrations – a property known as concentration robustness. Here, I argue that two-component systems with a bifunctional enzyme may also exhibit ultrasensitivity if the input signal reciprocally affects multiple activities of the sensor kinase. To this end, I consider the case where an allosteric effector inhibits autophosphorylation and, concomitantly, activates the enzyme's phosphatase activity, as observed experimentally in the PhoQ/PhoP and NRII/NRI systems. A theoretical analysis reveals two operating regimes under steady state conditions depending on the effector affinity: If the affinity is low the system produces a graded response with respect to input signals and exhibits stimulus-dependent concentration robustness – consistent with previous experiments. In contrast, a high-affinity effector may generate ultrasensitivity by a similar mechanism as phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles with distinct converter enzymes. The occurrence of ultrasensitivity requires saturation of the sensor kinase's phosphatase activity, but is restricted to low effector concentrations, which suggests that this mode of operation might be employed for the detection and amplification of low abundant input signals. Interestingly, the same mechanism also applies to covalent modification cycles with a bifunctional converter enzyme, which suggests that reciprocal regulation, as a mechanism to generate ultrasensitivity, is not restricted to two-component systems, but

  11. Reciprocal regulation as a source of ultrasensitivity in two-component systems with a bifunctional sensor kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Straube

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, where the phosphorylation state of a regulator protein is modulated by a sensor kinase, are common in bacteria and other microbes. In many of these systems, the sensor kinase is bifunctional catalyzing both, the phosphorylation and the dephosphorylation of the regulator protein in response to input signals. Previous studies have shown that systems with a bifunctional enzyme can adjust the phosphorylation level of the regulator protein independently of the total protein concentrations--a property known as concentration robustness. Here, I argue that two-component systems with a bifunctional enzyme may also exhibit ultrasensitivity if the input signal reciprocally affects multiple activities of the sensor kinase. To this end, I consider the case where an allosteric effector inhibits autophosphorylation and, concomitantly, activates the enzyme's phosphatase activity, as observed experimentally in the PhoQ/PhoP and NRII/NRI systems. A theoretical analysis reveals two operating regimes under steady state conditions depending on the effector affinity: If the affinity is low the system produces a graded response with respect to input signals and exhibits stimulus-dependent concentration robustness--consistent with previous experiments. In contrast, a high-affinity effector may generate ultrasensitivity by a similar mechanism as phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles with distinct converter enzymes. The occurrence of ultrasensitivity requires saturation of the sensor kinase's phosphatase activity, but is restricted to low effector concentrations, which suggests that this mode of operation might be employed for the detection and amplification of low abundant input signals. Interestingly, the same mechanism also applies to covalent modification cycles with a bifunctional converter enzyme, which suggests that reciprocal regulation, as a mechanism to generate ultrasensitivity, is not restricted to two-component

  12. Reciprocal regulation as a source of ultrasensitivity in two-component systems with a bifunctional sensor kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Straube

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, where the phosphorylation state of a regulator protein is modulated by a sensor kinase, are common in bacteria and other microbes. In many of these systems, the sensor kinase is bifunctional catalyzing both, the phosphorylation and the dephosphorylation of the regulator protein in response to input signals. Previous studies have shown that systems with a bifunctional enzyme can adjust the phosphorylation level of the regulator protein independently of the total protein concentrations--a property known as concentration robustness. Here, I argue that two-component systems with a bifunctional enzyme may also exhibit ultrasensitivity if the input signal reciprocally affects multiple activities of the sensor kinase. To this end, I consider the case where an allosteric effector inhibits autophosphorylation and, concomitantly, activates the enzyme's phosphatase activity, as observed experimentally in the PhoQ/PhoP and NRII/NRI systems. A theoretical analysis reveals two operating regimes under steady state conditions depending on the effector affinity: If the affinity is low the system produces a graded response with respect to input signals and exhibits stimulus-dependent concentration robustness--consistent with previous experiments. In contrast, a high-affinity effector may generate ultrasensitivity by a similar mechanism as phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles with distinct converter enzymes. The occurrence of ultrasensitivity requires saturation of the sensor kinase's phosphatase activity, but is restricted to low effector concentrations, which suggests that this mode of operation might be employed for the detection and amplification of low abundant input signals. Interestingly, the same mechanism also applies to covalent modification cycles with a bifunctional converter enzyme, which suggests that reciprocal regulation, as a mechanism to generate ultrasensitivity, is not restricted to two-component

  13. Bacillus subtilis Two-Component System Sensory Kinase DegS Is Regulated by Serine Phosphorylation in Its Input Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jers, Carsten; Kobir, Ahasanul; Søndergaard, Elsebeth Oline; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis two-component system DegS/U is well known for the complexity of its regulation. The cytosolic sensory kinase DegS does not receive a single predominant input signal like most two-component kinases, instead it integrates a wide array of metabolic inputs that modulate its activity. The phosphorylation state of the response regulator DegU also does not confer a straightforward “on/off” response; it is fine-tuned and at different levels triggers different sub-regulons. Here we describe serine phosphorylation of the DegS sensing domain, which stimulates its kinase activity. We demonstrate that DegS phosphorylation can be carried out by at least two B. subtilis Hanks-type kinases in vitro, and this stimulates the phosphate transfer towards DegU. The consequences of this process were studied in vivo, using phosphomimetic (Ser76Asp) and non-phosphorylatable (Ser76Ala) mutants of DegS. In a number of physiological assays focused on different processes regulated by DegU, DegS S76D phosphomimetic mutant behaved like a strain with intermediate levels of DegU phosphorylation, whereas DegS S76A behaved like a strain with lower levels of DegU phophorylation. These findings suggest a link between DegS phosphorylation at serine 76 and the level of DegU phosphorylation, establishing this post-translational modification as an additional trigger for this two-component system. PMID:21304896

  14. Bacillus subtilis two-component system sensory kinase DegS is regulated by serine phosphorylation in its input domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Jers

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis two-component system DegS/U is well known for the complexity of its regulation. The cytosolic sensory kinase DegS does not receive a single predominant input signal like most two-component kinases, instead it integrates a wide array of metabolic inputs that modulate its activity. The phosphorylation state of the response regulator DegU also does not confer a straightforward "on/off" response; it is fine-tuned and at different levels triggers different sub-regulons. Here we describe serine phosphorylation of the DegS sensing domain, which stimulates its kinase activity. We demonstrate that DegS phosphorylation can be carried out by at least two B. subtilis Hanks-type kinases in vitro, and this stimulates the phosphate transfer towards DegU. The consequences of this process were studied in vivo, using phosphomimetic (Ser76Asp and non-phosphorylatable (Ser76Ala mutants of DegS. In a number of physiological assays focused on different processes regulated by DegU, DegS S76D phosphomimetic mutant behaved like a strain with intermediate levels of DegU phosphorylation, whereas DegS S76A behaved like a strain with lower levels of DegU phophorylation. These findings suggest a link between DegS phosphorylation at serine 76 and the level of DegU phosphorylation, establishing this post-translational modification as an additional trigger for this two-component system.

  15. Bacillus subtilis Two-Component System Sensory Kinase DegS Is Regulated by Serine Phosphorylation in Its Input Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jers, Carsten; Kobir, Ahasanul; Søndergaard, Elsebeth Oline;

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis two-component system DegS/U is well known for the complexity of its regulation. The cytosolic sensory kinase DegS does not receive a single predominant input signal like most two-component kinases, instead it integrates a wide array of metabolic inputs that modulate its activity...

  16. Stochastic kinetic model of two component system signalling reveals all-or-none, graded and mixed mode stochastic switching responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierzek, Andrzej M; Zhou, Lu; Wanner, Barry L

    2010-03-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are prevalent signal transduction systems in bacteria that control innumerable adaptive responses to environmental cues and host-pathogen interactions. We constructed a detailed stochastic kinetic model of two component signalling based on published data. Our model has been validated with flow cytometry data and used to examine reporter gene expression in response to extracellular signal strength. The model shows that, depending on the actual kinetic parameters, TCSs exhibit all-or-none, graded or mixed mode responses. In accordance with other studies, positively autoregulated TCSs exhibit all-or-none responses. Unexpectedly, our model revealed that TCSs lacking a positive feedback loop exhibit not only graded but also mixed mode responses, in which variation of the signal strength alters the level of gene expression in induced cells while the regulated gene continues to be expressed at the basal level in a substantial fraction of cells. The graded response of the TCS changes to mixed mode response by an increase of the translation initiation rate of the histidine kinase. Thus, a TCS is an evolvable design pattern capable of implementing deterministic regulation and stochastic switches associated with both graded and threshold responses. This has implications for understanding the emergence of population diversity in pathogenic bacteria and the design of genetic circuits in synthetic biology applications. The model is available in systems biology markup language (SBML) and systems biology graphical notation (SBGN) formats and can be used as a component of large-scale biochemical reaction network models.

  17. Positive autoregulation shapes response timing and intensity in two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrophanov, Alexander Y; Hadley, Tricia J; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2010-08-27

    Positive feedback loops are regulatory elements that can modulate expression output, kinetics and noise in genetic circuits. Transcriptional regulators participating in such loops are often expressed from two promoters, one constitutive and one autoregulated. Here, we investigate the interplay of promoter strengths and the intensity of the stimulus activating the transcriptional regulator in defining the output of a positively autoregulated genetic circuit. Using a mathematical model of two-component regulatory systems, which are present in all domains of life, we establish that positive feedback strongly affects the steady-state output levels at both low and high levels of stimulus if the constitutive promoter of the regulator is weak. By contrast, the effect of positive feedback is negligible when the constitutive promoter is sufficiently strong, unless the stimulus intensity is very high. Furthermore, we determine that positive feedback can affect both transient and steady state output levels even in the simplest genetic regulatory systems. We tested our modeling predictions by abolishing the positive feedback loop in the two-component regulatory system PhoP/PhoQ of Salmonella enterica, which resulted in diminished induction of PhoP-activated genes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of a two-component signal transduction system that regulates maltose genes in Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, Thomas J; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Cheung, Jackie K; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive rod that is widely distributed in nature and is the etiological agent of several human and animal diseases. The complete genome sequence of C. perfringens strain 13 has been determined and multiple two-component signal transduction systems identified. One of these systems, designated here as the MalNO system, was analyzed in this study. Microarray analysis was used to carry out functional analysis of a malO mutant. The results, which were confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, indicated that genes putatively involved in the uptake and metabolism of maltose were up-regulated in the malO mutant. These effects were reversed by complementation with the wild-type malO gene. Growth of these isogenic strains in medium with and without maltose showed that the malO mutant recovered more quickly from maltose deprivation when compared to the wild-type and complemented strains, leading to the conclusion that the MalNO system regulates maltose utilization in C. perfringens. It is postulated that this regulatory network may allow this soil bacterium and opportunistic pathogen to respond to environmental conditions where there are higher concentrations of maltose or maltodextrins, such as in the presence of decaying plant material in rich soil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of drug efflux genes by EvgAS, a two-component system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Yoko; Oshima, Taku; Mori, Hirotada; Aono, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2003-10-01

    A constitutively active mutant of histidine kinase sensor EvgS was found to confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) to an acrA-deficient Escherichia coli, indicating the relationship between the two-component system EvgAS and the expression of the MDR system. The observed MDR also depended on an outer-membrane channel, TolC. Microarray and S1 mapping assays indicated that, in the presence of this constitutive mutant EvgS, the level of transcription increased for some MDR genes, including the drug efflux genes emrKY, yhiUV, acrAB, mdfA and tolC. Transcription in vitro of emrK increased by the addition of phosphorylated EvgA. Transcription activation of tolC by the activated EvgS was, however, dependent on both EvgAS and PhoPQ (Mg(2+)-responsive two-component system), in agreement with the presence of the binding site (PhoP box) for the regulator PhoP in the tolC promoter region. Transcription in vitro of yhiUV also appears to require an as-yet-unidentified additional transcriptional factor besides EvgA. Taken together we propose that the expression of the MDR system is under a complex regulatory network, including the phosphorylated EvgA serving as the master regulator.

  20. The VirSR two-component signal transduction system regulates NetB toxin production in Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jackie K; Keyburn, Anthony L; Carter, Glen P; Lanckriet, Anouk L; Van Immerseel, Filip; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I

    2010-07-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes several diseases in domestic livestock, including necrotic enteritis in chickens, which is of concern to the poultry industry due to its health implications and associated economic cost. The novel pore-forming toxin NetB is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of this disease. In this study, we have examined the regulation of NetB toxin production. In C. perfringens, the quorum sensing-dependent VirSR two-component signal transduction system regulates genes encoding several toxins and extracellular enzymes. Analysis of the sequence upstream of the netB gene revealed the presence of potential DNA binding sites, or VirR boxes, that are recognized by the VirR response regulator. In vitro binding experiments showed that purified VirR was able to recognize and bind to these netB-associated VirR boxes. Furthermore, using a reporter gene assay, the netB VirR boxes were shown to be functional. Mutation of the virR gene in two avian C. perfringens strains was shown to significantly reduce the production of the NetB toxin; culture supernatants derived from these strains were no longer cytotoxic to Leghorn male hepatoma cells. Complementation with the virRS operon restored the toxin phenotypes to wild type. The results also showed that the VirSR two-component system regulates the expression of netB at the level of transcription. We postulate that in the gastrointestinal tract of infected birds, NetB production is upregulated when the population of C. perfringens cells reaches a threshold level that leads to activation of the VirSR system.

  1. The Nla28S/Nla28 two-component signal transduction system regulates sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Zaara; Garza, Anthony G

    2012-09-01

    The response regulator Nla28 is a key component in a cascade of transcriptional activators that modulates expression of many important developmental genes in Myxococcus xanthus. In this study, we identified and characterized Nla28S, a histidine kinase that modulates the activity of this important regulator of M. xanthus developmental genes. We show that the putative cytoplasmic domain of Nla28S has the in vitro biochemical properties of a histidine kinase protein: it hydrolyzes ATP and undergoes an ATP-dependent autophosphorylation that is acid labile and base stable. We also show that the putative cytoplasmic domain of Nla28S transfers a phosphoryl group to Nla28 in vitro, that the phosphotransfer is specific, and that a substitution in the predicted site of Nla28 phosphorylation (aspartate 53) abolishes the phosphotransfer reaction. In phenotypic studies, we found that a mutation in nla28S produces a developmental phenotype similar to, but weaker than, that produced by a mutation in nla28; both mutations primarily affect sporulation. Together, these data indicate that Nla28S is the in vivo histidine kinase partner of Nla28 and that the primary function of the Nla28S/Nla28 two-component signal transduction system is to regulate sporulation genes. The results of genetic studies suggest that phosphorylation of Nla28S is important for the in vivo sporulation function of the Nla28S/Nla28 two-component system. In addition, the quorum signal known as A-signal is important for full developmental expression of the nla28S-nla28 operon, suggesting that quorum signaling regulates the availability of the Nla28S/Nla28 signal transduction circuit in developing cells.

  2. The VirSR Two-Component Signal Transduction System Regulates NetB Toxin Production in Clostridium perfringens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jackie K.; Keyburn, Anthony L.; Carter, Glen P.; Lanckriet, Anouk L.; Van Immerseel, Filip; Moore, Robert J.; Rood, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes several diseases in domestic livestock, including necrotic enteritis in chickens, which is of concern to the poultry industry due to its health implications and associated economic cost. The novel pore-forming toxin NetB is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of this disease. In this study, we have examined the regulation of NetB toxin production. In C. perfringens, the quorum sensing-dependent VirSR two-component signal transduction system regulates genes encoding several toxins and extracellular enzymes. Analysis of the sequence upstream of the netB gene revealed the presence of potential DNA binding sites, or VirR boxes, that are recognized by the VirR response regulator. In vitro binding experiments showed that purified VirR was able to recognize and bind to these netB-associated VirR boxes. Furthermore, using a reporter gene assay, the netB VirR boxes were shown to be functional. Mutation of the virR gene in two avian C. perfringens strains was shown to significantly reduce the production of the NetB toxin; culture supernatants derived from these strains were no longer cytotoxic to Leghorn male hepatoma cells. Complementation with the virRS operon restored the toxin phenotypes to wild type. The results also showed that the VirSR two-component system regulates the expression of netB at the level of transcription. We postulate that in the gastrointestinal tract of infected birds, NetB production is upregulated when the population of C. perfringens cells reaches a threshold level that leads to activation of the VirSR system. PMID:20457789

  3. Signal transduction and adaptive regulation through bacterial two-component systems: the Escherichia coli AtoSC paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2009-09-01

    Adaptive signal transduction within microbial cells involves a multi-faceted regulated phosphotransfer mechanism that comprises structural rearrangements of sensor histidine kinases upon ligand-binding and phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in response regulators of versatile two-component systems (TCS), arisen early in bacterial evolution. In Escherichia coli, cross-talk between the AtoS histidine kinase and the AtoC response regulator, forming the AtoSC TCS, through His --> Asp phosphotransfer, activates AtoC directly to induce atoDAEB operon expression, thus modulating diverse fundamental cellular processes such as short-chain fatty acid catabolism, poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate biosynthesis and chemotaxis. Among the inducers hitherto identified, acetoacetate is the classical activator. The AtoSC TCS functional modulation by polyamines, histamine and Ca(2+), as well as the role of AtoC as transcriptional regulator, add new promising perspectives in the physiological significance and potential pharmacological exploitation of this TCS in cell proliferation, bacteria-host interactions, chemotaxis, and adaptation.

  4. A putative colR(XC1049)-colS(XC1050) two-component signal transduction system in Xanthomonas campestris positively regulates hrpC and hrpE operons and is involved in virulence, the hypersensitive response and tolerance to various stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sui-Sheng; He, Yong-Qiang; Xu, Li-Ming; Chen, Bo-Wen; Jiang, Bo-Le; Liao, Jie; Cao, Jin-Rui; Liu, Dan; Huang, Yan-Qiang; Liang, Xiao-Xia; Tang, Dong-Jie; Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2008-01-01

    The ColR-ColS two-component signal transduction system was originally characterized as a regulatory system involved in the capacity of root-colonizing biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens to colonize plant roots. There are three pairs of putative colR-colS two-component regulatory systems annotated in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris. Mutational studies revealed that one of them, named colR(XC1049) and colS(XC1050), is a global regulatory system involved in various cellular processes, including virulence, hypersensitive response and stress tolerance. Growth rate determination showed that, although the colR(XC1049) and colS(XC1050) mutants are not auxotrophic, colR(XC1049) and colS(XC1050) are required for the pathogen to proliferate well in standard media and host plants. Assays of beta-glucuronidase activities of plasmid-driven promoter-gusA reporters and/or semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that colR(XC1049) and colS(XC1050) positively regulate expression of hrpC and hrpE operons, and that expression of colR(XC1049) and colS(XC1050) is not controlled by key hrp regulators HrpG and HrpX.

  5. Analysis of protein expression regulated by the Helicobacter pylori ArsRS two-component signal transduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, John T; Gupta, Shobhana S; Friedman, David B; Krezel, Andrzej M; Cover, Timothy L

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Helicobacter pylori ArsRS two-component signal transduction system contributes to acid-responsive gene expression. To identify additional members of the ArsRS regulon and further investigate the regulatory role of the ArsRS system, we analyzed protein expression in wild-type and arsS null mutant strains. Numerous proteins were differentially expressed in an arsS mutant strain compared to a wild-type strain when the bacteria were cultured at pH 5.0 and also when they were cultured at pH 7.0. Genes encoding 14 of these proteins were directly regulated by the ArsRS system, based on observed binding of ArsR to the relevant promoter regions. The ArsRS-regulated proteins identified in this study contribute to acid resistance (urease and amidase), acetone metabolism (acetone carboxylase), resistance to oxidative stress (thioredoxin reductase), quorum sensing (Pfs), and several other functions. These results provide further definition of the ArsRS regulon and underscore the importance of the ArsRS system in regulating expression of H. pylori proteins during bacterial growth at both neutral pH and acidic pH.

  6. The two-component signal transduction system YvcPQ regulates the bacterial resistance to bacitracin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumeng; Li, Xinfeng; Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; He, Jin

    2016-10-01

    YvcPQ is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that respond to specific stimuli and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvcQ and a response regulator YvcP. In this study, through searching the consensus sequence recognized by YvcP, we found four YvcP-binding motifs in the promoter regions of genes yvcR (BMB171_C4100), BMB171_C4385, kapD (BMB171_C4525) and BMB171_C4835 in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 which is a representative of Bacillus cereus group, and confirmed that these genes are regulated by YvcP. We compared the sequence of yvcPQ and its downstream genes in genus Bacillus, and found two different kinds of yvc locus, one was the yvcPQ-RS in B. subtilis species and the other was the yvcPQ-R-S1S2 in B. cereus group. Furthermore, we found that YvcP activates the transcription of yvcS1S2 (downstream of yvcR) to promote bacterial resistance to bacitracin and deletion of either yvcPQ operon or yvcS1S2 operon renders the bacterial cells more sensitive to bacitracin. This study enriched our understanding of both the YvcPQ's function and the mechanism of bacterial resistance to bacitracin.

  7. Regulation of the homologous two-component systems KvgAS and KvhAS in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2006-11-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43, deletion of the sensor gene kvgS reduced the kvgAS expression in M9 medium with 0.2 mM paraquat, 0.2 mM 2,2-dihydropyridyl, or 300 mM NaCl. This result shows an autoregulatory role of KvgS and a stress-responsive expression of the two-component system (2CS). The kvgS deletion also appeared to decrease the expression of kvhAS, paralogous genes of kvgAS. Additionally, measurements of the promoter activity in kvgA(-) mutant revealed that KvgA is probably an activator for the expression of kvgAS and kvhAS. The subsequent electrophoretic mobility shift assay, indicating a specific binding of the recombinant KvgA to the putative promoters P(kvgAS) and P(kvhAS), also supported an interacting regulation between the 2CSs. In P(kvgAS) and P(kvhAS), the presence of RpoS binding elements suggested an RpoS-dependent regulation. Nevertheless, the rpoS deletion reduced the expression of kvgAS but increased that of kvhAS. Moreover, the kvgA deletion reduced the expression of katG and sodC. The overexpression of KvhA altered the susceptibility to fosfomycin and an increasing activity of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvyl transferase, the target protein of fosfomycin, which suggesting a regulation by KvhA. Taken together, these indicated that the two 2CSs probably belong to different regulatory circuits of the RpoS regulon.

  8. Identification of a U/Zn/Cu responsive global regulatory two-component system in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dan M; Overton, K Wesley; Liou, Megan J; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-12-30

    Despite the well-known toxicity of uranium (U) to bacteria, little is known about how cells sense and respond to U. The recent finding of a U-specific stress response in Caulobacter crescentus has provided a foundation for studying the mechanisms of U- perception in bacteria. To gain insight into this process, we used a forward genetic screen to identify the regulatory components governing expression of the urcA promoter (PurcA ) that is strongly induced by U. This approach unearthed a previously uncharacterized two-component system, named UzcRS, which is responsible for U-dependent activation of PurcA . UzcRS is also highly responsive to zinc and copper, revealing a broader specificity than previously thought. Using ChIP-seq, we found that UzcR binds extensively throughout the genome in a metal-dependent manner and recognizes a noncanonical DNA-binding site. Coupling the genome-wide occupancy data with RNA-seq analysis revealed that UzcR is a global regulator of transcription, predominately activating genes encoding proteins that are localized to the cell envelope; these include metallopeptidases, multidrug-resistant efflux (MDR) pumps, TonB-dependent receptors and many proteins of unknown function. Collectively, our data suggest that UzcRS couples the perception of U, Zn and Cu with a novel extracytoplasmic stress response.

  9. A conserved two-component signal transduction system controls the response to phosphate starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Martin, Pablo; Fernández, Matilde; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; MacSharry, John; Zomer, Aldert; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2012-08-01

    This work reports on the identification and molecular characterization of the two-component regulatory system (2CRS) PhoRP, which controls the response to inorganic phosphate (P(i)) starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. The response regulator PhoP was shown to bind to the promoter region of pstSCAB, specifying a predicted P(i) transporter system, as well as that of phoU, which encodes a putative P(i)-responsive regulatory protein. This interaction is assumed to cause transcriptional modulation under conditions of P(i) limitation. Our data suggest that the phoRP genes are subject to positive autoregulation and, together with pstSCAB and presumably phoU, represent the complete regulon controlled by the phoRP-encoded 2CRS in B. breve UCC2003. Determination of the minimal PhoP binding region combined with bioinformatic analysis revealed the probable recognition sequence of PhoP, designated here as the PHO box, which together with phoRP is conserved among many high-GC-content Gram-positive bacteria. The importance of the phoRP 2CRS in the response of B. breve to P(i) starvation conditions was confirmed by analysis of a B. breve phoP insertion mutant which exhibited decreased growth under phosphate-limiting conditions compared to its parent strain UCC2003.

  10. Phosphorylation dependent and independent regulation of Helicobacter pylori acid acclimation by the ArsRS two-component system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Sachs, George; Wen, Yi; Scott, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The pH sensitive Helicobacter pylori ArsRS two-component system (TCS) aids survival of this neutralophile in the gastric environment by directly sensing and responding to environmental acidity. ArsS is required for acid-induced trafficking of urease and its accessory proteins to the inner membrane, allowing rapid, urea-dependent cytoplasmic and periplasmic buffering. Expression of ArsR, but not its phosphorylation, is essential for bacterial viability. The aim of this study is to characterize the roles of ArsS and ArsR in the response of H. pylori to acid. Materials and Methods Wildtype H. pylori and an arsR(D52N) phosphorylation deficient strain were incubated at acidic or neutral pH. Gene and protein expression, survival, membrane trafficking of urease proteins, urease activity, and internal pH were studied. Results Phosphorylation of ArsR is not required for acid survival. ArsS-driven trafficking of urease proteins to the membrane in acid, required for recovery of internal pH, is independent of ArsR phosphorylation. ArsR phosphorylation increases expression of the urease gene cluster, and the loss of negative feedback in a phosphorylation deficient mutant leads to an increase in total urease activity. Conclusions ArsRS has a dual function in acid acclimation: regulation of urease trafficking to UreI at the cytoplasmic membrane, driven by ArsS, and regulation of urease gene cluster expression, driven by phosphorylation of ArsR. ArsS and ArsR work through phosphorylation dependent and independent regulatory mechanisms to impact acid acclimation and allow gastric colonization. Furthering understanding of the intricacies of acid acclimation will impact the future development of targeted, non-antibiotic treatment regimens. PMID:25997502

  11. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  12. Molecular evolution of the two-component system BvgAS involved in virulence regulation in Bordetella.

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    Julien Herrou

    Full Text Available The whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis is closely related to Bordetella bronchiseptica, which is responsible for chronic respiratory infections in various mammals and is occasionally found in humans, and to Bordetella parapertussis, one lineage of which causes mild whooping cough in humans and the other ovine respiratory infections. All three species produce similar sets of virulence factors that are co-regulated by the two-component system BvgAS. We characterized the molecular diversity of BvgAS in Bordetella by sequencing the two genes from a large number of diverse isolates. The response regulator BvgA is virtually invariant, indicating strong functional constraints. In contrast, the multi-domain sensor kinase BvgS has evolved into two different types. The pertussis type is found in B. pertussis and in a lineage of essentially human-associated B. bronchiseptica, while the bronchiseptica type is associated with the majority of B. bronchiseptica and both ovine and human B. parapertussis. BvgS is monomorphic in B. pertussis, suggesting optimal adaptation or a recent population bottleneck. The degree of diversity of the bronchiseptica type BvgS is markedly different between domains, indicating distinct evolutionary pressures. Thus, absolute conservation of the putative solute-binding cavities of the two periplasmic Venus Fly Trap (VFT domains suggests that common signals are perceived in all three species, while the external surfaces of these domains vary more extensively. Co-evolution of the surfaces of the two VFT domains in each type and domain swapping experiments indicate that signal transduction in the periplasmic region may be type-specific. The two distinct evolutionary solutions for BvgS confirm that B. pertussis has emerged from a specific B. bronchiseptica lineage. The invariant regions of BvgS point to essential parts for its molecular mechanism, while the variable regions may indicate adaptations to different lifestyles. The

  13. The periplasmic regulator ExoR inhibits ExoS/ChvI two-component signaling in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Esther J.; Sabio, Erich A.; Long, Sharon R

    2008-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti requires ExoS/ChvI two-component signaling to establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with legume hosts. The importance of ExoS/ChvI signaling in microbe-host interactions is underscored by the requirement of ExoS/ChvI orthologs for virulence of the related α-proteobacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Brucella abortus. In S. meliloti, ExoS/ChvI is a key regulator of gene expression for exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, motility, nutrient utilization, and f...

  14. A two-component histidine kinase Shk1 controls stress response, sclerotial formation and fungicide resistance in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

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    Duan, Yabing; Ge, Changyan; Liu, Shengming; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2013-09-01

    Fungal histidine kinases (HKs) are involved in osmotic and oxidative stress responses, hyphal development, fungicide sensitivity and virulence. Members of HK class III are known to signal through the high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase (HOG MAPK). In this study, we characterized the Shk1 gene (SS1G_12694.3), which encodes a putative class III HK, from the plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Disruption of Shk1 resulted in resistance to phenylpyrrole and dicarboximide fungicides and increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress and H2 O2 -induced oxidative stress. The Shk1 mutant showed a significant reduction in vegetative hyphal growth and was unable to produce sclerotia. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and glycerol determination assays showed that the expression of SsHOG1 (the last kinase of the Hog pathway) and glycerol accumulation were regulated by the Shk1 gene, but PAK (p21-activated kinase) was not. In addition, the Shk1 mutant showed no change in virulence. All the defects were restored by genetic complementation of the Shk1 deletion mutant with the wild-type Shk1 gene. These findings indicate that Shk1 is involved in vegetative differentiation, sclerotial formation, glycerol accumulation and adaption to hyperosmotic and oxidative stresses, and to fungicides, in S. sclerotiorum. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, the role of two-component HKs in Sclerotinia.

  15. The σ(54)-dependent two-component system regulating sulfur oxidization (Sox) system in Acidithiobacillus caldus and some chemolithotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Feng; Fu, Luo-Jie; Lin, Jian-Qun; Pang, Xin; Liu, Xiang-Mei; Wang, Rui; Wang, Zhao-Bao; Lin, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Lin-Xu

    2017-03-01

    The sulfur oxidization (Sox) system is the central sulfur oxidization pathway of phototrophic and chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Regulation and function of the Sox system in the chemotrophic Paracoccus pantotrophus has been elucidated; however, to date, no information is available on the regulation of this system in the chemolithotrophic Acidithiobacillus caldus, which is widely utilized in bioleaching. We described the novel tspSR-sox-like clusters in A. caldus and other chemolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria containing Sox systems. The highly homologous σ(54)-dependent two-component signaling system (TspS/R), upstream of the sox operons in these novel clusters, was identified by phylogenetic analyses. A typical σ(54)-dependent promoter, P1, was identified upstream of soxX-I in the sox-I cluster of A. caldus MTH-04. The transcriptional start site (G) and the -12/-24 regions (GC/GG) of P1 were determined by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'RACE), and the upstream activator sequences (UASs; TGTCCCAAATGGGACA) were confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) in vitro and by UAS-probe-plasmids assays in vivo. Sequence analysis of promoter regions in tspSR-sox-like clusters revealed that there were similar σ(54)-dependent promoters upstream of the soxX genes. Based on our results, we proposed a TspSR-mediated signal transduction and transcriptional regulation pathway for the Sox system in A. caldus. The regulation of σ(54)-dependent two-component systems (TCSs) for Sox pathways were explained for the first time in A. caldus, A. thiooxidans, T. tepidarius, and T. denitrificans, indicating the significance of modulating the sulfur oxidization in these chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers.

  16. Two components in IOR: evidence for response bias and perceptual processing delays using the SAT methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Heinke, Dietmar; Ivanoff, Jason; Klein, Raymond M; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2011-10-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) occurs when reaction times (RTs) are slowed to respond to a target that appears at a previously attended location. We used the speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) procedure to obtain conjoint measures of IOR on sensitivity and processing speed by presenting targets at cued and uncued locations. The results showed that IOR is associated with both delays in processing speed and shifts in response criterion. When the target was briefly presented, the results supported a criterion shift account of IOR. However, when the target was presented until response, the evidence indicated that, in addition to a response bias effect, there was an increase in the minimal time required for information about the target to accumulate above chance level. A hybrid account of IOR is suggested that describes effects on both response bias and perceptual processing.

  17. Dopamine reward prediction-error signalling: a two-component response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Environmental stimuli and objects, including rewards, are often processed sequentially in the brain. Recent work suggests that the phasic dopamine reward prediction-error response follows a similar sequential pattern. An initial brief, unselective and highly sensitive increase in activity unspecifically detects a wide range of environmental stimuli, then quickly evolves into the main response component, which reflects subjective reward value and utility. This temporal evolution allows the dopamine reward prediction-error signal to optimally combine speed and accuracy. PMID:26865020

  18. Contributions of Two-Component Regulatory Systems, Alternative σ Factors, and Negative Regulators to Listeria monocytogenes Cold Adaptation and Cold Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yvonne C.; Hu, Yuewei; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Files, Kali D.; Bowen, Barbara M.; Boor, Kathryn J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures is critical for transmission of this foodborne pathogen. We evaluated the contributions of different transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems to L. monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth. L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and selected isogenic null mutants in genes encoding four alternative σ factors (sigB, sigH, sigC, and sigL), two regulators of σB (rsbT and rsbV), two negative regulators (ctsR and hrcA), and 15 two-component response regulators were grown in brain heart infusion broth at 4°C with (i) a high-concentration starting inoculum (108 CFU/ml), (ii) a low-concentration starting inoculum (102 CFU/ml), and (iii) a high-concentration starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells. With a starting inoculum of 108 CFU/ml, null mutants in genes encoding selected alternative σ factors (ΔsigH, ΔsigC, and ΔsigL), a negative regulator (ΔctsR), regulators of σB (ΔrsbT and ΔrsbV), and selected two-component response regulators (ΔlisR, Δlmo1172, and Δlmo1060) had significantly reduced growth (P < 0.05) compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4°C. The growth defect for ΔsigL was limited and was not confirmed by optical density (OD600) measurement data. With a starting inoculum of 102 CFU/ml and after monitoring growth at 4°C over 84 days, only the ΔctsR strain had a consistent but limited growth defect; the other mutant strains had either no growth defects or limited growth defects apparent at only one or two of the nine sampling points evaluated during the 84-day growth period (ΔsigB, ΔsigC, and Δlmo1172). With a 108 CFU/ml starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells, none of the mutant strains that had a growth defect when inoculation was performed with cells pregrown at 37°C had reduced growth as compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4°C, suggesting a specific defect in the ability of these mutant strains to adapt to 4

  19. The LovK-LovR two-component system is a regulator of the general stress pathway in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean

    2012-06-01

    A conserved set of regulators control the general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus, including σ(T), its anti-σ factor NepR, the anti-anti-σ factor PhyR, and the transmembrane sensor kinase PhyK. We report that the soluble histidine kinase LovK and the single-domain response regulator LovR also function within the C. crescentus general stress pathway. Our genetic data support a model in which LovK-LovR functions upstream of σ(T) by controlling the phosphorylation state and thus anti-anti-σ activity of PhyR. Transcription of lovK and lovR is independently activated by stress through a mechanism that requires sigT and phyR. Conversely, lovK and lovR function together to repress transcription of the general stress regulon. Concordant with a functional role of the LovK-LovR two-component system as a negative regulator of the general stress pathway, lovK-lovR-null mutants exhibit increased cell survival after osmotic stress, while coordinate overexpression of lovK and lovR attenuates cell survival relative to that of the wild type. Notably, lovK can complement the transcriptional and cell survival defects of a phyK-null mutant when lovR is deleted. Moreover, in this same genetic background, σ(T)-dependent transcription is activated in response to osmotic stress. This result suggests that flavin-binding LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinases are competent to perceive cytoplasmic signals in addition to the environmental signal blue light. We conclude that the PhyK-PhyR and LovK-LovR two-component signaling systems coordinately regulate stress physiology in C. crescentus.

  20. The Staphylococcus aureus ArlRS two-component system is a novel regulator of agglutination and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennifer N; Crosby, Heidi A; Spaulding, Adam R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Malone, Cheryl L; Rosenthal, Carolyn B; Schlievert, Patrick M; Boyd, Jeffrey M; Horswill, Alexander R

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent bacterial pathogen that is known to agglutinate in the presence of human plasma to form stable clumps. There is increasing evidence that agglutination aids S. aureus pathogenesis, but the mechanisms of this process remain to be fully elucidated. To better define this process, we developed both tube based and flow cytometry methods to monitor clumping in the presence of extracellular matrix proteins. We discovered that the ArlRS two-component system regulates the agglutination mechanism during exposure to human plasma or fibrinogen. Using divergent S. aureus strains, we demonstrated that arlRS mutants are unable to agglutinate, and this phenotype can be complemented. We found that the ebh gene, encoding the Giant Staphylococcal Surface Protein (GSSP), was up-regulated in an arlRS mutant. By introducing an ebh complete deletion into an arlRS mutant, agglutination was restored. To assess whether GSSP is the primary effector, a constitutive promoter was inserted upstream of the ebh gene on the chromosome in a wildtype strain, which prevented clump formation and demonstrated that GSSP has a negative impact on the agglutination mechanism. Due to the parallels of agglutination with infective endocarditis development, we assessed the phenotype of an arlRS mutant in a rabbit combined model of sepsis and endocarditis. In this model the arlRS mutant displayed a large defect in vegetation formation and pathogenesis, and this phenotype was partially restored by removing GSSP. Altogether, we have discovered that the ArlRS system controls a novel mechanism through which S. aureus regulates agglutination and pathogenesis.

  1. BarA-UvrY two-component system regulates virulence of uropathogenic E. coli CFT073.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyandi, Senthilkumar; Mitra, Arindam; Herren, Christopher D; Lockatell, C Virginia; Johnson, David E; Zhu, Xiaoping; Mukhopadhyay, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a member of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, cause ∼80% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) in humans. UPEC initiates its colonization in epithelial cells lining the urinary tract with a complicated life cycle, replicating and persisting in intracellular and extracellular niches. Consequently, UPEC causes cystitis and more severe form of pyelonephritis. To further understand the virulence characteristics of UPEC, we investigated the roles of BarA-UvrY two-component system (TCS) in regulating UPEC virulence. Our results showed that mutation of BarA-UvrY TCS significantly decreased the virulence of UPEC CFT073, as assessed by mouse urinary tract infection, chicken embryo killing assay, and cytotoxicity assay on human kidney and uroepithelial cell lines. Furthermore, mutation of either barA or uvrY gene reduced the production of hemolysin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8). The virulence phenotype was restored similar to that of wild-type by complementation of either barA or uvrY gene in trans. In addition, we discussed a possible link between the BarA-UvrY TCS and CsrA in positively and negatively controlling virulence in UPEC. Overall, this study provides the evidences for BarA-UvrY TCS regulates the virulence of UPEC CFT073 and may point to mechanisms by which virulence regulations are observed in different ways may control the long-term survival of UPEC in the urinary tract.

  2. Two-component systems are involved in the regulation of botulinum neurotoxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum type A strain Hall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Chloé; Brüggemann, Holger; Brueggemann, Holger; Mazuet, Christelle; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Cayet, Nadège; Popoff, Michel R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum synthesizes a potent neurotoxin (BoNT) which associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes. The bont and antp genes are clustered in two operons. In C. botulinum type A, bont/A and antp genes are expressed during the end of the exponential growth phase and the beginning of the stationary phase under the control of an alternative sigma factor encoded by botR/A, which is located between the two operons. In the genome of C. botulinum type A strain Hall, 30 gene pairs predicted to encode two-component systems (TCSs) and 9 orphan regulatory genes have been identified. Therefore, 34 Hall isogenic antisense strains on predicted regulatory genes (29 TCSs and 5 orphan regulatory genes) have been obtained by a mRNA antisense procedure. Two TCS isogenic antisense strains showed more rapid growth kinetics and reduced BoNT/A production than the control strain, as well as increased bacterial lysis and impairment of the bacterial cell wall structure. Three other TCS isogenic antisense strains induced a low level of BoNT/A and ANTP production. Interestingly, reduced expression of bont/A and antp genes was shown to be independent of botR/A. These results indicate that BoNT/A synthesis is under the control of a complex network of regulation including directly at least three TCSs.

  3. Two-component systems are involved in the regulation of botulinum neurotoxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum type A strain Hall.

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    Chloé Connan

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum synthesizes a potent neurotoxin (BoNT which associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs to form complexes of various sizes. The bont and antp genes are clustered in two operons. In C. botulinum type A, bont/A and antp genes are expressed during the end of the exponential growth phase and the beginning of the stationary phase under the control of an alternative sigma factor encoded by botR/A, which is located between the two operons. In the genome of C. botulinum type A strain Hall, 30 gene pairs predicted to encode two-component systems (TCSs and 9 orphan regulatory genes have been identified. Therefore, 34 Hall isogenic antisense strains on predicted regulatory genes (29 TCSs and 5 orphan regulatory genes have been obtained by a mRNA antisense procedure. Two TCS isogenic antisense strains showed more rapid growth kinetics and reduced BoNT/A production than the control strain, as well as increased bacterial lysis and impairment of the bacterial cell wall structure. Three other TCS isogenic antisense strains induced a low level of BoNT/A and ANTP production. Interestingly, reduced expression of bont/A and antp genes was shown to be independent of botR/A. These results indicate that BoNT/A synthesis is under the control of a complex network of regulation including directly at least three TCSs.

  4. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein.

  5. The ChrSA and HrrSA Two-Component Systems Are Required for Transcriptional Regulation of the hemA Promoter in Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes heme and hemoglobin (Hb) as iron sources for growth in low-iron environments. In C. diphtheriae, the two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) ChrSA and HrrSA are responsive to Hb levels and regulate the transcription of promoters for hmuO, hrtAB, and hemA. ChrSA and HrrSA activate transcription at the hmuO promoter and repress transcription at hemA in an Hb-dependent manner. In this study, we show that HrrSA is the predominant repressor at hemA and that its activity results in transcriptional repression in the presence and absence of Hb, whereas repression of hemA by ChrSA is primarily responsive to Hb. DNA binding studies showed that both ChrA and HrrA bind to the hemA promoter region at virtually identical sequences. ChrA binding was enhanced by phosphorylation, while binding to DNA by HrrA was independent of its phosphorylation state. ChrA and HrrA are phosphorylated in vitro by the sensor kinase ChrS, whereas no kinase activity was observed with HrrS in vitro. Phosphorylated ChrA was not observed in vivo, even in the presence of Hb, which is likely due to the instability of the phosphate moiety on ChrA. However, phosphorylation of HrrA was observed in vivo regardless of the presence of the Hb inducer, and genetic analysis indicates that ChrS is responsible for most of the phosphorylation of HrrA in vivo. Phosphorylation studies strongly suggest that HrrS functions primarily as a phosphatase and has only minimal kinase activity. These findings collectively show a complex mechanism of regulation at the hemA promoter, where both two-component systems act in concert to optimize expression of heme biosynthetic enzymes. IMPORTANCE Understanding the mechanism by which two-component signal transduction systems function to respond to environmental stimuli is critical to the study of bacterial pathogenesis. The current study expands on the previous analyses of the ChrSA and HrrSA TCSs in the human pathogen C

  6. Evolution of multidrug resistance during Staphylococcus aureus infection involves mutation of the essential two component regulator WalKR.

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    Benjamin P Howden

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health threat, compounded by emergence of strains with resistance to vancomycin and daptomycin, both last line antimicrobials. Here we have performed high throughput DNA sequencing and comparative genomics for five clinical pairs of vancomycin-susceptible (VSSA and vancomycin-intermediate ST239 S. aureus (VISA; each pair isolated before and after vancomycin treatment failure. These comparisons revealed a frequent pattern of mutation among the VISA strains within the essential walKR two-component regulatory locus involved in control of cell wall metabolism. We then conducted bi-directional allelic exchange experiments in our clinical VSSA and VISA strains and showed that single nucleotide substitutions within either walK or walR lead to co-resistance to vancomycin and daptomycin, and caused the typical cell wall thickening observed in resistant clinical isolates. Ion Torrent genome sequencing confirmed no additional regulatory mutations had been introduced into either the walR or walK VISA mutants during the allelic exchange process. However, two potential compensatory mutations were detected within putative transport genes for the walK mutant. The minimal genetic changes in either walK or walR also attenuated virulence, reduced biofilm formation, and led to consistent transcriptional changes that suggest an important role for this regulator in control of central metabolism. This study highlights the dramatic impacts of single mutations that arise during persistent S. aureus infections and demonstrates the role played by walKR to increase drug resistance, control metabolism and alter the virulence potential of this pathogen.

  7. Two overlapping two-component systems in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae contribute to full fitness in rice by regulating virulence factors expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dehong; Yao, Xiaoyan; Duan, Meng; Luo, Yufeng; Liu, Biao; Qi, Pengyuan; Sun, Ming; Ruan, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) are widely used by bacteria to adapt to the environment. In the present study, StoS (stress tolerance-related oxygen sensor) and SreKRS (salt response kinase, regulator, and sensor) were found to positively regulate extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and swarming in the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Surprisingly, the absence of stoS or sreKRS did not attenuate virulence. To better understand the intrinsic functions of StoS and SreKRS, quantitative proteomics isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) was employed. Consistent with stoS and sreK mutants exhibiting a similar phenotype, the signalling circuits of StoS and SreKRS overlapped. Carbohydrate metabolism proteins and chemotaxis proteins, which could be responsible for EPS and swarming regulation, respectively, were reprogrammed in stoS and sreK mutants. Moreover, StoS and SreKRS demonstrated moderate expression of the major virulence factor, hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) proteins through the HrpG-HrpX circuit. Most importantly, Xoo equipped with StoS and SreKRS outcompetes strains without StoS or SreKRS in co-infected rice and grows outside the host. Therefore, we propose that StoS and SreKRS adopt a novel strategy involving the moderation of Hrp protein expression and the promotion of EPS and motility to adapt to the environment. PMID:26957113

  8. An Oxygen-Sensing Two-Component System in the Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulates Biofilm, Intracellular Invasion, and Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tiffany L.; Boisvert, Nicole M.; Priebe, Gregory P.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), which is a group of bacteria that cause chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and can be associated with outbreaks carrying high morbidity and mortality. While investigating the genomic diversity of B. dolosa strains collected from an outbreak among CF patients, we previously identified fixL as a gene showing signs of strong positive selection. This gene has homology to fixL of the rhizobial FixL/FixJ two-component system. The goals of this study were to determine the functions of FixLJ and their role in virulence in B. dolosa. We generated a fixLJ deletion mutant and complemented controls in B. dolosa strain AU0158. Using a fixK-lacZ reporter we found that FixLJ was activated in low oxygen in multiple BCC species. In a murine pneumonia model, the B. dolosa fixLJ deletion mutant was cleared faster from the lungs and spleen than wild-type B. dolosa strain AU0158 at 7 days post infection. Interestingly, the fixLJ deletion mutant made more biofilm, albeit with altered structure, but was less motile than strain AU0158. Using RNA-seq with in vitro grown bacteria, we found ~11% of the genome was differentially expressed in the fixLJ deletion mutant relative to strain AU0158. Multiple flagella-associated genes were down-regulated in the fixLJ deletion mutant, so we also evaluated virulence of a fliC deletion mutant, which lacks a flagellum. We saw no difference in the ability of the fliC deletion mutant to persist in the murine model relative to strain AU0158, suggesting factors other than flagella caused the phenotype of decreased persistence. We found the fixLJ deletion mutant to be less invasive in human lung epithelial and macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, B. dolosa fixLJ is a global regulator that controls biofilm formation, motility, intracellular invasion/persistence, and virulence. PMID:28046077

  9. The Eukaryotic-Like Ser/Thr Kinase PrkC Regulates the Essential WalRK Two-Component System in Bacillus subtilis.

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    Elizabeth A Libby

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most bacteria contain both eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases (eSTKs and eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr phosphatases (eSTPs. Their role in bacterial physiology is not currently well understood in large part because the conditions where the eSTKs are active are generally not known. However, all sequenced Gram-positive bacteria have a highly conserved eSTK with extracellular PASTA repeats that bind cell wall derived muropeptides. Here, we report that in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the PASTA-containing eSTK PrkC and its cognate eSTP PrpC converge with the essential WalRK two-component system to regulate WalR regulon genes involved in cell wall metabolism. By continuously monitoring gene expression throughout growth, we consistently find a large PrkC-dependent effect on expression of several different WalR regulon genes in early stationary phase, including both those that are activated by WalR (yocH as well as those that are repressed (iseA, pdaC. We demonstrate that PrkC phosphorylates WalR in vitro and in vivo on a single Thr residue located in the receiver domain. Although the phosphorylated region of the receiver domain is highly conserved among several B. subtilis response regulators, PrkC displays specificity for WalR in vitro. Consistently, strains expressing a nonphosphorylatable WalR point mutant strongly reduce both PrkC dependent activation and repression of yocH, iseA, and pdaC. This suggests a model where the eSTK PrkC regulates the essential WalRK two-component signaling system by direct phosphorylation of WalR Thr101, resulting in the regulation of WalR regulon genes involved in cell wall metabolism in stationary phase. As both the eSTK PrkC and the essential WalRK two-component system are highly conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, these results may be applicable to further understanding the role of eSTKs in Gram-positive physiology and cell wall metabolism.

  10. Roles of two-component system AfsQ1/Q2 in regulating biosynthesis of the yellow-pigmented coelimycin P2 in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuangshuang; Zheng, Guosong; Zhu, Hong; He, Huiqi; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen; Jiang, Weihong; Lu, Yinhua

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that in Streptomyces coelicolor two-component system AfsQ1/Q2 activates the production of the yellow-colored coelimycin P2 (also named as yCPK) on glutamate-supplemented minimal medium, and the response regulator AfsQ1 could specifically bind to the intergenic region between two structural genes, cpkA and cpkD Here, a more in-depth investigation was performed to elucidate the mechanism underlying the role of AfsQ1/Q2 in regulating coelimycin P2 biosynthesis. Deletion of afsQ1/Q2 resulted in markedly decreased expression of the whole coelimycin P2 biosynthetic gene cluster. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that AfsQ1 bound only to the target site identified previously, but not to any other promoters in the gene cluster. Mutations of AfsQ1-binding motif only resulted in drastically reduced transcription of the cpkA/B/C operon (encoding three type I polyketide synthases) and intriguingly, led to enhanced expression of some coelimcyin P2 genes, particularly accA1 and scF These results suggested the direct role of AfsQ1/Q2 in regulating coelimycin production, which is directly mediated by the structural genes, but not the cluster-situated regulatory genes, and also implied that other unknown mechanisms may be involved in AfsQ1/Q2-mediated regulation of coelimycin P2 biosynthesis.

  11. The Campylobacter jejuni CprRS two-component regulatory system regulates aspects of the cell envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a leading cause of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis, Campylobacter jejuni is a significant human pathogen. C. jejuni lives commensally in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, but tolerates variable environments during transit to a susceptible host. A two-component regulatory system, CprRS, w...

  12. The Role of the Two-Component System BaeSR in Disposing Chemicals through Regulating Transporter Systems in Acinetobacter baumannii.

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    Ming-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Bacterial two-component regulatory systems (TCSs facilitate changes in gene expression in response to environmental stimuli. TCS BaeR regulons influence tigecycline susceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii through positively regulating the pump genes adeA and adeB. In this study, we demonstrate that an additional two transport systems, AdeIJK and MacAB-TolC, are also regulated by BaeSR. In the wild type and clinical tigecycline-resistant A. baumannii strains, gene expression of AdeIJK and MacAB-TolC increased after tigecycline induction, implicating their importance to tigecycline resistance in addition to AdeABC. Phenotypic microarray results showed that A. baumannii is vulnerable to certain chemicals, especially tannic acid, after deleting baeR, which was confirmed using the spot assay. The wild-type strain of A. baumannii also exhibited 1.6-fold and 4.4-fold increase in gene expression of adeJ and macB in the medium with 100 μg/mL tannic acid, but the increase was fully inhibited by baeR deletion. An electrophoretic motility shift assay based on an interaction between His-BaeR and the adeA, adeI and macA promoter regions did not demonstrate direct binding. In conclusion, A. baumannii can use the TCS BaeSR in disposing chemicals, such as tannic acid and tigecycline, through regulating the efflux pumps.

  13. Crosstalk of two-component signal transduction systems in regulating central carbohydrate and energy metabolism during autotrophic and photomixotrophic growth of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Guangsheng; Niu, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Yuqing; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2017-05-22

    Unicellular model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has received considerable attention as a sustainable energy resource because of its photosynthetic machinery. However, two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTSs) in regulating central carbohydrate and energy metabolism of cyanobacteria are still poorly understood due to their diversity and functional complication. In this study, by comparing the growth of knockout mutants of 44 response regulators (RRs) of TCSTSs in Synechocystis, several RR mutants demonstrating differential growth patterns were identified under auto- or photomixotrophic conditions. However, in spite of no growth difference observed for the remaining RR mutants, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomic profile analysis showed that a widespread crosstalk of TCSTSs in regulating central carbohydrate and energy metabolism of Synechocystis was identified, while most of them showed diverse patterns during different trophic types or growth stages. Furthermore, an integrative analysis between evolutionary relationships and metabolomic profiles revealed some pairs of paralogous RRs with highly functional convergence, suggesting the possible conserved functions of Synechocystis TCSTSs during evolution. This study laid an important basis for understanding the function of TCSTSs in photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

  14. Conjugal transfer of the Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 symbiotic plasmid is governed through the concerted action of one- and two-component signal transduction regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Joaquina; Blanca-Ordóñez, Helena; Olivares, José; Sanjuán, Juan

    2013-03-01

    Conjugal transfer of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmids are repressed by the transcriptional regulator RctA. Here we report on new key players in the signal transduction cascade towards S. meliloti pSym conjugation. We have identified S. meliloti pSymA gene SMa0974 as an orthologue of the R. etli rctB gene which is required to antagonize repression by RctA. In S. meliloti two additional genes, rctR and rctC participate in control of rctB expression. rctR (SMa0955) encodes a protein of the GntR family of transcriptional regulators involved in repression of rctB. A rctR mutant promotes pSymA conjugal transfer and displays increased transcription of tra, virB and rctB genes even in presence of wild-type rctA gene. Among genes repressed by RctR, rctC (SMa0961) encodes a response regulator required to activate rctB transcription and therefore for derepression of plasmid conjugative functions. We conclude that in both R. etli and S. meliloti pSym conjugal transfer is derepressed via rctB, however the regulatory cascades to achieve activation of rctB are probably different. Upstream of rctB, the S. meliloti pSym conjugal transfer is regulated through the concerted action of genes representing one- (rctR) and two-component (rctC) signal transduction systems in response to yet unidentified signals.

  15. A conserved two-component regulatory system, PidS/PidR, globally regulates pigmentation and virulence-related phenotypes of Burkholderia glumae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Hari Sharan; Barphagha, Inderjit Kaur; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2012-09-01

    Burkholderia glumae is a rice pathogenic bacterium that causes bacterial panicle blight. Some strains of this pathogen produce dark brown pigments when grown on casamino-acid peptone glucose (CPG) agar medium. A pigment-positive and highly virulent strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, was randomly mutagenized with mini-Tn5gus, and the resulting mini-Tn5gus derivatives showing altered pigmentation phenotypes were screened on CPG agar plates to identify the genetic elements governing the pigmentation of B. glumae. In this study, a novel two-component regulatory system (TCRS) composed of the PidS sensor histidine kinase and the PidR response regulator was identified as an essential regulatory factor for pigmentation. Notably, the PidS/PidR TCRS was also required for the elicitation of the hypersensitive response on tobacco leaves, indicating the dependence of the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III secretion system of B. glumae on this regulatory factor. In addition, B. glumae mutants defective in the PidS/PidR TCRS showed less production of the phytotoxin, toxoflavin, and less virulence on rice panicles and onion bulbs relative to the parental strain, 411gr-6. The presence of highly homologous PidS and PidR orthologues in other Burkholderia species suggests that PidS/PidR-family TCRSs may exert the same or similar functions in different Burkholderia species, including both plant and animal pathogens.

  16. A novel two-component system PdeK/PdeR regulates c-di-GMP turnover and virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Sun, Lei; Chen, Huamin; Wu, Maosen; Yang, Ching-Hong; He, Chenyang

    2012-10-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) consisting of histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR) play essential roles in bacteria to sense environmental signals and regulate cell functions. One type of RR is involved in metabolism of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger. Although genomic studies predicted a large number of them existing in different bacteria, only a few have been studied. In this work, we characterized a novel TCS consisting of PdeK(PXO_01018)/PdeR(PXO_ 01019) from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, which causes the bacterial leaf blight of rice. PdeR (containing GGDEF, EAL, and REC domains) was shown to have phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in vitro by colorimetric assays and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The PDE activity of full-length PdeR needs to be triggered by HK PdeK. Deletion of pdeK or pdeR in X. oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99(A) had attenuated its virulence on rice. ΔpdeK and ΔpdeR secreted less exopolysaccharide than the wild type but there were no changes in terms of motility or extracellular cellulase activity, suggesting the activity of PdeK/PdeR might be specific.

  17. Systems level analysis of two-component signal transduction systems in Erwinia amylovora: Role in virulence, regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis and swarming motility

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    Sundin George W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTs, consisting of a histidine kinase (HK and a response regulator (RR, represent a major paradigm for signal transduction in prokaryotes. TCSTs play critical roles in sensing and responding to environmental conditions, and in bacterial pathogenesis. Most TCSTs in Erwinia amylovora have either not been identified or have not yet been studied. Results We used a systems approach to identify TCST and related signal transduction genes in the genome of E. amylovora. Comparative genomic analysis of TCSTs indicated that E. amylovora TCSTs were closely related to those of Erwinia tasmaniensis, a saprophytic enterobacterium isolated from apple flowers, and to other enterobacteria. Forty-six TCST genes in E. amylovora including 17 sensor kinases, three hybrid kinases, 20 DNA- or ligand-binding RRs, four RRs with enzymatic output domain (EAL-GGDEF proteins, and two kinases were characterized in this study. A systematic TCST gene-knockout experiment was conducted, generating a total of 59 single-, double-, and triple-mutants. Virulence assays revealed that five of these mutants were non-pathogenic on immature pear fruits. Results from phenotypic characterization and gene expression experiments indicated that several groups of TCST systems in E. amylovora control amylovoran biosynthesis, one of two major virulence factors in E. amylovora. Both negative and positive regulators of amylovoran biosynthesis were identified, indicating a complex network may control this important feature of pathogenesis. Positive (non-motile, EnvZ/OmpR, negative (hypermotile, GrrS/GrrA, and intermediate regulators for swarming motility in E. amylovora were also identified. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that TCSTs in E. amylovora played major roles in virulence on immature pear fruit and in regulating amylovoran biosynthesis and swarming motility. This suggested presence of regulatory networks governing

  18. Systems level analysis of two-component signal transduction systems in Erwinia amylovora: role in virulence, regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis and swarming motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youfu; Wang, Dongping; Nakka, Sridevi; Sundin, George W; Korban, Schuyler S

    2009-05-26

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTs), consisting of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), represent a major paradigm for signal transduction in prokaryotes. TCSTs play critical roles in sensing and responding to environmental conditions, and in bacterial pathogenesis. Most TCSTs in Erwinia amylovora have either not been identified or have not yet been studied. We used a systems approach to identify TCST and related signal transduction genes in the genome of E. amylovora. Comparative genomic analysis of TCSTs indicated that E. amylovora TCSTs were closely related to those of Erwinia tasmaniensis, a saprophytic enterobacterium isolated from apple flowers, and to other enterobacteria. Forty-six TCST genes in E. amylovora including 17 sensor kinases, three hybrid kinases, 20 DNA- or ligand-binding RRs, four RRs with enzymatic output domain (EAL-GGDEF proteins), and two kinases were characterized in this study. A systematic TCST gene-knockout experiment was conducted, generating a total of 59 single-, double-, and triple-mutants. Virulence assays revealed that five of these mutants were non-pathogenic on immature pear fruits. Results from phenotypic characterization and gene expression experiments indicated that several groups of TCST systems in E. amylovora control amylovoran biosynthesis, one of two major virulence factors in E. amylovora. Both negative and positive regulators of amylovoran biosynthesis were identified, indicating a complex network may control this important feature of pathogenesis. Positive (non-motile, EnvZ/OmpR), negative (hypermotile, GrrS/GrrA), and intermediate regulators for swarming motility in E. amylovora were also identified. Our results demonstrated that TCSTs in E. amylovora played major roles in virulence on immature pear fruit and in regulating amylovoran biosynthesis and swarming motility. This suggested presence of regulatory networks governing expression of critical virulence genes in E. amylovora.

  19. The Ferrous Iron-Responsive BqsRS Two-Component System Activates Genes That Promote Cationic Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreamer, Naomi N.; Costa, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The physiological resistance of pathogens to antimicrobial treatment is a severe problem in the context of chronic infections. For example, the mucus-filled lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are readily colonized by diverse antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Previously, we showed that bioavailable ferrous iron [Fe(II)] is present in CF sputum at all stages of infection and constitutes a significant portion of the iron pool at advanced stages of lung function decline [R. C. Hunter et al., mBio 4(4):e00557-13, 2013]. P. aeruginosa, a dominant CF pathogen, senses Fe(II) using a two-component signal transduction system, BqsRS, which is transcriptionally active in CF sputum [R. C. Hunter et al., mBio 4(4):e00557-13, 2013; N. N. Kreamer, J. C. Wilks, J. J. Marlow, M. L. Coleman, and D. K. Newman, J Bacteriol 194:1195–1204, 2012]. Here, we show that an RExxE motif in BqsS is required for BqsRS activation. Once Fe(II) is sensed, BqsR binds a tandem repeat DNA sequence, activating transcription. The BqsR regulon—defined through iterative bioinformatic predictions and experimental validation—includes several genes whose products are known to drive antibiotic resistance to aminoglycosides and polymyxins. Among them are genes encoding predicted determinants of polyamine transport and biosynthesis. Compared to the wild type, bqsS and bqsR deletion mutants are sensitive to high levels of Fe(II), produce less spermidine in high Fe(II), and are more sensitive to tobramycin and polymyxin B but not arsenate, chromate, or cefsulodin. BqsRS thus mediates a physiological response to Fe(II) that guards the cell against positively charged molecules but not negatively charged stressors. These results suggest Fe(II) is an important environmental signal that, via BqsRS, bolsters tolerance of a variety of cationic stressors, including clinically important antimicrobial agents. PMID:25714721

  20. The two-component system CpxRA negatively regulates the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli involving sigma 32 and Lon protease

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    MIGUEL A. eDE LA CRUZ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC is a significant cause of serious human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. EHEC strains contain a pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE, which encodes virulence factors responsible for damaging the gut mucosa. The Cpx envelope stress response of E. coli is controlled by a two-component system consisting of a sensor histidine kinase (CpxA and a cytoplasmic response regulator (CpxR. In this study, we investigated the role of CpxRA in the expression of LEE-encoded virulence factors of EHEC. We found that a mutation in cpxA significantly affected adherence of EHEC to human epithelial cells. Analysis of this mutant revealed the presence of high levels of CpxR which repressed transcription of grlA and ler, the main positive virulence regulators of the LEE, and influenced negatively the production of the type 3 secretion system–associated EspABD translocator proteins. It is known that CpxR activates rpoH (Sigma factor 32, which in turns activates transcription of the lon protease gene. We found that transcription levels of ler and grlA were significantly increased in the lon and cpxA lon mutants suggesting that lon is involved in down-regulating LEE genes. In addition, the Galleria mellonella model of infection was used to analyze the effect of the loss of the cpx and lon genes in EHEC’s ability to kill the larvae. We found that the cpxA mutant was significantly deficient at killing the larvae however, the cpxA lon mutant which overexpresses LEE genes in vitro, was unable to kill the larvae, suggesting that virulence in the G. mellonella model is T3SS independent and that CpxA modulates virulence through a yet unknown EHEC-specific factor. Our data provides new insights and broadens our scope into the complex regulatory network of the LEE in which the CpxA sensor kinase plays an important role in a cascade involving both global and virulence regulators.

  1. The Two-Component System CpxRA Negatively Regulates the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Involving σ32 and Lon protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Miguel A.; Morgan, Jason K.; Ares, Miguel A.; Yáñez-Santos, Jorge A.; Riordan, James T.; Girón, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a significant cause of serious human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. EHEC strains contain a pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which encodes virulence factors responsible for damaging the gut mucosa. The Cpx envelope stress response of E. coli is controlled by a two-component system (TCS) consisting of a sensor histidine kinase (CpxA) and a cytoplasmic response regulator (CpxR). In this study, we investigated the role of CpxRA in the expression of LEE-encoded virulence factors of EHEC. We found that a mutation in cpxA significantly affected adherence of EHEC to human epithelial cells. Analysis of this mutant revealed the presence of high levels of CpxR which repressed transcription of grlA and ler, the main positive virulence regulators of the LEE, and influenced negatively the production of the type 3 secretion system–associated EspABD translocator proteins. It is known that CpxR activates rpoH (Sigma factor 32), which in turns activates transcription of the lon protease gene. We found that transcription levels of ler and grlA were significantly increased in the lon and cpxA lon mutants suggesting that lon is involved in down-regulating LEE genes. In addition, the Galleria mellonella model of infection was used to analyze the effect of the loss of the cpx and lon genes in EHEC's ability to kill the larvae. We found that the cpxA mutant was significantly deficient at killing the larvae however, the cpxA lon mutant which overexpresses LEE genes in vitro, was unable to kill the larvae, suggesting that virulence in the G. mellonella model is T3SS independent and that CpxA modulates virulence through a yet unknown EHEC-specific factor. Our data provides new insights and broadens our scope into the complex regulatory network of the LEE in which the CpxA sensor kinase plays an important role in a cascade involving both global and virulence regulators. PMID:26904510

  2. Characterization of the mrgRS locus of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei: temperature regulates the expression of a two-component signal transduction system

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    Dance David AB

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a saprophyte in tropical environments and an opportunistic human pathogen. This versatility requires a sensing mechanism that allows the bacterium to respond rapidly to altered environmental conditions. We characterized a two-component signal transduction locus from B. pseudomallei 204, mrgR and mrgS, encoding products with extensive homology with response regulators and histidine protein kinases of Escherichia coli, Bordetella pertussis, and Vibrio cholerae. Results The locus was present and expressed in a variety of B. pseudomallei human and environmental isolates but was absent from other Burkholderia species, B. cepacia, B. cocovenenans, B. plantarii, B. thailandensis, B. vandii, and B. vietnamiensis. A 2128 bp sequence, including the full response regulator mrgR, but not the sensor kinase mrgS, was present in the B. mallei genome. Restriction fragment length polymorphism downstream from mrgRS showed two distinct groups were present among B. pseudomallei isolates. Our analysis of the open reading frames in this region of the genome revealed that transposase and bacteriophage activity may help explain this variation. MrgR and MrgS proteins were expressed in B. pseudomallei 204 cultured at different pH, salinity and temperatures and the expression was substantially reduced at 25°C compared with 37°C or 42°C but was mostly unaffected by pH or salinity, although at 25°C and 0.15% NaCl a small increase in MrgR expression was observed at pH 5. MrgR was recognized by antibodies in convalescent sera pooled from melioidosis patients. Conclusion The results suggest that mrgRS regulates an adaptive response to temperature that may be essential for pathogenesis, particularly during the initial phases of infection. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are very closely related species that differ in their capacity to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Modifications in this region of the genome may

  3. The cold-induced two-component system CBO0366/CBO0365 regulates metabolic pathways with novel roles in group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsten, Elias; Zhang, Zhen; Somervuo, Panu; Minton, Nigel P; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    The two-component system CBO0366/CBO0365 was recently demonstrated to have a role in cold tolerance of group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502. The mechanisms under its control, ultimately resulting in increased sensitivity to low temperature, are unknown. A transcriptomic analysis with DNA microarrays was performed to identify the differences in global gene expression patterns of the wild-type ATCC 3502 and a derivative mutant with insertionally inactivated cbo0365 at 37 and 15°C. Altogether, 150 or 141 chromosomal coding sequences (CDSs) were found to be differently expressed in the cbo0365 mutant at 37 or 15°C, respectively, and thus considered to be under the direct or indirect transcriptional control of the response regulator CBO0365. Of the differentially expressed CDSs, expression of 141 CDSs was similarly affected at both temperatures investigated, suggesting that the putative CBO0365 regulon was practically not affected by temperature. The regulon involved genes related to acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, motility, arsenic resistance, and phosphate uptake and transport. Deteriorated growth at 17°C was observed for mutants with disrupted ABE fermentation pathway components (crt, bcd, bdh, and ctfA), arsenic detoxifying machinery components (arsC and arsR), or phosphate uptake mechanism components (phoT), suggesting roles for these mechanisms in cold tolerance of group I C. botulinum. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed recombinant CBO0365 to bind to the promoter regions of crt, arsR, and phoT, as well as to the promoter region of its own operon, suggesting direct DNA-binding transcriptional activation or repression as a means for CBO0365 in regulating these operons. The results provide insight to the mechanisms group I C. botulinum utilizes in coping with cold.

  4. Phosphorylation-dependent and Phosphorylation-independent Regulation of Helicobacter pylori Acid Acclimation by the ArsRS Two-component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Elizabeth A; Sachs, George; Wen, Yi; Scott, David R

    2016-02-01

    The pH-sensitive Helicobacter pylori ArsRS two-component system (TCS) aids survival of this neutralophile in the gastric environment by directly sensing and responding to environmental acidity. ArsS is required for acid-induced trafficking of urease and its accessory proteins to the inner membrane, allowing rapid, urea-dependent cytoplasmic and periplasmic buffering. Expression of ArsR, but not its phosphorylation, is essential for bacterial viability. The aim of this study was to characterize the roles of ArsS and ArsR in the response of H. pylori to acid. Wild-type H. pylori and an arsR(D52N) phosphorylation-deficient strain were incubated at acidic or neutral pH. Gene and protein expression, survival, membrane trafficking of urease proteins, urease activity, and internal pH were studied. Phosphorylation of ArsR is not required for acid survival. ArsS-driven trafficking of urease proteins to the membrane in acid, required for recovery of internal pH, is independent of ArsR phosphorylation. ArsR phosphorylation increases expression of the urease gene cluster, and the loss of negative feedback in a phosphorylation-deficient mutant leads to an increase in total urease activity. ArsRS has a dual function in acid acclimation: regulation of urease trafficking to UreI at the cytoplasmic membrane, driven by ArsS, and regulation of urease gene cluster expression, driven by phosphorylation of ArsR. ArsS and ArsR work through phosphorylation-dependent and phosphorylation-independent regulatory mechanisms to impact acid acclimation and allow gastric colonization. Furthering understanding of the intricacies of acid acclimation will impact the future development of targeted, nonantibiotic treatment regimens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The FlgS/FlgR two-component signal transduction system regulates the fla regulon in Campylobacter jejuni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten, M.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Putten, van J.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is a highly motile organism that carries a flagellum on each pole. The flagellar motility is regarded as an important trait in C. jejuni colonization of the intestinal tract, however, the knowledge of the regulation of this important colonization factor is

  6. Regulation of natural competence by the orphan two-component system sensor kinase ChiS involves a non-canonical transmembrane regulator in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shouji; Mitobe, Jiro; Ishikawa, Takahiko; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo; Izumiya, Hidemasa

    2014-01-01

    In Vibrio cholerae, 41 chitin-inducible genes, including the genes involved in natural competence for DNA uptake, are governed by the orphan two-component system (TCS) sensor kinase ChiS. However, the mechanism by which ChiS controls the expression of these genes is currently unknown. Here, we report the involvement of a novel transcription factor termed 'TfoS' in this process. TfoS is a transmembrane protein that contains a large periplasmic domain and a cytoplasmic AraC-type DNA-binding domain, but lacks TCS signature domains. Inactivation of tfoS abolished natural competence as well as transcription of the tfoR gene encoding a chitin-induced small RNA essential for competence gene expression. A TfoS fragment containing the DNA-binding domain specifically bound to and activated transcription from the tfoR promoter. Intracellular TfoS levels were unaffected by disruption of chiS and coexpression of TfoS and ChiS in Escherichia coli recovered transcription of the chromosomally integrated tfoR::lacZ gene, suggesting that TfoS is post-translationally modulated by ChiS during transcriptional activation; however, this regulation persisted when the canonical phosphorelay residues of ChiS were mutated. The results presented here suggest that ChiS operates a chitin-induced non-canonical signal transduction cascade through TfoS, leading to transcriptional activation of tfoR.

  7. The two-component system CpxR/A represses the expression of Salmonella virulence genes by affecting the stability of the transcriptional regulator HilD

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Miguel A.; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Palacios, Irene J.; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Calva, Edmundo; Bustamante, Víctor H.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica can cause intestinal or systemic infections in humans and animals mainly by the presence of pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, containing 39 and 44 genes, respectively. The AraC-like regulator HilD positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as many other Salmonella virulence genes including those located in SPI-2. A previous report indicates that the two-component system CpxR/A regulates the SPI-1 genes: the absence of the sensor kinase CpxA, but not the absence of its cognate response regulator CpxR, reduces their expression. The presence and absence of cell envelope stress activates kinase and phosphatase activities of CpxA, respectively, which in turn controls the level of phosphorylated CpxR (CpxR-P). In this work, we further define the mechanism for the CpxR/A-mediated regulation of SPI-1 genes. The negative effect exerted by the absence of CpxA on the expression of SPI-1 genes was counteracted by the absence of CpxR or by the absence of the two enzymes, AckA and Pta, which render acetyl-phosphate that phosphorylates CpxR. Furthermore, overexpression of the lipoprotein NlpE, which activates CpxA kinase activity on CpxR, or overexpression of CpxR, repressed the expression of SPI-1 genes. Thus, our results provide several lines of evidence strongly supporting that the absence of CpxA leads to the phosphorylation of CpxR via the AckA/Pta enzymes, which represses both the SPI-1 and SPI-2 genes. Additionally, we show that in the absence of the Lon protease, which degrades HilD, the CpxR-P-mediated repression of the SPI-1 genes is mostly lost; moreover, we demonstrate that CpxR-P negatively affects the stability of HilD and thus decreases the expression of HilD-target genes, such as hilD itself and hilA, located in SPI-1. Our data further expand the insight on the different regulatory pathways for gene expression involving CpxR/A and on the complex regulatory network governing virulence in Salmonella. PMID:26300871

  8. The CLO3403/CLO3404 two-component system of Clostridium botulinum E1 Beluga is important for cold shock response and growth at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascher, Gerald; Derman, Yagmur; Kirk, David G; Palonen, Eveliina; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    In order to survive a temperature downshift, bacteria have to sense the changing environment and adjust their metabolism and structure. Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) play a central role in sensing and responding to many different environmental stimuli. Although the nonproteolytic (group II) Clostridium botulinum represents a major hazard in chilled foods, the cold adaption mechanisms of group II C. botulinum organisms are not known. Here, we show that the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS of C. botulinum E1 Beluga is involved in the cold shock response and growth at 12°C. Cold shock induced the expression of the genes encoding the histidine kinase (clo3403) and the response regulator (clo3404) by more than 100-fold after 5 h relative to their expression in a nonshocked culture at the corresponding time point. The involvement of CLO3403/CLO3404 in growth at low temperature was demonstrated by impaired growth of the insertional clo3403 and clo3404 knockout mutants at 12°C compared to the growth of the wild-type culture. Additionally, the inactivation of clo3403 had a negative effect on motility. The growth efficiency at 12°C of the TCS mutants and the motility of the kinase mutants were restored by introducing a plasmid harboring the operon of the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS. The results suggest that the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS is important for the cold tolerance of C. botulinum E1 Beluga.

  9. The PmrA/PmrB Two-Component System of Legionella pneumophila Is a Global Regulator Required for Intracellular Replication within Macrophages and Protozoa▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Al-khodor, Souhaila; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Price, Christopher T.; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2008-01-01

    To examine the role of the PmrA/PmrB two-component system (TCS) of Legionella pneumophila in global gene regulation and in intracellular infection, we constructed pmrA and pmrB isogenic mutants by allelic exchange. Genome-wide microarray gene expression analyses of the pmrA and pmrB mutants at both the exponential and the postexponential phases have shown that the PmrA/PmrB TCS has a global effect on the expression of 279 genes classified into nine groups of genes encoding eukaryotic-like pro...

  10. Functional characterization of a novel outer membrane porin KpnO, regulated by PhoBR two-component system in Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044.

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    Vijaya Bharathi Srinivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diffusion of antibiotics through the outer membrane is primarily affected by the porin super family, changes contribute to antibiotic resistance. Recently we demonstrated that the CpxAR two-component signaling system alters the expression of an uncharacterized porin OmpC(KP, to mediate antimicrobial resistance in K. pneumoniae. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, functional characterization of the putative porin OmpC(KP (denoted kpnO with respect to antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence was evaluated by generating an isogenic mutant, ΔkpnO in a clinical isolate of K. pneumoniae. Estimation of uronic acid content confirmed that ΔkpnO produced ∼2.0 fold lesser capsular polysaccharide than the wild-type. The ΔkpnO displayed higher sensitivity to hyper osmotic and bile conditions. Disruption of kpnO increased the susceptibility of K. pneumoniae to oxidative and nitrostative stress by ∼1.6 fold and >7 fold respectively. The loss of the Klebsiella porin led to an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration of tetracycline (3-fold, nalidixic acid (4-fold, tobramycin (4-fold, streptomycin (10-fold, and spectinomycin (10-fold, which could be restored following complementation. The single deletion of kpnO reduced the survival of the pathogen by 50% when exposed to disinfectants. In Caenorhabditis elegans model, the kpnO mutant exhibited significantly (P<0.01 lower virulence. To dissect the role of PhoBR signaling system in regulating the expression of the kpnO, a phoB(KP isogenic mutant was constructed. The phoB(KP mutant exhibited impaired gastrointestinal stress response and decreased antimicrobial susceptibility. The mRNA levels of kpnO were found to be 4-fold less in phoB(KP mutant compared to wild type. A regulatory role of PhoB(KP for the expression of kpnO was further supported by the specific binding of PhoB(KP to the putative promoter of kpnO. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Loss of PhoBR regulated porin Kpn

  11. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae two-component system QseB/QseC regulates the transcription of PilM, an important determinant of bacterial adherence and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinlin; Hu, Linlin; Xu, Zhuofei; Tan, Chen; Yuan, Fangyan; Fu, Shulin; Cheng, Hui; Chen, Huanchun; Bei, Weicheng

    2015-05-15

    QseB/QseC is one of the five predicted two-component systems (TCSs) in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. To understand the roles of this TCS in A. pleuropneumoniae, a markerless gene-deletion mutant ΔqseBC was constructed. Differentially expressed (DE) genes in ΔqseBC were filtered by microarray analysis. A total of 44 DE genes were found to be regulated by QseB/QseC system. The transcriptional profile of A. pleuropneumoniae ΔqseBC was compared with that of ΔluxS and catecholamine (CA) stimulations, 13 genes regulated by QseB/QseC were found also regulated by LuxS, and 3 Qse-regulons were co-regulated by CA stimulations, respectively. Binding of QseB to the promoters of three regulons (pilM, glpK and hugZ), which were co-regulated by QseB/QseC and LuxS, was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay. Results indicated that pilM was directly regulated by phosphorylated-QseB. Then the pilM deletion mutant ΔpilM was constructed and characterized. Data presented here revealed that adherence ability of ΔpilM to St. Jude porcine lung cells was significantly decreased, and ΔpilM exhibited reduced virulence in pigs, suggesting PilM contributes to the process of A. pleuropneumoniae infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The VirS/VirR two-component system regulates the anaerobic cytotoxicity, intestinal pathogenicity, and enterotoxemic lethality of Clostridium perfringens type C isolate CN3685.

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    Ma, Menglin; Vidal, Jorge; Saputo, Juliann; McClane, Bruce A; Uzal, Francisco

    2011-01-25

    Clostridium perfringens vegetative cells cause both histotoxic infections (e.g., gas gangrene) and diseases originating in the intestines (e.g., hemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis or lethal enterotoxemia). Despite their medical and veterinary importance, the molecular pathogenicity of C. perfringens vegetative cells causing diseases of intestinal origin remains poorly understood. However, C. perfringens beta toxin (CPB) was recently shown to be important when vegetative cells of C. perfringens type C strain CN3685 induce hemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis and lethal enterotoxemia. Additionally, the VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system was found to control CPB production by CN3685 vegetative cells during aerobic infection of cultured enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. Using an isogenic virR null mutant, the current study now reports that the VirS/VirR system also regulates CN3685 cytotoxicity during infection of Caco-2 cells under anaerobic conditions, as found in the intestines. More importantly, the virR mutant lost the ability to cause hemorrhagic necrotic enteritis in rabbit small intestinal loops. Western blot analyses demonstrated that the VirS/VirR system mediates necrotizing enteritis, at least in part, by controlling in vivo CPB production. In addition, vegetative cells of the isogenic virR null mutant were, relative to wild-type vegetative cells, strongly attenuated in their lethality in a mouse enterotoxemia model. Collectively, these results identify the first regulator of in vivo pathogenicity for C. perfringens vegetative cells causing disease originating in the complex intestinal environment. Since VirS/VirR also mediates histotoxic infections, this two-component regulatory system now assumes a global role in regulating a spectrum of infections caused by C. perfringens vegetative cells.

  13. The essential yhcSR two-component signal transduction system directly regulates the lac and opuCABCD operons of Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Meiying Yan

    Full Text Available Our previous studies suggested that the essential two-component signal transduction system, YhcSR, regulates the opuCABCD operon at the transcriptional level, and the Pspac-driven opuCABCD partially complements the lethal effects of yhcS antisense RNA expression in Staphylococcus aureus. However, the reason why yhcSR regulon is required for growth is still unclear. In this report, we present that the lac and opuC operons are directly transcriptionally regulated by YhcSR. Using real-time RT-PCR we showed that the down-regulation of yhcSR expression affected the transcription of lacA encoding galactose-6-phosphotase isomerase subunit LacA, and opuCA encoding a subunit of a glycine betaine/carnitine/choline ABC transporter. Promoter-lux reporter fusion studies further confirmed the transcriptional regulation of lac by YhcSR. Gel shift assays revealed that YhcR binds to the promoter regions of the lac and opuC operons. Moreover, the Pspac-driven lacABC expression in trans was able to partially complement the lethal effect of induced yhcS antisense RNA. Likewise, the Pspac-driven opuCABCD expression in trans complemented the growth defect of S. aureus in a high osmotic strength medium during the depletion of YhcSR. Taken together, the above data indicate that the yhcSR system directly regulates the expression of lac and opuC operons, which, in turn, may be partially associated with the essentiality of yhcSR in S. aureus. These results provide a new insight into the biological functions of the yhcSR, a global regulator.

  14. The essential yhcSR two-component signal transduction system directly regulates the lac and opuCABCD operons of Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Yan, Meiying; Hall, Jeffrey W; Yang, Junshu; Ji, Yinduo

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies suggested that the essential two-component signal transduction system, YhcSR, regulates the opuCABCD operon at the transcriptional level, and the Pspac-driven opuCABCD partially complements the lethal effects of yhcS antisense RNA expression in Staphylococcus aureus. However, the reason why yhcSR regulon is required for growth is still unclear. In this report, we present that the lac and opuC operons are directly transcriptionally regulated by YhcSR. Using real-time RT-PCR we showed that the down-regulation of yhcSR expression affected the transcription of lacA encoding galactose-6-phosphotase isomerase subunit LacA, and opuCA encoding a subunit of a glycine betaine/carnitine/choline ABC transporter. Promoter-lux reporter fusion studies further confirmed the transcriptional regulation of lac by YhcSR. Gel shift assays revealed that YhcR binds to the promoter regions of the lac and opuC operons. Moreover, the Pspac-driven lacABC expression in trans was able to partially complement the lethal effect of induced yhcS antisense RNA. Likewise, the Pspac-driven opuCABCD expression in trans complemented the growth defect of S. aureus in a high osmotic strength medium during the depletion of YhcSR. Taken together, the above data indicate that the yhcSR system directly regulates the expression of lac and opuC operons, which, in turn, may be partially associated with the essentiality of yhcSR in S. aureus. These results provide a new insight into the biological functions of the yhcSR, a global regulator.

  15. The Myxococcus xanthus Two-Component System CorSR Regulates Expression of a Gene Cluster Involved in Maintaining Copper Tolerance during Growth and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sutil, María Celestina; Pérez, Juana; Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Shimkets, Lawrence J.; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2013-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a soil-dwelling member of the δ–Proteobacteria that exhibits a complex developmental cycle upon starvation. Development comprises aggregation and differentiation into environmentally resistant myxospores in an environment that includes fluctuations in metal ion concentrations. While copper is essential for M. xanthus cells because several housekeeping enzymes use it as a cofactor, high copper concentrations are toxic. These opposing effects force cells to maintain a tight copper homeostasis. A plethora of paralogous genes involved in copper detoxification, all of which are differentially regulated, have been reported in M. xanthus. The use of in-frame deletion mutants and fusions with the reporter gene lacZ has allowed the identification of a two-component system, CorSR, that modulates the expression of an operon termed curA consisting of nine genes whose expression slowly increases after metal addition, reaching a plateau. Transcriptional regulation of this operon is complex because transcription can be initiated at different promoters and by different types of regulators. These genes confer copper tolerance during growth and development. Copper induces carotenoid production in a ΔcorSR mutant at lower concentrations than with the wild-type strain due to lack of expression of a gene product resembling subunit III of cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase. This data may explain why copper induces carotenoid biosynthesis at suboptimal rather than optimal growth conditions in wild-type strains. PMID:23874560

  16. The Myxococcus xanthus two-component system CorSR regulates expression of a gene cluster involved in maintaining copper tolerance during growth and development.

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    María Celestina Sánchez-Sutil

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus is a soil-dwelling member of the δ-Proteobacteria that exhibits a complex developmental cycle upon starvation. Development comprises aggregation and differentiation into environmentally resistant myxospores in an environment that includes fluctuations in metal ion concentrations. While copper is essential for M. xanthus cells because several housekeeping enzymes use it as a cofactor, high copper concentrations are toxic. These opposing effects force cells to maintain a tight copper homeostasis. A plethora of paralogous genes involved in copper detoxification, all of which are differentially regulated, have been reported in M. xanthus. The use of in-frame deletion mutants and fusions with the reporter gene lacZ has allowed the identification of a two-component system, CorSR, that modulates the expression of an operon termed curA consisting of nine genes whose expression slowly increases after metal addition, reaching a plateau. Transcriptional regulation of this operon is complex because transcription can be initiated at different promoters and by different types of regulators. These genes confer copper tolerance during growth and development. Copper induces carotenoid production in a ΔcorSR mutant at lower concentrations than with the wild-type strain due to lack of expression of a gene product resembling subunit III of cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase. This data may explain why copper induces carotenoid biosynthesis at suboptimal rather than optimal growth conditions in wild-type strains.

  17. The Acinetobacter baumannii Two-Component System AdeRS Regulates Genes Required for Multidrug Efflux, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in a Strain-Specific Manner

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    Grace E. Richmond

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to persist in the environment and is often multidrug resistant (MDR, causing difficulties in the treatment of infections. Here, we show that the two-component system AdeRS, which regulates the production of the AdeABC multidrug resistance efflux pump, is required for the formation of a protective biofilm in an ex vivo porcine mucosal model, which mimics a natural infection of the human epithelium. Interestingly, deletion of adeB impacted only on the ability of strain AYE to form a biofilm on plastic and only on the virulence of strain Singapore 1 for Galleria mellonella. RNA-Seq revealed that loss of AdeRS or AdeB significantly altered the transcriptional landscape, resulting in the changed expression of many genes, notably those associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence interactions. For example, A. baumannii lacking AdeRS displayed decreased expression of adeABC, pil genes, com genes, and a pgaC-like gene, whereas loss of AdeB resulted in increased expression of pil and com genes and decreased expression of ferric acinetobactin transport system genes. These data define the scope of AdeRS-mediated regulation, show that changes in the production of AdeABC mediate important phenotypes controlled by AdeRS, and suggest that AdeABC is a viable target for antimicrobial drug and antibiofilm discovery.

  18. The Acinetobacter baumannii Two-Component System AdeRS Regulates Genes Required for Multidrug Efflux, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in a Strain-Specific Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Grace E.; Evans, Laura P.; Anderson, Michele J.; Wand, Matthew E.; Bonney, Laura C.; Ivens, Alasdair; Chua, Kim Lee; Webber, Mark A.; Sutton, J. Mark; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to persist in the environment and is often multidrug resistant (MDR), causing difficulties in the treatment of infections. Here, we show that the two-component system AdeRS, which regulates the production of the AdeABC multidrug resistance efflux pump, is required for the formation of a protective biofilm in an ex vivo porcine mucosal model, which mimics a natural infection of the human epithelium. Interestingly, deletion of adeB impacted only on the ability of strain AYE to form a biofilm on plastic and only on the virulence of strain Singapore 1 for Galleria mellonella. RNA-Seq revealed that loss of AdeRS or AdeB significantly altered the transcriptional landscape, resulting in the changed expression of many genes, notably those associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence interactions. For example, A. baumannii lacking AdeRS displayed decreased expression of adeABC, pil genes, com genes, and a pgaC-like gene, whereas loss of AdeB resulted in increased expression of pil and com genes and decreased expression of ferric acinetobactin transport system genes. These data define the scope of AdeRS-mediated regulation, show that changes in the production of AdeABC mediate important phenotypes controlled by AdeRS, and suggest that AdeABC is a viable target for antimicrobial drug and antibiofilm discovery. PMID:27094331

  19. The two-component signal transduction system ArlRS regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner.

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    Yang Wu

    Full Text Available Due to its ability to form biofilms on medical devices, Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a major pathogen of nosocomial infections. In this study, we investigated the role of the two-component signal transduction system ArlRS in regulating S. epidermidis biofilm formation. An ArlRS-deficient mutant, WW06, was constructed using S. epidermidis strain 1457 as a parental strain. Although the growth curve of WW06 was similar to that of SE1457, the mutant strain was unable to form biofilms in vitro. In a rabbit subcutaneous infection model, sterile disks made of polymeric materials were implanted subcutaneously followed with inoculation of WW06 or SE1457. The viable bacteria cells of WW06 recovered from biofilms on the embedded disks were much lower than that of SE1457. Complementation of arlRS genes expression from plasmid in WW06 restored biofilm-forming phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. WW06 maintained the ability to undergo initial attachment. Transcription levels of several genes involved in biofilm formation, including icaADBC, sigB, and sarA, were decreased in WW06, compared to SE1457; and icaR expression was increased in WW06, detected by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The biofilm-forming phenotype was restored by overexpressing icaADBC in WW06 but not by overexpressing sigB, indicating that ArlRS regulates biofilm formation through the regulation of icaADBC. Gel shift assay showed that ArlR can bind to the promoter region of the ica operon. In conclusion, ArlRS regulates S. epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner, distinct from its role in S. aureus.

  20. The two-component signal transduction system ArlRS regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Wang, Jiaxue; Xu, Tao; Liu, Jingran; Yu, Wenqi; Lou, Qiang; Zhu, Tao; He, Nianan; Ben, Haijing; Hu, Jian; Götz, Friedrich; Qu, Di

    2012-01-01

    Due to its ability to form biofilms on medical devices, Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a major pathogen of nosocomial infections. In this study, we investigated the role of the two-component signal transduction system ArlRS in regulating S. epidermidis biofilm formation. An ArlRS-deficient mutant, WW06, was constructed using S. epidermidis strain 1457 as a parental strain. Although the growth curve of WW06 was similar to that of SE1457, the mutant strain was unable to form biofilms in vitro. In a rabbit subcutaneous infection model, sterile disks made of polymeric materials were implanted subcutaneously followed with inoculation of WW06 or SE1457. The viable bacteria cells of WW06 recovered from biofilms on the embedded disks were much lower than that of SE1457. Complementation of arlRS genes expression from plasmid in WW06 restored biofilm-forming phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. WW06 maintained the ability to undergo initial attachment. Transcription levels of several genes involved in biofilm formation, including icaADBC, sigB, and sarA, were decreased in WW06, compared to SE1457; and icaR expression was increased in WW06, detected by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The biofilm-forming phenotype was restored by overexpressing icaADBC in WW06 but not by overexpressing sigB, indicating that ArlRS regulates biofilm formation through the regulation of icaADBC. Gel shift assay showed that ArlR can bind to the promoter region of the ica operon. In conclusion, ArlRS regulates S. epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner, distinct from its role in S. aureus.

  1. The Two-component System RsrS-RsrR Regulates the Tetrathionate Intermediate Pathway for Thiosulfate Oxidation in Acidithiobacillus caldus

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    Zhaobao Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acidithiobacillus caldus (A. caldus is a common bioleaching bacterium that possesses a sophisticated and highly efficient inorganic sulfur compound metabolism network. Thiosulfate, a central intermediate in the sulfur metabolism network of A. caldus and other sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms, can be metabolized via the tetrathionate intermediate (S4I pathway catalyzed by thiosulfate:quinol oxidoreductase (Tqo or DoxDA and tetrathionate hydrolase (TetH. In A. caldus, there is an additional two-component system called RsrS-RsrR. Since rsrS and rsrR are arranged as an operon with doxDA and tetH in the genome, we suggest that the regulation of the S4I pathway may occur via the RsrS-RsrR system. To examine the regulatory role of the two-component system RsrS-RsrR on the S4I pathway, ΔrsrR and ΔrsrS strains were constructed in A. caldus using a newly developed markerless gene knockout method. Transcriptional analysis of the tetH cluster in the wild type and mutant strains revealed positive regulation of the S4I pathway by the RsrS-RsrR system. A 19bp inverted repeat sequence (IRS, AACACCTGTTACACCTGTT located upstream of the tetH promoter was identified as the binding site for RsrR by using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs in vitro and promoter-probe vectors in vivo. In addition, ΔrsrR and ΔrsrS strains cultivated in K2S4O6- medium exhibited significant growth differences when compared with the wild type. Transcriptional analysis indicated that the absence of rsrS or rsrR had different effects on the expression of genes involved in sulfur metabolism and signaling systems. Finally, a model of tetrathionate sensing by RsrS, signal transduction via RsrR, and transcriptional activation of tetH-doxDA was proposed to provide insights towards the understanding of sulfur metabolism in A. caldus. This study also provided a powerful genetic tool for studies in A. caldus.

  2. Systematic mutation analysis of two-component signal transduction systems reveals EsrA-EsrB and PhoP-PhoQ as the major virulence regulators in Edwardsiella tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yuanzhi; Xiao, Jingfan; Liu, Qin; Wu, Haizhen; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao

    2012-05-25

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative broad-host-range pathogen that causes hemorrhagic septicemia in many commercially important fish species. Its ability to adapt to and thrive in diverse environments outside and inside of its hosts prompts us to investigate the roles of the previously identified 33 putative two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) in E. tarda. In this work, we successfully constructed deletion mutations in each of the response regulator genes, suggesting that none of the TCSs are essential for cell viability in E. tarda. The mutants were further examined for roles in biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, stress response, expression and secretion of proteins involved in either the type III secretion system (T3SS) or type VI secretion system (T6SS), as well as virulence. Through these assays, we identified four regulators of biofilm development, two regulators of antibiotic resistance, and four regulators involved in stress responses. We found that two regulators, EsrB and PhoP, are essential for the pathogenicity of E. tarda and further demonstrated that these two regulators have codependent and independent contributions to E. tarda virulence. Mutation of EsrB resulted in the complete loss of both the T3SS and T6SS proteins, while PhoP partially regulated the expression of T3SS and T6SS genes through EsrB, and was essential for resistance to antimicrobial peptides. This work suggested that these two response regulators are involved in the regulation of the complex virulence network of this bacterium and merit as candidate genes for live attenuated vaccine construction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural features of the two-component system LisR/LisK suggests multiple responses for the adaptation and survival of Listeria monocytogenes

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    Nelson Enrique Arenas Suarez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we characterized the structure of the two-component regulatory system, LisR/LisK, in Listeria monocytogenes. To predict the structure of both proteins and the relationship between them, we employed several bioinformatic tools and databases. Based on our results, LisK protein is embedded in the cell membrane and its modular composition (HAMP, histidine kinase and ATPase domains is associated with its autophosphorylation (His-266. A stimulus-response likely determines the sequential signal propagation from the bacterial cell surface to its cytoplasmic components. According to our results, LisR is a cytoplasmic protein with a receptor domain (homologous to CheY that comprises a phosphoacceptor residue (Asp-52 and a DNA-binding domain, which may allow the transmission of a specific transcriptional response. LisR/LisK has been experimentally characterized both biochemically andfunctionally in other Bacilli pathophysiology; our structure-function approach may facilitate the design of suitable inhibitors.

  4. A two-component micelle with emergent pH responsiveness by mixing dilauroyl phosphocholine and deoxycholic acid and its delivery of proteins into the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Noriko; Fujii, Shota; Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sakurai, Kazuo; Sakaguchi, Naoki; Koiwai, Kazunori

    2017-06-01

    Providing appropriate pH responsiveness for drug delivery nanoparticles is one of the major issues in developing a new generation of delivery systems. This paper reports that, when phosphocholine and a bile acid were mixed, the resultant two-component micelle gained pH responsiveness, while the individual components did not show any such responsiveness. The pH responsiveness was shown to be determined by the chemical structure, especially the positions and chirality of the OH groups, of the bile acid, and the sensitivity was determined by the alkyl chain length of the phosphocholine. The best combination for evading endocytosis was dilauroyl phosphocholine (DLPC) and deoxycholic acid (DA). Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed that the pH responsiveness was related to the change of surface hydrophobicity, namely, decreasing pH led to protonation of the carboxylic acid, resulting in aggregation of the preceding micelles. We assume that particles that become hydrophobic in this way can start interacting with the endocytotic bilayer, which eventually leads to rupture of the endocytotic vesicle. This mechanism is well supported by the finding that fluorescein-conjugated ovalbumin proteins were transported into the cytosol when they were co-administered with DLPC/DA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Receptor domains of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2011-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are found ubiquitously in prokaryotes, and in archaea, fungi, yeast and some plants, where they regulate physiologic and molecular processes at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Two-component systems sense changes in environmental conditions when a specific ligand binds to the receptor domain of the histidine kinase sensory component. The structures of many histidine kinase receptors are known, including those which sense extracellular and cytoplasmic signals. In this review, we discuss the basic architecture of two-component signalling circuits, including known system ligands, structure and function of both receptor and signalling domains, the chemistry of phosphotransfer, and cross-talk between different two-component pathways. Given the importance of these systems in regulating cellular responses, many biochemical techniques have been developed for their study and analysis. We therefore also review current methods used to study two-component signalling, including a new affinity-based proteomics approach used to study inducible resistance to the antibiotic vancomycin through the VanSR two-component signal transduction system.

  6. Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species

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    Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

  7. Cytokinin Regulates the Etioplast-Chloroplast Transition through the Two-Component Signaling System and Activation of Chloroplast-Related Genes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortleven, Anne; Marg, Ingke; Schlicke, Hagen; Hill, Kristine; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    One of the classical functions of the plant hormone cytokinin is the regulation of plastid development, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we employed a genetic approach to evaluate the role of cytokinin and its signaling pathway in the light-induced development of chloroplasts from etioplasts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Cytokinin increases the rate of greening and stimulates ultrastructural changes characteristic for the etioplast-to-chloroplast transition. The steady-state levels of metabolites of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway leading to the production of chlorophyll are enhanced by cytokinin. This effect of cytokinin on metabolite levels arises due to the modulation of expression for chlorophyll biosynthesis genes such as HEMA1, GUN4, GUN5, and CHLM. Increased expression of HEMA1 is reflected in an enhanced level of the encoded glutamyl-tRNA reductase, which catalyzes one of the rate-limiting steps of chlorophyll biosynthesis. Mutant analysis indicates that the cytokinin receptors ARABIDOPSIS HIS KINASE2 (AHK2) and AHK3 play a central role in this process. Furthermore, the B-type ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR1 (ARR1), ARR10, and ARR12 play an important role in mediating the transcriptional output during etioplast-chloroplast transition. B-type ARRs bind to the promotors of HEMA1 and LHCB6 genes, indicating that cytokinin-dependent transcription factors directly regulate genes of chlorophyll biosynthesis and the light harvesting complex. Together, these results demonstrate an important role for the cytokinin signaling pathway in chloroplast development, with the direct transcriptional regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis genes as a key aspect for this hormonal control. PMID:27388681

  8. Cytokinin Regulates the Etioplast-Chloroplast Transition through the Two-Component Signaling System and Activation of Chloroplast-Related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortleven, Anne; Marg, Ingke; Yamburenko, Maria V; Schlicke, Hagen; Hill, Kristine; Grimm, Bernhard; Schaller, G Eric; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    One of the classical functions of the plant hormone cytokinin is the regulation of plastid development, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we employed a genetic approach to evaluate the role of cytokinin and its signaling pathway in the light-induced development of chloroplasts from etioplasts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Cytokinin increases the rate of greening and stimulates ultrastructural changes characteristic for the etioplast-to-chloroplast transition. The steady-state levels of metabolites of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway leading to the production of chlorophyll are enhanced by cytokinin. This effect of cytokinin on metabolite levels arises due to the modulation of expression for chlorophyll biosynthesis genes such as HEMA1, GUN4, GUN5, and CHLM Increased expression of HEMA1 is reflected in an enhanced level of the encoded glutamyl-tRNA reductase, which catalyzes one of the rate-limiting steps of chlorophyll biosynthesis. Mutant analysis indicates that the cytokinin receptors ARABIDOPSIS HIS KINASE2 (AHK2) and AHK3 play a central role in this process. Furthermore, the B-type ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR1 (ARR1), ARR10, and ARR12 play an important role in mediating the transcriptional output during etioplast-chloroplast transition. B-type ARRs bind to the promotors of HEMA1 and LHCB6 genes, indicating that cytokinin-dependent transcription factors directly regulate genes of chlorophyll biosynthesis and the light harvesting complex. Together, these results demonstrate an important role for the cytokinin signaling pathway in chloroplast development, with the direct transcriptional regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis genes as a key aspect for this hormonal control. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  9. The ABC transporter HrtAB confers resistance to hemin toxicity and is regulated in a hemin-dependent manner by the ChrAS two-component system in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibb, Lori A; Schmitt, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the causative agent of the severe respiratory disease diphtheria, utilizes hemin and hemoglobin as iron sources for growth in iron-depleted environments. Because of the toxicity of high levels of hemin and iron, these compounds are often tightly regulated in bacterial systems. In this report, we identify and characterize the C. diphtheriae hrtAB genes, which encode a putative ABC type transporter involved in conferring resistance to the toxic effects of hemin. Deletion of the hrtAB genes in C. diphtheriae produced increased sensitivity to hemin, which was complemented by a plasmid harboring the cloned hrtAB locus. The HrtAB system was not involved in the uptake and use of hemin as an iron source. The hrtAB genes are located on the C. diphtheriae genome upstream from the chrSA operon, which encodes a previously characterized two-component signal transduction system that regulates gene expression in a heme-dependent manner. The hrtB promoter is activated by the ChrAS system in the presence of hemin or hemoglobin, and mutations in the chrSA genes abolish heme-activated expression from the hrtB promoter. It was also observed that transcription from the hrtB promoter is reduced in a dtxR deletion mutant, suggesting that DtxR is required for optimal expression of hrtAB. Previous studies proposed that the ChrS sensor kinase may be responsive to an environmental signal, such as hemin. We show that specific point mutations in the ChrS N-terminal transmembrane domain result in a reduced ability to activate the hrtB promoter in the presence of a heme source, suggesting that this putative sensor region is essential for the detection of a signal produced in response to hemin exposure. This study shows that the HrtAB system is required for protection from hemin toxicity and that expression of the hrtAB genes is regulated by the ChrAS two-component system. This study demonstrates a direct correlation between the detection of heme or a heme

  10. Regulation of the AbrA1/A2 two-component system in Streptomyces coelicolor and the potential of its deletion strain as a heterologous host for antibiotic production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rico

    Full Text Available The Two-Component System (TCS AbrA1/A2 from Streptomyces coelicolor M145 is a negative regulator of antibiotic production and morphological differentiation. In this work we show that it is able to auto-regulate its expression, exerting a positive induction of its own operon promoter, and that its activation is dependent on the presence of iron. The overexpression of the abrA2 response regulator (RR gene in the mutant ΔabrA1/A2 results in a toxic phenotype. The reason is an excess of phosphorylated AbrA2, as shown by phosphoablative and phosphomimetic AbrA2 mutants. Therefore, non-cognate histidine kinases (HKs or small phospho-donors may be responsible for AbrA2 phosphorylation in vivo. The results suggest that in the parent strain S. coelicolor M145 the correct amount of phosphorylated AbrA2 is adjusted through the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation activity rate of the HK AbrA1. Furthermore, the ABC transporter system, which is part of the four-gene operon comprising AbrA1/A2, is necessary to de-repress antibiotic production in the TCS null mutant. Finally, in order to test the possible biotechnological applications of the ΔabrA1/A2 strain, we demonstrate that the production of the antitumoral antibiotic oviedomycin is duplicated in this strain as compared with the production obtained in the wild type, showing that this strain is a good host for heterologous antibiotic production. Thus, this genetically modified strain could be interesting for the biotechnology industry.

  11. A two-component system, an anti-sigma factor and two paralogous ECF sigma factors are involved in the control of general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Rogério F; Kohler, Christian; Gomes, Suely L

    2011-06-01

    The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor σ(T) is the master regulator of general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus and controls the expression of its paralogue σ(U). In this work we showed that PhyR and NepR act, respectively, as positive and negative regulators of σ(T) expression and function. Biochemical data also demonstrated that NepR directly binds σ(T) and the phosphorylated form of PhyR. We also described the essential role of the histidine kinase gene CC3474, here denominated phyK, for expression of σ(T)-dependent genes and for resistance to stress conditions. Additionally, in vivo evidence of PhyK-dependent phosphorylation of PhyR is presented. This study also identified a conserved cysteine residue (C95) located in the periplasmic portion of PhyK that is crucial for the function of the protein. Furthermore, we showed that PhyK, PhyR and σ(T) regulate the same set of genes and that σ(T) apparently directly controls most of its regulon. In contrast, σ(U) seems to have a very modest contribution to the expression of a subset of σ(T)-dependent genes. In conclusion, this report describes the molecular mechanism involved in the control of general stress response in C. crescentus.

  12. Two-component mediated peroxide sensing and signal transduction in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Janet; Malakasi, Panagiota; Smith, Deborah A; Cheetham, Jill; Buck, Vicky; Millar, Jonathan B A; Morgan, Brian A

    2011-07-01

    Two-component related proteins play a major role in regulating the oxidative stress response in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For example, the peroxide-sensing Mak2 and Mak3 histidine kinases regulate H(2)O(2)-induced activation of the Sty1 stress-activated protein kinase pathway, and the Skn7-related response regulator transcription factor, Prr1, is essential for activation of the core oxidative stress response genes. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which the S. pombe two-component system senses H(2)O(2), and the potential role of two-component signaling in the regulation of Prr1. Significantly, we demonstrate that PAS and GAF domains present in the Mak2 histidine kinase are essential for redox-sensing and activation of Sty1. In addition, we find that Prr1 is required for the transcriptional response to a wide range of H(2)O(2) concentrations and, furthermore, that two-component regulation of Prr1 is specifically required for the response of cells to high levels of H(2)O(2). Significantly, this provides the first demonstration that the conserved two-component phosphorylation site on Skn7-related proteins influences resistance to oxidative stress and oxidative stress-induced gene expression. Collectively, these data provide new insights into the two-component mediated sensing and signaling mechanisms underlying the response of S. pombe to oxidative stress.

  13. Auxiliary phosphatases in two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversmith, Ruth E

    2010-04-01

    Signal termination in two-component systems occurs by loss of the phosphoryl group from the response regulator protein. This review explores our current understanding of the structures, catalytic mechanisms and means of regulation of the known families of phosphatases that catalyze response regulator dephosphorylation. The CheZ and CheC/CheX/FliY families, despite different overall structures, employ identical catalytic strategies using an amide side chain to orient a water molecule for in-line attack of the aspartyl phosphate. Spo0E phosphatases contain sequence and structural features that suggest a strategy similar to the chemotaxis phosphatases but the mechanism used by the Rap phosphatases is not yet elucidated. Identification of features shared by phosphatase families may aid in the identification of currently unrecognized classes of response regulator phosphatases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaction Analysis of a Two-Component System Using Nanodiscs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hörnschemeyer

    Full Text Available Two-component systems are the major means by which bacteria couple adaptation to environmental changes. All utilize a phosphorylation cascade from a histidine kinase to a response regulator, and some also employ an accessory protein. The system-wide signaling fidelity of two-component systems is based on preferential binding between the signaling proteins. However, information on the interaction kinetics between membrane embedded histidine kinase and its partner proteins is lacking. Here, we report the first analysis of the interactions between the full-length membrane-bound histidine kinase CpxA, which was reconstituted in nanodiscs, and its cognate response regulator CpxR and accessory protein CpxP. Using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy in combination with interaction map analysis, the affinity of membrane-embedded CpxA for CpxR was quantified, and found to increase by tenfold in the presence of ATP, suggesting that a considerable portion of phosphorylated CpxR might be stably associated with CpxA in vivo. Using microscale thermophoresis, the affinity between CpxA in nanodiscs and CpxP was determined to be substantially lower than that between CpxA and CpxR. Taken together, the quantitative interaction data extend our understanding of the signal transduction mechanism used by two-component systems.

  15. Feedback Control of Two-Component Regulatory Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, Eduardo A

    2016-09-08

    Two-component systems are a dominant form of bacterial signal transduction. The prototypical two-component system consists of a sensor that responds to a specific input(s) by modifying the output of a cognate regulator. Because the output of a two-component system is the amount of phosphorylated regulator, feedback mechanisms may alter the amount of regulator, and/or modify the ability of a sensor or other proteins to alter the phosphorylation state of the regulator. Two-component systems may display intrinsic feedback whereby the amount of phosphorylated regulator changes under constant inducing conditions and without the participation of additional proteins. Feedback control allows a two-component system to achieve particular steady-state levels, to reach a given steady state with distinct dynamics, to express coregulated genes in a given order, and to activate a regulator to different extents, depending on the signal acting on the sensor.

  16. Low-amplitude high frequency vibration down-regulates myostatin and atrogin-1 expression, two components of the atrophy pathway in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Benedetti, Laura; Galli, Daniela; Prè, Deborah; Silvani, Giulia; Crosetto, Nicola; Magenes, Giovanni; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella

    2014-05-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) is a very widespread mechanical stimulus used in physical therapy, rehabilitation and fitness centres. It has been demonstrated that vibration induces improvements in muscular strength and performance and increases bone density. We investigated the effects of low-amplitude, high frequency vibration (HFV) at the cellular and tissue levels in muscle. We developed a system to produce vibrations adapted to test several parameters in vitro and in vivo. For in vivo experiments, we used newborn CD1 wild-type mice, for in vitro experiments, we isolated satellite cells from 6-day-old CD1 mice, while for proliferation studies, we used murine cell lines. Animals and cells were treated with high frequency vibration at 30 Hz. We analyzed the effects of mechanical stimulation on muscle hypertrophy/atrophy pathways, fusion enhancement of myoblast cells and modifications in the proliferation rate of cells. Results demonstrated that mechanical vibration strongly down-regulates atrophy genes both in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro experiments indicated that mechanical stimulation promotes fusion of satellite cells treated directly in culture compared to controls. Finally, proliferation experiments indicated that stimulated cells had a decreased growth rate compared to controls. We concluded that vibration treatment at 30 Hz is effective in suppressing the atrophy pathway both in vivo and in vitro and enhances fusion of satellite muscle cells.

  17. Chloroplast two-component systems: evolution of the link between photosynthesis and gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Allen, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction, consisting of sensor kinases and response regulators, is the predominant signalling mechanism in bacteria. This signalling system originated in prokaryotes and has spread throughout the eukaryotic domain of life through endosymbiotic, lateral gene transfer from the bacterial ancestors and early evolutionary precursors of eukaryotic, cytoplasmic, bioenergetic organelles—chloroplasts and mitochondria. Until recently, it was thought that two-component systems i...

  18. Rewiring the specificity of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Perchuk, Barrett S; Siryaporn, Albert; Lubin, Emma A; Ashenberg, Orr; Goulian, Mark; Laub, Michael T

    2008-06-13

    Two-component signal transduction systems are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Bacteria often employ tens or hundreds of these paralogous signaling systems, comprised of histidine kinases (HKs) and their cognate response regulators (RRs). Faithful transmission of information through these signaling pathways and avoidance of detrimental crosstalk demand exquisite specificity of HK-RR interactions. To identify the determinants of two-component signaling specificity, we examined patterns of amino acid coevolution in large, multiple sequence alignments of cognate kinase-regulator pairs. Guided by these results, we demonstrate that a subset of the coevolving residues is sufficient, when mutated, to completely switch the substrate specificity of the kinase EnvZ. Our results shed light on the basis of molecular discrimination in two-component signaling pathways, provide a general approach for the rational rewiring of these pathways, and suggest that analyses of coevolution may facilitate the reprogramming of other signaling systems and protein-protein interactions.

  19. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: A stochastic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation.

  20. Dual Control of Sinorhizobium meliloti RpoE2 Sigma Factor Activity by Two PhyR-Type Two-Component Response Regulators▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Bastiat, Bénédicte; Sauviac, Laurent; Bruand, Claude

    2010-01-01

    RpoE2 is an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor involved in the general stress response of Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the legume plant alfalfa. RpoE2 orthologues are widely found among alphaproteobacteria, where they play various roles in stress resistance and/or host colonization. In this paper, we report a genetic and biochemical investigation of the mechanisms of signal transduction leading to S. meliloti RpoE2 activation in response to stress. We show...

  1. The multi-step phosphorelay mechanism of unorthodox two-component systems in E. coli realizes ultrasensitivity to stimuli while maintaining robustness to noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Rae; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2006-12-01

    E. coli has two-component systems composed of histidine kinase proteins and response regulator proteins. For a given extracellular stimulus, a histidine kinase senses the stimulus, autophosphorylates and then passes the phosphates to the cognate response regulators. The histidine kinase in an orthodox two-component system has only one histidine domain where the autophosphorylation occurs, but a histidine kinase in some unusual two-component systems (unorthodox two-component systems) has two histidine domains and one aspartate domain. So, the unorthodox two-component systems have more complex phosphorelay mechanisms than orthodox two-component systems. In general, the two-component systems are required to promptly respond to external stimuli for survival of E. coli. In this respect, the complex multi-step phosphorelay mechanism seems to be disadvantageous, but there are several unorthodox two-component systems in E. coli. In this paper, we investigate the reason why such unorthodox two-component systems are present in E. coli. For this purpose, we have developed simplified mathematical models of both orthodox and unorthodox two-component systems and analyzed their dynamical characteristics through extensive computer simulations. We have finally revealed that the unorthodox two-component systems realize ultrasensitive responses to external stimuli and also more robust responses to noises than the orthodox two-component systems.

  2. Evolution of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Emily J; Laub, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    To exist in a wide range of environmental niches, bacteria must sense and respond to a variety of external signals. A primary means by which this occurs is through two-component signal transduction pathways, typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase that receives the input stimuli and then phosphorylates a response regulator that effects an appropriate change in cellular physiology. Histidine kinases and response regulators have an intrinsic modularity that separates signal input, phosphotransfer, and output response; this modularity has allowed bacteria to dramatically expand and diversify their signaling capabilities. Recent work has begun to reveal the molecular basis by which two-component proteins evolve. How and why do orthologous signaling proteins diverge? How do cells gain new pathways and recognize new signals? What changes are needed to insulate a new pathway from existing pathways? What constraints are there on gene duplication and lateral gene transfer? Here, we review progress made in answering these questions, highlighting how the integration of genome sequence data with experimental studies is providing major new insights.

  3. The Evolution of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Emily J.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    To exist in a wide range of environmental niches, bacteria must sense and respond to a myriad of external signals. A primary means by which this occurs is through two-component signal transduction pathways, typically comprised of a histidine kinase that receives the input stimuli and a response regulator that effects an appropriate change in cellular physiology. Histidine kinases and response regulators have an intrinsic modularity that separates signal input, phosphotransfer, and output response; this modularity has allowed bacteria to dramatically expand and diversify their signaling capabilities. Recent work has begun to reveal the molecular basis by which two-component proteins evolve. How and why do orthologous signaling proteins diverge? How do cells gain new pathways and recognize new signals? What changes are needed to insulate a new pathway from existing pathways? What constraints are there on gene duplication and lateral gene transfer? Here, we review progress made in answering these questions, highlighting how the integration of genome sequence data with experimental studies is providing major new insights. PMID:22746333

  4. Two-component PhoB-PhoR regulatory system and ferric uptake regulator sense phosphate and iron to control virulence genes in type III and VI secretion systems of Edwardsiella tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Smarajit; Sivaraman, J; Leung, Ka Yin; Mok, Yu-Keung

    2011-11-11

    Inorganic phosphate (P(i)) and iron are essential nutrients that are depleted by vertebrates as a protective mechanism against bacterial infection. This depletion, however, is sensed by some pathogens as a signal to turn on the expression of virulence genes. Here, we show that the PhoB-PhoR two-component system senses changes in P(i) concentration, whereas the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) senses changes in iron concentration in Edwardsiella tarda PPD130/91 to regulate the expression of type III and VI secretion systems (T3SS and T6SS) through an E. tarda secretion regulator, EsrC. In sensing low P(i) concentration, PhoB-PhoR autoregulates and activates the phosphate-specific transport operon, pstSCAB-phoU, by binding directly to the Pho box in the promoters of phoB and pstS. PhoB also binds with EsrC simultaneously on the promoter of an E. tarda virulence protein, evpA, to regulate directly the transcription of genes from T6SS. In addition, PhoB requires and interacts with PhoU to activate esrC and suppress fur indirectly through unidentified regulators. Fur, on the other hand, senses high iron concentration and binds directly to the Fur box in the promoter of evpP to inhibit EsrC binding to the same region. In addition, Fur suppresses transcription of phoB, pstSCAB-phoU, and esrC indirectly via unidentified regulators, suggesting negative cross-talk with the Pho regulon. Physical interactions exist between Fur and PhoU and between Fur and EsrC. Our findings suggest that T3SS and T6SS may carry out distinct roles in the pathogenicity of E. tarda by responding to different environmental factors.

  5. Two component theory and electron magnetic moment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The two-component formulation of quantum electrodynamics is studied. The relation with the usual Dirac formulation is exhibited, and the Feynman rules for the two-component form of the theory are presented in terms of familiar objects. The transformation from the Dirac theory to the two-component th

  6. Two component theory and electron magnetic moment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The two-component formulation of quantum electrodynamics is studied. The relation with the usual Dirac formulation is exhibited, and the Feynman rules for the two-component form of the theory are presented in terms of familiar objects. The transformation from the Dirac theory to the two-component

  7. In vivo study of the two-component signaling network in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms commonly use ‘two-component’ signaling systems for sensing environmental conditions, with members being present in nearly all bacterial and archaeal genomes in different numbers. Prototypical two-component systems are comprised of a sensory histidine kinase and a response regulator protein that is phosphorylated by the kinase. The regulator typically acts as a transcription factor regulating gene expression. Due to their prevalence in microorganisms, a basic understanding of th...

  8. Complement-mediated opsonization of invasive group A Streptococcus pyogenes strain AP53 is regulated by the bacterial two-component cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovRS) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, Garima; Liang, Zhong; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Balsara, Rashna D; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2013-09-20

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) strain AP53 is a primary isolate from a patient with necrotizing fasciitis. These AP53 cells contain an inactivating mutation in the sensor component of the cluster of virulence (cov) responder (R)/sensor (S) two-component gene regulatory system (covRS), which enhances the virulence of the primary strain, AP53/covR(+)S(-). However, specific mechanisms by which the covRS system regulates the survival of GAS in humans are incomplete. Here, we show a key role for covRS in the regulation of opsonophagocytosis of AP53 by human neutrophils. AP53/covR(+)S(-) cells displayed potent binding of host complement inhibitors of C3 convertase, viz. Factor H (FH) and C4-binding protein (C4BP), which concomitantly led to minimal C3b deposition on AP53 cells, further showing that these plasma protein inhibitors are active on GAS cells. This resulted in weak killing of the bacteria by human neutrophils and a corresponding high death rate of mice after injection of these cells. After targeted allelic alteration of covS(-) to wild-type covS (covS(+)), a dramatic loss of FH and C4BP binding to the AP53/covR(+)S(+) cells was observed. This resulted in elevated C3b deposition on AP53/covR(+)S(+) cells, a high level of opsonophagocytosis by human neutrophils, and a very low death rate of mice infected with AP53/covR(+)S(+). We show that covRS is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes directing AP53 killing by neutrophils and regulates the levels of the receptors for FH and C4BP, which we identify as the products of the fba and enn genes, respectively.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Two-Component Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Keidel, Victoria; Szurmant, Hendrik

    2016-09-25

    Two-component systems (TCS) comprising sensor histidine kinases and response regulator proteins are among the most important players in bacterial and archaeal signal transduction and also occur in reduced numbers in some eukaryotic organisms. Given their importance to cellular survival, virulence, and cellular development, these systems are among the most scrutinized bacterial proteins. In the recent years, a flurry of bioinformatics, genetic, biochemical, and structural studies have provided detailed insights into many molecular mechanisms that underlie the detection of signals and the generation of the appropriate response by TCS. Importantly, it has become clear that there is significant diversity in the mechanisms employed by individual systems. This review discusses the current knowledge on common themes and divergences from the paradigm of TCS signaling. An emphasis is on the information gained by a flurry of recent structural and bioinformatics studies.

  10. Comparative analysis of wolbachia genomes reveals streamlining and divergence of minimalist two-component systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Steen; Serbus, Laura Renee

    2015-03-24

    Two-component regulatory systems are commonly used by bacteria to coordinate intracellular responses with environmental cues. These systems are composed of functional protein pairs consisting of a sensor histidine kinase and cognate response regulator. In contrast to the well-studied Caulobacter crescentus system, which carries dozens of these pairs, the streamlined bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis encodes only two pairs: CckA/CtrA and PleC/PleD. Here, we used bioinformatic tools to compare characterized two-component system relays from C. crescentus, the related Anaplasmataceae species Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and 12 sequenced Wolbachia strains. We found the core protein pairs and a subset of interacting partners to be highly conserved within Wolbachia and these other Anaplasmataceae. Genes involved in two-component signaling were positioned differently within the various Wolbachia genomes, whereas the local context of each gene was conserved. Unlike Anaplasma and Ehrlichia, Wolbachia two-component genes were more consistently found clustered with metabolic genes. The domain architecture and key functional residues standard for two-component system proteins were well-conserved in Wolbachia, although residues that specify cognate pairing diverged substantially from other Anaplasmataceae. These findings indicate that Wolbachia two-component signaling pairs share considerable functional overlap with other α-proteobacterial systems, whereas their divergence suggests the potential for regulatory differences and cross-talk.

  11. The mechanism of signal transduction by two-component systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Two-component systems, composed of a homodimeric histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), are major signal transduction devices in bacteria. Typically the signal triggers HK autophosphorylation at one His residue, followed by phosphoryl transfer from the phospho-His to an Asp residue in the RR. Signal extinction frequently involves phospho-RR dephosphorylation by a phosphatase activity of the HK. Our understanding of these reactions and of the determinants of partner specificity among HK-RR couples has been greatly increased by recent crystal structures and biochemical experiments on HK-RR complexes. Cis-autophosphorylation (one subunit phosphorylates itself) occurs in some HKs while trans-autophosphorylation takes place in others. We review and integrate this new information, discuss the mechanism of the three reactions and propose a model for transmembrane signaling by these systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Determinants of specificity in two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Maintaining the faithful flow of information through signal transduction pathways is critical to the survival and proliferation of organisms. This problem is particularly challenging as many signaling proteins are part of large, paralogous families that are highly similar at the sequence and structural levels, increasing the risk of unwanted cross-talk. To detect environmental signals and process information, bacteria rely heavily on two-component signaling systems comprised of sensor histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators. Although most species encode dozens of these signaling pathways, there is relatively little cross-talk, indicating that individual pathways are well insulated and highly specific. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that enforce this specificity. Further, we highlight recent studies that have revealed how these mechanisms evolve to accommodate the introduction of new pathways by gene duplication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xingguo; HUANG Wei; WU Qingyu

    2006-01-01

    Two-component systems are signal transduction systems which enable bacteria to regulate cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. The unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has become a model organism for a range of biochemical and molecular biology studies aiming at investigating environmental stress response. The publication of the complete genome sequence of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 provided a tremendous stimulus for research in this field, and at least 80 open reading frames were identified as members of the two-component signal transduction systems in this single species of cyanobacteria. To date, functional roles have been determined for only a limited number of such proteins. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the two-component signal transduction systems in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and describes recent achievements in elucidating the functional roles of these systems.

  14. Two-component Duality and Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Freund, Peter G O

    2007-01-01

    A phenomenologically successful two-component hadronic duality picture led to Veneziano's amplitude, the fundamental first step to string theory. This picture is briefly recalled and its two components are identified as the open strings (mesons and baryons) and closed strings (Pomeron).

  15. Two component systems: physiological effect of a third component.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldiri Salvado

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems mediate the response and adaptation of organisms to environmental changes. In prokaryotes, this signal transduction is often done through Two Component Systems (TCS. These TCS are phosphotransfer protein cascades, and in their prototypical form they are composed by a kinase that senses the environmental signals (SK and by a response regulator (RR that regulates the cellular response. This basic motif can be modified by the addition of a third protein that interacts either with the SK or the RR in a way that could change the dynamic response of the TCS module. In this work we aim at understanding the effect of such an additional protein (which we call "third component" on the functional properties of a prototypical TCS. To do so we build mathematical models of TCS with alternative designs for their interaction with that third component. These mathematical models are analyzed in order to identify the differences in dynamic behavior inherent to each design, with respect to functionally relevant properties such as sensitivity to changes in either the parameter values or the molecular concentrations, temporal responsiveness, possibility of multiple steady states, or stochastic fluctuations in the system. The differences are then correlated to the physiological requirements that impinge on the functioning of the TCS. This analysis sheds light on both, the dynamic behavior of synthetically designed TCS, and the conditions under which natural selection might favor each of the designs. We find that a third component that modulates SK activity increases the parameter space where a bistable response of the TCS module to signals is possible, if SK is monofunctional, but decreases it when the SK is bifunctional. The presence of a third component that modulates RR activity decreases the parameter space where a bistable response of the TCS module to signals is possible.

  16. Tobacco two-component gene NTHK2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By using a previously isolated tobacco two- component gene NTHK1 as a probe, we screened a cDNA library and obtained a homologous gene designated NTHK2. Sequencing analysis revealed that NTHK2 encoded a putative ethylene receptor homolog and contained a histidine kinase domain and a receiver domain. In the histidine kinase domain, the histidine at the phosphorylation site was replaced by an asparagine. Southern analysis indicated that NTHK2 was present at low copies in tobacco genome. The expression of NTHK2 was studied using a competitive RT-PCR method. It was found that, in young flower buds, NTHK2 was expressed abundantly, while in other organs or tissues, it was expressed in a low level. When leaf was subjected to wounding (cutting) treatment, NTHK2 expression was increased. When tobacco seedlings were stressed with PEG and heat shock, NTHK2 transcription was also enhanced. Other treatments showed little effects. These results indicated that NTHK2 might be involved in the developmental processes and in plant responses to some environmental stresses.

  17. General aspects of two-component regulatory circuits in bacteria: Domains, signals and roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Mondragón-Jaimes, Verónica; Franco, Bernardo

    2016-08-09

    All living organisms are subject to changing environments, which must be sensed in order to respond swiftly and efficiently. Two-component systems (TCS) are signal transduction regulatory circuits based typically on a membrane bound sensor kinase and a cytoplasmic response regulator, that is activated through a histidine to aspartate phosphorelay reactions. Activated response regulator acts usually as a transcription factor. The best known examples were identified in bacteria, but they are also found in fungi, algae and plants. Thus far, they are not found in mammals. Regulatory circuits coupled to two-component systems exhibit a myriad of responses to environmental stimuli such as: redox potential, pH, specific metabolites, pressure, light and more recently to specific antimicrobial peptides that activate a sensor kinase responsible for expressing virulence factors through the active response regulator. In this review we explore general aspects on two-component systems that ultimately can play a role on virulence regulation, also the intriguing domain properties of the sensor kinases that can be a potential target for antimicrobial compounds. Only a handful of sensor kinases are extensively characterized, the vast majority belong to what we call 'the dark matter of bacterial signal transduction' since no known signal, structure and biochemical properties are available. Regulatory circuits from vertebrate pathogenic organisms can explain virulence in terms of either response to environmental factors or specific niche occupancy. Hopefully, knowledge on these signal transduction systems can lead to identify novel molecules that target two-component systems, since the increase of drug resistant microorganisms is worrisome.

  18. Inhibitors targeting two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2008-01-01

    A two-component signal transduction system (TCS) is an attractive target for antibacterial agents. In this chapter, we review the TCS inhibitors developed during the past decade and introduce novel drug discovery systems to isolate the inhibitors of the YycG/YycF system, an essential TCS for bacterial growth, in an effort to develop a new class of antibacterial agents.

  19. Dynamical principles of two-component genetic oscillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Guantes

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic oscillators based on the interaction of a small set of molecular components have been shown to be involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, the circadian rhythms, or the response of several signaling pathways. Uncovering the functional properties of such oscillators then becomes important for the understanding of these cellular processes and for the characterization of fundamental properties of more complex clocks. Here, we show how the dynamics of a minimal two-component oscillator is drastically affected by its genetic implementation. We consider a repressor and activator element combined in a simple logical motif. While activation is always exerted at the transcriptional level, repression is alternatively operating at the transcriptional (Design I or post-translational (Design II level. These designs display differences on basic oscillatory features and on their behavior with respect to molecular noise or entrainment by periodic signals. In particular, Design I induces oscillations with large activator amplitudes and arbitrarily small frequencies, and acts as an "integrator" of external stimuli, while Design II shows emergence of oscillations with finite, and less variable, frequencies and smaller amplitudes, and detects better frequency-encoded signals ("resonator". Similar types of stimulus response are observed in neurons, and thus this work enables us to connect very different biological contexts. These dynamical principles are relevant for the characterization of the physiological roles of simple oscillator motifs, the understanding of core machineries of complex clocks, and the bio-engineering of synthetic oscillatory circuits.

  20. Antibody responses to Bordetella pertussis Fim2 or Fim3 following immunization with a whole-cell, two-component, or five-component acellular pertussis vaccine and following pertussis disease in children in Sweden in 1997 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallander, Hans; Advani, Abdolreza; Alexander, Frances; Gustafsson, Lennart; Ljungman, Margaretha; Pratt, Catherine; Hall, Ian; Gorringe, Andrew R

    2014-02-01

    Bordetella pertussis fimbriae (Fim2 and Fim3) are components of a five-component acellular pertussis vaccine (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine [DTaP5]), and antibody responses to fimbriae have been associated with protection. We analyzed the IgG responses to individual Fim2 and Fim3 in sera remaining from a Swedish placebo-controlled efficacy trial that compared a whole-cell vaccine (diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis vaccine [DTwP]), a two-component acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP2), and DTaP5. One month following three doses of the Fim-containing vaccines (DTwP or DTaP5), anti-Fim2 geometric mean IgG concentrations were higher than those for anti-Fim3, with a greater anti-Fim2/anti-Fim3 IgG ratio elicited by DTaP5. We also determined the responses in vaccinated children following an episode of pertussis. Those who received DTaP5 showed a large rise in anti-Fim2 IgG, reflecting the predominant Fim2 serotype at the time. In contrast, those who received DTwP showed an equal rise in anti-Fim2 and anti-Fim3 IgG concentrations, indicating that DTwP may provide a more efficient priming effect for a Fim3 response following contact with B. pertussis. Anti-Fim2 and anti-Fim3 IgG concentrations were also determined in samples from two seroprevalence studies conducted in Sweden in 1997, when no pertussis vaccine was used and Fim2 isolates predominated, and in 2007, when either DTaP2 or DTaP3 without fimbriae was used and Fim3 isolates predominated. Very similar distributions of anti-Fim2 and anti-Fim3 IgG concentrations were obtained in 1997 and 2007, except that anti-Fim3 concentrations in 1997 were lower. This observation, together with the numbers of individuals with both anti-Fim2 and anti-Fim3 IgG concentrations, strongly suggests that B. pertussis expresses both Fim2 and Fim3 during infection.

  1. A novel two-component system involved in the transition to secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rozas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial two-component signal transduction regulatory systems are the major set of signalling proteins frequently mediating responses to changes in the environment. They typically consist of a sensor, a membrane-associated histidine kinase and a cytoplasmic response regulator. The membrane-associated sensor detects the environmental signal or stress, whereas the cytoplasmic regulatory protein controls the cellular response usually by gene transcription modulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPALFINDINGS: The Streptomyces coelicolor two genes operon SCO5784-SCO5785 encodes a two-component system, where SCO5784 encodes a histidine-kinase sensor and SCO5785 encodes a response regulator protein. When the expression level of the regulator gene decreases, the antibiotic synthesis and sporulation is delayed temporarily in addition to some ribosomal genes became up regulated, whereas the propagation of the regulatory gene in high copy number results in the earlier synthesis of antibiotics and sporulation, as well as the down regulation of some ribosomal genes and, moreover, in the overproduction of several extracellular proteins. Therefore, this two-component system in S. coelicolor seems to influence various processes characterised by the transition from primary to secondary metabolism, as determined by proteomic and transcriptomic analyses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Propagation of SCO5785 in multicopy enhances the production of antibiotics as well as secretory proteins. In particular, the increase in the expression level of secretory protein encoding genes, either as an artefactual or real effect of the regulator, could be of potential usefulness when using Streptomyces strains as hosts for homologous or heterologous extracellular protein production.

  2. Engineering bacterial two-component system PmrA/PmrB to sense lanthanide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Haihua; Deng, Xin; Bosscher, Mike; Ji, Quanjiang; Jensen, Mark P; He, Chuan

    2013-02-13

    The Salmonella PmrA/PmrB two-component system uses an iron(III)-binding motif on the cell surface to sense the environmental or host ferric level and regulate PmrA-controlled gene expression. We replaced the iron(III)-binding motif with a lanthanide-binding peptide sequence that is known to selectively recognize trivalent lanthanide ions. The newly engineered two-component system (PmrA/PmrB) can effectively sense lanthanide ion and regulate gene expression in E. coli . This work not only provides the first known lanthanide-based sensing and response in live cells but also demonstrates that the PmrA/PmrB system is a suitable template for future synthetic biology efforts to construct bacteria that can sense and respond to other metal ions in remediation or sequestration.

  3. Two-component Abelian sandpile models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, F C; Pyatov, P; Rittenberg, V

    2009-04-01

    In one-component Abelian sandpile models, the toppling probabilities are independent quantities. This is not the case in multicomponent models. The condition of associativity of the underlying Abelian algebras imposes nonlinear relations among the toppling probabilities. These relations are derived for the case of two-component quadratic Abelian algebras. We show that Abelian sandpile models with two conservation laws have only trivial avalanches.

  4. Use of two-component signal transduction systems in the construction of synthetic genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninfa, Alexander J

    2010-04-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are a common type of signaling system in prokaryotes; the typical cell has dozens of systems regulating aspects of physiology and controlling responses to environmental conditions. In this review, I consider how these systems may be useful for engineering novel cell functions. Examples of successful incorporation of two-component systems into engineered systems are noted, and features of the systems that favor or hinder potential future use of these signaling systems for synthetic biology applications are discussed. The focus will be on the engineering of novel couplings of sensory functions to signaling outputs. Recent successes in this area are noted, such as the development of light-sensitive transmitter proteins and chemotactic receptors responsive to nitrate. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Two-Component System CesRK Controls the Transcriptional Induction of Cell Envelope-Related Genes in Listeria monocytogenes in Response to Cell Wall-Acting Antibiotics▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Bygebjerg-Hove, Iver; Bonde, Mette; Nielsen, Pia Kiil; Nguyen, Thanh Ha; Gravesen, Anne; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.

    2008-01-01

    The two-component system CesRK of Listeria monocytogenes responds to cell wall-acting antibiotics. We show here that CesRK controls the transcription of several cell envelope-related genes. The CesRK-dependent induction of these genes may be viewed as an attempt by L. monocytogenes to protect itself against the damaging effects of cell wall-acting antibiotics. PMID:18456805

  6. The two-component system CesRK controls the transcriptional induction of cell envelope-related genes in Listeria monocytogenes in response to cell wall-acting antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Bygebjerg-Hove, Iver; Bonde, Mette; Nielsen, Pia Kiil; Nguyen, Thanh Ha; Gravesen, Anne; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H

    2008-07-01

    The two-component system CesRK of Listeria monocytogenes responds to cell wall-acting antibiotics. We show here that CesRK controls the transcription of several cell envelope-related genes. The CesRK-dependent induction of these genes may be viewed as an attempt by L. monocytogenes to protect itself against the damaging effects of cell wall-acting antibiotics.

  7. Two-component model of solar plages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Jianping(李建平); DING; Mingde(丁明德); FANG; Cheng(方成)

    2002-01-01

    By use of the 2-m Mcmath-Pierce telescope at Kitt Peak, the high-quality spectra of a plage with moderate brightness near the center of solar disk were obtained. The data include seven spectral lines, which are Hα, Hβ, CaII H and K lines and the infrared triplet. With the consideration of fine structures of solar plages, a two-component atmospheric model is constructed by keeping the cool component to be the quiet atmosphere. Three cases of the hot component are given for different filling factors where the temperature and density distribution are adjusted in order to reproduce the seven observed spectral profiles. We also briefly discuss the influence of the column density at the base of the corona, m0, and the macro-turbulent velocity on the required filling factor and computed profiles. The two-component model is compared with precious one-component semi-empirical models. The limitation of the model is pointed out and further improvement is indicated.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes response regulators important for stress tolerance and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, B H; Ingmer, H

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sensing by two-component signal transduction systems is likely to play a role for growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes both during transmission in food products and within a host organism. Two-component systems typically consist of a membrane-associated sensor histidine...... kinase and a gene regulatory protein, the response regulator (RR). We have identified seven putative RR genes in L. monocytogenes LO28 by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotide primers. By insertional inactivation we obtained data suggesting that three of the putative RRs contribute to the pathogenicity...... of L. monocytogenes in mice. Strikingly, the mutants that were attenuated in virulence also had a decreased ability to grow in the presence of various stress conditions potentially encountered in an infection process. Thus, our data point to a connection between the ability of the putative two...

  9. Structural insight into partner specificity and phosphoryl transfer in two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2009-10-16

    The chief mechanism used by bacteria for sensing their environment is based on two conserved proteins: a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and an effector response regulator (RR). The signal transduction process involves highly conserved domains of both proteins that mediate autokinase, phosphotransfer, and phosphatase activities whose output is a finely tuned RR phosphorylation level. Here, we report the structure of the complex between the entire cytoplasmic portion of Thermotoga maritima class I HK853 and its cognate, RR468, as well as the structure of the isolated RR468, both free and BeF(3)(-) bound. Our results provide insight into partner specificity in two-component systems, recognition of the phosphorylation state of each partner, and the catalytic mechanism of the phosphatase reaction. Biochemical analysis shows that the HK853-catalyzed autokinase reaction proceeds by a cis autophosphorylation mechanism within the HK subunit. The results suggest a model for the signal transduction mechanism in two-component systems.

  10. Dam methylation participates in the regulation of PmrA/PmrB and RcsC/RcsD/RcsB two component regulatory systems in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Hernán Sarnacki

    Full Text Available The absence of Dam in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a defect in lipopolysaccharide (LPS pattern associated to a reduced expression of wzz gene. Wzz is the chain length regulator of the LPS O-antigen. Here we investigated whether Dam regulates wzz gene expression through its two known regulators, PmrA and RcsB. Thus, the expression of rcsB and pmrA was monitored by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting using fusions with 3×FLAG tag in wild type (wt and dam strains of S. Enteritidis. Dam regulated the expression of both rcsB and pmrA genes; nevertheless, the defect in LPS pattern was only related to a diminished expression of RcsB. Interestingly, regulation of wzz in serovar Enteritidis differed from that reported earlier for serovar Typhimurium; RcsB induces wzz expression in both serovars, whereas PmrA induces wzz in S. Typhimurium but represses it in serovar Enteritidis. Moreover, we found that in S. Enteritidis there is an interaction between both wzz regulators: RcsB stimulates the expression of pmrA and PmrA represses the expression of rcsB. Our results would be an example of differential regulation of orthologous genes expression, providing differences in phenotypic traits between closely related bacterial serovars.

  11. Two-Component Description for Relativistic Fermions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Qi; SANG Wen-Long; YANG Lan-Fei

    2009-01-01

    We propose a two-component form to describe massive relativistic fermions in gauge theories. Relations between the Green's functions in this form and those in the conventional four-component form are derived. It is shown that the S-matrix elements in both forms are exactly the same. The description of the fermion in the new form simplifies significantly the γ-matrix algebra in the four-component form. In particular, in perturbative calculations the propagator of the fermion is a scalar function. As examples, we use this form to reproduce the relativistic spectrum of hydrodron atom, the S-matrix of e+ e-→μ+ μ- and QED one-loop vacuum polarization of photon.

  12. Dam Methylation Participates in the Regulation of PmrA/ PmrB and RcsC/RcsD/RcsB Two Component Regulatory Systems in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastián Hernán Sarnacki; María del Rosario Aya Castañeda; Mariángeles Noto Llana; Mónica Nancy Giacomodonato; Miguel Ángel Valvano; María Cristina Cerquetti

    2015-01-01

    The absence of Dam in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a defect in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pattern associated to a reduced expression of wzz gene. Wzz is the chain length regulator of the LPS O-antigen. Here we investigated whether Dam regulates wzz gene expression through its two known regulators, PmrA and RcsB. Thus, the expression of rcsB and pmrA was monitored by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting using fusions with 36FLAG tag in wild type (wt) and dam s...

  13. A Two-Component Regulatory System Integrates Redox State and Population Density Sensing in Pseudomonas putida▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Ramos, Juan Luis; Rodríguez-Herva, José Juan; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    A two-component system formed by a sensor histidine kinase and a response regulator has been identified as an element participating in cell density signal transduction in Pseudomonas putida KT2440. It is a homolog of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa RoxS/RoxR system, which in turn belongs to the RegA/RegB family, described in photosynthetic bacteria as a key regulatory element. In KT2440, the two components are encoded by PP_0887 (roxS) and PP_0888 (roxR), which are transcribed in a single unit. Ch...

  14. The Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria citH gene is expressed early in the infection process of tomato and is positively regulated by the TctDE two-component regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir-Ariel, Dafna; Rosenberg, Tally; Burdman, Saul

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease of tomato and pepper. Previously, we have reported the adaptation of a recombinase- or resolvase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET) approach to identify Xcv genes that are specifically induced during its interaction with tomato. Analysis of some of these genes revealed that a citH (citrate transporter) homologous gene contributes to Xcv virulence on tomato. Here, we demonstrate that the citH product indeed facilitates citrate uptake by showing the following: citH is specifically needed for Xcv growth in citrate, but not in other carbon sources; the citH promoter is specifically induced by citrate; and the concentration of citrate from tomato leaf apoplast is considerably reduced following growth of the wild-type and a citH-complemented strain, but not the citH mutant. We also show that, in the Xcv-tomato interaction, the promoter activity of the citH gene is induced as early as 2.5h after Xcv is syringe infiltrated into tomato leaves, and continues to be active for at least 96h after inoculation. We identified an operon containing a two-component regulatory system homologous to tctD/tctE influencing citH expression in Xcv, as well as its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The expression of hrp genes does not seem to be affected in the citH mutant, and this mutant cannot be complemented for growth in planta when co-inoculated with the wild-type strain, indicating that citrate uptake in the apoplast is important for the virulence of Xcv.

  15. Specificity residues determine binding affinity for two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Jonathan W; Tiwari, Nitija; Müller, Susanne; Hummels, Katherine R; Houtman, Jon C D; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Kirby, John R

    2013-11-05

    Two-component systems (TCS) comprise histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators and allow bacteria to sense and respond to a wide variety of signals. Histidine kinases (HKs) phosphorylate and dephosphorylate their cognate response regulators (RRs) in response to stimuli. In general, these reactions appear to be highly specific and require an appropriate association between the HK and RR proteins. The Myxococcus xanthus genome encodes one of the largest repertoires of signaling proteins in bacteria (685 open reading frames [ORFs]), including at least 127 HKs and at least 143 RRs. Of these, 27 are bona fide NtrC-family response regulators, 21 of which are encoded adjacent to their predicted cognate kinases. Using system-wide profiling methods, we determined that the HK-NtrC RR pairs display a kinetic preference during both phosphotransfer and phosphatase functions, thereby defining cognate signaling systems in M. xanthus. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicated that cognate HK-RR pairs interact with dissociation constants (Kd) of approximately 1 µM, while noncognate pairs had no measurable binding. Lastly, a chimera generated between the histidine kinase, CrdS, and HK1190 revealed that residues conferring phosphotransfer and phosphatase specificity dictate binding affinity, thereby establishing discrete protein-protein interactions which prevent cross talk. The data indicate that binding affinity is a critical parameter governing system-wide signaling fidelity for bacterial signal transduction proteins. Using in vitro phosphotransfer and phosphatase profiling assays and isothermal titration calorimetry, we have taken a system-wide approach to demonstrate specificity for a family of two-component signaling proteins in Myxococcus xanthus. Our results demonstrate that previously identified specificity residues dictate binding affinity and that phosphatase specificity follows phosphotransfer specificity for cognate HK-RR pairs. The data

  16. Bioinformatics analysis of two-component regulatory systems in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Zhiqiang; ZHONG Yang; ZHANG Jian; HE Youyu; WU Yang; JIANG Juan; CHEN Jiemin; LUO Xiaomin; QU Di

    2004-01-01

    Sixteen pairs of two-component regulatory systems are identified in the genome of Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC12228 strain, which is newly sequenced by our laboratory for Medical Molecular Virology and Chinese National Human Genome Center at Shanghai, by using bioinformatics analysis. Comparative analysis of the twocomponent regulatory systems in S. epidermidis and that of S.aureus and Bacillus subtilis shows that these systems may regulate some important biological functions, e.g. growth,biofilm formation, and expression of virulence factors in S.epidermidis. Two conserved domains, i.e. HATPase_c and REC domains, are found in all 16 pairs of two-component proteins.Homologous modelling analysis indicates that there are 4similar HATPase_c domain structures of histidine kinases and 13 similar REC domain structures of response regulators,and there is one AMP-PNP binding pocket in the HATPase_c domain and three active aspartate residues in the REC domain. Preliminary experiment reveals that the bioinformatics analysis of the conserved domain structures in the two-component regulatory systems in S. epidermidis may provide useful information for discovery of potential drug target.

  17. Cross-talk and specificity in two-component signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ruchi; Sahoo, Bikash Kumar; Saini, Deepak Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Two-component signaling systems (TCSs) are composed of two proteins, sensor kinases and response regulators, which can cross-talk and integrate information between them by virtue of high-sequence conservation and modular nature, to generate concerted and diversified responses. However, TCSs have been shown to be insulated, to facilitate linear signal transmission and response generation. Here, we discuss various mechanisms that confer specificity or cross-talk among TCSs. The presented models are supported with evidence that indicate the physiological significance of the observed TCS signaling architecture. Overall, we propose that the signaling topology of any TCSs cannot be predicted using obvious sequence or structural rules, as TCS signaling is regulated by multiple factors, including spatial and temporal distribution of the participating proteins.

  18. Phosphorylation-independent activity of atypical response regulators of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Jennifer; Sickmann, Albert; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-05-01

    The genome of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori harbors a remarkably low number of regulatory genes, including three and five open reading frames encoding two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, respectively, which are putatively involved in transcriptional regulation. Two of the response regulator genes, hp1043 and hp166, proved to be essential for cell growth, and inactivation of the response regulator gene hp1021 resulted in a severe growth defect, as indicated by a small-colony phenotype. The sequences of the receiver domains of response regulators HP1043 and HP1021 differ from the consensus sequence of the acidic pocket of the receiver domain which is involved in the phosphotransfer reaction from the histidine kinase to the response regulator. Using a genetic complementation system, we demonstrated that the function of response regulator HP166, which is essential for cell growth, can be provided by a mutated derivative carrying a D52N substitution at the site of phosphorylation. We found that the atypical receiver sequences of HP1043 and HP1021 are not crucial for the function of these response regulators. Phosphorylation of the receiver domains of HP1043 and HP1021 is not needed for response regulator function and may not occur at all. Thus, the phosphorylation-independent action of these regulators differs from the well-established two-component paradigm.

  19. Two-component systems and their co-option for eukaryotic signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, G Eric; Shiu, Shin-Han; Armitage, Judith P

    2011-05-10

    Two-component signaling pathways involve histidine kinases, response regulators, and sometimes histidine-containing phosphotransfer proteins. Prevalent in prokaryotes, these signaling elements have also been co-opted to meet the needs of signal transduction in eukaryotes such as fungi and plants. Here we consider the evolution of such regulatory systems, with a particular emphasis on the roles they play in signaling by the plant hormones cytokinin and ethylene, in phytochrome-mediated perception of light, and as integral components of the circadian clock. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rewiring two-component signal transduction with small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpel, Yvonne; Görke, Boris

    2012-04-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) and small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) form densely interconnected networks that integrate and transduce information from the environment into fine-tuned changes of gene expression. Many TCSs control target genes indirectly through regulation of sRNAs, which in turn regulate gene expression by base-pairing with mRNAs or targeting a protein. Conversely, sRNAs may control TCS synthesis, thereby recruiting the TCS regulon to other regulatory networks. Several TCSs control expression of multiple homologous sRNAs providing the regulatory networks with further flexibility. These sRNAs act redundantly, additively or hierarchically on targets. The regulatory speed of sRNAs and their unique features in gene regulation make them ideal players extending the flexibility, dynamic range or timing of TCS signaling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Negative control in two-component signal transduction by transmitter phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Stewart, Valley

    2011-10-01

    Bifunctional sensor transmitter modules of two-component systems exert both positive and negative control on the receiver domain of the cognate response regulator. In negative control, the transmitter module accelerates the rate of phospho-receiver dephosphorylation. This transmitter phosphatase reaction serves the important physiological functions of resetting response regulator phosphorylation level and suppressing cross-talk. Although the biochemical reactions underlying positive control are reasonably well understood, the mechanism for transmitter phosphatase activity has been unknown. A recent hypothesis is that the transmitter phosphatase reaction is catalysed by a conserved Gln, Asn or Thr residue, via a hydrogen bond between the amide or hydroxyl group and the nucleophilic water molecule in acyl-phosphate hydrolysis. This hypothetical mechanism closely resembles the established mechanisms of auxiliary phosphatases such as CheZ and CheX, and may be widely conserved in two-component signal transduction. In addition to the proposed catalytic residues, transmitter phosphatase activity also requires the correct transmitter conformation and appropriate interactions with the receiver. Evidence suggests that the phosphatase-competent and autokinase-competent states are mutually exclusive, and the corresponding negative and positive activities are likely to be reciprocally regulated through dynamic control of transmitter conformations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Using structural information to change the phosphotransfer specificity of a two-component chemotaxis signalling complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H Bell

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction pathways comprising histidine protein kinases (HPKs and their response regulators (RRs are widely used to control bacterial responses to environmental challenges. Some bacteria have over 150 different two-component pathways, and the specificity of the phosphotransfer reactions within these systems is tightly controlled to prevent unwanted crosstalk. One of the best understood two-component signalling pathways is the chemotaxis pathway. Here, we present the 1.40 A crystal structure of the histidine-containing phosphotransfer domain of the chemotaxis HPK, CheA(3, in complex with its cognate RR, CheY(6. A methionine finger on CheY(6 that nestles in a hydrophobic pocket in CheA(3 was shown to be important for the interaction and was found to only occur in the cognate RRs of CheA(3, CheY(6, and CheB(2. Site-directed mutagenesis of this methionine in combination with two adjacent residues abolished binding, as shown by surface plasmon resonance studies, and phosphotransfer from CheA(3-P to CheY(6. Introduction of this methionine and an adjacent alanine residue into a range of noncognate CheYs, dramatically changed their specificity, allowing protein interaction and rapid phosphotransfer from CheA(3-P. The structure presented here has allowed us to identify specificity determinants for the CheA-CheY interaction and subsequently to successfully reengineer phosphotransfer signalling. In summary, our results provide valuable insight into how cells mediate specificity in one of the most abundant signalling pathways in biology, two-component signal transduction.

  3. Phenotype MicroArray Analysis of Escherichia coli K-12 Mutants with Deletions of All Two-Component Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Lei, Xiang-He; Bochner, Barry R.; Wanner, Barry L.

    2003-01-01

    Two-component systems are the most common mechanism of transmembrane signal transduction in bacteria. A typical system consists of a histidine kinase and a partner response regulator. The histidine kinase senses an environmental signal, which it transmits to its partner response regulator via a series of autophosphorylation, phosphotransfer, and dephosphorylation reactions. Much work has been done on particular systems, including several systems with regulatory roles in cellular physiology, communication, development, and, in the case of bacterial pathogens, the expression of genes important for virulence. We used two methods to investigate two-component regulatory systems in Escherichia coli K-12. First, we systematically constructed mutants with deletions of all two-component systems by using a now-standard technique of gene disruption (K. A. Datsenko and B. L. Wanner, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:6640-6645, 2000). We then analyzed these deletion mutants with a new technology called Phenotype MicroArrays, which permits assays of nearly 2,000 growth phenotypes simultaneously. In this study we tested 100 mutants, including mutants with individual deletions of all two-component systems and several related genes, including creBC-regulated genes (cbrA and cbrBC), phoBR-regulated genes (phoA, phoH, phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP, psiE, and ugpBAECQ), csgD, luxS, and rpoS. The results of this battery of nearly 200,000 tests provided a wealth of new information concerning many of these systems. Of 37 different two-component mutants, 22 showed altered phenotypes. Many phenotypes were expected, and several new phenotypes were also revealed. The results are discussed in terms of the biological roles and other information concerning these systems, including DNA microarray data for a large number of the same mutants. Other mutational effects are also discussed. PMID:12897016

  4. Systematic Dissection and Trajectory-Scanning Mutagenesis of the Molecular Interface That Ensures Specificity of Two-Component Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Emma A.; Ashenberg, Orr; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; Laub, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems enable bacteria to sense and respond to a wide range of environmental stimuli. Sensor histidine kinases transmit signals to their cognate response regulators via phosphorylation. The faithful transmission of information through two-component pathways and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk require exquisite specificity of histidine kinase-response regulator interactions to ensure that cells mount the appropriate response to external signals. To identify putative specificity-determining residues, we have analyzed amino acid coevolution in two-component proteins and identified a set of residues that can be used to rationally rewire a model signaling pathway, EnvZ-OmpR. To explore how a relatively small set of residues can dictate partner selectivity, we combined alanine-scanning mutagenesis with an approach we call trajectory-scanning mutagenesis, in which all mutational intermediates between the specificity residues of EnvZ and another kinase, RstB, were systematically examined for phosphotransfer specificity. The same approach was used for the response regulators OmpR and RstA. Collectively, the results begin to reveal the molecular mechanism by which a small set of amino acids enables an individual kinase to discriminate amongst a large set of highly-related response regulators and vice versa. Our results also suggest that the mutational trajectories taken by two-component signaling proteins following gene or pathway duplication may be constrained and subject to differential selective pressures. Only some trajectories allow both the maintenance of phosphotransfer and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk. PMID:21124821

  5. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan); Gabdullin, M. T. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, NNLOT, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  6. Influence of two-component signal transduction systems of Lactobacillus casei BL23 on tolerance to stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Cristina; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    Lactobacillus casei BL23 carries 17 two-component signal transduction systems. Insertional mutations were introduced into each gene encoding the cognate response regulators, and their effects on growth under different conditions were assayed. Inactivation of systems TC01, TC06, and TC12 (LCABL_02080-LCABL_02090, LCABL_12050-LCABL_12060, and LCABL_19600-LCABL_19610, respectively) led to major growth defects under the conditions assayed.

  7. Phosphate sink containing two-component signaling systems as tunable threshold devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munia Amin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology aims to design de novo biological systems and reengineer existing ones. These efforts have mostly focused on transcriptional circuits, with reengineering of signaling circuits hampered by limited understanding of their systems dynamics and experimental challenges. Bacterial two-component signaling systems offer a rich diversity of sensory systems that are built around a core phosphotransfer reaction between histidine kinases and their output response regulator proteins, and thus are a good target for reengineering through synthetic biology. Here, we explore the signal-response relationship arising from a specific motif found in two-component signaling. In this motif, a single histidine kinase (HK phosphotransfers reversibly to two separate output response regulator (RR proteins. We show that, under the experimentally observed parameters from bacteria and yeast, this motif not only allows rapid signal termination, whereby one of the RRs acts as a phosphate sink towards the other RR (i.e. the output RR, but also implements a sigmoidal signal-response relationship. We identify two mathematical conditions on system parameters that are necessary for sigmoidal signal-response relationships and define key parameters that control threshold levels and sensitivity of the signal-response curve. We confirm these findings experimentally, by in vitro reconstitution of the one HK-two RR motif found in the Sinorhizobium meliloti chemotaxis pathway and measuring the resulting signal-response curve. We find that the level of sigmoidality in this system can be experimentally controlled by the presence of the sink RR, and also through an auxiliary protein that is shown to bind to the HK (yielding Hill coefficients of above 7. These findings show that the one HK-two RR motif allows bacteria and yeast to implement tunable switch-like signal processing and provides an ideal basis for developing threshold devices for synthetic biology applications.

  8. Engineered microbial biosensors based on bacterial two-component systems as synthetic biotechnology platforms in bioremediation and biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Sambandam; Baylon, Mary Grace; Park, Si Jae; Choi, Jong-Il

    2017-04-14

    Two-component regulatory systems (TCRSs) mediate cellular response by coupling sensing and regulatory mechanisms. TCRSs are comprised of a histidine kinase (HK), which serves as a sensor, and a response regulator, which regulates expression of the effector gene after being phosphorylated by HK. Using these attributes, bacterial TCRSs can be engineered to design microbial systems for different applications. This review focuses on the current advances in TCRS-based biosensors and on the design of microbial systems for bioremediation and their potential application in biorefinery.

  9. Physiological Role of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in Food-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monedero, Vicente; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are widespread signal transduction pathways mainly found in bacteria where they play a major role in adaptation to changing environmental conditions. TCSs generally consist of sensor histidine kinases that autophosphorylate in response to a specific stimulus and subsequently transfer the phosphate group to their cognate response regulators thus modulating their activity, usually as transcriptional regulators. In this review we present the current knowledge on the physiological role of TCSs in species of the families Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae of the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). LAB are microorganisms of great relevance for health and food production as the group spans from starter organisms to pathogens. Whereas the role of TCSs in pathogenic LAB (most of them belonging to the family Streptococcaceae) has focused the attention, the roles of TCSs in commensal LAB, such as most species of Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae, have been somewhat neglected. However, evidence available indicates that TCSs are key players in the regulation of the physiology of these bacteria. The first studies in food-associated LAB showed the involvement of some TCSs in quorum sensing and production of bacteriocins, but subsequent studies have shown that TCSs participate in other physiological processes, such as stress response, regulation of nitrogen metabolism, regulation of malate metabolism, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, among others. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nickel-responsive transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiani, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Bazzani, Micaela; Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient for a large number of living organisms, but it is also a toxic metal ion when it accumulates beyond the sustainable level as it may result if and when its cellular trafficking is not properly governed. Therefore, the homeostasis and metabolism of nickel is tightly regulated through metal-specific protein networks that respond to the available Ni(II) concentration. These are directed by specific nickel sensors, able to couple Ni(II) binding to a change in their DNA binding affinity and/or specificity, thus translating the cellular level of Ni(II) into a modification of the expression of the proteins devoted to modulating nickel uptake, efflux and cellular utilization. This review describes the Ni(II)-dependent transcriptional regulators discovered so far, focusing on their structural features, metal coordination modes and metal binding thermodynamics. Understanding these properties is essential to comprehend how these sensors correlate nickel availability to metal coordination and functional responses. A broad and comparative study, described here, reveals some general traits that characterize the binding stoichiometry and Ni(II) affinity of these metallo-sensors.

  11. The SaeRS Two-Component System of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Yeo, Won-Sik; Bae, Taeok

    2016-01-01

    In the Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the SaeRS two-component system (TCS) plays a major role in controlling the production of over 20 virulence factors including hemolysins, leukocidins, superantigens, surface proteins, and proteases. The SaeRS TCS is composed of the sensor histidine kinase SaeS, response regulator SaeR, and two auxiliary proteins SaeP and SaeQ. Since its discovery in 1994, the sae locus has been studied extensively, and its contributions to staphylococcal virulence and pathogenesis have been well documented and understood; however, the molecular mechanism by which the SaeRS TCS receives and processes cognate signals is not. In this article, therefore, we review the literature focusing on the signaling mechanism and its interaction with other global regulators. PMID:27706107

  12. Two-component system YvqEC-dependent bacterial resistance against vancomycin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumeng; Hu, Yimin; Fan, Qingyun; Wang, Xun; He, Jin

    2015-08-01

    YvqEC is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that may respond to cell envelope stress and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvqE and a response regulator YvqC. In this study, we separately constructed a single gene mutant ΔyvqE and a double gene mutant ΔyvqEC in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 through a homing endonucleases I-SceI mediated markerless gene deletion method. We found that the deletion of either yvqE or yvqEC weakened the resistance of B. thuringiensis against vancomycin. We also identified nine operons that may be involved in the cellular metabolism regulated by YvqC. This study not only enriches our understanding of bacterial resistance mechanisms against vancomycin, but also helps investigate the functions of YvqEC.

  13. The oligomeric assembly of the novel haem-degrading protein HbpS is essential for interaction with its cognate two-component sensor kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Bogel, Gabriele; Zou, Peijian; Groves, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    HbpS, a novel protein of previously unknown function from Streptomyces reticuli, is up-regulated in response to haemin- and peroxide-based oxidative stress and interacts with the SenS/SenR two-component signal transduction system. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structures (2.2

  14. The oligomeric assembly of the novel haem-degrading protein HbpS is essential for interaction with its cognate two-component sensor kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Bogel, Gabriele; Zou, Peijian; Groves, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    HbpS, a novel protein of previously unknown function from Streptomyces reticuli, is up-regulated in response to haemin- and peroxide-based oxidative stress and interacts with the SenS/SenR two-component signal transduction system. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structures (2.2

  15. An intimate link: two-component signal transduction systems and metal transport systems in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various strategies to contend with high concentrations of environmental heavy metal ions for rapid, adaptive responses to maintain cell viability. Evidence gathered in the past two decades suggests that bacterial two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTSs) are intimately involved in monitoring cation accumulation, and can regulate the expression of related metabolic and virulence genes to elicit adaptive responses to changes in the concentration of these ions. Using examples garnered from recent studies, we summarize the cross-regulatory relationships between metal ions and TCSTSs. We present evidence of how bacterial TCSTSs modulate metal ion homeostasis and also how metal ions, in turn, function to control the activities of these signaling systems linked with bacterial survival and virulence.

  16. Cyclic di-GMP regulation of the bvg-repressed genes and the orphan response regulator RisA in Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expression of Bordetella pertussis virulence factors is activated by the BvgAS two-component system. Under modulating growth conditions BvgAS indirectly represses another set of genes through the action of BvgR, a bvg-activated protein. BvgR blocks activation of the response regulator RisA which is ...

  17. Purification and assays of Rhodobacter capsulatus RegB-RegA two-component signal transduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swem, Lee R; Swem, Danielle L; Wu, Jiang; Bauer, Carl E

    2007-01-01

    Two-component signal-transduction systems, composed of a histidine-sensor kinase and a DNA-binding response regulator, allow bacteria to detect environmental changes and adjust cellular physiology to live more efficiently in a broad distribution of niches. Although many two-component signal-transduction systems are known, a limited number of signals that stimulate these systems have been discovered. This chapter describes the purification and characterization of the predominant two-component signal-transduction system utilized by Rhodobacter capsulatus, a nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacterium. Specifically, we explain the overexpression, detergent solubilization, and purification of the full-length membrane-spanning histidine-sensor kinase RegB. We also provide a method to measure autophosphorylation of RegB and discern the effect of its signal molecule, ubiquinone, on autophosphorylation levels. In addition we describe the overexpression and purification of the cognate response regulator RegA and a technique used to visualize the phosphotransfer reaction from RegB to RegA.

  18. Analysis of proteins regulated by two-component signal transduction system saeRS in Staphylococcus epidermidis%表皮葡萄球菌双组分信号转导系统saeRS对相关蛋白调控的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄强; 王艳歌; 瞿涤

    2012-01-01

    目的 利用双向电泳技术对表皮葡萄球菌菌体蛋白进行蛋白质组学分析,寻找双组分信号转导系统saeRS的调控网络.方法 对表皮葡萄球菌1457双组分信号转导系统saeRS删除株与野生株菌体蛋白进行双向电泳差异比较;电泳图谱采用Image Master 2D Platinum软件分析;免疫印迹法验证saeRS调控的差异蛋白.结果 在表皮葡萄球菌1457双组分信号转导系统saeRS删除株与野生株蛋白质图谱中共发现23个差异表达的蛋白点(10个下调,13个上调).结论 蛋白质双向电泳技术可以成功应用于分析表皮葡萄球菌双组分信号转导系统saeRS的调控网络;此图谱为进一步研究saeRS在表皮葡萄球菌中的调控机制奠定了基础.%Objective To search for new proteins regulated by two-component signal transduction system saeRS, the proteomics of whole cellular proteins between saeRS deletion mutant and wild-type strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis ( S. epidermidis) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Methods Immobilized pH gradient (IPG) two-dimensional electrophoresis was adopted and the gels were analyzed with Image Master 2D Platinum software. Western blot was used to analyze the differentially expressed proteins. Results We found 23 differentially expressed protein spots (10 down-regulated and 13 up-regulated) in 2-DE gels of saeRS deletion mutant and wild-type strain of S. epidermidis. Conclusion Two-dimensional electrophoresis of protein can be used to analyze the regulation network of two-component signal transduction system saeRS in S. epidermidis, and this provides basis for further study on saeRS regulation mechanism.

  19. The sae locus of Staphylococcus aureus encodes a two-component regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudo, A T; Calzolari, A; Cataldi, A A; Bogni, C; Nagel, R

    1999-08-01

    Sae is a regulatory locus that activates the production of several exoproteins in Staphylococcus aureus. A 3.4-kb fragment of a S. aureus genomic library, screened with a probe adjacent to the transposon insertion of a sae::Tn551 mutant, was cloned into a bifunctional vector. This fragment was shown to carry the sae locus by restoration of exoprotein production in sae mutants. The sae locus was mapped to the SmaI-D fragment of the staphylococcal chromosome by pulse-field electrophoresis. Sequence analysis of the cloned fragment revealed the presence of two genes, designated saeR and saeS, encoding a response regulator and a histidine protein kinase, respectively, with high homology to other bacterial two-component regulatory systems.

  20. Genomic analysis of two-component signal transduction proteins in basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavín, José L; Ramírez, Lucía; Ussery, David W; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Oguiza, José A

    2010-01-01

    Two-component system (TCS) proteins are components of complex signal transduction pathways in fungi, and play essential roles in the regulation of several cellular functions and responses. Species of basidiomycetes have a marked variation in their specific physiological traits, morphological complexity and lifestyles. In this study, we have used the available complete genomes of basidiomycetes to carry out a thorough identification and an extensive comparative analysis of the TCS proteins in this fungal phylum. In comparison with ascomycetes, basidiomycetes exhibit an intermediate number of TCS proteins. Several TCS proteins are highly conserved among all the basidiomycetes, and other TCS proteins appear to be specific to particular species of basidiomycetes. Moreover, some species appear to have developed a unique histidine kinase group with unusual domain architecture, the Dual-histidine kinases. The presence of differential sets of TCS proteins between basidiomycete species might reflect their adaptation to diverse environmental niches.

  1. Histidine phosphotransfer proteins in fungal two-component signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassler, Jan S; West, Ann H

    2013-08-01

    The histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) protein Ypd1 is an important participant in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae multistep two-component signal transduction pathway and, unlike the expanded histidine kinase gene family, is encoded by a single gene in nearly all model and pathogenic fungi. Ypd1 is essential for viability in both S. cerevisiae and in Cryptococcus neoformans. These and other aspects of Ypd1 biology, combined with the availability of structural and mutational data in S. cerevisiae, suggest that the essential interactions between Ypd1 and response regulator domains would be a good target for antifungal drug development. The goal of this minireview is to summarize the wealth of data on S. cerevisiae Ypd1 and to consider the potential benefits of conducting related studies in pathogenic fungi.

  2. Two-component signal transduction as potential drug targets in pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Eguchi, Yoko; Watanabe, Takafumi; Okamoto, Sho; Doi, Akihiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2010-04-01

    Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An Introductory Idea for Teaching Two-Component Phase Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Gavin D.; McNaught, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of two-component phase diagrams has attracted little attention in this "Journal," and it is hoped that this article will make a useful contribution. Current physical chemistry textbooks describe two-component phase diagrams adequately, but do so in a piecemeal fashion one section at a time; first solid-liquid equilibria, then…

  4. Two-component micro injection moulding for hearing aid applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Marhöfer, David Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    Two-component (2k) injection moulding is an important process technique at the present state of technology, and it is growing rapidly in the field of precision micro moulding. Besides combining different material properties in the same product, two-component moulding can eliminate many assembly s...

  5. Evolution and phyletic distribution of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuichet, Kristin; Cantwell, Brian J; Zhulin, Igor B

    2010-04-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are abundant in prokaryotes. They enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. These systems are also found, although in much smaller numbers, in lower eukaryotes and plants, where they appear to control a few very specific functions. Two-component systems have evolved in Bacteria from much simpler one-component systems bringing about the benefit of extracellular versus intracellular sensing. We review reports establishing the origins of two-component systems and documenting their occurrence in major lineages of Life. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel hybrid kinase is essential for regulating the sigmaB-mediated stress response of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, de M.W.H.J.; Tempelaars, M.H.; Schaik, van W.; Moezelaar, R.; Siezen, R.J.; Abee, T.

    2010-01-01

    A common bacterial strategy for monitoring environmental challenges is to use two-component systems, which consist of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). In the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus, the alternative sigma factor sB is activated by the RR RsbY. Here we present

  7. Functional characterization of WalRK: A two-component signal transduction system from Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisha Dhiman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS, consisting of a sensor histidine protein kinase and its cognate response regulator, are an important mode of environmental sensing in bacteria. Additionally, they have been found to regulate virulence determinants in several pathogens. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a bioterrorism agent, harbours 41 pairs of TCS. However, their role in its pathogenicity has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show that WalRK of B. anthracis forms a functional TCS which exhibits some species-specific functions. Biochemical studies showed that domain variants of WalK, the histidine kinase, exhibit classical properties of autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer to its cognate response regulator WalR. Interestingly, these domain variants also show phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated WalR, thereby making WalK a bifunctional histidine kinase/phosphatase. An in silico regulon determination approach, using a consensus binding sequence from Bacillus subtilis, provided a list of 30 genes that could form a putative WalR regulon in B. anthracis. Further, electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to show direct binding of purified WalR to the upstream regions of three putative regulon candidates, an S-layer protein EA1, a cell division ABC transporter FtsE and a sporulation histidine kinase KinB3. Our work lends insight into the species-specific functions and mode of action of B. anthracis WalRK.

  8. Functional characterization of WalRK: A two-component signal transduction system from Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Alisha; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Kulshreshtha, Parul; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS), consisting of a sensor histidine protein kinase and its cognate response regulator, are an important mode of environmental sensing in bacteria. Additionally, they have been found to regulate virulence determinants in several pathogens. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a bioterrorism agent, harbours 41 pairs of TCS. However, their role in its pathogenicity has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show that WalRK of B. anthracis forms a functional TCS which exhibits some species-specific functions. Biochemical studies showed that domain variants of WalK, the histidine kinase, exhibit classical properties of autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer to its cognate response regulator WalR. Interestingly, these domain variants also show phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated WalR, thereby making WalK a bifunctional histidine kinase/phosphatase. An in silico regulon determination approach, using a consensus binding sequence from Bacillus subtilis, provided a list of 30 genes that could form a putative WalR regulon in B. anthracis. Further, electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to show direct binding of purified WalR to the upstream regions of three putative regulon candidates, an S-layer protein EA1, a cell division ABC transporter FtsE and a sporulation histidine kinase KinB3. Our work lends insight into the species-specific functions and mode of action of B. anthracis WalRK.

  9. Evolution and phyletic distribution of two-component signal transduction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wuichet, Kristin; Cantwell, Brian J.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2010-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are abundant in prokaryotes. They enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. These systems are also found, although in much smaller numbers, in lower eukaryotes and plants, where they appear to control a few very specific functions. Two-component systems have evolved in Bacteria from much simpler one-component systems bringing about the benefit of extracellular versus intracellular sensing. We ...

  10. Diversity of two-component systems: insights into the signal transduction mechanism by the  Staphylococcus aureus two-component system GraSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzamal, Uzma; Gomez, Daniel; Kapadia, Fenika; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila

    2014-01-01

    The response to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) in Staphylococcus aureus relies on a two-component system (TCS), GraSR, an auxiliary protein GraX and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, VraF/G. To understand the signal transduction mechanism by GraSR, we investigated the kinase activity of the cytoplasmic domain of histidine kinase GraS and the interaction with its cognate response regulator GraR. We also investigated interactions among the auxiliary protein GraX, GraS/R and the ATPase protein of the ABC transporter, VraF. We found that GraS lacks autophosphorylation activity, unlike a similar histidine kinase, BceS, of Bacillus subtilis. In addition, the interaction between GraS and GraR is very weak in comparison to the stronger interaction observed between BceS and its conjugated response regulator, BceR, suggesting that CAMP signaling may not flow directly from GraS to GraR. We found that the auxiliary protein GraX interacts with VraF and GraR, and requires the histidine phosphotransfer and dimerization domain of GraS to interact with this protein. Further, VraF requires the GraS region that connects the membrane-bound domain with the cytoplasmic domain of this protein for interaction with GraS. The interactions of GraX with GraS/R and VraF indicate that GraX may serve as a scaffold to bring these proteins in close proximity to GraS, plausibly to facilitate activation of GraS to ultimately transduce the signal to GraR.

  11. Adaptation to environmental stimuli within the host: two-component signal transduction systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretl, Daniel J; Demetriadou, Chrystalla; Zahrt, Thomas C

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms encounter a variety of environmental stresses following infection of their respective hosts. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, is an unusual bacterial pathogen in that it is able to establish lifelong infections in individuals within granulomatous lesions that are formed following a productive immune response. Adaptation to this highly dynamic environment is thought to be mediated primarily through transcriptional reprogramming initiated in response to recognition of stimuli, including low-oxygen tension, nutrient depletion, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, altered pH, toxic lipid moieties, cell wall/cell membrane-perturbing agents, and other environmental cues. To survive continued exposure to these potentially adverse factors, M. tuberculosis encodes a variety of regulatory factors, including 11 complete two-component signal transduction systems (TCSSs) and several orphaned response regulators (RRs) and sensor kinases (SKs). This report reviews our current knowledge of the TCSSs present in M. tuberculosis. In particular, we discuss the biochemical and functional characteristics of individual RRs and SKs, the environmental stimuli regulating their activation, the regulons controlled by the various TCSSs, and the known or postulated role(s) of individual TCSSs in the context of M. tuberculosis physiology and/or pathogenesis.

  12. Stochastic study of information transmission and population stability in a generic bacterial two-component system

    CERN Document Server

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Banik, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the role of fluctuations in signal propagation and on gene regulation in monoclonal bacterial population have been extensively pursued based on the machinery of two-component system. The bacterial two-component system shows noise utilisation through its inherent plasticity. The fluctuations propagation takes place using the phosphotransfer module and the feedback mechanism during gene regulation. To delicately observe the noisy kinetics the generic cascade needs stochastic investigation at the mRNA and protein levels. To this end, we propose a theoretical framework to investigate the noisy signal transduction in a generic two-component system. The model shows reliability in information transmission through quantification of several statistical measures. We further extend our analysis to observe the protein distribution in a population of cells. Through numerical simulation, we identify the regime of the kinetic parameter set that generates a stability switch in the steady state distribution of prot...

  13. Evolutionary analysis and lateral gene transfer of two-component regulatory systems associated with heavy-metal tolerance in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Juan L; Hoostal, Matthew J

    2013-05-01

    Microorganisms have adapted intricate signal transduction mechanisms to coordinate tolerance to toxic levels of metals, including two-component regulatory systems (TCRS). In particular, both cop and czc operons are regulated by TCRS; the cop operon plays a key role in bacterial tolerance to copper, whereas the czc operon is involved in the efflux of cadmium, zinc, and cobalt from the cell. Although the molecular physiology of heavy metal tolerance genes has been extensively studied, their evolutionary relationships are not well-understood. Phylogenetic relationships among heavy-metal efflux proteins and their corresponding two-component regulatory proteins revealed orthologous and paralogous relationships from species divergences and ancient gene duplications. The presence of heavy metal tolerance genes on bacterial plasmids suggests these genes may be prone to spread through horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic inferences revealed nine potential examples of lateral gene transfer associated with metal efflux proteins and two examples for regulatory proteins. Notably, four of the examples suggest lateral transfer across major evolutionary domains. In most cases, differences in GC content in metal tolerance genes and their corresponding host genomes confirmed lateral gene transfer events. Three-dimensional protein structures predicted for the response regulators encoded by cop and czc operons showed a high degree of structural similarity with other known proteins involved in TCRS signal transduction, which suggests common evolutionary origins of functional phenotypes and similar mechanisms of action for these response regulators.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Two-component Signal Transduction System in Two Streptomycete Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu WEI; Yixue LI; Weihua WANG; Zhiwei CAO; Hong YU; Xiaojing WANG; Jing ZHAO; Hao TAN; Hao XU; Weihong JIANG

    2007-01-01

    Species of the genus Streptomyces are major bacteria responsible for producing most natural antibiotics. Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces avermitilis were sequenced in 2002 and 2003,respectively. Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), consisting of a histidine sensor kinase (SK) and a cognate response regulator (RR), form the most common mechanism of transmembrane signal transduction in prokaryotes. TCSs in S. coelicolor A3(2) have been analyzed in detail. Here, we identify and classify the SK and RR of S. avermitilis and compare the TCSs with those of S. coelicolor A3(2) by computational approaches. Phylogenetic analysis of the cognate SK-RR pairs of the two species indicated that the cognate SK-RR pairs fall into four classes according to the distribution of their orthologs in other organisms. In addition to the cognate SK-RR pairs, some potential partners of non-cognate SK-RR were found, including those of unpaired SK and orphan RR and the cross-talk between different components in either strain. Our study provides new clues for further exploration of the molecular regulation mechanism of streptomycetes with industrial importance.

  15. [Two-component signal transduction as attractive drug targets in pathogenic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Ryutaro; Igarashi, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). TCS consists of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). TCSs are attractive as drug targets for antimicrobials because many HK and RR genes are coded on the bacterial genome though few are found in lower eukaryotes. The HK/RR signal transduction system is distinct from serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation in higher eukaryotes. Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets.

  16. Two-component signal transduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum and other corynebacteria: on the way towards stimuli and targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Michael; Brocker, Melanie

    2012-06-01

    In bacteria, adaptation to changing environmental conditions is often mediated by two-component signal transduction systems. In the prototypical case, a specific stimulus is sensed by a membrane-bound histidine kinase and triggers autophosphorylation of a histidine residue. Subsequently, the phosphoryl group is transferred to an aspartate residue of the cognate response regulator, which then becomes active and mediates a specific response, usually by activating and/or repressing a set of target genes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on two-component signal transduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum. This Gram-positive soil bacterium is used for the large-scale biotechnological production of amino acids and can also be applied for the synthesis of a wide variety of other products, such as organic acids, biofuels, or proteins. Therefore, C. glutamicum has become an important model organism in industrial biotechnology and in systems biology. The type strain ATCC 13032 possesses 13 two-component systems and the role of five has been elucidated in recent years. They are involved in citrate utilization (CitAB), osmoregulation and cell wall homeostasis (MtrAB), adaptation to phosphate starvation (PhoSR), adaptation to copper stress (CopSR), and heme homeostasis (HrrSA). As C. glutamicum does not only face changing conditions in its natural environment, but also during cultivation in industrial bioreactors of up to 500 m(3) volume, adaptability can also be crucial for good performance in biotechnological production processes. Detailed knowledge on two-component signal transduction and regulatory networks therefore will contribute to both the application and the systemic understanding of C. glutamicum and related species.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of the Brucella abortus BvrR/BvrS two-component regulatory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Viadas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The two-component BvrR/BvrS system is essential for Brucella abortus virulence. It was shown previously that its dysfunction alters the expression of some major outer membrane proteins and the pattern of lipid A acylation. To determine the genes regulated by BvrR/BvrS, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis using B. abortus RNA obtained from wild type and bvrR mutant cells grown in the same conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 127 differentially expressed genes were found: 83 were over expressed and 44 were less expressed in the bvrR mutant. Two operons, the phosphotransferase system and the maltose transport system, were down-regulated. Several genes involved in cell envelope or outer membrane biogenesis were differentially expressed: genes for outer membrane proteins (omp25a, omp25d, lipoproteins, LPS and fatty acid biosynthesis, stress response proteins, chaperones, flagellar genes, and twelve genes encoding ABC transport systems. Ten genes related with carbon metabolism (pckA and fumB among others were up-regulated in the bvrR mutant, and denitrification genes (nirK, norC and nosZ were also regulated. Notably, seven transcriptional regulators were affected, including VjbR, ExoR and OmpR that were less expressed in the bvrR mutant. Finally, the expression of eleven genes which have been previously related with Brucella virulence was also altered. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All these data corroborate the impact of BvrR/BvrS on cell envelope modulation, confirm that this system controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and suggest a cross-talk among some regulators to adjust the Brucella physiology to the shift expected to occur during the transit from the extracellular to the intracellular niche.

  18. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anna W.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Moreno Morales, Neydis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacterium Ramlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, the R. tataouinensis bacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems. IMPORTANCE BphP histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators comprise widespread red light-sensing two-component systems. Much work on BphPs has focused on structural understanding of light sensing and on enhancing the natural infrared fluorescence of these

  19. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anna W; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Moreno Morales, Neydis; Forest, Katrina T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacterium Ramlibacter tataouinensis RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, the R. tataouinensis bacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems. BphP histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators comprise widespread red light-sensing two-component systems. Much work on BphPs has focused on structural understanding of light sensing and on enhancing the natural infrared fluorescence of these proteins, rather than

  20. Ultrasound Assisted Co-aggregation of a Two-component System with Multicolor Emission and Its Response to Aoid%超声促进两组分多彩发光体系分子聚集体的共组装及其对酸的响应行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余旭东; 刘倩; 许秀芳; 兰海闯; 曹新华; 陈黎明; 刘斌; 易涛

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a two-component gel/micro-crystal system including amino acid and imidazole-based derivatives with blue and red emission, respectively, is designed and obtained. The two emission colors are convenient for the study of the co-aggregation of the two molecules via double channel confocal laser scanning microscopy. The two-component system could response to ultrasound with the morphology change from the mixture of club-shaped microcrystals and helical fibers by a thermal process to homogenous fibers exposing to sonication. Further evidence for the co-aggregation of the two compo- nents was obtained from circular dichromism (CD), IR spectra and X-ray powder diffraction. The self-assembly process be- tween the two components was also studied by optimized molecular geometry calculation. Moreover, the co-aggregation obtained by the sonication then heating-cooling process, could not be destroyed by repeated heating-cooling. The gel-sol process could be further repeated for many times, suggesting that the co-aggregated gel was thermal-stable. It can be deduced that sonication weakened the intermolecular interaction between congeneric molecules and promoted the intermolecular hy- drogen bonding between the two components. The results indicate that cooperation of the sonication and thermal processes is an effective way to prohibit phase separation and to promote gelation in the gel/micro-crystal system. Thus, a light harvest system is achieved by co-aggregation of the two components at nanoscale by means of sonication. The emission color of these two-component gels can be tuned by changing the ratio of the two compounds. These gels are sensitive to acid, giving clear spectral variation, accompanied by a gel to sol transition. The morphology of the two-component system is changed from a fiber structure to vesicles without phase separation when responding to acid and metal ions. Moreover, both the gel state and the morphology can be reversed by further addition of

  1. Two-component signal transduction in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under phosphate limitation: role of acetyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntarajumnong, Waraporn; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2007-09-30

    The two-component signal transduction, which typically consists of a histidine kinase and a response regulator, is used by bacterial cells to sense changes in their environment. Previously, the SphS-SphR histidine kinase and response regulator pair of phosphate sensing signal transduction has been identified in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. In addition, some response regulators in bacteria have been shown to be cross regulated by low molecular weight phosphorylated compounds in the absence of the cognate histidine kinase. The ability of an endogenous acetyl phosphate to phosphorylate the response regulator, SphR in the absence of the cognate histidine kinase, SphS was therefore tested in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The mutant lacking functional SphS and acetate kinase showed no detectable alkaline phosphatase activity under phosphate-limiting growth conditions. The results suggested that the endogenous acetyl phosphate accumulated inside the mutants could not activate the SphR via phosphorylation. On the other hand, exogenous acetyl phosphate could allow the mutant lacking functional acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase to grow under phosphate-limiting conditions suggesting the role of acetyl phosphate as an energy source. Reverse transcription PCR demonstrated that the transcripts of acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is upregulated in response to phosphate limitation suggesting the importance of these two enzymes for energy metabolism in Synechocystis cells.

  2. Leptin Regulation of Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Caitlin; Petri, William A

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is a regulatory hormone with multiple roles in the immune system. We favor the concept that leptin signaling 'licenses' various immune cells to engage in immune responses and/or to differentiate. Leptin is an inflammatory molecule that is capable of activating both adaptive and innate immunity. It can also 'enhance' immune functions, including inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages, granulocyte chemotaxis, and increased Th17 proliferation. Leptin can also 'inhibit' cells; CD4(+) T cells are inhibited from differentiating into regulatory T cells in the presence of elevated leptin, while NK cells can exhibit impaired cytotoxicity under the same circumstances. Consequently, understanding the effect of leptin signaling is important to appreciate various aspects of immune dysregulation observed in malnutrition, obesity, and autoimmunity.

  3. Circulation Condition of Two-component Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the report we point out that there exists an intrinsic difference in the internal symmetry of the two components spin-1/2 Bose condensates from that of spinor Bose condensates of the atoms with hyperfine states of nonzero integer-spins,which gives rise to a new topological constrain on the circulation for this two-component spin-1/2 Bose condensates.It is shown that the SU(2) symmetry of the spin-1/2 Bose condensate implies a

  4. Itinerant Ferromagnetism in a Polarized Two-Component Fermi Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massignan, Pietro; Yu, Zhenhua; Bruun, Georg

    2013-01-01

    We analyze when a repulsively interacting two-component Fermi gas becomes thermodynamically unstable against phase separation. We focus on the strongly polarized limit, where the free energy of the homogeneous mixture can be calculated accurately in terms of well-defined quasiparticles, the repul......We analyze when a repulsively interacting two-component Fermi gas becomes thermodynamically unstable against phase separation. We focus on the strongly polarized limit, where the free energy of the homogeneous mixture can be calculated accurately in terms of well-defined quasiparticles...

  5. Analysis of the BarA/UvrY two-component system in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Binnenkade

    Full Text Available The BarA/UvrY two-component system is well conserved in species of the γ-proteobacteria and regulates numerous processes predominantly by controlling the expression of a subset of noncoding small RNAs. In this study, we identified and characterized the BarA/UvrY two-component system in the gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Functional interaction of sensor kinase BarA and the cognate response regulator UvrY was indicated by in vitro phosphotransfer studies. The expression of two predicted small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs, CsrB1 and CsrB2, was dependent on UvrY. Transcriptomic analysis by microarrays revealed that UvrY is a global regulator and directly or indirectly affects transcript levels of more than 200 genes in S. oneidensis. Among these are genes encoding key enzymes of central carbon metabolism such as ackA, aceAB, and pflAB. As predicted of a signal transduction pathway that controls aspects of central metabolism, mutants lacking UvrY reach a significantly higher OD than the wild type during aerobic growth on N-acetylglucosamine (NAG while under anaerobic conditions the mutant grew more slowly. A shorter lag phase occurred with lactate as carbon source. In contrast, significant growth phenotypes were absent in complex medium. Based on these studies we hypothesize that, in S. oneidensis MR-1, the global BarA/UvrY/Csr regulatory pathway is involved in central carbon metabolism processes.

  6. Novel two-component regulatory systems play a role in biofilm formation of Lactobacillus reuteri rodent isolate 100-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-04-01

    This study characterized the two-component regulatory systems encoded by bfrKRT and cemAKR, and assessed their influence on biofilm formation by Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23. A method for deletion of multiple genes was employed to disrupt the genetic loci of two-component systems. The operons bfrKRT and cemAKR showed complementary organization. Genes bfrKRT encode a histidine kinase, a response regulator and an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter with a bacteriocin-processing peptidase domain, respectively. Genes cemAKR code for a signal peptide, a histidine kinase and a response regulator, respectively. Deletion of single or multiple genes in the operons bfrKRT and cemAKR did not affect cell morphology, growth or the sensitivity to various stressors. However, gene disruption affected biofilm formation; this effect was dependent on the carbon source. Deletion of bfrK or cemA increased sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in vitro. Glucose-dependent biofilm formation was particularly increased by deletion of cemK. The expression of cemK and cemR was altered by deletion of bfrK, indicating cross-talk between these two regulatory systems. These results may contribute to our understanding of the genetic factors related to the biofilm formation and competitiveness of L. reuteri in intestinal ecosystems.

  7. Two component permeation through thin zeolite MFI membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, K.; Burggraaf, A.J.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Verweij, H.

    1998-01-01

    Two component permeation measurements have been performed by the Wicke-Kallenbach method on a thin (3 μm) zeolite MFI (Silicalite-1) membrane with molecules of different kinetic diameters, d(k). The membrane was supported by a flat porous α-Al2O3 substrate. The results obtained could be classified i

  8. two component permeation through thin zeolite MFI membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, Klaas; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Verweij, H.

    1998-01-01

    Two component permeation measurements have been performed by the Wicke–Kallenbach method on a thin (3 μm) zeolite MFI (Silicalite-1) membrane with molecules of different kinetic diameters, dk. The membrane was supported by a flat porous -Al2O3 substrate. The results obtained could be classified in s

  9. TWO-COMPONENT JETS AND THE FANAROFF-RILEY DICHOTOMY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.; Sauty, C.

    2010-01-01

    Transversely stratified jets are observed in many classes of astrophysical objects, ranging from young stellar objects, mu-quasars, to active galactic nuclei and even in gamma-ray bursts. Theoretical arguments support this transverse stratification of jets with two components induced by intrinsic fe

  10. Two component injection moulding: Present and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    Two component injection moulding has widespread industrial applications. Still the technology is yet to gain its full potential in highly demanding and technically challenging applications areas. The smart use of this technology can open the doors for cost effective and convergent manufacturing...

  11. Entanglement Properties in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Di-You

    2016-10-01

    We investigate entanglement inseparability and bipartite entanglement of in two-component Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of the nonlinear interatomic interaction, interspecies interaction. Entanglement inseparability and bipartite entanglement have the similar properties. More entanglement can be generated by adjusting the nonlinear interatomic interaction and control the time interval of the entanglement by adjusting interspecies interaction.

  12. Goal-Directed Aiming: Two Components but Multiple Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Digby; Hansen, Steve; Grierson, Lawrence E. M.; Lyons, James; Bennett, Simon J.; Hayes, Spencer J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the behavioral literature on the control of goal-directed aiming and presents a multiple-process model of limb control. The model builds on recent variants of Woodworth's (1899) two-component model of speed-accuracy relations in voluntary movement and incorporates ideas about dynamic online limb control based on prior…

  13. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in Probiotic Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuijing; Peng, Yanping; Chen, Wanyi; Deng, Yangwu; Guo, Yanhua

    2014-09-01

    Lactobacillus casei has traditionally been recognized as a probiotic, thus needing to survive the industrial production processes and transit through the gastrointestinal tract before providing benefit to human health. The two-component signal transduction system (TCS) plays important roles in sensing and reacting to environmental changes, which consists of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). In this study we identified HKs and RRs of six sequenced L. casei strains. Ortholog analysis revealed 15 TCS clusters (HK-RR pairs), one orphan HKs and three orphan RRs, of which 12 TCS clusters were common to all six strains, three were absent in one strain. Further classification of the predicted HKs and RRs revealed interesting aspects of their putative functions. Some TCS clusters are involved with the response under the stress of the bile salts, acid, or oxidative, which contribute to survive the difficult journey through the human gastrointestinal tract. Computational predictions of 15 TCSs were verified by PCR experiments. This genomic level study of TCSs should provide valuable insights into the conservation and divergence of TCS proteins in the L. casei strains.

  14. A small protein that mediates the activation of a two-component system by another two-component system

    OpenAIRE

    Kox, Linda F.F.; Wösten, Marc M. S. M.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2000-01-01

    The PmrA–PmrB two-component system of Salmonella enterica controls resistance to the peptide antibiotic polymyxin B and to several antimicrobial proteins from human neutrophils. Transcription of PmrA-activated genes is induced by high iron, but can also be promoted by growth in low magnesium in a process that requires another two-component system, PhoP–PhoQ. Here, we define the genetic basis for the interaction between the PhoP–PhoQ and PmrA–PmrB systems. We have identified pmrD as a PhoP-act...

  15. An asymmetric heterodomain interface stabilizes a response regulator-DNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, Anoop; Kumar, Shivesh; Evrard, Amanda N.; Paul, Lake N.; Yernool, Dinesh A. [Purdue; (Duke-MED)

    2014-02-14

    Two-component signal transduction systems consist of pairs of histidine kinases and response regulators, which mediate adaptive responses to environmental cues. Most activated response regulators regulate transcription by binding tightly to promoter DNA via a phosphorylation-triggered inactive-to-active transition. The molecular basis for formation of stable response regulator–DNA complexes that precede the assembly of RNA polymerases is unclear. Here, we present structures of DNA complexed with the response regulator KdpE, a member of the OmpR/PhoB family. The distinctively asymmetric complex in an active-like conformation reveals a unique intramolecular interface between the receiver domain (RD) and the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of only one of the two response regulators in the complex. Structure–function studies show that this RD–DBD interface is necessary to form stable complexes that support gene expression. The conservation of sequence and structure suggests that these findings extend to a large group of response regulators that act as transcription factors.

  16. A novel two-component system found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, J. P.; Gosmann, S.; Nowak, E.;

    2005-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel two-component system in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We show that the putative histidine kinase with the genomic locus tag Rv3220c is able to self-phosphorylate in the presence of Mg2+/ATP and subsequently transfer the phosphoryl group to a novel response...

  17. Mapping the Two-component Regulatory Networks in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric; Dehal, Paramvir; Joachimiak, Marcin; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    D. vulgaris Hildenborough has 72 response regulators. The Desulfovibrio are sulfate reducing bacteria that are important in the sulfur and carbon cycles in anoxic habitats. Its large number of two componenent systems are probably critical to its ability to sense and respond to its environment. Our goal is to map these RRs to the genes they regulate using a DNA-affinity-purification-chip (DAP-chip) protocol. First target determined usuing EMSA. A positive target was determined for as many RRs as possible using EMSA. Targets were selected based on gene proximity, regulon predictions and/or predicted sigma54 dependent promoters. qPCR was used to ensure that the target was enriched from sheared genomic DNA before proceeding to the DAP-chip.

  18. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh;

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence o...

  19. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis and Deduction of Putative Cognate Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-01-20

    ABSTRACT-Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTS) composed of sensory histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), constitute a key element of the mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to changes in environments. A large number of TCSTSs including 59 putative HKs and 55 RRs were identified from the Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome, indicating their important roles in regulation of cellular metabolism. In this study, the structural and phylogenetic analysis of all putative TCSTSs in D. vulgaris was performed. The results showed D. vulgaris contained an unexpectedly large number of hybrid-type HKs, implying that multiple-step phosphorelay may be a common signal transduction mechanism in D. vulgaris. Most TCSTS components of D. vulgaris were found clustered into several subfamilies previously recognized in other bacteria and extensive co-evolution between D. vulgaris HKs and RRs was observed, suggesting that the concordance of HKs and RRs in cognate phylogenetic groups could be indicative of cognate TCSTSs...

  20. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. IgA isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections. PMID:25837997

  1. A two-component NZRI metamaterial based rectangular cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sikder Sunbeam; Faruque, Mohammd Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2015-10-01

    A new two-component, near zero refractive index (NZRI) metamaterial is presented for electromagnetic rectangular cloaking operation in the microwave range. In the basic design a pi-shaped, metamaterial was developed and its characteristics were investigated for the two major axes (x and z-axis) wave propagation through the material. For the z-axis wave propagation, it shows more than 2 GHz bandwidth and for the x-axis wave propagation; it exhibits more than 1 GHz bandwidth of NZRI property. The metamaterial was then utilized in designing a rectangular cloak where a metal cylinder was cloaked perfectly in the C-band area of microwave regime. The experimental result was provided for the metamaterial and the cloak and these results were compared with the simulated results. This is a novel and promising design for its two-component NZRI characteristics and rectangular cloaking operation in the electromagnetic paradigm.

  2. On a periodic two-component Hunter-Saxton equation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohlmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We determine the solution of the geodesic equation associated with a periodic two-component Hunter-Saxton system on a semidirect product obtained from the diffeomorphism group of the circle, modulo rigid rotations, and a space of scalar functions. In particular, we compute the time of breakdown of the geodesic flow. As a further goal, we establish a local well-posedness result for the two-component Hunter-Saxton system in the smooth category. The paper gets in line with some recent results for the generalized Hunter-Saxton equation provided by Escher, Wu and Wunsch in [J. Escher, Preprint 2010] and [H. Wu, M. Wunsch, arXiv:1009.1688v1 [math.AP

  3. Two Component Injection Moulding for Moulded Interconnect Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The moulded interconnect devices (MIDs) contain huge possibilities for many applications in micro electro-mechanical-systems because of their potential in reducing the number of components, process steps and finally in miniaturization of the product. Among the available MID process chains, two...... component (2k) injection moulding is one of the most industrially adaptive processes. However, the use of two component injection moulding for MID fabrication, with circuit patterns in sub-millimeter range, is still a big challenge. This book searches for the technical difficulties associated...... with the process and makes attempts to overcome those challenges. In search of suitable polymer materials for MID applications, potential materials are characterized in terms of polymer-polymer bond strength, polymer-polymer interface quality and selective metallization. The experimental results find the factors...

  4. Two-component microinjection moulding for MID fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2010-01-01

    Moulded interconnect devices (MIDs) are plastic substrates with electrical infrastructure. The fabrication of MIDs is usually based on injection moulding, and different process chains may be identified from this starting point. The use of MIDs has been driven primarily by the automotive sector......, but recently, the medical sector seems more and more interested. In particular, the possibility of miniaturisation of three-dimensional components with electrical infrastructure is attractive. The present paper describes possible manufacturing routes and challenges of miniaturised MIDs based on two......-component injection moulding and subsequent metallisation. This technology promises cost effective and convergent manufacturing approaches for both macro- and microapplications. This paper presents the results of industrial MID production based on two-component injection moulding and discusses the important issues...

  5. The Vibrio cholerae VprA-VprB two-component system controls virulence through endotoxin modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carmen M; Crofts, Alexander A; Henderson, Jeremy C; Pingali, S Cassandra; Davies, Bryan W; Trent, M Stephen

    2014-12-23

    The bacterial cell surface is the first structure the host immune system targets to prevent infection. Cationic antimicrobial peptides of the innate immune system bind to the membrane of Gram-negative pathogens via conserved, surface-exposed lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. We recently reported that modern strains of the global intestinal pathogen Vibrio cholerae modify the anionic lipid A domain of LPS with a novel moiety, amino acids. Remarkably, glycine or diglycine addition to lipid A alters the surface charge of the bacteria to help evade the cationic antimicrobial peptide polymyxin. However, the regulatory mechanisms of lipid A modification in V. cholerae are unknown. Here, we identify a novel two-component system that regulates lipid A glycine modification by responding to important biological cues associated with pathogenesis, including bile, mildly acidic pH, and cationic antimicrobial peptides. The histidine kinase Vc1319 (VprB) and the response regulator Vc1320 (VprA) respond to these signals and are required for the expression of the almEFG operon that encodes the genes essential for glycine modification of lipid A. Importantly, both the newly identified two-component system and the lipid A modification machinery are required for colonization of the mammalian host. This study demonstrates how V. cholerae uses a previously unknown regulatory network, independent of well-studied V. cholerae virulence factors and regulators, to respond to the host environment and cause infection. Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera disease, infects millions of people every year. V. cholerae El Tor and classical biotypes have been responsible for all cholera pandemics. The El Tor biotype responsible for the current seventh pandemic has displaced the classical biotype worldwide and is highly resistant to cationic antimicrobial peptides, like polymyxin B. This resistance arises from the attachment of one or two glycine residues to the lipid A domain of

  6. Quantitative Kinetic Analyses of Shutting Off a Two-Component System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Gao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells rely on accurate control of signaling systems to adapt to environmental perturbations. System deactivation upon stimulus removal is as important as activation of signaling pathways. The two-component system (TCS is one of the major bacterial signaling schemes. In many TCSs, phosphatase activity of the histidine kinase (HK is believed to play an essential role in shutting off the pathway and resetting the system to the prestimulus state. Two basic challenges are to understand the dynamic behavior of system deactivation and to quantitatively evaluate the role of phosphatase activity under natural cellular conditions. Here we report a kinetic analysis of the response to shutting off the archetype Escherichia coli PhoR-PhoB TCS pathway using both transcription reporter assays and in vivo phosphorylation analyses. Upon removal of the stimulus, the pathway is shut off by rapid dephosphorylation of the PhoB response regulator (RR while PhoB-regulated gene products gradually reset to prestimulus levels through growth dilution. We developed an approach combining experimentation and modeling to assess in vivo kinetic parameters of the phosphatase activity with kinetic data from multiple phosphatase-diminished mutants. This enabled an estimation of the PhoR phosphatase activity in vivo, which is much stronger than the phosphatase activity of PhoR cytoplasmic domains analyzed in vitro. We quantitatively modeled how strong the phosphatase activity needs to be to suppress nonspecific phosphorylation in TCSs and discovered that strong phosphatase activity of PhoR is required for cross-phosphorylation suppression.

  7. The Escherichia coli BarA-UvrY two-component system is a virulence determinant in the urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgellis Dimitris

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Salmonella enterica BarA-SirA, the Erwinia carotovora ExpS-ExpA, the Vibrio cholerae BarA-VarA and the Pseudomonas spp GacS-GacA all belong to the same orthologous family of two-component systems as the Escherichia coli BarA-UvrY. In the first four species it has been demonstrated that disruption of this two-component system leads to a clear reduction in virulence of the bacteria. Our aim was to determine if the Escherichia coli BarA-UvrY two-component system is connected with virulence using a monkey cystitis model. Results Cystitis was generated in Macaque fascularis monkeys by infecting the bladder with a 1:1 mixture of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate DS17 and a derivative where the uvrY gene had been disrupted with a kanamycin resistance gene. Urine was collected through bladder punctuation at subsequent time intervals and the relative amount of uvrY mutant was determined. This showed that inactivation of the UvrY response regulator leads to a reduced fitness. In similar competitions in culture flasks with Luria Broth (LB the uvrY mutant rather had a higher fitness than the wild type. When the competitions were done in flasks with human urine the uvrY mutant initially had a lower fitness. This was followed by a fluctuation in the level of mutant in the long-term culture, with a pattern that was specific for the individual urines that were tested. Addition of LB to the different urine competition cultures however clearly led to a consistently higher fitness of the uvrY mutant. Conclusion This paper demonstrates that the BarA-UvrY two-component system is a determinant for virulence in a monkey cystitis model. The observed competition profiles strengthen our previous hypothesis that disruption of the BarA-UvrY two-component system impairs the ability of the bacteria to switch between different carbon sources. The urine in the bladder contains several different carbon sources and its composition changes over

  8. A two component system is involved in acid adaptation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhua; Liu, Wei; Qu, Xiaojun; Chen, Zhangting; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Lanwei

    2012-05-20

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus is of vital importance to the food industry, especially to the dairy industry. Two component systems (TCSs) are one of the most important mechanisms for environmental sensing and signal transduction in the majority of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A typical TCS consists of a histidine protein kinase (HPK) and a cytoplasmic response regulator (RR). To investigate the functions of TCSs during acid adaptation in L. bulgaricus, we used quantitative PCR to reveal how TCSs expression changes during acid adaptation. Two TCSs (JN675228/JN675229 and JN675230/JN675231) and two HPKs (JN675236 and JN675240) were induced during acid adaptation. These TCSs were speculated to be related with the acid adaptation ability of L. bulgaricus. The mutants of JN675228/JN675229 were constructed in order to investigate the functions of JN675228/JN675229. The mutants showed reduced acid adaptation compared to that of wild type, and the complemented strains were similar to the wild-type strain. These observations suggested that JN675228 and JN675229 were involved in acid adaptation in L. bulgaricus. The interaction between JN675228 and JN675229 was identified by means of yeast two-hybrid system. The results indicated there is interaction between JN675228 and JN675229.

  9. A hybrid two-component system protein from Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was involved in chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhua; Tu, Ran; Wu, Lixian; Hong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Sanfeng

    2011-09-20

    We here report the sequence and functional analysis of org35 of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7, which was originally identified to be able to interact with NifA in yeast-two-hybrid system. The org35 encodes a hybrid two-component system protein, including N-terminal PAS domains, a histidine kinase (HPK) domain and a response regulator (RR) domain in C-terminal. To determine the function of the Org35, a deletion-insertion mutant in PAS domain [named Sp7353] and a complemental strain Sp7353C were constructed. The mutant had reduced chemotaxis ability compared to that of wild-type, and the complemental strain was similar to the wild-type strain. These data suggested that the A. brasilense org35 played a key role in chemotaxis. Variants containing different domains of the org35 were expressed, and the functions of these domains were studied in vitro. Phosphorylation assays in vitro demonstrated that the HPK domain of Org35 possessed the autokinase activity and that the phosphorylated HPK was able to transfer phosphate groups to the RR domain. The result indicated Org35 was a phosphorylation-communicating protein.

  10. Vibrio cholerae Response Regulator VxrB Controls Colonization and Regulates the Type VI Secretion System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS are used by bacteria to sense and respond to their environment. TCS are typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK and a response regulator (RR. The Vibrio cholerae genome encodes 52 RR, but the role of these RRs in V. cholerae pathogenesis is largely unknown. To identify RRs that control V. cholerae colonization, in-frame deletions of each RR were generated and the resulting mutants analyzed using an infant mouse intestine colonization assay. We found that 12 of the 52 RR were involved in intestinal colonization. Mutants lacking one previously uncharacterized RR, VCA0566 (renamed VxrB, displayed a significant colonization defect. Further experiments showed that VxrB phosphorylation state on the predicted conserved aspartate contributes to intestine colonization. The VxrB regulon was determined using whole genome expression analysis. It consists of several genes, including those genes that create the type VI secretion system (T6SS. We determined that VxrB is required for T6SS expression using several in vitro assays and bacterial killing assays, and furthermore that the T6SS is required for intestinal colonization. vxrB is encoded in a four gene operon and the other vxr operon members also modulate intestinal colonization. Lastly, though ΔvxrB exhibited a defect in single-strain intestinal colonization, the ΔvxrB strain did not show any in vitro growth defect. Overall, our work revealed that a small set of RRs is required for intestinal colonization and one of these regulators, VxrB affects colonization at least in part through its regulation of T6SS genes.

  11. Vibrio cholerae Response Regulator VxrB Controls Colonization and Regulates the Type VI Secretion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Andrew T; Ottemann, Karen M; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are used by bacteria to sense and respond to their environment. TCS are typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). The Vibrio cholerae genome encodes 52 RR, but the role of these RRs in V. cholerae pathogenesis is largely unknown. To identify RRs that control V. cholerae colonization, in-frame deletions of each RR were generated and the resulting mutants analyzed using an infant mouse intestine colonization assay. We found that 12 of the 52 RR were involved in intestinal colonization. Mutants lacking one previously uncharacterized RR, VCA0566 (renamed VxrB), displayed a significant colonization defect. Further experiments showed that VxrB phosphorylation state on the predicted conserved aspartate contributes to intestine colonization. The VxrB regulon was determined using whole genome expression analysis. It consists of several genes, including those genes that create the type VI secretion system (T6SS). We determined that VxrB is required for T6SS expression using several in vitro assays and bacterial killing assays, and furthermore that the T6SS is required for intestinal colonization. vxrB is encoded in a four gene operon and the other vxr operon members also modulate intestinal colonization. Lastly, though ΔvxrB exhibited a defect in single-strain intestinal colonization, the ΔvxrB strain did not show any in vitro growth defect. Overall, our work revealed that a small set of RRs is required for intestinal colonization and one of these regulators, VxrB affects colonization at least in part through its regulation of T6SS genes.

  12. Two-Component Multi-Parameter Time-Frequency Electromagnetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangZhou; DongWeibin; HeTiezhi

    2003-01-01

    The two-component multi-parameter time-frequency electromagnetic method, used for the development of oilfields,makes use of both the traditional individual conductivity parameters of oil-producing layers and the dispersion information of the conductivity, i.e., the induced polarization parameter. The frequency-domain dispersion data is used to delineate the contacts between oil and water and the time domain dBz/dt component is used to estimate the depths to the un-known reservoirs so as to offer significant data in many aspects for oil exploration and detection.

  13. A polaritonic two-component Bose-Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, M J; Brandao, F G S L; Plenio, M B [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Exhibition Road, SW7 2PE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.hartmann@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-03-15

    We demonstrate that polaritons in an array of interacting micro-cavities with strong atom-photon coupling can form a two-component Bose-Hubbard model in which both polariton species are protected against spontaneous emission as their atomic part is stored in two ground states of the atoms. The parameters of the effective model can be tuned via the driving strength of external lasers and include attractive and repulsive polariton interactions. We also describe a method to measure the number statistics in one cavity for each polariton species independently.

  14. Two component micro injection moulding for moulded interconnect devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    2008-01-01

    Moulded interconnect devices (MIDs) contain huge possibilities for many applications in micro electro-mechanical-systems because of their capability of reducing the number of components, process steps and finally in miniaturization of the product. Among the available MID process chains, two...... and a reasonable adhesion between them. • Selective metallization of the two component plastic part (coating one polymer with metal and leaving the other one uncoated) To overcome these two main issues in MID fabrication for micro applications, the current Ph.D. project explores the technical difficulties...

  15. Two-component Fermi gas in a Harmonic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, X X; Cui, H T; Zhang, C M

    2002-01-01

    We consider a mixture of two-component Fermi gases at low temperature. The density profile of this degenerate Fermi gas is calculated under the semiclassical approximation. The results show that the fermion-fermion interactions make a large correction to the density profile at low temperature. The phase separation of such a mixture is also discussed for both attractive and repulsive interatomic interactions, and the numerical calculations demonstrate the exist of a stable temperature region $T_{c1}

  16. Itinerant ferromagnetism in a polarized two-component Fermi gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massignan, Pietro; Yu, Zhenhua; Bruun, Georg M

    2013-06-07

    We analyze when a repulsively interacting two-component Fermi gas becomes thermodynamically unstable against phase separation. We focus on the strongly polarized limit, where the free energy of the homogeneous mixture can be calculated accurately in terms of well-defined quasiparticles, the repulsive polarons. Phase diagrams as a function of polarization, temperature, mass imbalance, and repulsive polaron energy, as well as scattering length and range parameter, are provided. We show that the lifetime of the repulsive polaron increases significantly with the interaction range and the mass of the minority atoms, raising the prospects of detecting the transition to the elusive itinerant ferromagnetic state with ultracold atoms.

  17. Two component micro injection molding for MID fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    Molded Interconnect Devices (MIDs) are plastic substrates with electrical infrastructure. The fabrication of MIDs is usually based on injection molding and different process chains may be identified from this starting point. The use of MIDs has been driven primarily by the automotive sector......, but recently the medical sector seems more and more interested. In particular the possibility of miniaturization of 3D components with electrical infrastructure is attractive. The paper describes possible manufacturing routes and challenges of miniaturized MIDs based on two component micro injection molding...

  18. Structure of the Response Regulator NsrR from Streptococcus agalactiae, Which Is Involved in Lantibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosa, Sakshi; Hoeppner, Astrid; Gohlke, Holger; Schmitt, Lutz; Smits, Sander H J

    2016-01-01

    Lantibiotics are antimicrobial peptides produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Interestingly, several clinically relevant and human pathogenic strains are inherently resistant towards lantibiotics. The expression of the genes responsible for lantibiotic resistance is regulated by a specific two-component system consisting of a histidine kinase and a response regulator. Here, we focused on a response regulator involved in lantibiotic resistance, NsrR from Streptococcus agalactiae, and determined the crystal structures of its N-terminal receiver domain and C-terminal DNA-binding effector domain. The C-terminal domain exhibits a fold that classifies NsrR as a member of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily of regulators. Amino acids involved in phosphorylation, dimerization, and DNA-binding were identified and demonstrated to be conserved in lantibiotic resistance regulators. Finally, a model of the full-length NsrR in the active and inactive state provides insights into protein dimerization and DNA-binding.

  19. Graphene Oxide: A One- versus Two-Component Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Anton; Grote, Fabian; Overgaard, Marc; Roth, Alexandra; Halbig, Christian E; Nørgaard, Kasper; Guldi, Dirk M; Eigler, Siegfried

    2016-09-14

    The structure of graphene oxide (GO) is a matter of discussion. While established GO models are based on functional groups attached to the carbon framework, another frequently used model claims that GO consists of two components, a slightly oxidized graphene core and highly oxidized molecular species, oxidative debris (OD), adsorbed on it. Those adsorbents are claimed to be the origin for optical properties of GO. Here, we examine this model by preparing GO with a low degree of functionalization, combining it with OD and studying the optical properties of both components and their combination in an artificial two-component system. The analyses of absorption and emission spectra as well as lifetime measurements reveal that properties of the combined system are distinctly different from those of GO. That confirms structural models of GO as a separate oxygenated hexagonal carbon framework with optical properties governed by its internal structure rather than the presence of OD. Understanding the structure of GO allows further reliable interpretation of its optical and electronic properties and enables controlled processing of GO.

  20. Identification of a second two-component signal transduction system that controls fosfomycin tolerance and glycerol-3-phosphate uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Kumiko; Hirakawa, Yuko; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Hirakawa, Hidetada

    2015-03-01

    Particular interest in fosfomycin has resurfaced because it is a highly beneficial antibiotic for the treatment of refractory infectious diseases caused by pathogens that are resistant to other commonly used antibiotics. The biological cost to cells of resistance to fosfomycin because of chromosomal mutation is high. We previously found that a bacterial two-component system, CpxAR, induces fosfomycin tolerance in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7. This mechanism does not rely on irreversible genetic modification and allows EHEC to relieve the fitness burden that results from fosfomycin resistance in the absence of fosfomycin. Here we show that another two-component system, TorSRT, which was originally characterized as a regulatory system for anaerobic respiration utilizing trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), also induces fosfomycin tolerance. Activation of the Tor regulatory pathway by overexpression of torR, which encodes the response regulator, or addition of TMAO increased fosfomycin tolerance in EHEC. We also show that phosphorylated TorR directly represses the expression of glpT, a gene that encodes a symporter of fosfomycin and glycerol-3-phosphate, and activation of the TorR protein results in the reduced uptake of fosfomycin by cells. However, cells in which the Tor pathway was activated had an impaired growth phenotype when cultured with glycerol-3-phosphate as a carbon substrate. These observations suggest that the TorSRT pathway is the second two-component system to reversibly control fosfomycin tolerance and glycerol-3-phosphate uptake in EHEC, and this may be beneficial for bacteria by alleviating the biological cost. We expect that this mechanism could be a potential target to enhance the utility of fosfomycin as chemotherapy against multidrug-resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Closing the loop: The PmrA/PmrB two-component system negatively controls expression of its posttranscriptional activator PmrD

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Akinori; Latifi, Tammy; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how an organism integrates multiple signals to mediate an appropriate cellular response. The PmrA/PmrB two-component system of Salmonella enterica can be activated independently by Fe3+, which is sensed by the PmrB protein, and in low Mg2+, which is sensed by the PhoQ protein. The low-Mg2+ activation requires pmrD, a PhoP/PhoQ-activated gene that activates the response regulator PmrA at a posttranscriptional level. We now report that pmrD expression is neg...

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Amit Rahat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mϕ exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mϕ, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mϕ, orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mϕ, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mϕ. Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mϕ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mϕ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mϕ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators HIF-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, Erg-1, but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mϕ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mϕ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mϕ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mϕ.

  3. Imidazole as a Small Molecule Analogue in Two-Component Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephani C; Silversmith, Ruth E; Collins, Edward J; Bourret, Robert B

    2015-12-15

    In two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), responses to stimuli are mediated through phosphotransfer between protein components. Canonical TCSs use His → Asp phosphotransfer in which phosphoryl groups are transferred from a conserved His on a sensory histidine kinase (HK) to a conserved Asp on a response regulator (RR). RRs contain the catalytic core of His → Asp phosphotransfer, evidenced by the ability of RRs to autophosphorylate with small molecule analogues of phospho-His proteins. Phosphorelays are a more complex variation of TCSs that additionally utilize Asp → His phosphotransfer through the use of an additional component, the histidine-containing phosphotransfer domain (Hpt), which reacts with RRs both as phosphodonors and phosphoacceptors. Here we show that imidazole has features of a rudimentary Hpt. Imidazole acted as a nucleophile and attacked phosphorylated RRs (RR-P) to produce monophosphoimidazole (MPI) and unphosphorylated RR. Phosphotransfer from RR-P to imidazole required the intact RR active site, indicating that the RR provided the core catalytic machinery for Asp → His phosphotransfer. Imidazole functioned in an artificial phosphorelay to transfer phosphoryl groups between unrelated RRs. The X-ray crystal structure of an activated RR·imidazole complex showed imidazole oriented in the RR active site similarly to the His of an Hpt. Imidazole interacted with RR nonconserved active site residues, which influenced the relative reactivity of RR-P with imidazole versus water. Rate constants for reaction of imidazole or MPI with chimeric RRs suggested that the RR active site contributes to the kinetic preferences exhibited by the YPD1 Hpt.

  4. Characterization of the Arc two-component signal transduction system of the capnophilic rumen bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Won Seok; Jung, Young Ryul; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Kang, Hyun Ah; Lee, Sang Yup; Chavez-Canales, Maria; Georgellis, Dimitris; Kwon, Ohsuk

    2008-07-01

    The ArcB/A two-component signal transduction system of Escherichia coli modulates the expression of numerous operons in response to redox conditions of growth. We demonstrate that the putative arcA and arcB genes of Mannheimia succiniciproducens MBEL55E, a capnophilic (CO2-loving) rumen bacterium, encode functional proteins that specify a two-component system. The Arc proteins of the two bacterial species sufficiently resemble each other that they can participate in heterologous transphosphorylation in vitro, and the arcA and arcB genes of M. succiniciproducens confer toluidine blue resistance to E. coli arcA and arcB mutants. However, neither the quinone analogs (ubiquinone 0 and menadione) nor the cytosolic effectors (d-lactate, acetate, and pyruvate) affect the net phosphorylation of M. succiniciproducens ArcB. Our results indicate that different types of signaling molecules and distinct modes of kinase regulation are used by the ArcB proteins of E. coli and M. succiniciproducens.

  5. Searching for Potential Drug Targets in Two-component and Phosphorelay Signal-transduction Systems using Three-dimensional Cluster Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hui CAI; Qing ZHANG; Shuo-Yong SHI; Da-Fu DING

    2005-01-01

    Two-component and phosphorelay signal transduction systems are central components in the virulence and antimicrobial resistance responses of a number of bacterial and fungal pathogens; in some cases, these systems are essential for bacterial growth and viability. Herein, we analyze in detail the conserved surface residue clusters in the phosphotransferase domain of histidine kinases and the regulatory domain of response regulators by using complex structure-based three-dimensional cluster analysis. We also investigatethe protein-protein interactions that these residue clusters participate in. The Spo0B-SpoOF complex structure was used as the reference structure, and the multiple aligned sequences of phosphotransferases and response regulators were paired correspondingly. The results show that a contiguous conserved residue cluster is formed around the active site, which crosses the interface of histidine kinases and response regulators. The conserved residue clusters of phosphotransferase and the regulatory domains are directly involved in the functional implementation of two-component signal transduction systems and are good targets for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  6. Exact two-component relativistic energy band theory and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Rundong; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian, E-mail: liuwj@pku.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, and Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-01-28

    An exact two-component (X2C) relativistic density functional theory in terms of atom-centered basis functions is proposed for relativistic calculations of band structures and structural properties of periodic systems containing heavy elements. Due to finite radial extensions of the local basis functions, the periodic calculation is very much the same as a molecular calculation, except only for an Ewald summation for the Coulomb potential of fluctuating periodic monopoles. For comparison, the nonrelativistic and spin-free X2C counterparts are also implemented in parallel. As a first and pilot application, the band gaps, lattice constants, cohesive energies, and bulk moduli of AgX (X = Cl, Br, I) are calculated to compare with other theoretical results.

  7. Dynamics of two-component membranes surrounded by viscoelastic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Shigeyuki; Yasuda, Kento; Okamoto, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the dynamics of two-component fluid membranes which are surrounded by viscoelastic media. We assume that membrane-embedded proteins can diffuse laterally and induce a local membrane curvature. The mean squared displacement of a tagged membrane segment is obtained as a generalized Einstein relation. When the elasticity of the surrounding media obeys a power-law behavior in frequency, an anomalous diffusion of the membrane segment is predicted. We also consider the situation where the proteins generate active non-equilibrium forces. The generalized Einstein relation is further modified by an effective temperature that depends on the force dipole energy. The obtained generalized Einstein relations are useful for membrane microrheology experiments.

  8. Two-component jet simulations: Combining analytical and numerical approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Matsakos, T; Trussoni, E; Tsinganos, K; Vlahakis, N; Sauty, C; Mignone, A

    2009-01-01

    Recent observations as well as theoretical studies of YSO jets suggest the presence of two steady components: a disk wind type outflow needed to explain the observed high mass loss rates and a stellar wind type outflow probably accounting for the observed stellar spin down. In this framework, we construct numerical two-component jet models by properly mixing an analytical disk wind solution with a complementary analytically derived stellar outflow. Their combination is controlled by both spatial and temporal parameters, in order to address different physical conditions and time variable features. We study the temporal evolution and the interaction of the two jet components on both small and large scales. The simulations reach steady state configurations close to the initial solutions. Although time variability is not found to considerably affect the dynamics, flow fluctuations generate condensations, whose large scale structures have a strong resemblance to observed YSO jet knots.

  9. Exact two-component relativistic energy band theory and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rundong; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian

    2016-01-28

    An exact two-component (X2C) relativistic density functional theory in terms of atom-centered basis functions is proposed for relativistic calculations of band structures and structural properties of periodic systems containing heavy elements. Due to finite radial extensions of the local basis functions, the periodic calculation is very much the same as a molecular calculation, except only for an Ewald summation for the Coulomb potential of fluctuating periodic monopoles. For comparison, the nonrelativistic and spin-free X2C counterparts are also implemented in parallel. As a first and pilot application, the band gaps, lattice constants, cohesive energies, and bulk moduli of AgX (X = Cl, Br, I) are calculated to compare with other theoretical results.

  10. Recent advances in description of few two-component fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Kartavtsev, O I

    2012-01-01

    Overview of the recent advances in description of the few two-component fermions is presented. The zero-range interaction limit is generally considered to discuss the principal aspects of the few-body dynamics. Significant attention is paid to detailed description of two identical fermions of mass $m$ and a distinct particle of mass $m_1$; two universal $L^P = 1^-$ bound states arise for mass ratio $m/m_1$ increasing up to the critical value $\\mu_c \\approx 13.607$, beyond which the Efimov effect takes place. The topics considered include rigorous treatment of the few-fermion problem in the zero-range interaction limit, low-dimensional results, the four-body energy spectrum, crossover of the energy spectra for $m/m_1$ near the critical value $\\mu_c $, and properties of potential-dependent states. At last, enlisted are the problems, whose solution is in due course.

  11. Bond strength of two component injection moulded MID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2006-01-01

    Most products of the future will require industrially adapted, cost effective production processes and on this issue two-component (2K) injection moulding is a potential candidate for MID manufacturing. MID based on 2k injection moulded plastic part with selectively metallised circuit tracks allows...... the integration of electrical and mechanical functionalities in a real 3D structure. If 2k injection moulding is applied with two polymers, of which one is plateable and the other is not, it will be possible to make 3D electrical structures directly on the component. To be applicable in the real engineering field...... the two different plastic materials in the MID structure require good bonding between them. This paper finds suitable combinations of materials for MIDs from both bond strength and metallisation view-point. Plastic parts were made by two-shot injection moulding and the effects of some important process...

  12. Efficient two-component relativistic method for large systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Hiromi [Department of Chemitsry and Biochemistry, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    This paper reviews a series of theoretical studies to develop efficient two-component (2c) relativistic method for large systems by the author’s group. The basic theory is the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (IODKH) method for many-electron Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. The local unitary transformation (LUT) scheme can effectively produce the 2c relativistic Hamiltonian, and the divide-and-conquer (DC) method can achieve linear-scaling of Hartree-Fock and electron correlation methods. The frozen core potential (FCP) theoretically connects model potential calculations with the all-electron ones. The accompanying coordinate expansion with a transfer recurrence relation (ACE-TRR) scheme accelerates the computations of electron repulsion integrals with high angular momenta and long contractions.

  13. No electrostatic supersolitons in two-component plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verheest, Frank, E-mail: frank.verheest@ugent.be [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B–9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Lakhina, Gurbax S., E-mail: lakhina@iigm.iigs.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai (India); Hellberg, Manfred A., E-mail: hellberg@ukzn.ac.za [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2014-06-15

    The concept of acoustic supersolitons was introduced for a very specific plasma with five constituents, and discussed only for a single set of plasma parameters. Supersolitons are characterized by having subsidiary extrema on the sides of a typical bipolar electric field signature, or by association with a root beyond double layers in the fully nonlinear Sagdeev pseudopotential description. It was subsequently found that supersolitons could exist in several plasma models having three constituent species, rather than four or five. In the present paper, it is proved that standard two-component plasma models cannot generate supersolitons, by recalling and extending results already in the literature, and by establishing the necessary properties of a more recent model.

  14. Budding Transition of Asymmetric Two-component Lipid Domains

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, Jean; Andelman, David

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model that accounts for the budding transition of asymmetric two-component lipid domains, where the two monolayers (leaflets) have different average compositions controlled by independent chemical potentials. Assuming a coupling between the local curvature and local lipid composition in each of the leaflets, we discuss the morphology and thermodynamic behavior of asymmetric lipid domains. The membrane free-energy contains three contributions: the bending energy, the line tension, and a Landau free-energy for a lateral phase separation. Within a mean-field treatment, we obtain various phase diagrams containing fully budded, dimpled, and flat states as a function of the two leaflet compositions. The global phase behavior is analyzed, and depending on system parameters, the phase diagrams include one-phase, two-phase and three-phase regions. In particular, we predict various phase coexistence regions between different morphologies of domains, which may be observed in multi-component membranes or ves...

  15. How insects overcome two-component plant chemical defence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentzold, Stefan; Zagrobelny, Mika; Rook, Frederik;

    2014-01-01

    Insect herbivory is often restricted by glucosylated plant chemical defence compounds that are activated by plant β-glucosidases to release toxic aglucones upon plant tissue damage. Such two-component plant defences are widespread in the plant kingdom and examples of these classes of compounds...... are alkaloid, benzoxazinoid, cyanogenic and iridoid glucosides as well as glucosinolates and salicinoids. Conversely, many insects have evolved a diversity of counteradaptations to overcome this type of constitutive chemical defence. Here we discuss that such counter-adaptations occur at different time points......-component chemical defence. These adaptations include host plant choice, non-disruptive feeding guilds and various physiological adaptations as well as metabolic enzymatic strategies of the insect’s digestive system. Furthermore, insect adaptations often act in combination, may exist in both generalists...

  16. Parallel TREE code for two-component ultracold plasma analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byoungseon; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2008-02-01

    The TREE method has been widely used for long-range interaction N-body problems. We have developed a parallel TREE code for two-component classical plasmas with open boundary conditions and highly non-uniform charge distributions. The program efficiently handles millions of particles evolved over long relaxation times requiring millions of time steps. Appropriate domain decomposition and dynamic data management were employed, and large-scale parallel processing was achieved using an intermediate level of granularity of domain decomposition and ghost TREE communication. Even though the computational load is not fully distributed in fine grains, high parallel efficiency was achieved for ultracold plasma systems of charged particles. As an application, we performed simulations of an ultracold neutral plasma with a half million particles and a half million time steps. For the long temporal trajectories of relaxation between heavy ions and light electrons, large configurations of ultracold plasmas can now be investigated, which was not possible in past studies.

  17. The YvqE two-component system controls biofilm formation and acid production in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Maeyama, Jun-Ichi; Matsui, Hideyuki; Zhang, Yan; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-07-01

    In Streptococcus pyogenes, proteins involved in determining virulence are controlled by stand-alone response regulators and by two-component regulatory systems. Previous studies reported that, compared to the parental strain, the yvqE sensor knockout strain showed significantly reduced growth and lower virulence. To determine the function of YvqE, we performed biofilm analysis and pH assays on yvqE mutants, and site-directed mutagenesis of YvqE. The yvqE deletion mutant showed a slower acid production rate, indicating that YvqE regulates acid production from sugar fermentation. The mutant strain, in which the Asp(26) residue in YvqE was replaced with Asn, affected biofilm formation, suggesting that this amino acid senses hydrogen ions produced by fermentative sugar metabolism. Signals received by YvqE were directly or indirectly responsible for inducing pilus expression. This study shows that at low environmental pH, biofilm formation in S. pyogenes is mediated by YvqE and suggests that regulation of pilus expression by environmental acidification could be directly under the control of YvqE.

  18. Comparative Expression Analysis of Two-Component System Members in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama eSingh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Two component system (TCS is one of the key signal sensing machinery which enables species to sense environmental stimuli. It essentially comprises of three major components, sensory histidine kinase proteins (HKs, histidine phosphotransfer proteins (Hpts and response regulator proteins (RRs. The members of the TCS family have already been identified in Arabidopsis and rice but the knowledge about their functional indulgence during various abiotic stress conditions remains meagre. Current study is an attempt to carry out comprehensive analysis of the expression of TCS members in response to various abiotic stress conditions and in various plant tissues in Arabidopsis and rice using MPSS and publicly available microarray data. The analysis suggests that despite having almost similar number of genes, rice expresses higher number of TCS members during various abiotic stress conditions than Arabidopsis. We found that the TCS machinery is regulated by not only various abiotic stresses, but also by the tissue specificity. Analysis of expression of some representative members of TCS gene family showed their regulation by the diurnal cycle in rice seedlings, thus bringing-in another level of their transcriptional control. Thus, we report a highly complex and tight regulatory network of TCS members, as influenced by the tissue, abiotic stress signal and diurnal rhythm. The insights on the comparative expression analysis presented in this study may provide crucial leads towards dissection of diverse role(s of the various TCS family members in Arabidopsis and rice.

  19. Distribution, structure and diversity of “bacterial” genes encoding two-component proteins in the Euryarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark K. Ashby

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The publicly available annotated archaeal genome sequences (23 complete and three partial annotations, October 2005 were searched for the presence of potential two-component open reading frames (ORFs using gene category lists and BLASTP. A total of 489 potential two-component genes were identified from the gene category lists and BLASTP. Two-component genes were found in 14 of the 21 Euryarchaeal sequences (October 2005 and in neither the Crenarchaeota nor the Nanoarchaeota. A total of 20 predicted protein domains were identified in the putative two-component ORFs that, in addition to the histidine kinase and receiver domains, also includes sensor and signalling domains. The detailed structure of these putative proteins is shown, as is the distribution of each class of two-component genes in each species. Potential members of orthologous groups have been identified, as have any potential operons containing two or more two-component genes. The number of two-component genes in those Euryarchaeal species which have them seems to be linked more to lifestyle and habitat than to genome complexity, with most examples being found in Methanospirillum hungatei, Haloarcula marismortui, Methanococcoides burtonii and the mesophilic Methanosarcinales group. The large numbers of two-component genes in these species may reflect a greater requirement for internal regulation. Phylogenetic analysis of orthologous groups of five different protein classes, three probably involved in regulating taxis, suggests that most of these ORFs have been inherited vertically from an ancestral Euryarchaeal species and point to a limited number of key horizontal gene transfer events.

  20. The GacS-GacA two-component regulatory system of Pseudomonas fluorescens: a bacterial two-hybrid analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Chang, Limei; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2009-03-01

    The two-component regulatory system comprised of the sensor kinase, GacS, and its response regulator, GacA, is involved in regulation of secondary metabolism and many other aspects of bacterial physiology. Although it is known that the sensor kinases RetS and LadS feed into the GacS/GacA system, the mechanism through which this occurs is unknown, as are the protein-protein interactions in this system. To characterize and define these interactions, we utilized a bacterial two-hybrid system to study the interactions of GacS and GacA from Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0. Domains of GacA and GacS, identified through bioinformatics, were subcloned and their ability to interact in vivo was investigated. We found that the entire GacA molecule is required for GacA to interact with itself or GacS. Furthermore, the HisKA/HATPase/REC domains of GacS together are responsible for GacS interacting with GacA, while the HAMP domain of GacS is responsible for GacS interacting with itself. In addition, homologs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa hybrid sensor kinases, RetS and LadS, were identified in P. fluorescens, and shown to interact with GacS, but not GacA.

  1. Implementation of Two Component Advective Flow Solution in XSPEC

    CERN Document Server

    Debnath, Dipak; Mondal, Santanu

    2014-01-01

    Spectral and Temporal properties of black hole candidates can be explained reasonably well using Chakrabarti-Titarchuk solution of two component advective flow (TCAF). This model requires two accretion rates, namely, the Keplerian disk accretion rate and the halo accretion rate, the latter being composed of a sub-Keplerian, low angular momentum flow which may or may not develop a shock. In this solution, the relevant parameter is the relative importance of the halo (which creates the Compton cloud region) rate with respect to the Keplerian disk rate (soft photon source). Though this model has been used earlier to manually fit data of several black hole candidates quite satisfactorily, for the first time, we made it user friendly by implementing it into XSPEC software of GSFC/NASA. This enables any user to extract physical parameters of the accretion flows, such as two accretion rates, the shock location, the shock strength etc. for any black hole candidate. We provide some examples of fitting a few cases usin...

  2. Hamiltonian of a homogeneous two-component plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essén, Hanno; Nordmark, A

    2004-03-01

    The Hamiltonian of one- and two-component plasmas is calculated in the negligible radiation Darwin approximation. Since the Hamiltonian is the phase space energy of the system its form indicates, according to statistical mechanics, the nature of the thermal equilibrium that plasmas strive to attain. The main issue is the length scale of the magnetic interaction energy. In the past a screening length lambda=1/square root of r(e)n], with n number density and r(e) classical electron radius, has been derived. We address the question whether the corresponding longer screening range obtained from the classical proton radius is physically relevant and the answer is affirmative. Starting from the Darwin Lagrangian it is nontrivial to find the Darwin Hamiltonian of a macroscopic system. For a homogeneous system we resolve the difficulty by temporarily approximating the particle number density by a smooth constant density. This leads to Yukawa-type screened vector potential. The nontrivial problem of finding the corresponding, divergence free, Coulomb gauge version is solved.

  3. A minimal model for two-component dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, Sonja; Klasen, Michael; Yaguna, Carlos E. [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 9,D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We propose and study a new minimal model for two-component dark matter. The model contains only three additional fields, one fermion and two scalars, all singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Two of these fields, one fermion and one scalar, are odd under a Z{sub 2} symmetry that renders them simultaneously stable. Thus, both particles contribute to the observed dark matter density. This model resembles the union of the singlet scalar and the singlet fermionic models but it contains some new features of its own. We analyze in some detail its dark matter phenomenology. Regarding the relic density, the main novelty is the possible annihilation of one dark matter particle into the other, which can affect the predicted relic density in a significant way. Regarding dark matter detection, we identify a new contribution that can lead either to an enhancement or to a suppression of the spin-independent cross section for the scalar dark matter particle. Finally, we define a set of five benchmarks models compatible with all present bounds and examine their direct detection prospects at planned experiments. A generic feature of this model is that both particles give rise to observable signals in 1-ton direct detection experiments. In fact, such experiments will be able to probe even a subdominant dark matter component at the percent level.

  4. A minimal model for two-component dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Esch, Sonja; Yaguna, Carlos E

    2014-01-01

    We propose and study a new minimal model for two-component dark matter. The model contains only three additional fields, one fermion and two scalars, all singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Two of these fields, one fermion and one scalar, are odd under a $Z_2$ symmetry that renders them simultaneously stable. Thus, both particles contribute to the observed dark matter density. This model resembles the union of the singlet scalar and the singlet fermionic models but it contains some new features of its own. We analyze in some detail its dark matter phenomenology. Regarding the relic density, the main novelty is the possible annihilation of one dark matter particle into the other, which can affect the predicted relic density in a significant way. Regarding dark matter detection, we identify a new contribution that can lead either to an enhancement or to a suppression of the spin-independent cross section for the scalar dark matter particle. Finally, we define a set of five benchmarks models compatibl...

  5. A minimal model for two-component dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Sonja; Klasen, Michael; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2014-09-01

    We propose and study a new minimal model for two-component dark matter. The model contains only three additional fields, one fermion and two scalars, all singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Two of these fields, one fermion and one scalar, are odd under a Z 2 symmetry that renders them simultaneously stable. Thus, both particles contribute to the observed dark matter density. This model resembles the union of the singlet scalar and the singlet fermionic models but it contains some new features of its own. We analyze in some detail its dark matter phenomenology. Regarding the relic density, the main novelty is the possible annihilation of one dark matter particle into the other, which can affect the predicted relic density in a significant way. Regarding dark matter detection, we identify a new contribution that can lead either to an enhancement or to a suppression of the spin-independent cross section for the scalar dark matter particle. Finally, we define a set of five benchmarks models compatible with all present bounds and examine their direct detection prospects at planned experiments. A generic feature of this model is that both particles give rise to observable signals in 1-ton direct detection experiments. In fact, such experiments will be able to probe even a subdominant dark matter component at the percent level.

  6. Two-component perfect fluid in FRW universe

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    We propose the cosmological model which allows to describe on equal footing the evolution of matter in the universe on the time interval from the inflation till the domination of dark energy. The matter is considered as a two-component perfect fluid imitated by homogeneous scalar fields between which there is energy exchange. Dark energy is represented by the cosmological constant, which is supposed invariable during the whole evolution of the universe. The matter changes its equation of state with time, so that the era of radiation domination in the early universe smoothly passes into the era of a pressureless gas, which then passes into the late-time epoch, when the matter is represented by a gas of low-velocity cosmic strings. The inflationary phase is described as an analytic continuation of the energy density in the very early universe into the region of small negative values of the parameter which characterizes typical time of energy transfer from one matter component to another. The Hubble expansion ra...

  7. Regulation of oxidative stress response by CosR, an essential response regulator in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunyoung Hwang

    Full Text Available CosR (Campylobacter oxidative stress regulator; Cj0355c is an OmpR-type response regulator essential for the viability of Campylobacter jejuni, a leading foodborne pathogen causing human gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite importance, the function of CosR remains completely unknown mainly because of cell death caused by its knockout mutation. To overcome this technical limitation, in this study, antisense technology was used to investigate the regulatory function of CosR by modulating the level of CosR expression. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE was performed to identify the CosR regulon either by suppressing CosR expression with antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA or by overexpressing CosR in C. jejuni. According to the results of 2DGE, CosR regulated 32 proteins involved in various cellular processes. Notably, CosR negatively regulated a few key proteins of the oxidative stress response of C. jejuni, such as SodB, Dps, Rrc and LuxS, whereas CosR positively controlled AhpC. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that CosR directly bound to the promoter region of the oxidative stress genes. DNase I footprinting assays identified 21-bp CosR binding sequences in the sodB and ahpC promoters, suggesting CosR specifically recognizes and binds to the regulated genes. Interestingly, the level of CosR protein was significantly reduced by paraquat (a superoxide generator but not by hydrogen peroxide. Consistent with the overall negative regulation of oxidative stress defense proteins by CosR, the CosR knockdown by antisense rendered C. jejuni more resistant to oxidative stress compared to the wild type. Overall, this study reveals the important role played by the essential response regulator CosR in the oxidative stress defense of C. jejuni.

  8. Hantavirus Regulation of Type I Interferon Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Matthys

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses primarily infect human endothelial cells (ECs and cause two highly lethal human diseases. Early addition of Type I interferon (IFN to ECs blocks hantavirus replication and thus for hantaviruses to be pathogenic they need to prevent early interferon induction. PHV replication is blocked in human ECs, but not inhibited in IFN deficient VeroE6 cells and consistent with this, infecting ECs with PHV results in the early induction of IFNβ and an array of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs. In contrast, ANDV, HTNV, NY-1V and TULV hantaviruses, inhibit early ISG induction and successfully replicate within human ECs. Hantavirus inhibition of IFN responses has been attributed to several viral proteins including regulation by the Gn proteins cytoplasmic tail (Gn-T. The Gn-T interferes with the formation of STING-TBK1-TRAF3 complexes required for IRF3 activation and IFN induction, while the PHV Gn-T fails to alter this complex or regulate IFN induction. These findings indicate that interfering with early IFN induction is necessary for hantaviruses to replicate in human ECs, and suggest that additional determinants are required for hantaviruses to be pathogenic. The mechanism by which Gn-Ts disrupt IFN signaling is likely to reveal potential therapeutic interventions and suggest protein targets for attenuating hantaviruses.

  9. Importins and exportins regulating allergic immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankita; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of macromolecules is a well-controlled process involving importins and exportins. These karyopherins recognize and bind to receptor-mediated intracellular signals through specific signal sequences that are present on cargo proteins and transport into and out of the nucleus through nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) present on cargo molecules to be imported while nuclear export signals (NES) on the molecules to be exported are recognized by importins and exportins, respectively. The classical NLS are found on many transcription factors and molecules that are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In addition, several immune modulators, including corticosteroids and vitamin D, elicit their cellular responses by regulating the expression and activity of importin molecules. In this review article, we provide a comprehensive list of importin and exportin molecules and their specific cargo that shuttled between cytoplasm and the nucleus. We also critically review the role and regulation of specific importin and exportin involved in the transport of activated transcription factors in allergic diseases, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the potential target sites for developing better therapeutic approaches.

  10. Importins and Exportins Regulating Allergic Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of macromolecules is a well-controlled process involving importins and exportins. These karyopherins recognize and bind to receptor-mediated intracellular signals through specific signal sequences that are present on cargo proteins and transport into and out of the nucleus through nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear localization signals (NLS present on cargo molecules to be imported while nuclear export signals (NES on the molecules to be exported are recognized by importins and exportins, respectively. The classical NLS are found on many transcription factors and molecules that are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In addition, several immune modulators, including corticosteroids and vitamin D, elicit their cellular responses by regulating the expression and activity of importin molecules. In this review article, we provide a comprehensive list of importin and exportin molecules and their specific cargo that shuttled between cytoplasm and the nucleus. We also critically review the role and regulation of specific importin and exportin involved in the transport of activated transcription factors in allergic diseases, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the potential target sites for developing better therapeutic approaches.

  11. The KdpD/KdpE two-component system: integrating K⁺ homeostasis and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Zoë N; Dorus, Steve; Waterfield, Nicholas R

    2013-03-01

    The two-component system (TCS) KdpD/KdpE, extensively studied for its regulatory role in potassium (K(+)) transport, has more recently been identified as an adaptive regulator involved in the virulence and intracellular survival of pathogenic bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, entero-haemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia pestis, Francisella species, Photorhabdus asymbiotica, and mycobacteria. Key homeostasis requirements monitored by KdpD/KdpE and other TCSs such as PhoP/PhoQ are critical to survival in the stressful conditions encountered by pathogens during host interactions. It follows these TCSs may therefore acquire adaptive roles in response to selective pressures associated with adopting a pathogenic lifestyle. Given the central role of K(+) in virulence, we propose that KdpD/KdpE, as a regulator of a high-affinity K(+) pump, has evolved virulence-related regulatory functions. In support of this hypothesis, we review the role of KdpD/KdpE in bacterial infection and summarize evidence that (i) KdpD/KdpE production is correlated with enhanced virulence and survival, (ii) KdpE regulates a range of virulence loci through direct promoter binding, and (iii) KdpD/KdpE regulation responds to virulence-related conditions including phagocytosis, exposure to microbicides, quorum sensing signals, and host hormones. Furthermore, antimicrobial stress, osmotic stress, and oxidative stress are associated with KdpD/KdpE activity, and the system's accessory components (which allow TCS fine-tuning or crosstalk) provide links to stress response pathways. KdpD/KdpE therefore appears to be an important adaptive TCS employed during host infection, promoting bacterial virulence and survival through mechanisms both related to and distinct from its conserved role in K(+) regulation.

  12. The KdpD/KdpE two-component system: integrating K⁺ homeostasis and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë N Freeman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The two-component system (TCS KdpD/KdpE, extensively studied for its regulatory role in potassium (K(+ transport, has more recently been identified as an adaptive regulator involved in the virulence and intracellular survival of pathogenic bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, entero-haemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia pestis, Francisella species, Photorhabdus asymbiotica, and mycobacteria. Key homeostasis requirements monitored by KdpD/KdpE and other TCSs such as PhoP/PhoQ are critical to survival in the stressful conditions encountered by pathogens during host interactions. It follows these TCSs may therefore acquire adaptive roles in response to selective pressures associated with adopting a pathogenic lifestyle. Given the central role of K(+ in virulence, we propose that KdpD/KdpE, as a regulator of a high-affinity K(+ pump, has evolved virulence-related regulatory functions. In support of this hypothesis, we review the role of KdpD/KdpE in bacterial infection and summarize evidence that (i KdpD/KdpE production is correlated with enhanced virulence and survival, (ii KdpE regulates a range of virulence loci through direct promoter binding, and (iii KdpD/KdpE regulation responds to virulence-related conditions including phagocytosis, exposure to microbicides, quorum sensing signals, and host hormones. Furthermore, antimicrobial stress, osmotic stress, and oxidative stress are associated with KdpD/KdpE activity, and the system's accessory components (which allow TCS fine-tuning or crosstalk provide links to stress response pathways. KdpD/KdpE therefore appears to be an important adaptive TCS employed during host infection, promoting bacterial virulence and survival through mechanisms both related to and distinct from its conserved role in K(+ regulation.

  13. Gene expression of a two-component regulatory system associated with sunscreen biosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Jacob; Soule, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    Long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA) can damage cells through photooxidative stress, leading to harmful photosensitized proteins and pigments in cyanobacteria. To mitigate damage, some cyanobacteria secrete the UVA-absorbing pigment scytonemin into their extracellular sheath. Comparative genomic analyses suggest that scytonemin biosynthesis is regulated by the two-component regulatory system (TCRS) proteins encoded by Npun_F1277 and Npun_F1278 in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133. To understand the dynamics of these genes, their expression was measured following exposure to UVA, UVB, high visible (VIS) irradiance and oxidative stress for 20, 40 and 60 min. Overall, both genes had statistically similar patterns of expression for all four conditions and were generally upregulated, except for those exposed to UVB by 60 min and for the cells under oxidative stress. The greatest UVA response was an upregulation by 20 min, while the response to UVB was the most dramatic and persisted through 40 min. High VIS irradiance resulted in a modest upregulation, while oxidative stress caused a slight downregulation. Both genes were also found to occur on the same transcript. These results demonstrate that these genes are positively responding to several light-associated conditions, which suggests that this TCRS may regulate more than just scytonemin biosynthesis under UVA stress. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Real time propagation of the exact two component time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goings, Joshua J.; Kasper, Joseph M.; Egidi, Franco; Sun, Shichao; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-09-01

    We report the development of a real time propagation method for solving the time-dependent relativistic exact two-component density functional theory equations (RT-X2C-TDDFT). The method is fundamentally non-perturbative and may be employed to study nonlinear responses for heavy elements which require a relativistic Hamiltonian. We apply the method to several group 12 atoms as well as heavy-element hydrides, comparing with the extensive theoretical and experimental studies on this system, which demonstrates the correctness of our approach. Because the exact two-component Hamiltonian contains spin-orbit operators, the method is able to describe the non-zero transition moment of otherwise spin-forbidden processes in non-relativistic theory. Furthermore, the two-component approach is more cost effective than the full four-component approach, with similar accuracy. The RT-X2C-TDDFT will be useful in future studies of systems containing heavy elements interacting with strong external fields.

  15. The DosRST two-component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Characterizing the activation mechanism of DosR response regulator as a potential target for novel antimycobacterial drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Marszalek, Marta Anna

    2014-01-01

    La tuberculosi, la malaltia infecciosa causada per Mycobacterium tuberculosis, es un problema de salut global que provoca aproximadament 2 milions de morts anuals. Un terç de la població mundial es troba crònicament infectada amb Mycobacterium tuberculosis però no mostra símptomes clínics encara que té un risc d’un 10% de desenvolupar la malaltia, la qual cosa representa un reservori incontrolable de tuberculosi. En aquesta condició asimptomàtica, coneguda com a tuberculosi latent, Mycobacte...

  16. Analysis of the virulence-associated RevSR two-component signal transduction system of Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Adams, Vicki M; Quinsey, Noelene S; Rood, Julian I

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that causes human gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis) and food poisoning. Early studies showed that virulence was regulated by the VirSR two-component signal transduction system. However, our identification of the RevR orphan response regulator indicated that more than one system was involved in controlling virulence. To further characterize this virulence-associated regulator, gel mobility shift experiments, coupled with DNase I footprinting, were used to identify the RevR DNA binding sequence. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that an orphan sensor histidine kinase, CPE1757 (renamed RevS), was the cognate sensor of RevR. Interaction between RevS and RevR was demonstrated by use of a bacterial two-hybrid system and validated by protein-protein interaction studies using biolayer interferometry. To assess the involvement of RevS in virulence regulation, the revS gene was inactivated by Targetron insertion. When isogenic wild-type, revS and complemented revS strains were tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, the revS mutant was found to be attenuated in virulence, which was similar to the attenuation observed previously with the revR mutant. However, transcriptional analysis of selected RevR-regulated genes in the revS mutant revealed a different pattern of expression to a revR mutant, suggesting that the RevSR system is more complex than originally thought. Taken together, the results have led to the identification and characterization of the two essential parts of a new regulatory network that is involved in the regulation of virulence in C. perfringens.

  17. The Fractional Virial Potential Energy in Two-Component Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi, R.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-component systems are conceived as macrogases, and the related equation of state is expressed using the virial theorem for subsystems, under the restriction of homeoidally striated density profiles. Explicit calculations are performed for a useful reference case and a few cases of astrophysical interest, both with and without truncation radius. Shallower density profiles are found to yield an equation of state, $phi=phi(y,m$, characterized (for assigned values of the fractional mass, $m=M_j/ M_i$ by the occurrence of two extremum points, a minimum and a maximum, as found in an earlier attempt. Steeper density profiles produce a similar equation of state, which implies that a special value of $m$ is related to a critical curve where the above mentioned extremum points reduce to a single horizontal inflexion point, and curves below the critical one show no extremum points. The similarity of the isofractional mass curves to van der Waals' isothermal curves, suggests the possibility of a phase transition in a bell-shaped region of the $({sf O}yphi$ plane, where the fractional truncation radius along a selected direction is $y=R_j/R_i$, and the fractional virial potential energy is $phi=(E_{ji}_mathrm{vir}/(E_{ij}_mathrm{vir}$. Further investigation is devoted to mass distributions described by Hernquist (1990 density profiles, for which an additional relation can be used to represent a sample of $N=16$ elliptical galaxies (EGs on the $({sf O}yphi$ plane. Even if the evolution of elliptical galaxies and their hosting dark matter (DM haloes, in the light of the model, has been characterized by equal fractional mass, $m$, and equal scaled truncation radius, or concentration, $Xi_u=R_u/r_u^dagger$, $u=i,j$, still it cannot be considered as strictly homologous, due to different values of fractional truncation radii, $y$, or fractional scaling radii, $y^dagger=r_j^dagger/r_i^dagger$, deduced from sample objects.

  18. The YvfTU Two-component System is involved in plcR expression in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brillard, Julien; Susanna, Kim; Michaud, Caroline; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Gohar, Michel; Nielsen-Leroux, Christina; Ramarao, Nalini; Kolsto, Anne-Brit; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Lereclus, Didier; Broussolle, Veronique

    2008-01-01

    Background: Most extracellular virulence factors produced by Bacillus cereus are regulated by the pleiotropic transcriptional activator PlcR. Among strains belonging to the B. cereus group, the plcR gene is always located in the vicinity of genes encoding the YvfTU two-component system. The putative

  19. The Atypical Response Regulator AtvR Is a New Player in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Response to Hypoxia and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihami, Gilberto Hideo; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; de Almeida, José Roberto Fogaça; de Oliveira Pereira, Thays; Nicastro, Gianlucca Gonçalves; Boechat, Ana Laura; de Almeida, Sandro Rogério; Baldini, Regina Lúcia

    2017-08-01

    Two-component systems are widespread in bacteria, allowing adaptation to environmental changes. The classical pathway is composed of a histidine kinase that phosphorylates an aspartate residue in the cognate response regulator (RR). RRs lacking the phosphorylatable aspartate also occur, but their function and contribution during host-pathogen interactions are poorly characterized. AtvR (PA14_26570) is the only atypical response regulator with a DNA-binding domain in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa Macrophage infection with the atvR mutant strain resulted in higher levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion as well as increased bacterial clearance compared to those for macrophages infected with the wild-type strain. In an acute pneumonia model, mice infected with the atvR mutant presented increased amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, increased neutrophil recruitment to the lungs, reductions in bacterial burdens, and higher survival rates in comparison with the findings for mice infected with the wild-type strain. Further, several genes involved in hypoxia/anoxia adaptation were upregulated upon atvR overexpression, as seen by high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. In addition, atvR was more expressed in hypoxia in the presence of nitrate and required for full expression of nitrate reductase genes, promoting bacterial growth under this condition. Thus, AtvR would be crucial for successful infection, aiding P. aeruginosa survival under conditions of low oxygen tension in the host. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the atypical response regulator AtvR is part of the repertoire of transcriptional regulators involved in the lifestyle switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. This finding increases the complexity of regulation of one of the central metabolic pathways that contributes to Pseudomonas ubiquity and versatility. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Characterization of a two-component regulatory system from Acinetobacter baumannii that controls biofilm formation and cellular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaras, Andrew P; Flagler, Michael J; Dorsey, Caleb W; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Actis, Luis A

    2008-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii forms biofilms on abiotic surfaces, a phenotype that may explain its ability to survive in nosocomial environments and to cause device-related infections in compromised patients. The biofilm proficiency of the 19606 type strain depends on the production of pili, cell-surface appendages assembled via the CsuAB-A-B-C-D-E chaperone-usher secretion system. The screening of a bank of isogenic insertion derivatives led to the identification of a biofilm-deficient derivative in which a transposon insertion disrupted a gene predicted to encode the response regulator of a two-component regulatory system. This gene, which was named bfmR, is required for the expression of the Csu pili chaperone-usher assembly system. This coding region is followed by an ORF encoding a putative sensor kinase that was named bfmS, which plays a less relevant role in biofilm formation when cells are cultured in rich medium. Further examination showed that the bfmR mutant was capable of attaching to abiotic surfaces, although to levels significantly lower than those of the parental strain, when it was cultured in a chemically defined minimal medium. Additionally, the morphology of planktonic cells of this mutant, when grown in minimal medium, was drastically affected, while adherent mutant cells were indistinguishable in shape and size from the parental strain. Together, these results indicate that BfmR is part of a two-component regulatory system that plays an important role in the morphology of A. baumannii 19606 cells and their ability to form biofilms on abiotic surfaces.

  1. Activation of the Campylobacter jejuni FlgSR two-component system is linked to the flagellar export apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Stephanie N; Hendrixson, David R

    2009-04-01

    Activation of sigma(54)-dependent gene expression essential for formation of flagella in Campylobacter jejuni requires the components of the inner membrane-localized flagellar export apparatus and the FlgSR two-component regulatory system. In this study, we characterized the FlgS sensor kinase and how activation of the protein is linked to the flagellar export apparatus. We found that FlgS is localized to the C. jejuni cytoplasm and that His141 of FlgS is essential for autophosphorylation, phosphorelay to the cognate FlgR response regulator, motility, and expression of sigma(54)-dependent flagellar genes. Mutants with incomplete flagellar export apparatuses produced wild-type levels of FlgS and FlgR, but they were defective for signaling through the FlgSR system. By using genetic approaches, we found that FlgSR activity is linked to and downstream of the flagellar export apparatus in a regulatory cascade that terminates in expression of sigma(54)-dependent flagellar genes. By analyzing defined flhB and fliI mutants of C. jejuni that form flagellar export apparatuses that are secretion incompetent, we determined that formation of the apparatus is required to contribute to the signal sensed by FlgS to terminate in activation of expression of sigma(54)-dependent flagellar genes. Considering that the flagellar export apparatuses of Escherichia coli and Salmonella species influence sigma(28)-dependent flagellar gene expression, our work expands the signaling activity of the apparatuses to include sigma(54)-dependent pathways of C. jejuni and possibly other motile bacteria. This study indicates that these apparatuses have broader functions beyond flagellar protein secretion, including activation of essential two-component regulatory systems required for expression of sigma(54)-dependent flagellar genes.

  2. Interaction of a plant pseudo-response regulator with a calmodulin-like protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perochon, Alexandre; Dieterle, Stefan; Pouzet, Cecile; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe [UMR 5546 CNRS/Universite Toulouse 3, Pole de Biotechnologie vegetale, BP 42617 Auzeville, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan cedex (France); Ranty, Benoit, E-mail: ranty@scsv.ups-tlse.fr [UMR 5546 CNRS/Universite Toulouse 3, Pole de Biotechnologie vegetale, BP 42617 Auzeville, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan cedex (France)

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} The pseudo-response regulator PRR2 specifically binds CML9, a calmodulin-like protein {yields} The interaction is confirmed in plant cell nuclei {yields} The interaction requires an intact PRR2 protein. -- Abstract: Calmodulin (CaM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes by modulating the activities of numerous target proteins. Plants possess an extended CaM family including numerous CaM-like proteins (CMLs), most of which appear to be unique to plants. We previously demonstrated a role for CML9 in abiotic stress tolerance and seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. We report here the isolation of PRR2, a pseudo-response regulator as a CML9 interacting protein by screening an expression library prepared from Arabidopsis seedlings with CML9 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid system. PRR2 is similar to the response regulators of the two-component system, but lacks the invariant residue required for phosphorylation by which response regulators switch their output response, suggesting the existence of alternative regulatory mechanisms. PRR2 was found to bind CML9 and closely related CMLs but not a canonical CaM. Mapping analyses indicate that an almost complete form of PRR2 is required for interaction with CML9, suggesting a recognition mode different from the classical CaM-target peptide complex. PRR2 contains several features that are typical of transcription factors, including a GARP DNA recognition domain, a Pro-rich region and a Golden C-terminal box. PRR2 and CML9 as fusion proteins with fluorescent tags co-localized in the nucleus of plant cells, and their interaction in the nuclear compartment was validated in planta by using a fluorophore-tagged protein interaction assay. These findings suggest that binding of PRR2 to CML9 may be an important mechanism to modulate the physiological role of this transcription factor in plants.

  3. The auxiliary protein complex SaePQ activates the phosphatase activity of sensor kinase SaeS in the SaeRS two-component system of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Do-Won; Cho, Hoonsik; Jones, Marcus B.; Shatzkes, Kenneth; Sun, Fei; Ji, Quanjiang; Liu, Qian; Scott N Peterson; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2012-01-01

    In bacterial two-component regulatory systems (TCSs), dephosphorylation of phosphorylated response regulators is essential for resetting the activated systems to the pre-activation state. However, in the SaeRS TCS, a major virulence TCS of Staphylococcus aureus, the mechanism for dephosphorylation of the response regulator SaeR has not been identified. Here we report that two auxiliary proteins from the sae operon, SaeP and SaeQ, form a protein complex with the sensor kinase SaeS and activate...

  4. Extracellular zinc induces phosphoethanolamine addition to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipid A via the ColRS two-component system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Emily M; O'Brien, John P; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Trent, M Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria survive harmful environmental stressors by modifying their outer membrane. Much of this protection is afforded upon remodeling of the lipid A region of the major surface molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For example, the addition of cationic substituents, such as 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose (L-Ara4N) and phosphoehthanolamine (pEtN) at the lipid A phosphate groups, is often induced in response to specific environmental flux stabilizing the outer membrane. The work herein represents the first report of pEtN addition to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipid A. We have identified the key pEtN transferase which we named EptAPa and characterized its strict activity on only one position of lipid A, contrasting from previously studied EptA enzymes. We further show that transcription of eptAP a is regulated by zinc via the ColRS two-component system instead of the PmrAB system responsible for eptA regulation in E. coli and Salmonella enterica. Further, although L-Ara4N is readily added to the same position of lipid A as pEtN under certain environmental conditions, ColR specifically induces pEtN addition to lipid A in lieu of L-Ara4N when Zn2+ is present. The unique, specific regulation of eptAP a transcription and enzymatic activity described in this work demonstrates the tight yet inducible control over LPS modification in P. aeruginosa. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The two-component system CBO2306/CBO2307 is important for cold adaptation of Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Isokallio, Marita; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a notorious foodborne pathogen. Its ability to adapt to and grow at low temperatures is of interest for food safety. Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to be involved in cold-shock and growth at low temperatures. Here we show the importance of TCS CBO2306/CBO2307 in the cold-shock response of C. botulinum ATCC 3502. The relative expression levels of the cbo2306 and cbo2307 were up to 4.4-fold induced in the cold-shocked cultures but negatively regulated in the late-log and stationary growth phase in relation to early logarithmic growth phase in non-shocked cultures. Importance of the CBO2306/CBO2307 in the cold stress was further demonstrated by impaired growth of insertional cbo2306 or cbo2307 knockout mutants in relation to the wild-type strain ATCC 3502. The results suggest that the TCS CBO2306/CBO2307 is important for cold-shock response and adaptation of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 to low temperature.

  6. A Novel Two-Component System, GluR-GluK, Involved in Glutamate Sensing and Uptake in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Jiang, Weihong; Lu, Yinhua

    2017-09-15

    Two-component systems (TCSs), the predominant signal transduction pathways employed by bacteria, play important roles in physiological metabolism in Streptomyces Here, a novel TCS, GluR-GluK (encoded by SCO5778-SCO5779), which is located divergently from the gluABCD operon encoding a glutamate uptake system, was identified as being involved in glutamate sensing and uptake as well as antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor Under the condition of minimal medium (MM) supplemented with different concentrations of glutamate, deletion of the gluR-gluK operon (gluR-K) resulted in enhanced actinorhodin (ACT) but reduced undecylprodigiosin (RED) and yellow type I polyketide (yCPK) production, suggesting that GluR-GluK plays a differential role in antibiotic biosynthesis. Furthermore, we found that the response regulator GluR directly promotes the expression of gluABCD under the culture condition of MM with a high concentration of glutamate (75 mM). Using the biolayer interferometry assay, we demonstrated that glutamate acts as the direct signal of the histidine kinase GluK. It was therefore suggested that upon sensing high concentrations of glutamate, GluR-GluK would be activated and thereby facilitate glutamate uptake by increasing gluABCD expression. Finally, we demonstrated that the role of GluR-GluK in antibiotic biosynthesis is independent of its function in glutamate uptake. Considering the wide distribution of the glutamate-sensing (GluR-GluK) and uptake (GluABCD) module in actinobacteria, it could be concluded that the GluR-GluK signal transduction pathway involved in secondary metabolism and glutamate uptake should be highly conserved in this bacterial phylum.IMPORTANCE In this study, a novel two-component system (TCS), GluR-GluK, was identified to be involved in glutamate sensing and uptake as well as antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor A possible GluR-GluK working model was proposed. Upon sensing high glutamate concentrations (such as 75

  7. Light-induced thermodiffusion in two-component media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V.; Ivanova, G.; Okishev, K.; Khe, V.

    2017-01-01

    We have theoretically studied the optical transmittance response of thin cell with liquid containing absorbing nanoparticles in a Gaussian beam field. The transmittance spatial changing is caused by thermal diffusion phenomenon (Soret effect) which produces the variations of concentration of absorbing nanoparticles. The thickness of optical cell (including windows) is significantly less than the size of the beam. As a result, an exact analytical expression for the one dimensional thermal task is derived, taking into account the Soret feedback that leads to the temperature rising on the axis of a Gaussian beam. We have experimentally studied this phenomenon in carbon nanosuspension.

  8. Pellino-1 Selectively Regulates Epithelial Cell Responses to Rhinovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Julie A; Prince, Lynne R; Parker, Lisa C; Stokes, Clare A; de Bruin, Harold G; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H; Whyte, Moira K; Sabroe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates respon

  9. Pellino-1 selectively regulates epithelial cell responses to rhinovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Julie A; Prince, Lynne R; Parker, Lisa C; Stokes, Clare A; de Bruin, Harold G; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H; Whyte, Moira K; Sabroe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates respon

  10. Transcriptional Activation of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides Cytochrome c2 Gene P2 Promoter by the Response Regulator PrrA

    OpenAIRE

    Comolli, James C; Carl, Audrey J.; Hall, Christine; Donohue, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Anoxygenic photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a member of the α subclass of the class Proteobacteria, requires the response regulator PrrA. PrrA and the sensor kinase PrrB are part of a two-component signaling pathway that influences a wide range of processes under oxygen-limited conditions. In this work we characterized the pathway of transcription activation by PrrB and PrrA by purifying these proteins, analyzing them in vitro, and characterizing a mutant PrrA protein in vivo...

  11. Control of CydB and GltA1 expression by the SenX3 RegX3 two component regulatory system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretta Roberts

    Full Text Available Two component regulatory systems are used widely by bacteria to coordinate changes in global gene expression profiles in response to environmental signals. The SenX3-RegX3 two component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has previously been shown to play a role in virulence and phosphate-responsive control of gene expression. We demonstrate that expression of SenX3-RegX3 is controlled in response to growth conditions, although the absolute changes are small. Global gene expression profiling of a RegX3 deletion strain and wild-type strain in different culture conditions (static, microaerobic, anaerobic, as well as in an over-expressing strain identified a number of genes with changed expression patterns. Among those were genes previously identified as differentially regulated in aerobic culture, including ald (encoding alanine dehydrogenase cyd,encoding a subunit of the cytochrome D ubiquinol oxidase, and gltA1, encoding a citrate synthase. Promoter activity in the upstream regions of both cydB and gltA1 was altered in the RegX3 deletion strain. DNA-binding assays confirmed that RegX3 binds to the promoter regions of ald, cydB and gltA1 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Taken together these data suggest a direct role for the SenX-RegX3 system in modulating expression of aerobic respiration, in addition to its role during phosphate limitation.

  12. Comparative analysis of two-component signal transduction systems of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, de M.W.H.J.; Francke, C.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group are ubiquitously present in the environment and can adapt to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. In bacteria, these adaptive responses are generally mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), which consist of a histidine kinase (HK) and

  13. Comparative analysis of two-component signal transduction systems of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, M.W.H.J. de; Francke, C.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group are ubiquitously present in the environment and can adapt to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. In bacteria, these adaptive responses are generally mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), which consist of a histidine kinase (HK) and

  14. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of the response regulator NsrR involved in nisin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosa, Sakshi; Hoeppner, Astrid; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Smits, Sander H J

    2015-10-01

    A number of Gram-positive bacteria produce a class of bacteriocins called `lantibiotics'. These lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptides that possess high antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including clinically challenging pathogens, and are therefore potential alternatives to antibiotics. All lantibiotic producer strains and some Gram-positive nonproducer strains express protein systems to circumvent a suicidal effect or to become resistant, respectively. Two-component systems consisting of a response regulator and a histidine kinase upregulate the expression of these proteins. One of the best-characterized lantibiotics is nisin, which is produced by Lactococcus lactis and possesses bactericidal activity against various Gram-positive bacteria, including some human pathogenic strains. Within many human pathogenic bacterial strains inherently resistant to nisin, a response regulator, NsrR, has been identified which regulates the expression of proteins involved in nisin resistance. In the present study, an expression and purification protocol was established for the NsrR protein from Streptococcus agalactiae COH1. The protein was successfully crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method, resulting in crystals that diffracted X-rays to 1.4 Å resolution.

  15. In vivo phosphorylation dynamics of the Bordetella pertussis virulence-controlling response regulator BvgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Alice; Chen, Qing; Hinton, Deborah M; Stibitz, Scott

    2013-04-01

    We have used protein electrophoresis through polyacrylamide gels derivatized with the proprietary ligand Phos-tag™ to separate the response regulator BvgA from its phosphorylated counterpart BvgA∼P. This approach has allowed us to readily ascertain the degree of phosphorylation of BvgA in in vitro reactions, or in crude lysates of Bordetella pertussis grown under varying laboratory conditions. We have used this technique to examine the kinetics of BvgA phosphorylation after shift of B. pertussis cultures from non-permissive to permissive conditions, or of its dephosphorylation following a shift from permissive to non-permissive conditions. Our results provide the first direct evidence that levels of BvgA∼P in vivo correspond temporally to the expression of early and late BvgA-regulated virulence genes. We have also examined a number of other aspects of BvgA function predicted from previous studies and by analogy with other two-component response regulators. These include the site of BvgA phosphorylation, the exclusive role of the cognate BvgS sensor kinase in its phosphorylation in Bordetella pertussis, and the effect of the T194M mutation on phosphorylation. We also detected the phosphorylation of a small but consistent fraction of BvgA purified after expression in Escherichia coli.

  16. DNA consensus sequence motif for binding response regulator PhoP, a virulence regulator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Shuishu

    2014-12-30

    Tuberculosis has reemerged as a serious threat to human health because of the increasing prevalence of drug-resistant strains and synergetic infection with HIV, prompting an urgent need for new and more efficient treatments. The PhoP-PhoR two-component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in the virulence of the pathogen and thus represents a potential drug target. To study the mechanism of gene transcription regulation by response regulator PhoP, we identified a high-affinity DNA sequence for PhoP binding using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The sequence contains a direct repeat of two 7 bp motifs separated by a 4 bp spacer, TCACAGC(N4)TCACAGC. The specificity of the direct-repeat sequence for PhoP binding was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PhoP binds to the direct repeat as a dimer in a highly cooperative manner. We found many genes previously identified to be regulated by PhoP that contain the direct-repeat motif in their promoter sequences. Synthetic DNA fragments at the putative promoter-binding sites bind PhoP with variable affinity, which is related to the number of mismatches in the 7 bp motifs, the positions of the mismatches, and the spacer and flanking sequences. Phosphorylation of PhoP increases the affinity but does not change the specificity of DNA binding. Overall, our results confirm the direct-repeat sequence as the consensus motif for PhoP binding and thus pave the way for identification of PhoP directly regulated genes in different mycobacterial genomes.

  17. A subfamily of putative cytokinin receptors is revealed by an analysis of the evolution of the two-component signaling system of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, Nijuscha; Halawa, Mhyeddeen; Snel, Berend; Seidl, Michael F; Heyl, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The two-component signaling system--the major signaling pathway of bacteria--is found among higher eukaryotes only in plants, where it regulates diverse processes, such as the signaling of the phytohormone cytokinin. Cytokinin is perceived by a hybrid histidine (His) kinase receptor, and the signal is transduced by a multistep phosphorelay system of His phosphotransfer proteins and different classes of response regulators (RRs). To shed light on the origin and evolution of the two-component signaling system members in plants, we conducted a comprehensive domain-based phylogenetic study across the relevant kingdoms, including Charophyceae algae, the group of green algae giving rise to land plants. Surprisingly, we identified a subfamily of cytokinin receptors with members only from the early diverging land plants Marchantia polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens and then experimentally characterized two members of this subfamily. His phosphotransfer proteins of Charophyceae seemed to be more closely related to land plants than to other groups of green algae. Farther down the signaling pathway, the type-B RRs were found across all plant clades, but many members lack either the canonical Asp residue or the DNA binding domain. In contrast, the type-A RRs seemed to be limited to land plants. Finally, the analysis provided hints that one additional group of RRs, the type-C RRs, might be degenerated receptors and thus, of a different evolutionary origin than bona fide RRs.

  18. Features of protein-protein interactions in two-component signaling deduced from genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert A; Szurmant, Hendrik; Hoch, James A; Hwa, Terence

    2007-01-01

    As more and more sequence data become available, new approaches for extracting information from these data become feasible. This chapter reports on one such method that has been applied to elucidate protein-protein interactions in bacterial two-component signaling pathways. The method identifies residues involved in the interaction through an analysis of over 2500 functionally coupled proteins and a precise determination of the substitutional constraints placed on one protein by its signaling mate. Once identified, a simple log-likelihood scoring procedure is applied to these residues to build a predictive tool for assigning signaling mates. The ability to apply this method is based on a proliferation of related domains within multiple organisms. Paralogous evolution through gene duplication and divergence of two-component systems has commonly resulted in tens of closely related interacting pairs within one organism with a roughly one-to-one correspondence between signal and response. This provides us with roughly an order of magnitude more protein pairs than there are unique, fully sequenced bacterial species. Consequently, this chapter serves as both a detailed exposition of the method that has provided more depth to our knowledge of bacterial signaling and a look ahead to what would be possible on a more widespread scale, that is, to protein-protein interactions that have only one example per genome, as the number of genomes increases by a factor of 10.

  19. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression – adding another layer of complexity to the DNA damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eBoucas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for DNA repair, or, if the extend of damage is beyond repair capacity, induce apoptosis. This signaling network, which is collectively referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR, is primarily thought to consist of two components – a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes and a delayed transcriptional response that promotes a prolonged cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves potent posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms that control the cellular response to DNA damage. Although much has been written on the relevance of the DDR in cancer and on the post-transcriptional role of microRNAs (miRs in cancer, the post-transcriptional regulation of the DDR by non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs still remains elusive in large parts. Here, we review the recent developments in this exciting new area of research in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. We put specific emphasis on the role of RNA-binding proteins and the control of their function through DNA damage-activated protein kinases.

  20. A Two-Component Regulatory System Impacts Extracellular Membrane-Derived Vesicle Production in Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Resch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Export of macromolecules via extracellular membrane-derived vesicles (MVs plays an important role in the biology of Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria have also recently been reported to produce MVs; however, the composition and mechanisms governing vesiculogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria remain undefined. Here, we describe MV production in the Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS, the etiological agent of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. M1 serotype GAS isolates in culture exhibit MV structures both on the cell wall surface and in the near vicinity of bacterial cells. A comprehensive analysis of MV proteins identified both virulence-associated protein substrates of the general secretory pathway in addition to “anchorless surface proteins.” Characteristic differences in the contents, distributions, and fatty acid compositions of specific lipids between MVs and GAS cell membrane were also observed. Furthermore, deep RNA sequencing of vesicular RNAs revealed that GAS MVs contained differentially abundant RNA species relative to bacterial cellular RNA. MV production by GAS strains varied in a manner dependent on an intact two-component system, CovRS, with MV production negatively regulated by the system. Modulation of MV production through CovRS was found to be independent of both GAS cysteine protease SpeB and capsule biosynthesis. Our data provide an explanation for GAS secretion of macromolecules, including RNAs, lipids, and proteins, and illustrate a regulatory mechanism coordinating this secretory response.

  1. A hybrid two-component system of Tannerella forsythia affects autoaggregation and post-translational modification of surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe closely associated with both periodontal and periapical diseases. The ORF TF0022 of strain ATCC 43037 encodes a hybrid two-component system consisting of an N-terminal histidine kinase and a C-terminal response regulator. Disruption of the TF0022 locus enhanced autoaggregation of the broth-cultured cells. Comparative proteome analyses revealed that two S-layer proteins in the TF0022 mutant exhibited decreased apparent masses by denaturing gel electrophoresis, suggesting a deficiency in post-translational modification. Furthermore, the mutant decreased the production of a glycosyltransferase encoded by TF1061 that is located in a putative glycosylation-related gene cluster. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed reduced transcription of TF1061 and the associated genes in the TF0022 mutant. These results indicate that TF0022 upregulates the expression of the glycosylation-related genes and suggest modulation of the autoaggregation of T. forsythia cells by a possible post-translational modification of cell-surface components.

  2. A pair of two-component regulatory genes ecrA1/A2 in S.coelicolor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永泉; 岑沛霖; 陈时飞; 吴丹; 郑静

    2004-01-01

    Two-component genes are kinds of genetic elements involved in regulation of antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. DNA microarray analysis revealed that ecrA1/A2, which mapped at distant sites from red locus and encode respectively the kinase and regulator, expressed coordinately with genes of Red specific biosynthetic pathway, ecrA1 and ecrA2 gene-disruptive mutants were constructed using homogenotisation by reciprocal double crossover. Fermentation data showed that the undecylprodigiosin (Red) level of production was lower than that of wild-type strain. However, the change of the actinorhodin (Act) production level was not significant compared with wild type. Thus, these experiment results confirmed that the two-component system ecrA 1/A2 was positive regulatory element for red gene cluster.

  3. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Korkeala, Hannu; Dahlsten, Elias; Sahala, Elina; Heap, John T; Minton, Nigel P; Lindström, Miia

    2013-03-01

    Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  4. Pathway-level acceleration of glycogen catabolism by a response regulator in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Oikawa, Akira; Numata, Keiji; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2014-04-01

    Response regulators of two-component systems play pivotal roles in the transcriptional regulation of responses to environmental signals in bacteria. Rre37, an OmpR-type response regulator, is induced by nitrogen depletion in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that genes related to sugar catabolism and nitrogen metabolism were up-regulated by rre37 overexpression. Protein levels of GlgP(slr1367), one of the two glycogen phosphorylases, in the rre37-overexpressing strain were higher than those of the parental wild-type strain under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Glycogen amounts decreased to less than one-tenth by rre37 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites of the sugar catabolic pathway and amino acids were altered in the rre37-overexpressing strain after nitrogen depletion. These results demonstrate that Rre37 is a pathway-level regulator that activates the metabolic flow from glycogen to polyhydroxybutyrate and the hybrid tricarboxylic acid and ornithine cycle, unraveling the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of primary metabolism in this unicellular cyanobacterium.

  5. Transcriptional responses and regulations to deficient phosphorus in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxiang BAO; Shuhua ZHANG; Wenjing LU; Chengjin GUO; Juntao GU; Kai XIAO

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made over the past several years in the understanding of phosphorus (Pi)-starvation responses in plants and their regulation. The transcriptional changes that occur in response to Pi starvation are beginning to be revealed, although much is left to understand about their significance. In this paper, the recent progresses on the gene expression changes under deficient-Pi, cis-regulatory elements involved in response to deficient-Pi, the transcriptional control of Pi-starvation responses in eukaryotes, transcription factors involved in response to Pi-starvation, the role of MicroRNA on regulation of phosphate homeostasis, and phosphate sensing and signal transduction in plants have been summarized. The purpose of this review is to provide some basis for further elucidation of the transcriptional responses and regulations, and the networks of Pi sensing and signal transduction under deficient-Pi in plants in the future.

  6. Linking maternal warmth and responsiveness to children's self-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The present study demonstrated that a more differentiated view of positive parenting practices is necessary in the study of children?s acquisition of self-regulation. Here, the unique contributions of maternal warmth and responsiveness to distress to children?s self-regulation were tested in a sample of 102 German mothers and their kindergarten children (51 girls and 51 boys). Behavior regulation and internalization of rules of conduct were examined as specific components ...

  7. Linking maternal warmth and responsiveness to children's self-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    von Suchodoletz, Antje; Trommsdorff, Gisela; Heikamp, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The present study demonstrated that a more differentiated view of positive parenting practices is necessary in the study of children's acquisition of self-regulation. Here, the unique contributions of maternal warmth and responsiveness to distress to children's self-regulation were tested in a sample of 102 German mothers and their kindergarten children (51 girls and 51 boys). Behavior regulation and internalization of rules of conduct were examined as specific compone...

  8. Initial data problems for the two-component Camassa-Holm system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohuan Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the study of some properties of the two-component Camassa-Holm system. By constructing two sequences of solutions of the two-component Camassa-Holm system, we prove that the solution map of the Cauchy problem of the two-component Camassa-Holm system is not uniformly continuous in $H^s(\\mathbb{R}$, $s>5/2$.

  9. A connecter-like factor, CacA, links RssB/RpoS and the CpxR/CpxA two-component system in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Akinori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria integrate numerous environmental stimuli when generating cellular responses. Increasing numbers of examples describe how one two-component system (TCS responds to signals detected by the sensor of another TCS. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly defined. Results Here, we report a connector-like factor that affects the activity of the CpxR/CpxA two-component system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We isolated a clone that induced the expression of a cpxP-lac gene fusion from a high-copy-number plasmid pool of random Salmonella genomic fragments. A 63-amino acid protein, CacA, was responsible for the CpxA/CpxR-dependent activation of the cpxP gene. The CpxR-activated genes cpxP and spy exhibited approximately 30% and 50% reductions in transcription, respectively, in a clean cacA deletion mutant strain in comparison to wild-type. From 33 response regulator (RR deletion mutants, we identified that the RssB regulator represses cacA transcription. Substitution mutations in a conserved -10 region harboring the RNA polymerase recognition sequence, which is well conserved with a known RpoS -10 region consensus sequence, rendered the cacA promoter RpoS-independent. The CacA-mediated induction of cpxP transcription was affected in a trxA deletion mutant, which encodes thioredoxin 1, suggesting a role for cysteine thiol-disulfide exchange(s in CacA-dependent Cpx activation. Conclusions We identified CacA as an activator of the CpxR/CpxA system in the plasmid clone. We propose that CacA may integrate the regulatory status of RssB/RpoS into the CpxR/CpxA system. Future investigations are necessary to thoroughly elucidate how CacA activates the CpxR/CpxA system.

  10. Analytical method for yrast line states in the interacting two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解炳昊; 景辉

    2002-01-01

    The yrast spectrum for the harmonically trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), omitting thedifference between the two components, has been studied using an analytical method. The energy eigenstates andeigenvalues for L=0,1,2,3 are given. We illustrate that there are different eigenstate behaviours between the even Land odd L cases for the two-component BEC in two dimensions. Except for symmetric states, there are antisymmetricstates for the permutation of the two components, which cannot reduce to those in a single condensate case when thevalue of L is odd.

  11. Special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation of two-component outflow powered by magnetic explosion on compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Jin; Masada, Youhei; Asano, Eiji; Shibata, Kazunari

    2011-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of the outflow driven by magnetic explosion on the surface of compact object is investigated through special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We adopt, as an initial equilibrium state, a spherical stellar object embedded in the hydrostatic plasma which has a density ρ(r) ~ r-α and is threaded by a dipole magnetic field. The injection of magnetic energy at the surface of compact star breaks the dynamical equilibrium and triggers two-component outflow. At the early evolutionary stage, the magnetic pressure increases rapidly in time around the stellar surface, initiating a magnetically driven outflow. Then it excites a strong forward shock, shock driven outflow. The expansion velocity of the magnetically driven outflow is characterized by the Alfvén velocity on the stellar surface, and follows a simple scaling relation υmag ~ υA1/2. When the initial density profile declines steeply with radius, the strong shock is accelerated self-similarly to relativistic velocity ahead of the magnetically driven component. We find that the evolution of the strong forward shock can be described by a self-similar relation Γsh ~ rsh, where Γsh is the Lorentz factor of the plasma measured at the shock surface rsh. It should be stressed that the pure hydrodynamic process is responsible for the acceleration of the shock driven outflow. Our two-component outflow model, which is the natural outcome of the magnetic explosion, would deepen the understanding of the magnetic active phenomena on various magnetized stellar objects.

  12. Hepato-cardiovascular response and its regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Nong Li; Irving S Benjamin; Barry Alexander

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the possible existence of a hepatocardiovascular response and its regulatory mechanism in normal rats.METHODS: Systemic hemodynamic changes following intraportal injection of latex microspheres were studied in two modified rat models of hepatic circulation, in which the extrahepatic splanchnic circulation was excluded by evisceration and the liver was perfused by systemic blood via either the portal vein (model 1) or hepatic artery(model 2)in vivo.RFSULTS: In model 1, intraportal injection of two sized microspheres (15-μm and 8O-μm) induced a similar decrease in mean arterial pressure, while extrahepatic portal venous occlusion induced an immediate increase in mean arterial pressure. In model 2, microsphere injection again induced a significant reduction in mean arterial pressure, aortic blood flow and aortic resistance. There were no significant differences in these parameters between liver-innervated rats and liver-denervated rats.The degrees of microsphere-induced reduction in mean arterial pressure (-38.1±1.9% in liver-innervated rats and -35.4±2.1% in liver-denervated rats, respectively)were similar to those obtained by withdrawal of 2.0 mL of blood via the jugular vein (-33.3±2.1%) (P>0.05).Injection of 2.0 mL Haemaccel in microsphere-treated rats, to compensate for the reduced effective circulating blood volume, led to a hyperdynamic state which, as compared with basal values and unlike control rats, was characterised by increased aortic blood flow (+21.6±3.3%),decreased aortic resistance (-38.1±3.5%) and reduced mean arterial pressure (-9.7±2.8%).CONCLUSION: A hepato-cardiovascular response exists in normal rats. It acts through a humoral mechanism leading to systemic vasodilatation, and may be involved in the hemodynamic disturbances associated with acute and chronic liver diseases.

  13. A genome-wide study of two-component signal transduction systems in eight newly sequenced mutans streptococci strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lifu; Sudhakar, Padhmanand; Wang, Wei; Conrads, Georg; Brock, Anke; Sun, Jibin; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Zeng, An-Ping

    2012-04-04

    Mutans streptococci are a group of gram-positive bacteria including the primary cariogenic dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans and closely related species. Two component systems (TCSs) composed of a signal sensing histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR) play key roles in pathogenicity, but have not been comparatively studied for these oral bacterial pathogens. HKs and RRs of 8 newly sequenced mutans streptococci strains, including S. sobrinus DSM20742, S. ratti DSM20564 and six S. mutans strains, were identified and compared to the TCSs of S. mutans UA159 and NN2025, two previously genome sequenced S. mutans strains. Ortholog analysis revealed 18 TCS clusters (HK-RR pairs), 2 orphan HKs and 2 orphan RRs, of which 8 TCS clusters were common to all 10 strains, 6 were absent in one or more strains, and the other 4 were exclusive to individual strains. Further classification of the predicted HKs and RRs revealed interesting aspects of their putative functions. While TCS complements were comparable within the six S. mutans strains, S. sobrinus DSM20742 lacked TCSs possibly involved in acid tolerance and fructan catabolism, and S. ratti DSM20564 possessed 3 unique TCSs but lacked the quorum-sensing related TCS (ComDE). Selected computational predictions were verified by PCR experiments. Differences in the TCS repertoires of mutans streptococci strains, especially those of S. sobrinus and S. ratti in comparison to S. mutans, imply differences in their response mechanisms for survival in the dynamic oral environment. This genomic level study of TCSs should help in understanding the pathogenicity of these mutans streptococci strains.

  14. Adaptation of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator to activate transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka-Verner, Eva; Salem, Tarek A; Gurley, William B

    2016-02-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator of the VirA/VirG two-component system was adapted to function in tobacco protoplasts. The subcellular localization of VirG and VirA proteins transiently expressed in onion cells was determined using GFP fusions. Preliminary studies using Gal4DBD-VP16 fusions with VirG and Escherichia coli UhpA, and NarL response regulators indicated compatibility of these bacterial proteins with the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus. A strong transcriptional activator based on tandem activation domains from the Drosophila fushi tarazu and Herpes simplex VP16 was created. Selected configurations of the two-site Gal4-vir box GUS reporters were activated by chimeric effectors dependent on either the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain or that of VirG. Transcriptional induction of the GUS reporter was highest for the VirE19-element promoter with both constitutive and wild-type VirG-tandem activation domain effectors. Multiple VirE19 elements increased the reporter activity proportionately, indicating that the VirG DNA binding domain was functional in plants. The VirG constitutive-Q-VP16 effector was more active than the VirG wild-type. In both the constitutive and wild-type forms of VirG, Q-VP16 activated transcription of the GUS reporter best when located at the C-terminus, i.e. juxtaposed to the VirG DNA binding domain. These results demonstrate the possibility of using DNA binding domains from bacterial response regulators and their cognate binding elements in the engineering of plant gene expression.

  15. Two-Component Super AKNS Equations and Their Finite-Dimensional Integrable Super Hamiltonian System

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Yu; Jingwei Han

    2014-01-01

    Starting from a matrix Lie superalgebra, two-component super AKNS system is constructed. By making use of monononlinearization technique of Lax pairs, we find that the obtained two-component super AKNS system is a finite-dimensional integrable super Hamiltonian system. And its Lax representation and $r$ -matrix are also given in this paper.

  16. TASI 2011 lectures notes: two-component fermion notation and supersymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    These notes, based on work with Herbi Dreiner and Howie Haber, discuss how to do practical calculations of cross sections and decay rates using two-component fermion notation, as appropriate for supersymmetry and other beyond-the-Standard-Model theories. Included are a list of two-component fermion Feynman rules for the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, and some example calculations.

  17. Relativistic two-component jet evolutions in 2D and 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of astrophysical jets and theoretical arguments suggest a transverse stratification with two components induced by intrinsic features of the central engine (accretion disk + black hole). We study two-component jet dynamics for an inner fast low density jet, surrounded by a slower, dense

  18. Two-Component Super AKNS Equations and Their Finite-Dimensional Integrable Super Hamiltonian System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a matrix Lie superalgebra, two-component super AKNS system is constructed. By making use of monononlinearization technique of Lax pairs, we find that the obtained two-component super AKNS system is a finite-dimensional integrable super Hamiltonian system. And its Lax representation and r-matrix are also given in this paper.

  19. Impact of the Staphylococcus epidermidis LytSR two-component regulatory system on murein hydrolase activity, pyruvate utilization and global transcriptional profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fangyou

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as one of the most important nosocomial pathogens, mainly because of its ability to colonize implanted biomaterials by forming a biofilm. Extensive studies are focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation. The LytSR two-component regulatory system regulates autolysis and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. However, the role of LytSR played in S. epidermidis remained unknown. Results In the present study, we demonstrated that lytSR knock-out in S. epidermidis did not alter susceptibility to Triton X-100 induced autolysis. Quantitative murein hydrolase assay indicated that disruption of lytSR in S. epidermidis resulted in decreased activities of extracellular murein hydrolases, although zymogram showed no apparent differences in murein hydrolase patterns between S. epidermidis strain 1457 and its lytSR mutant. Compared to the wild-type counterpart, 1457ΔlytSR produced slightly more biofilm, with significantly decreased dead cells inside. Microarray analysis showed that lytSR mutation affected the transcription of 164 genes (123 genes were upregulated and 41 genes were downregulated. Specifically, genes encoding proteins responsible for protein synthesis, energy metabolism were downregulated, while genes involved in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, amino acid transporters were upregulated. Impaired ability to utilize pyruvate and reduced activity of arginine deiminase was observed in 1457ΔlytSR, which is consistent with the microarray data. Conclusions The preliminary results suggest that in S. epidermidis LytSR two-component system regulates extracellular murein hydrolase activity, bacterial cell death and pyruvate utilization. Based on the microarray data, it appears that lytSR inactivation induces a stringent response. In addition, LytSR may indirectly enhance biofilm formation by altering the metabolic status of the bacteria.

  20. The circadian clock regulates auxin signaling and responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Covington

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a pervasive role in the temporal regulation of plant physiology, environmental responsiveness, and development. In contrast, the phytohormone auxin plays a similarly far-reaching role in the spatial regulation of plant growth and development. Went and Thimann noted 70 years ago that plant sensitivity to auxin varied according to the time of day, an observation that they could not explain. Here we present work that explains this puzzle, demonstrating that the circadian clock regulates auxin signal transduction. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found many auxin-induced genes are under clock regulation. We verified that endogenous auxin signaling is clock regulated with a luciferase-based assay. Exogenous auxin has only modest effects on the plant clock, but the clock controls plant sensitivity to applied auxin. Notably, we found both transcriptional and growth responses to exogenous auxin are gated by the clock. Thus the circadian clock regulates some, and perhaps all, auxin responses. Consequently, many aspects of plant physiology not previously thought to be under circadian control may show time-of-day-specific sensitivity, with likely important consequences for plant growth and environmental responses.

  1. Identification, Functional Characterization and Regulon Prediction of a Novel Two Component System Comprising BAS0540-BAS0541 of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalani, Monisha; Kandari, Divya; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Two component systems (TCSs) can be envisaged as complex molecular devices that help the bacteria to sense its environment and respond aptly. 41 TCSs are predicted in Bacillus anthracis, a potential bioterrorism agent, of which only four have been studied so far. Thus, the intricate signaling network contributed by TCSs remains largely unmapped in B. anthracis and needs comprehensive exploration. In this study, we functionally characterized one such system composed of BAS0540 (Response regulator) and BAS0541 (Histidine kinase). BAS0540-BAS0541, the closest homolog of CiaRH of Streptococcus in B. anthracis, forms a functional TCS with BAS0541 displaying autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphotransfer to BAS0540. BAS0540 was also found to accept phosphate from physiologically relevant small molecule phosphodonors like acetyl phosphate and carbamoyl phosphate. Results of qRT-PCR and immunoblotting demonstrated that BAS0540 exhibits a constitutive expression throughout the growth of B. anthracis. Regulon prediction for BAS0540 in B. anthracis was done in silico using the consensus DNA binding sequence of CiaR of Streptococcus. The predicted regulon of BAS0540 comprised of 23 genes, which could be classified into 8 functionally diverse categories. None of the proven virulence factors were a part of the predicted regulon, an observation contrasting with the regulon of CiaRH in Streptococci. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to show direct binding of purified BAS0540 to the upstream regions of 5 putative regulon candidates- BAS0540 gene itself; a gene predicted to encode cell division protein FtsA; a self–immunity gene; a RND family transporter gene and a gene encoding stress (heat) responsive protein. A significant enhancement in the DNA binding ability of BAS0540 was observed upon phosphorylation. Overexpression of response regulator BAS0540 in B. anthracis led to a prodigious increase of ~6 folds in the cell length, thereby conferring it a filamentous

  2. Reconstructing a Network of Stress-Response Regulators via Dynamic System Modeling of Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Sheng Wu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene’s expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specifi c stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably suffi cient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  3. Reconstructing a network of stress-response regulators via dynamic system modeling of gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2008-02-10

    Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs) that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene's expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA) to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specific stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably sufficient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  4. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PhoPQ two-component system is required for AvrXA21 activity, hrpG expression, and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Jeong, Kyu-Sik; Han, Sang-Wook; Lee, Seung-Eun; Phee, Bong-Kwan; Hahn, Tae-Ryong; Ronald, Pamela

    2008-03-01

    The rice pathogen recognition receptor, XA21, confers resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strains producing the type one system-secreted molecule, AvrXA21. X. oryzae pv. oryzae requires a regulatory two-component system (TCS) called RaxRH to regulate expression of eight rax (required for AvrXA21 activity) genes and to sense population cell density. To identify other key components in this critical regulatory circuit, we assayed proteins expressed in a raxR gene knockout strain. This survey led to the identification of the phoP gene encoding a response regulator that is up-regulated in the raxR knockout strain. Next we generated a phoP knockout strain and found it to be impaired in X. oryzae pv. oryzae virulence and no longer able to activate the response regulator HrpG (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity G) in response to low levels of Ca2+. The impaired virulence of the phoP knockout strain can be partially complemented by constitutive expression of hrpG, indicating that PhoP controls a key aspect of X. oryzae pv. oryzae virulence through regulation of hrpG. A gene encoding the cognate putative histidine protein kinase, phoQ, was also isolated. Growth curve analysis revealed that AvrXA21 activity is impaired in a phoQ knockout strain as reflected by enhanced growth of this strain in rice lines carrying XA21. These results suggest that the X. oryzae pv. oryzae PhoPQ TCS functions in virulence and in the production of AvrXA21 in partnership with RaxRH.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes response regulators important for stress tolerance and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, B H; Ingmer, H

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sensing by two-component signal transduction systems is likely to play a role for growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes both during transmission in food products and within a host organism. Two-component systems typically consist of a membrane-associated sensor histidine...... of L. monocytogenes in mice. Strikingly, the mutants that were attenuated in virulence also had a decreased ability to grow in the presence of various stress conditions potentially encountered in an infection process. Thus, our data point to a connection between the ability of the putative two-component...

  6. Preparation and frictional investigation of the two-components silanes deposited on alumina surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kośla, K.; Grobelny, J.; Cichomski, M., E-mail: mcichom@uni.lodz.pl

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The two-component silane films on the alumina surface were obtained by a combination of soft lithography and vapor phase deposition method. • The effectiveness of modification procedure was monitored by AFM topography images. • By using gas phase deposition method succeeded in obtaining a good reproduction of pattern. • Silane films with low surface free energy and coefficient of friction values were obtained. • The frictional performance in milli-Newton load range of one- and two-component films was investigated by microtribometry. - Abstract: Functionalization and pattering technique that permits two-component pattern-specific modification of alumina surface with silanes molecules are reported. The method relies on a two-component molecular system that simultaneously decreases coefficient of friction of the alumina surface and provides uniform chemical functionality suitable for further elaboration. Pattern/two-component modification is achieved via gas-phase deposition of the silanes using polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The frictional behaviors of the two-component films of the silane molecules with different chain length covalently absorbed on alumina surfaces, were characterized by the ball-disk (microtribometer) tester. The surfaces of the substrate modified by two-component molecular films were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The measured tribological results showed that the mixing of the fluoroalkylsilane and alkylsilane enhance the lubrication and decrease the friction compared to the one-component thin films.

  7. Biochemical Activities of Three Pairs of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Two-Component Regulatory System Proteins Involved in Inhibition of Lysosomal Fusion†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yumi; Cheng, Zhihui; Lin, Mingqun; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2006-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, replicates in early endosomes by avoiding lysosomal fusion in monocytes and macrophages. In E. chaffeensis we predicted three pairs of putative two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) designated PleC-PleD, NtrY-NtrX, and CckA-CtrA based on amino acid sequence homology. In the present study to determine biochemical pairs and specificities of the TCSs, the recombinant proteins of the three putative histidine kinase (HK) kinase domains (rPleCHKD, rNtrYHKD, and MBP-rCckAHKD) and the full-length forms of three putative response regulators (RRs) (rPleD, rNtrX, and rCtrA) as well as the respective mutant recombinant proteins (rPleCHKDH244A, rNtrYHKDH498A, MBP-rCckAHKDH449A, rPleDD53A, rNtrXD59A, and rCtrAD53A) were expressed and purified as soluble proteins. The in vitro HK activity, the specific His residue-dependent autophosphorylation of the kinase domain, was demonstrated in the three HKs. The specific Asp residue-dependent in vitro phosphotransfer from the kinase domain to the putative cognate RR was demonstrated in each of the three RRs. Western blot analysis of E. chaffeensis membrane and soluble fractions using antibodies specific for each recombinant protein detected PleC and CckA in the membrane fraction, whereas it detected NtrY, NtrX, and PleD in the soluble fraction. CtrA was found in the two fractions at similar levels. E. chaffeensis was sensitive to closantel, an HK inhibitor. Closantel treatment induced lysosomal fusion of the E. chaffeensis inclusion in a human monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1 cells, implying that functional TCSs are essential in preventing lysosomal fusion of the E. chaffeensis inclusion compartment. PMID:16926392

  8. Evolutionary history of the OmpR/IIIA family of signal transduction two component systems in Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Candelas Fernando

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two component systems (TCS are signal transduction pathways which typically consist of a sensor histidine kinase (HK and a response regulator (RR. In this study, we have analyzed the evolution of TCS of the OmpR/IIIA family in Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae, two families belonging to the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. LAB colonize nutrient-rich environments such as foodstuffs, plant materials and the gastrointestinal tract of animals thus driving the study of this group of both basic and applied interest. Results The genomes of 19 strains belonging to 16 different species have been analyzed. The number of TCS encoded by the strains considered in this study varied between 4 in Lactobacillus helveticus and 17 in Lactobacillus casei. The OmpR/IIIA family was the most prevalent in Lactobacillaceae accounting for 71% of the TCS present in this group. The phylogenetic analysis shows that no new TCS of this family has recently evolved in these Lactobacillaceae by either lineage-specific gene expansion or domain shuffling. Furthermore, no clear evidence of non-orthologous replacements of either RR or HK partners has been obtained, thus indicating that coevolution of cognate RR and HKs has been prevalent in Lactobacillaceae. Conclusions The results obtained suggest that vertical inheritance of TCS present in the last common ancestor and lineage-specific gene losses appear as the main evolutionary forces involved in their evolution in Lactobacillaceae, although some HGT events cannot be ruled out. This would agree with the genomic analyses of Lactobacillales which show that gene losses have been a major trend in the evolution of this group.

  9. Development and validation of a high-throughput cell-based screen to identify activators of a bacterial two-component signal transduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Julia J; Fortney, Kate R; Chen, Lan; Krieger, Andrew J; Lima, Bruno P; Wolfe, Alan J; Katz, Barry P; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Spinola, Stanley M

    2015-07-01

    CpxRA is a two-component signal transduction system (2CSTS) found in many drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. In response to periplasmic stress, CpxA autophosphorylates and donates a phosphoryl group to its cognate response regulator, CpxR. Phosphorylated CpxR (CpxR-P) upregulates genes involved in membrane repair and downregulates multiple genes that encode virulence factors, which are trafficked across the cell membrane. Mutants that constitutively activate CpxRA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Haemophilus ducreyi are avirulent in mice and humans, respectively. Thus, the activation of CpxRA has high potential as a novel antimicrobial/antivirulence strategy. Using a series of Escherichia coli strains containing a CpxR-P-responsive lacZ reporter and deletions in genes encoding CpxRA system components, we developed and validated a novel cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS) for CpxRA activators. A screen of 36,000 compounds yielded one hit compound that increased reporter activity in wild-type cells. This is the first report of a compound that activates, rather than inhibits, a 2CSTS. The activity profile of the compound against CpxRA pathway mutants in the presence of glucose suggested that the compound inhibits CpxA phosphatase activity. We confirmed that the compound induced the accumulation of CpxR-P in treated cells. Although the hit compound contained a nitro group, a derivative lacking this group retained activity in serum and had lower cytotoxicity than that of the initial hit. This HTS is amenable for the screening of larger libraries to find compounds that activate CpxRA by other mechanisms, and it could be adapted to find activators of other two-component systems.

  10. Regulation of abiotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights into ...... through ubiquitination. The wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses that affect crop plants limits agricultural production.......Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights...

  11. The response to inositol: regulation of glycerolipid metabolism and stress response signaling in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Susan A; Gaspar, Maria L; Jesch, Stephen A

    2014-05-01

    This article focuses on discoveries of the mechanisms governing the regulation of glycerolipid metabolism and stress response signaling in response to the phospholipid precursor, inositol. The regulation of glycerolipid lipid metabolism in yeast in response to inositol is highly complex, but increasingly well understood, and the roles of individual lipids in stress response are also increasingly well characterized. Discoveries that have emerged over several decades of genetic, molecular and biochemical analyses of metabolic, regulatory and signaling responses of yeast cells, both mutant and wild type, to the availability of the phospholipid precursor, inositol are discussed.

  12. Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

    2013-07-09

    Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

  13. Two-component generalizations of the periodic Camassa-Holm and Degasperis-Procesi equations

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim; Lenells, Jonatan

    2010-01-01

    We use geometric methods to study two natural two-component generalizations of the periodic Camassa-Holm and Degasperis-Procesi equations. We show that these generalizations can be regarded as geodesic equations on the semidirect product of the diffeomorphism group of the circle $\\Diff(S^1)$ with some space of sufficiently smooth functions on the circle. Our goals are to understand the geometric properties of these two-component systems and to prove local well-posedness in various function spaces. Furthermore, we perform some explicit curvature calculations for the two-component Camassa-Holm equation, giving explicit examples of large subspaces of positive curvature.

  14. Travelling wave solutions for some two-component shallow water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutykh, Denys; Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we perform a unified analysis of travelling wave solutions to three different two-component systems which appear in shallow water theory. Namely, we analyze the celebrated Green-Naghdi equations, the integrable two-component Camassa-Holm equations and a new two-component system of Green-Naghdi type. In particular, we are interested in solitary and cnoidal-type solutions, as two most important classes of travelling waves that we encounter in applications. We provide a complete phase-plane analysis of all possible travelling wave solutions which may arise in these models. In particular, we show the existence of new type of solutions.

  15. Two-Component Wadati-Konno-Ichikawa Equation and Its Symmetry Reductions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Chang-Zheng; YAO Ruo-Xia; LI Zhi-Bin

    2004-01-01

    @@ It is shown that two-component Wadati-Konno-Ichikawa (WKI) equation, i.e. a generalization of the well-known WKI equation, is obtained from the motion of space curves in Euclidean geometry, and it is exactly a system for the graph of the curves when the curve motion is governed by the two-component modified Korteweg-de Vries flow. Group-invariant solutions of the two-component WKI equation which corresponds to an optimal system of its Lie point symmetry groups are obtained, and its similarity reductions to systems of ordinary differential equations are also given.

  16. The CroRS Two-Component Regulatory System Is Required for Intrinsic β-Lactam Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comenge, Yannick; Quintiliani, Richard; Li, Ling; Dubost, Lionnel; Brouard, Jean-Paul; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Arthur, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis produces a specific penicillin-binding protein (PBP5) that mediates high-level resistance to the cephalosporin class of β-lactam antibiotics. Deletion of a locus encoding a previously uncharacterized two-component regulatory system of E. faecalis (croRS) led to a 4,000-fold reduction in the MIC of the expanded-spectrum cephalosporin ceftriaxone. The cytoplasmic domain of the sensor kinase (CroS) was purified and shown to catalyze ATP-dependent autophosphorylation followed by transfer of the phosphate to the mated response regulator (CroR). The croR and croS genes were cotranscribed from a promoter (croRp) located in the rrnC-croR intergenic region. A putative seryl-tRNA synthetase gene (serS) located immediately downstream from croS did not appear to be a target of CroRS regulation or to play a role in ceftriaxone resistance. A plasmid-borne croRp-lacZ fusion was trans-activated by the CroRS system in response to the presence of ceftriaxone in the culture medium. The fusion was also induced by representatives of other classes of β-lactam antibiotics and by inhibitors of early and late steps of peptidoglycan synthesis. The croRS null mutant produced PBP5, and expression of an additional copy of pbp5 under the control of a heterologous promoter did not restore ceftriaxone resistance. Deletion of croRS was not associated with any defect in the synthesis of the nucleotide precursor UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide or of the d-Ala4→l-Ala-l-Ala-Lys3 peptidoglycan cross-bridge. Thus, the croRS mutant was susceptible to ceftriaxone despite the production of PBP5 and the synthesis of wild-type peptidoglycan precursors. These observations constitute the first description of regulatory genes essential for PBP5-mediated β-lactam resistance in enterococci. PMID:14645279

  17. Vapour-mediated sensing and motility in two-component droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, N. J.; Benusiglio, A.; Prakash, M.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the wetting behaviour of liquids on surfaces is important for a variety of industrial applications such as water-repellent coatings and lubrication. Liquid behaviour on a surface can range from complete spreading, as in the `tears of wine' effect, to minimal wetting as observed on a superhydrophobic lotus leaf. Controlling droplet movement is important in microfluidic liquid handling, on self-cleaning surfaces and in heat transfer. Droplet motion can be achieved by gradients of surface energy. However, existing techniques require either a large gradient or a carefully prepared surface to overcome the effects of contact line pinning, which usually limit droplet motion. Here we show that two-component droplets of well-chosen miscible liquids such as propylene glycol and water deposited on clean glass are not subject to pinning and cause the motion of neighbouring droplets over a distance. Unlike the canonical predictions for these liquids on a high-energy surface, these droplets do not spread completely but exhibit an apparent contact angle. We demonstrate experimentally and analytically that these droplets are stabilized by evaporation-induced surface tension gradients and that they move in response to the vapour emitted by neighbouring droplets. Our fundamental understanding of this robust system enabled us to construct a wide variety of autonomous fluidic machines out of everyday materials.

  18. Scale and Contour: Two Components of a Theory of Memory for Melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, W. Jay

    1978-01-01

    The author concentrates on two components of memory which contribute to the reproduction and recognition of melodies, namely, melodic contour and musical scale. A new experiment is reported that shows the interdependence of both components. (Author/RK)

  19. Laser controlling chaotic region of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boli Xia; Wenhua Hai

    2005-01-01

    @@ For a weakly and periodically driven two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) the Melnikov chaotic solution and boundedness conditions are derived from a direct perturbation theory that leads to the chaotic regions in the parameter space.

  20. Two component injection moulding: an interface quality and bond strength dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2008-01-01

    Two component injection moulding is a special branch of injection moulding where two different polymers are combined in to a single part to exploit the different material properties in the final product. Considering the technical and economical importance of the process, this paper investigates...... on quality parameters of the two component parts. Most engineering applications of two component injection moulding calls for high bond strength between the two polymers, on the other hand a sharp and well-defined interface between the two polymers are required for applications like selective metallization...... conditions for a sharp and well-defined interface are exactly the opposite of what is congenial for higher bond strength. So in the production of two component injection moulded parts, there is a compromise to make between the interface quality and the bond strength of the two polymers. Also the injection...

  1. Crystallographic characterization of a multidomain histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component regulatory system

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    The multidomain cytoplasmic portion of the histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component signal transduction system has been crystallized and X-ray data have been collected to 2.8 Å resolution.

  2. Ezrin Inhibition Up-regulates Stress Response Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Haydar; Bulut, Gülay; Han, Jenny; Graham, Garrett T.; Minas, Tsion Z.; Conn, Erin J.; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Pauly, Gary T.; Hayran, Mutlu; Li, Xin; Özdemirli, Metin; Ayhan, Ayşe; Rudek, Michelle A.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Üren, Aykut

    2016-01-01

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family of proteins that links cortical cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. High expression of ezrin correlates with poor prognosis and metastasis in osteosarcoma. In this study, to uncover specific cellular responses evoked by ezrin inhibition that can be used as a specific pharmacodynamic marker(s), we profiled global gene expression in osteosarcoma cells after treatment with small molecule ezrin inhibitors, NSC305787 and NSC668394. We identified and validated several up-regulated integrated stress response genes including PTGS2, ATF3, DDIT3, DDIT4, TRIB3, and ATF4 as novel ezrin-regulated transcripts. Analysis of transcriptional response in skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSC305787-treated mice compared with a control group revealed that, among those genes, the stress gene DDIT4/REDD1 may be used as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of ezrin inhibitor compound activity. In addition, we validated the anti-metastatic effects of NSC305787 in reducing the incidence of lung metastasis in a genetically engineered mouse model of osteosarcoma and evaluated the pharmacokinetics of NSC305787 and NSC668394 in mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cytoplasmic ezrin, previously considered a dormant and inactive protein, has important functions in regulating gene expression that may result in down-regulation of stress response genes. PMID:27137931

  3. 17 CFR 450.1 - Scope of regulations; office responsible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... responsible. 450.1 Section 450.1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REGULATIONS UNDER TITLE II OF THE GOVERNMENT SECURITIES ACT OF 1986 CUSTODIAL HOLDINGS OF GOVERNMENT SECURITIES BY... institutions that hold government securities as fiduciary, custodian, or otherwise for the account of...

  4. VENTROMEDIAL HYPOTHALAMIC REGULATION OF HORMONAL AND METABOLIC RESPONSES TO EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissing, John; Wallace, Jo L.; Scheurink, Anton J.W.; Galbo, Henrik; Steffens, Anton B.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated a neural regulation of hormonal and metabolic responses to exercise. Studies on the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) suggest that the VMH might be involved in neural control of exercise metabolism. We therefore studied 25 rats with or without Marcain-anesthetized VMH (Ma

  5. Photoisomerization-induced morphology and transparency transition in an azobenzene based two-component organogel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinhua; Liu, Xue; Chen, Liming; Mao, Yueyuan; Lan, Haichuang; Yi, Tao

    2015-11-15

    A two-component gel containing long chain alkylated gallic acid (GA) and photochromic phenazopyridine (PAP) was prepared. The gel was thoroughly characterized by UV-visible and IR spectra, SEM and POM images, XRD diffraction and dynamic oscillatory measurements. The structure and transparency of the two-component gel can be reversibly changed by alternative UV light irradiation and warming in the palm of the hand. This kind of soft material has potential application in upscale surface functional materials.

  6. Competitive Adsorption of a Two-Component Gas on a Deformable Adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Usenko, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the competitive adsorption of a two-component gas on the surface of an adsorbent whose adsorption properties vary in adsorption due to the adsorbent deformation. The essential difference of adsorption isotherms for a deformable adsorbent both from the classical Langmuir adsorption isotherms of a two-component gas and from the adsorption isotherms of a one-component gas taking into account variations in adsorption properties of the adsorbent in adsorption is obtained. We establi...

  7. Variational derivation of two-component Camassa-Holm shallow water system

    CERN Document Server

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2012-01-01

    By a variational approach in the Lagrangian formalism, we derive the nonlinear integrable two-component Camassa-Holm system (1). We show that the two-component Camassa-Holm system (1) with the plus sign arises as an approximation to the Euler equations of hydrodynamics for propagation of irrotational shallow water waves over a flat bed. The Lagrangian used in the variational derivation is not a metric.

  8. Regulatory Role of the MisR/S Two-Component System in Hemoglobin Utilization in Neisseria meningitidis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Outer membrane iron receptors are some of the major surface entities that are critical for meningococcal pathogenesis. The gene encoding the meningococcal hemoglobin receptor, HmbR, is both independently transcribed and transcriptionally linked to the upstream gene hemO, which encodes a heme oxygenase. The MisR/S two-component system was previously determined to regulate hmbR transcription, and its hemO and hmbR regulatory mechanisms were characterized further here. The expression of hemO and...

  9. A response regulator from a soil metagenome enhances resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic carbenicillin in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather K Allen

    Full Text Available Functional metagenomic analysis of soil metagenomes is a method for uncovering as-yet unidentified mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. Here we report an unconventional mode by which a response regulator derived from a soil metagenome confers resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic carbenicillin in Escherichia coli. A recombinant clone (βlr16 harboring a 5,169 bp DNA insert was selected from a metagenomic library previously constructed from a remote Alaskan soil. The βlr16 clone conferred specific resistance to carbenicillin, with limited increases in resistance to other tested antibiotics, including other β-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, fusidic acid, and gentamicin. Resistance was more pronounced at 24°C than at 37°C. Zone-of-inhibition assays suggested that the mechanism of carbenicillin resistance was not due to antibiotic inactivation. The DNA insert did not encode any genes known to confer antibiotic resistance, but did have two putative open reading frames (ORFs that were annotated as a metallopeptidase and a two-component response regulator. Transposon mutagenesis and subcloning of the two ORFs followed by phenotypic assays showed that the response regulator gene was necessary and sufficient to confer the resistance phenotype. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that the response regulator suppressed expression of the ompF porin gene, independently of the small RNA regulator micF, and enhanced expression of the acrD, mdtA, and mdtB efflux pump genes. This work demonstrates that antibiotic resistance can be achieved by the modulation of gene regulation by heterologous DNA. Functional analyses such as these can be important for making discoveries in antibiotic resistance gene biology and ecology.

  10. Enhancing forest tenure reforms through more responsive regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Larson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest tenure reforms have offered new opportunities for communities to obtain formal rights to forests and forest benefits, but at the same time a variety of limitations are placed on livelihood options. This article draws on several case studies of reforms in Africa, Asia and Latin America to analyse the regulations accompanying reforms. It identifies three types of regulations, namely rules that limit areas available to local communities; rules that delineate conservation areas and impose related limits on use; and bureaucratic requirements for permits and management plans, which restrict the commercial use and marketing of valuable forest products. It discusses problems with these regulations, and proposes a simple framework for identifying ways to promote regulations that work for forest conservation but are more responsive to the needs of communities and forests.

  11. Intra-leukocyte expression of two-component systems in Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum and effects of the histidine kinase inhibitor closantel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhihui; Kumagai, Yumi; Lin, Mingqun; Zhang, Chunbin; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2006-08-01

    The two-component system (TCS) composed of a pair of a sensor histidine kinase and a response regulator, allows bacteria to sense signals and respond to changes in their environment through specific gene activation or repression. The present study examined TCS in the obligatory intracellular bacteria Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, that cause human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) and human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) respectively. The genomes of E. chaffeensis and A. phagocytophilum were each predicted to encode three pairs of TCSs. All six genes encoding three histidine kinases and three response regulators were expressed in both E. chaffeensis and A. phagocytophilum cultured in human leukocytes. Pretreatment of host cell-free E. chaffeensis or A. phagocytophilum with closantel, an inhibitor of histidine kinases, completely blocked the infection of host cells. Treatment of infected cells 1 day post infection with closantel cleared infection in dose-dependent manner. All six genes in E. chaffeensis were cloned, recombinant proteins were expressed, and polyclonal antibodies were produced. Double immunofluorescence labelling and Western blot analysis revealed that all six proteins were expressed in cell culture. Autokinase activities of the three recombinant histidine kinases from E. chaffeensis were inhibited by closantel in vitro. A number of E. chaffeensis genes, including the six TCS genes, were downregulated within 5-60 min post closantel treatment. These results suggest that these TCSs play an essential role in infection and survival of E. chaffeensis and A. phagocytophilum in human leukocytes.

  12. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. In silico characterization of three two-component systems of Ehrlichia canis and evaluation of a natural plant-derived inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E V; Silva, G; Cardozo, G P; Bitencourt, T A; França, S C; Fachin, A L; Marins, M

    2012-10-04

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are important elements in the interaction of endobacteria with host cells. They are basically composed of two proteins, an environmental signal sensor and a response regulator, which activate genes involved in a wide range of bacterial responses to their environment. We analyzed three sets of genes corresponding to TCS of Ehrlichia canis, a common tick-borne canine pathogen and the etiologic agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, in order to identify the characteristic domains of the sensor and response regulator components. Analysis of sequence alignments of the corresponding proteins indicated a high degree of similarity to other members of the Anaplasmataceae TCS proteins, demonstrating that they could be useful as universal targets for development of new drugs against these bacteria. We also evaluated by quantitative PCR inhibition of E. canis by (2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (BOA), the core compound of the plant phenolic compound DIMBOA, which shows inhibitory action against TCS of the phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefasciens. This bacterium exerts its pathogenicity by transferring oncogenic DNA (T-DNA) into plant cells; this transfer is mediated through a type-IV secretion system, which is regulated by the VirA/VirG TCS. The process of infection and pathogenesis of E. canis is associated with the secretion of effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm through a T4SS system, which blocks the cell defense response. We suggest that BOA, and possibly other plant phenolic compounds that are TCS inhibitors, can be exploited in the search for new antiehrlichial drugs to be used alone or as complements in the treatment of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis.

  14. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  15. MicroRNAs as regulators in plant metal toxicity response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Mendoza-Soto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal toxicity is a major stress affecting crop production. This includes metals that are essential for plants (copper, iron, zinc, manganese, and non-essential metals (cadmium, aluminum, cobalt, mercury. A primary common effect of high concentrations of metals such as aluminum, cooper, cadmium or mercury, is root growth inhibition. Metal toxicity triggers the accumulation of reactive oxygen species leading to damage of lipids, proteins and DNA. The plants response to metal toxicity involves several biological processes that require fine and precise regulation at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are 21 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. A miRNA, incorporated into a RNA induced silencing complex, promotes cleavage of its target mRNA that is recognized by an almost perfect base complementarity. In plants miRNA regulation has been involved in development and also in biotic and abiotic stress responses. We review novel advances in identifying miRNAs related to metal toxicity responses and their potential role according to their targets. Most of the targets for plant metal-responsive miRNAs are transcription factors. Information about metal-responsive miRNAs in different plants points to important regulatory roles of miR319, miR390, miR393 and miR398. The target of miR319 is the TCP transcription factor, implicated in growth control. MiR390 exerts its action through the biogenesis of trans-acting small interference RNAs that, in turn, regulate auxin responsive factors. MiR393 targets the auxin receptors TIR1/AFBs and a bHLH transcription factor. Increasing evidence points to the crucial role of miR398 and its targets Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases in the control of the oxidative stress generated after high metal copper or iron exposure.

  16. Structural studies of the activation of the two component receiver domain NTRC by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohaile, M J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the N-terminal domain of the transcriptional enhancer NTRC (NiTrogen Regulatory protein C). This domain belongs to the family of receiver domains of two-component regulatory systems involved in signal transduction. Phosphorylation of NTRC at D54 leads to an activated form of the molecule which stimulates transcription of genes involved in nitrogen regulation. Three and four dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine an intermediate resolution structure of the unphosphorylated, inactive form of the N-terminal domain of NTRC. The structure is comprised of five {alpha}-helices and a five-stranded {beta}-sheet in a ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 5} topology. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of NTRC indicate that helix 4 and strand 5 are significantly more flexible than the rest of the secondary structure of the protein and that the loops making up the active site are flexible. The short lifetime of phospho-NTRC hampers the study of this form. However, conditions for determining the resonance assignments and, possibly, the three dimensional structure of phosphorylated NTRC have been obtained. Tentative assignments of the phosphorylated form indicate that the majority of the changes that NTRC experiences upon phosphorylation occur in helix 3, strand 4, helix 4, strand 5, and the loop between strand 5 and helix 5 (the 3445 face of NTRC) as well as near the site of phosphorylation. In order to examine a stable, activated form of the protein, constitutively active mutants of NTRC were investigated.

  17. Structural studies of the activation of the two component receiver domain NTRC by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohaile, Michael James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the N-terminal domain of the transcriptional enhancer NTRC (NiTrogen Regulatory protein C). This domain belongs to the family of receiver domains of two-component regulatory systems involved in signal transduction. Phosphorylation of NTRC at D54 leads to an activated form of the molecule which stimulates transcription of genes involved in nitrogen regulation. Three and four dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine an intermediate resolution structure of the unphosphorylated, inactive form of the N-terminal domain of NTRC. The structure is comprised of five α-helices and a five-stranded β-sheet in a (β/α)5 topology. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of NTRC indicate that helix 4 and strand 5 are significantly more flexible than the rest of the secondary structure of the protein and that the loops making up the active site are flexible. The short lifetime of phospho-NTRC hampers the study of this form. However, conditions for determining the resonance assignments and, possibly, the three dimensional structure of phosphorylated NTRC have been obtained. Tentative assignments of the phosphorylated form indicate that the majority of the changes that NTRC experiences upon phosphorylation occur in helix 3, strand 4, helix 4, strand 5, and the loop between strand 5 and helix 5 (the 3445 face of NTRC) as well as near the site of phosphorylation. In order to examine a stable, activated form of the protein, constitutively active mutants of NTRC were investigated.

  18. lncRNA-mediated regulation of the interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadkhan, Saba; Gunawardane, Lalith S

    2016-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) response is a critical arm of the innate immune response and a major host defense mechanism against viral infections. Following microbial encounter, a series of signaling events lead to transcriptional activation of the IFN genes, which in turn leads to significant changes in the cellular transcriptome by altering the expression of hundreds of target genes. Emerging evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute a major subgroup of the IFN target genes, and further, that the IFN response is subject to regulation by a large number of host- and pathogen-derived lncRNAs. While the vast majority of lncRNAs with potential roles in the IFN response remain unstudied, analysis of a very small subset provides a glimpse of the regulatory impact of this class of RNAs on IFN response.

  19. SOS response and its regulation on the fluoroquinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ting-Ting; Kang, Hai-Quan; Ma, Ping; Li, Peng-Peng; Huang, Lin-Yan; Gu, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria can survive fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) treatment by becoming resistant through a genetic change-mutation or gene acquisition. The SOS response is widespread among bacteria and exhibits considerable variation in its composition and regulation, which is repressed by LexA protein and derepressed by RecA protein. Here, we take a comprehensive review of the SOS gene network and its regulation on the fluoroquinolone resistance. As a unique survival mechanism, SOS may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo.

  20. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuexian O.; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F–deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases. PMID:18411338

  1. Dissecting the regulon of the two-component system CvsSR: Identifying new virulence genes in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recognition of environmental changes and regulation of genes that allow for adaption to those changes is essential for survival of bacteria. Two-component systems (TCSs) allow bacteria to sense and adapt to their environment. We previously identified the TCS CvsSR in the bacterial plant pathogen Pse...

  2. Two-component signal transduction in Agaricus bisporus: a comparative genomic analysis with other basidiomycetes through the web-based tool BASID2CS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavín, José L; García-Yoldi, Alberto; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Oguiza, José A

    2013-06-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are signal transduction mechanisms present in many eukaryotes, including fungi that play essential roles in the regulation of several cellular functions and responses. In this study, we carry out a genomic analysis of the TCS proteins in two varieties of the white button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The genomes of both A. bisporus varieties contain eight genes coding for TCS proteins, which include four hybrid Histidine Kinases (HKs), a single histidine-containing phosphotransfer (HPt) protein and three Response Regulators (RRs). Comparison of the TCS proteins among A. bisporus and the sequenced basidiomycetes showed a conserved core complement of five TCS proteins including the Tco1/Nik1 hybrid HK, HPt protein and Ssk1, Skn7 and Rim15-like RRs. In addition, Dual-HKs, unusual hybrid HKs with 2 HK and 2 RR domains, are absent in A. bisporus and are limited to various species of basidiomycetes. Differential expression analysis showed no significant up- or down-regulation of the Agaricus TCS genes in the conditions/tissue analyzed with the exception of the Skn7-like RR gene (Agabi_varbisH97_2|198669) that is significantly up-regulated on compost compared to cultured mycelia. Furthermore, the pipeline web server BASID2CS (http://bioinformatics.unavarra.es:1000/B2CS/BASID2CS.htm) has been specifically designed for the identification, classification and functional annotation of putative TCS proteins from any predicted proteome of basidiomycetes using a combination of several bioinformatic approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification and characterization of the two-component NtrY/NtrX regulatory system in Azospirillum brasilense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Ishida

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Two Azospirillum brasilense open reading frames (ORFs exhibited homology with the two-component NtrY/NtrX regulatory system from Azorhizobium caulinodans. These A. brasilense ORFs, located downstream to the nifR3ntrBC operon, were isolated, sequenced and characterized. The present study suggests that ORF1 and ORF2 correspond to the A. brasilense ntrY and ntrX genes, respectively. The amino acid sequences of A. brasilense NtrY and NtrX proteins showed high similarity to sensor/kinase and regulatory proteins, respectively. Analysis of lacZ transcriptional fusions by the ß-galactosidase assay in Escherichia coli ntrC mutants showed that the NtrY/NtrX proteins failed to activate transcription of the nifA promoter of A. brasilense. The ntrYX operon complemented a nifR3ntrBC deletion mutant of A. brasilense for nitrate-dependent growth, suggesting a possible cross-talk between the NtrY/X and NtrB/C sensor/regulator pairs. Our data support the existence of another two-component regulatory system in A. brasilense, the NtrY/NtrX system, probably involved in the regulation of nitrate assimilation.

  4. Sae regulator factor impairs the response to photodynamic inactivation mediated by Toluidine blue in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gándara, Lautaro; Mamone, Leandro; Dotto, Cristian; Buzzola, Fernanda; Casas, Adriana

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) involves the combined use of light and a photosensitizer, which, in the presence of oxygen, originates cytotoxic species capable of inactivating bacteria. Since the emergence of multi-resistant bacterial strains is becoming an increasing public health concern, PDI becomes an attractive choice. The aim of this work was to study the differential susceptibility to Toluidine blue (TB) mediated PDI (TB-PDI) of S. aureus mutants (RN6390 and Newman backgrounds) for different key regulators of virulence factors related to some extent to oxidative stress. Complete bacteria eradication of planktonic cultures of RN6390 S. aureus photosensitized with 13μM TB was obtained upon illumination with a low light dose of 4.2J/cm(2) from a non-coherent light source. Similarly, complete cell death was achieved applying 1.3μM TB and 19J/cm(2) light dose, showing that higher light doses can lead to equal cell death employing low photosensitizer concentrations. Interestingly, RN6390 in planktonic culture responded significantly better to TB-PDI than the Newman strain. We showed that deficiencies in rsbU, mgrA (transcription factors related to stress response) or agr (quorum sensing system involved in copper resistance to oxidative stress) did not modify the response of planktonic S. aureus to PDI. On the other hand, the two component system sae impaired the response to TB-PDI through a mechanism not related to the Eap adhesin. More severe conditions were needed to inactivate S. aureus biofilms (0.5mM TB, 157J/cm(2) laser light). In mutant sae biofilms, strain dependant differential susceptibilities are not noticed.

  5. Structural basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Vijay; Mirouze, Nicolas; Dubnau, David A; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2011-02-08

    Bacterial Rap family proteins have been most extensively studied in Bacillus subtilis, where they regulate activities including sporulation, genetic competence, antibiotic expression, and the movement of the ICEBs1 transposon. One subset of Rap proteins consists of phosphatases that control B. subtilis and B. anthracis sporulation by dephosphorylating the response regulator Spo0F. The mechanistic basis of Rap phosphatase activity was unknown. Here we present the RapH-Spo0F X-ray crystal structure, which shows that Rap proteins consist of a 3-helix bundle and a tetratricopeptide repeat domain. Extensive biochemical and genetic functional studies reveal the importance of the observed RapH-Spo0F interactions, including the catalytic role of a glutamine in the RapH 3-helix bundle that inserts into the Spo0F active site. We show that in addition to dephosphorylating Spo0F, RapH can antagonize sporulation by sterically blocking phosphoryl transfer to and from Spo0F. Our structure-function analysis of the RapH-Spo0F interaction identified Rap protein residues critical for Spo0F phosphatase activity. This information enabled us to assign Spo0F phosphatase activity to a Rap protein based on sequence alone, which was not previously possible. Finally, as the ultimate test of our newfound understanding of the structural requirements for Rap phosphatase function, a non-phosphatase Rap protein that inhibits the binding of the response regulator ComA to DNA was rationally engineered to dephosphorylate Spo0F. In addition to revealing the mechanistic basis of response regulator dephosphorylation by Rap proteins, our studies support the previously proposed T-loop-Y allostery model of receiver domain regulation that restricts the aromatic "switch" residue to an internal position when the β4-α4 loop adopts an active-site proximal conformation.

  6. SpaK/SpaR two-component system characterized by a structure-driven domain-fusion method and in vitro phosphorylation studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Chakicherla

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we introduce a quantitative structure-driven computational domain-fusion method, which we used to predict the structures of proteins believed to be involved in regulation of the subtilin pathway in Bacillus subtilis, and used to predict a protein-protein complex formed by interaction between the proteins. Homology modeling of SpaK and SpaR yielded preliminary structural models based on a best template for SpaK comprising a dimer of a histidine kinase, and for SpaR a response regulator protein. Our LGA code was used to identify multi-domain proteins with structure homology to both modeled structures, yielding a set of domain-fusion templates then used to model a hypothetical SpaK/SpaR complex. The models were used to identify putative functional residues and residues at the protein-protein interface, and bioinformatics was used to compare functionally and structurally relevant residues in corresponding positions among proteins with structural homology to the templates. Models of the complex were evaluated in light of known properties of the functional residues within two-component systems involving His-Asp phosphorelays. Based on this analysis, a phosphotransferase complexed with a beryllofluoride was selected as the optimal template for modeling a SpaK/SpaR complex conformation. In vitro phosphorylation studies performed using wild type and site-directed SpaK mutant proteins validated the predictions derived from application of the structure-driven domain-fusion method: SpaK was phosphorylated in the presence of (32P-ATP and the phosphate moiety was subsequently transferred to SpaR, supporting the hypothesis that SpaK and SpaR function as sensor and response regulator, respectively, in a two-component signal transduction system, and furthermore suggesting that the structure-driven domain-fusion approach correctly predicted a physical interaction between SpaK and SpaR. Our domain-fusion algorithm leverages quantitative structure information

  7. Pleiotropic regulations of neutrophil receptors response to sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Sun, Bingwei

    2017-03-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical condition that causes a high mortality rate worldwide. Numerous studies on the pathophysiology of sepsis have revealed an imbalance in the inflammatory network, thus leading to tissue damage, organ failure, and ultimately death. The impairment of neu-trophil migration is associated with the outcome of sepsis. Literature review was performed on the roles of neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil receptors as pleiotropic regulators during sepsis. Additionally, we systematically classify neutrophil receptors with regard to the neutrophil response during sepsis and discuss the clinical implications of these receptors for the treatment of sepsis. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant dysfunction in neutrophil recruitment during sepsis, characterized by the failure to migrate to the site of infection. Neutrophil receptors, as pleiotropic regulators, play important roles in the neutrophil response during sepsis. Neutrophil receptors play key roles in chemotactic neutrophil migration and may prove to be suitable targets in future pharmacological therapies for sepsis.

  8. The light responsive transcriptome of the zebrafish: function and regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Weger

    Full Text Available Most organisms possess circadian clocks that are able to anticipate the day/night cycle and are reset or "entrained" by the ambient light. In the zebrafish, many organs and even cultured cell lines are directly light responsive, allowing for direct entrainment of the clock by light. Here, we have characterized light induced gene transcription in the zebrafish at several organizational levels. Larvae, heart organ cultures and cell cultures were exposed to 1- or 3-hour light pulses, and changes in gene expression were compared with controls kept in the dark. We identified 117 light regulated genes, with the majority being induced and some repressed by light. Cluster analysis groups the genes into five major classes that show regulation at all levels of organization or in different subset combinations. The regulated genes cover a variety of functions, and the analysis of gene ontology categories reveals an enrichment of genes involved in circadian rhythms, stress response and DNA repair, consistent with the exposure to visible wavelengths of light priming cells for UV-induced damage repair. Promoter analysis of the induced genes shows an enrichment of various short sequence motifs, including E- and D-box enhancers that have previously been implicated in light regulation of the zebrafish period2 gene. Heterologous reporter constructs with sequences matching these motifs reveal light regulation of D-box elements in both cells and larvae. Morpholino-mediated knock-down studies of two homologues of the D-box binding factor Tef indicate that these are differentially involved in the cell autonomous light induction in a gene-specific manner. These findings suggest that the mechanisms involved in period2 regulation might represent a more general pathway leading to light induced gene expression.

  9. Low temperatures shear viscosity of a two-component dipolar Fermi gas with unequal population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsheshdar, E.; Yavari, H.; Zangeneh, Z.

    2016-07-01

    By using the Green's functions method and linear response theory we calculate the shear viscosity of a two-component dipolar Fermi gas with population imbalance (spin polarized) in the low temperatures limit. In the strong-coupling Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) region where a Feshbach resonance gives rise to tightly bound dimer molecules, a spin-polarized Fermi superfluid reduces to a simple Bose-Fermi mixture of Bose-condensed dimers and the leftover unpaired fermions (atoms). The interactions between dimer-atom, dimer-dimer, and atom-atom take into account to the viscous relaxation time (τη) . By evaluating the self-energies in the ladder approximation we determine the relaxation times due to dimer-atom (τDA) , dimer-dimer (τcDD ,τdDD) , and atom-atom (τAA) interactions. We will show that relaxation rates due to these interactions τDA-1 ,τcDD-1, τdDD-1, and τAA-1 have T2, T4, e - E /kB T (E is the spectrum of the dimer atoms), and T 3 / 2 behavior respectively in the low temperature limit (T → 0) and consequently, the atom-atom interaction plays the dominant role in the shear viscosity in this rang of temperatures. For small polarization (τDA ,τAA ≫τcDD ,τdDD), the low temperatures shear viscosity is determined by contact interaction between dimers and the shear viscosity varies as T-5 which has the same behavior as the viscosity of other superfluid systems such as superfluid neutron stars, and liquid helium.

  10. Enzyme action in the regulation of plant hormone responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Corey S; Muehler, Ashley M; Jez, Joseph M

    2013-07-05

    Plants synthesize a chemically diverse range of hormones that regulate growth, development, and responses to environmental stresses. The major classes of plant hormones are specialized metabolites with exquisitely tailored perception and signaling systems, but equally important are the enzymes that control the dose and exposure to the bioactive forms of these molecules. Here, we review new insights into the role of enzyme families, including the SABATH methyltransferases, the methylesterases, the GH3 acyl acid-amido synthetases, and the hormone peptidyl hydrolases, in controlling the biosynthesis and modifications of plant hormones and how these enzymes contribute to the network of chemical signals responsible for plant growth, development, and environmental adaptation.

  11. Regulation of Neurotransmitter Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-05

    accordance with DoD 5200.1 -R, Information Security Program Regulation. Chapter V1 Section 2, V"-apaph 4-200. clasification markings are to be stamped...through pharmacologically distinct reports. Finally, the augmenting response does not appear to be mediated through protein kinase C. However, BAC...may facilitate second messenger production by altering the coupling of catecholamine receptor to C- proteins involved in the cAMP cascade. (( ( CONTRACT

  12. Adaptive Immune Responses Regulate the Pathophysiology of Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Pathophysiology of Lymphedema PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jamie Zampell, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan-Kettering Institute for...Immune Responses Regulate the Pathophysiology of Lymphedema 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0495 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... Lymphedema is a debilitating disorder affecting as many as 1 in 8 cancer survivors. Despite wide prevalence, limited understanding of disease

  13. Global regulation of gene expression in response to cysteine availability in Clostridium perfringens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Gaelle

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine has a crucial role in cellular physiology and its synthesis is tightly controlled due to its reactivity. However, little is known about the sulfur metabolism and its regulation in clostridia compared with other firmicutes. In Clostridium perfringens, the two-component system, VirR/VirS, controls the expression of the ubiG operon involved in methionine to cysteine conversion in addition to the expression of several toxin genes. The existence of links between the C. perfringens virulence regulon and sulfur metabolism prompted us to analyze this metabolism in more detail. Results We first performed a tentative reconstruction of sulfur metabolism in C. perfringens and correlated these data with the growth of strain 13 in the presence of various sulfur sources. Surprisingly, C. perfringens can convert cysteine to methionine by an atypical still uncharacterized pathway. We further compared the expression profiles of strain 13 after growth in the presence of cystine or homocysteine that corresponds to conditions of cysteine depletion. Among the 177 genes differentially expressed, we found genes involved in sulfur metabolism and controlled by premature termination of transcription via a cysteine specific T-box system (cysK-cysE, cysP1 and cysP2 or an S-box riboswitch (metK and metT. We also showed that the ubiG operon was submitted to a triple regulation by cysteine availability via a T-box system, by the VirR/VirS system via the VR-RNA and by the VirX regulatory RNA. In addition, we found that expression of pfoA (theta-toxin, nagL (one of the five genes encoding hyaluronidases and genes involved in the maintenance of cell redox status was differentially expressed in response to cysteine availability. Finally, we showed that the expression of genes involved in [Fe-S] clusters biogenesis and of the ldh gene encoding the lactate dehydrogenase was induced during cysteine limitation. Conclusion Several key functions for the

  14. Two-component signal transduction system SaeRS is involved in competence and penicillin susceptibility in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qiang; Ma, Yuanfang; Qu, Di

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, the S. epidermidis SaeRS was identified to negatively regulate the expression of genes involved in competence (comF, murF), cytolysis (lrgA), and autolysis (lytS) by DNA microarray or real-time RT-PCR analysis. In addition, saeRS mutant showed increased competence and higher susceptibility to antibiotics such as penicillin and oxacillin than the wild-type strain. The study will be helpful for understanding the characterization of the SaeRS in S. epidermidis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Evolutionary tuning of protein expression levels of a positively autoregulated two-component system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Gao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular adaptation relies on the development of proper regulatory schemes for accurate control of gene expression levels in response to environmental cues. Over- or under-expression can lead to diminished cell fitness due to increased costs or insufficient benefits. Positive autoregulation is a common regulatory scheme that controls protein expression levels and gives rise to essential features in diverse signaling systems, yet its roles in cell fitness are less understood. It remains largely unknown how much protein expression is 'appropriate' for optimal cell fitness under specific extracellular conditions and how the dynamic environment shapes the regulatory scheme to reach appropriate expression levels. Here, we investigate the correlation of cell fitness and output response with protein expression levels of the E. coli PhoB/PhoR two-component system (TCS. In response to phosphate (Pi-depletion, the PhoB/PhoR system activates genes involved in phosphorus assimilation as well as genes encoding themselves, similarly to many other positively autoregulated TCSs. We developed a bacteria competition assay in continuous cultures and discovered that different Pi conditions have conflicting requirements of protein expression levels for optimal cell fitness. Pi-replete conditions favored cells with low levels of PhoB/PhoR while Pi-deplete conditions selected for cells with high levels of PhoB/PhoR. These two levels matched PhoB/PhoR concentrations achieved via positive autoregulation in wild-type cells under Pi-replete and -deplete conditions, respectively. The fitness optimum correlates with the wild-type expression level, above which the phosphorylation output saturates, thus further increase in expression presumably provides no additional benefits. Laboratory evolution experiments further indicate that cells with non-ideal protein levels can evolve toward the optimal levels with diverse mutational strategies. Our results suggest that the natural

  16. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-05-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes.

  17. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission with Two Components: Application to the Planck High Frequency Instrument Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales.

  18. Phosphate sink containing two-component signaling systems as tunable threshold devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Munia; Kothamachu, Varun B; Feliu, Elisenda

    2014-01-01

    -component signaling systems offer a rich diversity of sensory systems that are built around a core phosphotransfer reaction between histidine kinases and their output response regulator proteins, and thus are a good target for reengineering through synthetic biology. Here, we explore the signal-response relationship...... and define key parameters that control threshold levels and sensitivity of the signal-response curve. We confirm these findings experimentally, by in vitro reconstitution of the one HK-two RR motif found in the Sinorhizobium meliloti chemotaxis pathway and measuring the resulting signal-response curve. We...... to implement tunable switch-like signal processing and provides an ideal basis for developing threshold devices for synthetic biology applications....

  19. Domain Walls and Textured Vortices in a Two-Component Ginzburg-Landau Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Peder; Gaididei, Yu. B.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2005-01-01

    We look for domain wall and textured vortex solutions in a two-component Ginzburg-Landau model inspired by two-band superconductivity. The two-dimensional two-component model, with equal coherence lengths and no magnetic field, shows some interesting properties. In the absence of a Josephson type...... coupling between the two order parameters a ''textured vortex'' is found by analytical and numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equations. With a Josephson type coupling between the two order parameters we find the system to split up in two domains separated by a domain wall, where the order parameter...

  20. Block algebra in two-component BKP and D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanzhong; He, Jingsong

    2013-11-01

    We construct generalized additional symmetries of a two-component BKP hierarchy defined by two pseudo-differential Lax operators. These additional symmetry flows form a Block type algebra with some modified (or additional) terms because of a B type reduction condition of this integrable hierarchy. Further we show that the D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchy, which is a reduction of the two-component BKP hierarchy, possess a complete Block type additional symmetry algebra. That D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchy has a similar algebraic structure as the bigraded Toda hierarchy which is a differential-discrete integrable system.

  1. Rabi Oscillations in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates with a Coupling Drive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-Dong; FAN Wen-Bing; ZHOU Xiao-Ji; WANG Yi-Qiu; LIANG Jiu-Qing

    2002-01-01

    The Rabi oscillations in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with a coupling drive are studiedby means of a pair of bosonic operators. The coupling drive and initial phase difference will affect the amplitudeand the period of the Rabi oscillations. The Rabi oscillations will vanish in the evolution of the condensate densityfor some special initial phase differences (ψ = 0 or π). Our theory provides not only an analytical framework forquantitative predictions for two-component condensates, but also gives an intuitive understanding of some mysteriousfeatures observed in experiments and numerical. simulations.

  2. Targeting two-component signal transduction: a novel drug discovery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takafumi; Furuta, Eiji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2007-01-01

    We have developed two screening systems for isolating inhibitors that target bacterial two-component signal transduction: (1) a differential growth assay using a temperature-sensitive yycF mutant (CNM2000) of Bacillus subtilis, which is supersensitive to histidine kinase inhibitors, and (2) a high-throughput genetic system for targeting the homodimerization of histidine kinases essential for the bacterial two-component signal transduction. By using these methods, we have been able to identify various types of inhibitors that block the autophosphorylation of histidine kinases with different modes of actions.

  3. Modulational instability of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, G R; Nahm, K; Jin, Guang-Ri; Kim, Chul Koo; Nahm, Kyun

    2004-01-01

    We study modulational instability of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in a deep optical lattice, which is modelled as a coupled discrete nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. The excitation spectrum and the modulational instability condition of the total system are presented analytically. In the long-wavelength limit, our results agree with the homogeneous two-component Bose-Einstein condensates case. The discreteness effects result in the appearance of the modulational instability for the condensates in miscible region. The numerical calculations confirm our analytical results and show that the interspecies coupling can transfer the instability from one component to another.

  4. Domain Walls and Textured Vortices in a Two-Component Ginzburg-Landau Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Peder; Gaididei, Yu. B.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2005-01-01

    We look for domain wall and textured vortex solutions in a two-component Ginzburg-Landau model inspired by two-band superconductivity. The two-dimensional two-component model, with equal coherence lengths and no magnetic field, shows some interesting properties. In the absence of a Josephson type...... coupling between the two order parameters a ''textured vortex'' is found by analytical and numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equations. With a Josephson type coupling between the two order parameters we find the system to split up in two domains separated by a domain wall, where the order parameter...

  5. Block algebra in two-component BKP and D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuanzhong, E-mail: lichuanzhong@nbu.edu.cn; He, Jingsong, E-mail: hejingsong@nbu.edu.cn [Department of Mathematics, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)

    2013-11-15

    We construct generalized additional symmetries of a two-component BKP hierarchy defined by two pseudo-differential Lax operators. These additional symmetry flows form a Block type algebra with some modified (or additional) terms because of a B type reduction condition of this integrable hierarchy. Further we show that the D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchy, which is a reduction of the two-component BKP hierarchy, possess a complete Block type additional symmetry algebra. That D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchy has a similar algebraic structure as the bigraded Toda hierarchy which is a differential-discrete integrable system.

  6. The genetic regulation of infant immune responses to vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eNewport

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of factors are recognised to influence immune responses to vaccinations including age, gender, the dose and quality of the antigen used, the number of doses given, the route of administration and the nutritional status of the recipient. Additionally, several immunogenetic studies have identified associations between polymorphisms in genes encoding immune response proteins, both innate and adaptive, and variation in responses to vaccines. Variants in the genes encoding Toll-like receptors, HLA molecules, cytokines, cytokine receptors have associated with heterogeneity of responses to a wide range of vaccines including measles, hepatitis B, influenza A, BCG, Haemophilus influenzae type b and certain Neisseria meningitidis serotypes, amongst others. However, the vast majority of these studies have been conducted in older children and adults and there are very few data available from studies conducted in infants. This paper reviews the evidence to date that host genes influencing vaccines responses in these older population and identifies a large gap in our understanding of the genetic regulation of responses in early life. . Given the high mortality from infection in early life and the challenges of developing vaccines that generate effective immune responses in the context of the developing immune system further research on infant populations is required.

  7. The Campylobacter jejuni RacRS two-component system activates the glutamate synthesis by directly upregulating γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Xander evan der Stel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The highly conserved enzyme γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT plays an important role in metabolism of glutathione and glutamine. Yet, the regulation of ggt transcription in prokaryotes is poorly understood. In the human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, GGT is important as it contributes to persistent colonization of the gut. Here we show that the GGT activity in C. jejuni is dependent on a functional RacRS (reduced ability to colonize two-component system. Electrophoretic mobility shift and luciferase reporter assays indicate that the response regulator RacR binds to a promoter region ~80 bp upstream of the ggt transcriptional start site, which contains a recently identified RacR DNA binding consensus sequence. RacR needs to be phosphorylated to activate the transcription of the ggt gene, which is the case under low oxygen conditions in presence of alternative electron acceptors. A functional GGT and RacR are needed to allow C. jejuni to grow optimally on glutamine as sole carbon source under RacR inducing conditions. However, when additional carbon sources are present C. jejuni is capable of utilizing glutamine independently of GGT. RacR is the first prokaryotic transcription factor known to directly upregulate both the cytoplasmic (glutamine-2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT as well as the periplasmic (GGT production of glutamate.

  8. VLDL hydrolysis by hepatic lipase regulates PPARδ transcriptional responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PPARs (α,γ,δ are a family of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate energy balance, including lipid metabolism. Despite these critical functions, the integration between specific pathways of lipid metabolism and distinct PPAR responses remains obscure. Previous work has revealed that lipolytic pathways can activate PPARs. Whether hepatic lipase (HL, an enzyme that regulates VLDL and HDL catabolism, participates in PPAR responses is unknown. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using PPAR ligand binding domain transactivation assays, we found that HL interacted with triglyceride-rich VLDL (>HDL≫LDL, IDL to activate PPARδ preferentially over PPARα or PPARγ, an effect dependent on HL catalytic activity. In cell free ligand displacement assays, VLDL hydrolysis by HL activated PPARδ in a VLDL-concentration dependent manner. Extended further, VLDL stimulation of HL-expressing HUVECs and FAO hepatoma cells increased mRNA expression of canonical PPARδ target genes, including adipocyte differentiation related protein (ADRP, angiopoietin like protein 4 and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4. HL/VLDL regulated ADRP through a PPRE in the promoter region of this gene. In vivo, adenoviral-mediated hepatic HL expression in C57BL/6 mice increased hepatic ADRP mRNA levels by 30%. In ob/ob mice, a model with higher triglycerides than C57BL/6 mice, HL overexpression increased ADRP expression by 70%, demonstrating the importance of triglyceride substrate for HL-mediated PPARδ activation. Global metabolite profiling identified HL/VLDL released fatty acids including oleic acid and palmitoleic acid that were capable of recapitulating PPARδ activation and ADRP gene regulation in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: These data define a novel pathway involving HL hydrolysis of VLDL that activates PPARδ through generation of specific monounsaturated fatty acids. These data also demonstrate how integrating cell biology with metabolomic approaches provides insight

  9. Conformational Dynamics of Response Regulator RegX3 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Ahmad

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS are vital for adaptive responses to various environmental stresses in bacteria, fungi and even plants. A TCS typically comprises of a sensor histidine kinase (SK with its cognate response regulator (RR, which often has two domains-N terminal receiver domain (RD and C terminal effector domain (ED. The histidine kinase phosphorylates the RD to activate the ED by promoting dimerization. However, despite significant progress on structural studies, how RR transmits activation signal from RD to ED remains elusive. Here we analyzed active to inactive transition process of OmpR/PhoB family using an active conformation of RegX3 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a model system by computational approaches. An inactive state of RegX3 generated from 150 ns molecular dynamic simulation has rotameric conformations of Thr79 and Tyr98 that are generally conserved in inactive RRs. Arg81 in loop β4α4 acts synergistically with loop β1α1 to change its interaction partners during active to inactive transition, potentially leading to the N-terminal movement of RegX3 helix α1. Global conformational dynamics of RegX3 is mainly dependent on α4β5 region, in particular seven 'hot-spot' residues (Tyr98 to Ser104, adjacent to which several coevolved residues at dimeric interface, including Ile76-Asp96, Asp97-Arg111 and Glu24-Arg113 pairs, are critical for signal transduction. Taken together, our computational analyses suggest a molecular linkage between Asp phosphorylation, proximal loops and α4β5α5 dimeric interface during RR active to inactive state transition, which is not often evidently defined from static crystal structures.

  10. Perturbation of the two-component signal transduction system, BprRS, results in attenuated virulence and motility defects in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar Adler, Natalie R; Allwood, Elizabeth M; Deveson Lucas, Deanna; Harrison, Paul; Watts, Stephen; Dimitropoulos, Alexandra; Treerat, Puthayalai; Alwis, Priyangi; Devenish, Rodney J; Prescott, Mark; Govan, Brenda; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-04

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe invasive disease of humans and animals. Initial screening of a B. pseudomallei signature-tagged mutagenesis library identified an attenuated mutant with a transposon insertion in a gene encoding the sensor component of an uncharacterised two-component signal transduction system (TCSTS), which we designated BprRS. Single gene inactivation of either the response regulator gene (bprR) or the sensor histidine kinase gene (bprS) resulted in mutants with reduced swarming motility and reduced virulence in mice. However, a bprRS double mutant was not attenuated for virulence and displayed wild-type levels of motility. The transcriptomes of the bprS, bprR and bprRS mutants were compared with the transcriptome of the parent strain K96243. Inactivation of the entire BprRS TCSTS (bprRS double mutant) resulted in altered expression of only nine genes, including both bprR and bprS, five phage-related genes and bpss0686, encoding a putative 5, 10-methylene tetrahydromethanopterin reductase involved in one carbon metabolism. In contrast, the transcriptomes of each of the bprR and bprS single gene mutants revealed more than 70 differentially expressed genes common to both mutants, including regulatory genes and those required for flagella assembly and for the biosynthesis of the cytotoxic polyketide, malleilactone. Inactivation of the entire BprRS TCSTS did not alter virulence or motility and very few genes were differentially expressed indicating that the definitive BprRS regulon is relatively small. However, loss of a single component, either the sensor histidine kinase BprS or its cognate response regulator BprR, resulted in significant transcriptomic and phenotypic differences from the wild-type strain. We hypothesize that the dramatically altered phenotypes of these single mutants are the result of cross-regulation with one or more other TCSTSs and concomitant dysregulation of other key regulatory genes.

  11. Three-wave interaction in two-component quadratic nonlinear lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konotop, V. V.; Cunha, M. D.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1999-01-01

    We investigate a two-component lattice with a quadratic nonlinearity and find with the multiple scale technique that integrable three-wave interaction takes place between plane wave solutions when these fulfill resonance conditions. We demonstrate that. energy conversion and pulse propagation kno...

  12. A Two-Component Generalization of Burgers' Equation with Quasi-Periodic Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongfei; Xia, Tiecheng; Chen, Dengyuan

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we aim for the theta function representation of quasi-periodic solution and related crucial quantities for a two-component generalization of Burgers' equation. Our tools include the theory of algebraic curves, meromorphic functions, Baker-Akhiezer functions and the Dubrovin-type equations for auxiliary divisor. Eith these tools, the explicit representations for above quantities are obtained.

  13. Two-component Brownian coagulation: Monte Carlo simulation and process characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibo Zhao; Chu guang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    The compositional distribution within aggregates of a given size is essential to the functionality of composite aggregates that are usually enlarged by rapid Brownian coagulation.There is no analytical solution for the process of such two-component systems.Monte Carlo method is an effective numerical approach for two-component coagulation.In this paper,the differentially weighted Monte Carlo method is used to investigate two-component Brownian coagulation,respectively,in the continuum regime,the freemolecular regime and the transition regime.It is found that ( 1 ) for Brownian coagulation in the continuum regime and in the free-molecular regime,the mono-variate compositional distribution,i.e.,the number density distribution function of one component amount (in the form of volume of the component in aggregates) satisfies self-preserving form the same as particle size distribution in mono-component Brownian coagulation; (2) however,for Brownian coagulation in the transition regime the mono-variate compositional distribution cannot reach self-similarity; and (3) the bivariate compositional distribution,i.e.,the combined number density distribution function of two component amounts in the three regimes satisfies a semi self-preserving form.Moreover,other new features inherent to aggregative mixing are also demonstrated; e.g.,the degree of mixing between components,which is largely controlled by the initial compositional mass fraction,improves as aggregate size increases.

  14. Transport of a two-component mixture in one-dimensional channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borman, VD; Tronin, VN; Tronin, [No Value; Troyan, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    The transport of a two-component gas mixture in subnanometer channels is investigated theoretically for an arbitrary filling of channels. Special attention is paid to consistent inclusion of density effects, which are associated both with the interaction and with a finite size of particles. The anal

  15. The Integrability of New Two-Component KdV Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziemowit Popowicz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the bi-Hamiltonian representation of the two-component coupled KdV equations discovered by Drinfel'd and Sokolov and rediscovered by Sakovich and Foursov. Connection of this equation with the supersymmetric Kadomtsev-Petviashvilli-Radul-Manin hierarchy is presented. For this new supersymmetric equation the Lax representation and odd Hamiltonian structure is given.

  16. The Qualitative Analysis of a Solution of a Series Maintenance System with Two Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUOWei-hua; YANGMing-zeng

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, firstly we study the series maintenance system with two components, obtain its exsistence and uniqueness of a dynamic state nonnegative solution by strongly continuous semigroups of operators theory. Then we prove that 0 is the eigenvalue of the system's host operators, and finally we study the eigenvector of the eigenvalue 0.

  17. Impacts of photon bending on observational aspects of Two Component Advective Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Arka

    2016-01-01

    Nature of photon trajectories in a curved spacetime around black holes are studied without constraining their motion to any plane. Impacts of photon bending are separately scrutinized for Keplerian and CENBOL components of Two Component Advective Flow (TCAF) model. Parameters like Red shift, Bolometric Flux, temperature profile and time of arrival of photons are also computed.

  18. The essential YycFG two-component system controls cell wall metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisicchia, Paola; Noone, David; Lioliou, Efthimia

    2007-01-01

    Adaptation of bacteria to the prevailing environmental and nutritional conditions is often mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCS). The Bacillus subtilis YycFG TCS has attracted special attention as it is essential for viability and its regulon is poorly defined. Here we show...

  19. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission with Two Components: Application to the Planck HFI Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Meisner, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck HFI maps. This parametrization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single modified blackbody (MBB) dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. (1999) based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.1' resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 micron data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.1' FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to...

  20. Global dissipative solutions for the two-component Camassa-Holm shallow water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a continuous semigroup of globally defined weak dissipative solutions for the two-component Camassa-Holm system. Such solutions are established by using a new approach based on characteristics a set of new variables overcoming the difficulties inherent in multi-component systems.

  1. Phase separation and dynamics of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kean Loon; Jørgensen, Nils Byg; Liu, I-Kang;

    2016-01-01

    The miscibility of two interacting quantum systems is an important testing ground for the understanding of complex quantum systems. Two-component Bose-Einstein condensates enable the investigation of this scenario in a particularly well controlled setting. In a homogeneous system, the transition...

  2. Phase of Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates with a Coupling Drive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; JIN Shuo; JIAO Zhi-Yong; WANG Ji-Suo

    2007-01-01

    By using the invariant theory, we study the phases of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with a coupling drive under the case that the strength of the interatomic interaction in each condensate equals the interspecies interaction. The dynamical and geometric phases are presented respectively. The Aharonov-Anandan phase is also obtained under the cyclical evolution.

  3. The dynamics of nonstationary solutions in one-dimensional two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Bin-Bin; Hao Xue; Tian Qiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamical properties of nonstationary solutions in one-dimensional two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. It gives three kinds of stationary solutions to this model and develops a general method of constructing nonstationary solutions. It obtains the unique features about general evolution and soliton evolution of nonstationary solutions in this model.

  4. Instabilities on crystal surfaces: The two-component body-centered solid-on-solid model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlon, E.; van Beijeren, H.; Mazzeo, G.

    1996-01-01

    The free energy of crystal surfaces that can be described by the two-component body-centered solid-on-solid model has been calculated in a mean-field approximation. The system may model ionic crystals with a bcc lattice structure (for instance CsCl). Crossings between steps are energetically favored

  5. Geometric Integrability of Two-Component Camassa-Holm and Hunter-Saxton Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Juu-Feng; QU Chang-Zheng

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the two-component Camassa-Holm and Hunter-Saxton systems are geometrically integrable, namely they describe pseudo-spherical surfaces. As a consequence, their infinite number o, conservation laws are directly constructed. In addition, a class of nonlocal symmetries depending on the pseudo-potentials are obtained.

  6. Transport of a two-component mixture in one-dimensional channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borman, VD; Tronin, VN; Tronin, [No Value; Troyan, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    The transport of a two-component gas mixture in subnanometer channels is investigated theoretically for an arbitrary filling of channels. Special attention is paid to consistent inclusion of density effects, which are associated both with the interaction and with a finite size of particles. The

  7. Supply chain carbon footprinting and responsibility allocation under emission regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Xiao; Chen, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions has become an enormous challenge for any single enterprise and its supply chain because of the increasing concern on global warming. This paper investigates carbon footprinting and responsibility allocation for supply chains involved in joint production. Our study is conducted from the perspective of a social planner who aims to achieve social value optimization. The carbon footprinting model is based on operational activities rather than on firms because joint production blurs the organizational boundaries of footprints. A general model is proposed for responsibility allocation among firms who seek to maximize individual profits. This study looks into ways for the decentralized supply chain to achieve centralized optimality of social value under two emission regulations. Given a balanced allocation for the entire supply chain, we examine the necessity of over-allocation to certain firms under specific situations and find opportunities for the firms to avoid over-allocation. The comparison of the two regulations reveals that setting an emission standard per unit of product will motivate firms to follow the standard and improve their emission efficiencies. Hence, a more efficient and promising policy is needed in contrast to existing regulations on total production.

  8. Arabidopsis type B cytokinin response regulators ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively regulate plant responses to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kien Huu; Ha, Chien Van; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yasunari; Tran, Uven Thi; Li, Weiqiang; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki; Schaller, G Eric; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Tran, L S

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we used a loss-of-function approach to elucidate the functions of three Arabidopsis type B response regulators (ARRs)--namely ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12--in regulating the Arabidopsis plant responses to drought. The arr1,10,12 triple mutant showed a significant increase in drought tolerance versus WT plants, as indicated by its higher relative water content and survival rate on drying soil. This enhanced drought tolerance of arr1,10,12 plants can be attributed to enhanced cell membrane integrity, increased anthocyanin biosynthesis, abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitivity, and reduced stomatal aperture, but not to altered stomatal density. Further drought-tolerance tests of lower-order double and single mutants indicated that ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively and redundantly control plant responses to drought, with ARR1 appearing to bear the most critical function among the three proteins. In agreement with these findings, a comparative genome-wide analysis of the leaves of arr1,10,12 and WT plants under both normal and dehydration conditions suggested a cytokinin (CK) signaling-mediated network controlling plant adaptation to drought via many dehydration/drought- and/or ABA-responsive genes that can provide osmotic adjustment and protection to cellular and membrane structures. Expression of all three ARR genes was repressed by dehydration and ABA treatments, inferring that plants down-regulate these genes as an adaptive mechanism to survive drought. Collectively, our results demonstrate that repression of CK response, and thus CK signaling, is one of the strategies plants use to cope with water deficit, providing novel insight for the design of drought-tolerant plants by genetic engineering.

  9. Prioritization of a plant polysaccharide over a mucus carbohydrate is enforced by a Bacteroides hybrid two-component system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jonathan B; Sonnenburg, Justin L

    2012-08-01

    Bacteroides is a dominant genus within the intestinal microbiota of healthy humans. Key adaptations of the Bacteroides to the dynamic intestinal ecosystem include a diverse repertoire of genes involved in sensing and processing numerous diet- and host-derived polysaccharides. One such adaptation is the carbohydrate-sensing hybrid two-component system (HTCS) family of signalling sensors, which has been widely expanded within the Bacteroides. Using Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron as a model, we have created a chimeric HTCS consisting of the well-characterized sensing domain of one HTCS, BT1754, and the regulatory domain of another HTCS, BT0366, to explore the regulatory capabilities of these molecules. We found that the BT0366 regulatory region directly binds to and mediates induction of the adjacent polysaccharide utilization locus (PUL) using whole-genome transcriptional profiling after inducing signalling through our chimeric protein. We also found that BT0366 activation simultaneously leads to repression of distal PULs involved in mucus carbohydrate consumption. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which an HTCS enforces a nutrient hierarchy within the Bacteroides via induction and repression of multiple PULs. Thus, hybrid two-component systems provide a mechanism for prioritizing consumption of carbohydrates through simultaneous binding and regulation of multiple polysaccharide utilization loci. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Glucocorticoids and the Brain: Neural Mechanisms Regulating the Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Shawn N; Friedman, Aaron R; Kaufer, Daniela; Sakhai, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the central role of the brain in the glucocorticoid mediated stress response. We describe the mechanisms by which the brain gauges the severity of stress, mechanisms of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) regulation, and how various sub-systems of the brain respond to glucocorticoid (GC) signaling to regulate stress behavior. In particular, we focus on the hippocampus, pre-frontal cortex, and amygdala, where GCs can induce a series of changes. Finally, we briefly discuss an apparent paradox in GC signaling: while exposure to glucocorticoids promotes the survival of an organism during acute stress, these same hormones in chronic excess can also cause damage and promote illness.

  11. Circadian clock-regulated physiological outputs: dynamic responses in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A; Golembeski, Greg S; Imaizumi, Takato

    2013-05-01

    The plant circadian clock is involved in the regulation of numerous processes. It serves as a timekeeper to ensure that the onset of key developmental events coincides with the appropriate conditions. Although internal oscillating clock mechanisms likely evolved in response to the earth's predictable day and night cycles, organisms must integrate a range of external and internal cues to adjust development and physiology. Here we introduce three different clock outputs to illustrate the complexity of clock control. Clock-regulated diurnal growth is altered by environmental stimuli. The complexity of the photoperiodic flowering pathway highlights numerous nodes through which plants may integrate information to modulate the timing of flowering. Comparative analyses among ecotypes that differ in flowering response reveal additional environmental cues and molecular processes that have developed to influence flowering. We also explore the process of cold acclimation, where circadian inputs, light quality, and stress responses converge to improve freezing tolerance in anticipation of colder temperatures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The tumor suppressor ARF regulates innate immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2011-12-15

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading organisms, and TLRs are the main sensors of microbial components, initiating signaling pathways that induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. An antiviral action for the tumor suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) has been reported; however, the precise role of ARF in innate immunity is unknown. In this study, we show that ARF plays an important role in regulation of inflammatory responses. In peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages from ARF-deficient animals, the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by TLR ligands was severely impaired. The altered responses of ARF(-/-) cells to TLR ligands result from aberrant activation of intracellular signaling molecules including MAPKs, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB activation. Additionally, animals lacking ARF were resistant to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. This impaired activation of inflammation in ARF(-/-) mice was not restricted to TLRs, as it was also shown in response to non-TLR signaling pathways. Thus, ARF(-/-) mice were also unable to trigger a proper inflammatory response in experimental peritonitis or in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced edema. Overexpression of ARF, but not its downstream target p53, rescued the ARF-deficient phenotype, increasing TLR4 levels and restoring inflammatory reaction. An increase in the E2F1 protein levels observed in ARF(-/-) macrophages at basal condition and after LPS stimulation may be involved in the impaired response in this system, as E2F1 has been described as an inflammatory suppressor. These results indicate that tumor suppressor ARF is a new regulator of inflammatory cell signaling.

  13. Molecular Responses to Small Regulating Molecules against Huanglongbing Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Federico; Dolan, David; Fileccia, Veronica; Reagan, Russell L.; Phu, My; Spann, Timothy M.; McCollum, Thomas G.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB; citrus greening) is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. No cure is yet available for this disease and infected trees generally decline after several months. Disease management depends on early detection of symptoms and chemical control of insect vectors. In this work, different combinations of organic compounds were tested for the ability to modulate citrus molecular responses to HLB disease beneficially. Three small-molecule regulating compounds were tested: 1) L-arginine, 2) 6-benzyl-adenine combined with gibberellins, and 3) sucrose combined with atrazine. Each treatment contained K-phite mineral solution and was tested at two different concentrations. Two trials were conducted: one in the greenhouse and the other in the orchard. In the greenhouse study, responses of 42 key genes involved in sugar and starch metabolism, hormone-related pathways, biotic stress responses, and secondary metabolism in treated and untreated mature leaves were analyzed. TGA5 was significantly induced by arginine. Benzyladenine and gibberellins enhanced two important genes involved in biotic stress responses: WRKY54 and WRKY59. Sucrose combined with atrazine mainly upregulated key genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as sucrose-phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, starch synthase, and α-amylase. Atrazine also affected expression of some key genes involved in systemic acquired resistance such as EDS1, TGA6, WRKY33, and MYC2. Several treatments upregulated HSP82, which might help protect protein folding and integrity. A subset of key genes was chosen as biomarkers for molecular responses to treatments under field conditions. GPT2 was downregulated by all small-molecule treatments. Arginine-induced genes involved in systemic acquired resistance included PR1, WRKY70, and EDS1. These molecular data encourage long-term application of treatments that combine these regulating molecules in field trials. PMID:27459099

  14. Molecular Responses to Small Regulating Molecules against Huanglongbing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Federico; Dolan, David; Fileccia, Veronica; Reagan, Russell L; Phu, My; Spann, Timothy M; McCollum, Thomas G; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB; citrus greening) is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. No cure is yet available for this disease and infected trees generally decline after several months. Disease management depends on early detection of symptoms and chemical control of insect vectors. In this work, different combinations of organic compounds were tested for the ability to modulate citrus molecular responses to HLB disease beneficially. Three small-molecule regulating compounds were tested: 1) L-arginine, 2) 6-benzyl-adenine combined with gibberellins, and 3) sucrose combined with atrazine. Each treatment contained K-phite mineral solution and was tested at two different concentrations. Two trials were conducted: one in the greenhouse and the other in the orchard. In the greenhouse study, responses of 42 key genes involved in sugar and starch metabolism, hormone-related pathways, biotic stress responses, and secondary metabolism in treated and untreated mature leaves were analyzed. TGA5 was significantly induced by arginine. Benzyladenine and gibberellins enhanced two important genes involved in biotic stress responses: WRKY54 and WRKY59. Sucrose combined with atrazine mainly upregulated key genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as sucrose-phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, starch synthase, and α-amylase. Atrazine also affected expression of some key genes involved in systemic acquired resistance such as EDS1, TGA6, WRKY33, and MYC2. Several treatments upregulated HSP82, which might help protect protein folding and integrity. A subset of key genes was chosen as biomarkers for molecular responses to treatments under field conditions. GPT2 was downregulated by all small-molecule treatments. Arginine-induced genes involved in systemic acquired resistance included PR1, WRKY70, and EDS1. These molecular data encourage long-term application of treatments that combine these regulating molecules in field trials.

  15. Molecular Responses to Small Regulating Molecules against Huanglongbing Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Martinelli

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB; citrus greening is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. No cure is yet available for this disease and infected trees generally decline after several months. Disease management depends on early detection of symptoms and chemical control of insect vectors. In this work, different combinations of organic compounds were tested for the ability to modulate citrus molecular responses to HLB disease beneficially. Three small-molecule regulating compounds were tested: 1 L-arginine, 2 6-benzyl-adenine combined with gibberellins, and 3 sucrose combined with atrazine. Each treatment contained K-phite mineral solution and was tested at two different concentrations. Two trials were conducted: one in the greenhouse and the other in the orchard. In the greenhouse study, responses of 42 key genes involved in sugar and starch metabolism, hormone-related pathways, biotic stress responses, and secondary metabolism in treated and untreated mature leaves were analyzed. TGA5 was significantly induced by arginine. Benzyladenine and gibberellins enhanced two important genes involved in biotic stress responses: WRKY54 and WRKY59. Sucrose combined with atrazine mainly upregulated key genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as sucrose-phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, starch synthase, and α-amylase. Atrazine also affected expression of some key genes involved in systemic acquired resistance such as EDS1, TGA6, WRKY33, and MYC2. Several treatments upregulated HSP82, which might help protect protein folding and integrity. A subset of key genes was chosen as biomarkers for molecular responses to treatments under field conditions. GPT2 was downregulated by all small-molecule treatments. Arginine-induced genes involved in systemic acquired resistance included PR1, WRKY70, and EDS1. These molecular data encourage long-term application of treatments that combine these regulating molecules in field trials.

  16. The ChrA response regulator in Corynebacterium diphtheriae controls hemin-regulated gene expression through binding to the hmuO and hrtAB promoter regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Michael P

    2012-04-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the etiologic agent of diphtheria, utilizes heme and hemoglobin (Hb) as iron sources for growth. Heme-iron utilization involves HmuO, a heme oxygenase that degrades cytosolic heme, resulting in the release of heme-associated iron. Expression of the hmuO promoter is under dual regulation, in which transcription is repressed by DtxR and iron and activated by a heme source, such as hemin or Hb. Hemin-dependent activation is mediated primarily by the ChrAS two-component system, in which ChrS is a putative heme-responsive sensor kinase while ChrA is proposed to serve as a response regulator that activates transcription. It was recently shown that the ChrAS system similarly regulates the hrtAB genes, which encode an ABC transporter involved in the protection of C. diphtheriae from hemin toxicity. In this study, we characterized the phosphorelay mechanism in the ChrAS system and provide evidence for the direct regulation of the hmuO and hrtAB promoters by ChrA. A fluorescence staining method was used to show that ChrS undergoes autophosphorylation and that the phosphate moiety is subsequently transferred to ChrA. Promoter fusion studies identified regions upstream of the hmuO and hrtAB promoters that are critical for the heme-dependent regulation by ChrA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that ChrA specifically binds at the hmuO and hrtAB promoter regions and that binding is phosphorylation dependent. A phosphorylation-defective mutant of ChrA [ChrA(D50A)] exhibited significantly diminished binding to the hmuO promoter region relative to that of wild-type ChrA. DNase I footprint analysis further defined the sequences in the hmuO and hrtAB promoters that are involved in ChrA binding, and this analysis revealed that the DtxR binding site at the hmuO promoter partially overlaps the binding site for ChrA. DNase I protection studies as well as promoter fusion analysis suggest that ChrA and DtxR compete for binding at the hmuO promoter

  17. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs by serum response factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jeanne Y

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serum response factor (SRF regulates certain microRNAs that play a role in cardiac and skeletal muscle development. However, the role of SRF in the regulation of microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis in cardiac hypertrophy has not been well established. In this report, we employed two distinct transgenic mouse models to study the impact of SRF on cardiac microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis. Cardiac-specific overexpression of SRF (SRF-Tg led to altered expression of a number of microRNAs. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a and upregulation of miR-21 occurred by 7 days of age in these mice, long before the onset of cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that SRF overexpression impacted the expression of microRNAs which contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. Reducing cardiac SRF level using the antisense-SRF transgenic approach (Anti-SRF-Tg resulted in the expression of miR-1, miR-133a and miR-21 in the opposite direction. Furthermore, we observed that SRF regulates microRNA biogenesis, specifically the transcription of pri-microRNA, thereby affecting the mature microRNA level. The mir-21 promoter sequence is conserved among mouse, rat and human; one SRF binding site was found to be in the mir-21 proximal promoter region of all three species. The mir-21 gene is regulated by SRF and its cofactors, including myocardin and p49/Strap. Our study demonstrates that the downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a, and upregulation of miR-21 can be reversed by one single upstream regulator, SRF. These results may help to develop novel therapeutic interventions targeting microRNA biogenesis.

  18. Equation-free analysis of two-component system signalling model reveals the emergence of co-existing phenotypes in the absence of multistationarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca B Hoyle

    Full Text Available Phenotypic differences of genetically identical cells under the same environmental conditions have been attributed to the inherent stochasticity of biochemical processes. Various mechanisms have been suggested, including the existence of alternative steady states in regulatory networks that are reached by means of stochastic fluctuations, long transient excursions from a stable state to an unstable excited state, and the switching on and off of a reaction network according to the availability of a constituent chemical species. Here we analyse a detailed stochastic kinetic model of two-component system signalling in bacteria, and show that alternative phenotypes emerge in the absence of these features. We perform a bifurcation analysis of deterministic reaction rate equations derived from the model, and find that they cannot reproduce the whole range of qualitative responses to external signals demonstrated by direct stochastic simulations. In particular, the mixed mode, where stochastic switching and a graded response are seen simultaneously, is absent. However, probabilistic and equation-free analyses of the stochastic model that calculate stationary states for the mean of an ensemble of stochastic trajectories reveal that slow transcription of either response regulator or histidine kinase leads to the coexistence of an approximate basal solution and a graded response that combine to produce the mixed mode, thus establishing its essential stochastic nature. The same techniques also show that stochasticity results in the observation of an all-or-none bistable response over a much wider range of external signals than would be expected on deterministic grounds. Thus we demonstrate the application of numerical equation-free methods to a detailed biochemical reaction network model, and show that it can provide new insight into the role of stochasticity in the emergence of phenotypic diversity.

  19. Large-signal transient response of a switching regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, K.; Nabeshima, T.

    Analytical and experimental considerations on the large-signal transient-responses of the buck-type switching regulator are described. The behaviour under the large-signal operation is different from the case of small signal because of the saturation characteristics of the PWM feedback controller. The effect of this nonlinearity is analyzed by dividing its operation into three modes. As a result, the maximum peak values of the inrush current and output voltage are obtained analytically both for the start-up and for the step change of the load current.

  20. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohedano, Maria L; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation.

  1. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  2. The response regulator YycF inhibits expression of the fatty acid biosynthesis repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luz Mohedano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB or TCS02 two-component system (TCS is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation.

  3. Copper response regulator1-dependent and -independent responses of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii transcriptome to dark anoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Casero, David; Liu, Bensheng; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Happe, Thomas; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobiosis is a stress condition for aerobic organisms and requires extensive acclimation responses. We used RNA-Seq for a whole-genome view of the acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to anoxic conditions imposed simultaneously with transfer to the dark. Nearly 1.4 × 10(3) genes were affected by hypoxia. Comparing transcript profiles from early (hypoxic) with those from late (anoxic) time points indicated that cells activate oxidative energy generation pathways before employing fermentation. Probable substrates include amino acids and fatty acids (FAs). Lipid profiling of the C. reinhardtii cells revealed that they degraded FAs but also accumulated triacylglycerols (TAGs). In contrast with N-deprived cells, the TAGs in hypoxic cells were enriched in desaturated FAs, suggesting a distinct pathway for TAG accumulation. To distinguish transcriptional responses dependent on copper response regulator1 (CRR1), which is also involved in hypoxic gene regulation, we compared the transcriptomes of crr1 mutants and complemented strains. In crr1 mutants, ~40 genes were aberrantly regulated, reaffirming the importance of CRR1 for the hypoxic response, but indicating also the contribution of additional signaling strategies to account for the remaining differentially regulated transcripts. Based on transcript patterns and previous results, we conclude that nitric oxide-dependent signaling cascades operate in anoxic C. reinhardtii cells.

  4. Involvement of the HP0165-HP0166 two-component system in expression of some acidic-pH-upregulated genes of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yi; Feng, Jing; Scott, David R; Marcus, Elizabeth A; Sachs, George

    2006-03-01

    About 200 genes of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori increase expression at medium pHs of 6.2, 5.5, and 4.5, an increase that is abolished or much reduced by the buffering action of urease. Genes up-regulated by a low pH include the two-component system HP0165-HP0166, suggesting a role in the regulation of some of the pH-sensitive genes. To identify targets of HP0165-HP0166, the promoter regions of genes up-regulated by a low pH were grouped based on sequence similarity. Probes for promoter sequences representing each group were subjected to electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) with recombinant HP0166-His(6) or a mutated response regulator, HP0166-D52N-His(6), that can specifically determine the role of phosphorylation of HP0166 in binding (including a control EMSA with in-vitro-phosphorylated HP0166-His(6)). Nineteen of 45 promoter-regulatory regions were found to interact with HP0166-His(6). Seven promoters for genes encoding alpha-carbonic anhydrase, omp11, fecD, lpp20, hypA, and two with unknown function (pHP1397-1396 and pHP0654-0675) were clustered in gene group A, which may respond to changes in the periplasmic pH at a constant cytoplasmic pH and showed phosphorylation-dependent binding in EMSA with HP0166-D52N-His(6). Twelve promoters were clustered in groups B and C whose up-regulation likely also depends on a reduction of the cytoplasmic pH at a medium pH of 5.5 or 4.5. Most of the target promoters in groups B and C showed phosphorylation-dependent binding with HP0166-D52N-His(6), but promoters for ompR (pHP0166-0162), pHP0682-0681, and pHP1288-1289 showed phosphorylation-independent binding. These findings, combined with DNase I footprinting, suggest that HP0165-0166 is an acid-responsive signaling system affecting the expression of pH-sensitive genes. Regulation of these genes responds either to a decrease in the periplasmic pH alone (HP0165 dependent) or also to a decrease in the cytoplasmic pH (HP0165 independent).

  5. Involvement of the HP0165-HP0166 Two-Component System in Expression of Some Acidic-pH-Upregulated Genes of Helicobacter pylori†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yi; Feng, Jing; Scott, David R.; Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Sachs, George

    2006-01-01

    About 200 genes of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori increase expression at medium pHs of 6.2, 5.5, and 4.5, an increase that is abolished or much reduced by the buffering action of urease. Genes up-regulated by a low pH include the two-component system HP0165-HP0166, suggesting a role in the regulation of some of the pH-sensitive genes. To identify targets of HP0165-HP0166, the promoter regions of genes up-regulated by a low pH were grouped based on sequence similarity. Probes for promoter sequences representing each group were subjected to electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) with recombinant HP0166-His6 or a mutated response regulator, HP0166-D52N-His6, that can specifically determine the role of phosphorylation of HP0166 in binding (including a control EMSA with in-vitro-phosphorylated HP0166-His6). Nineteen of 45 promoter-regulatory regions were found to interact with HP0166-His6. Seven promoters for genes encoding α-carbonic anhydrase, omp11, fecD, lpp20, hypA, and two with unknown function (pHP1397-1396 and pHP0654-0675) were clustered in gene group A, which may respond to changes in the periplasmic pH at a constant cytoplasmic pH and showed phosphorylation-dependent binding in EMSA with HP0166-D52N-His6. Twelve promoters were clustered in groups B and C whose up-regulation likely also depends on a reduction of the cytoplasmic pH at a medium pH of 5.5 or 4.5. Most of the target promoters in groups B and C showed phosphorylation-dependent binding with HP0166-D52N-His6, but promoters for ompR (pHP0166-0162), pHP0682-0681, and pHP1288-1289 showed phosphorylation-independent binding. These findings, combined with DNase I footprinting, suggest that HP0165-0166 is an acid-responsive signaling system affecting the expression of pH-sensitive genes. Regulation of these genes responds either to a decrease in the periplasmic pH alone (HP0165 dependent) or also to a decrease in the cytoplasmic pH (HP0165 independent). PMID:16484186

  6. Conductivity-depth imaging of fixed-wing time-domain electromagnetic data with pitch based on two-component measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Mei; Zhang, Qiong; Meng, Yang; Li, Jing; Lu, Yiming; Zhu, Kaiguang

    2017-01-01

    Conductivity-depth imaging (CDI) of data is generally applied in identifying conductive targets. CDI results will be affected by the bird attitude especially the pitch of the receiver coil due to the attitude, velocity of the aircraft and the wind speed. A CDI algorithm with consideration of pitch is developed based on two-component measurement. A table is established based on two-component B field response and the pitch is considered as a parameter in the table. Primary advantages of this method are immunity to pith errors and better resolution of conductive layers than results without consideration of pith. Not only the conductivity but also the pitch can be obtained from this algorithm. Tests on synthetic data demonstrate that the CDI results with pitch based on two-component measurement does a better job than the results without consideration of pitch and the pitch obtained is close to the true model in many circumstances.

  7. Characterization of the yehUT two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi and Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa K; Pickard, Derek J; Barquist, Lars; Sivaraman, Karthikeyan; Page, Andrew J; Hart, Peter J; Arends, Mark J; Holt, Kathryn E; Kane, Leanne; Mottram, Lynda F; Ellison, Louise; Bautista, Ruben; McGee, Chris J; Kay, Sally J; Wileman, Thomas M; Kenney, Linda J; MacLennan, Calman A; Kingsley, Robert A; Dougan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Proteins exhibiting hyper-variable sequences within a bacterial pathogen may be associated with host adaptation. Several lineages of the monophyletic pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) have accumulated non-synonymous mutations in the putative two-component regulatory system yehUT. Consequently we evaluated the function of yehUT in S. Typhi BRD948 and S. Typhimurium ST4/74. Transcriptome analysis identified the cstA gene, encoding a carbon starvation protein as the predominantly yehUT regulated gene in both these serovars. Deletion of yehUT had no detectable effect on the ability of these mutant Salmonella to invade cultured epithelial cells (S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium) or induce colitis in a murine model (S. Typhimurium only). Growth, metabolic and antimicrobial susceptibility tests identified no obvious influences of yehUT on these phenotypes.

  8. Histamine regulates the inflammatory response of the tunicate Styela plicata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Erick; Gómez-González, Nuria E; Meseguer, José; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Mulero, Victoriano

    2014-10-01

    Histamine is stored inside hemocytes of the tunicate Styela plicata (Chordata, Tunicata, Ascidiacea), but no evidence on its role in the regulation of the immune response of this species has been reported. We examined whether histamine participated in the regulation of inflammation and host defense in S. plicata. The presence of histamine inside S. plicata hemocytes was confirmed by flow cytometry, and histamine release was detected by ELISA, after in vitro hemocyte stimulation with different PAMPs. In vitro hemocyte treatment with histamine, or specific histamine-receptor agonists, reduced their phagocytic ability. Injection of histamine into the tunic recruited hemocytes to the site of injection. Systemic injection of histamine, or the histamine-releasing agent compound 48/80, decreased the phagocytic ability of hemocytes. Histamine promoted the constriction of tunic hemolymph vessels in vivo, having a direct effect on vasoconstriction in tunic explants. These results provide for the first time clear evidence for the involvement of histamine in the regulation of inflammation and host defense in tunicates.

  9. Systemic inflammation regulates microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Davalos, Dimitrios; Biswas, Dipankar; Swanger, Sharon A.; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel; Loth, Francis; Akassoglou, Katerina; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, exist in either a “resting” state associated with physiological tissue surveillance or an “activated” state in neuroinflammation. We recently showed that ATP is the primary chemoattractor to tissue damage in vivo and elicits opposite effects on the motility of activated microglia in vitro through activation of adenosine A2A receptors. However, whether systemic inflammation affects microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo remains largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon imaging of mice, we show that injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at levels that can produce both clear neuroinflammation and some features of sepsis significantly reduced the rate of microglial response to laser-induced ablation injury in vivo. Under pro-inflammatory conditions, microglial processes initially retracted from the ablation site, but subsequently moved toward and engulfed the damaged area. Analyzing the process dynamics in 3D cultures of primary microglia indicated that only A2A, but not A1 or A3 receptors, mediate process retraction in LPS-activated microglia. The A2A receptor antagonists caffeine and preladenant reduced adenosine-mediated process retraction in activated microglia in vitro. Finally, administration of preladenant before induction of laser ablation in vivo accelerated the microglial response to injury following systemic inflammation. The regulation of rapid microglial responses to sites of injury by A2A receptors could have implications for their ability to respond to the neuronal death occurring under conditions of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24807189

  10. Hydrodynamic regulation of monocyte inflammatory response to an intracellular pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar J Evani

    Full Text Available Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation.

  11. Gene regulation in the immediate-early response process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Shahram; Drabløs, Finn

    2016-09-01

    Immediate-early genes (IEGs) can be activated and transcribed within minutes after stimulation, without the need for de novo protein synthesis, and they are stimulated in response to both cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic signals. Extracellular signals are transduced from the cell surface, through receptors activating a chain of proteins in the cell, in particular extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and members of the RhoA-actin pathway. These communicate through a signaling cascade by adding phosphate groups to neighboring proteins, and this will eventually activate and translocate TFs to the nucleus and thereby induce gene expression. The gene activation also involves proximal and distal enhancers that interact with promoters to simulate gene expression. The immediate-early genes have essential biological roles, in particular in stress response, like the immune system, and in differentiation. Therefore they also have important roles in various diseases, including cancer development. In this paper we summarize some recent advances on key aspects of the activation and regulation of immediate-early genes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding the Posttranscriptional Regulation of Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    KAUST Repository

    AlShareef, Sahar A.

    2017-06-01

    Constitutive and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs from multiexonic genes controls the diversity of the proteome; these precisely regulated processes also fine-tune responses to cues related to growth, development, and biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent work showed that AS is pervasive across plant species, with more than 60% of intron-containing genes producing different isoforms. Mammalian cell-based assays have discovered various AS small-molecule inhibitors that perturb splicing and thereby provide invaluable tools for use as chemical probes to uncover the molecular underpinnings of splicing regulation and as potential anticancer compounds. Here, I show that the macrolide Pladienolide B (PB) and herboxidiene (GEX1A) inhibits both constitutive and alternative splicing, mimics an abiotic stress signal, and activates the abscisic acid (ABA) pathway in plants. Moreover, PB and GEX1A activate genome-wide transcriptional patterns involved in abiotic stress responses in plants. PB and GEX1A treatment triggered the ABA signaling pathway, activated ABA-inducible promoters, and led to stomatal closure. Interestingly, PB and GEX1A elicited similar cellular changes, including alterations in the patterns of transcription and splicing, suggesting that these compounds might target the same spliceosome complex in plant cells. This work establishes PB and GEX1A as potent splicing inhibitors in plants that can be used to probe the assembly, dynamics, and molecular functions of the spliceosome and to study the interplay between splicing stress and abiotic stresses, as well as having potential biotechnological applications.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the stress response by mTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramburu, Jose; Ortells, M Carmen; Tejedor, Sonia; Buxadé, Maria; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation that integrates inputs from growth factor receptors, nutrient availability, intracellular ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate), and a variety of stressors. Since early works in the mid-1990s uncovered the role of mTOR in stimulating protein translation, this kinase has emerged as a rather multifaceted regulator of numerous processes. Whereas mTOR is generally activated by growth- and proliferation-stimulating signals, its activity can be reduced and even suppressed when cells are exposed to a variety of stress conditions. However, cells can also adapt to stress while maintaining their growth capacity and mTOR function. Despite knowledge accumulated on how stress represses mTOR, less is known about mTOR influencing stress responses. In this review, we discuss the capability of mTOR, in particular mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), to activate stress-responsive transcription factors, and we outline open questions for future investigation.

  14. Geotail observations of temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the dusk plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Nishino

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In search for clues towards the understanding of the cold plasma sheet formation under northward IMF, we study the temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the plasma sheet near the dusk low-latitude boundary observed by the Geotail spacecraft. The two-component protons result from mixing of the cold component from the solar wind and the hot component of the magnetospheric origin, and may be the most eloquent evidence for the transport process across the magnetopause. The cold component occasionally has a strong anisotropy in the dusk flank, and the sense of the anisotropy depends on the observed locations: the parallel temperature is enhanced in the tail flank while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. The hot component is nearly isotropic in the tail while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. We discuss possible mechanism that can lead to the observed temperature anisotropies.

  15. Trapping of two-component matter-wave solitons by mismatched optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Z.; Law, K.J.H. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States); Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States)], E-mail: kevrekid@gmail.com; Malomed, B.A. [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2008-05-26

    We consider a one-dimensional model of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of periodic external potentials of opposite signs, acting on the two species. The interaction between the species is attractive, while intra-species interactions may be attractive too [the system of the bright-bright (BB) type], or of opposite signs in the two components [the gap-bright (GB) type]. We identify the existence and stability domains for soliton complexes of the BB and GB types. The evolution of unstable solitons leads to the establishment of oscillatory states. The increase of the strength of the nonlinear attraction between the species results in symbiotic stabilization of the complexes, despite the fact that one component is centered around a local maximum of the respective periodic potential.

  16. An efficient implementation of two-component relativistic exact-decoupling methods for large molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Daoling; Weigend, Florian; Reiher, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We present an efficient algorithm for one- and two-component relativistic exact-decoupling calculations. The spin-orbit coupling was taken into account for the evaluation of relativistically transformed Hamiltonian. The relativistic decoupling transformation has to be evaluated with primitive functions so that the construction of the relativistic one-electron Hamiltonian becomes the bottleneck of the whole calculation for large molecules. We apply our recently developed local DLU scheme [J. Chem. Phys. 136 (2012) 244108] to accelerate this step. With our new implementation two-component relativistic density functional calculations can be performed invoking the resolution-of-identity density-fitting approximation and (Abelian as well as non-Abelian) point group symmetries to accelerate both the exact-decoupling and the two-electron part. The capability of our implementation is illustrated at the example of silver clusters with up to 309 atoms, for which the cohesive energy is calculated and extrapolated to the...

  17. Two-component Fermi-liquid theory - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the transition of condensed hydrogen from an insulating molecular crystal phase to a metallic liquid phase, at zero temperature and high pressure, appears possible. Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH), comprising interpenetrating proton and electron fluids, would constitute a two-component Fermi liquid with both a very high component-mass ratio and long-range, species-dependent bare interactions. The low-temperature equilibrium properties of LMH are examined by means of a generalization to the case of two components of the phenomenological Landau Fermi-liquid theory, and the low-temperature specific heat, compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and spin susceptibility are given. It is found that the specific heat and the thermal expansion coefficient are vastly greater in the liquid than in the corresponding solid, due to the presence of proton quasiparticle excitations in the liquid.

  18. A hydrodynamic scheme for two-component winds from hot stars

    CERN Document Server

    Votruba, V; Kubát, J; Rätzel, D

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a time-dependent two-component hydrodynamics code to simulate radiatively-driven stellar winds from hot stars. We use a time-explicit van Leer scheme to solve the hydrodynamic equations of a two-component stellar wind. Dynamical friction due to Coulomb collisions between the passive bulk plasma and the line-scattering ions is treated by a time-implicit, semi-analytic method using a polynomial fit to the Chandrasekhar function. This gives stable results despite the stiffness of the problem. This method was applied to model stars with winds that are both poorly and well-coupled. While for the former case we reproduce the mCAK solution, for the latter case our solution leads to wind decoupling.

  19. Atomic Tunneling Effect in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates with a Coupling Drive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAOZhi-Yong; YUZhao-Xian; YANGXin-Jian

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied the atomic population difference and the atomic tunneling current of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with a coupling drive. It is found that when the two-component Bose Einstein condensates are initially in the coherent states, the atomic population difference may exhibit the step structure, in which the numbers of the step increase with the decrease of the Rabi frequency and with the increment of the initial phase difference. The atomic population difference may exhibit collapses, and revivals, in which their periods are affected dramatically by the Rabi frequency and the initial phase difference. The atomic tunneling current may exhibit damping oscillation behaviors, and exist the step structure for the time range of 10-10 ~ 10-9 second.

  20. Two-component Fermi-liquid theory - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the transition of condensed hydrogen from an insulating molecular crystal phase to a metallic liquid phase, at zero temperature and high pressure, appears possible. Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH), comprising interpenetrating proton and electron fluids, would constitute a two-component Fermi liquid with both a very high component-mass ratio and long-range, species-dependent bare interactions. The low-temperature equilibrium properties of LMH are examined by means of a generalization to the case of two components of the phenomenological Landau Fermi-liquid theory, and the low-temperature specific heat, compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and spin susceptibility are given. It is found that the specific heat and the thermal expansion coefficient are vastly greater in the liquid than in the corresponding solid, due to the presence of proton quasiparticle excitations in the liquid.

  1. Error Propagation in Equations for Geochemical Modeling of Radiogenic Isotopes in Two-Component Mixing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surendra P Verma

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents error propagation equations for modeling of radiogenic isotopes during mixing of two components or end-members. These equations can be used to estimate errors on an isotopic ratio in the mixture of two components, as a function of the analytical errors or the total errors of geological field sampling and analytical errors. Two typical cases (``Small errors'' and ``Large errors'') are illustrated for mixing of Sr isotopes. Similar examples can be formulated for the other radiogenic isotopic ratios. Actual isotopic data for sediment and basalt samples from the Cocos plate are also included to further illustrate the use of these equations. The isotopic compositions of the predicted mixtures can be used to constrain the origin of magmas in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. These examples show the need of high quality experimental data for them to be useful in geochemical modeling of magmatic processes.

  2. A two-component Frenkel-Kontorowa model for surface alloy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Daruka, I

    2003-01-01

    It has been shown by recent experiments that bulk immiscible metals (e.g. Ag/Cu, Ag/Co and Au/Ni) can form binary alloys on certain surfaces where the substrate mediates the elastic misfits between the two components, thus relieving the elastic strain in the overlayer. These novel surface alloys exhibit a rich phase structure. We formulate a two-component Frenkel-Kontorova model in one dimension to study surface alloy formation. This model can naturally incorporate dislocation formation that plays a crucial role in determining the actual structure of the system. Using energy minimization calculations we provide a phase diagram in terms of average alloy composition and the energy of mixing. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to study the structure and interaction of the emerging dislocations.

  3. A hybrid two-component Bose–Einstein condensate interferometer for measuring magnetic field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Fei [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Jiahao, E-mail: hjiahao@mail2.sysu.edu.cn [TianQin Research Center & School of Physics and Astronomy, Sun Yat-Sen University, SYSU Zhuhai Campus, Zhuhai 519082 (China); Liu, Quan [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2017-03-03

    Highlights: • A scheme for detecting magnetic field gradients via a double-well two-component Bose–Einstein condensate interferometer. • The magnetic field gradient can be extracted by either the spin population or the external state. • Our proposal is potentially sensitive to weak magnetic field inhomogeneity due to its small sensor size. - Abstract: We have proposed a scheme to detect magnetic field gradients via an interferometer based on a double-well two-component Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC). Utilizing a sequence of quantum control operations on both external and internal degree of the BEC, one can extract the magnetic field gradients by measuring either the population in one component or the fidelity between the final external state and the initial ground state. Our scheme can be implemented by current experimental techniques of manipulating ultracold atoms.

  4. Special Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of a Two-component Outflow Powered by Magnetic Explosion on Compact Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Jin; Masada, Youhei; Asano, Eiji; Shibata, Kazunari

    2011-05-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of outflows driven by magnetic explosion on the surface of a compact star is investigated through special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We adopt, as the initial equilibrium state, a spherical stellar object embedded in hydrostatic plasma which has a density ρ(r) vprop r -α and is threaded by a dipole magnetic field. The injection of magnetic energy at the surface of a compact star breaks the equilibrium and triggers a two-component outflow. At the early evolutionary stage, the magnetic pressure increases rapidly around the stellar surface, initiating a magnetically driven outflow. A strong forward shock driven outflow is then excited. The expansion velocity of the magnetically driven outflow is characterized by the Alfvén velocity on the stellar surface and follows a simple scaling relation v mag vprop v A 1/2. When the initial density profile declines steeply with radius, the strong shock is accelerated self-similarly to relativistic velocity ahead of the magnetically driven component. We find that it evolves according to a self-similar relation Γsh vprop r sh, where Γsh is the Lorentz factor of the plasma measured at the shock surface r sh. A purely hydrodynamic process would be responsible for the acceleration mechanism of the shock driven outflow. Our two-component outflow model, which is the natural outcome of the magnetic explosion, can provide a better understanding of the magnetic active phenomena on various magnetized compact stars.

  5. Two-Component Regulatory Systems – implication in the quorum sensing mechanisms and bacteriocin production in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia–Mara Ditu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For lactic acid bacteria, the mechanisms of quorum sensing and response are mediated by peptides or pheromones that interfere with the synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMP called bacteriocins, when these molecules reach a certain critical level of concentration. Generally, the synthesis and activity of pheromones is adjusted by means of a two-component regulatory system. The observation that some microorganisms, in particular lactic acid bacteria, produce bacteriocins according to the cell density, has led to the discovery of the involvement of QS mechanisms in the synthesis of these peptides. Bacteriocins synthesis is inducible, the process requiring the extracellular accumulation of peptides that functions as chemical messengers activators of bacteriocins synthesis. This minireview presents the molecular architecture and functions of two-component regulatory systems and ABC transporters implicated in the synthesis and secretion of nisin, one of the most studied bacteriocin. The elucidation of the intimate mechanisms of bacteriocins synthesis is equally of biotechnological and medical importance, opening interesting perspectives for the development of improved technologies for the production of bacteriocins with good yields, and also, for increasing the beneficial anti-infective roles of probiotic bacteria when administered in vivo.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  7. Two-component model of the interaction of an interstellar cloud with surrounding hot plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Provornikova, E. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Lallement, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a two-component gasdynamic model of an interstellar cloud embedded in a hot plasma. It is assumed that the cloud consists of atomic hydrogen gas, interstellar plasma is quasineutral. Hydrogen atoms and plasma protons interact through a charge exchange process. Magnetic felds and radiative processes are ignored in the model. The influence of heat conduction within plasma on the interaction between a cloud and plasma is studied. We consider the extreme case and assume that hot plasma...

  8. Histidine Phosphotransfer Proteins in Fungal Two-Component Signal Transduction Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) protein Ypd1 is an important participant in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae multistep two-component signal transduction pathway and, unlike the expanded histidine kinase gene family, is encoded by a single gene in nearly all model and pathogenic fungi. Ypd1 is essential for viability in both S. cerevisiae and in Cryptococcus neoformans. These and other aspects of Ypd1 biology, combined with the availability of structural and mutational data in S. cerevisiae, s...

  9. Stability properties of vector solitons in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with tunable interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiao-Fei; Zhang Pei; He Wan-Quan; Liu Xun-Xu

    2011-01-01

    By using a unified theory of the formation of various types of vector-solitons in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with tunable interactions, we obtain a family of exact vector-soliton solutions for the coupled nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equations. Moreover, the Bogoliubov equation shows that there exists stable dark soliton in specific situations. Our results open up new ways in considerable experimental interest for the quantum control of multi-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

  10. Bloch Oscillations of Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Huai-Qiang; WANG Zhi-Cheng; JIN Kang; TAN Lei

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the Bloch oscillations of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in spin-dependent optical lattices. The influence of the intercomponent atom interaction on the system is discussed in detail Accelerated breakdown of the Bloch oscillations and revival phenomena are found respectively for the repulsive and attractive case. For both the cases, the system will finally be set in a quantum self-trapping state due to dynamical instability.

  11. The CpxRA two-component system is essential for Citrobacter rodentium virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassin, Jenny-Lee; Giannakopoulou, Natalia; Zhu, Lei; Gross, Jeremy; Salmon, Kristiana; Leclerc, Jean-Mathieu; Daigle, France; Le Moual, Hervé; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2015-05-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a murine intestinal pathogen used as a model for the foodborne human pathogens enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and enteropathogenic E. coli. During infection, these pathogens use two-component signal transduction systems to detect and adapt to changing environmental conditions. In E. coli, the CpxRA two-component signal transduction system responds to envelope stress by modulating the expression of a myriad of genes. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that cpxRA was expressed in the colon of C57BL/6J mice infected with C. rodentium. To determine whether CpxRA plays a role during C. rodentium infection, a cpxRA deletion strain was generated and found to have a colonization defect during infection. This defect was independent of an altered growth rate or a defective type III secretion system, and single-copy chromosomal complementation of cpxRA restored virulence. The C. rodentium strains were then tested in C3H/HeJ mice, a lethal intestinal infection model. Mice infected with the ΔcpxRA strain survived infection, whereas mice infected with the wild-type or complemented strains succumbed to infection. Furthermore, we found that the cpxRA expression level was higher during early infection than at a later time point. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CpxRA two-component signal transduction system is essential for the in vivo virulence of C. rodentium. In addition, these data suggest that fine-tuned cpxRA expression is important for infection. This is the first study that identifies a C. rodentium two-component transduction system required for pathogenesis. This study further indicates that CpxRA is an interesting target for therapeutics against enteric pathogens.

  12. A Possible Two-Component Structure of the Non-Perturbative Pomeron

    CERN Document Server

    Gauron, P; Gauron, Pierre; Nicolescu, Basarab

    2000-01-01

    We propose a QCD-inspired two-component Pomeron form which gives an excellent description of the proton-proton, pi-proton, kaon-proton, gamma-proton and gamma-gamma total cross sections. Our fit has a better CHI2/dof for a smaller number of parameters as compared with the PDG fit. Our 2-Pomeron form is fully compatible with weak Regge exchange-degeneracy, universality, Regge factorization and the generalized vector dominance model.

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Arabidopsis in Response to Salt Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhulong Chan

    2012-01-01

    Salt stress is a major factor limiting agricultural productivity worldwide.Adaptations to salt stress include avoidance by reduced sodium uptake,sequestration of toxic sodium ions away from the cytoplasm,or production of compatible solutes or osmoprotectants to reduce molecular disruption.Approaches to engineer salt stress resistance have included regulation of ion transport through introduction of Na+/H+ antiporter; synthesis of compatible solutes; or the introduction of transcription factors regulating expression of stress-responsive genes.On the other hand,naturally occurring variation among wild-type populations of plants also can be used to understand plant adaptive responses to their environments.In this study,we compared phenotypic and transcriptomic effects of constitutive expression of genes intended to confer salt stress tolerance by three different mechanisms:a transcription factor,CBF3/DREB1a; a metabolic gene,M6PR,for mannitol biosynthesis; and the Na+/H+ antiporter,SOS1.In the absence of salt,M6PR and SOS1 lines performed comparably with wild type; CBF3 lines exhibited dwarfing as reported previously.All three transgenes conferred fitness advantage when subjected to 100 mmol/L NaCI in the growth chamber.CBF3 and M6PR affected transcription of numerous abiotic stress-related genes as measured by Affymetrix microarray analysis.M6PR additionally modified expression of biotic stress and oxidative stress genes.Transcriptional effects of SOS1 were smaller and primarily limited to redox-related genes.In addition,we compared natural variations in salt tolerance between Ler and Sha ecotypes based on their responses to salt treatments and the results indicated that Ler was salt-sensitive,but Sha,which obtained a truncated RAS1 protein,was salt-tolerant.Transcriptome analysis revealed that many genes involved in secondary metabolism,photosynthesis,and protein synthesis were mainly down-regulated by salinity effects,while transposable element genes,microRNA and

  14. Different electronic charges in two-component superconductor by coherent state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xuguang, E-mail: shixg@bjfu.edu.cn

    2015-07-17

    Recently, the different electronic charges, which are related to the different coupling constants with magnetic field, in the two-component superconductor have been studied in the frame of Ginzburg–Landau theory. In order to study the electronic charges in detail we suggest the wave function in the two-component superconductor to be in the coherent state. We find the different electronic charges exist not only in the coherent state but also in the incoherent state. But the ratio of the different charges in the coherent state is different from the ratio in the incoherence. The expressions of the coupling constants are given directly based on the coherence effects. We also discuss the winding number in such a system. - Highlights: • Suggest the wave function in two-component superconductor is coherent. • Interpret the existence of different electric charges by the coherent states. • Derive a new expression for the supercurrent. • Reveal the relation between different electric charges and winding number.

  15. Sub classification and targeted characterization of prophage-encoded two-component cell lysis cassette

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Srividhya; S Krishnaswamy

    2007-08-01

    Bacteriophage induced lysis of host bacterial cell is mediated by a two component cell lysis cassette comprised of holin and lysozyme. Prophages are integrated forms of bacteriophages in bacterial genomes providing a repertoire for bacterial evolution. Analysis using the prophage database (http://bicmku.in:8082) constructed by us showed 47 prophages were associated with putative two component cell lysis genes. These proteins cluster into four different subgroups. In this process, a putative holin (essd) and endolysin (ybcS), encoded by the defective lambdoid prophage DLP12 was found to be similar to two component cell lysis genes in functional bacteriophages like p21 and P1. The holin essd was found to have a characteristic dual start motif with two transmembrane regions and C-terminal charged residues as in class II holins. Expression of a fusion construct of essd in Escherichia coli showed slow growth. However, under appropriate conditions, this protein could be over expressed and purified for structure function studies. The second component of the cell lysis cassette, ybcS, was found to have an N-terminal SAR (Signal Arrest Release) transmembrane domain. The construct of ybcS has been over expressed in E. coli and the purified protein was functional, exhibiting lytic activity against E. coli and Salmonella typhi cell wall substrate. Such targeted sequence-structure-function characterization of proteins encoded by cryptic prophages will help understand the contribution of prophage proteins to bacterial evolution.

  16. Design of Novel Mixer and Applicator for Two-Component Surgical Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Kevin; Kim, Yeong; Lee, Andy H.; Staricha, Kelly; Messersmith, Phillip; Glucksberg, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Current mixer and applicator devices on the market are not able to properly and efficiently mix two-component surgical adhesives in small volumes necessary to achieve economic viability. Furthermore, in these devices a significant amount of adhesive is wasted during the application process, as material within the dead space of the mixing chamber must be discarded. We have designed and demonstrated a new active mixer and applicator system capable of rapidly and efficiently mixing two components of an adhesive and applying it to the surgical site. Recently, Messersmith et al. have developed a tissue adhesive inspired by the mussel byssus and have shown that it is effective as a surgical sealant, and is especially suited for wet environments such as in fetal surgery. Like some other tissue sealants, this one requires that two components of differing viscosities be thoroughly mixed within a specified and short time period. Through a combination of compression and shear testing, we demonstrated that our device could effectively mix the adhesive developed by Messersmith et al. and improve its shear strength to significantly higher values than what has been reported for vortex mixing. Overall, our mixer and applicator system not only has potential applications in mixing and applying various adhesives in multiple surgical fields but also makes this particular adhesive viable for clinical use. PMID:26421090

  17. DMPD: Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscription. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16753195 Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetran...l) (.csml) Show Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscription. PubmedI...D 16753195 Title Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation o

  18. The PprA-PprB two-component system activates CupE, the first non-archetypal Pseudomonas aeruginosa chaperone-usher pathway system assembling fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Caroline; Bernard, Christophe S; Calderon, Virginie; Yang, Liang; Filloux, Alain; Molin, Søren; Fichant, Gwennaele; Bordi, Christophe; de Bentzmann, Sophie

    2011-03-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has redundant molecular systems that contribute to its pathogenicity. Those assembling fimbrial structures promote complex organized community lifestyle. We characterized a new 5.8 kb genetic locus, cupE, that includes the conserved usher- and chaperone-encoding genes. This locus, widely conserved in different bacterial species, contains four additional genes encoding non-archetypal fimbrial subunits. We first evidenced that the cupE gene cluster was specifically expressed in biofilm conditions and was responsible for fibre assembly containing at least CupE1 protein, at the bacterial cell surface. These fimbriae not only played a significant role in the early stages (microcolony and macrocolony formation) but also in shaping 3D mushrooms during P. aeruginosa biofilm development. Using wide-genome transposon mutagenesis, we identified the PprAB two-component system (TCS) as a regulator of cupE expression, and further demonstrated the involvement of the PprAB TCS in direct CupE fimbrial assembly activation. Thus, this TCS represents a new regulatory element controlling the transition between planktonic and community lifestyles in P. aeruginosa.

  19. DNA-responsive inflammasomes and their regulators in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Divaker

    2012-03-01

    Upon sensing microbial and self-derived DNA, DNA sensors initiate innate immune responses. These sensors include the interferon (IFN)-inducible Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and PYHIN proteins. Upon sensing DNA, cytosolic (murine Aim2 and human AIM2) and nuclear (IFI16) PYHIN proteins recruit an adaptor protein (ASC) and pro-caspase-1 to form an inflammasome, which activates caspase-1. The activated caspase-1 cleaves pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18 to generate active forms. However, upon sensing cytosolic DNA, the IFI16 protein recruits STING to induce the expression of type I IFN. Recognition of self DNA by innate immune cells contributes to the production of increased levels of type I IFN. Given that the type I IFNs modulate the expression of inflammasome proteins and that the IFN-inducible proteins inhibit the activity of DNA-responsive inflammasomes, an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the activity of DNA-responsive inflammasomes is likely to identify new therapeutic targets to treat autoimmune diseases.

  20. Bmp indicator mice reveal dynamic regulation of transcriptional response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Javier

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to Bmp ligands are regulated at multiple levels, both extracellularly and intracellularly. Therefore, the presence of these growth factors is not an accurate indicator of Bmp signaling activity. While a common approach to detect Bmp signaling activity is to determine the presence of phosphorylated forms of Smad1, 5 and 8 by immunostaining, this approach is time consuming and not quantitative. In order to provide a simpler readout system to examine the presence of Bmp signaling in developing animals, we developed BRE-gal mouse embryonic stem cells and a transgenic mouse line that specifically respond to Bmp ligand stimulation. Our reporter identifies specific transcriptional responses that are mediated by Smad1 and Smad4 with the Schnurri transcription factor complex binding to a conserved Bmp-Responsive Element (BRE, originally identified among Drosophila, Xenopus and human Bmp targets. Our BRE-gal mES cells specifically respond to Bmp ligands at concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml; and BRE-gal reporter mice, derived from the BRE-gal mES cells, show dynamic activity in many cellular sites, including extraembryonic structures and mammary glands, thereby making this a useful scientific tool.

  1. A novel hybrid kinase is essential for regulating the sigma(B)-mediated stress response of Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Been, Mark; Tempelaars, Marcel H; van Schaik, Willem; Moezelaar, Roy; Siezen, Roland J; Abee, Tjakko

    2010-03-01

    A common bacterial strategy for monitoring environmental challenges is to use two-component systems, which consist of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). In the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus, the alternative sigma factor sigma(B) is activated by the RR RsbY. Here we present strong indications that the PP2C-type phosphatase RsbY receives its input from the multi-sensor hybrid kinase BC1008 (renamed RsbK). Genome analyses revealed that, across bacilli, rsbY and rsbK are located in a conserved gene cluster. A B. cereus rsbK deletion strain was shown to be incapable of inducing sigma(B) upon stress conditions and was impaired in its heat adaptive response. Comparison of the wild-type and rsbK mutant transcriptomes upon heat shock revealed that RsbK was primarily involved in the activation of the sigma(B)-mediated stress response. Truncation of the RsbK RR receiver domain demonstrated the importance of this domain for sigma(B) induction upon stress. The domain architecture of RsbK suggests that in the B. cereus group and in other bacilli, environmental and intracellular stress signalling routes are combined into one single protein. This strategy is markedly different from the sigma(B) activation pathway in other low-GC Gram-positives.

  2. Quorum sensing regulates the osmotic stress response in Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Julia C; Rutherford, Steven T; Cong, Jian-Ping; Quinodoz, Sofia; Healy, James; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to monitor cell density and to alter behavior in response to fluctuations in population numbers. Previous studies with Vibrio harveyi have shown that LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator, activates and represses >600 genes. These include six genes that encode homologs of the Escherichia coli Bet and ProU systems for synthesis and transport, respectively, of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant used during osmotic stress. Here we show that LuxR activates expression of the glycine betaine operon betIBA-proXWV, which enhances growth recovery under osmotic stress conditions. BetI, an autorepressor of the V. harveyi betIBA-proXWV operon, activates the expression of genes encoding regulatory small RNAs that control quorum-sensing transitions. Connecting quorum-sensing and glycine betaine pathways presumably enables V. harveyi to tune its execution of collective behaviors to its tolerance to stress.

  3. Flexible parasympathetic responses to sadness facilitate spontaneous affect regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P; Hamilton, Jessica L; Fresco, David M; Alloy, Lauren B

    2017-07-01

    The ability of the parasympathetic nervous system to flexibly adapt to changes in environmental context is thought to serve as a physiological indicator of self-regulatory capacity, and deficits in parasympathetic flexibility appear to characterize affective disorders such as depression. However, whether parasympathetic flexibility (vagal withdrawal to emotional or environmental challenges such as sadness, and vagal augmentation during recovery from sadness) could facilitate the effectiveness of adaptive affect regulation strategies is not known. In a study of 178 undergraduate students, we evaluated whether parasympathetic flexibility in response to a sad film involving loss would enhance the effectiveness of regulatory strategies (reappraisal, distraction, and suppression) spontaneously employed to reduce negative affect during a 2-min uninstructed recovery period following the induction. Parasympathetic reactivity and recovery were indexed by fluctuations in respiratory sinus arrhythmia and high-frequency heart rate variability. Cognitive reappraisal and distraction were more effective in attenuating negative affect among individuals with more parasympathetic flexibility, particularly greater vagal augmentation during recovery, relative to individuals with less parasympathetic flexibility. In contrast, suppression was associated with less attenuation of negative affect, but only among individuals who also had less vagal withdrawal during the sad film. Alternative models provided partial support for reversed directionality, with reappraisal predicting greater parasympathetic recovery, but only when individuals also experienced greater reductions in negative affect. These results suggest that contextually appropriate parasympathetic reactivity and recovery may facilitate the success of affect regulation. Impairments in parasympathetic flexibility could confer risk for affective disorders due to attenuated capacity for effective self-regulation. © 2017 Society for

  4. Identification of a cyclic-di-GMP-modulating response regulator that impacts biofilm formation in a model sulfate reducing bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara eRajeev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We surveyed the eight putative cyclic-di-GMP-modulating response regulators (RRs in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough that are predicted to function via two-component signaling. Using purified proteins, we examined cyclic-di-GMP production or turnover in vitro of all eight proteins. The two RRs containing only GGDEF domains (DVU2067, DVU0636 demonstrated cyclic-di-GMP production activity in vitro. Of the remaining proteins, three RRs with HD-GYP domains (DVU0722, DVUA0086 and DVU2933 were confirmed to be Mn2+ dependent phosphodiesterases in vitro and converted cyclic-di-GMP to its linear form, pGpG. DVU0408, containing both cyclic-di-GMP production (GGDEF and degradation domains (EAL, showed cyclic-di-GMP turnover activity in vitro also with production of pGpG. No cyclic-di-GMP related activity could be assigned to the RR DVU0330, containing a metal-dependent phosphohydrolase HD-OD domain, or to the HD-GYP domain RR, DVU1181. Studies included examining the impact of overexpressed cyclic-di-GMP-modulating RRs in the heterologous host E. coli and led to the identification of one RR, DVU0636, with increased cellulose production. Evaluation of a transposon mutant in DVU0636 indicated that the strain was impaired in biofilm formation and demonstrated an altered carbohydrate:protein ratio relative to the D. vulgaris wild type biofilms. However, grown in liquid lactate/sulfate medium, the DVU0636 transposon mutant showed no growth impairment relative to the wild-type strain. Among the eight candidates, only the transposon disruption mutant in the DVU2067 RR presented a growth defect in liquid culture. Our results indicate that, of the two diguanylate cyclases that function as part of two-component signaling, DVU0636 plays an important role in biofilm formation while the function of DVU2067 has pertinence in planktonic growth.

  5. Ozone promotes regeneration by regulating the inflammatory response in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Kenan; Li, Yanhao; Feng, Jianyu; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yiyue; Ma, Ning; Zeng, Qingle; Pang, Huajin; Wang, Chunyan; Xiao, Lijun; He, Xiaofeng

    2015-09-01

    Ozone is thought to advance wound healing by inhibiting inflammation, but the mechanism of this phenomenon has not been determined. Although the zebrafish is often used in regeneration experiments, there has been no report of zebrafish treated with ozonated water. We successfully established a zebrafish model of ozonated water treatment and demonstrate that ozonated water stimulates the regeneration of the zebrafish caudal fin, its mechanism, and time dependence. The growth rate of the caudal fin and the number of neutrophils migrating to the caudal fin wound after resection were higher in the experimental (ozonated) group than in the control group, preliminarily confirming that ozone-promoted regeneration is related to the stimulation of an early inflammatory response by ozone. Ozone modulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in two ways by regulating interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression. Therefore, ozone promotes tissue regeneration by regulating the inflammatory pathways. This effect of ozone in an experimental zebrafish model is demonstrated for the first time, confirming its promotion of wound healing and the mechanism of its effect in tissue regeneration. These results will open up new directions for ozone and regeneration research.

  6. Magnitude-dependent response of osteoblasts regulated by compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-qing; Geng, Yuan-ming; Liu, Ping; Huang, Xiang-yu; Li, Shu-yi; Liu, Chun-dong; Zhou, Zheng; Xu, Ping-ping

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of magnitude in adaptive response of osteoblasts exposed to compressive stress. Murine primary osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells were exposed to compressive stress (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 g/cm2) in 3D culture. Cell viability was evaluated, and expression levels of Runx2, Alp, Ocn, Rankl, and Opg were examined. ALP activity in osteoblasts and TRAP activity in RAW264.7 cells co-cultured with MC3T3-E1 cells were assayed. Results showed that compressive stress within 5.0 g/cm2 did not influence cell viability. Both osteoblastic and osteoblast-regulated osteoclastic differentiation were enhanced at 2 g/cm2. An increase in stress above 2 g/cm2 did not enhance osteoblastic differentiation further but significantly inhibited osteoblast-regualted osteoclastic differentiation. This study suggested that compressive stress regulates osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation through osteoblasts in a magnitude-dependent manner. PMID:28317941

  7. Testosterone regulates tight junction proteins and influences prostatic autoimmune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Montgomery, Bruce; True, Larry; Nelson, Peter S

    2011-06-01

    Testosterone and inflammation have been linked to the development of common age-associated diseases affecting the prostate gland including prostate cancer, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. We hypothesized that testosterone regulates components of prostate tight junctions which serve as a barrier to inflammation, thus providing a connection between age- and treatment-associated testosterone declines and prostatic pathology. We examined the expression and distribution of tight junction proteins in prostate biospecimens from mouse models and a clinical study of chemical castration, using transcript profiling, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. We determined that low serum testosterone is associated with reduced transcript and protein levels of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8, resulting in defective tight junction ultrastructure in benign prostate glands. Expression of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8 was negatively correlated with the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate caused by testosterone deprivation. Testosterone suppression also induced an autoimmune humoral response directed toward prostatic proteins. Testosterone supplementation in castrate mice resulted in re-expression of tight junction components in prostate epithelium and significantly reduced prostate inflammatory cell numbers. These data demonstrate that tight junction architecture in the prostate is related to changes in serum testosterone levels, and identify an androgen-regulated mechanism that potentially contributes to the development of prostate inflammation and consequent pathology.

  8. Mutational activation of the AmgRS two-component system in aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N; Poole, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The amgRS operon encodes a presumed membrane stress-responsive two-component system linked to intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genome sequencing of a lab isolate showing modest pan-aminoglycoside resistance, strain K2979, revealed a number of mutations, including a substitution in amgS that produced an R182C change in the AmgS sensor kinase product of this gene. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise wild-type strain recapitulated the resistance phenotype, while correcting the mutation in the resistant mutant abrogated the resistant phenotype, confirming that the amgS mutation is responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance of strain K2979. The amgSR182 mutation promoted an AmgR-dependent, 2- to 3-fold increase in expression of the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528, mirroring the impact of aminoglycoside exposure of wild-type cells on htpX and PA5528 expression. This suggests that amgSR182 is a gain-of-function mutation that activates AmgS and the AmgRS two-component system in promoting modest resistance to aminoglycosides. Screening of several pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa revealed three that showed elevated htpX and PA5528 expression and harbored single amino acid-altering mutations in amgS (V121G or D106N) and no mutations in amgR. Introduction of the amgSV121G mutation into wild-type P. aeruginosa generated a resistance phenotype reminiscent of the amgSR182 mutant and produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in htpX and PA5528 expression, confirming that it, too, is a gain-of-function aminoglycoside resistance-promoting mutation. These results highlight the contribution of amgS mutations and activation of the AmgRS two-component system to acquired aminoglycoside resistance in lab and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  9. Identification of DNA binding motifs of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP/PhoR two-component signal transduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Mena; Thomas, Christophe; Namouchi, Amine; Dubrac, Sarah; Gicquel, Brigitte; Gopaul, Deshmukh N

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP/PhoR two-component signal transduction system controls the expression of about 2% of the genome and plays a major role in pathogenicity. However, its regulon has not been well characterized. The binding site of PhoP transcription regulator was identified in the upstream regions of msl3, pks2, lipF and fadD21 genes, by using gene fusions, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting experiments. A consensus sequence for PhoP binding was deduced. It consists of two direct repeats, DR1/DR2, associated with a third repeat, DR3, important in some cases for PhoP binding to DR1/DR2 but located at a variable distance from these direct repeats. DR1/DR2 and DR3 consensus sequences were used to screen the whole-genome sequence for other putative binding sites potentially corresponding to genes directly regulated by PhoP. The identified 87 genes, encoding transcription regulators, and proteins involved in secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and catabolism are proposed to belong to the PhoP regulon. A consensus sequence derived from the analysis of PhoP binding to four gene promoter regions is proposed. We show for the first time the involvement of a third direct repeat motif in this binding reaction. The consensus sequence was instrumented to study the global regulation mediated by PhoP in M. tuberculosis. This analysis leads to the identification of several genes that are potentially regulated by this key player.

  10. Predictions of Phase Distribution in Liquid-Liquid Two-Component Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Sun, Xiaodong; Duval, Walter M.

    2011-06-01

    Ground-based liquid-liquid two-component flow can be used to study reduced-gravity gas-liquid two-phase flows provided that the two liquids are immiscible with similar densities. In this paper, we present a numerical study of phase distribution in liquid-liquid two-component flows using the Eulerian two-fluid model in FLUENT, together with a one-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) that takes into account fluid particle interactions, such as coalescence and disintegration. This modeling approach is expected to dynamically capture changes in the interfacial structure. We apply the FLUENT-IATE model to a water-Therminol 59® two-component vertical flow in a 25-mm inner diameter pipe, where the two liquids are immiscible with similar densities (3% difference at 20°C). This study covers bubbly (drop) flow and bubbly-to-slug flow transition regimes with area-averaged void (drop) fractions from 3 to 30%. Comparisons of the numerical results with the experimental data indicate that for bubbly flows, the predictions of the lateral phase distributions using the FLUENT-IATE model are generally more accurate than those using the model without the IATE. In addition, we demonstrate that the coalescence of fluid particles is dominated by wake entrainment and enhanced by increasing either the continuous or dispersed phase velocity. However, the predictions show disagreement with experimental data in some flow conditions for larger void fraction conditions, which fall into the bubbly-to-slug flow transition regime. We conjecture that additional fluid particle interaction mechanisms due to the change of flow regimes are possibly involved.

  11. Analytical solution and meaning of feasible regions in two-component three-way arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidikia, Nematollah; Abdollahi, Hamid; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen; Rajkó, Róbert

    2016-10-01

    Although many efforts have been directed to the development of approximation methods for determining the extent of feasible regions in two- and three-way data sets; analytical determination (i.e. using only finite-step direct calculation(s) instead of the less exact numerical ones) of feasible regions in three-way arrays has remained unexplored. In this contribution, an analytical solution of trilinear decomposition is introduced which can be considered as a new direct method for the resolution of three-way two-component systems. The proposed analytical calculation method is applied to the full rank three-way data array and arrays with rank overlap (a type of rank deficiency) loadings in a mode. Close inspections of the analytically calculated feasible regions of rank deficient cases help us to make clearer the information gathered from multi-way problems frequently emerged in physics, chemistry, biology, agricultural, environmental and clinical sciences, etc. These examinations can also help to answer, e.g., the following practical question: "Is two-component three-way data with proportional loading in a mode actually a three-way data array?" By the aid of the additional information resulted from the investigated feasible regions of two-component three-way data arrays with proportional profile in a mode, reasons for the inadequacy of the seemingly trilinear data treatment methods published in the literature (e.g., U-PLS/RBL-LD that was used for extraction of quantitative and qualitative information reported by Olivieri et al. (Anal. Chem. 82 (2010) 4510-4519)) could be completely understood.

  12. Design principles in two component systems and his-asp phosphorelays

    OpenAIRE

    Salvadó López, Baldiri

    2016-01-01

    L’objectiu d’aquesta tesi és trobar principis generals que permetin relacionar l’estructura i les propietats funcionals dels circuits moleculars de transducció de senyals two-component systems (TCS) i his-asp phosphorelays (PR). La tesi s’inicia revisant els mètodes usats per a l’estudi de principis de disseny en sistemes moleculars i alguns dels resultats obtinguts fins ara, i discutint la importància de l’estudi dels principis de disseny. A continuació, explorem els proteomes seqüenc...

  13. On the inspection policy of a two-component parallel system with failure interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zequeira, Romulo I. [ISTIT, Equipe Modelisation et Surete des Systemes, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 Rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)]. E-mail: romulo.zequeira@utt.fr; Berenguer, Christophe [ISTIT, Equipe Modelisation et Surete des Systemes, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 Rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)]. E-mail: christophe.berenguer@utt.fr

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we study a two-component standby system which can successfully operate upon a demand if at least one component is not failed. We assume that failures can be detected only by periodic inspections. We consider that the failure of one component can modify the (conditional) failure probability of the component still alive with probability p and do not interact with probability 1-p. For that failure interaction scheme we obtain the system reliability function for the case of staggered inspections. We compare staggered and non-staggered inspections through numerical examples considering constant hazard rates.

  14. Optimization and control of two-component radially self-accelerating beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander [Institute of Applied Physics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-11-23

    We report on the properties of radially self-accelerating intensity distributions consisting of two components in the angular frequency domain. We show how this subset of solutions, in literature also known as helicon beams, possesses peculiar characteristics that enable a better control over its properties. In this work, we present a step-by-step optimization procedure to achieve the best possible intensity contrast, a distinct rotation rate and long propagation lengths. All points are discussed on a theoretical basis and are experimentally verified.

  15. Modulational instability for a self-attractive two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Sheng-Chang; Duan Wen-Shan

    2009-01-01

    By means of the multiple-scale expansion method, the coupled nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equations without an explicit external potential are obtained in two-dimensional geometry for a self-attractive Bose-Einstein condensate composed of different hyperfine states. The modulational instability of two-component condensate is investigated by using a simple technique. Based on the discussion about two typical cases, the explicit expression of the growth rate for a purely growing modulational instability and the optimum stable conditions are given and analysed analytically. The results show that the modulational instability of this two-dimensional system is quite different from that in a one-dimensional system.

  16. Mapping the Two-Component Atomic Fermi Gas to the Nuclear Shell-Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, C.; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The physics of a two-component cold fermi gas is now frequently addressed in laboratories. Usually this is done for large samples of tens to hundreds of thousands of particles. However, it is now possible to produce few-body systems (1-100 particles) in very tight traps where the shell structure...... of the external potential becomes important. A system of two-species fermionic cold atoms with an attractive zero-range interaction is analogous to a simple model of nucleus in which neutrons and protons interact only through a residual pairing interaction. In this article, we discuss how the problem of a two...

  17. A hybrid two-component Bose-Einstein condensate interferometer for measuring magnetic field gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Huang, Jiahao; Liu, Quan

    2017-03-01

    We have proposed a scheme to detect magnetic field gradients via an interferometer based on a double-well two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Utilizing a sequence of quantum control operations on both external and internal degree of the BEC, one can extract the magnetic field gradients by measuring either the population in one component or the fidelity between the final external state and the initial ground state. Our scheme can be implemented by current experimental techniques of manipulating ultracold atoms.

  18. Topological phases of two-component bosons in species-dependent artificial gauge potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Hai; Shi, Tao

    2016-08-01

    We study bosonic atoms with two internal states in artificial gauge potentials whose strengths are different for the two components. A series of topological phases for such systems is proposed using the composite fermion theory and the parton construction. It is found in exact diagonalization that some of the proposed states may be realized for simple contact interaction between bosons. The ground states and low-energy excitations of these states are modeled using trial wave functions. The effective field theories for these states are also constructed and reveal some interesting properties.

  19. Mapping the Two-Component Atomic Fermi Gas to the Nuclear Shell-Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, C.; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2014-01-01

    of the external potential becomes important. A system of two-species fermionic cold atoms with an attractive zero-range interaction is analogous to a simple model of nucleus in which neutrons and protons interact only through a residual pairing interaction. In this article, we discuss how the problem of a two......-component atomic fermi gas in a tight external trap can be mapped to the nuclear shell model so that readily available many-body techniques in nuclear physics, such as the Shell Model Monte Carlo (SMMC) method, can be directly applied to the study of these systems. We demonstrate an application of the SMMC method...

  20. Numerical simulation of two-component flow fluid - fluid in the microchannel T- type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shebeleva A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of testing methodology for calculating two-phase flows based on the method of fluid in the cells (VOF method, and the procedure for CSF accounting of surface tension forces in the microchannel are considered in the work. Mathematical modeling of two-component flow fluid -fluid in the T- microchannel conducted using this methodology. The following flow regimes studied slug flow, rivulet flow, parallel flow, dispersed (droplet flow, plug flow. Comparison of numerical results with experimental data done. Satisfactory agreement between the calculated values with the experimental data obtained.