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Sample records for two-bottle tests relative

  1. Flavor-postingestive consequence associations incorporate the behaviorally opposing effects of positive reinforcement and anticipated satiety: implications for interpreting two-bottle tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Z S; Weingarten, H P

    1996-09-01

    Rats consuming distinctively flavored solutions containing different numbers of calories learn to associate each flavor with the ensuing postingestive effects ("flavor-postingestive consequence learning"). The hallmark of such learning is preferential consumption of one of the flavors in two-bottle tests (both flavors presented in nutrient-identical solutions). Two experiments were conducted to characterize the relationship between the number of calories associated with flavors and subsequent preferences in two-bottle tests. In Experiment 1, three groups of rats each associated distinctive flavors with real-fed sugar and with sham-fed sugar. The groups differed in the concentration of sucrose (8%, 14%, 24%) with which they were trained. In two-bottle tests rats trained with 8% sucrose preferred the real-fed flavor, whereas rats trained with 24% sucrose preferred the sham-fed flavor. Rats trained with 14% sucrose were intermediate to the other groups. In Experiment 2, two groups of rats associated distinctive flavors with two concentrations of real-fed sucrose. In two-bottle tests, the group trained with 1% and 5% sucrose preferred the flavor paired with the higher concentration, whereas the group trained with 5% and 30% sucrose preferred the flavor paired with the lower concentration. These findings suggest that flavor-postingestive consequence learning incorporates both positive reinforcement, which has the behavioral effect of increasing intake of the associated flavor, and anticipated satiety, which has the behavioral effect of suppressing intake of the associated flavor. When a flavor is associated with relatively few calories, the positive reinforcing effect predominates over anticipated satiety. However, when a flavor is associated with a greater number of calories, anticipated satiety predominates over the positive reinforcing effect.

  2. The palatability of corn oil and linoleic acid to mice as measured by short-term two-bottle choice and licking tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Takeshi; Saitou, Katsuyoshi; Mizushige, Takafumi; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Manabe, Yasuko; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2007-06-08

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) were reported to be recognized in the oral cavity and possibly involved in fatty foods recognition. To understand the importance of oil recognition in the oral cavity, we investigated the effect of various concentrations of a fatty acid or corn oil on fluid intake as well as mice's preferences in a two-bottle choice test and a licking test. Linoleic acid (LA), which is a main component of corn oil, was used as a representative FFA. In the two-bottle choice test between a pair of different concentrations of corn oil, the mice consistently adopted the higher concentration of corn oil. In the licking test for corn oil, the licking rates for the serial concentration of corn oils (0, 1, 5, 10 and 100%) were increased in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, in the two-bottle test for a pair of different concentrations of LA (0, 0.125, 0.25 and 1%), 0.25% and 1% LA were preferred to mineral oil, but 0.25% and 1% LA were preferred equally in mice. In the licking test for LA, the mice showed the largest number of initial lickings for the 1% LA, while the licking rates for the high concentration of LA decreased. These results suggest that mice could discriminate the concentration of corn oil and LA in the oral cavity. We also suggest that pure corn oil is a highly preferable solution, while an optimal concentration of LA according to the preferences of mice is a low-range concentration (0.25-1%).

  3. Tests Related to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to learn. Search form Search Tests related to pregnancy You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... to Genetic Counseling . What Are Tests Related to Pregnancy? Pregnancy related testing is done before or during ...

  4. Testing General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    This lecture will present a review of the past and present tests of the General Relativity theory. The essentials of the theory will be recalled and the measurable effects will be listed and analyzed. The main historical confirmations of General Relativity will be described. Then, the present situation will be reviewed presenting a number of examples. The opportunities given by astrophysical and astrometric observations will be shortly discussed. Coming to terrestrial experiments the attention will be specially focused on ringlasers and a dedicated experiment for the Gran Sasso Laboratories, named by the acronym GINGER, will be presented. Mention will also be made of alternatives to the use of light, such as particle beams and superfluid rings.

  5. Relativity tests and their motivation

    CERN Document Server

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Some motivations for Lorentz-symmetry tests in the context of quantum-gravity phenomenology are reiterated. The description of the emergent low-energy effects with the Standard-Model Extension (SME) is reviewed. The possibility of constraining such effects with dispersion-relation analyses of collider data is established.

  6. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  7. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  8. Moisture related test protocols for HVS testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available is to determine the effect of changes in moisture condition on the performance of the pavement structure, and specific layers in the structure. The development of Moisture Accelerated Distress (MAD) was defined by De Beer and Horak (1987) as a specific failure... mode where the addition of moisture to the pavement structure causes severe and relatively rapid structural damage to the pavement. The response indicated in Figure 1 indicates schematically the development of MAD for a granular pavement structure...

  9. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyse experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable -- maximal energy of the scattered photons -- would experience a significant shift in the Earth's gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of res...

  10. Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003691.htm Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test To use the ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-RP) test measures the ...

  11. Test Performance Related Dysfunctional Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep TÜTÜNCÜ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Examinations by using tests are very frequently used in educational settings and successful studying before the examinations is a complex matter to deal with. In order to understand the determinants of success in exams better, we need to take into account not only emotional and motivational, but also cognitive aspects of the participants such as dysfunctional beliefs. Our aim is to present the relationship between candidates’ characteristics and distorted beliefs/schemata just before an examination. Method: The subjects of the study were 30 female and 30 male physicians who were about to take the medical specialization exam (MSE in Turkey. Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS and Young Schema Questionnaire Short Form (YSQ-SF were applied to the subjects. The statistical analysis was done using the F test, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square test and spearman’s correlation test. Results: It was shown that some of the DAS and YSQ-SF scores were significantly higher in female gender, in the group who could not pass the exam, who had repetitive examinations, who had their first try taking an examination and who were unemployed at the time of the examination. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that candidates seeking help before MSE examination could be referred for cognitive therapy or counseling even they do not have any psychiatric diagnosis due to clinically significant cognitive distortion. Measurement and treatment of cognitive distortions that have negative impact on MSE performance may improve the cost-effectiveness and mental well being of the young doctors.

  12. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable – maximal energy of the scattered photons – would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  13. Black Hole Based Tests of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent

    2016-01-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some impor...

  14. Black hole based tests of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C.

    2016-03-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the Universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some important characteristics of general relativity include (but are not limited to) (i) only tensor gravitational degrees of freedom, (ii) the graviton is massless, (iii) no quadratic or higher curvatures in the action, and (iv) the theory is four-dimensional. Altering a characteristic leads to a different extension of general relativity: (i) scalar-tensor theories, (ii) massive gravity theories, (iii) quadratic gravity, and (iv) theories with large extra dimensions. Within each theory, we describe black hole solutions, their properties, and current and projected constraints on each theory using black hole based tests of gravity. We close this review by listing some of the open problems in model-independent tests and within each specific theory.

  15. Testing Asteroseismic Scaling Relations with Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The asteroseismic scaling relations for the frequency of maximum oscillation power, vmax, and the large frequency separation, Δν, provide an easy way to directly determine the masses and radii of stars with detected solar-like oscillations. With the vast amount of data available from the CoRoT and Kepler missions, the convenience of the scaling relations has resulted in their wide-spread use. But how valid are the scaling relations when applied to red giants, which have a substantially different structure than the Sun? Verifying the scaling relations empirically requires independent measurements. We report on the current state and future prospects of interferometric tests of the scaling relations.

  16. Experimental testing of constructivism and related theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelman, U

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to show that experimental scientific methods can be applied to explain how the analytic mechanism of the left cerebral hemisphere and the synthetic mechanism of the right one create complex cognitive constructions like ontology and mathematics. Nominalism and ordinal mathematical concepts are related to the analytic left hemisphere while Platonism and cardinal mathematical concepts are related to the synthetic right one. Thus persons with a dominant left hemisphere tend to prefer nominalist ontology and have more aptitude for ordinal mathematics than for cardinal mathematics, while persons with a dominant right hemisphere tend to prefer platonist ontology and have more aptitude for cardinal mathematics than for ordinal mathematics. It is further explained how the Kantism temporal mode of perceiving experience can be related to the left hemisphere while the Kantian spatial mode of perceiving experience can be related to the right hemisphere. This relation can be tested experimentally, thus the Kantian source of constructivism, and through it constructivism itself, can be tested experimentally.

  17. Einstein's Jury The Race to Test Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Crelinsten, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's Jury is the dramatic story of how astronomers in Germany, England, and America competed to test Einstein's developing theory of relativity. Weaving a rich narrative based on extensive archival research, Jeffrey Crelinsten shows how these early scientific debates shaped cultural attitudes we hold today. The book examines Einstein's theory of general relativity through the eyes of astronomers, many of whom were not convinced of the legitimacy of Einstein's startling breakthrough. These were individuals with international reputations to uphold and benefactors and shareholders to p

  18. Testing the νmax scaling relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two key global seismic quantities are relevant to estimate the fundamental properties of a star: the frequency of maximum power (νmax and the large frequency separation (Δν. The focus of this work is to test the νmax scaling relation in order to ascertain it’s level of accuracy. Here we report our results using artificial data and real Kepler data, based on a grid-modelling approach.

  19. Testing relativity with solar system dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A major breakthrough is described in the accuracy of Solar System dynamical tests of relativistic gravity. The breakthrough was achieved by factoring in ranging data from Viking Landers 1 and 2 from the surface of Mars. Other key data sources included optical transit circle observations, lunar laser ranging, planetary radar, and spacecraft (Mariner 9 to Mars and Mariner 10 to Mercury). The Solar System model which is used to fit the data and the process by which such fits are performed are explained and results are discussed. The results are fully consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  20. Testing relativity with solar system dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A major breakthrough is described in the accuracy of Solar System dynamical tests of relativistic gravity. The breakthrough was achieved by factoring in ranging data from Viking Landers 1 and 2 from the surface of Mars. Other key data sources included optical transit circle observations, lunar laser ranging, planetary radar, and spacecraft (Mariner 9 to Mars and Mariner 10 to Mercury). The Solar System model which is used to fit the data and the process by which such fits are performed are explained and results are discussed. The results are fully consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  1. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; 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Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J; Boyle, M; Campanelli, M; Hemberger, D A; Kidder, L E; Ossokine, S; Scheel, M A; Szilagyi, B; Teukolsky, S; Zlochower, Y

    2016-06-03

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 10^{13}  km. In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  2. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.

    2016-06-01

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 1013 km . In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  3. The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Shao, Michael; Nordtvedt, Kenneth L.

    2004-09-01

    This paper discusses new fundamental physics experiment to test relativistic gravity at the accuracy better than the effects of the 2nd order in the gravitational field strength, ∝ G2. The Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity (LATOR) mission uses laser interferometry between two micro-spacecraft whose lines of sight pass close by the Sun to accurately measure deflection of light in the solar gravity. The key element of the experimental design is a redundant geometry optical truss provided by a long-baseline (100 m) multi-channel stellar optical interferometer placed on the International Space Station (ISS). The interferometer is used for measuring the angles between the two spacecraft. In Euclidean geometry, determination of a triangle's three sides determines any angle therein; with gravity changing the optical lengths of sides passing close by the Sun and deflecting the light, the Euclidean relationships are overthrown. The geometric redundancy enables LATOR to measure the departure from Euclidean geometry caused by the solar gravity field to a very high accuracy. LATOR will not only improve the value of the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter γ to unprecedented levels of accuracy of 10-8, it will also reach ability to measure effects of the next post-Newtonian order (c-4) of light deflection resulting from gravity's intrinsic non-linearity. The solar quadrupole moment parameter, J2, will be measured with high precision, as well as a variety of other relativistic effects including Lense-Thirring precession. LATOR will lead to very robust advances in the tests of fundamental physics: this mission could discover a violation or extension of general relativity, or reveal the presence of an additional long range interaction in the physical law. There are no analogs to the LATOR experiment; it is unique and is a natural culmination of solar system gravity experiments.

  4. The laser astrometric test of relativity mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turyshev, Slava G [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Shao, Michael [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Nordtvedt, Kenneth [Northwest Analysis, 118 Sourdough Ridge Road, Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States)

    2004-06-21

    This paper discusses the motivation and general design elements of a new fundamental physics experiment that will test relativistic gravity at the accuracy better than the effects of the second order in the gravitational field strength, {proportional_to}G{sup 2}. The laser astrometric test of relativity (LATOR) mission uses laser interferometry between two micro-spacecraft whose lines of sight pass close by the Sun to accurately measure deflection of light in the solar gravity. The key element of the experimental design is a redundant geometry optical truss provided by a long-baseline (100 m) multi-channel stellar optical interferometer placed on the International Space Station (ISS). The spatial interferometer is used for measuring the angles between the two spacecraft and for orbit determination purposes. In Euclidean geometry, determination of a triangle's three sides determines any angle therein; with gravity changing the optical lengths of sides passing close by the Sun and deflecting the light, the Euclidean relationships are overthrown. The geometric redundancy enables LATOR to measure the departure from Euclidean geometry caused by the solar gravity field to a very high accuracy. LATOR will not only improve the value of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter {gamma} to unprecedented levels of accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 8}, it will also reach the ability to measure effects of the next post-Newtonian order ({proportional_to}G{sup 2}) of light deflection resulting from gravity's intrinsic nonlinearity. The solar quadrupole moment parameter, J{sub 2}, will be measured with high precision, as well as a variety of other relativistic effects including Lense-Thirring precession. LATOR will lead to very robust advances in the tests of fundamental physics: this mission could discover a violation or extension of general relativity, or reveal the presence of an additional long range interaction in the physical law. There are no analogues to the

  5. Standard Penetration Test and Relative Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-02-01

    laboratorio ejecutados con un penetr6metro est’tico pequeno. INTRODUCTION One of the main problems encountered in subsoil e’xploration is in situ...would be more valid. REFERENCES Burmister, D. M. �), "The Grading-Density Relation of Gr•anular Materials ." Proc,.edings of the American Society for...Reclamation (1953), "Second Progress Report of Re- search of the Penetration Resistance Method of Subsurface Explora- tion," Report No. EM-356. Design and Construction Division, Earth Materials Laboratory, Denver,

  6. Einstein's Jury -The Race to Test Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crelinsten, Jeffrey

    2006-12-01

    It is common belief that Einstein’s general theory of relativity won worldwide acceptance after British astronomers announced in November 1919 that the sun’s gravitational field bends starlight by an amount predicted by Einstein. This paper demonstrates that the case for Einstein was not settled until much later and that there was considerable confusion and debate about relativity during this period. Most astronomers considered Einstein’s general theory too metaphysical and abstruse, and many tried to find more conventional explanations of the astronomical observations. Two American announcements before the British results appeared had been contrary to Einstein’s prediction. They came from Lick and Mt. Wilson observatories, which enjoyed international reputations as two of the most advanced astrophysical research establishments in the world. Astronomers at these renowned institutions were instrumental in swaying the court of scientific opinion during the decade of the 1920s, which saw numerous attempts to measure light-bending, as well as solar line displacements and even ether-drift. How astronomers approached the “Einstein problem” in these early years before and after the First World War, and how the public reacted to what they reported, helped to shape attitudes we hold today about Einstein and his ideas.

  7. Optical design for the Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Shao, Michael; Nordtvedt, Kenneth L., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) mission. LATOR is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the pure tensor metric nature of gravitation the fundamental postulate of Einstein's theory of general relativity. With its focus on gravity's action on light propagation it complements other tests which rely on the gravitational dynamics of bodies.

  8. Test-Retest Changes on Scholastic Aptitude Tests Are Not Related to "g"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    This research examined the relation between test-retest changes on scholastic aptitude tests and g-loaded cognitive measures (viz., college grade-point average, Wonderlic Personnel Test, and word recall). University students who had twice taken a scholastic aptitude test (viz., Scholastic Assessment Test or American College Testing Program…

  9. A Method of Precision Testing Relative Relation of Space Points and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田林亚; 李鹏; 夏开旺

    2003-01-01

    In response to the high requirements of industrial precision test, presenting a method of testing relative relation of space points was studied. The spatial-coordinate testing system was established by using high precision theodolites and horizontal staff. The related test was conducted with the use of the space intersection and the precision was evaluated based on the error of baseline. In the practical application of radar-development base, the relative relation of space points was implemented by using electronic theodolite and horizontal staff, which can be easily operated. Furthermore, it can be conveniently used to test small areas where the instruments are difficult to be installed and for high industrial requirements of precision test. The test results can fully meet the strict industrial requirements.

  10. Testing general relativity: from local to cosmological scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-12-28

    I summarize various tests of general relativity on astrophysical scales, based on the large-scale structure of the universe but also on other systems, in particular the constants of physics. I emphasize the importance of hypotheses on the geometric structures of our universe while performing such tests and discuss their complementarity as well as their possible extensions.

  11. FORTRAN implementation of Friedman's test for several related samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    The FRIEDMAN program is a FORTRAN-coded implementation of Friedman's nonparametric test for several related samples with one observation per treatment/-block combination, or as it is sometimes called, the two-way analysis of variance by ranks. The FRIEDMAN program is described and a test data set and its results are presented to aid potential users of this program.

  12. Transfer of function and prior derived-relations testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Adam H; Best, Lauren

    2017-10-01

    This experiment assessed transfer of function through equivalence relations with and without prior derived-stimulus-relations (DSR) testing. In a DSR-Testing Group, eight college students learned A-B and A-C discriminations in baseline. They then derived the B-C and C-B equivalence relations before being exposed to a transfer-of-function manipulation and test. Eight participants in a No-DSR Testing Group were exposed to the transfer-of-function manipulation and test immediately after learning the baseline discriminations (i.e., B-C and C-B testing were omitted). In the transfer-of-function manipulation, participants learned to respond differently in the presence of B1 and B2 to avoid money loss. In the transfer-of-function test, responding in the presence of C1 and C2 was measured in the absence of differential consequences. Transfer of function occurred reliably only in the DSR-Testing Group (i.e., participants responding to C1 and C2 in the manner they learned to respond to B1 and B2, respectively). These findings support the notion that prior DSR testing can be critical to observing transfer of function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Relative Deprivation and Adolescent Outcomes in Iceland: A Multilevel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernburg, Jon Gunnar; Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora

    2009-01-01

    The theory of relative deprivation emphasizes that social comparisons contextualize how people experience impoverishment. An important application of this theory argues that relative deprivation that stems from unfavorable social comparisons can result in anger, normlessness and an increased likelihood of deviant behavior. We test this theory in a…

  14. Relative Deprivation and Adolescent Outcomes in Iceland: A Multilevel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernburg, Jon Gunnar; Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora

    2009-01-01

    The theory of relative deprivation emphasizes that social comparisons contextualize how people experience impoverishment. An important application of this theory argues that relative deprivation that stems from unfavorable social comparisons can result in anger, normlessness and an increased likelihood of deviant behavior. We test this theory in a…

  15. Neuropsychological testing as it relates to recovery from sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putukian, Margot

    2011-10-01

    Concussion is a challenging injury for the sports medicine team, and neuropsychological testing has been used as an adjunct to other clinical measures for assessment and management, and to guide return-to-play decisions. Understanding the limitations as well as the role of neuropsychological testing in the evaluation and management of sports-related concussion is important for the sports medicine team. This article will review the evidence regarding the utility of neuropsychological testing as it relates to concussion in sports.

  16. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Boehmer, Christian G; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2009-01-01

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light, and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander, constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models. Hence Solar System tests represent very convenient and efficient tools to test the viability of the different black hole solutions in brane worl...

  17. How to test for a relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Broadway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 'swinging light test' is used to detect a relative afferent pupil defect (RAPD: a means of detecting differences between the two eyes in how they respond to a light shone in one eye at a time. The test can be very useful for detecting unilateral or asymmetrical disease of the retina or optic nerve (but only optic nerve disease that occurs in front of the optic chiasm.

  18. GRAMMATICAL MISTAKES IN RELATION TO ENGLISH COMPETENCY TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Gde Sosiowati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The research aims at finding out the freshmen’s ability on English grammar. This is very important activity so that the English department knows their level of ability so that the teaching materials can be determined. The test is about structure, taken from TOEFL. The theory used is the theory English Language Teaching, especially Testing by Harmer (2001, in which the test is used as diagnostic test. The result of the test will provide the information about three crucial points on grammar that must be developed. This will help the related teacher to decide what items should be taught so that by the end of the semester, at least most of the students can reach the level of Intermediate, that is the level in which the students are capable of doing conversations on routines, u nderstanding lectures, understanding English TV programs (http://www.embassyenglish.com/student-life/yourlevel-of-english cited on 19 January 2015.

  19. Cosmological tests of general relativity with future tomographic surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Pogosian, Levon; Silvestri, Alessandra; Zylberberg, Joel

    2009-12-11

    Future weak lensing surveys will map the evolution of matter perturbations and gravitational potentials, yielding a new test of general relativity on cosmic scales. They will probe the relations between matter overdensities, local curvature, and the Newtonian potential. These relations can be modified in alternative gravity theories or by the effects of massive neutrinos or exotic dark energy fluids. We introduce two functions of time and scale which account for any such modifications in the linear regime. We use a principal component analysis to find the eigenmodes of these functions that cosmological data will constrain. The number of constrained modes gives a model-independent forecast of how many parameters describing deviations from general relativity could be constrained, along with w(z). The modes' scale and time dependence tell us which theoretical models will be better tested.

  20. Kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms: Testing gravitational-wave tests of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Samajdar, Anuradha; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We describe a variety of self-consistent modifications of the effective-one-body framework that yield kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveforms. These waveforms do not correspond to any particular modified theory of gravity, but offer parametrized deviations from general relativity in various regimes. They can thus be used to test the performance of various gravitational wave tests of general relativity (GR). As an example, we introduce the IMR consistency test, which tests for consistency between the estimations of the final mass and spin from the inspiral and merger-ringdown portions of a binary black hole waveform. We show that for reasonable source parameters and SNRs in Advanced LIGO, this test is able to detect a deviation from GR with high confidence for certain modifications of the GR energy flux that are not constrained by observations of the double pulsar. We also consider the performance of a parameterized test of GR on these kludge modified gravity waveforms.

  1. Testing consistency of general relativity with kinematic and dynamical probes

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we test consistency relations between a kinematic probe, the observational Hubble data, and a dynamical probe, the growth rates for cosmic large scale structure, which should hold if general relativity is the correct theory of gravity on cosmological scales. Moreover, we summarize the development history of parametrization in testings and make an improvement of it. Taking advantage of the Hubble parameter given from both parametric and non-parametric methods, we propose three equations and test two of them performed by means of two-dimensional parameterizations, including one using trigonometric functions we propose. As a result, it is found that the consistency relations satisfies well at $1\\sigma$ CL and trigonometric functions turn out to be efficient tools in parameterizations. Furthermore, in order to confirm the validity of our test, we introduce a model of modified gravity, DGP model and compare the testing results in the cases of $\\Lambda$CDM, "DGP in GR" and DGP model with mock data. It...

  2. Muon g − 2 and Tests of Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Francis J M

    2015-01-01

    After a brief introduction to the muon anomalous moment a ≡ (g−2)/2, the pioneering measurements at CERN are described. This includes the CERN cyclotron experiment, the first Muon Storage Ring, the invention of the “magic energy”, the second Muon Storage Ring and stringent tests of special relativity.

  3. Does the Fizeau Experiment Really Test Special Relativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Gerard

    1980-01-01

    The motivation and interpretation of the Fizeau experiment are reviewed, and its status as a test of special relativity is discussed. It is shown, with the aid of a simplified, purely mechanical model of the propagation of light in matter, that the experiment actually cannot discriminate between Galilean and relativistic kinematics. (Author/SK)

  4. A job-related fitness test for the Dutch police

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strating, M.; Bakker, R. H.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Lemmink, K. A. P. M.; Groothoff, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background The variety of tasks that characterize police work highlights the importance of being in good physical condition. Aims To take a first step at standardizing the administration of a job-related test to assess a person's ability to perform the physical demands of the core tasks of police wo

  5. Testing General Relativity with Present and Future Astrophysical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pani, Paolo; Sperhake, Ulrich; Stein, Leo C; Wex, Norbert; Yagi, Kent; Baker, Tessa; Burgess, C P; Coelho, Flávio S; Doneva, Daniela; De Felice, Antonio; Ferreira, Pedro G; Freire, Paulo C C; Healy, James; Herdeiro, Carlos; Horbatsch, Michael; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Klein, Antoine; Kokkotas, Kostas; Kunz, Jutta; Laguna, Pablo; Lang, Ryan N; Li, Tjonnie G F; Littenberg, Tyson; Matas, Andrew; Mirshekari, Saeed; Okawa, Hirotada; Radu, Eugen; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Sathyaprakash, Bangalore S; Broeck, Chris Van Den; Winther, Hans A; Witek, Helvi; Aghili, Mir Emad; Alsing, Justin; Bolen, Brett; Bombelli, Luca; Caudill, Sarah; Chen, Liang; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Fujita, Ryuichi; Gao, Caixia; Gerosa, Davide; Kamali, Saeed; Silva, Hector O; Rosa, João G; Sadeghian, Laleh; Sampaio, Marco; Sotani, Hajime; Zilhao, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    One century after its formulation, Einstein's general relativity has made remarkable predictions and turned out to be compatible with all experimental tests. Most (if not all) of these tests probe the theory in the weak-field regime, and there are theoretical and experimental reasons to believe that general relativity should be modified when gravitational fields are strong and spacetime curvature is large. The best astrophysical laboratories to probe strong-field gravity are black holes and neutron stars, whether isolated or in binary systems. We review the motivations to consider extensions of general relativity. We present a (necessarily incomplete) catalog of modified theories of gravity for which strong-field predictions have been computed and contrasted to Einstein's theory, and we summarize our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of compact objects in these theories. We discuss current bounds on modified gravity from binary pulsar and cosmological observations, and we highlight the poten...

  6. The Relative Effectiveness of Varied Visual Testing Formats in Retrieving Information Related to Different Educational Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jaison; Dwyer, Francis

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to: (1) examine the relative effectiveness with which different types of visual test formats facilitated information retrieval on tests measuring different educational objectives; (2) measure the effect that prior knowledge had on information retrieval; and (3) to determine whether an interaction existed between prior…

  7. Relational Constraint Driven Test Case Synthesis for Web Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Fu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a relational constraint driven technique that synthesizes test cases automatically for web applications. Using a static analysis, servlets can be modeled as relational transducers, which manipulate backend databases. We present a synthesis algorithm that generates a sequence of HTTP requests for simulating a user session. The algorithm relies on backward symbolic image computation for reaching a certain database state, given a code coverage objective. With a slight adaptation, the technique can be used for discovering workflow attacks on web applications.

  8. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Christian G [Department of Mathematics and Institute of Origins, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); De Risi, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli studi di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Bari, Via G. Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Harko, Tiberiu [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road (Hong Kong); Lobo, Francisco S N, E-mail: c.boehmer@ucl.ac.u, E-mail: giuseppe.derisi@ba.infn.i, E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.h, E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-21

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models.

  9. Black Hole Spectroscopy: Testing General Relativity through Gravitational Wave Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, O; Krishnan, B; Finn, L S; Garrison, D; López-Aleman, R; Dreyer, Olaf; Kelly, Bernard; Krishnan, Badri; Finn, Lee Samuel; Garrison, David; Lopez-Aleman, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Assuming that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity in the strong field limit, can gravitational wave observations distinguish between black hole and other compact object sources? Alternatively, can gravitational wave observations provide a test of one of the fundamental predictions of general relativity? Here we describe a definitive test of the hypothesis that observations of damped, sinusoidal gravitational waves originated from a black hole or, alternatively, that nature respects the general relativistic no-hair theorem. For astrophysical black holes, which have a negligible charge-to-mass ratio, the black hole quasi-normal mode spectrum is characterized entirely by the black hole mass and angular momentum and is unique to black holes. In a different theory of gravity, or if the observed radiation arises from a different source (e.g., a neutron star, strange matter or boson star), the spectrum will be inconsistent with that predicted for general relativistic black holes. We give a statistica...

  10. Psychological distress related to BRCA testing in ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnslett, Merete; Dahl, Alv A; Sørebø, Øystein; Dørum, Anne

    2015-12-01

    An increasing demand for genetic testing has moved the procedure from highly selected at-risk individuals, now also including cancer patients for treatment associated testing. The heritable fraction of ovarian cancer is more than 10%, and our department has offered BRCA testing to such patients irrespective of family history since 2002. This study examined potential psychosocial distress associated with this procedure using The Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (MICRA) questionnaire and other patient-rated generic distress instruments. Patients were divided into four groups according to cancer risk: mutation carriers, own history of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, family history of breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer, and patients without family history. In a postal survey, 354 patients responded. Good acceptance of the MICRA was observed, and previously described good psychometric properties were confirmed. A significant association between MICRA total score and receiving a positive BRCA test result was found. No significant between-group differences were observed with generic distress instruments. Time since cancer diagnosis, test result, and survey showed no significant associations with MICRA scores. Internal consistencies of instruments were adequate. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed adequate fit indices for a three factor solution of the MICRA, but further refinement of the items should be considered. In conclusion, the specific types of worry and distress most relevant to receiving genetic testing irrespective of family history were not captured by the generic distress instruments. The MICRA was supported as a useful tool for detection of mental distress related to genetic testing and risk evaluation.

  11. Criterion Related Validity of Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabene, Helmi; Hachana, Younes; Franchini, Emerson; Tabben, Montassar; Mkaouer, Bessem; Negra, Yassine; Hammami, Mehrez; Chamari, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Karate is one the most popular combat sports in the world. Physical fitness assessment on a regular manner is important for monitoring the effectiveness of the training program and the readiness of karatekas to compete. Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the criterion related to validity of the karate specific aerobic test (KSAT) as an indicator of aerobic level of karate practitioners. Patients and Methods: Cardiorespiratory responses, aerobic performance level through both treadmill laboratory test and YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYoIRTL1) as well as time to exhaustion in the KSAT test (TE’KSAT) were determined in a total of fifteen healthy international karatekas (i.e. karate practitioners) (means ± SD: age: 22.2 ± 4.3 years; height: 176.4 ± 7.5 cm; body mass: 70.3 ± 9.7 kg and body fat: 13.2 ± 6%). Results: Peak heart rate obtained from KSAT represented ~99% of maximal heart rate registered during the treadmill test showing that KSAT imposes high physiological demands. There was no significant correlation between KSAT’s TE and relative (mL/min kg) treadmill maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.14; P = 0.69; [small]). On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between KSAT’s TE and the velocity associated with VO2max (vVO2max) (r = 0.67; P = 0.03; [large]) as well as the velocity at VO2 corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold (vVO2 VAT) (r = 0.64; P = 0.04; [large]). Moreover, significant relationship was found between TE’s KSAT and both the total distance covered and parameters of intermittent endurance measured through YoYoIRTL1. Conclusions: The KSAT has not proved to have indirect criterion related validity as no significant correlations have been found between TE’s KSAT and treadmill VO2max. Nevertheless, as correlated to other aerobic fitness variables, KSAT can be considered as an indicator of karate specific endurance. The establishment of the criterion related validity of the KSAT

  12. Criterion Related Validity of Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaabene

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Karate is one the most popular combat sports in the world. Physical fitness assessment on a regular manner is important for monitoring the effectiveness of the training program and the readiness of karatekas to compete. Objectives The aim of this research was to examine the criterion related to validity of the karate specific aerobic test (KSAT as an indicator of aerobic level of karate practitioners. Patients and Methods Cardiorespiratory responses, aerobic performance level through both treadmill laboratory test and YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYoIRTL1 as well as time to exhaustion in the KSAT test (TE’KSAT were determined in a total of fifteen healthy international karatekas (i.e. karate practitioners (means ± SD: age: 22.2 ± 4.3 years; height: 176.4 ± 7.5 cm; body mass: 70.3 ± 9.7 kg and body fat: 13.2 ± 6%. Results Peak heart rate obtained from KSAT represented ~99% of maximal heart rate registered during the treadmill test showing that KSAT imposes high physiological demands. There was no significant correlation between KSAT’s TE and relative (mL/min kg treadmill maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.14; P = 0.69; [small]. On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between KSAT’s TE and the velocity associated with VO2max (vVO2max (r = 0.67; P = 0.03; [large] as well as the velocity at VO2 corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold (vVO2 VAT (r = 0.64; P = 0.04; [large]. Moreover, significant relationship was found between TE’s KSAT and both the total distance covered and parameters of intermittent endurance measured through YoYoIRTL1. Conclusions The KSAT has not proved to have indirect criterion related validity as no significant correlations have been found between TE’s KSAT and treadmill VO2max. Nevertheless, as correlated to other aerobic fitness variables, KSAT can be considered as an indicator of karate specific endurance. The establishment of the criterion related validity of the

  13. Polynomial Tests of Normal Forms and Some Related Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王克

    1992-01-01

    The following problem is called the everywhere-cover problem:“Given a set of dependencies over a database scheme,is he set of dependencies explicitly given for each relation scheme equivalent to the dependencies implied for that relation sheme?”It is shown that when the everywhere-cover problem has a yes answer,examining only the dependencies explicitly given will suffice to test 3NF, BCNF and 4NF of a database scheme.But this does not hold for 2NF.Consequently,in such cases,tests of BCNF and 4NF all take polynomial time.Then a proof is given that test of 3NF of a database scheme is Co-NP-complete,and from this result it is shown that everywhere-cover is also Co-NP-complete when only functional dependencies are allowed.These results lead to doubt the truth of the well believed conjecture that no polynomial time algorithm for designing a lossless BCNF database scheme is likely to exist.

  14. Fundamental Physics with the Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Turyshev, S G; Lämmerzahl, C; Theil, S; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E; Foerstner, R; Johann, U; Klioner, S A; Soffel, M H; Dachwald, B; Seboldt, W; Perlick, V; Sandford, M C W; Bingham, R; Kent, B; Sumner, T J; Bertolami, O; Páramos, J; Christophe, B; Foulon, B; Touboul, P; Bouyer, P; Damour, T; Salomon, C; Reynaud, S; Brillet, A; Bondu, F; Mangin, J F; Samain, E; Bertotti, B; Iess, L; Erd, C; Grenouilleau, J C; Izzo, D; Rathke, A; Asmar, S W; Colavita, M; Gursel, Y; Hemmati, H; Shao, M; Williams, J G; Nordtvedt, K L; Shapiro, I; Reasenberg, R; Drever, R W P; Degnan, J; Plowman, J E; Hellings, R; Murphy, T W; Rovisco Pais, A; Copernic, A N; Favata, F; Turyshev, Slava G.; Dittus, Hansjoerg

    2005-01-01

    The Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity (LATOR) is a European-U.S. Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the pure tensor metric nature of gravitation - the fundamental postulate of Einstein's theory of general relativity. By using a combination of independent time-series of highly accurate gravitational deflection of light in the immediate proximity to the Sun along with measurements of the Shapiro time delay on the interplanetary scales (to a precision respectively better than 0.1 picoradians and 1 cm), LATOR will significantly improve our knowledge of relativistic gravity. The primary mission objective is to i) measure the key post-Newtonian Eddington parameter \\gamma with accuracy of a part in 10^9. (1-\\gamma) is a direct measure for presence of a new interaction in gravitational theory, and, in its search, LATOR goes a factor 30,000 beyond the present best result, Cassini's 2003 test. The mission will also provide: ii) first measurement of gravity's non-linear effects on light to ~0.01% accur...

  15. LARES: A New Satellite Specifically Designed for Testing General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paolozzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that today several hundred operational satellites are orbiting Earth while many more either have already reentered the atmosphere or are no longer operational. On the 13th of February 2012 one more satellite of the Italian Space Agency has been successfully launched. The main difference with respect to all other satellites is its extremely high density that makes LARES not only the densest satellite but also the densest known orbiting object in the solar system. That implies that the nongravitational perturbations on its surface will have the smallest effects on its orbit. Those design characteristics are required to perform an accurate test of frame dragging and specifically a test of Lense-Thirring effect, predicted by General Relativity. LARES satellite, although passive, with 92 laser retroreflectors on its surface, was a real engineering challenge in terms of both manufacturing and testing. Data acquisition and processing are in progress. The paper will describe the scientific objectives, the status of the experiment, the special feature of the satellite and separation system including some manufacturing issues, and the special tests performed on its retroreflectors.

  16. Non-time-orthogonality and Tests of Special Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Klauber, R D

    2000-01-01

    An intriguing, and possibly significant, anomalous signal in the most accurate Michelson-Morley type experiment performed to date is contrasted with a simple first order test of special relativity subsequently performed to discount that signal as spurious. Analysis of the non-time-orthogonal nature of the rotating earth frame leads to the conclusion that the latter test needed second order accuracy in order to detect the effect sought, and hence was not sufficient to discount the potential cause of the anomalous signal. The analysis also explains the perplexing result found from Sagnac type experiments wherein interference fringing remained unchanged when different media were placed on the rotating apparatus in the path of the light beams.

  17. Ambiguous Tests of General Relativity on Cosmological Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Zuntz, Joe; Ferreira, Pedro; Skordis, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to testing General Relativity (GR) on linear scales using Parameterized Post-Friedmann (PPF) methods. It is generally assumed that the details of any given parameterization are unimportant if one uses it as a diagnostic for deviations from GR. In this brief report we show that this is not so by taking two particular parameterizations and analyzing a subset of the current cosmological data. We argue that any PPF approach should always be accompanied by a characterization of the class of modified gravity models it is seeking to approximate.

  18. A superconducting gyroscope to test Einstein's general theory of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Schiff (1960) proposed a new test of general relativity based on measuring the precessions of the spin axes of gyroscopes in earth orbit. Since 1963 a Stanford research team has been developing an experiment to measure the two effects calculated by Schiff. The gyroscope consists of a uniform sphere of fused quartz 38 mm in diameter, coated with superconductor, electrically suspended and spinning at about 170 Hz in vacuum. The paper describes the proposed flight apparatus and the current state of development of the gyroscope, including techniques for manufacturing and measuring the gyro rotor and housing, generating ultralow magnetic fields, and mechanizing the readout.

  19. Improved test of time dilation in special relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saathoff, G; Karpuk, S; Eisenbarth, U; Huber, G; Krohn, S; Muñoz Horta, R; Reinhardt, S; Schwalm, D; Wolf, A; Gwinner, G

    2003-11-07

    An improved test of time dilation in special relativity has been performed using laser spectroscopy on fast ions at the heavy-ion storage-ring TSR in Heidelberg. The Doppler-shifted frequencies of a two-level transition in 7Li+ ions at v=0.064c have been measured in the forward and backward direction to an accuracy of Deltanu/nu=1 x 10(-9) using collinear saturation spectroscopy. The result confirms the relativistic Doppler formula and sets a new limit of 2.2 x 10(-7) for deviations from the time dilation factor gamma(SR)=(1-v2/c2)(-1/2).

  20. Relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; O`Farrell, T.P.

    1993-12-31

    Seven hundred fifty-nine transects having a total length of 1,191 km were walked during 1981--1986 to determine the distribution and relative abundance of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The abundance of tortoises on NTS was low to very low relative to other populations in the Mojave Desert. Sign of tortoises was found from 880 to 1,570 m elevation and was more abundant above 1,200 m than has been reported previously for Nevada. Tortoises were more abundant on NTS on the upper alluvial fans and slopes of mountains than in valley bottoms. They also were more common on or near limestone and dolomite mountains than on mountains of volcanic origin.

  1. Testing the distance duality relation with present and future data

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, Vincenzo F; Hook, Isobel; Scaramella, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The assumptions that "light propagates along null geodesics of the spacetime metric" and "the number of photons is conserved along the light path" lead to the distance duality relation (DDR), $\\eta = D_L(z) (1 + z)^{-2}/D_A(z) = 1$, with $D_L(z)$ and $D_A(z)$ the luminosity and angular diameter distances to a source at redshift $z$. In order to test the DDR, we follow the usual strategy comparing the angular diameter distances of a set of clusters, inferred from X - ray and radio data, with the luminosity distance at the same cluster redshift using the local regression technique to estimate $D_L(z)$ from Type Ia Supernovae (SNeIa) Hubble diagram. In order to both strengthen the constraints on the DDR and get rid of the systematics related to the unknown cluster geometry, we also investigate the possibility to use Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) to infer $D_A(z)$ from future BAO surveys. As a test case, we consider the proposed Euclid mission investigating the precision can be afforded on $\\eta(z)$ from the...

  2. OPTIS - A satellite test of Special and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, H.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Peters, A.; Schiller, S.

    OPTIS has been proposed as a small satellite platform in a high elliptical orbit (apogee 40,000 km, perigee 10,000 km) and is designed for high precision tests of foundations of Special and General Relativity. The experimental set-up consists of two ultrastable Nd:YAG lasers, two crossed optical resonators (monolithic cavities), an atomic clock, and an optical comb generator. OPTIS enables (1) a Michelson- Morley experiment to test the isotropy of light propagation (constancy of light speed, dc/c) with an accuracy of 1 part in 101 8 , (2) a Kennedey-Thorndike experiment to measure the independence of the light speed from the velocity of the laboratory in the order of 1 part in 101 6 , and (3) a test of the gravitational red shift by comparing the atomic clock and an optical clock on a precision level of 1 part in 104 . To avoid any influence from atmospheric drag, solar radiation, or earth albedo, the satellite needs drag free control, to depress the residual acceleration down to 10-14 m/s 2 in the frequency range between 100 to 1,000 Hz, and thermal control to stabilize the cavity temperature variation, dT/T, to 1 part in 107 during 100 s and to 1 part in 105 during 1 orbit.

  3. LARES Satellite Thermal Forces and a Test of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, Richard; Brooks, Jason; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We summarize a laser-ranged satellite test of General Relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames, and then describe the modeling of an important perturbing effect, thermally induced forces, on the satellite. The frame dragging result is obtained by using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. It produces a result in agreement with the prediction of General Relativity: $\\mu = (0.994 \\pm 0.002) \\pm 0.05$, where $\\mu$ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its General Relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is the estimated systematic error. The thermal force model assumes heat flow from the sun (visual) and from Earth (IR) to the satellite core and to the fused silica reflectors on the satellite, and reradiation into space. For a roughly current epoch (days 1460 - 1580 after launch) we c...

  4. Classical Nonminimal Lagrangians and Kinematic Tests of Special Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, M

    2016-01-01

    This article gives a brief summary on recently obtained classical lagrangians for the nonminimal fermion sector of the Standard-Model Extension (SME). Such lagrangians are adequate descriptions of classical particles that are subject to a Lorentz-violating background field based on the SME. Explicitly, lagrangians were obtained for the leading nonminimal contributions of the m, a, c, e, and f coefficients. These results were then used to interpret classical, kinematic tests of Special Relativity in the framework of the nonminimal SME. This led to new constraints on certain nonminimal controlling coefficients. Although the experiments were very sophisticated in the era when they were carried out, their sensitivities for detecting Lorentz violation were still far away from the Planck scale. Obtaining the novel constraints can be considered as a proof-of-principle demonstrating the applicability of the classical lagrangians computed.

  5. Gravitational waves astronomy: the ultimate test for Einstein's General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that Einstein's General Relativity (GR) achieved a great success and overcame lots of experimental tests. On the other hand, GR also showed some shortcomings and flaws which today advise theorists to ask if it is the definitive theory of gravity. In this review we show that, if advanced projects on the detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) will improve their sensitivity, allowing to perform a GWs astronomy, understanding if Einstein's GR is the correct and definitive theory of gravity will be possible. For this goal, accurate angular and frequency dependent response functions of interferometers for GWs arising from various Theories of Gravity, i.e. GR and Extended Theories of Gravity will have to be used. This review is founded on the Essay which won an Honorable Mention at the the 2009 Gravity Research Foundation Awards.

  6. Factors Related to the Validity of Reproduction Tonal Memory Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the validity of reproduction tonal memory tests by examining the relationships among performances on an existing reproduction tonal memory test and several recognition tonal memory tests. Tested 210 fifth through twelfth grade students. Concludes that there is a moderate relationship among performances on the tests. Includes references.…

  7. Is Test Taker Perception of Assessment Related to Construct Validity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qin

    2011-01-01

    This study examined test takers' perception of assessment demand and its impact on the measurement of intended constructs. More than 800 test takers took a pre- and a posttest of College English Test Band 4 and filled in a perception questionnaire to report the skills they perceive as necessary for answering the test. The study found test takers…

  8. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-square-fits that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-square fits that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing o...

  9. A Time Domain Waveform for Testing General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Huwyler, Cédric; Jetzer, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational-wave parameter estimation is only as good as the theory the waveform generation models are based upon. It is therefore crucial to test General Relativity (GR) once data becomes available. Many previous works, such as studies connected with the ppE framework by Yunes and Pretorius, rely on the stationary phase approximation (SPA) to model deviations from GR in the frequency domain. As Fast Fourier Transform algorithms have become considerably faster and in order to circumvent possible problems with the SPA, we test GR with corrected time domain waveforms instead of SPA waveforms. Since a considerable amount of work has been done already in the field using SPA waveforms, we establish a connection between leading-order-corrected waveforms in time and frequency domain, concentrating on phase-only corrected terms. In a Markov Chain Monte Carlo study, whose results are preliminary and will only be available later, we will assess the ability of the eLISA detector to measure deviations from GR for signa...

  10. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo, W.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-squares fit that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-squares fit that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing of radio pulsars and the increase in the number of observed systems. We demonstrate the power of this framework using simulated data sets that are representative of current observations.

  11. Testing general relativity using golden black-hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Abhirup; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K; Mishra, Chandra Kant; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter; Nichols, David A; Chen, Yanbei; Nielsen, Alex B; Berry, Christopher P L; London, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    The coalescences of stellar-mass black-hole binaries through their inspiral, merger, and ringdown are among the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. If a GW signal is observed with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the masses and spins of the black holes can be estimated from just the inspiral part of the signal. Using these estimates of the initial parameters of the binary, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be uniquely predicted making use of general-relativistic numerical simulations. In addition, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be independently estimated from the merger-ringdown part of the signal. If the binary black hole dynamics is correctly described by general relativity, these independent estimates have to be consistent with each other. We present a Bayesian implementation of such a test of general relativity, and outline the expected constraints from upcoming GW observations using the second-generation of ground-based GW detectors.

  12. Strategy for genotoxicity testing: hazard identification and risk assessment in relation to in vitro testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybaud, V; Aardema, M; Clements, J; Dearfield, K; Galloway, S; Hayashi, M; Jacobson-Kram, D; Kirkland, D; MacGregor, J T; Marzin, D; Ohyama, W; Schuler, M; Suzuki, H; Zeiger, E

    2007-02-03

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the September 9-10, 2005 meeting of the Expert Working Group on Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment in Relation to In Vitro Testing, part of an initiative on genetic toxicology. The objective of the Working Group was to develop recommendations for interpretation of results from tests commonly included in regulatory genetic toxicology test batteries, and to propose an appropriate strategy for follow-up testing when positive in vitro results were obtained in these assays. The Group noted the high frequency of positive in vitro findings in the genotoxicity test batteries with agents found not to be carcinogenic and thought not to pose a carcinogenic health hazard to humans. The Group agreed that a set of consensus principles for appropriate interpretation and follow-up testing when initial in vitro tests are positive was needed. Current differences in emphasis and policy among different regulatory agencies were recognized as a basis of this need. Using a consensus process among a balanced group of recognized international authorities from industry, government, and academia, it was agreed that a strategy based on these principles should include guidance on: (1) interpretation of initial results in the "core" test battery; (2) criteria for determining when follow-up testing is needed; (3) criteria for selecting appropriate follow-up tests; (4) definition of when the evidence is sufficient to define the mode of action and the relevance to human exposure; and (5) definition of approaches to evaluate the degree of health risk under conditions of exposure of the species of concern (generally the human). A framework for addressing these issues was discussed, and a general "decision tree" was developed that included criteria for assessing the need for further testing, selecting appropriate follow-up tests, and determining a sufficient weight of evidence to attribute a level of risk and stop testing. The discussion included case

  13. Astronomical tests of relativity: beyond parameterized post-Newtonian formalism (PPN), to testing fundamental principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    2010-01-01

    By the early 1970s, the improved accuracy of astrometric and time measurements enabled researchers not only to experimentally compare relativistic gravity with the Newtonian predictions, but also to compare different relativistic gravitational theories (e.g., the Brans-Dicke Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation). For this comparison, Kip Thorne and others developed the Parameterized Post-Newtonian Formalism (PPN), and derived the dependence of different astronomically observable effects on the values of the corresponding parameters. Since then, all the observations have confirmed General Relativity. In other words, the question of which relativistic gravitation theory is in the best accordance with the experiments has been largely settled. This does not mean that General Relativity is the final theory of gravitation: it needs to be reconciled with quantum physics (into quantum gravity), it may also need to be reconciled with numerous surprising cosmological observations, etc. It is, therefore, reasonable to prepare an extended version of the PPN formalism, that will enable us to test possible quantum-related modifications of General Relativity. In particular, we need to include the possibility of violating fundamental principles that underlie the PPN formalism but that may be violated in quantum physics, such as scale-invariance, T-invariance, P-invariance, energy conservation, spatial isotropy violations, etc. In this paper, we present the first attempt to design the corresponding extended PPN formalism, with the (partial) analysis of the relation between the corresponding fundamental physical principles.

  14. ASTROD I - Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity using Optical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Hanns; Ni, Wei-Tou; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    In 2011 ASTROD I has been selected as one of the final 14 candidates for the Cosmic Vision M3 mission. ASTROD I is a planned interplanetary space mission with multiple goals. The primary aims are: to test general relativity with an improvement in sensitivity of over three orders of magnitude, improving our understanding of gravity and aiding the development of a new quantum gravity theory; to measure key solar system parameters with increased accuracy, advancing solar physics and our knowledge of the solar system; and to measure the time rate of change of the gravitational constant with an order of magnitude improvement and probing dark matter and dark energy gravitationally. It is an international project, and is envisaged as the first in a series of ASTROD missions. ASTROD I will consist of one spacecraft carrying a telescope, four lasers, two event timers and a clock. Two-way, two-wavelength laser pulse ranging will be used between the spacecraft in a solar orbit and deep space laser stations on Earth, to achieve the ASTROD I goals. Finally the mission was not selected for the final 4 candidates for CV M3 in 2011. Nevertheless, ASTROD is a very promising concept for a fundamental physics space mission and shares some key technologies with other popular space missions like LISA and Jason 2 (T2L2). We have also considered possibilities (i) to add an ASTROD I laser ranging package to other fundamental missions for testing the dynamics of relativistic gravity; (ii) to fully combine ASTROD I with another fundamental mission using basic technology of the LISA Pathfiner (this could also be good for a LISA-type mission scheduled to launch 20 years later). In this paper, we present various possibilities of our study.

  15. Scientific issues related to the cytology proficiency testing regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prey Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The member organizations of the Cytology Education and Technology Consortium believe there are significant flaws in current cytology proficiency testing regulations. The most immediate needed modifications include lengthening the required testing interval, utilizing stringently validated and continuously monitored slides, changing the grading scheme, and changing the focus of the test from the individual to laboratory level testing. Integration of new computer-assisted and located-guided screening technologies into the testing protocols is necessary for the testing protocol to be compliant with the law.

  16. Event-related potentials associated with Attention Network Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Andres H; Urbanek, Carsten; Opgen-Rhein, Carolin; Hahn, Eric; Ta, Thi Minh Tam; Koehler, Simone; Gross, Melanie; Dettling, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Selective visual attention is thought to be comprised of distinct neuronal networks that serve different attentional functions. The Attention Network Test (ANT) has been introduced to allow for assessment of alerting, orienting, and response inhibition. Information on associated measures of neural processing during ANT is still scarce. We topographically analyzed top-down ANT effects on visual event-related potential morphology in 44 healthy participants. Significant reaction time effects were obtained for all attention networks. Posterior cue-locked target N1 amplitude was significantly increased during both alerting and orienting. P3 amplitude was significantly modulated at frontal and parietal leads as a function of inhibition. Our data suggests that attentional mechanisms of alerting and orienting are employed simultaneously at early stages of the visual processing stream to amplify perceptual discrimination and load onto the same ERP component. Fronto-parietal modulations of P3 amplitude seem to mirror both response inhibition and visual target detection and may be interesting markers for further studies.

  17. Test of Special Relativity and Equivalence principle from K Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hambye, T; Sarkar, U

    1998-01-01

    A violation of Local Lorentz Invariance (VLI) and hence the special theory of relativity or a violation of equivalence principle (VEP) in the Kaon system can, in principle, induce oscillations between $K^0$ and $\\bar{K}^0$. We construct a general formulation in which simultaneous pairwise diagonalization of mass, momemtum, weak or gravitational eigenstates is not assumed. %and the maximum attainable %velocities of the velocity eigenstates are different. We discuss this problem in a general way and point out that, as expected, the VEP and VLI contributions are indistinguishable. We then insist on the fact that VEP or VLI can occur even when CPT is conserved. A possible CP violation of the superweak type induced by VEP or VLI is introduced and discussed. We show that the general VEP mechanism (or the VLI mechanism, but not both simultaneously), with or without conserved CPT, could be clearly tested experimentally through the energy dependence of the $K_L-K_S$ mass difference and of $\\eta_{+-}$, calculated.

  18. Test Code Quality and Its Relation to Issue Handling Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Athanasiou, D.; Nugroho, A.; Visser, J.; Zaidman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Automated testing is a basic principle of agile development. Its benefits include early defect detection, defect cause localization and removal of fear to apply changes to the code. Therefore, maintaining high quality test code is essential. This study introduces a model that assesses test code qual

  19. The relative performance of bivariate causality tests in small samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bult, J..R.; Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Causality tests have been applied to establish directional effects and to reduce the set of potential predictors, For the latter type of application only bivariate tests can be used, In this study we compare bivariate causality tests. Although the problem addressed is general and could benefit resea

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    'I know very well that my theory rests on a shaky foundation. What attracts me to it is that it leads to consequences that seem to be accessible to experiment, and it provides a starting point for the theoretical understanding of gravitation', wrote Einstein in 1911. Einstein's Jury by Jeffrey Crelinsten—well documented, well written, and fascinating to read—describes how, from 1909 on, Einstein's two theories of relativity became known to astronomers, and how the predictions made between 1907 and 1915 were received as challenges to observers. The author gives a non-technical account of the efforts made until 1930 to test these predictions; he focuses on two of the three classical tests, namely gravitational redshift and bending of light; the 'jury' consists mainly of American observers—Adams, Campbell, Curtis, Hale, Perrin, St John, Trumpler and others—working with newly built large telescopes, and the Britons Eddington and Evershed. The major steps which, after a long struggle, convinced the majority of astronomers that Einstein was right, are narrated chronologically in rather great detail, especially the work at Lick Observatory, before and after the famous British observation of 1919, on solar eclipses, and the work at Mount Wilson and the Indian Kodaikanal Observatories to extract the gravitational redshift from the complicated spectrum of the sun. The account of the eclipse work which was carried out between 1918 and 1923 by Lick astronomers corrects the impression suggested by many historical accounts that the British expedition alone settled the light-bending question. Apart from these main topics, the anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury and the ether problem are covered. By concentrating on astronomy rather than on physics this book complements the rich but repetitive literature on Einstein and relativity which appeared in connection with the commemoration of Einstein's annus mirabilis, 2005. The well told stories include curiosities such as

  1. [ALPHA-fitness test battery: health-related field-based fitness tests assessment in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J R; España Romero, V; Castro Piñero, J; Artero, E G; Ortega, F B; Cuenca García, M; Jiménez Pavón, D; Chillón, P; Girela Rejón, Ma J; Mora, J; Gutiérrez, A; Suni, J; Sjöstrom, M; Castillo, M J

    2011-01-01

    Hereby we summarize the work developed by the ALPHA (Assessing Levels of Physical Activity) Study and describe the tests included in the ALPHA health-related fitness test battery for children and adolescents. The evidence-based ALPHA-Fitness test battery include the following tests: 1) the 20 m shuttle run test to assess cardiorespiratory fitness; 2) the handgrip strength and 3) standing broad jump to assess musculoskeletal fitness, and 4) body mass index, 5) waist circumference; and 6) skinfold thickness (triceps and subscapular) to assess body composition. Furthermore, we include two versions: 1) the high priority ALPHA health-related fitness test battery, which comprises all the evidence-based fitness tests except the measurement of the skinfold thickness; and 2) the extended ALPHA health-related fitness tests battery for children and adolescents, which includes all the evidence-based fitness tests plus the 4 x 10 m shuttle run test to assess motor fitness.

  2. A test battery related to ergonomics of protective clothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, G.; Heus, R.

    2004-01-01

    Specialised protective clothing, such as that worn by firefighters, is usually tested only to standards which give requirements for the materials used (e.g. EN469). However,this testing often neglects the effect the manufacturing process of the garment has on the material properties,the effects of

  3. SEU mitigation exploratory tests in a ITER related FPGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Antonio J.N., E-mail: toquim@ipfn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Leong, Carlos [Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores – Investigação e Desenvolvimento (INESC-ID), 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, Bruno; Fernandes, Ana [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ramos, Ana Rita; Santos, Joana P.; Marques, José G. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares (C2TN), Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), Universidade de Lisboa - UL, 2695-066 Bobadela (Portugal); Teixeira, Isabel C.; Teixeira, João P. [Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores – Investigação e Desenvolvimento (INESC-ID), 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); Sousa, Jorge; Gonçalves, Bruno [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2017-05-15

    Data acquisition hardware of ITER diagnostics if located in the port cells of the tokamak, as an example, will be irradiated with neutrons during the fusion reactor operation. Due to this reason the majority of the hardware containing Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) will be placed after the ITER bio-shield, such as the cubicles instrumentation room. Nevertheless, it is worth to explore real-time mitigation of soft-errors caused by neutrons radiation in ITER related FPGAs. A Virtex-6 FPGA from Xilinx (XC6VLX365T-1FFG1156C) is used on the ATCA-IO-PROCESSOR board, included in the ITER Catalog of Instrumentation & Control (I & C) products – Fast Controllers. The Virtex-6 is a re-programmable logic device where the configuration is stored in Static RAM (SRAM), the functional data is stored in dedicated Block RAM (BRAM) and the functional state logic in Flip-Flops. Single Event Upsets (SEU) due to the ionizing radiation of neutrons cause soft errors, unintended changes (bit-flips) of the logic values stored in the state elements of the FPGA. Real-time SEU monitoring and soft errors repairing, when possible, were explored in this work. An FPGA built-in Soft Error Mitigation (SEM) controller detects and corrects soft errors in the FPGA Configuration Memory (CM). BRAM based SEU sensors with Error Correction Code (ECC) detect and repair the respective BRAM contents. Real-time mitigation of SEU can increase reliability and availability of data acquisition hardware for nuclear applications. The results of the tests performed using the SEM controller and the SEU sensors are presented for a Virtex-6 FPGA (XC6VLX240T-1FFG1156C) when irradiated with neutrons from the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI), a 1 MW nuclear fission reactor, operated by IST in the neighborhood of Lisbon. Results show that the proposed SEU mitigation technique is able to repair the majority of the detected SEU soft-errors in the FPGA memory.

  4. Testing for Long-Run Relation between Economic Growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2016-06-01

    Jun 1, 2016 ... cointegration test based on Johansen's procedure indicate the existence of a cointegration between export earnings of ..... going by the result of the Trace statistic, the null ..... Shumway R. H. and Stoffer D. S. (2010), Time.

  5. Non-parametric combination and related permutation tests for neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Anderson M; Webster, Matthew A; Brooks, Jonathan C; Tracey, Irene; Smith, Stephen M; Nichols, Thomas E

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we show how permutation methods can be applied to combination analyses such as those that include multiple imaging modalities, multiple data acquisitions of the same modality, or simply multiple hypotheses on the same data. Using the well-known definition of union-intersection tests and closed testing procedures, we use synchronized permutations to correct for such multiplicity of tests, allowing flexibility to integrate imaging data with different spatial resolutions, surface and/or volume-based representations of the brain, including non-imaging data. For the problem of joint inference, we propose and evaluate a modification of the recently introduced non-parametric combination (NPC) methodology, such that instead of a two-phase algorithm and large data storage requirements, the inference can be performed in a single phase, with reasonable computational demands. The method compares favorably to classical multivariate tests (such as MANCOVA), even when the latter is assessed using permutations. We also evaluate, in the context of permutation tests, various combining methods that have been proposed in the past decades, and identify those that provide the best control over error rate and power across a range of situations. We show that one of these, the method of Tippett, provides a link between correction for the multiplicity of tests and their combination. Finally, we discuss how the correction can solve certain problems of multiple comparisons in one-way ANOVA designs, and how the combination is distinguished from conjunctions, even though both can be assessed using permutation tests. We also provide a common algorithm that accommodates combination and correction.

  6. Testing relationships between values and food-related lifestyle:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsø, Karen; Scholderer, Joachim; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2004-01-01

    The value survey developed by Shalom Schwartz (1992) has been applied in many countries with different purposes. In this study we present a new way of analysing the theoretically assumed circumplex structure of Schwartz value survey and its relationships to other constructs, here the instrument...... food-related lifestyle. In two countries; Germany and Spain, data were collected. In each country 1000 interviews were carried out where consumers were asked about their value priorities and about their food-related lifestyle. The study provides new insights into the way values influence peoples' food......-related lifestyle in Germany and Spain, and the results validate both the Schwartz value survey and the food-related lifestyle instrument in a nomological sense, since significant and meaningful relationships were found between the two constructs....

  7. A Bartlett correction factor for tests on the cointegrating relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2000-01-01

    Likelihood ratio tests for restrictions on cointegrating vectors are asymptotically [chi]2 distributed. For some values of the parameters this asymptotic distribution does not give a good approximation to the finite sample distribution. In this paper we derive the Bartlett correction factor...

  8. Preliminary Test for Nonlinear Input Output Relations in SISO Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses and develops preliminary statistical tests for detecting nonlinearities in the deterministic part of SISO systems with noise. The most referenced method is unreliable for common noise processes as e.g.\\ colored. Therefore two new methods based on superposition and sinus input...

  9. Establishing relative sensitivities of various toxicity testing organisms to ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karle, L.M.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, M.E.; Karls, R.K. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The toxicity of ammonia to various organisms was examined to develop a baseline for mortality in several commonly used testing species. This baseline data will assist in choosing the proper test species and in interpreting results as they pertain to ammonia. Responses for two juvenile fish species, three marine amphipods, and two species of mysid shrimp were compared for their sensitivity to levels of ammonia. All mortality caused by ammonia in the bottom-dwelling Citharichthys stigmaeus occurred within 24 h of exposure, whereas mortality in the silverside, Menidia beryllina, occurred over the entire 96-h test duration. Responses to ammonia varied among the amphipods Rhepoxynius abronius, Ampelisca abdita, and Eohaustorius estuarius. R. abronius and A. abdita showed similar sensitivity to ammonia at lower concentrations; A. abdita appeared more sensitive than R. abronius at levels above 40 mg/L. Concentrations of ammonia required to produce significant mortality in the amphipod E. estuarius were far higher than the other species examined (> 100 mg/L NH{sub 3}). A comparison of ammonia toxicity with two commonly used invertebrates, Holmesimysis sculpts and Mysidopsis bahia, suggest that these two species of mysid have similar sensitivities to ammonia. Further studies with ammonia that examine sensitivity of different organisms should be conducted to assist regulatory and environmental agencies in determining appropriate test species and in interpreting toxicological results as they may be affected by levels of ammonia.

  10. Incremental Validity of the Subscales of the Emotional Regulation Related to Testing Scale for Predicting Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt, Ronald; Lindley, Kyla; Louison, Rebecca; Roe, Allison; Timm, Megan; Utinkova, Nikola

    2015-01-01

    The Emotional Regulation Related to Testing Scale (ERT Scale) assesses strategies students use to regulate emotion related to academic testing. It has four dimensions: Cognitive Appraising Processes (CAP), Emotion-Focusing Processes (EFP), Task-Focusing Processes (TFP), and Regaining Task-Focusing Processes (RTFP). The study examined the factor…

  11. The science, technology and mission design for the Laser Astrometric test of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.

    2006-01-01

    The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the Einstein's general theory of relativity in the most intense gravitational environment available in the solar system - the close proximity to the Sun.

  12. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-related Cancer in Women The U.S. Preventive Services ... Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-related Cancer in Women. This final recommendation statement ...

  13. Hearing Aid–Related Standards and Test Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Gert; Preves, David

    2015-01-01

    Many documents describe standardized methods and standard equipment requirements in the field of audiology and hearing aids. These standards will ensure a uniform level and a high quality of both the methods and equipment used in audiological work. The standards create the basis for measuring performance in a reproducible manner and independent from how and when and by whom parameters have been measured. This article explains, and focuses on, relevant acoustic and electromagnetic compatibility parameters and describes several test systems available. PMID:27516709

  14. How to deal with double partial verification when evaluating two index tests in relation to a reference test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geloven, Nan; Brooze, Kimiko A; Opmeer, Brent C; Mol, Ben Willem; Zwinderman, Aeilko H

    2012-05-20

    Research into the diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests is often hampered by single or double partial verification mechanisms, that is, not all patients have their disease status verified by a reference test, neither do all patients receive all tests under evaluation (index tests). We show methods that reduce verification bias introduced when omitting data from partially tested patients. Adjustment techniques are well established when there are no missing index tests and when the reference test is 'missing at random'. However, in practice, index tests tend to be omitted, and the choice of applying a reference test may depend on unobserved variables related to disease status, that is, verification may be missing not at random (MNAR). We study double partial verification in a clinical example from reproductive medicine in which we analyse the diagnostic values of the chlamydia antibody test and the hysterosalpingography in relation to a diagnostic laparoscopy. First, we plot all possible combinations of sensitivity and specificity of both index tests in two test ignorance regions. Then, we construct models in which we impose different assumptions for the verification process. We allow for missing index tests, study the influence of patient characteristics and study the accuracy estimates if an MNAR mechanism would operate. It is shown that data on tests used in the diagnostic process of the same population are preferably studied jointly and that the influence of an MNAR verification process was limited in a clinical study where more than half of the patients did not have the reference test.

  15. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A(*).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Tim; Broderick, Avery E; Plewa, Philipp M; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-22

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A^{*} (Sgr A^{*}) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A^{*} with an uncertainty of ∼1.5  μas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  16. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Johannsen, Tim; Plewa, Philipp M; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A* with an uncertainty of ~1.5 uas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  17. Models of political public relations: Testing the situation in Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jordi Xifra Triadú

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea that political communication strategies are an application of marketing strategies to political field is today commonly shared by specialists. For them public relations is viewed like a set of techniques that serves political parties and other actors of the political scene, concentrated on media relations. This instrumental perspective is not in keeping with structural dimension of public relations in political activity and communication of his actors: political parties, pressure groups and political leaders. In this point of view, during managing periods of governance or opposition and during electoral campaigns, the most applied communication form by political parties is structured in accordance with the major public relations models: press agent model, public information model, two way asymmetrical model, and two way symmetrical model. This research prove hypothesis in Catalonia according the results of a quantitative survey focused on inside professionals who provide services for the seven main political parties in this Spanish Autonomous Community.RESUMEN:La idea de que las estrategias de comunicación política constituyen una aplicación de las estrategias del marketing al ámbito político es hoy comúnmente compartida por los analistas. Para éstos, las relaciones públicas son percibidas como un conjunto de técnicas al servicio de los partidos políticos y de otros actores de la escena política concentradas en las relaciones con la prensa. Esta perspectiva instrumental no concuerda con la dimensión estructural de las relaciones públicas en la actividad política y comunicativa de sus actores: partidos políticos, grupos de presión y líderes. Desde este punto de vista, tanto en los periodos de gestión u oposición como en los electorales, la forma comunicativa más aplicada por los partidos políticos se estructura de acuerdo con los modelos tradicionales de las relaciones públicas: agente de prensa, información p

  18. Further Experiments with Lok-Test and Ultrasonic Test in Relation to Fresh and Hardened Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Kristian Jehrbo

    Lok-test is mainly a non-destructive pull-out test for determination of concrete strength. The method is deseribed in (l) and it is detailed discussed in theory (2). The method is welknown in practice. Ultrasonic is commonly used for investigations of several materials, especially concrete...

  19. Event horizons in numerical relativity; 1, methods and tests

    CERN Document Server

    Libson, J; Seidel, E; Suen, W M; Walker, P; Libson, Joseph; Masso, Joan; Seidel, Edward; Suen, Wai Mo; Walker, Paul

    1996-01-01

    This is the first paper in a series on event horizons in numerical relativity. In this paper we present methods for obtaining the location of an event horizon in a numerically generated spacetime. The location of an event horizon is determined based on two key ideas: (1) integrating backward in time, and (2) integrating the whole horizon surface. The accuracy and efficiency of the methods are examined with various sample spacetimes, including both analytic (Schwarzschild and Kerr) and numerically generated black holes. The numerically evolved spacetimes contain highly distorted black holes, rotating black holes, and colliding black holes. In all cases studied, our methods can find event horizons to within a very small fraction of a grid zone.

  20. CRYOGLOBULIN TEST AND CRYOGLOBULINEMIA HEPATITIS C-VIRUS RELATED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Basile

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryoglobulins are immunoglobulins that precipitate in serum at temperatures below 37°C and resolubilize upon warming. The clinical syndrome of cryoglobulinemia usually includes purpura, weakness, and arthralgia, but the underlying disease may also contribute other symptoms. Blood samples for cryoglobulin are collected, transported, clotted and spun at 37°C, before the precipitate is allowed to form when serum is stored at 4°C in a Wintrobe tube for at least seven days. The most critical and confounding factor affecting the cryoglobulin test is when the preanalytical phase is not fully completed at 37°C. The easiest way to quantify cryoglobulins is the cryocrit estimate. However, this approach has low accuracy and sensitivity. Furthermore, the precipitate should be resolubilized by warming to confirm that it is truly formed of cryoglobulins. The characterization of cryoglobulins requires the precipitate is several times washed, before performing immunofixation, a technique by which cryoglobulins can be classified depending on the characteristics of the detected immunoglobulins. These features imply a pathogenic role of these molecules which are consequently associated with a wide range of symptoms and manifestations. According to the Brouet classification, Cryoglobulins are grouped into three types by the immunochemical properties of immunoglobulins in the cryoprecipitate. The aim of this paper is to review the major aspects of cryoglobulinemia and the laboratory techniques used to detect and characterize cryoglobulins, taking into consideration the presence and consequences of cryoglobulinemia in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection.

  1. Cryoglobulin Test and Cryoglobulinemia Hepatitis C-Virus Related

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulli, Francesca; Santini, Stefano Angelo; Napodano, Cecilia; Bottoni, Patrizia; Pocino, Krizia; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Basile, Umberto

    2017-01-01

    Cryoglobulins are immunoglobulins that precipitate in serum at temperatures below 37°C and resolubilize upon warming. The clinical syndrome of cryoglobulinemia usually includes purpura, weakness, and arthralgia, but the underlying disease may also contribute other symptoms. Blood samples for cryoglobulin are collected, transported, clotted and spun at 37°C, before the precipitate is allowed to form when serum is stored at 4°C in a Wintrobe tube for at least seven days. The most critical and confounding factor affecting the cryoglobulin test is when the preanalytical phase is not fully completed at 37°C. The easiest way to quantify cryoglobulins is the cryocrit estimate. However, this approach has low accuracy and sensitivity. Furthermore, the precipitate should be resolubilized by warming to confirm that it is truly formed of cryoglobulins. The characterization of cryoglobulins requires the precipitate is several times washed, before performing immunofixation, a technique by which cryoglobulins can be classified depending on the characteristics of the detected immunoglobulins. These features imply a pathogenic role of these molecules which are consequently associated with a wide range of symptoms and manifestations. According to the Brouet classification, Cryoglobulins are grouped into three types by the immunochemical properties of immunoglobulins in the cryoprecipitate. The aim of this paper is to review the major aspects of cryoglobulinemia and the laboratory techniques used to detect and characterize cryoglobulins, taking into consideration the presence and consequences of cryoglobulinemia in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection. PMID:28101312

  2. A possible new test of general relativity with Juno

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, L

    2013-01-01

    The expansion in multipoles of the gravitational potential of a rotating body affects the orbital motion of a test particle orbiting it with long-term perturbations both at a classical and at a relativistic level. In this preliminary sensitivity analysis, we show that, for the first time, the J2 c^-2 effects could be measured by the ongoing Juno mission in the gravitational field of Jupiter during its yearlong science phase (10 November 2016-5 October 2017) thanks to its high eccentricity (e=0.947) and to the huge oblateness of Jupiter (J2=1.47 10^-2). The semi-major axis a and the perijove \\omega\\ of Juno are expected to be shifted by \\Delta a =700-900 m and \\Delta\\omega = 50-60 milliarcseconds, respectively, over 1-2 yr. A numerical analysis shows also that the expected J2c^-2 range-rate signal for Juno should be as large as 280 microns per second during a typical 6 h pass at its closest approach. Independent analyses previously performed by other researchers about the measurability of the Lense-Thirring ef...

  3. Optimizing Feedlot Diagnostic Testing Strategies Using Test Characteristics, Disease Prevalence, and Relative Costs of Misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Miles E; White, Brad J; Renter, David G

    2015-11-01

    Diagnostic tests are commonly used by feedlot practitioners and range from clinical observations to more advanced physiologic testing. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, estimated prevalence in the population, and the costs of misdiagnoses need to be considered when selecting a diagnostic test strategy and interpreting results. This article describes methods for evaluating diagnostic strategies using economic outcomes to evaluate the most appropriate strategy for the expected situation. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, and expected prevalence influence the likelihood of misdiagnosis in a given population, and the estimated direct economic impact can be used to quantify differences among diagnostic strategies.

  4. Relation of field independence and test-item format to student performance on written piagetian tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ló; Pez-Rupérez, F.; Palacios, C.; Sanchez, J.

    In this study we have investigated the relationship between the field-dependence-independence (FDI) dimension as measured by the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) and subject performance on the Longeot test, a pencil-and-paper Piagetian test, through the open or closed format of its items. The sample consisted of 141 high school students. Correlation and variance analysis show that the FDI dimension and GEFT correlate significantly on only those items on the Longeot test that require formal reasoning. The effect of open- or closed-item format is found exclusively for formal items; only the open format discriminates significantly (at the 0.01 level) between the field-dependent and -independent subjects performing on this type of item. Some implications of these results for science education are discussed.

  5. Testing Special Relativity at High Energies with Astrophysical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2007-01-01

    Since the group of Lorentz boosts is unbounded, there is a question as to whether Lorentz invariance (LI) holds to infinitely short distances. However, special and general relativity may break down at the Planck scale. Various quantum gravity scenarios such as loop quantum gravity, as well as some forms of string theory and extra dimension models may imply Lorentz violation (LV) at ultrahigh energies. The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), to be launched in mid-December, will measure the spectra of distant extragalactic sources of high energy gamma-rays, particularly active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. GLAST can look for energy-dependent gamma-ray propagation effects from such sources as a signal of Lorentz invariance violation. These sources may also exhibit the high energy cutoffs predicted to be the result of intergalactic annihilation interactions with low energy photons having a flux level as determined by various astronomical observations. With LV the threshold for such interactions can be significantly raised, changing the predicted absorption turnover in the observed spectrum of the sources. Stecker and Glashow have shown that the existence such absorption features in the spectra of extragalactic sources puts constraints on LV. Such constraints have important implications for some quantum gravity and large extra dimension models. Future spaceborne detectors dedicated to measuring gamma-ray polarization can look for birefringence effects as a possible signal of loop quantum gravity. A very small LV may also result in the modification or elimination of the GZK effect, thus modifying the spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. This possibility can be explored with ground-based arrays such as Auger or with a space based detector system such as the proposed OWL satellite mission.

  6. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn’t depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M. Robitaille, according to which the 2.7 K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7 K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein’s theory.

  7. Cosmic Relativity: The Fundamental Theory of Relativity, its Implications, and Experimental Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Unnikrishnan, C S

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I argue for a reassessment of special relativity. The fundamental theory of relativity applicable in this Universe has to be consistent with the existence of the massive Universe, and with the effects of its gravitational interaction on local physics. A reanalysis of the situation suggests that all relativistic effects that are presently attributed to kinematics of relative motion in flat space-time are in fact gravitational effects of the nearly homogeneous and isotropic Universe. The correct theory of relativity is the one with a preferred cosmic rest frame. Yet, the theory preserves Lorentz invariance. I outline the new theory of Cosmic Relativity, and its implications to local physics, especially to physics of clocks and to quantum physics. This theory is generally applicable to inertial and noninertial motion. Most significanlty, experimental evidence support and favour Cosmic Relativity. There are observed effects that can be consistently explained only within Cosmic Relativity. The most a...

  8. Test anxiety in relation to measures of cognitive and intellectual functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Carlton S; Curiel, Rosie E

    2011-08-01

    The potential impact of test anxiety on cognitive testing was examined in a sample of 300 predominantly male veteran referrals who were administered a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. Exclusionary criteria included failure on effort testing (n= 14). Level of test anxiety was significantly related to performance on the WAIS-III Working Memory Index (r = -.343, p Test anxiety was not related to a global index of neuropsychological performance on the HRNES-R (Average Impairment Scale). Level of education had a collinear relationship with test anxiety in predicting cognitive test performance. Regression analyses revealed a more prominent role for education, indicating the possibility that test anxiety may be a reaction to, more than a cause of, deficient working memory performance. These results suggest that clinicians who use these particular tests should be reluctant to attribute poor test performance to anxiety that occurs during the testing process.

  9. On Wasserstein Two-Sample Testing and Related Families of Nonparametric Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaditya Ramdas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonparametric two-sample or homogeneity testing is a decision theoretic problem that involves identifying differences between two random variables without making parametric assumptions about their underlying distributions. The literature is old and rich, with a wide variety of statistics having being designed and analyzed, both for the unidimensional and the multivariate setting. Inthisshortsurvey,wefocusonteststatisticsthatinvolvetheWassersteindistance. Usingan entropic smoothing of the Wasserstein distance, we connect these to very different tests including multivariate methods involving energy statistics and kernel based maximum mean discrepancy and univariate methods like the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, probability or quantile (PP/QQ plots and receiver operating characteristic or ordinal dominance (ROC/ODC curves. Some observations are implicit in the literature, while others seem to have not been noticed thus far. Given nonparametric two-sample testing’s classical and continued importance, we aim to provide useful connections for theorists and practitioners familiar with one subset of methods but not others.

  10. A critical comparison of respirometric biodegradation tests based on OECD 301 and related test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Peter; Pagga, Udo; Strotmann, Uwe

    2003-04-01

    Biodegradation studies of organic compounds in the aquatic environment gain important information for the final fate of chemicals in the environment. A decisive role play tests for ready biodegradability (OECD 301) and in this context, the respirometric test (OECD 301F). Two different respirometric systems (Oxitop and Sapromat) were compared and in two of ten cases (diethylene glycol and 2-ethylhexylacrylate) differences were observed indicating that the test systems are not always equivalent. For 2-ethylhexylacrylate and cyclohexanone we could not state differences in the extent of biodegradation with a municipal and industrial inoculum whereas for cyclohexanone the degradation rate was faster with a municipal inoculum. Allylthiourea (ATU) proved to be an effective inhibitor of nitrification processes and did not affect the heterotrophic biodegradation activity. Modelling of biodegradation processes could be successfully performed with a first-order and a modified logistic plot.

  11. 78 FR 67206 - Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear...-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants.'' This RG is being revised to provide applicants and licensees with the most current information on testing safety-related actuators in nuclear power plants. This...

  12. Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

    2010-07-01

    This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

  13. Transfer Relation between the Compression Test Rig and the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    respectively. Moreover, SKYDEX material was used as the nominal floor mat in this loading test. Iso View Front View 11 Table 3 Loading conditions for...Fig. 18 Typical input- and output-acceleration histories in the CTR loading, CTR_03 (Height = 30 inches) 0 1000 2000 3000 -2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Ac...0.0 2.5 5.0 7.5 0 1000 2000 3000 -2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Lo ad (k N ) Ac ce le ra tio n (k N ) Time (msec) Input Acceleration Lower Tibia Load 15

  14. Local fallout from nuclear test detonations. Volume 2. Compilation of fallout patterns and related test data. Supplement. Foreign nuclear tests. Sanitized

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenthau, M.; Showers, R.L.

    1964-10-01

    The available fallout patterns and related test data for nuclear weapon tests conducted by the United Kingdom, the Republic of France, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, are included in this supplement to NDL-TR-34. The related test data for the British and French tests include: date and time of detonation, location of test site, total yield, fission yield, type of burst and placement, height of burst, cloud-top and -bottom heights, crater data, and wind information up to nuclear cloud-top height. No fallout patterns are available for any of the Soviet detonations. The list of Soviet detonations, which is as comprehensive as possible, contains the chronological order of the detonations, date, yield, type of burst and location of test site.

  15. Integrating Multiple On-line Knowledge Bases for Disease-Lab Test Relation Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaoyun; Soysal, Ergin; Moon, Sungrim; Wang, Jingqi; Tao, Cui; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    A computable knowledge base containing relations between diseases and lab tests would be a great resource for many biomedical informatics applications. This paper describes our initial step towards establishing a comprehensive knowledge base of disease and lab tests relations utilizing three public on-line resources. LabTestsOnline, MedlinePlus and Wikipedia are integrated to create a freely available, computable disease-lab test knowledgebase. Disease and lab test concepts are identified using MetaMap and relations between diseases and lab tests are determined based on source-specific rules. Experimental results demonstrate a high precision for relation extraction, with Wikipedia achieving the highest precision of 87%. Combining the three sources reached a recall of 51.40%, when compared with a subset of disease-lab test relations extracted from a reference book. Moreover, we found additional disease-lab test relations from on-line resources, indicating they are complementary to existing reference books for building a comprehensive disease and lab test relation knowledge base. PMID:26306271

  16. Interest in genetic testing in Ashkenazi Jewish Parkinson's disease patients and their unaffected relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupte, Manisha; Alcalay, Roy N; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Raymond, Deborah; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Roos, Ernest; Orbe-Reily, Martha; Tang, Ming-X; Mirelman, Anat; Ozelius, Laurie; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Clark, Lorraine; Giladi, Nir; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Our objective was to explore interest in genetic testing among Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) Parkinson's Disease (PD) cases and first-degree relatives, as genetic testing for LRRK2 G2019S is widely available. Approximately 18 % of AJ PD cases carry G2019S mutations; penetrance estimations vary between 24 and 100 % by age 80. A Genetic Attitude Questionnaire (GAQ) was administered at two New York sites to PD families unaware of LRRK2 G2019S mutation status. The association of G2019S, age, education, gender and family history of PD with desire for genetic testing (outcome) was modeled using logistic regression. One-hundred eleven PD cases and 77 relatives completed the GAQ. Both PD cases and relatives had excellent PD-specific genetic knowledge. Among PD, 32.6 % "definitely" and 41.1 % "probably" wanted testing, if offered "now." Among relatives, 23.6 % "definitely" and 36.1 % "probably" wanted testing "now." Desire for testing in relatives increased incrementally based on hypothetical risk of PD. The most important reasons for testing in probands and relatives were: if it influenced medication response, identifying no mutation, and early prevention and treatment. In logistic regression, older age was associated with less desire for testing in probands OR = 0.921 95%CI 0.868-0.977, p = 0.009. Both probands and relatives express interest in genetic testing, despite no link to current treatment or prevention.

  17. Do candidate reactions relate to job performance or affect criterion-related validity? A multistudy investigation of relations among reactions, selection test scores, and job performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Julie M; Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Lievens, Filip; Kung, Mei-Chuan; Sinar, Evan F; Campion, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that how candidates react to selection procedures can affect their test performance and their attitudes toward the hiring organization (e.g., recommending the firm to others). However, very few studies of candidate reactions have examined one of the outcomes organizations care most about: job performance. We attempt to address this gap by developing and testing a conceptual framework that delineates whether and how candidate reactions might influence job performance. We accomplish this objective using data from 4 studies (total N = 6,480), 6 selection procedures (personality tests, job knowledge tests, cognitive ability tests, work samples, situational judgment tests, and a selection inventory), 5 key candidate reactions (anxiety, motivation, belief in tests, self-efficacy, and procedural justice), 2 contexts (industry and education), 3 continents (North America, South America, and Europe), 2 study designs (predictive and concurrent), and 4 occupational areas (medical, sales, customer service, and technological). Consistent with previous research, candidate reactions were related to test scores, and test scores were related to job performance. Further, there was some evidence that reactions affected performance indirectly through their influence on test scores. Finally, in no cases did candidate reactions affect the prediction of job performance by increasing or decreasing the criterion-related validity of test scores. Implications of these findings and avenues for future research are discussed.

  18. 78 FR 25488 - Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... COMMISSION Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear..., ``Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants.'' DG-1235 is proposed Revision 1 of RG... Stations in order to demonstrate their ability to perform their intended safety functions under...

  19. Validity and reliability of tests determining performance-related components of wheelchair basketball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Sonja; Balvers, Inge J. M.; Kouwenhoven, Sanne M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of wheelchair basketball field tests. Nineteen wheelchair basketball players performed 10 test items twice to determine the reliability. The validity of the tests was assessed by relating the scores to the players'

  20. Validity and reliability of tests determining performance-related components of wheelchair basketball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Sonja; Balvers, Inge J. M.; Kouwenhoven, Sanne M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of wheelchair basketball field tests. Nineteen wheelchair basketball players performed 10 test items twice to determine the reliability. The validity of the tests was assessed by relating the scores to the players' classificat

  1. Validity and reliability of tests determining performance-related components of wheelchair basketball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Sonja; Balvers, Inge J. M.; Kouwenhoven, Sanne M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of wheelchair basketball field tests. Nineteen wheelchair basketball players performed 10 test items twice to determine the reliability. The validity of the tests was assessed by relating the scores to the players' classificat

  2. GMAT and GRE Aptitude Test Performance in Relation to Primary Language and Scores on TOEFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kenneth M.

    This study was designed to describe and analyze (1) the performance of foreign candidates taking the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) Aptitude Test in relation to self-reported primary language (English vs. other), and (2) relationships between performance on the respective admissions tests and…

  3. Testing of the line element of special relativity with rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Jose G.; Torr, Douglas G.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments with rotating systems are examined from the point of view of a test theory of the Lorentz transformations (LTs), permitting, in principle, the verification of the simultaneity relation. The significance of the experiments involved in the testing of the LTs can be determined using Robertson's test theory (RTT). A revised RTT is discussed, and attention is given to the Ehrenfest paradox in connection with the testing of the LTs.

  4. Test-retest reliability and age-related characteristics of the ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kimanh D; Welgampola, Miriam S; Carey, John P

    2010-07-01

    To determine the test-retest reliability and age-related trends of the cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP and oVEMP, respectively) responses to air-conducted sound and bone-conducted vibration stimulation. Prospective study. Tertiary referral center. Fifty-three healthy adults with no hearing or vestibular deficits. All subjects underwent cVEMP and oVEMP testing in response to sounds (0.1-ms clicks and 500-Hz tone bursts) and vibration (midline forehead taps at the hairline, Fz, with a reflex hammer and a Brüel & Kjaer Mini-Shaker Type 4810). Twelve subjects underwent an additional testing session that was conducted at a mean of 10 weeks after the first one. Test-retest reliability for VEMP response parameters (latency, peak-to-peak amplitude, and asymmetry ratio) were assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). : oVEMP amplitudes had excellent test-retest reliability (ICC > 0.75) for all 4 stimuli; cVEMP amplitudes had excellent reliability for hammer taps and fair-to-good reliability for other stimuli. oVEMP asymmetry ratios had excellent reliability for clicks and fair-to-good reliability (ICC = 0.4-0.75) for other stimuli; cVEMP asymmetry ratios had fair-to-good reliability for clicks and hammer taps. Older subjects (>50 years old) were found to have significantly decreased cVEMP amplitudes in response to clicks, tones, and taps with a Mini-Shaker and significantly decreased oVEMP amplitudes in response to clicks, tones, and taps with a reflex hammer. No age-related changes were found for latencies or asymmetry ratios. Overall, oVEMP response parameters demonstrated better test-retest reliability than cVEMP response parameters, but oVEMPs and cVEMPs had similar age-related changes.

  5. Reliability of health-related physical fitness tests in adolescents: the MOVE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhelst, Jérémy; Béghin, Laurent; Fardy, Paul S; Ulmer, Zekya; Czaplicki, Grégory

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to examine the reliability of health-related physical fitness tests that were used in a French health promotion program 'Move…A priority for your health'. Participants were 174 French youth (88 children and 86 adolescents) aged 8·2-16·2 years. Aerobic fitness, muscular strength, speed and flexibility were tested using 20-m shuttle run test, ½ mile run test, basketball throw, standing long jump, shoulder stretch and 20/30/50-m sprint tests. Reliability was calculated for the basketball throw, standing long jump, shoulder stretch and sprint tests. The tests were performed two times, 1 week apart on the same day of the week. Reliability was examined with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analysis. With the exception of the ½ mile run test, which resulted in moderate agreement (0·66), all tests had high reliability. ICCs were 0·97, 0·93, 0·91 and 0·93 for the sprint test, basketball throw, shoulder stretch and the standing long jump, respectively. The differences obtained between the first and the second trial were non-significant. Results from this study indicate that the BOUGE health-related physical fitness battery, administrated by physical education teachers, was reliable for measuring health-related components of fitness in children and adolescents in a school setting.

  6. Testing the relations between impulsivity-related traits, suicidality, and nonsuicidal self-injury: a test of the incremental validity of the UPPS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Donald R; Miller, Joshua D; Miller, Drew J; Bornovalova, Marina A; Lejuez, C W

    2011-04-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has received significant attention as a predictor of suicidal behavior (SB) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Despite significant promise, trait impulsivity has received less attention. Understanding the relations between impulsivity and SB and NSSI is confounded, unfortunately, by the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity. This study examined the relations among 4 personality pathways to impulsive behavior studied via the UPPS model of impulsivity and SB and NSSI in a residential sample of drug abusers (N = 76). In this study, we tested whether these 4 impulsivity-related traits (i.e., Negative Urgency, Sensation Seeking, Lack of Premeditation, and Lack of Perseverance) provide incremental validity in the statistical prediction of SB and NSSI above and beyond BPD; they do. We also tested whether BPD symptoms provide incremental validity in the prediction of SB and NSSI above and beyond these impulsivity-related traits; they do not. In addition to the main effects of Lack of Premeditation and Negative Urgency, we found evidence of a robust interaction between these 2 personality traits. The current results argue strongly for the consideration of these 2 impulsivity-related domains--alone and in interaction--when attempting to understand and predict SB and NSSI.

  7. Two new non-parametric tests to the distance duality relation with galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, S S; Holanda, R F L

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic distance duality relation is a milestone of cosmology involving the luminosity and angular diameter distances. Any departure of the relation points to new physics or systematic errors in the observations, therefore tests of the relation are extremely important to build a consistent cosmological framework. Here, two new tests are proposed based on galaxy clusters observations (angular diameter distance and gas mass fraction) and $H(z)$ measurements. By applying Gaussian Processes, a non-parametric method, we are able to derive constraints on departures of the relation where no evidence of deviation is found in both methods, reinforcing the cosmological and astrophysical hypotheses adopted so far.

  8. A new Tolman test of a cosmic distance duality relation at 21 cm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedekar, Satej; Chakraborti, Sayan

    2011-06-01

    Under certain general conditions in an expanding universe, the luminosity distance (d(L)) and angular diameter distance (d(A)) are connected by the Etherington relation as d(L)=d(A)(1+z)2. The Tolman test suggests the use of objects of known surface brightness, to test this relation. In this Letter, we propose the use of a redshifted 21 cm signal from disk galaxies, where neutral hydrogen (HI) masses are seen to be almost linearly correlated with surface area, to conduct a new Tolman test. We construct simulated catalogs of galaxies, with the observed size-luminosity relation and realistic redshift evolution of HI mass functions, likely to be detected with the planned Square Kilometer Array. We demonstrate that these observations may soon provide the best implementation of the Tolman test to detect any violation of the cosmic distance duality relation.

  9. On possible a-priori "imprinting" of General Relativity itself on some tests aimed to test it

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effect of possible a-priori "imprinting" effects of general relativity itself on satellite/spaceraft-based tests of it. We deal with some performed or proposed time-delay ranging experiments in the Sun's gravitational field, and with the attempts to measure the Lense-Thirring effect with the LAGEOS satellites orbiting the Earth. It turns out that the "imprint" of general relativity on the Astronomical Unit and the solar gravitational constant GM_\\odot, not solved for in the so far performed spacecraft-based time-delay tests, induces an a-priori bias of the order of 10^-6 in typical solar system ranging experiments aimed to measuring the space curvature PPN parameter \\gamma. It is too small by one order of magnitude to be of concern for the performed Cassini experiment, but it would affect future planned or proposed tests aiming to reach a 10^-7-10^-9 accuracy in determining \\gamma. General relativity, neither modelled nor solved for in the GRACE-based models of the Earth's geopotential, "im...

  10. The Relative Importance of Persons, Items, Subtests, and Languages to TOEFL Test Variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Dean

    1999-01-01

    Explored the relative contributions to Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score dependability of various numbers of persons, items, subtests, languages, and their various interactions. Sampled 15,000 test takers, 1000 each from 15 different language backgrounds. (Author/VWL)

  11. The Fitkids Treadmill Test: age- and sex-related normative values in Dutch children and adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotte, E.M.W.; Groot, J.F. de; Bongers, B.C.; Winkler, L.M.F.; Takken, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent research has shown that the Fitkids Treadmill Test (FTT) is a valid and reproducible exercise test for the assessment of aerobic exercise capacity in children and adolescents who are healthy. Objective: The study objective was to provide sex- and age-related normative values for

  12. Fitkids Treadmill Test : Age- and Sex-Related Normative Values in Dutch Children and Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotte, Elles M W; de Groot, Janke F; Bongers, Bart C; Winkler, Alexander M F; Takken, Tim

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent research has shown that the Fitkids Treadmill Test (FTT) is a valid and reproducible exercise test for the assessment of aerobic exercise capacity in healthy children and adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To provide sex- and age-related normative values for FTT performance in healthy and ty

  13. The Fitkids Treadmill Test: age- and sex-related normative values in Dutch children and adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotte, E.M.W.; Groot, J.F. de; Bongers, B.C.; Winkler, L.M.F.; Takken, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent research has shown that the Fitkids Treadmill Test (FTT) is a valid and reproducible exercise test for the assessment of aerobic exercise capacity in children and adolescents who are healthy. Objective: The study objective was to provide sex- and age-related normative values for F

  14. The Beneficial Effect of Testing: An Event-Related Potential Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hua eBai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced memory performance for items that are tested as compared to being restudied (the testing effect is a frequently reported memory phenomenon. According to the episodic context account of the testing effect, this beneficial effect of testing is related to a process which reinstates the previously learnt episodic information. Few studies have explored the neural correlates of this effect at the time point when testing takes place, however. In this study, we utilized the ERP correlates of successful memory encoding to address this issue, hypothesizing that if the benefit of testing is due to retrieval-related processes at test then subsequent memory effects should resemble the ERP correlates of retrieval-based processing in their temporal and spatial characteristics. Participants were asked to learn Swahili-German word pairs before items were presented in either a testing or a restudy condition. Memory performance was assessed immediately and one-day later with a cued recall task. Successfully recalling items at test increased the likelihood that items were remembered over time compared to items which were only restudied. An ERP subsequent memory contrast (later remembered vs. later forgotten tested items, which reflects the engagement of processes that ensure items are recallable the next day were topographically comparable

  15. Relation between dream content and eye movements tested by lucid dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholey, P

    1983-06-01

    This experiment illustrates that systematic observations in lucid dreams can be used to test hypotheses concerning the relation between dream content and eye movements. The observations were carried out by 5 students who had learned to induce lucid dreams by using the reflection technique developed by the author. Several hypotheses concerning the relation in question could be rejected.

  16. Relational Aggression and Hostile Attribution Biases: Testing Multiple Statistical Methods and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godleski, Stephanie A.; Ostrov, Jamie M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study used both categorical and dimensional approaches to test the association between relational and physical aggression and hostile intent attributions for both relational and instrumental provocation situations using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development longitudinal Study of Early Child Care and Youth…

  17. Test Anxiety and Academic Performance: The Effects of Study-Related Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Ralph E.; Holahan, Charles J.

    1980-01-01

    Students scoring high on the Test Anxiety Scale had lower grades and poorer study habits than their low-scoring counterparts. Amount and quality of study by high anxiety students were positively related to grades; missing classes and delaying exams were inversely related. (Author/CP)

  18. Objective vestibular testing of children with dizziness and balance complaints following sports-related concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangwei; Brodsky, Jacob R

    2015-06-01

    To conduct objective assessment of children with balance and vestibular complaints following sports-related concussions and identify the underlying deficits by analyzing laboratory test outcomes. Case series with chart review. Pediatric tertiary care facility. Medical records were reviewed of 42 pediatric patients with balance and/or vestibular complaints following sports-related concussions who underwent comprehensive laboratory testing on their balance and vestibular function. Patients' characteristics were summarized and results analyzed. More than 90% of the children with protracted dizziness or imbalance following sports-related concussion had at least 1 abnormal finding from the comprehensive balance and vestibular evaluation. The most frequent deficit was found in dynamic visual acuity test, followed by Sensory Organization Test and rotational test. Patient's balance problem associated with concussion seemed to be primarily instigated by vestibular dysfunction. Furthermore, semicircular canal dysfunction was involved more often than dysfunction of otolith organs. Yet, <10% of the children experienced a hearing loss following sports-related concussion. Vestibular impairment is common among children with protracted dizziness or imbalance following sports-related concussion. Our study demonstrated that proper and thorough evaluation is imperative to identify these underlying deficits and laboratory tests were helpful in the diagnosis and recommendation of following rehabilitations. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  19. Computerized Cognitive Testing in the Management of Youth Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Anthony P; Broshek, Donna K

    2016-01-01

    Computerized neurocognitive testing has become a growing practice across medical populations, but particularly within sports medicine and the management of sports-related concussion. Although traditional neuropsychological measures are solely administered and interpreted by neuropsychologists, computerized cognitive tests are marketed to and utilized by a wide range of professionals involved in the management of sports-related concussions, many of whom lack specialized psychometric training. Although the benefits of computerized testing allow for many youth athletes to be evaluated quickly, professionals implementing their use should be aware of the potential pitfalls and the high potential for misuse. After briefly reviewing the recommended guidelines set forth by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, we review the benefits/limitations of computerized testing in the management of sports-related concussion and the basic psychometric properties of some of the more widely used computerized measures. Lastly, we discuss the practical application of these devices.

  20. Use of relative risk test to evaluate the influence of the brand on beer acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Maria Della Lucia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The acceptance of the product is very complex and it involves not only its sensory attributes but also non-sensory characteristics, often presented in the packaging or related to concepts regarding the consumer. The relative risk test was applied in order to investigate the effect of the brand, a non-sensory characteristic, on consumers’ acceptance of beer. Eight commercial brands of Pilsen beer were evaluated by 101 consumers in two sessions of acceptance tests: the blind test and the test with brand information. As a general view, it could be concluded that three brands of beer showed a positive impact over the sensory acceptance of the product and four brands negatively impacted on consumers’ evaluation. One of the brands did not show any influence over the consumers’ response. The relative risk method was practical and useful as it was easily calculated and reproduced, and its application permitted easy interpretation of the results.

  1. Double trouble at high density: cross-level test of resource-related adaptive plasticity and crowding-related fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Gergs

    Full Text Available Population size is often regulated by negative feedback between population density and individual fitness. At high population densities, animals run into double trouble: they might concurrently suffer from overexploitation of resources and also from negative interference among individuals regardless of resource availability, referred to as crowding. Animals are able to adapt to resource shortages by exhibiting a repertoire of life history and physiological plasticities. In addition to resource-related plasticity, crowding might lead to reduced fitness, with consequences for individual life history. We explored how different mechanisms behind resource-related plasticity and crowding-related fitness act independently or together, using the water flea Daphnia magna as a case study. For testing hypotheses related to mechanisms of plasticity and crowding stress across different biological levels, we used an individual-based population model that is based on dynamic energy budget theory. Each of the hypotheses, represented by a sub-model, is based on specific assumptions on how the uptake and allocation of energy are altered under conditions of resource shortage or crowding. For cross-level testing of different hypotheses, we explored how well the sub-models fit individual level data and also how well they predict population dynamics under different conditions of resource availability. Only operating resource-related and crowding-related hypotheses together enabled accurate model predictions of D. magna population dynamics and size structure. Whereas this study showed that various mechanisms might play a role in the negative feedback between population density and individual life history, it also indicated that different density levels might instigate the onset of the different mechanisms. This study provides an example of how the integration of dynamic energy budget theory and individual-based modelling can facilitate the exploration of mechanisms

  2. Relatives' view on collaboration with nurses in acute wards: development and testing of a new measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tove; Nyberg, Per; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2008-01-01

    to assess, from the relatives' perspective, collaboration between relatives of frail elderly patients and nurses in acute hospital wards, as well as prerequisites for, and outcome of, collaboration. DESIGN: Instrument development and psychometric testing. SETTING: Acute medical and geriatric wards......BACKGROUND: Collaboration between relatives and nurses in acute care settings is sparsely investigated, and that mostly from nurses' point of view. Feasible and valid instruments are needed for assessing collaboration, its prerequisites and outcome. OBJECTIVES: To develop and test an instrument....... PARTICIPANTS: One hundred fifty-six relatives. Women constituted 74.8%, offspring 63.9% and spouses 20%, respectively. METHODS: A model for collaboration was developed and underpinned the development and construction of the instrument. Face and content validity was examined by relatives and an expert panel...

  3. Construction Of Critical Thinking Skills Test Instrument Related The Concept On Sound Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruroh, F.; Suhandi, A.

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to construct test instrument of critical thinking skills of high school students related the concept on sound wave. This research using a mixed methods with sequential exploratory design, consists of: 1) a preliminary study; 2) design and review of test instruments. The form of test instruments in essay questions, consist of 18 questions that was divided into 5 indicators and 8 sub-indicators of the critical thinking skills expressed by Ennis, with questions that are qualitative and contextual. Phases of preliminary study include: a) policy studies; b) survey to the school; c) and literature studies. Phases of the design and review of test instruments consist of two steps, namely a draft design of test instruments include: a) analysis of the depth of teaching materials; b) the selection of indicators and sub-indicators of critical thinking skills; c) analysis of indicators and sub-indicators of critical thinking skills; d) implementation of indicators and sub-indicators of critical thinking skills; and e) making the descriptions about the test instrument. In the next phase of the review test instruments, consist of: a) writing about the test instrument; b) validity test by experts; and c) revision of test instruments based on the validator.

  4. Laboratory Liquefaction Test of Sand Based on Grain Size and Relative Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hakam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquefaction due to strong earthquakes often occurs in sandy soil under low water table conditions with certain physical properties. The physical properties of sandy soil that give effect to liquefaction resistance include grain size and relative density. This paper presents the physical properties of sand soils related to their resistance to vibration. Vibration tests were conducted by using a shaking table. The acceleration and settlement of the samples were recorded during shaking. The tests were conducted with variation of soil density and mean grain size. The test results showed that average grain size and relative density of sand have a unique effect on liquefaction resistance. It can be concluded that there is a density limit with respect to the mean grain size of the sand particles associated with the liquefaction resistance for a certain acceleration.

  5. A study of the relation between sports activity and sports test in NNCT male Students

    OpenAIRE

    内山, 了治; 塚田, 修三; 加藤, 俊也

    1996-01-01

    Purposes of this study were to clarify the relation between sports activity and sports test (physical fitness and motor performance) in N National College of Technology (NNCT) male students. Their sports activity were gathered information by questionnaires developed by Taisyuukann-tairyokukagakukennkyukai. Physical fitness and motor performance were measured by a sports test developed by Ministry of Education. The main results were as follows: 1) All year students; Average of physical fitness...

  6. Reliability of Health-Related Physical Fitness Tests among Colombian Children and Adolescents: The FUPRECOL Study

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson Ramírez-Vélez; Diogo Rodrigues-Bezerra; Jorge Enrique Correa-Bautista; Mikel Izquierdo; Felipe Lobelo

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that youth physical fitness levels are an important marker of lifestyle and cardio-metabolic health profiles and predict future risk of chronic diseases. The reliability physical fitness tests have not been explored in Latino-American youth population. This study's aim was to examine the reliability of health-related physical fitness tests that were used in the Colombian health promotion "Fuprecol study". Participants were 229 Colombian youth (boys n = 124 and g...

  7. Real-time Terrain Relative Navigation Test Results from a Relevant Environment for Mars Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew E.; Cheng, Yang; Montgomery, James; Trawny, Nikolas; Tweddle, Brent; Zheng, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) is an on-board GN&C function that generates a position estimate of a spacecraft relative to a map of a planetary surface. When coupled with a divert, the position estimate enables access to more challenging landing sites through pin-point landing or large hazard avoidance. The Lander Vision System (LVS) is a smart sensor system that performs terrain relative navigation by matching descent camera imagery to a map of the landing site and then fusing this with inertial measurements to obtain high rate map relative position, velocity and attitude estimates. A prototype of the LVS was recently tested in a helicopter field test over Mars analog terrain at altitudes representative of Mars Entry Descent and Landing conditions. TRN ran in real-time on the LVS during the flights without human intervention or tuning. The system was able to compute estimates accurate to 40m (3 sigma) in 10 seconds on a flight like processing system. This paper describes the Mars operational test space definition, how the field test was designed to cover that operational envelope, the resulting TRN performance across the envelope and an assessment of test space coverage.

  8. Next-generation Lunar Laser Retroreflectors for Precision Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocci, Emanuele; dell'Agnello, Simone; Delle Monache, Giovanni; Martini, Manuele; Contessa, Stefania; Porcelli, Luca; Tibuzzi, Mattia; Salvatori, Lorenzo; Patrizi, Giordano; Maiello, Mauro; Intaglietta, Nicola; Mondaini, Chiara; Currie, Douglas; Chandler, John; Bianco, Giuseppe; Murphy, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Since 1969, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflectors (CCRs) has supplied almost all significant tests of General Relativity (GR). When first installed in the 1970s, the Apollo CCRs geometry contributed only a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Today, because of lunar librations, this contribution dominates the error budget, limiting the precision of the experimental tests of gravitational theories. The new MoonLIGHT-2 (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests) apparatus is a new-generation LLR payload developed by the SCF_Lab (http://www.lnf.infn.it/esperimenti/etrusco/) at INFN-LNF in collaboration with the Maryland University. With the unique design of a single large CCR unaffected by librations, MoonLIGHT-2 can increase up to a factor 100 the precision of the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession and other General Relativity (GR) tests respect to Apollo CCRs. MoonLIGHT-2 is approved to be launched with the Moon Express mission MEX-1 and will be deployed on the Moon surface in 2018. MoonLIGHT-2 is also proposed for the Roscosmos mission Luna-27. To validate/optimize MoonLIGHT-2 for MEX-1, the SCF_Lab is carrying out a unique experimental test called SCF-Test: the concurrent measurement of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the CCR under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator and simulated space environment. We perform test of GR with current LLR data and also different GR simulation of the expected improvement in GR test provided by MoonLIGHT-2, using the Planetary Ephemeris Program in collaboration with CfA. Our ultimate goal is to improve GR tests by a factor up to 100, and provide constraints on the new gravitational theories like non-miminally coupled gravity and spacetime torision.

  9. Classic tests of General Relativity described by brane-based spherically symmetric solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuzinatto, R.R. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Pompeia, P.J. [Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Instituto de Fomento e Coordenacao Industrial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); De Montigny, M. [University of Alberta, Theoretical Physics Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Campus Saint-Jean, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Khanna, F.C. [University of Alberta, Theoretical Physics Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of Victoria, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO box 1700, Victoria, BC (Canada); Silva, J.M.H. da [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We discuss a way to obtain information about higher dimensions from observations by studying a brane-based spherically symmetric solution. The three classic tests of General Relativity are analyzed in detail: the perihelion shift of the planet Mercury, the deflection of light by the Sun, and the gravitational redshift of atomic spectral lines. The braneworld version of these tests exhibits an additional parameter b related to the fifth-coordinate. This constant b can be constrained by comparison with observational data for massive and massless particles. (orig.)

  10. Classic tests of General Relativity described by brane-based spherically symmetric solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cuzinatto, R R; de Montigny, M; Khanna, F C; da Silva, J M Hoff

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a way to obtain information about higher dimensions from observations by studying a brane-based spherically symmetric solution. The three classic tests of General Relativity are analyzed in details: the perihelion shift of the planet Mercury, the deflection of light by the Sun, and the gravitational redshift of atomic spectral lines. The braneworld version of these tests exhibits an additional parameter $b$ related to the fifth-coordinate. This constant $b$ can be constrained by comparison with observational data for massive and massless particles.

  11. A massive binary black-hole system in OJ287 and a test of general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Valtonen, M. J.; Lehto, H. J.; Nilsson, K.; Heidt, J.; Takalo, L. O.; Sillanpää, A.; Villforth, C.; Kidger, M.; Poyner, G.; Pursimo, T.; Zola, S.; Wu, J. -H.; Zhou, X.; Sadakane, K.; Drozdz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity have mostly been carried out in weak gravitational fields where the space-time curvature effects are first-order deviations from Newton's theory. Binary pulsars provide a means of probing the strong gravitational field around a neutron star, but strong-field effects may be best tested in systems containing black holes. Here we report such a test in a close binary system of two candidate black holes in the quasar OJ287. This quasar shows quasi-p...

  12. Results of data base management system parameterized performance testing related to GSFC scientific applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carchedi, C. H.; Gough, T. L.; Huston, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a variety of tests designed to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of several commercially available data base management system (DBMS) products compatible with the Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 11/780 computer system are summarized. The tests were performed on the INGRES, ORACLE, and SEED DBMS products employing applications that were similar to scientific applications under development by NASA. The objectives of this testing included determining the strength and weaknesses of the candidate systems, performance trade-offs of various design alternatives and the impact of some installation and environmental (computer related) influences.

  13. Race-related cognitive test bias in the active study: a mimic model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken Morgan, Adrienne T; Marsiske, Michael; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Jones, Richard N; Whitfield, Keith E; Johnson, Kathy E; Cresci, Mary K

    2010-10-01

    The present study investigated evidence for race-related test bias in cognitive measures used in the baseline assessment of the ACTIVE clinical trial. Test bias against African Americans has been documented in both cognitive aging and early life span studies. Despite significant mean performance differences, Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) models suggested most differences were at the construct level. There was little evidence that specific measures put either group at particular advantage or disadvantage and little evidence of cognitive test bias in this sample. Small group differences in education, cognitive status, and health suggest positive selection may have attenuated possible biases.

  14. Does testing with feedback improve adult spelling skills relative to copying and reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Steven C; Rubin, Benjamin R; Rickard, Timothy C

    2015-12-01

    We examined testing's ability to enhance adult spelling acquisition, relative to copying and reading. Across 3 experiments in which testing with feedback was compared with copying, the spelling improvement after testing matched that following the same amount of time spent copying. A potent testing advantage, however, was observed for spelling words free-recalled. In the fourth experiment, a large testing advantage for both word free recall and spelling was observed, versus reading. Subjects also generally preferred testing and rated it as more effective than copying or reading. The equivalent performance of testing and copying for spelling contrasts with prior work involving children and suggests that retrieval practice may not be the only effective mechanism for spelling skill acquisition. Rather, we suggest that the critical learning event for spelling is focused study on phoneme-to-grapheme mappings for previously unlearned letter sequences. For adults with extensive spelling expertise, focused study is more automatic during both copying and testing with feedback than for individuals with beginning spelling skills. Reading, however, would not be expected to produce efficient focused study of phoneme-to-grapheme mappings, regardless of expertise level. Overall, adult spelling skill acquisition benefits both from testing and copying, and substantially less from reading. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Relation of Elite Rifle Shooters' Technique-Test Measures to Competition Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Simo; Linnamo, Vesa; Mononen, Kaisu; Kuitunen, Sami

    2016-07-01

    To describe the long-term changes in shooting technique in relation to competition performances in elite air-rifle shooters. Seventeen elite shooters completed simulated air-rifle shooting-competition series in 3 consecutive seasons, participating on 15 ± 7 testing occasions. Shooting score and aiming-point-trajectory variables were obtained with an optoelectronic shooting device, and postural-balance variables were measured with force platform. Shooters' competition results were collected from all international and national competitions during the 3-y period. Mean test score, stability of hold, aiming accuracy, cleanness of triggering, and postural balance improved during the 3-y period (ANOVA, time, P < .05-.01). Seasonal mean test results in stability of hold (R = -.70, P = .000) and cleanness of triggering (R = -.75, P = .000) were related to competition performances. Changes in stability of hold (R = -.61, P = .000) and cleanness of triggering (R = -.39, P = .022) were also related to the changes in competition performances. Postural balance in shooting direction was more related to cleanness of triggering (R = .57, P = .000), whereas balance in cross-shooting direction was more related to stability of hold (R = .70, P = .000). The shooting-technique testing used in the current study seems to be a valid and useful tool for long-term performance assessment. Stability of hold, cleanness of triggering, and postural balance can be further developed even at the elite level, resulting in improved competition performances.

  16. The criterion-related validity of integrity tests: an updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Roth, Philip L; Raymark, Patrick H; Odle-Dusseau, Heather N

    2012-05-01

    Integrity tests have become a prominent predictor within the selection literature over the past few decades. However, some researchers have expressed concerns about the criterion-related validity evidence for such tests because of a perceived lack of methodological rigor within this literature, as well as a heavy reliance on unpublished data from test publishers. In response to these concerns, we meta-analyzed 104 studies (representing 134 independent samples), which were authored by a similar proportion of test publishers and non-publishers, whose conduct was consistent with professional standards for test validation, and whose results were relevant to the validity of integrity-specific scales for predicting individual work behavior. Overall mean observed validity estimates and validity estimates corrected for unreliability in the criterion (respectively) were .12 and .15 for job performance, .13 and .16 for training performance, .26 and .32 for counterproductive work behavior, and .07 and .09 for turnover. Although data on restriction of range were sparse, illustrative corrections for indirect range restriction did increase validities slightly (e.g., from .15 to .18 for job performance). Several variables appeared to moderate relations between integrity tests and the criteria. For example, corrected validities for job performance criteria were larger when based on studies authored by integrity test publishers (.27) than when based on studies from non-publishers (.12). In addition, corrected validities for counterproductive work behavior criteria were larger when based on self-reports (.42) than when based on other-reports (.11) or employee records (.15).

  17. Publishing nutrition research: validity, reliability, and diagnostic test assessment in nutrition-related research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Philip M; Harris, Jeffrey; Sheean, Patricia M; Boushey, Carol J; Bruemmer, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    This is the sixth in a series of monographs on research design and analysis. The purpose of this article is to describe and discuss several concepts related to the measurement of nutrition-related characteristics and outcomes, including validity, reliability, and diagnostic tests. The article reviews the methodologic issues related to capturing the various aspects of a given nutrition measure's reliability, including test-retest, inter-item, and interobserver or inter-rater reliability. Similarly, it covers content validity, indicators of absolute vs relative validity, and internal vs external validity. With respect to diagnostic assessment, the article summarizes the concepts of sensitivity and specificity. The hope is that dietetics practitioners will be able to both use high-quality measures of nutrition concepts in their research and recognize these measures in research completed by others.

  18. The Relation Between Adult Dark Spermatogonia and Other Parameters of Fertility Potential in Cryptorchid Testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Kvist, Kolja; Clasen-Linde, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The fertility potential of boys with cryptorchidism may be related to the number of adult dark spermatogonia per tubular transverse section in testicular biopsies taken at orchiopexy. Placental-like alkaline phosphatase positive gonocytes in testes within year 1 of life indicate preserved ability...... for germ cell transformation. We related these parameters to the total number of tubular germ cells and other factors associated with fertility potential....

  19. Classical Tests of General Relativity: Brane-World Sun from Minimal Geometric Deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Casadio, Roberto; da Rocha, Roldao

    2015-01-01

    We consider a solution of the effective four-dimensional brane-world equations, obtained from the General Relativistic Schwarzschild metric via the principle of Minimal Geometric Deformation, and investigate the corresponding signatures stemming from the possible existence of a warped extra dimension. In particular, we derive bounds on an extra-dimensional parameter, closely related with the fundamental gravitational length, from the experimental results of the classical tests of General Relativity in the Solar system.

  20. Classical tests of general relativity: Brane-world Sun from minimal geometric deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, R.; Ovalle, J.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-05-01

    We consider a solution of the effective four-dimensional brane-world equations, obtained from the general relativistic Schwarzschild metric via the principle of minimal geometric deformation, and investigate the corresponding signatures stemming from the possible existence of a warped extra-dimension. In particular, we derive bounds on an extra-dimensional parameter, closely related with the fundamental gravitational length, from the experimental results of the classical tests of general relativity in the Solar system.

  1. A validity generalization procedure to test relations between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and influence tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuto, John E; Moss, Jennifer A

    2006-08-01

    The relations of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation with use of consultative, legitimating, and pressure influence tactics were examined using validity generalization procedures. 5 to 7 field studies with cumulative samples exceeding 800 were used to test each relationship. Significance was found for relation between agents' intrinsic motivation and their use of consultative influence tactics and agents' extrinsic motivation and their use of legitimating influence tactics.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A DIAGNOSTIC TEST RELATED TO CONCEPTIONS OF DIFFUSION AND OSMOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan ÇİNİCİ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the study, it was described the process of development and application a diagnostic test identifying and documenting students’ alternative conceptions related to diffusion and osmosis. The test development procedure had three general steps: defining the content boundaries of the test, identifying students’ alternative conceptions, and instrument development. Alternative conceptions were derived from a multiple-choice test which also required free responses in addition to literature. This first draft of the test was applied to 119 ninth graders from three different high schools. The alternative conceptions gathered from this administration and literature was used for developing second tiers of the items. In this way, the final version of the test was clarified and applied to 90 ninth and 73 tenth graders at Erzurum Anatolian High School. The reliability coefficient for the whole test is 0.62, average difficulty index is 0.55, and average discrimination power is 0.41. According to the results revealed from application of the test, high school students had many alternative conceptions on diffusion and osmosis.

  3. Event-by-event simulation of single-neutron experiments to test uncertainty relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Results from a discrete-event simulation of a recent single-neutron experiment that tests Ozawa's generalization of Heisenberg's uncertainty relation are presented. The event-based simulation algorithm reproduces the results of the quantum theoretical description of the experiment but does not requi

  4. Study duration and earnings: A test in relation to the human capital versus screening debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Oosterbeek

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we propose a simple test in relation to the human capital versus screening debate. It is argued that these theories lead to different predictions with respect to the earnings effects of deviations between actual and nominal durations of a study. Earnings and study duration equations ar

  5. Behavioural testing based breeding policy reduces the prevalence of fear and aggression related behaviour in Rottweilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, van der Joanne A.M.; Graat, Lisette; Beerda, Bonne

    2017-01-01

    Behavioural testing allows to exclude dogs that are fearful and aggressive from the breeding population, but relatively little is known about the effectiveness of such strategies in practice. From 2001 till 2009 parent purebred Dutch Rottweilers had to pass the Socially Acceptable Behaviour

  6. Development and Validation of the Test of Geography-Related Attitudes (ToGRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Scott L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced the development and validation of the Test of Geography-Related Attitudes (ToGRA). The ToGRA measures student attitude on four discrete measures student attitude on four discrete scales: 1) leisure interest in geography; 2) enjoyment of geographic education; 3) career interest in geography; and 4) interest in place. The ToGRA…

  7. The Impact of Personality on Training-Related Aspects of Motivation: Test of a Longitudinal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowold, Jens

    2007-01-01

    A model that proposed dispositional influences on training-related aspects of motivation was developed. More specifically, the model predicted influences of the Big Five personality variables on motivation to learn and transfer motivation, while controlling for general attitudes toward training. The model was tested empirically, drawing on a…

  8. Reliability and criterion-related validity of a new repeated agility test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Fessi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to assess the reliability and the criterion-related validity of a new repeated sprint T-test (RSTT that includes intense multidirectional intermittent efforts. The RSTT consisted of 7 maximal repeated executions of the agility T-test with 25 s of passive recovery rest in between. Forty-five team sports players performed two RSTTs separated by 3 days to assess the reliability of best time (BT and total time (TT of the RSTT. The intra-class correlation coefficient analysis revealed a high relative reliability between test and retest for BT and TT (>0.90. The standard error of measurement (<0.50 showed that the RSTT has a good absolute reliability. The minimal detectable change values for BT and TT related to the RSTT were 0.09 s and 0.58 s, respectively. To check the criterion-related validity of the RSTT, players performed a repeated linear sprint (RLS and a repeated sprint with changes of direction (RSCD. Significant correlations between the BT and TT of the RLS, RSCD and RSTT were observed (p<0.001. The RSTT is, therefore, a reliable and valid measure of the intermittent repeated sprint agility performance. As this ability is required in all team sports, it is suggested that team sports coaches, fitness coaches and sports scientists consider this test in their training follow-up.

  9. Experimental test of error-disturbance uncertainty relations by weak measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Fumihiro; Baek, So-Young; Ozawa, Masanao; Edamatsu, Keiichi

    2014-01-17

    We experimentally test the error-disturbance uncertainty relation (EDR) in generalized, strength-variable measurement of a single photon polarization qubit, making use of weak measurement that keeps the initial signal state practically unchanged. We demonstrate that the Heisenberg EDR is violated, yet the Ozawa and Branciard EDRs are valid throughout the range of our measurement strength.

  10. Considerations of proof tests of safety related systems; Betrachtungen zu periodischen Wiederholungspruefungen bei sicherheitsgerichteten Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boercsoek, J. [HIMA Paul Hildebrand GmbH und Co KG, Bruehl (Germany); Kassel Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Rechnerarchitektur und Systemprogrammierung

    2006-07-15

    With indroduction of IEC/EN 61508 it exists more requirements to the drafts and tests of safety related systems. Insertion from failure mode outcome more importance of reference to safety consideration of systems. Further on more transparence of failure mode for certification authority and more reliability and improvements of overall system in design level.

  11. Nutrition-Related Cancer Prevention Cognitions and Behavioral Intentions: Testing the Risk Perception Attitude Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Helen W.; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Finney Rutten, Lila J.; Hesse, Bradford W.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested whether the risk perception attitude framework predicted nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions. Data from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed to assess respondents' reported likelihood of developing cancer (risk) and perceptions of whether they could lower their…

  12. Identification of chemicals related to the chemical weapons convention during an interlaboratory proficiency test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijschuur, E.W.J.; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Reuver, L.P. de; Krimpen, S.H. van; Baar, B.L.M. van; Wils, E.R.J.; Kientz, C.E.; Brinkman, U.A.Th

    2002-01-01

    In order to test the ability of laboratories to detect and identify chemicals related to the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), which prohibits the development, production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons, and to designate laboratories for this task, the Technical Secretariat of the

  13. Role of Academic Self-Efficacy in Moderating the Relation between Task Importance and Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Youyan; Lau, Shun; Liau, Albert K.

    2011-01-01

    Emphasizing task importance, which is regarded as a way of motivating engaged behavior, may increase an individual's anxiety. The present research investigated whether academic self-efficacy could moderate the maladaptive relation between task importance and test anxiety. 1978 and 1670 Grade 9 Singaporean students participated in a survey related…

  14. A Proposal for Testing Local Realism Without Using Assumptions Related to Hidden Variable States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryff, Luiz Carlos

    1996-01-01

    A feasible experiment is discussed which allows us to prove a Bell's theorem for two particles without using an inequality. The experiment could be used to test local realism against quantum mechanics without the introduction of additional assumptions related to hidden variables states. Only assumptions based on direct experimental observation are needed.

  15. Identification of chemicals related to the chemical weapons convention during an interlaboratory proficiency test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijschuur, E.W.J.; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Reuver, L.P. de; Krimpen, S.H. van; Baar, B.L.M. van; Wils, E.R.J.; Kientz, C.E.; Brinkman, U.A.Th

    2002-01-01

    In order to test the ability of laboratories to detect and identify chemicals related to the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), which prohibits the development, production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons, and to designate laboratories for this task, the Technical Secretariat of the Organisa

  16. Nutrition-Related Cancer Prevention Cognitions and Behavioral Intentions: Testing the Risk Perception Attitude Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Helen W.; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Finney Rutten, Lila J.; Hesse, Bradford W.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested whether the risk perception attitude framework predicted nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions. Data from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed to assess respondents' reported likelihood of developing cancer (risk) and perceptions of whether they could lower their…

  17. Eysenck Personality Questionnaire scales and paper-and-pencil tests related to creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldberg, David

    2005-08-01

    Pearson correlations for scores on scales of the 1975 version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire with measures of schizotypy, hypomania, and creative traits are reported for 625 undergraduates. The Psychoticism scores are correlated .30 with Hypomanic traits, .25 with Perceptual Aberration, and .20 with the How Do You Think, a test of attitudes and activities related to creativity. Extraversion is also related to creativity-relevant scores. Results support a broad and nonspecific role for the Psychoticism scale in relation to both creativity and subclinical symptomatology.

  18. Food-related life styles in Singapore: Testing a Western European research instrument in Southeast Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, Søren; Brunsø, Karen; Crippen, Kaye;

    The food-related life style instrument developed by the MAPP research group has, up til now, been applied mainly in the context of European cultures. The purpose of the present study is to apply the food-related life style instrument in a new and very different cultural setting, to compare results......, and to interpret similarities and differences found. For this purpose, data have been collected in Singaporean families using the food-related life style instrument. A total of 89 questionnaires form the basis of the analysis. First, the cross-cultural validity of the instrument is tested, and secondly...

  19. Biochemical changes in relation to a maximal exercise test in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Mehlsen, J

    1994-01-01

    -1 was reached at a heart rate of 124 min-1 in the patients with fibromyalgia as compared to 140 min-1 in the controls (P = 0.02). In relation to workload, the patients scored higher on a Borg scale for perceived exertion during exercise, but if the Borg score was related to lactate no significant......Patients with fibromyalgia often complain of fatigue and pain during exercise and of worsening of pain days after exercise. The aim of the study described here was to determine if abnormal changes in potassium or lactate could be observed during an exercise test in fibromyalgia. Whether an abnormal...... incline in plasma creatine kinase or myoglobin could be observed days after the test was studied also. Fifteen female fibromyalgia patients and 15 age- and sex-matched controls performed a stepwise incremental maximal bicycle-ergometer test. Blood samples were collected from a catheter in a cubital vein...

  20. A-priori "imprinting" of General Relativity itself on some tests of it?

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of possible a-priori "imprinting" effects of general relativity itself on satellite/spaceraft-based tests of it. We deal with some performed or proposed time-delay ranging experiments in the Sun's gravitational field. It turns out that the "imprint" of general relativity on the Astronomical Unit and the solar gravitational constant GM_{\\odot}, not solved for in the so far performed spacecraft-based time-delay tests, induces an a-priori bias of the order of 10^-6 in typical solar system ranging experiments aimed to measuring the space curvature PPN parameter gamma. It is too small by one order of magnitude to be of concern for the performed Cassini experiment, but it would affect future planned or proposed tests aiming to reach a 10^-7-10^-9 accuracy in determining gamma.

  1. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations as Tools for Testing General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2004-01-01

    We continued a project, to analyse the ways in which detection and study of gravitational waves could provide quantitative tests of general relativity, with particular emphasis on waves that would be detectable by space-based observatories, such as LISA. This work had three foci: 1) Tests of scalar-tensor theories of gravity that, could be done by analyzing gravitational waves from neutron stars inspiralling into massive black holes, as detectable by LISA; 2) Study of alternative theories of gravity in which the graviton could be massive, and of how gravitational-wave observations by space-based detectors, solar-system tests, and cosmological observations could constrain such theories; and 3) Study of gravitational-radiation back reaction of particles orbiting black holes in general relativity, with emphasis on the effects of spin.

  2. A study of relative permeability parameters on rock cores using a two-phase flow test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hui Chiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure sequestration safety, confirming the injectivity of the reservoir rock formation is of critical importance, requiring studies of the rock permeability to uncover the fluid migration scenarios within the porous reservoir rock. Two-phase (super-critical CO2-brine flow behavior following the post CO2 injection is believed to be a dominating factor; its flooding behavior within the porous rock media needs to be further clarified prior to confirming the feasibility of domestic CO2 geo-sequestration. This study aims to determine the relative permeability of rock cores obtained from field outcropping. A test facility was established to determine the relative permeability during drainage and imbibition processes using a core-flooding test characterized by displacement method. The test facility was assembled locally and is regarded as a pioneering attempt. By relevant data interpretation, the parameters of relative permeability for predicting the movement of super-critical CO2 after injection can be modeled. More reliable parameters can be obtained using history matching processes wherein time-elapsed data calibration is used in conjunction with a computer code, TOUGH2. The test results were iteratively calibrated using numerical simulation by conducting a history matching process. The K-S curves derived from best-fit parameters are believed to be the most relevant relative permeability for the reservoir rock. Through this preliminary study, a better understanding of some of the problems and limitations associated with the determination of the rock relative permeability using two-phase flow test is achieved, but more advanced research is required.

  3. Interferometric detection of gravitational waves: the definitive test for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Even if Einstein's General Relativity achieved a great success and overcame lots of experimental tests, it also showed some shortcomings and flaws which today advise theorists to ask if it is the definitive theory of gravity. In this essay we show that, if advanced projects on the detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) will improve their sensitivity, allowing to perform a GWs astronomy, accurate angular and frequency dependent response functions of interferometers for GWs arising from various Theories of Gravity, i.e. General Relativity and Extended Theories of Gravity, will be the definitive test for General Relativity. The papers which found this essay have been the world's most cited in the official Astroparticle Publication Review of ASPERA during the 2007 with 13 citations.

  4. Relative sensory sparing in the diabetic foot implied through vibration testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd O'Brien

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dorsal aspect of the hallux is often cited as the anatomic location of choice for vibration testing in the feet of diabetic patients. To validate this preference, vibration tests were performed and compared at the hallux and 5th metatarsal head in diabetic patients with established neuropathy. Methods: Twenty-eight neuropathic, diabetic patients and 17 non-neuropathic, non-diabetic patients underwent timed vibration testing (TVT with a novel 128 Hz electronic tuning fork (ETF at the hallux and 5th metatarsal head. Results: TVT values in the feet of diabetic patients were found to be reduced at both locations compared to controls. Unexpectedly, these values were significantly lower at the hallux (P < 0.001 compared to the 5th metatarsal head. Conclusion: This study confirms the hallux as the most appropriate location for vibration testing and implies relative sensory sparing at the 5th metatarsal head, a finding not previously reported in diabetic patients.

  5. Direct-to-consumer personal genome testing for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Amin, Najaf; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Klaver, Caroline C W

    2014-08-21

    Genetic testing may be the next step in clinical medicine for a more personalized approach in determining risk of disease. Direct-to-consumer (DTC) personal genome tests may fulfill this role. We explored the practicability and predictive value of DTC tests from four companies (23andMe, deCODEme, Easy DNA, Genetic Testing Laboratories) for AMD. Body specimens of three individuals were collected and sent to four companies for DNA genotyping and disease risk estimation. In addition, DNA was also genotyped using Illumina HumanOmniExpress 12v1 array in the Rotterdam Study laboratory, and risk estimates of AMD were calculated using the validated prediction model from the population-based Three Continent AMD Consortium. Genotyped results of the four DTC tests matched genotyping performed by the Rotterdam Study laboratory. The estimated risks provided by the companies varied considerably in the tested individuals, from a 1.6-fold difference for overall relative risk to an up to 12-fold difference for lifetime risk. The lifetime risks for the individuals ranged from 1.4% to 16.1% in the DTC tests, while they varied from 0.5% to 4.2% in the validated prediction model. Most important reasons for the differences in risks were the testing of only a limited set of genetic markers, the choice of the reference population, and the methodology applied for risk calculation. Direct-to-consumer personal genome tests are not suitable for clinical application as yet. More comprehensive genetic testing and inclusion of environmental risk factors may improve risk prediction of AMD. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Reliability of Health-Related Physical Fitness Tests among Colombian Children and Adolescents: The FUPRECOL Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Ramírez-Vélez

    Full Text Available Substantial evidence indicates that youth physical fitness levels are an important marker of lifestyle and cardio-metabolic health profiles and predict future risk of chronic diseases. The reliability physical fitness tests have not been explored in Latino-American youth population. This study's aim was to examine the reliability of health-related physical fitness tests that were used in the Colombian health promotion "Fuprecol study". Participants were 229 Colombian youth (boys n = 124 and girls n = 105 aged 9 to 17.9 years old. Five components of health-related physical fitness were measured: 1 morphological component: height, weight, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold, and body fat (% via impedance; 2 musculoskeletal component: handgrip and standing long jump test; 3 motor component: speed/agility test (4x10 m shuttle run; 4 flexibility component (hamstring and lumbar extensibility, sit-and-reach test; 5 cardiorespiratory component: 20-meter shuttle-run test (SRT to estimate maximal oxygen consumption. The tests were performed two times, 1 week apart on the same day of the week, except for the SRT which was performed only once. Intra-observer technical errors of measurement (TEMs and inter-rater (reliability were assessed in the morphological component. Reliability for the Musculoskeletal, motor and cardiorespiratory fitness components was examined using Bland-Altman tests. For the morphological component, TEMs were small and reliability was greater than 95% of all cases. For the musculoskeletal, motor, flexibility and cardiorespiratory components, we found adequate reliability patterns in terms of systematic errors (bias and random error (95% limits of agreement. When the fitness assessments were performed twice, the systematic error was nearly 0 for all tests, except for the sit and reach (mean difference: -1.03% [95% CI = -4.35% to -2.28%]. The results from this study indicate that the

  7. Reliability of Health-Related Physical Fitness Tests among Colombian Children and Adolescents: The FUPRECOL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Rodrigues-Bezerra, Diogo; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Izquierdo, Mikel; Lobelo, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that youth physical fitness levels are an important marker of lifestyle and cardio-metabolic health profiles and predict future risk of chronic diseases. The reliability physical fitness tests have not been explored in Latino-American youth population. This study's aim was to examine the reliability of health-related physical fitness tests that were used in the Colombian health promotion "Fuprecol study". Participants were 229 Colombian youth (boys n = 124 and girls n = 105) aged 9 to 17.9 years old. Five components of health-related physical fitness were measured: 1) morphological component: height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold, and body fat (%) via impedance; 2) musculoskeletal component: handgrip and standing long jump test; 3) motor component: speed/agility test (4x10 m shuttle run); 4) flexibility component (hamstring and lumbar extensibility, sit-and-reach test); 5) cardiorespiratory component: 20-meter shuttle-run test (SRT) to estimate maximal oxygen consumption. The tests were performed two times, 1 week apart on the same day of the week, except for the SRT which was performed only once. Intra-observer technical errors of measurement (TEMs) and inter-rater (reliability) were assessed in the morphological component. Reliability for the Musculoskeletal, motor and cardiorespiratory fitness components was examined using Bland-Altman tests. For the morphological component, TEMs were small and reliability was greater than 95% of all cases. For the musculoskeletal, motor, flexibility and cardiorespiratory components, we found adequate reliability patterns in terms of systematic errors (bias) and random error (95% limits of agreement). When the fitness assessments were performed twice, the systematic error was nearly 0 for all tests, except for the sit and reach (mean difference: -1.03% [95% CI = -4.35% to -2.28%]. The results from this study indicate that the "Fuprecol

  8. Reliability of Health-Related Physical Fitness Tests among Colombian Children and Adolescents: The FUPRECOL Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Rodrigues-Bezerra, Diogo; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Izquierdo, Mikel; Lobelo, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that youth physical fitness levels are an important marker of lifestyle and cardio-metabolic health profiles and predict future risk of chronic diseases. The reliability physical fitness tests have not been explored in Latino-American youth population. This study’s aim was to examine the reliability of health-related physical fitness tests that were used in the Colombian health promotion “Fuprecol study”. Participants were 229 Colombian youth (boys n = 124 and girls n = 105) aged 9 to 17.9 years old. Five components of health-related physical fitness were measured: 1) morphological component: height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold, and body fat (%) via impedance; 2) musculoskeletal component: handgrip and standing long jump test; 3) motor component: speed/agility test (4x10 m shuttle run); 4) flexibility component (hamstring and lumbar extensibility, sit-and-reach test); 5) cardiorespiratory component: 20-meter shuttle-run test (SRT) to estimate maximal oxygen consumption. The tests were performed two times, 1 week apart on the same day of the week, except for the SRT which was performed only once. Intra-observer technical errors of measurement (TEMs) and inter-rater (reliability) were assessed in the morphological component. Reliability for the Musculoskeletal, motor and cardiorespiratory fitness components was examined using Bland–Altman tests. For the morphological component, TEMs were small and reliability was greater than 95% of all cases. For the musculoskeletal, motor, flexibility and cardiorespiratory components, we found adequate reliability patterns in terms of systematic errors (bias) and random error (95% limits of agreement). When the fitness assessments were performed twice, the systematic error was nearly 0 for all tests, except for the sit and reach (mean difference: -1.03% [95% CI = -4.35% to -2.28%]. The results from this study indicate that the

  9. Feasibility and validity of mobile cognitive testing in the investigation of age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Pierre; Husky, Mathilde; Allard, Michèle; Amieva, Hélène; Pérès, Karine; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Dartigues, Jean-François; Swendsen, Joel

    2016-08-19

    Mobile cognitive testing may be used to help characterize subtle deficits at the earliest stages of cognitive decline. Despite growing interest in this approach, comprehensive information concerning its feasibility and validity has been lacking in elderly samples. Over a one-week period, this study applied mobile cognitive tests of semantic memory, episodic memory and executive functioning in a cohort of 114 elderly non-demented community residents. While the study acceptance rate was moderate (66%), the majority of recruited individuals met minimal compliance thresholds and responded to an average of 82% of the repeated daily assessments. Missing data did not increase over the course of the study, but practice effects were observed for several test scores. However, even when controlling for practice effects, traditional neuropsychological tests were significantly associated with mobile cognitive test scores. In particular, the Isaacs Set Test was associated with mobile assessments of semantic memory (γ = 0.084, t = 5.598, p mobile assessments of episodic memory (γ = 0.069, t = 3.156, p mobile assessments of executive functioning (γ = 0.168, t = 4.562, p Mobile cognitive testing in the elderly may provide complementary and potentially more sensitive data relative to traditional neuropsychological assessment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Computerized neurocognitive testing in the management of sport-related concussion: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Jacob E; McCrea, Michael A; Cullum, C Munro

    2013-12-01

    Since the late nineties, computerized neurocognitive testing has become a central component of sport-related concussion (SRC) management at all levels of sport. In 2005, a review of the available evidence on the psychometric properties of four computerized neuropsychological test batteries concluded that the tests did not possess the necessary criteria to warrant clinical application. Since the publication of that review, several more computerized neurocognitive tests have entered the market place. The purpose of this review is to summarize the body of published studies on psychometric properties and clinical utility of computerized neurocognitive tests available for use in the assessment of SRC. A review of the literature from 2005 to 2013 was conducted to gather evidence of test-retest reliability and clinical validity of these instruments. Reviewed articles included both prospective and retrospective studies of primarily sport-based adult and pediatric samples. Summaries are provided regarding the available evidence of reliability and validity for the most commonly used computerized neurocognitive tests in sports settings.

  11. Age-related changes in the prostate and testes of the Beagle dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowseth, L.A.; Gerlach, R.F.; Gillett, N.A.; Muggenburg, B.A. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1990-01-01

    Age-related changes in the histologic morphology of the Beagle dog prostate have been used as a model for similar changes that occur in human beings. Previous studies of the aging changes in Beagle dogs have been limited to animals less than 10 years of age. In this study, the prostate, testes, and serum testosterone levels were evaluated in healthy Beagle dogs that were grouped by age to provide five groups of dogs that ranged from 3 to 14 years of age. Tissue sections from the prostate and testes were examined qualitatively and quantitatively by light microscopy. All animals 6 years of age and older had histologic characteristics of complex benign prostatic hyperplasia. A mean statistically significant increase in prostatic weight with increased age was noted. Morphometric analysis of the prostatic tissue suggested that similar to the change observed in human males, the increase in size was primarily due to an increase in the absolute volume of interstitial tissues. The epithelial component did not contribute to the increase noted, with the exception that the percentage of glandular lumen did increase with age, indicating progressive cystic dilatation of the glands. Stereologic analysis of the testes showed a decrease in the relative percentage of germ cells with increasing age. No distinct age-related trend was detected in serum testosterone concentrations. These findings indicate that the progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia occurs throughout the entire life span of the dog; an association with changes in the testes was not identified.

  12. XML related data exchange from the test machine to a web-enabled MAT-DB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nagy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the JRC Petten tasks is to support European Research and Development (R&D projects in the material and energy related areas with the management and dissemination of research results. By using XML technology test data can be entered directly from the test machines into the Web-enabled 'Materials Database' (Mat-DB, which is an integral part of the On-line Data Information Network (ODIN On-line Data Information Network, 2004 that has been developed at JRC Petten. Test data, which are kept in XML format and sent by R&D project partners via the World Wide Web to the Petten Server are stored within the Mat-DB XML module. There they can be checked and updated on-line before they are uploaded into the database. After validation by the source administrator they can immediately be retrieved and evaluated by all project partners. A pilot test with the new XML related data exchange module from test machine into Mat-DB has currently been started within the European TMF Standard R&D project.

  13. A Tool for Testing of Inheritance Related Bugs in Object Oriented Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Geetha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Object oriented software development different from traditional development products. In object oriented software polymorphism, inheritance, dynamic binding are the important features. An inheritance property is the main feature. The compilers usually detect the syntax oriented errors only. Some of the property errors may be located in the product. Data flow testing is an appropriate testing method for testing program futures. This test analysis structure of the software and gives the flow of property. This study is designed to detect the hidden errors with reference to the inheritance property. Inputs of the tool are set of classes and packages. Outputs of the tools are hierarchies of the classes, methods, attributes and a set of inheritance related bugs like naked access, spaghetti inheritance bugs are automatically detected by the tool. The tool is developed as three major modules. They are code analysis, knowledge base preparation and bugs analysis. The code analysis module is designed to parse extract details from the code. The knowledge base preparation module is designed to prepare the knowledge base about the program details. The bug's analysis module is designed to extract bugs related information from the database. It is a static testing. This study focused on Java programs.

  14. Relation of heart rate recovery after exercise testing to coronary artery calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Sae Young; Kurl, Sudhir; Laukkanen, Jari A; Yoon, Eun Sun; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Fernhall, Bo; Franklin, Barry A

    2017-08-01

    We examined whether slow heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise testing as an estimate of impaired autonomic function is related to coronary artery calcification (CAC), an emerging marker of coronary atherosclerosis. We evaluated 2088 men who participated in a health-screening program that included measures of CAC and peak or symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. HRR was calculated as the difference between peak heart rate (HR) during exercise testing and the HR at 2 min of recovery after peak exercise. We measured CAC using multidetector computed tomography to calculate the Agatston coronary artery calcium score. Advanced CAC was defined as a mean CAC >75th percentile for each age group. HRR was negatively correlated with CAC (r = -.14, p 52 bpm). Each 1 bpm decrease in HRR was associated with 1% increase in advanced CAC after adjusting for potential confounders. An attenuated HRR after exercise testing is associated with advanced CAC, independent of coronary risk factors and other related hemodynamic response. KEY MESSAGES Slow heart rate recovery (HRR) after maximal exercise testing, indicating decreased autonomic function, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular event and mortality. Slow HRR has been linked with the occurrence of malignant ventricular arrhythmias, but it remains unclear whether slow HRR is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery calcification (CAC), an emerging marker of coronary atherosclerosis. An attenuated HRR after exercise testing was associated with advanced CAC, independent of coronary risk factors and other potential hemodynamic confounder, supporting the hypothesis that slow HRR is related to the burden of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease.

  15. Testing the distance-duality relation with a combination of cosmological distance observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo Cao; Nan Liang

    2011-01-01

    We propose an accurate test of the distance-duality (DD) relation,η = DL(z)(1 + z)-2/DA(z) = 1 (where DL and DA are the luminosity distances and angular diameter distances,respectively),with a combination of cosmological observational data of Type la Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Union2 set and the galaxy cluster sample under an assumption of the spherical model.In order to avoid bias brought on by redshift non-coincidence between observational data and to consider redshift error bars of both clusters and SNe Ia in the analysis,we carefully choose the SNe Ia points which have the minimum acceptable redshift difference of the galaxy cluster sample (|△z|min = σz,SN + σz,cluster).By assuming ηto be a constant and defined as functions of the redshift parameterized by six different expressions,we find that there exists no observable evidence for variations in the DD relation based on the collected data,since related statistical tests are well satisfied within the 1σ confidence level for most cases.Further,considering different values of △z as constraints,we also find that the choice of △z may play an important role in this model-independent test of the DD relation for the spherical sample of galaxy clusters.

  16. Interest in Genetic Testing in Ashkenazi Jewish Parkinson’s Disease Patients and Their Unaffected Relatives

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to explore interest in genetic testing among Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) Parkinson’s Disease (PD) cases and first-degree relatives, as genetic testing for LRRK2 G2019S is widely available. Approximately 18 % of AJ PD cases carry G2019S mutations; penetrance estimations vary between 24 and 100 % by age 80. A Genetic Attitude Questionnaire (GAQ) was administered at two New York sites to PD families unaware of LRRK2 G2019S mutation status. The association of G2019S, age, education, g...

  17. Neural correlates of derived relational responding on tests of stimulus equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cataldo Michael F

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An essential component of cognition and language involves the formation of new conditional relations between stimuli based upon prior experiences. Results of investigations on transitive inference (TI highlight a prominent role for the medial temporal lobe in maintaining associative relations among sequentially arranged stimuli (A > B > C > D > E. In this investigation, medial temporal lobe activity was assessed while subjects completed "Stimulus Equivalence" (SE tests that required deriving conditional relations among stimuli within a class (A ≡ B ≡ C. Methods Stimuli consisted of six consonant-vowel-consonant triads divided into two classes (A1, B1, C1; A2, B2, C2. A simultaneous matching-to-sample task and differential reinforcement were employed during pretraining to establish the conditional relations A1:B1 and B1:C1 in class 1 and A2:B2 and B2:C2 in class 2. During functional neuroimaging, recombined stimulus pairs were presented and subjects judged (yes/no whether stimuli were related. SE tests involved presenting three different types of within-class pairs: Symmetrical (B1 A1; C1 B1; B2 A2; C2 B2, and Transitive (A1 C1; A2 C2 and Equivalence (C1 A1; C2 A2 relations separated by a nodal stimulus. Cross-class 'Foils' consisting of unrelated stimuli (e.g., A1 C2 were also presented. Results Relative to cross-class Foils, Transitive and Equivalence relations requiring inferential judgments elicited bilateral activation in the anterior hippocampus while Symmetrical relations elicited activation in the parahippocampus. Relative to each derived relation, Foils generally elicited bilateral activation in the parahippocampus, as well as in frontal and parietal lobe regions. Conclusion Activation observed in the hippocampus to nodal-dependent derived conditional relations (Transitive and Equivalence relations highlights its involvement in maintaining relational structure and flexible memory expression among stimuli within a

  18. Modified rapid urease test for Helicobacter pylori detection in relation to an immunohistochemical stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Y; Shirahase, H; Yamamoto, E; Inao, R; Hamaguchi, S; Kanaji, K; Kitaoka, A; Yagi, T; Tokuka, A; Ohsumi, K

    2000-06-01

    The rapid urease test and touch cytology have been used for the rapid detection of Helicobacter pylori infection. Recently, a modified rapid urease (MRU) test, which provides results in 20 min has been available on a commercial basis. To date, few reports have evaluated the accuracy of this test. This study evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the MRU test and touch cytology to detect H. pylori in relation to the density of H. pylori infection determined semi-quantitatively by using immunohistochemical stains. Biopsy specimens obtained from a total of 60 patients who underwent endoscopy for evaluation of gastroduodenal diseases were studied by using the MRU test, Giemsa stain for touch smear tissue and histological methods. An immunohistochemical stain was used as a standard, and the density of H. pylori infection was graded according to the number of individual bacteria seen as follows: grade 0 = 0; grade 1+ = 1-9; grade 2+ = 10-29; grade 3+ = 30-99; grade 4+ > or = 100. The severity of gastritis was evaluated histologically in each specimen and compared with the density of H. pylori infection. The MRU test had an overall sensitivity of 73%, specificity of 100% and accuracy of 85%. The Giemsa stain had a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 100% and accuracy of 95%.The sensitivities of the MRU test and Giemsa stain decreased in mild H. pylori infection. In the MRU test, the sensitivity was 47% when the density of H. pylori infection was 1+, while 80-100% sensitivities were obtained when the densities of infection were > or = 2+. With the Giemsa stain, the sensitivity was 80% when the density was 1+, while the sensitivity increased to 100% when the densities were > or = 2+. The severity of gastritis determined by the Rauws scores showed a positive correlation with the density of H. pylori infection as evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. The MRU test had high sensitivity and specificity for moderate to severe H. pylori infection, but it may

  19. Testing existing software for safety-related applications. Revision 7.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, J.A.; Lawrence, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    The increasing use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software products in digital safety-critical applications is raising concerns about the safety, reliability, and quality of these products. One of the factors involved in addressing these concerns is product testing. A tester`s knowledge of the software product will vary, depending on the information available from the product vendor. In some cases, complete source listings, program structures, and other information from the software development may be available. In other cases, only the complete hardware/software package may exist, with the tester having no knowledge of the internal structure of the software. The type of testing that can be used will depend on the information available to the tester. This report describes six different types of testing, which differ in the information used to create the tests, the results that may be obtained, and the limitations of the test types. An Annex contains background information on types of faults encountered in testing, and a Glossary of pertinent terms is also included. This study is pertinent for safety-related software at reactors.

  20. Testing the distance-duality relation with data from galaxy clusters and type Ia supernovae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Yun Fu; Pu-Xun Wu; Hong-Wei Yu; Zheng-Xiang Li

    2011-01-01

    We test the distance-duality (DD) relation by combining the angular diameter distance DA provided by two galaxy cluster samples compiled by De Filippis et al.(the elliptical β model) and Bonamente et al.(the spherical/β model),and the luminosity distance DL from Constitution and Union2 type la supernova (SNe Ia) datasets.To obtain DL associated with the observed DA at the same redshift,we smooth the noise of the SNe Ia in a model-independent way,obtain the evolutionary curve of DL and,finally,test the DD relation.We find that the elliptical/β model,when compared with the SNe Ia from the Constitution compilation,is only consistent with the DD relation at the 3σ confidence level (CL),while the spherical β model is incompatible with the DD relation at the 3σ CL.For the Union2 compilation,the De Filippis and Bonamente samples are marginally compatible with the validity of the DD relation at the 1σ and 2σ CLs,respectively.

  1. A modified Lorentz theory as a test theory of special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D. G.; Gagnon, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Attention has been given recently to a modified Lorentz theory (MLT) that is based on the generalized Galilean transformation. Some explicit formulas within the framework of MLT, dealing with the one-way velocity of light, slow-clock transport, and the Doppler effect are derived. A number of typical experiments are analyzed on this basis. Results indicate that the empirical equivalence between MLT and special relativity is still maintained to second order terms. The results of previous works that predict that the MLT might be distinguished from special relativity at the third order by Doppler centrifuge tests capable of a fractional frequency detection threshold of 10 to the -15th are confirmed.

  2. Frequency standards based on ultracold atoms in tests of general relativity, navigation and gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, K. Yu.; Kudeyarov, K. S.; Kolachevsky, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    Research and development in the field of optical clocks based on ultracold atoms and ions have enabled the relative uncertainty in frequency to be reduced down to a few parts in 1018. The use of novel, precise frequency comparison methods opens up new possibilities for basic research (sensitive tests of general relativity, a search for a drift of fundamental constants and a search for ‘dark matter’) as well as for state-of-the-art navigation and gravimetry. We discuss the key methods that are used in creating precision clocks (including transportable clocks) based on ultracold atoms and ions and the feasibility of using them in resolving current relativistic gravimetry issues.

  3. Test of the Fluctuation Relation in compressible turbulence on a free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Mahesh; Cressman, John; Goldburg, Walter

    2006-11-01

    The statistics of lagrangian velocity divergence are studied for an assembly of particles in compressible turbulence on a free surface. Under an appropriate definition of entropy, the two-dimensional velocity divergence of a particle trajectory represents the local entropy rate, a random variable. The statistics of this rate are shown to be in agreement with the steady-state fluctuation relation of Gallavotti and Cohen over a limited range of averaging times. The probability distribution functions obtained in this analysis exhibit features different from those observed in previous experimental tests of the fluctuation relation.

  4. Field of Genes: An Investigation of Sports-Related Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Wagner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sports-related genetic testing is a sector of the diverse direct-to-consumer (DTC industry that has not yet been examined thoroughly by academic scholars. A systematic search was used to identify companies in this sector and content analysis of online information was performed. More than a dozen companies were identified. Marketing practices observed generally did not target parents for child testing, and marketing images were mild compared to images used in popular media. Information was provided at a high reading level (industry-wide Flesh-Kincaid Grade Levels > 11. While ~75% of companies provide privacy policies and terms of service prior to purchase and ~40% provide scientific citations for their tests,

  5. Testing general relativity with black-hole binary observations: results and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2017-01-01

    The first two LIGO-Virgo detections of gravitational waves from binary black-hole inspirals offered the first opportunity to test gravitation in its strong-field, relativistic-motion, and radiative sector. The initial tests reported in PRL 116 (2016) probed consistency with the predictions of general relativity, to moderate precision. The space-based observatory LISA will observe black-hole binary signals with much larger SNRs, allowing for even more precise tests. Last, the detection of a binary black-hole stochastic background with pulsar-timing arrays will offer more constraints on the speed and polarizations of gravitational waves. I review these results and examine synergies across the gravitational-wave spectrum. I discuss the main challenges and opportunities from the viewpoint of data analysis, and outline prospects for making contact with current alternative theories of gravitation, in particular those motivated by models of dark energy.

  6. Field of Genes: An Investigation of Sports-Related Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jennifer K.; Royal, Charmaine D.

    2012-01-01

    Sports-related genetic testing is a sector of the diverse direct-to-consumer (DTC) industry that has not yet been examined thoroughly by academic scholars. A systematic search was used to identify companies in this sector and content analysis of online information was performed. More than a dozen companies were identified. Marketing practices observed generally did not target parents for child testing, and marketing images were mild compared to images used in popular media. Information was provided at a high reading level (industry-wide Flesh-Kincaid Grade Levels > 11). While ~75% of companies provide privacy policies and terms of service prior to purchase and ~40% provide scientific citations for their tests, e-commerce generally may adequately protect DTC genetics consumers without new federal legislation or regulation. PMID:25562204

  7. How the Laser Helped to Improve the Test of Special Theory of Relativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satya Pal

    2013-01-01

    In this paper of I have reviewed the test done for validating the special theory of relativity using masers and lasers in last one century. Michelson-Morley did the first experimental verification for the isotropy of space for the propagation of light in 1887. It has an accuracy of 1/100th of a fringe shift. The predicted fringe shift on the basis…

  8. Testing spatial symmetry using contingency tables based on nearest neighbor relations

    OpenAIRE

    Elvan Ceyhan

    2014-01-01

    Research Article Testing Spatial Symmetry Using Contingency Tables Based on Nearest Neighbor Relations Elvan Ceyhan Department of Mathematics, Koc¸ University, Sarıyer, 34450 Istanbul, Turkey Correspondence should be addressed to Elvan Ceyhan; Received 23 August 2013; Accepted 22 October 2013; Published 19 January 2014 Academic Editors: A. Barra, S. Casado, and J. Pacheco Copyright © 2014 Elvan Ceyhan. This is an open access article distributed under...

  9. Memory tests in first-degree adult relatives of schizophrenic patients: a meta-analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Trandafir, Anca; Méary, Alexandre; Schürhoff, Franck; Leboyer, Marion; Szöke, Andrei

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Memory deficits have been clearly demonstrated in schizophrenic patients. However, studies of memory performances in their relatives compared to normal controls provide conflicting results. A meta-analysis was carried out to synthesize all the published data. Unlike previous meta-analyses, which were based on composite scores, we analyzed each memory test separately. This prevents theoretically questionable choices in grouping variables, leads to results with clearer implications ...

  10. Reliability and criterion-related validity of a new repeated agility test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makni, E; Jemni, M; Elloumi, M; Chamari, K; Nabli, MA; Padulo, J; Moalla, W

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the reliability and the criterion-related validity of a new repeated sprint T-test (RSTT) that includes intense multidirectional intermittent efforts. The RSTT consisted of 7 maximal repeated executions of the agility T-test with 25 s of passive recovery rest in between. Forty-five team sports players performed two RSTTs separated by 3 days to assess the reliability of best time (BT) and total time (TT) of the RSTT. The intra-class correlation coefficient analysis revealed a high relative reliability between test and retest for BT and TT (>0.90). The standard error of measurement (repeated linear sprint (RLS) and a repeated sprint with changes of direction (RSCD). Significant correlations between the BT and TT of the RLS, RSCD and RSTT were observed (prepeated sprint agility performance. As this ability is required in all team sports, it is suggested that team sports coaches, fitness coaches and sports scientists consider this test in their training follow-up. PMID:27274109

  11. Testing the Distance-Duality Relation with Galaxy Clusters and Supernovae Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Ribeiro, M B

    2010-01-01

    In this letter we propose a new and model-independent cosmological test for the distance-duality (DD) relation, $\\eta=D_{L}(z)(1+z)^{-2}/D_{A}(z)=1$, where $D_{L}$ and $D_{A}$ are, respectively, the luminosity and angular diameter distances. For $D_L$ we consider two sub-samples of SNe type Ia taken from Constitution data (2009) whereas $D_A$ distances are provided by two samples of galaxy clusters compiled by De Fillipis {\\it et al.} (2005) and Bonamente {\\it et al.} (2006) by combining Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness. The SNe Ia redshifts of each sub-sample were carefully chosen to coincide with the ones of the associated galaxy cluster sample ($\\Delta z<0.005$) thereby allowing a direct test of DD relation. Since for very low redshifts, $D_{A}(z) \\approxeq D_{L}(z)$, we have tested the DD relation by assuming that $\\eta$ is a function of the redshift parametrized by two different expressions: $\\eta(z) = 1 + \\eta_{0}z$ and $\\eta(z) = 1 + \\eta_{0}z/(1+z)$, where $\\eta_0$ is a c...

  12. Using Relative Statistics and Approximate Disease Prevalence to Compare Screening Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Frank; Abbey, Craig

    2016-11-01

    Schatzkin et al. and other authors demonstrated that the ratios of some conditional statistics such as the true positive fraction are equal to the ratios of unconditional statistics, such as disease detection rates, and therefore we can calculate these ratios between two screening tests on the same population even if negative test patients are not followed with a reference procedure and the true and false negative rates are unknown. We demonstrate that this same property applies to an expected utility metric. We also demonstrate that while simple estimates of relative specificities and relative areas under ROC curves (AUC) do depend on the unknown negative rates, we can write these ratios in terms of disease prevalence, and the dependence of these ratios on a posited prevalence is often weak particularly if that prevalence is small or the performance of the two screening tests is similar. Therefore we can estimate relative specificity or AUC with little loss of accuracy, if we use an approximate value of disease prevalence.

  13. Absolute and Relative Reliability of the Timed 'Up & Go' Test and '30second Chair-Stand' Test in Hospitalised Patients with Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyders Johansen, Katrine; Derby Stistrup, Rikke; Skibdal Schjøtt, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The timed 'Up & Go' test and '30second Chair-Stand' test are simple clinical outcome measures widely used to assess functional performance. The reliability of both tests in hospitalised stroke patients is unknown. The purpose was to investigate the relative and absolute reliability of ...

  14. Use of the EFPA Test Review Model by the UK and Issues Relating to the Internationalization of Test Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Patricia A.; Bartram, Dave

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present the background to the development of test reviewing by the British Psychological Society (BPS) in the United Kingdom. We also describe the role played by the BPS in the development of the EFPA test review model and its adaptation for use in test reviewing in the United Kingdom. We conclude with a discussion of lessons…

  15. Effect of test duration and feeding on relative sensitivity of genetically distinct clades of Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucek, David J; Dickinson, Amy; Major, Kaley M; McEwen, Abigail R

    2013-11-01

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is widely used in ecotoxicology laboratories for the assessment of chemical risks to aquatic environments, and it is a cryptic species complex with a number of genetically distinct strains found in wild populations. While it would be valuable to note differences in contaminant sensitivity among different strains collected from various field sites, those findings would be influenced by acclimation of the populations to local conditions. In addition, potential differences in metabolism or lipid storage among different strains may confound assessment of sensitivity in unfed acute toxicity tests. In the present study, our aim was to assess whether there are genetic differences in contaminant sensitivity among three cryptic provisional species of H. azteca. Therefore, we used organisms cultured under the same conditions, assessed their ability to survive for extended periods without food, and conducted fed and unfed acute toxicity tests with two anions (nitrate and chloride) whose toxicities are not expected to be altered by the addition of food. We found that the three genetically distinct clades of H. azteca had substantially different responses to starvation, and the presence/absence of food during acute toxicity tests had a strong role in determining the relative sensitivity of the three clades. In fed tests, where starvation was no longer a potential stressor, significant differences in sensitivity were still observed among the three clades. In light of these differences in sensitivity, we suggest that ecotoxicology laboratories consider using a provisional species in toxicity tests that is a regionally appropriate surrogate.

  16. Results of Testing the Relative Oxidizing Hazard of Wipes and KMI Zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ams, Bridget Elaine [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-05-09

    This report includes the results from testing performed on the relative oxidizing hazard of a number of organic sorbing wipe materials, as well as KMI zeolite. These studies were undertaken to address a need by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Materials Management group, which requires a material that can sorb small spills in a glovebox without creating a disposal hazard due to the potential for oxidation reactions, as requested in Request for Testing of Wipes and Zeolite for Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Materials Group (NPl-7) (NPl-7-17-002) and Request for Testing of Chamois Material for Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Materials Group (NPl-7) (NPl-7-17-005). This set oftests is a continuation of previous testing described in Results from Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with (DWT-RPT-003), which provided data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Basis of Knowledge. The Basis of Knowledge establishes criteria for evaluating transuranic (TRU) waste that contains oxidizing chemicals.

  17. Testing the applicability of a model of oral health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Mello dos Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test Wilson & Cleary’s conceptual model of the direct and mediated pathways between clinical and non-clinical variables in relation to oral health-related quality of life. A random sample of 578 older people was evaluated. Wilson & Cleary’s conceptual model was tested using structural equations modeling including: biological variables, symptom status, functional health, oral health perceptions, oral health-related quality of life. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed with the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14. In the final model, edentulism was negatively correlated to dissatisfaction of appearance of their dental prostheses (r = -0.25. Worse functional status was correlated with poor oral health perception (r = 0.24. Being aged over 68 (r = 0.25, being a female (r = 0.39 and living in rural areas (r = 0.15 had a direct effect on the edentulism. Age had a direct effect on OHIP-14 (r = -0.15. There was an indirect effect of sex on OHIP-14 via functional status (r = 0.12. The present findings partially support Wilson & Cleary’s model framework.

  18. Testing the applicability of a model of oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Camila Mello Dos; Celeste, Roger Keller; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot; Hugo, Fernando Neves

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test Wilson & Cleary's conceptual model of the direct and mediated pathways between clinical and non-clinical variables in relation to oral health-related quality of life. A random sample of 578 older people was evaluated. Wilson & Cleary's conceptual model was tested using structural equations modeling including: biological variables, symptom status, functional health, oral health perceptions, oral health-related quality of life. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed with the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14). In the final model, edentulism was negatively correlated to dissatisfaction of appearance of their dental prostheses (r = -0.25). Worse functional status was correlated with poor oral health perception (r = 0.24). Being aged over 68 (r = 0.25), being a female (r = 0.39) and living in rural areas (r = 0.15) had a direct effect on the edentulism. Age had a direct effect on OHIP-14 (r = -0.15). There was an indirect effect of sex on OHIP-14 via functional status (r = 0.12). The present findings partially support Wilson & Cleary's model framework.

  19. Experimental Test of Heisenberg's Measurement Uncertainty Relation Based on Statistical Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenchao; Ma, Zhihao; Wang, Hengyan; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Ying; Kong, Fei; Li, Zhaokai; Peng, Xinhua; Shi, Mingjun; Shi, Fazhan; Fei, Shao-Ming; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-04-01

    Incompatible observables can be approximated by compatible observables in joint measurement or measured sequentially, with constrained accuracy as implied by Heisenberg's original formulation of the uncertainty principle. Recently, Busch, Lahti, and Werner proposed inaccuracy trade-off relations based on statistical distances between probability distributions of measurement outcomes [P. Busch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 160405 (2013); P. Busch et al., Phys. Rev. A 89, 012129 (2014)]. Here we reformulate their theoretical framework, derive an improved relation for qubit measurement, and perform an experimental test on a spin system. The relation reveals that the worst-case inaccuracy is tightly bounded from below by the incompatibility of target observables, and is verified by the experiment employing joint measurement in which two compatible observables designed to approximate two incompatible observables on one qubit are measured simultaneously.

  20. Accurate relative location estimates for the North Korean nuclear tests using empirical slowness corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Pabian, F.; Näsholm, S. P.; Kværna, T.; Mykkeltveit, S.

    2017-01-01

    Declared North Korean nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, 2013 and 2016 were observed seismically at regional and teleseismic distances. Waveform similarity allows the events to be located relatively with far greater accuracy than the absolute locations can be determined from seismic data alone. There is now significant redundancy in the data given the large number of regional and teleseismic stations that have recorded multiple events, and relative location estimates can be confirmed independently by performing calculations on many mutually exclusive sets of measurements. Using a 1-D global velocity model, the distances between the events estimated using teleseismic P phases are found to be approximately 25 per cent shorter than the distances between events estimated using regional Pn phases. The 2009, 2013 and 2016 events all take place within 1 km of each other and the discrepancy between the regional and teleseismic relative location estimates is no more than about 150 m. The discrepancy is much more significant when estimating the location of the more distant 2006 event relative to the later explosions with regional and teleseismic estimates varying by many hundreds of metres. The relative location of the 2006 event is challenging given the smaller number of observing stations, the lower signal-to-noise ratio and significant waveform dissimilarity at some regional stations. The 2006 event is however highly significant in constraining the absolute locations in the terrain at the Punggye-ri test-site in relation to observed surface infrastructure. For each seismic arrival used to estimate the relative locations, we define a slowness scaling factor which multiplies the gradient of seismic traveltime versus distance, evaluated at the source, relative to the applied 1-D velocity model. A procedure for estimating correction terms which reduce the double-difference time residual vector norms is presented together with a discussion of the associated uncertainty. The modified

  1. Genetic testing for inherited heart diseases: longitudinal impact on health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Jodie; Yeates, Laura; O'Brien, Lisa; McGaughran, Julie; Scuffham, Paul A; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2012-05-03

    Purpose:A genetic diagnosis is an extremely useful tool in the management and care of families with inherited heart diseases, particularly in allowing clarification of risk status of asymptomatic family members. The psychosocial consequences of genetic testing in this group are poorly understood. This longitudinal pilot study sought to determine changes in health-related quality of life in patients and asymptomatic family members undergoing genetic testing for inherited heart diseases.Methods:Individuals attending two specialized multidisciplinary cardiac genetic clinics in Australia were invited to participate. Patients undergoing proband or predictive genetic testing for an inherited cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmogenic disorder were eligible. The Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 (version 2) was administered before the genetic result was given, and follow-up surveys were completed 1-3, 6, and 12 months after the result was given.Results:A total of 54 individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, familial dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and long QT syndrome completed baseline and at least one follow-up survey, including 33 probands and 21 asymptomatic relatives. Physical and mental component scores analyzed at baseline and 1-3 months were found to be unchanged in all groups. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed up to 12 months after result.Conclusion:In this longitudinal pilot study, no change in health-related quality of life was observed up to 12 months after the result was given in patients and their asymptomatic family members undergoing genetic testing for an inherited heart disease.Genet Med 2012 advance online publication 3 May 2012.

  2. Testing the Abbreviated Food Technology Neophobia Scale and its relation to satisfaction with food-related life in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Grunert, Klaus G; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Orellana, Ligia; Sepúlveda, José; Lobos, Germán; Hueche, Clementina; Höger, Yesli

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to test the relationships between food neophobia, satisfaction with food-related life and food technology neophobia, distinguishing consumer segments according to these variables and characterizing them according to willingness to purchase food produced with novel technologies. A survey was conducted with 372 university students (mean aged=20.4years, SD=2.4). The questionnaire included the Abbreviated version of the Food Technology Neophobia Scale (AFTNS), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and a 6-item version of the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS). Using confirmatory factor analysis, it was confirmed that SWFL correlated inversely with FNS, whereas FNS correlated inversely with AFTNS. No relationship was found between SWFL and AFTNS. Two main segments were identified using cluster analysis; these segments differed according to gender and family size. Group 1 (57.8%) possessed higher AFTNS and FNS scores than Group 2 (28.5%). However, these groups did not differ in their SWFL scores. Group 1 was less willing to purchase foods produced with new technologies than Group 2. The AFTNS and the 6-item version of the FNS are suitable instruments to measure acceptance of foods produced using new technologies in South American developing countries. The AFTNS constitutes a parsimonious alternative for the international study of food technology neophobia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Why does Income Relate to Depressive Symptoms? Testing the Income Rank Hypothesis Longitudinally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osafo Hounkpatin, Hilda; Wood, Alex M; Brown, Gordon D A; Dunn, Graham

    This paper reports a test of the relative income rank hypothesis of depression, according to which it is the rank position of an individual's income amongst a comparison group, rather than the individual's absolute income, that will be associated with depressive symptoms. A new methodology is developed to test between psychosocial and material explanations of why income relates to well-being. This method was used to test the income rank hypothesis as applied to depressive symptoms. We used data from a cohort of 10,317 individuals living in Wisconsin who completed surveys in 1992 and 2003. The utility assumed to arise from income was represented with a constant relative risk aversion function to overcome limitations of previous work in which inadequate specification of the relationship between absolute income and well-being may have inappropriately favoured relative income specifications. We compared models in which current and future depressive symptoms were predicted from: (a) income utility alone, (b) income rank alone, (c) the transformed difference between the individual's income and the mean income of a comparison group and (d) income utility, income rank and distance from the mean jointly. Model comparison overcomes problems involving multi-collinearity amongst the predictors. A rank-only model was consistently supported. Similar results were obtained for the association between depressive symptoms and wealth and rank of wealth in a cohort of 32,900 British individuals who completed surveys in 2002 and 2008. We conclude that it is the rank of a person's income or wealth within a social comparison group, rather than income or wealth themselves or their deviations from the mean within a reference group, that is more strongly associated with depressive symptoms.

  4. Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity Using Optical Devices i (astrod i) — Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Hanns; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ni, Wei-Tou

    2013-01-01

    ASTROD I is the first planned space mission in a series of ASTROD missions for testing relativity in space using optical devices. The main aims are (i) to test general relativity with an improvement of three orders of magnitude compared to current results, (ii) to measure solar and solar system parameters with improved accuracy, (iii) to test the constancy of the gravitational constant and in general to get a deeper understanding of gravity. The first ideas for the ASTROD missions go back to the last century when new technologies in the area of laser physics and time measurement began to appear on the horizon. ASTROD is a mission concept that is supported by a broad international community covering the areas of space technology, fundamental physics, high performance laser and clock technology and drag-free control. While ASTROD I is a single-spacecraft concept that performs measurements with pulsed laser ranging between the spacecraft and earthbound laser ranging stations, ASTROD-GW is planned to be a three spacecraft mission with inter-spacecraft laser ranging. ASTROD-GW would be able to detect gravitational waves at frequencies below the eLISA/NGO bandwidth. As a third step Super-ASTROD with larger orbits could even probe primordial gravitational waves. This paper gives an overview on the basic principles especially for ASTROD I.

  5. Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity using Optical Devices I (ASTROD I) - Mission Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Selig, Hanns; Ni, Wei-Tou

    2012-01-01

    ASTROD I is the first planned space mission in a series of ASTROD missions for testing relativity in space using optical devices. The main aims are: (i) to test General Relativity with an improvement of three orders of magnitude compared to current results, (ii) to measure solar and solar system parameters with improved accuracy, (iii) to test the constancy of the gravitational constant and in general to get a deeper understanding of gravity. The first ideas for the ASTROD missions go back to the last century when new technologies in the area of laser physics and time measurement began to appear on the horizon. ASTROD is a mission concept that is supported by a broad international community covering the areas of space technology, fundamental physics, high performance laser and clock technology and drag free control. While ASTROD I is a single-spacecraft concept that performes measurements with pulsed laser ranging between the spacecraft and earthbound laser ranging stations, ASTROD-GW is planned to be a three...

  6. A massive binary black-hole system in OJ287 and a test of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Valtonen, M J; Nilsson, K; Heidt, J; Takalo, L O; Sillanpää, A; Villforth, C; Kidger, M; Poyner, G; Pursimo, T; Zola, S; Wu, J H; Zhou, X; Sadakane, K; Drozdz, M; Koziel, D; Marchev, D; Ogloza, W; Porowski, C; Siwak, M; Stachowski, G; Winiarski, M; Hentunen, V P; Nissinen, M; Liakos, A; Dogru, S

    2008-01-01

    Tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity have mostly been carried out in weak gravitational fields where the space-time curvature effects are first-order deviations from Newton's theory. Binary pulsars provide a means of probing the strong gravitational field around a neutron star, but strong-field effects may be best tested in systems containing black holes. Here we report such a test in a close binary system of two candidate black holes in the quasar OJ287. This quasar shows quasi-periodic optical outbursts at 12 yr intervals, with two outburst peaks per interval. The latest outburst occurred in September 2007, within a day of the time predicted by the binary black-hole model and general relativity. The observations confirm the binary nature of the system and also provide evidence for the loss of orbital energy in agreement (within 10 per cent) with the emission of gravitational waves from the system. In the absence of gravitational wave emission the outburst would have happened twenty days later.

  7. The relation between BMI with exercise test in individuals with cardiac ischemic pains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravanbakhsh Esmaeili1

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 19 Nov, 2008; Accepted 28 Jan, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Prevalence of over weight and obesity is increasing in the world. Those over weight are more susceptible to cardiovascular diseases than other individual's. Studies indicate that body fat distribution has a determining role in the identification of risk factors. Also, the relation between BMI, cardiac ischemic pains and exercise test condition in such patients, is in need further investigation. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between BMI with exercise tolerance test in patients with cardiac ischemic pains, who were referred to the Cardiac Center of Mazandaran Province, in Sari Township.Materials and methods: In this case control study considering the BMI in ischemic patients, 65 were selected as case and 65 persons as control using Tread mill and according to Bruce Protocol, results and tolerance test time was recorded. Independent T test was used for comparison of quantitative indexes mean, while x2 test using SPSS soft ware was used for comparison of the ratio of persons with the qualitative features.Results: Data indicated mean weight of 57.1 kg and height of 1.64m in the case group. Also, 58.5% had history of hyperlipidemia (Cholesterol higher than 200mg/dl and 78.8% with history of blood sugar (higher than 120mg/dl (P<0.001. Even 63.6% had hypertension of 140/9o mm Hg. Our findings showed that BMI in the case and control groups were (26.95±3.94 and (25.95±3.49 respectively. Moreover, a significant relationship between high BMI with cardiac ischemic pains and exercise tolerance test (P<0.001 were demonstrated.Conclusion: Cardiac ischemic pains in individuals with high BMI is common. Exercise tolerance test as one of the non invasive and less expensive procedures, can be an indicator of cardiac ischemic disease.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(68: 64-69 (Persian

  8. The predictive utility of neuropsychological symptom validity testing as it relates to psychological presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakzanis, Konstantine K; Gammada, Emnet; Jeffay, Eliyas

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between multiple neuropsychological symptom validity tests (SVTs) and psychological presentation. More formally, we set out to determine if performance on neuropsychological SVTs was related to psychological symptom credibility and which specific neuropsychological SVTs were most associated with noncredible psychological presentation. Archival records from 106 litigating examinees were utilized in this study. Our results illustrate that neuropsychological SVTs are modestly related to psychological symptom credibility and that specific neuropsychological SVTs are variably associated to this end. We conclude that when multiple, but not independent, neuropsychological SVTs are employed within the context of a neuropsychological examination, they do have clinical utility as it relates to credibility of psychological presentation and these constructs do share variance reciprocally in clinically meaningful ways. When independently employed, however, the observed relationship is modest at best. Hence, to place clinical opinion on firmer scientific grounds within the context of a neuropsychological examination, multiple cognitive SVTs, in hand with psychological test instruments that include validity indexes, are essential to derive opinion that is based on science rather than faith in the instance of litigation when an incentive to manifest disability for the sake of an external reward holds probable.

  9. Intensity profile during an ultra-endurance triathlon in relation to testing and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, A; Chaverri, D; Erola, P; Iglesias, X; Rodríguez, F A

    2014-12-01

    We examined the heart rate (HR)-based intensity profile during an ultra-endurance triathlon (UET) estimated from the individual HR-oxygen uptake (˙VO2) relationship during specific graded tests, relating it to race performance. 9 male ultra-endurance triathletes completed the study. Before racing, subjects performed graded exercise tests involving cycle (C) ergometry, treadmill running (R) and free swimming (S) for peak ˙VO2 and HR at ventilatory thresholds (VT). Exercise-specific HR-˙VO2 regression equations were developed. Mean race HR was higher during S (149.2 (10.1) bpm) than during C (137.1 (5.7) bpm) and R (136.2 (10.5) bpm). During C and R, HR was below both VT (11% and 27-28%). HR differences between S and C correlated with C, R and final times. The greatest differences between S and C were related to the worst times in the next stages. These ultra-endurance triathletes performed S at a higher relative intensity, which was inversely correlated with performance in the following stages. The best predictors of final racing time (81%) were weight-adjusted ˙VO2max and HR difference between C and S. A more adequate characterization of the time pattern during the whole race, especially during S, adds new information concerning the intensity profile and cardiovascular demands of an UET race.

  10. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity Using Gravitational Wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, K. G.; Pai, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test general relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories such as scalar-tensor theories, dynamical Chern-Simons theory and massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrized gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA configuration. We also compare the expected bounds on alternative theories of gravity from ground-based and space-based detectors and find that space-based GW detectors can test GR and other theories of gravity with unprecedented accuracies. We then focus on a recent proposal to use singular value decomposition of the Fisher information matrix to improve the accuracies with which post-Newtonian theory can be tested. We extend those results to the case of space-based detector eLISA and discuss its implications.

  11. The advisory working alliance and research training: test of a relational efficacy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, M Ashley; Lent, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    Relatively little research attention has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms through which the advising relationship functions as a medium for fostering doctoral students' development as researchers. Adapting Lent and Lopez's (2002) model of relational efficacy, we examined three types of efficacy beliefs (self-efficacy, other-efficacy, and relation-inferred self-efficacy) in relation to the advisory working alliance and the prediction of doctoral students' research interest and productivity. Gelso's (1993) concept of the research training environment was also included in model testing to capture a view of the advisory relationship as existing within a larger program training context. Participants were 274 doctoral students in a variety of academic fields. The results suggested that a slightly revised version of the hypothesized model produced good fit to the data. In particular, controlling for year in the graduate program, we found the advisory working alliance was linked to students' research self-efficacy indirectly via relation-inferred self-efficacy (i.e., students' beliefs about how their advisors viewed their research capabilities). Students' self-efficacy was, in turn, predictive of their interest in and productivity at research. We discuss the implications of these findings for future research and the practice of advising and research training. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10^{-5} – 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  13. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2012-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ~0.01mHz - 1Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  14. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative theories of gravity using Gravitational Wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational Wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test General Relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories like Scalar-Tensor theories, Dynamical Chern-Simons theory and Massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrised gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA config...

  15. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10(-5) - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  16. Stability of relative oxygen pulse curve during repeated maximal cardiopulmonary testing in professional soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Perim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available During cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET, stroke volume can be indirectly assessed by O2 pulse profile. However, for a valid interpretation, the stability of this variable over time should be known. The objective was to analyze the stability of the O2 pulse curve relative to body mass in elite athletes. VO2, heart rate (HR, and relative O2 pulse were compared at every 10% of the running time in two maximal CPETs, from 2005 to 2010, of 49 soccer players. Maximal values of VO2 (63.4 ± 0.9 vs 63.5 ± 0.9 mL O2•kg-1•min-1, HR (190 ± 1 vs188 ± 1 bpm and relative O2 pulse (32.9 ± 0.6 vs 32.6 ± 0.6 mL O2•beat-1•kg-1 were similar for the two CPETs (P > 0.05, while the final treadmill velocity increased from 18.5 ± 0.9 to 18.9 ± 1.0 km/h (P < 0.01. Relative O2 pulse increased linearly and similarly in both evaluations (r² = 0.64 and 0.63 up to 90% of the running time. Between 90 and 100% of the running time, the values were less stable, with up to 50% of the players showing a tendency to a plateau in the relative O2 pulse. In young healthy men in good to excellent aerobic condition, the morphology of the relative O2 pulse curve is consistent up to close to the peak effort for a CPET repeated within a 1-year period. No increase in relative O2pulse at peak effort could represent a physiologic stroke volume limitation in these athletes.

  17. Validity of the relative-dose-response test and the modified-relative-dose-response test as indicators of vitamin A stores in liver 1-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, H.; West, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Our group and many others have used the relativedose- response (RDR) test and the modified-RDR (MRDR) test as proxy indicators of liver stores of vitamin A. However, we have become concerned about the validity of these indicators. Objective: Simulation models were used to assess effects

  18. Validity of the relative-dose-response test and the modified-relative-dose-response test as indicators of vitamin A stores in liver 1-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, H.; West, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Our group and many others have used the relativedose- response (RDR) test and the modified-RDR (MRDR) test as proxy indicators of liver stores of vitamin A. However, we have become concerned about the validity of these indicators. Objective: Simulation models were used to assess effects

  19. Testing for Gender Related Size and Shape Differences of the Human Ear canal using Statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the shape of the human ear canal. It is described how a dense surface point distribution model of the human ear canal is built based on a training set of laser scanned ear impressions and a sparse set of anatomical landmarks placed by an expert. The dense...... surface models are built by using the anatomical landmarks to warp a template mesh onto all shapes in the training set. Testing the gender related differences is done by initially reducing the dimensionality using principal component analysis of the vertices of the warped meshes. The number of components...

  20. Age-related changes in human posture control: Sensory organization tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1989-01-01

    Postural control was measured in 214 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. Sensory organization tests measured the magnitude of anterior-posterior body sway during six 21 s trials in which visual and somatosensory orientation cues were altered (by rotating the visual surround and support surface in proportion to the subject's sway) or vision eliminated (eyes closed) in various combinations. No age-related increase in postural sway was found for subjects standing on a fixed support surface with eyes open or closed. However, age-related increases in sway were found for conditions involving altered visual or somatosensory cues. Subjects older than about 55 years showed the largest sway increases. Subjects younger than about 15 years were also sensitive to alteration of sensory cues. On average, the older subjects were more affected by altered visual cues whereas younger subjects had more difficulty with altered somatosensory cues.

  1. An Empirical Test of Rejection- and Anger-Related Interpretation Bias in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbestael, Jill; McNally, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    The authors tested whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by interpretation bias for disambiguating stimuli in favor of threatening interpretations, especially concerning abuse, abandonment, rejection, and anger-core emotional triggers for BPD patients. A mixed sample of 106 patients with marked BPD traits and nonpatients were assessed with SCID I and II and were presented with vignettes depicting ambiguous social interactions. Interpretations of these vignettes were assessed both in a closed and an open answer format. Results showed that BPD traits were related to a rejection- (closed and open answer formats) and an anger-related interpretation bias (closed answer option only). Cluster C traits were associated with self-blame interpretations. Aside from further validating the cognitive model of BPD, these findings denote interpretation bias as a key feature in patients with BPD that might contribute to their emotional hyperreactivity and interpersonal problems. These findings also highlight the importance of therapeutically normalizing interpretative bias in BPD and cluster C patients.

  2. Testing the asteroseismic scaling relations for Red Giants with Eclipsing Binaries Observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Gaulme, Patrick; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rawls, Meredith R; Corsaro, Enrico; Mosser, Benoit; Southworth, John; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Deshpande, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Given the potential of ensemble asteroseismology for understanding fundamental properties of large numbers of stars, it is critical to determine the accuracy of the scaling relations on which these measurements are based. From several powerful validation techniques, all indications so far show that stellar radius estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations are accurate to within a few percent. Eclipsing binary systems hosting at least one star with detectable solar-like oscillations constitute the ideal test objects for validating asteroseismic radius and mass inferences. By combining radial-velocity measurements and photometric time series of eclipses, it is possible to determine the masses and radii of each component of a double-lined spectroscopic binary. We report the results of a four-year radial-velocity survey performed with the \\'echelle spectrometer of the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5-m telescope and the APOGEE spectrometer at Apache Point Observatory. We compare the masses and radi...

  3. Validation of a computer-adaptive test to evaluate generic health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zardaín Pilar C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL is a relevant variable in the evaluation of health outcomes. Questionnaires based on Classical Test Theory typically require a large number of items to evaluate HRQoL. Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT can be used to reduce tests length while maintaining and, in some cases, improving accuracy. This study aimed at validating a CAT based on Item Response Theory (IRT for evaluation of generic HRQoL: the CAT-Health instrument. Methods Cross-sectional study of subjects aged over 18 attending Primary Care Centres for any reason. CAT-Health was administered along with the SF-12 Health Survey. Age, gender and a checklist of chronic conditions were also collected. CAT-Health was evaluated considering: 1 feasibility: completion time and test length; 2 content range coverage, Item Exposure Rate (IER and test precision; and 3 construct validity: differences in the CAT-Health scores according to clinical variables and correlations between both questionnaires. Results 396 subjects answered CAT-Health and SF-12, 67.2% females, mean age (SD 48.6 (17.7 years. 36.9% did not report any chronic condition. Median completion time for CAT-Health was 81 seconds (IQ range = 59-118 and it increased with age (p Conclusions Although domain-specific CATs exist for various areas of HRQoL, CAT-Health is one of the first IRT-based CATs designed to evaluate generic HRQoL and it has proven feasible, valid and efficient, when administered to a broad sample of individuals attending primary care settings.

  4. Fitkids Treadmill Test: Age- and Sex-Related Normative Values in Dutch Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotte, Elles M W; de Groot, Janke F; Bongers, Bart C; Winkler, Alexander M F; Takken, Tim

    2016-11-01

    Recent research has shown that the Fitkids Treadmill Test (FTT) is a valid and reproducible exercise test for the assessment of aerobic exercise capacity in children and adolescents who are healthy. The study objective was to provide sex- and age-related normative values for FTT performance in children and adolescents who were healthy, developing typically, and 6 to 18 years of age. This was a cross-sectional, observational study. Three hundred fifty-six children and adolescents who were healthy (174 boys and 182 girls; mean age=12.9 years, SD=3.7) performed the FTT to their maximal effort to assess time to exhaustion (TTE). The least-mean-square method was used to generate sex- and age-related centile charts (P3, P10, P25, P50, P75, P90, and P97) for TTE on the FTT. In boys, the reference curve (P50) showed an almost linear increase in TTE with age, from 8.8 minutes at 6 years of age to 16.1 minutes at 18 years of age. In girls, the P50 values for TTE increased from 8.8 minutes at 6 years of age to 12.5 minutes at 18 years of age, with a plateau in TTE starting at approximately 10 years of age. Youth who were not white were underrepresented in this study. This study describes sex- and age-related normative values for FTT performance in children and adolescents who were healthy, developing typically, and 6 to 18 years of age. These age- and sex-related normative values will increase the usefulness of the FTT in clinical practice. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  5. Recovery during Lunch Breaks: Testing Long-Term Relations with Energy Levels at Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaana Sianoja

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study had two aims. First, we examined whether lunch break settings, activities, and recovery experiences were associated with lunchtime recovery cross-sectionally. Second, we investigated whether lunchtime recovery was related to energy levels (i.e., exhaustion and vigor across a 12-month period. We collected longitudinal questionnaire data among 841 Finnish workers (59% female, mean age 47 years from 11 different organizations in various fields at two time points (spring 2013 and 2014. We used hierarchical regression analysis to test our hypotheses. We found that recovery experiences, that is, psychological detachment from work and control during the lunch break, were related to successful lunchtime recovery. After controlling for background factors, main job characteristics (workload and autonomy, and the outcomes at baseline, successful lunchtime recovery was related to a decrease in exhaustion and to an increase in vigor one year later. To conclude, lunch breaks offer an important setting for internal recovery during working days and seem to relate to energy levels at work over time.

  6. Discrete element modeling of indentation tests to investigate mechanisms of CO2-related chemomechanical rock alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuang; Espinoza, D. Nicolas; Balhoff, Matthew T.

    2016-11-01

    During CO2 injection into geological formations, petrophysical and geomechanical properties of host formations can be altered due to mineral dissolution and precipitation. Field and laboratory results have shown that sandstone and siltstone can be altered by CO2-water mixtures, but few quantitative studies have been performed to fully investigate underlying mechanisms. Based on the hypothesis that CO2-water mixtures alter the integrity of rock structure by attacking cements rather than grains, we attempt to explain the degradation of cementation due to long-term contact with CO2 and water and mechanisms for changes in rock mechanical properties. Many sandstones, including calcite-cemented quartzitic sandstone, chlorite-cemented quartzitic sandstone, and hematite-cemented quartzitic sandstone, contain interparticle cements that are more readily affected by CO2-water mixtures than grains. A model that couples the discrete element method and the bonded-particle model is used to perform simulations of indentation tests on synthetic rocks with crystal and random packings. The model is verified against the analytical cavity expansion model and validated against laboratory indentation tests on Entrada sandstone with and without CO2 alteration. Sensitivity analysis is performed for cementation microscopic parameters including stiffness, size, axial, and shear strength. The simulation results indicate that the CO2-related degradation of mechanical properties in bleached Entrada sandstone can be attributed to the reduction of cement size rather than cement strength. Our study indicates that it is possible to describe the CO2-related rock alteration through particle-scale mechanisms.

  7. Biochemical changes in relation to a maximal exercise test in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Mehlsen, J

    1994-01-01

    . The changes in heart rate, potassium levels, and haematocrit during the exercise test were similar in the two groups. The maximal obtained lactate concentration was 4.2 mmol l-1 (3.5-5.6) in the patients as compared to 4.9 mmol l-1 (3.9-5.9) in the controls (NS). The estimated anaerobic threshold of 2 mmol l......-1 was reached at a heart rate of 124 min-1 in the patients with fibromyalgia as compared to 140 min-1 in the controls (P = 0.02). In relation to workload, the patients scored higher on a Borg scale for perceived exertion during exercise, but if the Borg score was related to lactate no significant......Patients with fibromyalgia often complain of fatigue and pain during exercise and of worsening of pain days after exercise. The aim of the study described here was to determine if abnormal changes in potassium or lactate could be observed during an exercise test in fibromyalgia. Whether an abnormal...

  8. Cortical areas related to performance of WAIS Digit Symbol Test: a functional imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Nobuo; Haji, Tomoki; Maruyama, Masakazu; Katsuyama, Narumi; Uchida, Shinya; Hozawa, Atsushi; Omori, Kahoru; Tsuji, Ichiro; Kawashima, Ryuta; Taira, Masato

    2009-09-29

    Many neuropsychological studies have shown that the Digit Symbol Test (DST) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) is useful for screening for dysfunctions of the brain. However, it remains unclear which brain areas are actually involved in the performance of DST and what brain functions are used for executing this test. In this study, we examined the cortical areas related to cognitive aspects of DST using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and determined executive brain functions involved in this test on the basis of fMRI results. Eleven healthy young adults (mean=21.6 years) performed a modified DST (mDST) task and its control task, which required a simple graphomotor response during fMRI data acquisition. The direct comparison of brain activations between the mDST task and the control task revealed greater activations in a fronto-parietal cortical network, including the bilateral inferior frontal sulci, left middle frontal gyrus (close to the frontal eye field) and left posterior parietal cortex. These activations are interpreted as reflecting the visual search process and/or the updating process of working memory during the mDST task execution. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between the number of correct responses and activations in the bilateral inferior frontal regions, suggesting that these prefrontal areas have a crucial role in the performance of DST in a healthy young adult population.

  9. Test of Special Relativity Using a Fiber Network of Optical Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, P; Lodewyck, J; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Vallet, G; Le Targat, R; Pottie, P-E; Guerlin, C; Meynadier, F; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C; Lopez, O; Amy-Klein, A; Lee, W-K; Quintin, N; Lisdat, C; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Grebing, C; Grosche, G; Kuhl, A; Raupach, S; Sterr, U; Hill, I R; Hobson, R; Bowden, W; Kronjäger, J; Marra, G; Rolland, A; Baynes, F N; Margolis, H S; Gill, P

    2017-06-02

    Phase compensated optical fiber links enable high accuracy atomic clocks separated by thousands of kilometers to be compared with unprecedented statistical resolution. By searching for a daily variation of the frequency difference between four strontium optical lattice clocks in different locations throughout Europe connected by such links, we improve upon previous tests of time dilation predicted by special relativity. We obtain a constraint on the Robertson-Mansouri-Sexl parameter |α|≲1.1×10^{-8}, quantifying a violation of time dilation, thus improving by a factor of around 2 the best known constraint obtained with Ives-Stilwell type experiments, and by 2 orders of magnitude the best constraint obtained by comparing atomic clocks. This work is the first of a new generation of tests of fundamental physics using optical clocks and fiber links. As clocks improve, and as fiber links are routinely operated, we expect that the tests initiated in this Letter will improve by orders of magnitude in the near future.

  10. Health Evaluation for Hypertensive Population Using Exercise Testing and Health-related Quality of Life Questionnaire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to assess the impacts of hypertension on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), as well as cardiovascular functional status (CVFS). Methods An instrument was presented based on WHOQOL-BREF and SP-16 questionnaire and exercise testing. 57 normotensive and 76 hypertensive subjects aged 35-65 year-old participated the health survey using this instrument.Based on the exercise testing results of the two groups, a discriminate function was established and used to investigate cardiovascular risk factors for hypertensive population. Results The results showed that persons with hypertension rated significantly lower scores on physical health (i.e. limitation in performing daily activities and problems with work or mobility) than did normotensives (P < 0.01). The discriminant score obtained from the exercise testing results was capable of reflecting the impacts of hypertension on CVFS. Conclusions The method presented in this paper provides a more powerful tool to estimate the effects of health interventions and medical therapy for hypertensive population than just self-rated HRQOL questionnaire.

  11. RELATIVE AND ABSOLUTE RELIABILITY OF KARATE SPECIFIC AEROBIC TEST (KSAT IN EXPERIENCED MALE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmi Chaabane

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was conducted to evaluate the relative and absolute reliability and the minimal detectable change (MDC95% of the karate specific aerobic test (KSAT in male karate athletes. Sixteen subjects (age: 22.2±3.7 years, height: 175.7±6.7 cm, body mass: 72.7±7.2 kg and karate experience: 9.2±4.5 years participated in this study and performed the KSAT twice (test-retest. Reliability of time to exhaustion (TE was very good, with intraclass correlation coefficient ICC(3.1>0.90, standard errors of measurement SEM0.05. Effect size for all variables was dz≤0.2, rated as trivial. Thus, when using the present test as a measure of aerobic fitness, a change greater than 9.4%(81.42 s is necessary to be confident (at the 95% level that the change in time to exhaustion reflects improvement and exceeds the measurement error. The KSAT is a reliable tool that can be used by practitioners for assessing aerobic fitness in experienced karate athletes.

  12. Hemisphere Preference Test: psychometric properties and relations with academic performance among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Morales, Juan Francisco; Escribano Barreno, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored, in adolescents, the dimensionality (factorial structure), reliability (internal consistency and test-retest stability) and predictive validity (in relation with academic grades) of the Hemispheric Preference Test (HPT), a widely used self-report index of thinking styles among adults. A sample of 990 Spanish adolescents aged 10-14 completed HPT and reported their academic grades. Results indicated a two-factor structure for HPT that can be interpreted in terms of left- and right-Hemisphere Preference (HP). The two-factor structure was clearer in boys compared to girls. The internal consistency and test-retest at 6 and 12 months were satisfactory. Left-HP scores decreased with age whereas girls obtained a higher mean score on right-HP sub-scale. Finally, Left-HP accounted for a significant variance percentage on academic grades after controlling for age and sex. Results suggested that Spanish version of the HPT was effective and reliable among adolescents.

  13. The Moon as a Test Body for General Relativity and New Gravitational Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Manuele; March, Riccardo; Bellettini, Giovanni; Dell'Agnello, S.; Delle Monache, G. O.; Currie, D. G.; Martini, M.; Lops, C.; Garattini, M.; March, R.; Bellettini, G.; Tauraso, R.; Battat, J. B.; Bianco, G.; Murphy, T. W., Jr.; Coradini, A.; Boni, A.; Cantone, C.; Maiello, M.; Porcelli, L.; Berardi, S.; Intaglietta, N.

    Since 1969 Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo Cube Corner Reflector (CCR) arrays has supplied several significant tests of General Relativity (GR): it has evaluated the Geodetic Precession, probed the weak and strong equivalence principle, determined the PPN parameter , addressed the time change of G and 1/r2 deviations. We show that the Moon equipped with retroreflectors can be used effectively to test new gravitational theories beyond GR, like spacetime torsion (developed by some of the authors) and the unified braneworld theory by G. Dvali et al. LLR has also provided important information on the composition and origin of the Moon through measurement of its rotations and tides. Future robotic lunar missions, like the proposed International Lunar Network (ILN) will greatly expand this broad scientific program.Initially, the Apollo arrays contributed a negligible portion of the LLR error budget. Nowadays, the ranging accuracy of ground stations has improved by more than two orders of magnitude: the new APOLLO station at Apache Point, USA, is capable of mm-level range measurements; MRLO, at the ASI Space Geodesy Center in Matera, Italy, has re-started LR operations. Now, because of lunar librations, the Apollo arrays dominate the LLR error budget, which is a few cm. The University of Maryland, Principal Investigator for the Apollo arrays, and INFN-LNF are proposing an innovative CCR array design that will reduce the error contribution of LLR payloads by more than two orders of magnitude, down to tens of microns. This is the goal of the MoonLIGHT technological experiment of INFN (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-Accuracy Tests) and of the SCF, the CCR space test facility at LNF. We have also proposed the precursor test of the MoonLIGHT payload on the ASI lunar orbiter mission MAGIA (A. Coradini PI), which concluded its Phase A Study in 2009. In our new array design the main challenges are: 1) address the thermal and optical effects of the

  14. The risk of false inclusion of a relative in parentage testing - an in silico population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Chun-I; Tsai, Li-Chin; Chu, Pao-Ching; Lin, Yen-Yang; Lin, Chun-Yen; Huang, Tsun-Ying; Yu, Yu-Jen; Linacre, Adrian; Hsieh, Hsing-Mei

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the potential of false inclusion of a close genetic relative in paternity testing by using computer generated families. 10000 computer-simulated families over three generations were generated based on genotypes using 15 short tandem repeat loci. These data were used in assessing the probability of inclusion or exclusion of paternity when the father is actually a sibling, grandparent, uncle, half sibling, cousin, or a random male. Further, we considered a duo case where the mother's DNA type was not available and a trio case including the mother's profile. The data showed that the duo scenario had the highest and lowest false inclusion rates when considering a sibling (19.03 ± 0.77%) and a cousin (0.51 ± 0.14%) as the father, respectively; and the rate when considering a random male was much lower (0.04 ± 0.04%). The situation altered slightly with a trio case where the highest rate (0.56 ± 0.15%) occurred when a paternal uncle was considered as the father, and the lowest rate (0.03 ± 0.03%) occurred when a cousin was considered as the father. We also report on the distribution of the numbers for non-conformity (non-matching loci) where the father is a close genetic relative. The results highlight the risk of false inclusion in parentage testing. These data provide a valuable reference when incorporating either a mutation in the father's DNA type or if a close relative is included as being the father; particularly when there are varying numbers of non-matching loci.

  15. The serum protein carbonyl content level in relation to exercise stress test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titiporn Mekrungruangwong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protein carbonyl (P is oxidatively-modified protein with diagnostic potential for acute myocardial infarction. However, many findings indicated the elevation of serum PC content level related to exercise, which could cause false positive results and limiting the specificity for acute coronary syndrome diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the level of serum protein carbonyl content in healthy volunteers subjected to exercise stress test (EST. Materials and Methods: Serum from healthy volunteers was collected 5-10 min before performing EST and 1 hour after the EST was achieved. The serum was collected, and the serum PC content level was determined by spectrophotometric DNPH assay. Results: The serum PC content level after exercise stress test was significantly higher than that of before performing EST (0.373 ± 0.05 nM/mg vs. 0.275 ± 0.02 nM/mg, P < 0.0001. The results demonstrated that in both male and female, serum PC content level after EST was significantly higher than that of before performing EST (0.29 ± 0.03 nM/mg vs. 0.36 ± 0.05 nM/mg P < 0.0001 in male, 0.27 ± 0.02 nM/mg vs. 0.38 ± 0.06 nM/mg P < 0.0001 in female, respectively. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that exercise stress test could result in non-specificity and false positive increasing in serum PC content level in healthy subjects, which may cause misinterpretation when using PC as cardiac marker, especially in patients, who underwent exercise stress test or patients who performing heavy physical activities.

  16. Consent, compulsion and confidentiality in relation to testing for HIV infection: the views of WA doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, D I; Mulligan, J B

    1990-02-19

    A survey was undertaken of all of the consultant staff members of Perth's major teaching hospitals together with all the fellows of The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners in Western Australia in order to define their views on the issues of informed consent, compulsion in relation to surgery, and confidentiality in a particular circumstance, when testing for infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Of the 701 individuals surveyed, 548 (78.2%) responded. Of these, 74.3% considered that it was not always necessary to gain informed consent, 22.0% believed that it was always necessary to do so, while 2.3% were undecided. General practitioners (38.4%) were more likely to think it necessary to obtain consent than were hospital consultants (19.0%), but otherwise the field of specialty had little effect on opinion. Of the respondents, 39.0% believed that testing before elective surgery is mandatory for all patients, while 53.0% considered that it should be compulsory in high-risk groups. Similar views were held about compulsory HIV antibody testing after emergency surgery. Similar responses were obtained from all specialty groups. When asked about whether they would tell a sexual partner of a patient's HIV status when the patient refused, 10.5% of doctors stated they would never advise the partner, 24.7% of doctors would on some occasions, 41.0% of doctors would tell a partner, and 23.8% always were undecided. Many individuals commented that they failed to see why HIV infection was being treated differently from other serious diseases. We have found that the majority opinion of the most senior members of the medical profession is that specific, informed consent should not always be required, that there is great support for compulsory testing, and that confidentiality may be broken under certain circumstances. These views must be recognized by administrators and legislators when framing measures to control this infection.

  17. Quantification of brake creep groan in vehicle tests and its relation with stick-slip obtained in laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neis, P. D.; Ferreira, N. F.; Poletto, J. C.; Matozo, L. T.; Masotti, D.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing and correlating stick-slip and brake creep groan. For doing that, results of tribotests are compared to data obtained in vehicle tests. A low velocity and a linear reduction in normal force were set for the tribotests. The vehicle tests consisted of subjecting a sport utility vehicle to three different ramp slopes. Creep groan events were measured by accelerometers placed on the brake calipers. The root mean square of the acceleration signal (QRMS parameter) was shown to be able to measure the creep groan severity resulting from the vehicle tests. Differences in QRMS were observed between front-rear and left-right wheels for all tested materials. Frequency spectrum analysis of the acceleration revealed that the wheel side and material type do not cause any significant shift in the creep groan frequency. QRMS measured in the vehicle tests presented good correlation with slip power (SP) summation. For this reason, SP summation may represent the "creep groan propensity" of brake materials. Thus, the proposed tribotest method can be utilized to predict the creep groan severity of brake materials in service.

  18. Age differences in the Attention Network Test: Evidence from behavior and event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ryan S; Biel, Anna Lena; Wegier, Pete; Lapp, Leann K; Dyson, Benjamin J; Spaniol, Julia

    2016-02-01

    The Attention Network Test (ANT) is widely used to capture group and individual differences in selective attention. Prior behavioral studies with younger and older adults have yielded mixed findings with respect to age differences in three putative attention networks (alerting, orienting, and executive control). To overcome the limitations of behavioral data, the current study combined behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Twenty-four healthy younger adults (aged 18-29years) and 24 healthy older adults (aged 60-76years) completed the ANT while EEG data were recorded. Behaviorally, older adults showed reduced alerting, but did not differ from younger adults in orienting or executive control. Electrophysiological components related to alerting and orienting (P1, N1, and CNV) were similar in both age groups, whereas components related to executive control (N2 and P3) showed age-related differences. Together these results suggest that comparisons of network effects between age groups using behavioral data alone may not offer a complete picture of age differences in selective attention, especially for alerting and executive control networks.

  19. Testing General Relativity with the Radio Science Experiment of the BepiColombo mission to Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Giulia; Tommei, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    The relativity experiment is part of the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) on-board the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. Thanks to very precise radio tracking from the Earth and accelerometer, it will be possible to perform an accurate test of General Relativity, by constraining a number of post-Newtonian and related parameters with an unprecedented level of accuracy. The Celestial Mechanics Group of the University of Pisa developed a new dedicated software, ORBIT14, to perform the simulations and to determine simultaneously all the parameters of interest within a global least squares fit. After highlighting some critical issues, we report on the results of a full set of simulations, carried out in the most up-to-date mission scenario. For each parameter we discuss the achievable accuracy, in terms of a formal analysis through the covariance matrix and, furthermore, by the introduction of an alternative, more representative, estimation of the errors. We show that, for example, an accuracy of some parts in 10^-6 for the Eddington parameter β and of 10^-5 for the Nordtvedt parameter η can be attained, while accuracies at the level of 5×10^-7 and 1×10^-7 can be achieved for the preferred frames parameters α1 and α2, respectively.

  20. Testing General Relativity with the Radio Science Experiment of the BepiColombo mission to Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Schettino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The relativity experiment is part of the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE on-board the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. Thanks to very precise radio tracking from the Earth and accelerometer, it will be possible to perform an accurate test of General Relativity, by constraining a number of post-Newtonian and related parameters with an unprecedented level of accuracy. The Celestial Mechanics Group of the University of Pisa developed a new dedicated software, ORBIT14, to perform the simulations and to determine simultaneously all the parameters of interest within a global least squares fit. After highlighting some critical issues, we report on the results of a full set of simulations, carried out in the most up-to-date mission scenario. For each parameter we discuss the achievable accuracy, in terms of a formal analysis through the covariance matrix and, furthermore, by the introduction of an alternative, more representative, estimation of the errors. We show that, for example, an accuracy of some parts in 10 − 6 for the Eddington parameter β and of 10 − 5 for the Nordtvedt parameter η can be attained, while accuracies at the level of 5 × 10 − 7 and 1 × 10 − 7 can be achieved for the preferred frames parameters α 1 and α 2 , respectively.

  1. Are cactus growth forms related to germination responses to light? A test using Echinopsis species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Baes, Pablo; Aparicio-González, Mónica; Galíndez, Guadalupe; del Fueyo, Patricia; Sühring, Silvia; Rojas-Aréchiga, Mariana

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of light regimen (white light vs. darkness) on the germination of 12 species of the Echinopsis genus (tribe Trichocereeae, Cactaceae). This genus presents a variety of growth forms and relatively small and uniform seed size. These traits allowed us to test, within the same linage and removing seed mass effect, the hypothesis that the germination response to light (indifferent to light or positive photoblastic) is related to growth form. Our results reject this hypothesis since no seeds germinated in darkness, so all of the species can be classified as being positively photoblastic. The proportion of seed germination with white light was significantly different among cactus growth forms. Columnar cacti (arborescent, creeping and short) showed a greater proportion of seed germination than barrel and globose cacti. The germination rate differed among growth forms and species. At constant temperatures, creeping columnar cacti presented a significantly higher germination rate than the other growth forms. With alternating temperatures, columnar cacti showed higher germination rates than the other growth forms. The low proportion of seeds that germinated for some species indicates that they show seed dormancy. Our results suggest that germination responses to light in the cactus family could be related to seed mass and phylogenetic constraints.

  2. Is low IQ related to risk of death by homicide? Testing an hypothesis using data from a longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, George David; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Gale, Catharine R

    2008-01-01

    Lower IQ test scores are related to an increased risk of violent assault. We tested the relation between IQ and death by homicide. In a prospective cohort study of 14,537 men (21 homicides), the association between lower IQ and an increased risk of homicide was lost after multiple adjustment....

  3. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 30 - Criteria Relating to Use of Financial Tests and Parent Company Guarantees for Providing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of total liabilities to net worth less than 2.0; a ratio of the sum of net income plus depreciation... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria Relating to Use of Financial Tests and Parent... MATERIAL Pt. 30, App. A Appendix A to Part 30—Criteria Relating to Use of Financial Tests and...

  4. The Moon as a Laser-ranged Test Body for General Relativity and New Gravitational Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agnello, Simone; Currie, Douglas

    Since the 1970s Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo/Lunokhod Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR) Arrays supplied some of the best tests of General Relativity (GR): possible changes in the gravitational constant, gravitational self-energy (PPN parameter beta), weak equivalence principle, geodetic precession, inverse-square force-law. Secondly, LLR has provided significant information on the composition of the deep interior of the Moon. LLR physics analysis also allows to set constraints on extensions of GR (like spacetime torsion) and, possibly, on new gravitational physics which may explain the gravitational universe without Dark Matter and Dark Energy (like, for example, Non-Minimally Coupled gravity, NMC). LLR is the only Apollo/Lunokhod experiment still in operation, since 45 years. In the 1970s Apollo/Lunokohd LLR Arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Since the ranging capabilities of ground stations improved by more than two orders of magnitude, now, because of the lunar librations, Apollo/Lunokhod CCR arrays dominate the error budget. With the US/Italy project "LLRRA21/MoonLIGHT (Lunar Laser Ranging Retroreflector Array for the 21st century / Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High accuracy Tests)", University of Maryland and INFN-LNF developed and tested a next-generation LLR payload made by a single, large CCR (100 mm diameter), unaffected by the effect of librations. In fact, we will show that MoonLIGHT reflectors will improve the LLR accuracy by a factor of ten to one hundred in a few years. INFN-LNF also developed a laser retroreflector micropayload to be deployed on the lunar surface to be laser-ranged by lunar orbiters. The latter micropayload will further extend the physics reach of Apollo, Lunokhod and MoonLIGHT CCRs to improve all precision tests of GR and new gravitational physics using LLR data. As an added value for the LRR and SLR (Satellite Laser ranging) disciplines INFN-LNF built and is

  5. Commensurate scale relations: Precise tests of quantum chromodynamics without scale or scheme ambiguity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, H.J. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1994-10-01

    We derive commensurate scale relations which relate perturbatively calculable QCD observables to each other, including the annihilation ratio R{sub e+}e{sup {minus}}, the heavy quark potential, {tau} decay, and radiative corrections to structure function sum rules. For each such observable one can define an effective charge, such as {alpha}{sub R}({radical}s)/{pi} {equivalent_to} R {sub e+}e{sup {minus}}({radical}s)/(3{Sigma}e{sub q}{sup 2}){minus}1. The commensurate scale relation connecting the effective charges for observables A and B has the form {alpha}{sub A}(Q{sub A}) {alpha}{sub B}(Q{sub B})(1 + r {sub A/B}{sub {pi}}/{sup {alpha}B} + {hor_ellipsis}), where the coefficient r{sub A/B} is independent of the number of flavors {integral} contributing to coupling renormalization, as in BLM scale-fixing. The ratio of scales Q{sub A}/Q{sub B} is unique at leading order and guarantees that the observables A and B pass through new quark thresholds at the same physical scale. In higher orders a different renormalization scale Q{sup n*} is assigned for each order n in the perturbative series such that the coefficients of the series are identical to that of a invariant theory. The commensurate scale relations and scales satisfy the renormalization group transitivity rule which ensures that predictions in PQCD are independent of the choice of an intermediate renormalization scheme C. In particular, scale-fixed predictions can be made without reference to theoretically constructed singular renormalization schemes such as MS. QCD can thus be tested in a new and precise way by checking that the effective charges of observables track both in their relative normalization and in their commensurate scale dependence. The commensurate scale relations which relate the radiative corrections to the annihilation ratio R{sub e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}} to the radiative corrections for the Bjorken and Gross-Llewellyn Smith sum rules are particularly elegant and interesting.

  6. Testing the Relations Between Impulsivity-Related Traits, Suicidality, and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: A Test of the Incremental Validity of the UPPS Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lynam, Donald R.; Joshua D. Miller; Miller, Drew J.; Bornovalova, Marina A.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has received significant attention as a predictor of suicidal behavior (SB) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Despite significant promise, trait impulsivity has received less attention. Understanding the relations between impulsivity and SB and NSSI is confounded, unfortunately, by the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity. This study examined the relations among 4 personality pathways to impulsive behavior studied via the UPPS model of impulsivity and SB...

  7. Disentangling the Attention Network Test: Behavioral, Event Related Potentials and neural source analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro eGalvao-Carmona

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study of the attentional system remains a challenge for current neuroscience. The Attention Network Test (ANT was designed to study simultaneously three different attentional networks (alerting, orienting and executive based in subtraction of different experimental conditions. However, some studies recommend caution with these calculations due to the interactions between the attentional networks. In particular, it is highly relevant that several interpretations about attentional impairment have arisen from these calculations in diverse pathologies. Event Related Potentials (ERPs and neural source analysis can be applied to disentangle the relationships between these attentional networks not specifically shown by behavioural measures. Results. This study shows that there is a basic level of alerting (tonic alerting in the no cue condition, represented by a slow negative trend in the ERP trace prior to the onset of the target stimuli. A progressive increase in the CNV amplitude related to the amount of information provided by the cue conditions is also shown. Neural source analysis reveals specific modulations of the CNV related to a task-related expectancy presented in the no cue condition; a late modulation triggered by the central cue condition and probably representing a generic motor preparation; and an early and late modulation for spatial cue condition suggesting specific motor and sensory preactivation. Finally, the first component in the information processing of the target stimuli modulated by the interaction between orienting network and the executive system can be represented by N1. Conclusions. The ANT is useful as a paradigm to study specific attentional mechanisms and their interactions. However, calculation of network effects is based in subtractions with non-comparable experimental conditions, as evidenced by the present data, which can induce misinterpretations in the study of the attentional capacity in human

  8. Testing the Asteroseismic Scaling Relations for Red Giants with Eclipsing Binaries Observed by Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulme, P.; McKeever, J.; Jackiewicz, J.; Rawls, M. L.; Corsaro, E.; Mosser, B.; Southworth, J.; Mahadevan, S.; Bender, C.; Deshpande, R.

    2016-12-01

    Given the potential of ensemble asteroseismology for understanding fundamental properties of large numbers of stars, it is critical to determine the accuracy of the scaling relations on which these measurements are based. From several powerful validation techniques, all indications so far show that stellar radius estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations are accurate to within a few percent. Eclipsing binary systems hosting at least one star with detectable solar-like oscillations constitute the ideal test objects for validating asteroseismic radius and mass inferences. By combining radial velocity (RV) measurements and photometric time series of eclipses, it is possible to determine the masses and radii of each component of a double-lined spectroscopic binary. We report the results of a four-year RV survey performed with the échelle spectrometer of the Astrophysical Research Consortium’s 3.5 m telescope and the APOGEE spectrometer at Apache Point Observatory. We compare the masses and radii of 10 red giants (RGs) obtained by combining radial velocities and eclipse photometry with the estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations. We find that the asteroseismic scaling relations overestimate RG radii by about 5% on average and masses by about 15% for stars at various stages of RG evolution. Systematic overestimation of mass leads to underestimation of stellar age, which can have important implications for ensemble asteroseismology used for Galactic studies. As part of a second objective, where asteroseismology is used for understanding binary systems, we confirm that oscillations of RGs in close binaries can be suppressed enough to be undetectable, a hypothesis that was proposed in a previous work.

  9. Testing Of The Muon Port Card And Related Electronics For The Cms Endcap Muon Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Pawloski, G J

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is related to the design of the level one endcap muon trigger system for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This system is designed to use muon measurements to help reduce a computationally overwhelming 40 MHz signal of collision data (∼40 TBytes/sec) to a manageable 33kHz (∼33GBytes/sec) [1]. The main focus of this thesis will be on the validation of one of the electronics boards in the trigger device chain. This board is used to pick the 3 most interesting muons out of 18 measured in a single crossing. Referred to as the Muon Port Card, this card will be located on the periphery of the detector and can be tested through a VME back plane.

  10. Planetary ephemeris construction and general relativity tests of PPN-formalism with MESSENGER radioscience data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2013-10-01

    Current knowledge of Mercury orbit is mainly brought by the direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft orbiting Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the Mercury orbit. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity test of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (β and γ) are most stringent than previous results.

  11. Use of MESSENGER radioscience data to improve planetary ephemeris and to test general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Ashok; Laskar, Jacques; Manche, Herve; Gastineau, Mickael

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of Mercury orbit is mainly brought by the direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft orbiting Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the orbit of Mercury. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity test of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters are most stringent than previous results.

  12. Green-Kubo relation for viscosity tested using experimental data for a 2D dusty plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Bin; Cohen, E G D

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical Green-Kubo relation for viscosity is tested using experimentally obtained data. In a dusty plasma experiment, micron-size dust particles are introduced into a partially-ionized argon plasma, where they become negatively charged. They are electrically levitated to form a single-layer Wigner crystal, which is subsequently melted using laser heating. In the liquid phase, these dust particles experience interparticle electric repulsion, laser heating, and friction from the ambient neutral argon gas, and they can be considered to be in a nonequilibrium steady state. Direct measurements of the positions and velocities of individual dust particles are then used to obtain a time series for an off-diagonal element of the stress tensor and its time autocorrelation function. This calculation also requires the interparticle potential, which was not measured experimentally, but was obtained using a Debye-H\\"{u}ckel-type model with experimentally determined parameters. Integrating the autocorrelation functi...

  13. Statistical Test of Distance-Duality Relation with Type Ia Supernovae and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    We use cosmological luminosity distance ($d_L$) from the JLA Type Ia supernovae compilation and angular-diameter distance ($d_A$) based on BOSS and WiggleZ baryon acoustic oscillation measurements to test the distance-duality relation $\\eta \\equiv d_L / [ (1 + z)^2 d_A ] = 1$. The $d_L$ measurements are matched to $d_A$ redshift by a statistically-motivated compression procedure. By means of Monte Carlo methods, non-trivial and correlated distributions of $\\eta$ can be explored in a straightforward manner without resorting to a particular evolution template $\\eta(z)$. Assuming Planck cosmological parameter uncertainty, we find 5% constraints in favor of $\\eta = 1$, consistent with the weaker 7--10% constraints obtained using WiggleZ data. These results stand in contrast to previous claims that $\\eta < 1$ has been found close to or above $1\\sigma$ level.

  14. Physical aggression, compromised social support, and 10-year marital outcomes: Testing a relational spillover model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kieran T; Pasch, Lauri A; Lawrence, Erika; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a relational spillover model of physical aggression whereby physical aggression affects marital outcomes due to its effects on how spouses ask for and provide support to one another. Newlywed couples (n = 172) reported levels of physical aggression over the past year and engaged in interactions designed to elicit social support; marital adjustment, and stability were assessed periodically over the first 10 years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and 10-year marital adjustment levels whereas positive support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and divorce status. These findings emphasize the need to look beyond conflict when explaining how aggression affects relationships and when working with couples with a history of physical aggression who are seeking to improve their relationships.

  15. Implicit Theories Relate to Youth Psychopathology, But How? A Longitudinal Test of Two Predictive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleider, Jessica L; Weisz, John R

    2016-08-01

    Research shows relations between entity theories-i.e., beliefs that traits and abilities are unchangeable-and youth psychopathology. A common interpretation has been that entity theories lead to psychopathology, but another possibility is that psychopathology predicts entity theories. The two models carry different implications for developmental psychopathology and intervention design. We tested each model's plausibility, examining longitudinal associations between entity theories of thoughts, feelings, and behavior and psychopathology in early adolescents across one school year (N = 59, 52 % female, ages 11-14, 0 % attrition). Baseline entity theories did not predict increases in psychopathology; instead, baseline psychopathology predicted increased entity theories over time. When symptom clusters were assessed individually, greater youth internalizing (but not externalizing) problems predicted subsequent increases in entity theories. Findings suggest that the commonly proposed predictive model may not be the only one warranting attention. They suggest that youth psychopathology may contribute to the development of certain kinds of entity theories.

  16. Supermassive Black Hole Tests of General Relativity with eLISA

    CERN Document Server

    Huwyler, Cédric; Jetzer, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the parameterized post-Einsteinian (ppE) scheme devised by Yunes and Pretorius, which introduces corrections to the post-Newtonian coefficients of the frequency domain gravitational waveform in order to emulate alternative theories of gravity, we compute analytical time domain waveforms that, after a numerical Fourier transform, aim to represent (phase corrected only) ppE waveforms. In this formalism, alternative theories manifest themselves via corrections to the phase and frequency, as predicted by General Relativity (GR), at different post-Newtonian (PN) orders. In order to present a generic test of alternative theories of gravity, we assume that the coupling constant of each alternative theory is manifestly positive, allowing corrections to the GR waveforms to be either positive or negative. By exploring the capabilities of massive black hole binary GR waveforms in the detection and parameter estimation of corrected time domain ppE signals, using the current eLISA configuration (as presented ...

  17. Selecting Video Key Frames Based on Relative Entropy and the Extreme Studentized Deviate Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejun Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the relative entropy and its square root as distance measures of neighboring video frames for video key frame extraction. We develop a novel approach handling both common and wavelet video sequences, in which the extreme Studentized deviate test is exploited to identify shot boundaries for segmenting a video sequence into shots. Then, video shots can be divided into different sub-shots, according to whether the video content change is large or not, and key frames are extracted from sub-shots. The proposed technique is general, effective and efficient to deal with video sequences of any kind. Our new approach can offer optional additional multiscale summarizations of video data, achieving a balance between having more details and maintaining less redundancy. Extensive experimental results show that the new scheme obtains very encouraging results in video key frame extraction, in terms of both objective evaluation metrics and subjective visual perception.

  18. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  19. Higher emotional intelligence is related to lower test anxiety among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadpanah M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Ahmadpanah,1 Mohammadreza Keshavarz,1 Mohammad Haghighi,1 Leila Jahangard,1 Hafez Bajoghli,2 Dena Sadeghi Bahmani,3 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,3 Serge Brand3,4 1Behavioral Disorders and Substances Abuse, Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; 2Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders, 4Department of Sport, Exercise and Health Science, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: For students attending university courses, experiencing test anxiety (TA dramatically impairs cognitive performance and success at exams. Whereas TA is a specific case of social phobia, emotional intelligence (EI is an umbrella term covering interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, along with positive stress management, adaptability, and mood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that higher EI and lower TA are associated. Further, sex differences were explored.Method: During an exam week, a total of 200 university students completed questionnaires covering sociodemographic information, TA, and EI.Results: Higher scores on EI traits were associated with lower TA scores. Relative to male participants, female participants reported higher TA scores, but not EI scores. Intrapersonal and interpersonal skills and mood predicted low TA, while sex, stress management, and adaptability were excluded from the equation.Conclusion: The pattern of results suggests that efforts to improve intrapersonal and interpersonal skills, and mood might benefit students with high TA. Specifically, social commitment might counteract TA. Keywords: test anxiety, emotional intelligence, students, interpersonal skills, intrapersonal skills

  20. Testing cold dark matter with the low mass Tully-Fisher relation

    CERN Document Server

    Blanton, Michael R; West, Andrew A

    2007-01-01

    The galaxy circular velocity function at small masses is related to the matter power spectrum on small scales. Although this function is well-studied for Local Group dwarfs, theoretical predictions and observational measurements are difficult for satellite galaxies, because of ram pressure and tidal stripping. By contrast, isolated dwarf galaxies are less affected by these processes, and almost always have enough 21cm emission to trace their dynamics robustly. Here, we test cold dark matter cosmology using isolated low mass dwarf galaxies from the SDSS with measured 21cm widths. We find consistency between the predicted and observed number density of isolated galaxies down to circular velocities of 50 km/s. Our technique yields a direct test of small-scale cosmology independent of the Lyman-alpha forest power spectrum, but our sample is currently statistically less powerful: warm dark matter particles heavier than 0.5 keV cannot be ruled out. Our major systematic uncertainty is the surface brightness limit of...

  1. TRENDS: A flight test relational database user's guide and reference manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, M. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.; Cross, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    This report is designed to be a user's guide and reference manual for users intending to access rotocraft test data via TRENDS, the relational database system which was developed as a tool for the aeronautical engineer with no programming background. This report has been written to assist novice and experienced TRENDS users. TRENDS is a complete system for retrieving, searching, and analyzing both numerical and narrative data, and for displaying time history and statistical data in graphical and numerical formats. This manual provides a 'guided tour' and a 'user's guide' for the new and intermediate-skilled users. Examples for the use of each menu item within TRENDS is provided in the Menu Reference section of the manual, including full coverage for TIMEHIST, one of the key tools. This manual is written around the XV-15 Tilt Rotor database, but does include an appendix on the UH-60 Blackhawk database. This user's guide and reference manual establishes a referrable source for the research community and augments NASA TM-101025, TRENDS: The Aeronautical Post-Test, Database Management System, Jan. 1990, written by the same authors.

  2. Reliability of screening tests for health-related problems among low-income elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Teresa Saraiva Lino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Screening tests for health problems can identify elderly people who should undergo the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, enabling the planning of actions to prevent disability. The aim of this study was to analyze the inter-rater reliability (IRR of self-assessment questions (SAQ and performance tests (PT recommended in Brazil, in a sample of low-income elderly people, through an exploratory study performed with 165 elderly assessed by two professionals on different days. IRR was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for continuous variables and the kappa statistic for categorical ones. The IRR for the PT (muscle strength, mobility body mass index, vision was excellent and presented ICC values greater than 0.75. By contrast, the IRR for SAQ (urinary incontinence, self-perceived health and hearing impairment was intermediate. Only the fall-related item presented a good IRR. In this study single SAQ had poor reliability when compared to PT, suggesting the necessity of revision of subjective self-assessment items with low reproducibility before implementation.

  3. Feedback-related brain activity predicts learning from feedback in multiple-choice testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Different event-related potentials (ERPs) have been shown to correlate with learning from feedback in decision-making tasks and with learning in explicit memory tasks. In the present study, we investigated which ERPs predict learning from corrective feedback in a multiple-choice test, which combines elements from both paradigms. Participants worked through sets of multiple-choice items of a Swahili-German vocabulary task. Whereas the initial presentation of an item required the participants to guess the answer, corrective feedback could be used to learn the correct response. Initial analyses revealed that corrective feedback elicited components related to reinforcement learning (FRN), as well as to explicit memory processing (P300) and attention (early frontal positivity). However, only the P300 and early frontal positivity were positively correlated with successful learning from corrective feedback, whereas the FRN was even larger when learning failed. These results suggest that learning from corrective feedback crucially relies on explicit memory processing and attentional orienting to corrective feedback, rather than on reinforcement learning.

  4. The Relative Abundance of Desert Tortoises on the Nevada Test Site within Ecological Landform Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Roy; Rautenstrauch, Kurt R.; Hall, Derek B.; Ostler, W. Kent

    1998-09-01

    Sign-survey transects were sampled in 1996 to better determine the relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These transects were sampled within ecological land-form units (ELUs), which are small, ecologically homogeneous units of land. Two-hundred and six ELUs were sampled by walking 332 transects totaling 889 kilometers (km) (552 miles [mi]). These ELUs covered 528 km{sup 2} (204 mi{sup 2}). Two-hundred and eighty-one sign were counted. An average of 0.32 sign was found per km walked. Seventy percent of the area sampled had a very low abundance of tortoises, 29 percent had a low abundance, and 1 percent had a moderate abundance. A revised map of the relative abundance of desert tortoise on the NTS is presented. Within the 1,330 km{sup 2} (514 mi{sup 2}) of desert tortoise habitat on the NTS, 49 percent is classified as having no tortoises or a very low abundance, 18 percent has a low or moderate abundance, 12 percent is unclassified land being used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, and the remaining 21 percent still has an unknown abundance of desert tortoises. Based on the results of this work, the amount of tortoise habitat previously classified as having an unknown or low-moderate abundance, and on which clearance surveys and on-site monitoring was required, has been reduced by 20 percent.

  5. [Comparison of Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter (PHP) test and Amsler grid test in the diagnosis of different stages of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmeier, J; Zorn, M M; Lang, G K; Botros, Y T; Lang, G E

    2006-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years of age. A rapid loss of vision occurs especially in cases with choroidal neovascularisation. Early detection of ARMD and timely treatment are mandatory. We have prospectively studied the results of two diagnostic self tests for the early detection of metamorphopsia and scotoma, the PHP test and the Amsler grid test, in different stages of ARMD. Patients with ARMD and best corrected visual acuity of 6/30 or better (Snellen charts) were examined with a standardised protocol, including supervised Amsler grid examination and PHP, a new device for metamorphopsia or scotoma measurement, based on the hyperacuity phenomenon in the central 14 degrees of the visual field. The stages of ARMD were independently graded in a masked fashion by stereoscopic ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic fundus colour photographs, fluorescein angiography, and OCT. The patients were subdivided into 3 non-neovascular groups [early, late (RPE atrophy > 175 microm) and geographic atrophy], a neovascular group (classic and occult CNV) and an age-matched control group (healthy volunteers). 140 patients, with ages ranging from 50 to 90 years (median 68 years), were included in the study. Best corrected visual acuity ranged from 6/30 to 6/6 with a median of 6/12. 95 patients were diagnosed as non-neovascular ARMD. Thirty eyes had early ARMD (9 were tested positive by the PHP test and 9 by the Amsler grid test), and 50 late ARMD (positive: PHP test 23, Amsler grid test 26). The group with geographic atrophy consisted of 15 eyes (positive: PHP test 13, Amsler grid test 10). Forty-five patients presented with neovascular ARMD (positive: PHP test 38, Amsler grid test 36), 34 volunteers served as control group (positive: PHP test 1, Amsler grid test 5). The PHP and Amsler grid tests revealed comparable results detecting metamorphopsia and scotoma in early ARMD (30 vs. 30 %) and late ARMD (46 vs. 52 %). However, the

  6. A Computational Tool for Testing Dose-related Trend Using an Age-adjusted Bootstrap-based Poly-k Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Moon

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A computational tool for testing for a dose-related trend and/or a pairwise difference in the incidence of an occult tumor via an age-adjusted bootstrap-based poly-k test and the original poly-k test is presented in this paper. The poly-k test (Bailer and Portier 1988 is a survival-adjusted Cochran-Armitage test, which achieves robustness to effects of differential mortality across dose groups. The original poly-k test is asymptotically standard normal under the null hypothesis. However, the asymptotic normality is not valid if there is a deviation from the tumor onset distribution that is assumed in this test. Our age-adjusted bootstrap-based poly-k test assesses the significance of assumed asymptotic normal tests and investigates an empirical distribution of the original poly-k test statistic using an age-adjusted bootstrap method. A tumor of interest is an occult tumor for which the time to onset is not directly observable. Since most of the animal carcinogenicity studies are designed with a single terminal sacrifice, the present tool is applicable to rodent tumorigenicity assays that have a single terminal sacrifice. The present tool takes input information simply from a user screen and reports testing results back to the screen through a user-interface. The computational tool is implemented in C/C++ and is applied to analyze a real data set as an example. Our tool enables the FDA and the pharmaceutical industry to implement a statistical analysis of tumorigenicity data from animal bioassays via our age-adjusted bootstrap-based poly-k test and the original poly-k test which has been adopted by the National Toxicology Program as its standard statistical test.

  7. Proportion of adults fasting for lipid testing relative to guideline changes in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene; Viczko, Jeannine; Naugler, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines have historically recommended measuring lipid profile tests in a fasting state. However, in April 2011 and 2014, the Canadian city of Calgary and its province of Alberta, respectively, have changed their lipid guidelines to allow testing for individuals in any fasting state; several years prior to the release of the 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Hypertension Canada guidelines. The purpose of this study was to document the proportion of individuals in Calgary who fasted for a lipid encounter in relation to the change in various guidelines and policies. Counts were collected each month per gender from January 1, 2010 to June 30, 2016 for community-based adults ≥18years old who fasted (≥8h) or did not fast (fasting state. The proportion of adults who fasted declined from 98.59%±0.379% (mean±SD) in 2010 to 41.65%±1.295% (mean±SD) in 2016. However, a marked decline in the proportion of adults fasting for a lipid encounter was not observed until February 2015, which coincided with the release of Alberta's Toward Optimized Practice Clinical Practice Guidelines. This documentation of individuals fasting for a lipid encounter may assist other jurisdictions in Canada with the new nonfasting lipid guideline changes. We recommend releasing provincial clinical practice guidelines, in addition to laboratory bulletins and continuing medical education presentations, regarding the new nonfasting lipid recommendations in other jurisdictions to ensure community patients are aware of this change. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relation between heart rate recovery after exercise testing and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa Lins, Tereza Cristina; Valente, Lucila Maria; Sobral Filho, Dário Celestino; Barbosa e Silva, Odwaldo

    2015-01-01

    Impaired heart rate (HR) recovery after exercise testing is considered a predictor of cardiovascular mortality as it reflects vagus nerve dysfunction. To assess the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and HR recovery after exercise. We analyzed the records of 2443 patients of both sexes, aged between 20 and 59 years, in sinus rhythm, not using negative chronotropic agents and with no myocardial ischemic response to exercise testing carried out at a specialist clinic, between 2005 and 2011. BMI was categorized as normal (18.5-30 kg/m(2)). The different BMI groups were compared in terms of HR recovery after exercise, which was calculated as the difference between maximum HR during exercise and in the first minute of recovery. Recovery was considered impaired when the difference was ≤12 bpm. Eighty-seven (3.6%) patients presented impaired recovery, which was three times more prevalent in the obese group and twice as prevalent in the overweight group compared with the normal group (p<0.001 and p=0.010, respectively). Obese patients presented higher basal HR and lower maximum HR, as well as reduced chronotropic reserve (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, impaired HR recovery was associated with overweight (relative risk [RR]=1.8; p=0.035), obesity (RR=2; p=0.016), number of metabolic equivalents (RR=0.82; p<0.001) and resting HR (RR=1.05; p<0.001). The hazard ratio for hypertension was 2 (p=0.083, NS). Impaired HR recovery was associated with higher BMI, demonstrating that obese individuals present vagus nerve dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Criterion-Related Validity of Sit-and-Reach Tests for Estimating Hamstring and Lumbar Extensibility: a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Merino-Marban, Rafael; Viciana, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the present meta-analysis was to examine the scientific literature on the criterion-related validity of sit-and-reach tests for estimating hamstring and lumbar extensibility. For this purpose relevant studies were searched from seven electronic databases dated up through December 2012. Primary outcomes of criterion-related validity were Pearson´s zero-order correlation coefficients (r) between sit-and-reach tests and hamstrings and/or lumbar extensibility criterion measures. Then, from the included studies, the Hunter- Schmidt´s psychometric meta-analysis approach was conducted to estimate population criterion- related validity of sit-and-reach tests. Firstly, the corrected correlation mean (rp), unaffected by statistical artefacts (i.e., sampling error and measurement error), was calculated separately for each sit-and-reach test. Subsequently, the three potential moderator variables (sex of participants, age of participants, and level of hamstring extensibility) were examined by a partially hierarchical analysis. Of the 34 studies included in the present meta-analysis, 99 correlations values across eight sit-and-reach tests and 51 across seven sit-and-reach tests were retrieved for hamstring and lumbar extensibility, respectively. The overall results showed that all sit-and-reach tests had a moderate mean criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility (rp = 0.46-0.67), but they had a low mean for estimating lumbar extensibility (rp = 0. 16-0.35). Generally, females, adults and participants with high levels of hamstring extensibility tended to have greater mean values of criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility. When the use of angular tests is limited such as in a school setting or in large scale studies, scientists and practitioners could use the sit-and-reach tests as a useful alternative for hamstring extensibility estimation, but not for estimating lumbar extensibility. Key PointsOverall sit

  10. Gender differences in mathematics anxiety and the relation to mathematics performance while controlling for test anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devine Amy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematics anxiety (MA, a state of discomfort associated with performing mathematical tasks, is thought to affect a notable proportion of the school age population. Some research has indicated that MA negatively affects mathematics performance and that girls may report higher levels of MA than boys. On the other hand some research has indicated that boys’ mathematics performance is more negatively affected by MA than girls’ performance is. The aim of the current study was to measure girls’ and boys’ mathematics performance as well as their levels of MA while controlling for test anxiety (TA a construct related to MA but which is typically not controlled for in MA studies. Methods Four-hundred and thirty three British secondary school children in school years 7, 8 and 10 completed customised mental mathematics tests and MA and TA questionnaires. Results No gender differences emerged for mathematics performance but levels of MA and TA were higher for girls than for boys. Girls and boys showed a positive correlation between MA and TA and a negative correlation between MA and mathematics performance. TA was also negatively correlated with mathematics performance, but this relationship was stronger for girls than for boys. When controlling for TA, the negative correlation between MA and performance remained for girls only. Regression analyses revealed that MA was a significant predictor of performance for girls but not for boys. Conclusions Our study has revealed that secondary school children experience MA. Importantly, we controlled for TA which is typically not controlled for in MA studies. Girls showed higher levels of MA than boys and high levels of MA were related to poorer levels of mathematics performance. As well as potentially having a detrimental effect on ‘online’ mathematics performance, past research has shown that high levels of MA can have negative consequences for later mathematics education

  11. Analysis and testing of gyroscope performance for the Gravity Probe B relativity mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Yoshimi

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation describes the analysis and experimental testing of the performance of electrostatically suspended vacuum gyroscopes (ESVG) designed for the Gravity Probe B Relativity Experiment (GP-B). The GP-B mission is a satellite-based gyroscope experiment currently under joint development by NASA and Stanford University. It is designed to test two predictions of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity: the geodetic effect and the frame-dragging effect. They are predicted to be 6.6 and 0.042 arc-sec/year, respectively, for a planned circular polar orbit. The primary goal of the GP-B mission is to measure the geodetic effect to better than 0.01%, and the frame-dragging effect to better than 1%. In order to achieve this goal, the non-relativistic drift rate of the gyroscope must be less than 0.3 milli-arc-sec/year. Presented is the analysis of the part of the Newtonian torque on the gyroscope rotor that is due to the electrostatic support, estimation of the science-mission drift rate, and experimental validation of the theoretical torque modeling. The analysis of the electrostatic torque indicates that the torque depends on both the close-to-perfect rotor shape with very minor manufacturing asphericity, and the voltage applied to the electrodes. To estimate the science-mission drift rate, we used the measured asphericity of an existing rotor that was below flight quality. Throughout the analysis, the estimated drift rate of the gyroscope induced by the non-relativistic effect was less than the maximum allowed drift rate of 0.3 milli-arc-sec/year for this effect. This result is gratifying because the actual flight rotors will exhibit a much lower non-relativistic drift rate. In the laboratory, parameters that characterize the electrostatic torque were measured by changing the voltages applied to the electrodes and the position of the gyroscope rotor in its housing cavity. The results match well with the theoretical expectations, confirming the validity of the

  12. Gender differences in mathematics anxiety and the relation to mathematics performance while controlling for test anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Amy; Fawcett, Kayleigh; Szűcs, Dénes; Dowker, Ann

    2012-07-09

    Mathematics anxiety (MA), a state of discomfort associated with performing mathematical tasks, is thought to affect a notable proportion of the school age population. Some research has indicated that MA negatively affects mathematics performance and that girls may report higher levels of MA than boys. On the other hand some research has indicated that boys' mathematics performance is more negatively affected by MA than girls' performance is. The aim of the current study was to measure girls' and boys' mathematics performance as well as their levels of MA while controlling for test anxiety (TA) a construct related to MA but which is typically not controlled for in MA studies. Four-hundred and thirty three British secondary school children in school years 7, 8 and 10 completed customised mental mathematics tests and MA and TA questionnaires. No gender differences emerged for mathematics performance but levels of MA and TA were higher for girls than for boys. Girls and boys showed a positive correlation between MA and TA and a negative correlation between MA and mathematics performance. TA was also negatively correlated with mathematics performance, but this relationship was stronger for girls than for boys. When controlling for TA, the negative correlation between MA and performance remained for girls only. Regression analyses revealed that MA was a significant predictor of performance for girls but not for boys. Our study has revealed that secondary school children experience MA. Importantly, we controlled for TA which is typically not controlled for in MA studies. Girls showed higher levels of MA than boys and high levels of MA were related to poorer levels of mathematics performance. As well as potentially having a detrimental effect on 'online' mathematics performance, past research has shown that high levels of MA can have negative consequences for later mathematics education. Therefore MA warrants attention in the mathematics classroom, particularly because

  13. Speed, force, and power values produced from nonmotorized treadmill test are related to sprinting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangine, Gerald T; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Wells, Adam J; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; McCormack, William P; Robinson, Edward H; Fragala, Maren S; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-07-01

    The relationships between 30-m sprint time and performance on a nonmotorized treadmill (TM) test and a vertical jump test were determined in this investigation. Seventy-eight physically active men and women (22.9 ± 2.7 years; 73.0 ± 14.7 kg; 170.7 ± 10.4 cm) performed a 30-second maximal sprint on the curve nonmotorized TM after 1 familiarization trial. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients produced significant (p ≤ 0.05) moderate to very strong relationships between 30-m sprint time and body mass (r = -0.37), %fat (r = 0.79), peak power (PP) (r = -0.59), relative PP (r = -0.42), time to peak velocity (r = -0.23) and TM sprint times at 10 m (r = 0.48), 20 m (r = 0.59), 30 m (r = 0.67), 40 m (r = 0.71), and 50 m (r = 0.75). Strong relationships between 30-m sprint time and peak (r = -0.479) and mean vertical jump power (r = -0.559) were also observed. Subsequently, stepwise regression was used to produce two 30-m sprint time prediction models from TM performance (TM1: body mass + TM data and TM2: body composition + TM data) in a validation group (n = 39), and then crossvalidated against another group (n = 39). As no significant differences were observed between these groups, data were combined (n = 72) and used to create the final prediction models (TM1: r = 0.75, standard error of the estimate (SEE) = 0.27 seconds; TM2: r = 0.84, SEE = 0.22 seconds). These final movement-specific models seem to be more accurate in predicting 30-m sprint time than derived peak (r = 0.23, SEE = 0.48 seconds) and mean vertical jump power (r = 0.31, SEE = 0.45 seconds) equations. Consequently, sprinting performance on the TM can significantly predict short-distance sprint time. It, therefore, may be used to obtain movement-specific measures of sprinting force, velocity, and power in a controlled environment from a single 30-second maximal sprinting test.

  14. Which Psychological Factors are Related to HIV Testing? A Quantitative Systematic Review of Global Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeli, Michael; Pady, Kirsten; Wroe, Abigail L

    2016-04-01

    Deciding to test for HIV is necessary for receiving HIV treatment and care among those who are HIV-positive. This article presents a systematic review of quantitative studies on relationships between psychological (cognitive and affective) variables and HIV testing. Sixty two studies were included (fifty six cross sectional). Most measured lifetime testing. HIV knowledge, risk perception and stigma were the most commonly measured psychological variables. Meta-analysis was carried out on the relationships between HIV knowledge and testing, and HIV risk perception and testing. Both relationships were positive and significant, representing small effects (HIV knowledge, d = 0.22, 95 % CI 0.14-0.31, p testing included: perceived testing benefits, testing fear, perceived behavioural control/self-efficacy, knowledge of testing sites, prejudiced attitudes towards people living with HIV, and knowing someone with HIV. Research and practice implications are outlined.

  15. Tinetti mobility test is related to muscle mass and strength in non-institutionalized elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Francesco; Basile, Claudia; Liguori, Ilaria; Della-Morte, David; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Galizia, Gianluigi; Testa, Gianluca; Langellotto, Assunta; Cacciatore, Francesco; Bonaduce, Domenico; Abete, Pasquale

    2016-12-01

    Elderly people are characterized by a high prevalence of falls and sarcopenia. However, the relationship among Tinetti mobility test (TMT) score, a powerful tool to detect elderly people at risk of falls, and sarcopenia is still not thoroughly investigated. Thus, to determine the relationship between TMT score and muscle mass and strength, 337 elderly participants (mean age 77.1 ± 6.9 years) admitted to comprehensive geriatric assessment were enrolled. TMT score, muscle mass by bioimpedentiometer, and muscle strength by grip strength were evaluated. Muscle mass progressively decreased as TMT score decreased (from 15.3 ± 3.7 to 8.8 ± 1.8 kg/m(2); p for trend Tinetti score decreased (from 34.7 ± 8.0 to 23.7 ± 8.7 kg; p for trend 0.001). Linear regression analysis demonstrated that TMT score is linearly related with muscle mass (y = 4.5x + 0.4, r = 0.61; p score and muscle mass (r = 0.48, p = 0.024) and strength (r = 0.39, p = 0.046). The present study indicates that TMT score is significantly related to muscle mass and strength in non-institutionalized elderly participants. This evidence suggests that TMT score, together with evaluation of muscle mass and strength, may identify sarcopenic elderly participants at high risk of falls.

  16. Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2004-06-24

    This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

  17. Testing Taxonomic Predictivity of Foliar and Tuber Resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Wild Relatives of Potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiutti, A; Spooner, D M; Jansky, S H; Halterman, D A

    2015-09-01

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete phytopathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease found in potato-growing regions worldwide. Long-term management strategies to control late blight include the incorporation of host resistance to predominant strains. However, due to rapid genetic changes within pathogen populations, rapid and recurring identification and integration of novel host resistance traits is necessary. Wild relatives of potato offer a rich source of desirable traits, including late blight resistance, but screening methods can be time intensive. We tested the ability of taxonomy, ploidy, crossing group, breeding system, and geography to predict the presence of foliar and tuber late blight resistance in wild Solanum spp. Significant variation for resistance to both tuber and foliar late blight was found within and among species but there was no discernable predictive power based on taxonomic series, clade, ploidy, breeding system, elevation, or geographic location. We observed a moderate but significant correlation between tuber and foliar resistance within species. Although previously uncharacterized sources of both foliar and tuber resistance were identified, our study does not support an assumption that taxonomic or geographic data can be used to predict sources of late blight resistance in wild Solanum spp.

  18. Testing General Relativity's No-Hair Theorem with X-Ray Observations of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hoormann, Janie K; Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-01-01

    Despite its success in the weak gravity regime, General Relativity (GR) has yet to be verified in the regime of strong gravity. In this paper, we present the results of detailed ray tracing simulations aiming at clarifying if the combined information from X-ray spectroscopy, timing, and polarization observations of stellar mass and supermassive black holes can be used to test GR's no-hair theorem. The latter states that stationary astrophysical black holes are described by the Kerr-family of metrics with the black hole mass and spin being the only free parameters. We use four "non-Kerr metrics", some phenomenological in nature and others motivated by alternative theories of gravity, and study the observational signatures of deviations from the Kerr metric. Particular attention is given to the case when all the metrics are set to give the same Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) in quasi-Boyer Lindquist coordinates. We give a detailed discussion of similarities and differences of the observational signature...

  19. Values at stake: autonomy, responsibility, and trustworthiness in relation to genetic testing and personalized nutrition advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Karin; Juth, Niklas; Kjellström, Sofia; Meijboom, Franck L B; Görman, Ulf

    2013-07-01

    Personalized nutrition has the potential to enhance individual health control. It could be seen as a means to strengthen people's autonomy as they learn more about their personal health risks, and receive dietary advice accordingly. We examine in what sense personalized nutrition strengthens or weakens individual autonomy. The impact of personalized nutrition on autonomy is analyzed in relation to responsibility and trustworthiness. On a societal level, individualization of health promotion may be accompanied by the attribution of extended individual responsibility for one's health. This constitutes a dilemma of individualization, caused by a conflict between the right to individual freedom and societal interests. The extent to which personalized nutrition strengthens autonomy is consequently influenced by how responsibility for health is allocated to individuals. Ethically adequate allocation of responsibility should focus on prospective responsibility and be differentiated with regard to individual differences concerning the capacity of adults to take responsibility. The impact of personalized nutrition on autonomy also depends on its methodological design. Owing to the complexity of information received, personalized nutrition through genetic testing (PNTGT) is open to misinterpretation and may not facilitate informed choices and autonomy. As new technologies, personalized nutrition and PNTGT are subject to issues of trust. To strengthen autonomy, trust should be approached in terms of trustworthiness. Trustworthiness implies that an organization that develops or introduces personalized nutrition can show that it is competent to deal with both the technical and moral dimensions at stake and that its decisions are motivated by the interests and expectations of the truster.

  20. Supermassive black hole tests of general relativity with eLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwyler, Cédric; Porter, Edward K.; Jetzer, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the parametrized post-Einsteinian (ppE) scheme devised by Yunes and Pretorius, which introduces corrections to the post-Newtonian coefficients of the frequency domain gravitational waveform in order to emulate alternative theories of gravity, we compute analytical time domain waveforms that, after a numerical Fourier transform, aim to represent (phase corrected only) ppE waveforms. In this formalism, alternative theories manifest themselves via corrections to the phase and frequency, as predicted by general relativity (GR), at different post-Newtonian (PN) orders. To present a generic test of alternative theories of gravity, we assume that the coupling constant of each alternative theory is manifestly positive, allowing corrections to the GR waveforms to be either positive or negative. By exploring the capabilities of massive black hole binary GR waveforms in the detection and parameter estimation of corrected time domain ppE signals, using the current eLISA configuration (as presented for the European Space Agency Cosmic Vision L3 mission), we demonstrate that for corrections arising at higher than 1PN order in phase and frequency GR waveforms are sufficient for both detecting and estimating the parameters of alternative theory signals. However, for theories introducing corrections at the 0 and 0.5PN orders, GR waveforms are not capable of covering the entire parameter space, requiring the use of non-GR waveforms for detection and parameter estimation.

  1. Use of MESSENGER radioscience data to improve planetary ephemeris and to test general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, A. K.; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2014-01-01

    The current knowledge of Mercury's orbit has mainly been gained by direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and by five Mercury flybys made with Mariner 10 in the 70s, and with MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the orbit of Mercury. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity tests of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (γ and β) are more stringent than previous results.

  2. Is procrastination related to sleep quality? Testing an application of the procrastination–health model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuschia M. Sirois

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite a growing body of research on the consequences of procrastination for health and well-being, there is little research focused on testing or explaining the potential links between procrastination and sleep quality. Using the procrastination–health model as our guiding conceptual lens, we addressed this gap by examining how and why trait procrastination may be linked to various dimensions of sleep quality across two student samples. In Study 1, procrastination was associated with feeling unrested, but not with sleep disturbance frequency, in a sample of Greek undergraduate students (N = 141. In Study 2, bootstrapping analysis of the indirect effects of procrastination on an index of sleep quality through perceived stress in a sample of Canadian students (N = 339 was significant, supporting an extended procrastination–health model view of how chronic self-regulation failure may compromise sleep quality. Given the potential for dynamic and reciprocal relations among procrastination, stress, and sleep quality, suggested by the current and other research, the ways in which procrastination may contribute to and be influenced by poor sleep quality warrant further investigation.

  3. Numerical relativity for D dimensional axially symmetric space-times: formalism and code tests

    CERN Document Server

    Zilhao, Miguel; Sperhake, Ulrich; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos; Nerozzi, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The numerical evolution of Einstein's field equations in a generic background has the potential to answer a variety of important questions in physics: from applications to the gauge-gravity duality, to modelling black hole production in TeV gravity scenarios, analysis of the stability of exact solutions and tests of Cosmic Censorship. In order to investigate these questions, we extend numerical relativity to more general space-times than those investigated hitherto, by developing a framework to study the numerical evolution of D dimensional vacuum space-times with an SO(D-2) isometry group for D\\ge 5, or SO(D-3) for D\\ge 6. Performing a dimensional reduction on a (D-4)-sphere, the D dimensional vacuum Einstein equations are rewritten as a 3+1 dimensional system with source terms, and presented in the Baumgarte, Shapiro, Shibata and Nakamura (BSSN) formulation. This allows the use of existing 3+1 dimensional numerical codes with small adaptations. Brill-Lindquist initial data are constructed in D dimensions an...

  4. Extending cosmological tests of General Relativity with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Tests of general relativity (GR) are still in their infancy on cosmological scales, but forthcoming experiments promise to greatly improve their precision over a wide range of distance scales and redshifts. One such experiment, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will carry out several wide and deep surveys of resolved and unresolved neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line-emitting galaxies, mapping a significant fraction of the sky from $0 \\le z \\lesssim 6$. I present forecasts for the ability of a suite of possible SKA HI surveys to detect deviations from GR by reconstructing the cosmic expansion and growth history. SKA Phase 1 intensity mapping surveys can achieve sub-1% measurements of $f\\sigma_8$ out to $z\\approx 1$, with an SKA1-MID Band 2 survey out to $z \\lesssim 0.6$ able to surpass contemporary spectroscopic galaxy surveys such as DESI and Euclid in terms of constraints on modified gravity parameters if challenges such as foreground contamination can be tackled effectively. A more futuristic Phase 2 HI survey...

  5. Relative numerosity discrimination in the pigeon: further tests of the linear-exponential-ratio model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Armando; Keen, Richard

    2002-04-28

    This study tested a model of how animals discriminate the relative numerosity of stimuli in successive or sequential presentation tasks. In a discrete-trials procedure, pigeons were shown one light for nf times and then another for nl times. Next they received food for choosing the light that had occurred the least-number of times during the sample. At issue were (a) how performance varies with the interval between the two stimulus sets (the interblock interval) and the interval between the end of the sample and the beginning of the choice period (the retention interval); and (b) whether a simple mathematical model of the discrimination process could account for the data. The model assumed that the influence of a stimulus on choice increases linearly when the stimulus is presented, but decays exponentially when the stimulus is absent; choice probability is given by the ratio of the influence values of the two stimuli. The model also assumed that as the retention interval elapses there is an increasing probability that the ongoing discriminative process be disrupted and then the animal responds randomly. Results showed that increasing the interblock intervals reduced the probability of choosing the last stimulus of the sample as the least-frequent one. Increasing the retention interval reduced accuracy without inducing any stimulus bias. The model accounted well for the major trends in the data.

  6. Testing General Relativity on Horizon Scales and the Primordial non-Gaussianity

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uros; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2011-01-01

    The proper general relativistic description of the observed galaxy power spectrum is substantially different from the standard Newtonian description on large scales, providing a unique opportunity to test general relativity on horizon scales. Using the Einstein equations, the general relativistic effects can be classified as two new terms that represent the velocity and the gravitational potential, coupling to the time evolution of galaxy number density and Hubble parameter. Compared to the dominant density and velocity redshift-space distortion terms, the former scales as H/k and correlates the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier modes, while the latter scales as (H/k)^2, where k is the comoving wave number and H is the conformal Hubble parameter. We use the recently developed methods to reduce the sampling variance and shot noise to show that in an all sky galaxy redshift survey at low redshift the velocity term can be measured at 10-sigma confidence level, if one can utilize halos of mass M>10^{10} Msu...

  7. The Relation of Arm Exercise Peak Heart Rate to Stress Test Results and Outcome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xian, Hong; Liu, Weijian; Marshall, Cynthia; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Martin, III, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSEArm exercise is an alternative to pharmacologic stress testing for >50% of patients unable to perform treadmill exercise but no data exist regarding the effect of attained peak arm exercise heart rate on test sensitivity...

  8. Testing robustness of relative complexity measure method constructing robust phylogenetic trees for Galanthus L. Using the relative complexity measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Most phylogeny analysis methods based on molecular sequences use multiple alignment where the quality of the alignment, which is dependent on the alignment parameters, determines the accuracy of the resulting trees. Different parameter combinations chosen for the multiple alignment may result in different phylogenies. A new non-alignment based approach, Relative Complexity Measure (RCM), has been introduced to tackle this problem and proven to work in fungi and mitochondrial DNA. Result In this work, we present an application of the RCM method to reconstruct robust phylogenetic trees using sequence data for genus Galanthus obtained from different regions in Turkey. Phylogenies have been analyzed using nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences. Results showed that, the tree obtained from nuclear ribosomal RNA gene sequences was more robust, while the tree obtained from the chloroplast DNA showed a higher degree of variation. Conclusions Phylogenies generated by Relative Complexity Measure were found to be robust and results of RCM were more reliable than the compared techniques. Particularly, to overcome MSA-based problems, RCM seems to be a reasonable way and a good alternative to MSA-based phylogenetic analysis. We believe our method will become a mainstream phylogeny construction method especially for the highly variable sequence families where the accuracy of the MSA heavily depends on the alignment parameters. PMID:23323678

  9. Testing robustness of relative complexity measure method constructing robust phylogenetic trees for Galanthus L. Using the relative complexity measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakış Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most phylogeny analysis methods based on molecular sequences use multiple alignment where the quality of the alignment, which is dependent on the alignment parameters, determines the accuracy of the resulting trees. Different parameter combinations chosen for the multiple alignment may result in different phylogenies. A new non-alignment based approach, Relative Complexity Measure (RCM, has been introduced to tackle this problem and proven to work in fungi and mitochondrial DNA. Result In this work, we present an application of the RCM method to reconstruct robust phylogenetic trees using sequence data for genus Galanthus obtained from different regions in Turkey. Phylogenies have been analyzed using nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences. Results showed that, the tree obtained from nuclear ribosomal RNA gene sequences was more robust, while the tree obtained from the chloroplast DNA showed a higher degree of variation. Conclusions Phylogenies generated by Relative Complexity Measure were found to be robust and results of RCM were more reliable than the compared techniques. Particularly, to overcome MSA-based problems, RCM seems to be a reasonable way and a good alternative to MSA-based phylogenetic analysis. We believe our method will become a mainstream phylogeny construction method especially for the highly variable sequence families where the accuracy of the MSA heavily depends on the alignment parameters.

  10. Influence of relative humidity and physical load during storage on dustiness of inorganic nanomaterials: implications for testing and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Marcus; Rojas, Elena; Vanhala, Esa

    2015-01-01

    Dustiness testing using a down-scaled EN15051 rotating drum was used to investigate the effects of storage conditions such as relative humidity and physical loading on the dustiness of five inorganic metal oxide nanostructured powder materials. The tests consisted of measurements of gravimetrical...

  11. Relative sensitivities of toxicity test protocols with the amphipods Eohaustorius estuarius and Ampelisca abdita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian S; Lowe, Sarah; Phillips, Bryn M; Hunt, John W; Vorhees, Jennifer; Clark, Sara; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2008-01-01

    A series of dose-response experiments was conducted to compare the relative sensitivities of toxicity test protocols using the amphipods Ampelisca abdita and Eohaustorius estuarius. A. abdita is one of the dominant infaunal species in the San Francisco Estuary, and E. estuarius is the primary sediment toxicity species used in the San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program. Experiments were conducted with a formulated sediment spiked with copper, fluoranthene, chlorpyrifos, and the three pyrethroid pesticides permethrin, bifenthrin, and cypermethrin, all chemicals of concern in this Estuary. The results showed that the protocol with A. abdita was more sensitive to fluoranthene and much more sensitive to copper, while E. estuarius was more sensitive to chlorpyrifos, and much more sensitive to the pyrethroid pesticides. These results, considered in conjunction with those from previous spiking studies [Weston, D.P., 1995. Further development of a chronic Ampelisca abdita bioassay as an indicator of sediment toxicity: summary and conclusions. In: Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Annual Report. San Francisco Estuary Institute, Oakland, CA, pp 108-115; DeWitt, T.E., Swartz, R.C., Lamberson, J.O., 1989. Measuring the acute toxicity of estuarine sediments. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 8: 1035-1048; DeWitt, T.H.E., Pinza, M.R., Niewolny, L.A., Cullinan, V.I., Gruendell, B.D., 1997. Development and evaluation of a standard marine/estuarine chronic sediment toxicity method using Leptocheirus plumulosus. Draft report prepared for the US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Technology, Washington DC, under contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 by Batelle Marine Science Laboratory, Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, WA], suggest that, in general, A. abdita is more sensitive to metals, E. estuarius is more sensitive to pesticides, and both protocols have roughly comparable sensitivities to hydrocarbons. The preponderance of

  12. Absolute and Relative Reliability of the Timed 'Up & Go' Test and '30second Chair-Stand' Test in Hospitalised Patients with Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyders Johansen, Katrine; Derby Stistrup, Rikke; Skibdal Schjøtt, Camilla; Madsen, Jacqueline; Vinther, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The timed 'Up & Go' test and '30second Chair-Stand' test are simple clinical outcome measures widely used to assess functional performance. The reliability of both tests in hospitalised stroke patients is unknown. The purpose was to investigate the relative and absolute reliability of both tests in patients admitted to an acute stroke unit. Sixty-two patients (men, n = 41) attended two test sessions separated by a one hours rest. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) were calculated to assess relative reliability. Absolute reliability was expressed as Standard Error of Measurement (with 95% certainty-SEM95) and Smallest Real Difference (SRD) and as percentage of their respective means if heteroscedasticity was observed in Bland Altman plots (SEM95% and SRD%). ICC values for interrater reliability were 0.97 and 0.99 for the timed 'Up & Go' test and 0.88 and 0.94 for '30second Chair-Stand' test, respectively. ICC values for intrarater reliability were 0.95 and 0.96 for the timed 'Up & Go' test and 0.87 and 0.91 for '30second Chair-Stand' test, respectively. Heteroscedasticity was observed in the timed 'Up & Go' test. Interrater SEM95% ranged from 9.8% to 14.2% with corresponding SRD% of 13.9-20.1%. Intrarater SEM95% ranged from 15.8% to 18.7% with corresponding SRD% of 22.3-26.5%. For '30second Chair-Stand' test interrater SEM95 ranged between 1.5 and 1.9 repetitions with corresponding SRD of 2 and 3 and intrarater SEM95 ranged between 1.8 and 2.0 repetitions with corresponding SRD values of 3. Excellent reliability was observed for the timed 'Up & Go' test and the '30second Chair-Stand' test in hospitalised stroke patients. The thresholds to detect a real change in performance were 18.7% for the timed 'Up & Go' test and 2.0 repetitions for the '30second Chair-Stand' in groups of patients and 26.5% and 3 repetitions in individual patients, respectively.

  13. Absolute and Relative Reliability of the Timed ‘Up & Go’ Test and ‘30second Chair-Stand’ Test in Hospitalised Patients with Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyders Johansen, Katrine; Derby Stistrup, Rikke; Skibdal Schjøtt, Camilla; Madsen, Jacqueline; Vinther, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective The timed ‘Up & Go’ test and ‘30second Chair-Stand’ test are simple clinical outcome measures widely used to assess functional performance. The reliability of both tests in hospitalised stroke patients is unknown. The purpose was to investigate the relative and absolute reliability of both tests in patients admitted to an acute stroke unit. Methods Sixty-two patients (men, n = 41) attended two test sessions separated by a one hours rest. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) were calculated to assess relative reliability. Absolute reliability was expressed as Standard Error of Measurement (with 95% certainty—SEM95) and Smallest Real Difference (SRD) and as percentage of their respective means if heteroscedasticity was observed in Bland Altman plots (SEM95% and SRD%). Results ICC values for interrater reliability were 0.97 and 0.99 for the timed ‘Up & Go’ test and 0.88 and 0.94 for ‘30second Chair-Stand’ test, respectively. ICC values for intrarater reliability were 0.95 and 0.96 for the timed ‘Up & Go’ test and 0.87 and 0.91 for ‘30second Chair-Stand’ test, respectively. Heteroscedasticity was observed in the timed ‘Up & Go’ test. Interrater SEM95% ranged from 9.8% to 14.2% with corresponding SRD% of 13.9–20.1%. Intrarater SEM95% ranged from 15.8% to 18.7% with corresponding SRD% of 22.3–26.5%. For ‘30second Chair-Stand’ test interrater SEM95 ranged between 1.5 and 1.9 repetitions with corresponding SRD of 2 and 3 and intrarater SEM95 ranged between 1.8 and 2.0 repetitions with corresponding SRD values of 3. Conclusion Excellent reliability was observed for the timed ‘Up & Go’ test and the ‘30second Chair-Stand’ test in hospitalised stroke patients. The thresholds to detect a real change in performance were 18.7% for the timed ‘Up & Go’ test and 2.0 repetitions for the ‘30second Chair-Stand’ in groups of patients and 26.5% and 3 repetitions in individual patients, respectively. PMID:27798686

  14. Knowledge, attitude and practice of the smear test and its relation with female age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Nara Sibério Pinho; Vasconcelos, Camila Teixeira Moreira; Nicolau, Ana Izabel Oliveira; Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista; Pinheiro, Patricia Neyva da Costa; Pinheiro, Ana Karina Bezerra

    2016-06-14

    to verify the association among the knowledge attitude and practice of women in relation to the smear test and the age range. a cross-sectional research was undertaken, associated with the knowledge, attitude and practice survey at a Primary Health Care service. The sample consisted of 775 women, distributed in three age ranges: adolescent, young and elderly. although high rates of inappropriate knowledge were found in all age ranges, it was significantly higher among the adolescents (p=0.000). A similar trend was found in the attitude component, with percentages of inappropriateness in adolescence that drop as age advances (p=0.000). Nevertheless, no statistical difference among the groups was found in terms of practice (p=0.852). the study demonstrated a relation between the age range and knowledge, attitude and practice of the smear test. verificar a associação entre o conhecimento, atitude e prática de mulheres em relação ao exame colpocitológico e a faixa etária. trata-se de pesquisa de corte transversal associada ao inquérito conhecimento, atitude e prática, em uma Unidade de Atenção Primária à Saúde. A amostra foi composta por 775 mulheres, distribuídas em três faixas etárias: adolescentes, jovens e idosas. embora o conhecimento inadequado tenha tido altas taxas em todas as faixas etárias, foi significativamente superior entre as adolescentes (p=0,000). Tendência semelhante no componente atitude por apresentar percentuais de inadequabilidade na adolescência e decair com o avançar da idade (p=0,000). Todavia, não houve diferença estatística entre os grupos quanto à prática (p=0,852). o estudo demonstrou relação entre a faixa etária e o conhecimento, a atitude e a prática do exame colpocitológico. verificar la asociación entre el conocimiento, la actitud y práctica de mujeres con relación a la prueba colpocitológica y el rango de edad. se trata de investigación trasversal asociada a la encuesta conocimiento, actitud y pr

  15. Numerical relativity for D dimensional axially symmetric space-times: Formalism and code tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilhão, Miguel; Witek, Helvi; Sperhake, Ulrich; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos; Nerozzi, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    The numerical evolution of Einstein’s field equations in a generic background has the potential to answer a variety of important questions in physics: from applications to the gauge-gravity duality, to modeling black hole production in TeV gravity scenarios, to analysis of the stability of exact solutions, and to tests of cosmic censorship. In order to investigate these questions, we extend numerical relativity to more general space-times than those investigated hitherto, by developing a framework to study the numerical evolution of D dimensional vacuum space-times with an SO(D-2) isometry group for D≥5, or SO(D-3) for D≥6. Performing a dimensional reduction on a (D-4) sphere, the D dimensional vacuum Einstein equations are rewritten as a 3+1 dimensional system with source terms, and presented in the Baumgarte, Shapiro, Shibata, and Nakamura formulation. This allows the use of existing 3+1 dimensional numerical codes with small adaptations. Brill-Lindquist initial data are constructed in D dimensions and a procedure to match them to our 3+1 dimensional evolution equations is given. We have implemented our framework by adapting the Lean code and perform a variety of simulations of nonspinning black hole space-times. Specifically, we present a modified moving puncture gauge, which facilitates long-term stable simulations in D=5. We further demonstrate the internal consistency of the code by studying convergence and comparing numerical versus analytic results in the case of geodesic slicing for D=5, 6.

  16. Repeatability of contrast sensitivity testing in patients with age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcuk Kara

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the intrasession and intersession repeatability of contrast sensitivity (CS measurements in patients with glaucoma, cataract, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD and healthy controls. Methods: CS measurements were performed using the OPTEC-Functional Vision Analyzer (FVA, which uses a standardized and closed (view-in system. Measurements for patients with glaucoma, cataract, or AMD and healthy controls were repeated within 30 minutes (intrasession and during two sessions (intersession, separated by one week to one month. Test-retest reliability and correlation were measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and coefficient of repeatability (COR. Results: Ninety subjects (90 eyes with visual acuity of 0.17 logMAR or higher in the cataract group or 0.00 logMAR in the other groups were included. During the first session, the ICC values were 0.87, 0.90, 0.76, and 0.69, and COR values were 0.24, 0.20, 0.38, and 0.25 for the control, glaucoma, cataract, and AMD groups, respectively. The reliability scores significantly improved during the second session, except in the glaucoma group. There was an acceptable floor effect and no ceiling effect at higher frequencies in the glaucoma and AMD groups. Conclusion: In subjects with good visual acuity, the FVA system is useful for evaluating CS and demonstrates good repeatability, as shown by ICC and COR. Because there is no ceiling effect, this system is beneficial for evaluation of early changes in CS, particularly in patients with glaucoma or AMD.

  17. Self-administered tests as a screening procedure for pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Gutke, Annelie; Elden, Helen; Nordenman, Charlotte; Fabricius, Lina; Gravesen, Melissa; Lind, Anette; Kjellby-Wendt, Gunilla

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sensitivity and specificity of self-administrated tests aimed at pain provocation of posterior and/or anterior pelvis pain and to investigate pain intensity during and after palpation of the symphysis. A total of 175 women participated in the study, 100 pregnant women with and 25 pregnant women without lumbopelvic back pain and 50 non-pregnant women. Standard pain provocation tests were compared with self assessed tests. All women were asked to estimate pain during and after palpation of the symphysis. For posterior pelvic pain, the self-test of P4 and Bridging test had the highest sensitivity of 0.90 versus 0.97 and specificity of 0.92 and 0.87. Highest sensitivity for self-test for anterior pelvic pain was pulling a mat 0.85. Palpation of symphysis was painful and persistency of pain was the longest among women who fulfilled the criteria for symphyseal pain. There were overall significant differences between the groups concerning intensity and persistency of pain (P < 0.001). Our results indicate that pregnant women can perform a screening by provocation of posterior pelvic pain by self-tests with the new P4 self-test and the Bridging test. Palpation of the symphysis is painful and should only be used as a complement to history taking, pain drawing and pulling a MAT-test.

  18. Field-based fitness assessment in young people: the ALPHA health-related fitness test battery for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Castro-Piñero, José; España-Romero, Vanesa; Artero, Enrique G; Ortega, Francisco B; Cuenca, Magdalena M; Jimenez-Pavón, David; Chillón, Palma; Girela-Rejón, María J; Mora, Jesús; Gutiérrez, Angel; Suni, Jaana; Sjöström, Michael; Castillo, Manuel J

    2011-05-01

    The present study summarises the work developed by the ALPHA (Assessing Levels of Physical Activity) study and describes the procedures followed to select the tests included in the ALPHA health-related fitness test battery for children and adolescents. The authors reviewed physical fitness and health in youth findings from cross-sectional studies. The authors also performed three systematic reviews dealing with (1) the predictive validity of health-related fitness, (2) the criterion validity of field-based fitness tests and (3) the reliability of field-based fitness tests in youth. The authors also carried out 11-methodological studies to determine the criterion validity and the reliability of several field-based fitness tests for youth. Finally, the authors performed a study in the school setting to examine the reliability, feasibility and safety of the selected tests. The selected fitness tests were (1) the 20 m shuttle run test to assess cardiorespiratory fitness; (2) the handgrip strength and (3) standing broad jump to assess musculoskeletal fitness, and (4) body mass index, (5) skinfold thickness and (5) waist circumference to assess body composition. When there are time limits, the authors propose the high-priority ALPHA health-related fitness test battery, which comprises all the evidence-based fitness tests except the measurement of the skinfold thickness. The time required to administer this battery to a group of 20 youth by one physical education teacher is less than 2 h. In conclusion, the ALPHA fitness tests battery is valid, reliable, feasible and safe for the assessment of health-related physical fitness in children and adolescents to be used for health monitoring purposes at population level.

  19. Indices of slowness of information processing in head injury patients : Tests for selective attention related to ERP latencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spikman, Jacoba M.; Naalt, van der Joukje; Weerden , van Tiemen; Zomeren , van Adriaan H.

    2004-01-01

    We explored the relation between neuropsychological (attention tests involving time constraints) and neurophysiological (N2 and P3 event-related potential (ERP) latencies) indices of slowness of information processing after closed head injury (CHI). A group of 44 CHI patients performed worse than he

  20. Indices of slowness of information processing in head injury patients: Tests for selective attention related to ERP latencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba; van Weerden, Tiemen; van Zomeren, Adriaan

    2004-01-01

    We explored the relation between neuropsychological (attention tests involving time constraints) and neurophysiological (N2 and P3 event-related potential (ERP) latencies) indices of slowness of information processing after closed head injury (CHI). A group of 44 CHI patients performed worse than he

  1. The Use of the Rorschach Inkblot Test in the Assessment of Object Relations: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Hope Lynette

    Research in how the Rorschach Inkblot Test has been utilized in the assessment of object relations is reviewed. The review includes a critical examination of six areas: (1) constructs and concepts of object-relations theory represented in the research; (2) relevant Rorschach history and history; (3) characteristics of Rorschach-based,…

  2. Testing the Impact of Job-Related Variables on a Utility Judgment Training Criterion beyond Background and Affective Reaction Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Gibson, Greg; Bentley, Melissa; Chapman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    We tested the incremental impact of a job-related set of variables for explaining a utility judgment training effectiveness variable, that is, course completion skill preparedness, beyond background and course-related variables. Our respondents were two different emergency medical service samples, 415 basics and 742 paramedics, from the 2008 US…

  3. Psychological, situational and application-related determinants of the intention to self-test: a factorial survey among students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuecuekbalaban, Pinar; Rostalski, Tim; Schmidt, Silke; Muehlan, Holger

    2017-07-10

    The Internet enables an unprecedented opportunity to access a broad range of self-tests (e.g. testing for HIV, cancer, hepatitis B/C), which can be conducted by lay consumers without the help of a health professional. However, there is only little knowledge about the determinants of the use of self-tests. Thus, the aims of this study were (1) to experimentally investigate the impact of situational and application-related characteristics on the intention to use a self-test (ST), compared to being tested by a health professional at home (HPH) or at a doctor's office (HPD), (2) to examine the applicability of social-cognitive health behaviour theories on self-testing, and (3) to explore the advantages of integrating technological affinity into social-cognitive health behaviour models to predict self-testing. In a factorial survey, 1248 vignettes were rated by 208 students. The core concepts of social-cognitive health behaviour theories, technological affinity, and different situational and application-related characteristics were investigated. Intention to ST was only predicted by the medical expertise of the tested person, while HPH and HPD were also associated with the application purpose of the test and the presence of an emotionally supporting person. Perceived severity and outcome-expectancy significantly predicted intention to self-test. Technological enthusiastic people had a higher intention to use a self-test. Intention to ST, HPH and HPD were predicted by different situational and application-related characteristics. Social-cognitive health behaviour theories can be applied to predict self-testing and do not need to be extended by technological affinity.

  4. Relational health, alexithymia, and psychological distress in college women: testing a mediator model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Belle; West, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Relational health refers to interpersonal interactions that are growth-fostering or mutually empathic and empowering. Poor relational health increases an individual's risk for developing psychological distress. Alexithymia is the inability to recognize and express one's own internal emotional experience. In this study, the associations of relational health, psychological distress, and alexithymia were examined by surveying 197 female undergraduate psychology students. Support was found for the hypothesis that alexithymic symptoms mediate the direct effect of poor relational health on psychological distress. The importance of assessing relational health and tailoring counseling interventions for people with low relational health and alexithymic symptoms is discussed.

  5. Criterion-Related Validity of Sit-and-Reach Tests for Estimating Hamstring and Lumbar Extensibility: a Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mayorga-Vega

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present meta-analysis was to examine the scientific literature on the criterion-related validity of sit-and-reach tests for estimating hamstring and lumbar extensibility. For this purpose relevant studies were searched from seven electronic databases dated up through December 2012. Primary outcomes of criterion-related validity were Pearson´s zero-order correlation coefficients (r between sit-and-reach tests and hamstrings and/or lumbar extensibility criterion measures. Then, from the included studies, the Hunter- Schmidt´s psychometric meta-analysis approach was conducted to estimate population criterion- related validity of sit-and-reach tests. Firstly, the corrected correlation mean (rp, unaffected by statistical artefacts (i.e., sampling error and measurement error, was calculated separately for each sit-and-reach test. Subsequently, the three potential moderator variables (sex of participants, age of participants, and level of hamstring extensibility were examined by a partially hierarchical analysis. Of the 34 studies included in the present meta-analysis, 99 correlations values across eight sit-and-reach tests and 51 across seven sit-and-reach tests were retrieved for hamstring and lumbar extensibility, respectively. The overall results showed that all sit-and-reach tests had a moderate mean criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility (rp = 0.46-0.67, but they had a low mean for estimating lumbar extensibility (rp = 0. 16-0.35. Generally, females, adults and participants with high levels of hamstring extensibility tended to have greater mean values of criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility. When the use of angular tests is limited such as in a school setting or in large scale studies, scientists and practitioners could use the sit-and-reach tests as a useful alternative for hamstring extensibility estimation, but not for estimating lumbar extensibility.

  6. Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site, as a host for a rock mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-02-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Climax pluton, at the Nevada Test Site, as the host for a granite mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Climax granitic pluton has been the site of three nuclear weapons effects tests: Hard Hat, Tiny Tot, and Piledriver. Geologic exploration and mapping of the granite body were performed at the occasion of these tests. Currently, it is the site Spent Fuel Test (SFT-C) conducted in the vicinity of and at the same depth as that of the Piledriver drifts. Significant exploration, mapping, and rock mechanics work have been performed and continue at this Piledriver level - the 1400 (ft) level - in the context of SFT-C. Based on our technical discussions, and on the review of the significant geological and rock mechanics work already achieved in the Climax pluton, based also on the ongoing work and the existing access and support, it is concluded that the Climax site offers great opportunities for a rock mechanics test facility. It is not claimed, however, that Climax is the only possible site or the best possible site, since no case has been made for another granite test facility in the United States. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Relative User Ratings of MMPI-2 Computer-Based Test Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John E.; Weed, Nathan C.

    2004-01-01

    There are eight commercially available computer-based test interpretations (CBTIs) for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), of which few have been empirically evaluated. Prospective users of these programs have little scientific data to guide choice of a program. This study compared ratings of these eight CBTIs. Test users…

  8. The Relative Effects of Traditional Lectures and Guided Notes Lectures on University Student Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Larry; Weil, Timothy M.; Porter, James C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Guided notes were employed in two undergraduate Psychology courses involving 71 students. The study design utilized an alternating treatments format to compare Traditional Lectures with Guided Notes lectures. In one of the two courses, tests were administered after each class lecture, whereas the same type of test was administered at the beginning…

  9. Perceptions and Discourses Relating to Genetic Testing: Interviews with People with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barter, Barbara; Hastings, Richard Patrick; Williams, Rebecca; Huws, Jaci C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The perceptions of individuals with Down syndrome are conspicuously absent in discussions about the use of prenatal testing. Method: Eight individuals with Down syndrome were interviewed about their views and experience of the topic of prenatal testing. Results: Interpretative phenomenological analysis revealed two major themes with…

  10. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Musculoskeletal Physical Fitness Testing in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Sharon Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to bring attention to the 10 most pressing questions relevant to musculoskeletal physical fitness testing in children and adolescents. The goal is to stimulate research to answer these questions. The most pressing needs include establishing definitive links between valid, reliable, and feasible field test measures of…

  11. Perceptions and Discourses Relating to Genetic Testing: Interviews with People with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barter, Barbara; Hastings, Richard Patrick; Williams, Rebecca; Huws, Jaci C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The perceptions of individuals with Down syndrome are conspicuously absent in discussions about the use of prenatal testing. Method: Eight individuals with Down syndrome were interviewed about their views and experience of the topic of prenatal testing. Results: Interpretative phenomenological analysis revealed two major themes with…

  12. Students' Interpersonal Trust and Attitudes towards Standardised Tests: Exploring Affective Variables Related to Student Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Man-Wai; Guo, Qi; Leighton, Jacqueline P.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive and psychometric variables have directed research on student test performance. However, student learning involves a substantial affective component. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between two kinds of affective variables--interpersonal trust and attitudes towards standardised tests--likely to underlie student…

  13. The "value added" of neurocognitive testing after sports-related concussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kampen, Derk A.; Lovell, Mark R.; Pardini, Jamie E.; Collins, Michael W.; Fu, Freddie H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Neurocognitive testing has been endorsed as a "cornerstone" of concussion management by recent Vienna and Prague meetings of the Concussion in Sport Group. Neurocognitive testing is important given the potential unreliability of athlete self-report after injury. Relying only on athletes'

  14. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Musculoskeletal Physical Fitness Testing in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Sharon Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to bring attention to the 10 most pressing questions relevant to musculoskeletal physical fitness testing in children and adolescents. The goal is to stimulate research to answer these questions. The most pressing needs include establishing definitive links between valid, reliable, and feasible field test measures of…

  15. Estimation of the relative sensitivity of the comparative tuberculin skin test in tuberculous cattle herds subjected to depopulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Karolemeas

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (bTB is one of the most serious economic animal health problems affecting the cattle industry in Great Britain (GB, with incidence in cattle herds increasing since the mid-1980s. The single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT test is the primary screening test in the bTB surveillance and control programme in GB and Ireland. The sensitivity (ability to detect infected cattle of this test is central to the efficacy of the current testing regime, but most previous studies that have estimated test sensitivity (relative to the number of slaughtered cattle with visible lesions [VL] and/or positive culture results lacked post-mortem data for SICCT test-negative cattle. The slaughter of entire herds ("whole herd slaughters" or "depopulations" that are infected by bTB are occasionally conducted in GB as a last-resort control measure to resolve intractable bTB herd breakdowns. These provide additional post-mortem data for SICCT test-negative cattle, allowing a rare opportunity to calculate the animal-level sensitivity of the test relative to the total number of SICCT test-positive and negative VL animals identified post-mortem (rSe. In this study, data were analysed from 16 whole herd slaughters (748 SICCT test-positive and 1031 SICCT test-negative cattle conducted in GB between 1988 and 2010, using a bayesian hierarchical model. The overall rSe estimate of the SICCT test at the severe interpretation was 85% (95% credible interval [CI]: 78-91%, and at standard interpretation was 81% (95% CI: 70-89%. These estimates are more robust than those previously reported in GB due to inclusion of post-mortem data from SICCT test-negative cattle.

  16. Accepting test-anxiety-related thoughts increases academic performance among undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senay Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that unwanted thoughts are enhanced when suppressed, we tested among college freshmen who were about to take an academic exam if an acceptance strategy consisting of not suppressing intrusive thoughts will improve test performance. This strategy proved superior to students’ own default strategies as much as a modified, alternative strategy, avoiding the antecedents of intrusive thoughts. Moreover, the combination of the two strategies counteracted a stronger, negative effect of test anxiety on test performance as compared with each strategy used alone. The results suggest that not only intrusive thoughts per se but also the suppression of these thoughts can disrupt test performance, and hint that approaching such thoughts with acceptance may not interfere with simultaneously working toward avoiding the antecedents of these thoughts.

  17. Prevalence of the use of cancer related self-tests by members of the public: a community survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott John

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-tests are those where an individual can obtain a result without recourse to a health professional, by getting a result immediately or by sending a sample to a laboratory that returns the result directly. Self-tests can be diagnostic, for disease monitoring, or both. There are currently tests for more than 20 different conditions available to the UK public, and self-testing is marketed as a way of alerting people to serious health problems so they can seek medical help. Almost nothing is known about the extent to which people self-test for cancer or why they do this. Self-tests for cancer could alter perceptions of risk and health behaviour, cause psychological morbidity and have a significant impact on the demand for healthcare. This study aims to gain an understanding of the frequency of self-testing for cancer and characteristics of users. Methods Cross-sectional survey. Adults registered in participating general practices in the West Midlands Region, will be asked to complete a questionnaire that will collect socio-demographic information and basic data regarding previous and potential future use of self-test kits. The only exclusions will be people who the GP feels it would be inappropriate to send a questionnaire, for example because they are unable to give informed consent. Freepost envelopes will be included and non-responders will receive one reminder. Standardised prevalence rates will be estimated. Discussion Cancer related self-tests, currently available from pharmacies or over the Internet, include faecal occult blood tests (related to bowel cancer, prostate specific antigen tests (related to prostate cancer, breast cancer kits (self examination guide and haematuria tests (related to urinary tract cancers. The effect of an increase in self-testing for cancer is unknown but may be considerable: it may affect the delivery of population based screening programmes; empower patients or cause unnecessary anxiety

  18. Work-related stress is associated with impaired neuropsychological test performance: a clinical cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskildsen, Anita; Andersen, Lars Peter; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Vandborg, Sanne Kjær; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2015-01-01

    Patients on sick leave due to work-related stress often complain about impaired concentration and memory. However, it is undetermined how widespread these impairments are, and which cognitive domains are most long-term stress sensitive. Previous studies show inconsistent results and are difficult to synthesize. The primary aim of this study was to examine whether patients with work-related stress complaints have cognitive impairments compared to a matched control group without stress. Our secondary aim was to examine whether the level of self-reported perceived stress is associated with neuropsychological test performance. We used a broad neuropsychological test battery to assess 59 outpatients with work-related stress complaints (without major depression) and 59 healthy controls. We matched the patients and controls pairwise by sex, age and educational level. Compared to controls, patients generally showed mildly reduced performance across all the measured domains of the neuropsychological test battery. However, only three comparisons reached statistical significance (p tests of prospective memory, speed and complex working memory. There were no statistical significant associations between self-reported perceived stress level and neuropsychological test performance. In conclusion, we recommend that cognitive functions should be considered when evaluating patients with work-related stress complaints, especially when given advice regarding return to work. Since this study had a cross-sectional design, it is still uncertain whether the impairments are permanent. Further study is required to establish causal links between work-related stress and cognitive deficits.

  19. Relational Aggression, Victimization and Self-Concept: Testing Pathways from Middle Childhood to Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely-McClure, Sarah J; Ostrov, Jamie M

    2016-02-01

    When studying adolescent development, it is important to consider two key areas that are salient for teens, which are self-concept and peer relations. A secondary analysis of the National Institute of Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development was conducted to examine the prospective bidirectional associations between self-concept and peer relations. To date, how social development broadly and peer relations in particular (e.g., relational aggression and victimization) affect self-concept domains is not fully understood. Using a large sample (N = 1063; 532 girls; M = 11.14 years; SD = .59) with multiple informants, the present study examined whether fifth grade relational aggression and sixth grade relational victimization was associated with adolescent self-concept in three key domains (i.e., academic, sports, physical appearance). A significant direct effect emerged, such that relational aggression in middle childhood was associated with decreases in academic self-concept and increases in sports self-concept in adolescence. Analyses also revealed that having higher levels of domain specific self-concept led to decreases in relational aggression across the transition to adolescence. The findings highlight the importance of examining bidirectional prospective associations between relational aggression, relational victimization, and domain specific self-concept. Implications for future research and clinical intervention are discussed.

  20. Comparison of diagnostic tests in distinct well-defined conditions related to dry eye disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Alves

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study compares signs, symptoms and predictive tools used to diagnose dry eye disease (DED and ocular surface disorders in six systemic well-defined and non-overlapping diseases. It is well known that these tests are problematic because of a lack of agreement between them in identifying these conditions. Accordingly, we provide here a comparative clinical profile analysis of these different diseases. METHODS: A spontaneous and continuous sample of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS (n=27, graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD (n=28, Graves orbitopathy (n=28, facial palsy (n=8, diabetes mellitus without proliferative retinopathy (n=14 and glaucoma who chronically received topical drugs preserved with benzalkonium chloride (n=20 were enrolled. Evaluation consisted of a comprehensive protocol encompassing: (1 structured questionnaire - Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI; (2 tear osmolarity (TearLab Osmolarity System - Ocusense; (3 tear film break-up time (TBUT; (4 fluorescein and lissamine green staining; (5 Schirmer test and (6 severity grading. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty five patients (aged 48.8 years-old ± 14.1, male:female ratio=0.4 were enrolled in the study, along with 24 age and gender matched controls. Higher scores on DED tests were obtained in Sjögren Syndrome (P<0.05, except for tear film osmolarity that was higher in diabetics (P<0.001 and fluorescein staining, that was higher in facial palsy (P<0.001. TFBUT and OSDI correlated better with other tests. The best combination of diagnostic tests for DED was OSDI, TBUT and Schirmer test (sensitivity 100%, specificity 95% and accuracy 99.3%. CONCLUSIONS: DED diagnostic test results present a broad range of variability among different conditions. Vital stainings and TBUT correlated best with one another whereas the best test combination to detect DED was: OSDI/TBUT/Schirmer.

  1. Incorporating quality control activities in scrum in relation to the concept of test backlog

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MUHAMMAD AAMIR; MUHAMMAD NAEEM AHMED KHAN

    2017-07-01

    Scrum has become popular among the agile methodologies due to the substantial support that it provides to the project management teams. The scrum process delivers quick functionality in the form of sprints.Most of the quality assurance and quality control activities are skipped in scrum because of its short lifecycleand due to the absence of a dedicated quality assurance team. The development team pays more attention to delivery of products according to the customer satisfaction, and the parameters used for this type of assessment are the story success criteria and user acceptance testing. Only acceptance testing and integration testing are not sufficient to achieve a quality product. There is still a clamouring need felt to incorporate other quality control activities in scrum to achieve a quality product. In this work, we have made an attempt to implement the quality control activities in the scrum philosophy by introducing the concept of test backlog. The enhanced scrum model provides quality assessment methodology on the basis of frequency of remaining functional bugs. The concept of test backlog proposed in this study aims at implementing state of the art testing process in scrum. A case study was carried out to validate the model, which produced satisfactory results. Besides, we conducted a survey to access the state of the quality control in scrum. The proposed model and case study results are reported herein

  2. Combat-Related Heterotopic Ossification: Development of Animal Models for Identifying Mechanisms and Testing Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    etiology, treatment, and prevention is the absence of a reliable and reproducible small animal model that can be used to characterize combat‐related HO...contamination and subsequent wound colonization may be a key risk factor. Using a small animal model of blast-related extremity injury involving a...to the systemic and perhaps local antimicrobial therapies geared towards decreasing bioburden in combat wounds. 6 Using our blast-related HO

  3. Stress-strain relation of bentonite at undrained shear. Laboratory tests to investigate the influence of material composition and test technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Ann; Boergesson, Lennart; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This report describes a laboratory study conducted to update the material model of the buffer material used in the analyses of the effect of a rock shear through a deposition hole. The study considers some new conditions and is especially focused on the reference case with MX-80Ca developed for SR-Site (MX-80 ion exchanged to Ca). The material model is based on relations between density, swelling pressure, shear strength and rate of strain. The reference model is described by Boergesson et al. (2010). The laboratory study is focused on undrained stress-strain-strength properties, which have been studied mainly by conducting triaxial tests and unconfined compression tests. The test results are compared to the earlier measurements and models which show that the new results fit very well into the general picture and models. For the new conditions suitable values of constants included in the model are proposed

  4. Stress-strain relation of bentonite at undrained shear. Laboratory tests to investigate the influence of material composition and test technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Ann; Boergesson, Lennart; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This report describes a laboratory study conducted to update the material model of the buffer material used in the analyses of the effect of a rock shear through a deposition hole. The study considers some new conditions and is especially focused on the reference case with MX-80Ca developed for SR-Site (MX-80 ion exchanged to Ca). The material model is based on relations between density, swelling pressure, shear strength and rate of strain. The reference model is described by Boergesson et al. (2010). The laboratory study is focused on undrained stress-strain-strength properties, which have been studied mainly by conducting triaxial tests and unconfined compression tests. The test results are compared to the earlier measurements and models which show that the new results fit very well into the general picture and models. For the new conditions suitable values of constants included in the model are proposed

  5. Relational Memory Is Evident in Eye Movement Behavior despite the Use of Subliminal Testing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Allison E; Henke, Katharina; Hannula, Deborah E

    2015-01-01

    While it is generally agreed that perception can occur without awareness, there continues to be debate about the type of representational content that is accessible when awareness is minimized or eliminated. Most investigations that have addressed this issue evaluate access to well-learned representations. Far fewer studies have evaluated whether or not associations encountered just once prior to testing might also be accessed and influence behavior. Here, eye movements were used to examine whether or not memory for studied relationships is evident following the presentation of subliminal cues. Participants assigned to experimental or control groups studied scene-face pairs and test trials evaluated implicit and explicit memory for these pairs. Each test trial began with a subliminal scene cue, followed by three visible studied faces. For experimental group participants, one face was the studied associate of the scene (implicit test); for controls none were a match. Subsequently, the display containing a match was presented to both groups, but now it was preceded by a visible scene cue (explicit test). Eye movements were recorded and recognition memory responses were made. Participants in the experimental group looked disproportionately at matching faces on implicit test trials and participants from both groups looked disproportionately at matching faces on explicit test trials, even when that face had not been successfully identified as the associate. Critically, implicit memory-based viewing effects seemed not to depend on residual awareness of subliminal scene cues, as subjective and objective measures indicated that scenes were successfully masked from view. The reported outcomes indicate that memory for studied relationships can be expressed in eye movement behavior without awareness.

  6. Relational Memory Is Evident in Eye Movement Behavior despite the Use of Subliminal Testing Methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison E Nickel

    Full Text Available While it is generally agreed that perception can occur without awareness, there continues to be debate about the type of representational content that is accessible when awareness is minimized or eliminated. Most investigations that have addressed this issue evaluate access to well-learned representations. Far fewer studies have evaluated whether or not associations encountered just once prior to testing might also be accessed and influence behavior. Here, eye movements were used to examine whether or not memory for studied relationships is evident following the presentation of subliminal cues. Participants assigned to experimental or control groups studied scene-face pairs and test trials evaluated implicit and explicit memory for these pairs. Each test trial began with a subliminal scene cue, followed by three visible studied faces. For experimental group participants, one face was the studied associate of the scene (implicit test; for controls none were a match. Subsequently, the display containing a match was presented to both groups, but now it was preceded by a visible scene cue (explicit test. Eye movements were recorded and recognition memory responses were made. Participants in the experimental group looked disproportionately at matching faces on implicit test trials and participants from both groups looked disproportionately at matching faces on explicit test trials, even when that face had not been successfully identified as the associate. Critically, implicit memory-based viewing effects seemed not to depend on residual awareness of subliminal scene cues, as subjective and objective measures indicated that scenes were successfully masked from view. The reported outcomes indicate that memory for studied relationships can be expressed in eye movement behavior without awareness.

  7. Absence of GZK Cutoff and Test of de Sitter Invariant Special Relativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zhe; CHEN Shao-Xia; HUANG Chao-Guang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The possibility that the absence of Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) cutoff is used to discriminate between de Sitter invariant special relativity (SRc,R) and general relativity (GR) is studied.A careful investigation shows,unfortunately, that the phenomenon fails to distinguish SRc,R from GR, at least, at classical level.

  8. Development and testing of a cross-culturally valid instrument: food-related life style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsø, Karen; Grunert, Klaus G.

    1995-01-01

    Based on a cognitive perspective, we propose to make life style specific to certain areas of consumption. The specific area of consumption studied here is food, resulting in a concept of food-related life style. We have developed an instrument tha measure food-related life style in a cross...

  9. A Relational Turbulence Model Perspective on Communication in Intimate Relationships Post-HPV Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Knowles, Jacquelyn; Faw, Meara H

    2016-01-01

    The Relational Turbulence Model (RTM) is a theoretical tool designed to understand how romantic partners navigate tumultuous events. In this article, we explore two RTM constructs, relational uncertainty and partner interference, in the context of romantic partners' human papillomavirus (HPV) diagnosis outcomes. We examine whether self-reported relational uncertainty and partner interference were differentially associated with a negative self-HPV diagnosis, a positive self-diagnosis, or a partner's positive diagnosis. Findings suggest that diagnosis type predicts relational uncertainty and partner interference in different ways. We also argue that partners' reported expression of affect after experiencing a relationally-relevant transition may manifest in both positive and negative ways. Our results support the contention that partners may express both positive and negative affect toward one another, particularly based on the type of HPV diagnosis outcome they receive.

  10. Peritonsillar abscess and cellulitis and their relation to a positive antigen detection test for streptococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risberg, Stefan; Engfeldt, Peter; Hugosson, Svante

    2010-10-01

    The microbiological cause of peritonsillar abscess and the role of group A β-haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) are unclear. We performed a retrospective study at the ear, nose and throat clinic (ENT) of Orebro University Hospital, Sweden, and included 376 events of peritonsillitis between 2002 and 2004. We determined if the patients had visited a primary healthcare centre (PHCC) within 30 days prior to inclusion. The results of the rapid antigen detection test for GAS (Strep A) taken at the PHCC were compared with the occurrence of peritonsillar abscess (PTA) and peritonsillar cellulitis (PTC). A Strep A test was performed in 61% (229/376) of the events studied. Strep A was positive in 22% of PTA events and in 35% of PTC events (p = 0.036). Of 48,000 Strep A tests taken in primary healthcare, mainly for sore throat, 22% were positive. We examined the relationship between age, the incidence of PTA, and positive Strep A tests. We also determined if there was a monthly correlation between number of positive Strep A tests and number of PTA events. We found no significant correlations. In conclusion, our findings indicate that GAS does not play a major role in the development of PTA/PTC.

  11. Evaluation of psychoacoustic tests and P300 event-related potentials in elderly patients with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Leines, Sergio; Peñaloza-López, Yolanda R; Serrano-Miranda, Tirzo A; Flores-Ávalos, Blanca; Vidal-Ixta, Martha T; Jiménez-Herrera, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia as a risk factor for hearing impairment, neuronal damage and cognitive impairment in elderly patients is controversial and is limited by the small number of studies. The aim of this work was determine if elderly patients detected with hyperhomocysteinemia have an increased risk of developing abnormalities in the central auditory processes as compared with a group of patients with appropriate homocysteine levels, and to define the behaviour of psychoacoustic tests and long latency potentials (P300) in these patients. This was a cross-sectional, comparative and analytical study. We formed a group of patients with hyperhomocysteinemia and a control group with normal levels of homocysteine. All patients underwent audiometry, tympanometry and a selection of psychoacoustic tests (dichotic digits, low-pass filtered words, speech in noise and masking level difference), auditory evoked brainstem potentials and P300. Patients with hyperhomocysteinemia had higher values in the test of masking level difference than did the control group (P=.049) and more protracted latency in P300 (P=.000). Hyperhomocysteinemia is a factor that alters the central auditory functions. Alterations in psychoacoustic tests and disturbances in electrophysiological tests suggest that the central portion of the auditory pathway is affected in patients with hyperhomocysteinemia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2.

  13. Effects of Dark Energy Perturbations on Cosmological Tests of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Dossett, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Cosmological tests to distinguish between dark energy (DE) and modifications to gravity are a promising route to obtain clues on the origin of cosmic acceleration. We study here the robustness of these tests to the presence of DE density, velocity, and anisotropic stress perturbations. We find that the dispersion in the growth index parameter remains small enough to distinguish between extreme cases of DE models and some commonly used modified gravity models. The sign of the slope parameter for a redshift dependent growth index was found to be inconsistent as an additional test in extreme cases of DE models with perturbations. Next, we studied the effect of DE perturbations on the modified growth (MG) parameters that enter the perturbed Einstein equations. We find that while the dark energy perturbations affect the MG parameters, the deviations remain smaller than those due to modified gravity models. Additionally, the deviations due to DE perturbations with a non-zero effective sound speed occur at scale ran...

  14. Reducing patient identification errors related to glucose point-of-care testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Alreja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient identification (ID errors in point-of-care testing (POCT can cause test results to be transferred to the wrong patient′s chart or prevent results from being transmitted and reported. Despite the implementation of patient barcoding and ongoing operator training at our institution, patient ID errors still occur with glucose POCT. The aim of this study was to develop a solution to reduce identification errors with POCT. Materials and Methods: Glucose POCT was performed by approximately 2,400 clinical operators throughout our health system. Patients are identified by scanning in wristband barcodes or by manual data entry using portable glucose meters. Meters are docked to upload data to a database server which then transmits data to any medical record matching the financial number of the test result. With a new model, meters connect to an interface manager where the patient ID (a nine-digit account number is checked against patient registration data from admission, discharge, and transfer (ADT feeds and only matched results are transferred to the patient′s electronic medical record. With the new process, the patient ID is checked prior to testing, and testing is prevented until ID errors are resolved. Results: When averaged over a period of a month, ID errors were reduced to 3 errors/month (0.015% in comparison with 61.5 errors/month (0.319% before implementing the new meters. Conclusion: Patient ID errors may occur with glucose POCT despite patient barcoding. The verification of patient identification should ideally take place at the bedside before testing occurs so that the errors can be addressed in real time. The introduction of an ADT feed directly to glucose meters reduced patient ID errors in POCT.

  15. Testing ‘cultural reproduction theory’ against relative risk aversion theory – some remarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin David; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research note is to discuss inherent limitations in certain established, but problematic, conventions for operationalizing and testing Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of cultural reproduction. These conventions entail a selective focus on the concept of capital at the expense of the conc......The aim of this research note is to discuss inherent limitations in certain established, but problematic, conventions for operationalizing and testing Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of cultural reproduction. These conventions entail a selective focus on the concept of capital at the expense...

  16. Factors related to Acceptance of HIV Testing by Pregnant Mothers in Health Centres in Denpasar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arniti Ni Ketut

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine reasons of pregnant mothers to undergo HIV testing and factors influencing this decision.in two sites: Puskesmas I Denpasar Utara and Puskesmas II Denpasar Selatan, during the period of 26 March to 22 April2014. Data were collected through interviews using a structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using univariate todetermine the frequency distribution of each variable, bivariate to determine the relationship between the dependentvariable with each independent variable by the chi-squared test and multivariate analysis performed by logisticregression to determine the dominant factors to improve the acceptance of pregnant mothers to HIV testing.Results: Reasons to undergo HIV testing were on recommendation from health providers (65.8%, concern for personalstatus (61.7% and concerns about possibility of vertical transmission (19.2%. Bivariate analysis showed that theacceptance by pregnant mothers was higher in mothers unemployed (75.8%; p=0.033, good knowledge about HIV andits transmission (78.4%; p=0.001, was susceptible to HIV/AIDS (72.0%; p=0.019, the perception that HIV/AIDS is asevere disease (77.0%; p?0.001, perceptions of the benefits of HIV testing (70.8%; p=0.002, absence perceivedbarriers (100%; p?0.001 as well as good support from husband/family (87.7%; p?0.001. Multivariate analysis showedthat factors influencing were support from husband/family with OR=8.71 (95%CI: 2.89-26.28, perception of severity ofHIV with OR=3.39 (95%CI: 1.08-10.69 and employment status with OR=2.82 (95%CI: 1.07-7.42.Conclusion: The majority of women to undergo HIV testing because of recommendations by staff and a desire to knowHIV status. Acceptance of HIV testing among pregnant mothers was influenced by the support of the husband/family,the perception of the severity of HIV / AIDS, and employment status.Keywords: acceptance of HIV testing, pregnant mothers, Denpasar

  17. Testing general relativity with compact coalescing binaries: comparing exact and predictive methods to compute the Bayes factor

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter; Mandel, Ilya; Vecchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The second generation of gravitational-wave detectors is scheduled to start operations in 2015. Gravitational-wave signatures of compact binary coalescences could be used to accurately test the strong-field dynamical predictions of general relativity. Computationally expensive data analysis pipelines, including TIGER, have been developed to carry out such tests. As a means to cheaply assess whether a particular deviation from general relativity can be detected, Cornish et al. and Vallisneri recently proposed an approximate scheme to compute the Bayes factor between a general-relativity gravitational-wave model and a model representing a class of alternative theories of gravity parametrised by one additional parameter. This approximate scheme is based on only two easy-to-compute quantities: the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal and the fitting factor between the signal and the manifold of possible waveforms within general relativity. In this work, we compare the prediction from the approximate formula agains...

  18. Relaxin-3 receptor (RXFP3 signalling mediates stress-related alcohol preference in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Walker

    Full Text Available Stressful life events are causally linked with alcohol use disorders (AUDs, providing support for a hypothesis that alcohol consumption is aimed at stress reduction. We have previously shown that expression of relaxin-3 mRNA in rat brain correlates with alcohol intake and that central antagonism of relaxin-3 receptors (RXFP3 prevents stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking. Therefore the objectives of these studies were to investigate the impact of Rxfp3 gene deletion in C57BL/6J mice on baseline and stress-related alcohol consumption. Male wild-type (WT and Rxfp3 knockout (KO (C57/B6JRXFP3TM1/DGen littermate mice were tested for baseline saccharin and alcohol consumption and preference over water in a continuous access two-bottle free-choice paradigm. Another cohort of mice was subjected to repeated restraint followed by swim stress to examine stress-related alcohol preference. Hepatic alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was assessed in mice following chronic alcohol intake and in naive controls. WT and Rxfp3 KO mice had similar baseline saccharin and alcohol preference, and hepatic alcohol processing. However, Rxfp3 KO mice displayed a stress-induced reduction in alcohol preference that was not observed in WT littermates. Notably, this phenotype, once established, persisted for at least six weeks after cessation of stress exposure. These findings suggest that in mice, relaxin-3/RXFP3 signalling is involved in maintaining high alcohol preference during and after stress, but does not appear to strongly regulate the primary reinforcing effects of alcohol.

  19. Relations between peripheral and brain serotonin measures and behavioural responses in a novelty test in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursinus, Winanda W.; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Zonderland, Johan J.; Rodenburg, T. Bas; de Souza, Adriana S.; Koopmanschap, Rudie E.; Kemp, Bas; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Korte, S. Mechiel; van Reenen, Cornelis G.

    2013-01-01

    Pigs differ in their behavioural responses towards environmental challenges. Individual variation in maladaptive responses such as tail biting, may partly originate from underlying biological characteristics related to (emotional) reactivity to challenges and serotonergic system functioning. Assessi

  20. Numerical Relativity for Inspiraling Binaries in Co-Rotating Coordinates: Test Bed for Lapse and Shift Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, Kip S.

    1998-01-01

    Gravitational-wave data analysis requires a detailed understanding of the highly relativistic, late stages of inspiral of neutron-star and black-hole binaries. A promising method to compute the late inspiral and its emitted waves is numerical relativity in co-rotating coordinates. The coordinates must be kept co-rotating via an appropriate choice of numerical relativity's lapse and shift functions. This article proposes a model problem for testing the ability of various lapse and shift prescr...

  1. Perceived social structural relations and group stereotypes : A test of the Stereotype Content Model in Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Heleen; Verkuijten, Maykel; Khan, Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    Using data from two studies, the current research tests the Stereotype Content Model (SCM) within a Malaysian context using Chinese and ethnic Malay participants. The aim of the research is to examine the theoretical underpinnings of the SCM in a new context by investigating the role of aspects of t

  2. Ethics or Morals: Understanding Students' Values Related to Genetic Tests on Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Mats Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    To make meaning of scientific knowledge in such a way that concepts and values of the life-world are not threatened is difficult for students and laymen. Ethics and morals pertaining to the use of genetic tests for hereditary diseases have been investigated and discussed by educators, anthropologists, medical doctors and philosophers giving, at…

  3. Inequality of Higher Education in China: An Empirical Test Based on the Perspective of Relative Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liming

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to examine what makes Chinese college students dissatisfied with entrance opportunities for higher education. Based on the author's survey data, we test two parameters which could be a potential cause of this dissatisfaction: 1) distributive inequality, which emphasizes the individual's dissatisfaction caused by…

  4. easyCBM[R] Mathematics Criterion Related Validity Evidence: Washington State Test. Technical Report #1010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    easyCBM[R] is an online benchmark and progress monitoring assessment system designed for use within a response to intervention (RTI) framework. Part of the purpose of easyCBM[R] is to help educators identify students who may be at risk for failure. Often, students deemed at-risk are those who would be predicted to not pass the state test. Previous…

  5. Is procrastination related to sleep quality? Testing an application of the procrastination-health model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sirois, F.M.; van Eerde, W.; Argiropoulou, M.I.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing body of research on the consequences of procrastination for health and well-being, there is little research focused on testing or explaining the potential links between procrastination and sleep quality. Using the procrastination-health model as our guiding conceptual lens, we addr

  6. An Exploratory Study of Listening Practice Relative to Memory Testing and Lecture in Business Administration Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin T.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the combined impact of a memory test and subsequent listening practice in enhancing student listening abilities in collegiate business administration courses. The article reviews relevant literature and describes an exploratory study that was undertaken to compare the effectiveness of this technique with traditional…

  7. Patch test results of hand eczema patients : relation to clinical types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M B; Christoffers, W A; Coenraads, P J; Schuttelaar, M L A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis is a well-known cause of hand eczema, although the influence of contact allergens on different clinical types of hand eczema remains still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To identify most common positive tested allergens among hand eczema patients and to define the relati

  8. Ethics or Morals: Understanding Students' Values Related to Genetic Tests on Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Mats Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    To make meaning of scientific knowledge in such a way that concepts and values of the life-world are not threatened is difficult for students and laymen. Ethics and morals pertaining to the use of genetic tests for hereditary diseases have been investigated and discussed by educators, anthropologists, medical doctors and philosophers giving, at…

  9. The Survey of Behavioral Systems in Relation to Test Anxiety: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir ABDOLHOSSEINI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to compare the behavioral activation systems between students with test anxiety (TA and without TA. Methods: This study included undergraduate students registered at the Medical Science University of during 2009-2010. The selected female students (N=300 completed Test Anxiety Scale (TAS and Gray-Wilson personality questionnaire (GWPQ and 100 students who have obtained the lowest and highest scores in TA questionnaire, were further compared according to Grays Brine-Behavioral questionnaire. Data were analyzed using a T-test. Results: The results showed that samples were significantly different in total scores of Gray-Wilson personality questionnaire. In terms of subscales of Gray-Wilson personality questionnaire, there was a significant difference between the two groups in the behavioral inhabitation system (BIS and fight -flight system (FFS but no significant differences found between two groups in the behavioral activation system (BAS. Conclusion: Test Anxiety was corresponded with brain systems behavior theory, and anxiety increased in the avoidance system activation.

  10. Patch test results of hand eczema patients : relation to clinical types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M B; Christoffers, W A; Coenraads, P J; Schuttelaar, M L A

    BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis is a well-known cause of hand eczema, although the influence of contact allergens on different clinical types of hand eczema remains still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To identify most common positive tested allergens among hand eczema patients and to define the

  11. Does assessment of personal exposure matter during experimental neurocognitive testing in MRI-related magnetic fields?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nierop, Lotte E; Christopher-de Vries, Y.; Slottje, Pauline; Kromhout, Hans

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether the use of quantitative personal exposure measurements in experimental research would result in better estimates of the associations between static and time-varying magnetic field exposure and neurocognitive test performance than when exposure categories were based sole

  12. Relations between boiling water test, standard germination test and field emergence of leek (Allium porrum L. and onion (Allium cepa L. seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Guvenc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine relations occurring between boiling water test, standard germination test and field emergence of leek (Allium porrum L. and onion (Allium cepa L. seeds. In this study, seeds of six lots ('Kalem', 'Ala', 'Ínegöl-A, B, C and D' from three cultivars of leek and seven onion cultivars ('Early Texas Grano' (ETG, 'Panku', 'Storm', 'Banko', 'Aki', 'Kisagün' and 'Banka' seeds were used as plant material and their viability was evaluated in boiling water test (BWT, standard germination test (SGT and field emergence (FE. The percentage of field emergence was evaluated at three sowing times: 20 May (FE-I, 10 June (FE-II and 20 July (FE-III. The mean germination of leek seeds varied from 77.5% to 100.0% and from 36.0% to 61.0% in SGT and BWT, respectively. While the range of results obtained in the boiling water test was from 38.5% to 60.0%, the range of results of the standard germination test was from 81.0% to 100.0% in onion seeds. The range of field emergence was between 18.5% ('Kisagün', FE-III and 72.0% (İnegöl-C', FE-II. Besides, the boiling water test was correlated highly significantly with SGT (r = 0.670**, FE-I (r = 0.923**, FE-II (r = 0.906** and FE-III (r = 0.939** in leek seeds. Similarly, BWT showed positive correlation with SGT (r = 0.568**, FE-I (r = 0.844**, FE-II (r = 0.933** and FE-III (r = 0.858** in onion seeds. In conclusion, the boiling water test is a new and reliable technique to test seed viability and it has a great potential to test rapidly germination and field emergence of leek and onion seeds at different sowing times.

  13. Field-Testing Reusable Learning Objects Related to Sensory Over-Responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Gee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is an increased need for dynamic, mobile, and relevant parent and caregiver education related to autism spectrum disorders (ASD and Sensory Processing (SP. This need may be due to the increased incidence of the conditions’ co-morbidity and the revision of the diagnostic criteria of ASD. Reusable learning objects (RLOs have been implemented as instructional tools as a part of, or adjunct to, formal health care education programs. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the appropriateness of RLOs as a part of routine patient and caregiver instruction of children with ASD. Method. A semi-structured interview/rating scale was implemented among three practicing occupational therapists to ascertain their opinions regarding six prototype RLOs related to sensory processing for caregivers of children with ASD. Results. The participants’ perspectives revealed that the SP-based prototype RLOs were a viable and valuable option to be included as a resource for parents and caregivers of children with ASD. Conclusion. The findings of this study suggest that RLOs related to SP were valuable, especially related to their subject matter, accessibility, and reusability. Furthermore, the participants indirectly identified the strengths related to the foundational concepts of RLOs and how they could be applied to other therapeutic and behavioral topics for parents and caregivers of children with ASD.

  14. Factors related to non-adherence to the realization of the Papanicolaou test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Aparecida dos Santos Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify reasons for low adherence to the Papanicolaou test in women seeking care in primary health care. Methods: cross-sectional study. Data collection carried out during home visits, applying questionnaire to characterize sociodemographic aspects as well as the reasons for non-adherence to examination and suggestions for facilitating adherence. Results: among 169 women, 67% were of reproductive age and 73.9% have finished elementary school. The failure to previously scheduled examination was due mainly to the beliefs and attitudes (36.1% and service organization (25.4%. The feelings reported by women during the Papanicolaou test were shame (55.6%, discomfort (32.5% and pain (20.7%. Conclusion: Although the screening of cervical cancer is essential for timely intervention, a significant proportion of women still does not adhere to examination by myths and taboos, beliefs, and health attitudes, as well as service organization.

  15. Abrasive Properties of Test and Training Site Soils: Relative Hardness of Fine Particle Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    scales and mea- and examined for striations by incident light micro- surement techniques are reviewed by Sarkar (1980), scopy. Rabinowicz (1965...wear of cordage more likely approaches three- bor 1954, Howell et al. 1959, Rabinowicz 1965, body wear, as described by Rabinowicz (1965). Sarkar 1980...CONCLUSIONS Friction in Textiles. New York: Textile Book Publish- ers (Interscience). Soil specimens from several test and training Rabinowicz , E

  16. The central role of the nurse in process improvement relating to pharmacologic stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Nancy P; Baranyay, Janie

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacologic stress myocardial perfusion imaging is a noninvasive method for evaluating coronary artery disease in patients unable to exercise sufficiently to achieve a heart rate high enough to facilitate satisfactory imaging. The nuclear cardiology nurse is an invaluable member of the laboratory team that performs these tests. In this specialist role, the nurse must have a thorough knowledge of the different pharmacologic stress agents (dipyridamole, adenosine, regadenoson, and dobutamine) that can be used. This should comprise an understanding of their mechanisms of action, contraindications, drug-drug interactions, adverse effects, and administration protocols. By drawing on this knowledge, the nurse is able to verify that the right agent has been selected for each patient based on his/her medical history. The nurse also can help patients follow pretest instructions (such as withholding caffeine and certain medications) by explaining that the measures are necessary for a safe and successful procedure and that violation may result in test cancellation or postponement. On the day of the stress test, the nurse has an important role in safeguarding the patient as well as providing support and reassurance throughout the different stages of the examination. Responsibilities include explaining the entire procedure to the patients, notably, what they will be asked to do, the effect of the stress agent, the timing of each step, the adverse effects that they may experience, how any adverse events will be managed, and the importance of remaining still during imaging. This central role of the nuclear cardiology nurse in overseeing the practical aspects of the pharmacologic stress test has important implications in terms of optimizing the productivity and efficiency of their noninvasive cardiology laboratory and nuclear medicine department.

  17. Relative Navigation Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) Sensor Development Test Objective (DTO) Performance Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request from the NASA Associate Administrator (AA) for Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), to quantitatively evaluate the individual performance of three light detection and ranging (LIDAR) rendezvous sensors flown as orbiter's development test objective on Space Transportation System (STS)-127, STS-133, STS-134, and STS-135. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  18. Is procrastination related to sleep quality? Testing an application of the procrastination–health model

    OpenAIRE

    Sirois, F.; van Eerde, W.; Argiropoulou, M.I.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing body of research on the consequences of procrastination for health and well-being, there is little research focused on testing or explaining the potential links between procrastination and sleep quality. Using the procrastination-health model as our guiding conceptual lens, we addressed this gap by examining how and why trait procrastination may be linked to various dimensions of sleep quality across two student samples. In Study 1, procrastination was associated with feelin...

  19. Test for Nonlinear Input Output Relations in SISO Systems by Preliminary Data Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses and develops preliminary statistical tests for detecting nonlinearities in the deterministic part of SISO systems with noise. The most referenced method is unreliable for common noise processes as e.g.\\ colored. Therefore two new methods based on superposition and sinus input...... are developed. They are much more robust, especially the sinus method which is reliable also for colored, heavy tailed or skew distributed noise....

  20. Dental Student Study Strategies: Are Self-Testing and Scheduling Related to Academic Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Maureen; Morrow, Christina S; Atiyeh, Lindsey; Pierre, Gaëlle C

    2016-05-01

    Self-testing, a strategy wherein a student actively engages in creating questions and answers from study materials to assist with studying, has been found to be especially advantageous because it enhances future retrieval of information. Studies have found correlations among students' grade point averages (GPAs), self-testing, and rereading study strategies, as well as the spacing of study sessions over time. The aim of this study was to assess relationships among dental students' study strategies, scheduling of study time, and academic achievement. A 16-item survey requesting information on study habits, study schedules, and GPAs was distributed to 358 second-year dental students at New York University College of Dentistry. Additionally, the survey asked students to report the average number of hours per week they devoted to studying for didactic courses and preparing for hands-on preclinical courses. Of the 358 students, 94 (26%) responded to the survey. The vast majority of the respondents reported utilizing self-testing and rereading study strategies. High performers (with higher GPAs) were more likely to use self-testing, especially with flashcards, and to space their studying over multiple sessions. Lower performing students were more likely to highlight or underline their notes and to mass their study sessions or cram. Longer hours devoted to studying and practicing for simulation courses were associated with stronger performance; lower performers reported spending significantly fewer hours practicing for simulation courses. Half of the dental students surveyed said that they felt their studying would be more productive in the morning, although 84% reported doing most of their studying in the evening or late night. Sound study decisions depend on accurate regulation of ongoing learning and appropriate use and timing of evidence-based study strategies, so these results suggest that dental students may require guidance in these areas.

  1. Experimental Test of the State Estimation-Reversal Tradeoff Relation in General Quantum Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When a measurement has limited strength, only partial information, regarding the initial state, is extracted, and, correspondingly, there is a probability to reverse its effect on the system and retrieve the original state. Recently, a clear and direct quantitative description of this complementary relationship, in terms of a tradeoff relation, was developed by Y. K. Cheong and S. W. Lee. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 150402 (2012]. Here, this tradeoff relation is experimentally verified using polarization-encoded single photons from a quantum dot. Measurement operators representing a complete range, from not affecting the system to a projection to a single polarization state, are realized. In addition, for each measurement operator, an optimal reversal operator is also implemented. The upper bound of the tradeoff relation is mapped to experimental parameters representing the measurement strength. Our results complement the theoretical work and provide a hands-on characterization of general quantum measurements.

  2. Characterization of waferstepper and process related front- to backwafer overlay errors in bulk micro machining using electrical overlay test structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zeijl, H.W.; Bijnen, F.G.C.; Slabbekoorn, J.

    2004-01-01

    To validate the Front- To Backwafer Alignment (FTBA) calibration and to investigate process related overlay errors, electrical overlay test structures are used that requires FTBA [1]. Anisotropic KOH etch through the wafer is applied to transfer the backwafer pattern to the frontwafer. Consequently,

  3. Test-retest reliability of Antonovsky's 13-item sense of coherence scale in patients with hand-related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Alice Ørts; Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Cederlund, Ragnhild

    2017-01-01

    to be a powerful tool to measure the ICF component personal factors, which could have an impact on patients' rehabilitation outcomes. Implications for rehabilitation Antonovsky's SOC-13 scale showed test-retest reliability for patients with hand-related disorders. The SOC-13 scale could be a suitable tool to help...

  4. Testing scaling relations for solar-like oscillations from the main sequence to red giants using Kepler data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huber, D.; Bedding, T.R.; Stello, D.; Hekker, S.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Verner, G.A.; Bonanno, A.; Buzasi, D.L.; Campante, T.L.; Elsworth, Y.P.; Hale, S.J.; Kallinger, T.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Chaplin, W.J.; de Ridder, J.; Garcia, R.A.; Appourchaux, T.; Frandsen, S.; Houdek, G.; Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Monteiro, M.J.P.F.G.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Gilliland, R.L.; Kawaler, S.D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Broomhall, A.M.; Corsaro, E.; Salabert, D.; Sanderfer, D.T.; Seader, S.E.; Smith, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed solar-like oscillations in ~1700 stars observed by the Kepler Mission, spanning from the main sequence to the red clump. Using evolutionary models, we test asteroseismic scaling relations for the frequency of maximum power (νmax), the large frequency separation (Δν), and oscillation

  5. Testing of neuroendocrine function in astronauts as related to fluid shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauseng-Fellegger, G; Konig, E M; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H; Jezova, D; Vigas, M

    1992-07-01

    We addressed the question of optimal conditions for neuroendocrine and cardiovascular testing in astronauts. We tested stress reactions during LBNP of < or = -50 mmHg. There was a mild transient elevation of plasma GH concentration and a nonsignificant rise of plasma ACTH, while PRL, insulin and glucose remained unchanged. Aldosterone was decreased 5 and 10 min after beginning of LBNP, thereafter rose significantly, and displayed further significant concentration increase 5 min post-LBNP. The endocrine and cardiovascular responses to submaximal exercise were tested at 8.00 am and 8.00 pm. Exercise-induced changes of heart rate and blood pressure remained unchanged with daytime whereas plasma concentrations of epinephrine, GH and PRL in response to work load were significantly higher in the evening than in the morning. As expected, basal resting values of plasma cortisol were significantly lower in the evening than in the morning but were similar one hour after cessation of exercise. Our findings demonstrate the importance of frequent sampling in case of transient physiological phenomena, and contribute to existing knowledge on circadian influences upon neuroendocrine stress responses.

  6. Testing of neuroendocrine function in astronauts as related to fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauseng-Fellegger, G.; König, E. M.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Jezová, D.; Vigas, M.

    We addressed the question of optimal conditions for neuroendocrine and cardiovascular testing in astronauts. We tested stress reactions during LBNP of ≤-50 mm Hg. There was a mild transient elevation of plasma GH concentration and a nonsignificant rise of plasma ACTH, while PRL, insulin and glucose remained unchanged. Aldosterone was decreased 5 and 10 min after beginning of LBNP, thereafter rose significantly, and displayed a further significant concentration increase 5 min post-LBNP. The endocrine and cardiovascular responses to submaximal exercise were tested at 8.00 am and 8.00 pm. Exercise-induced changes of heart rate and blood pressure remained unchanged with daytime whereas plasma concentrations of epinephrine, GH and PRL in response to work load were significantly higher in the evening than in the morning. As expected, basal resting values of plasma cortisol were significantly lower in the evening than in the morning but were similar one hour after cessation of exercise. Our findings demonstrate the importance of frequent sampling in case of transient physiological phenomena, and contribute to existing knowledge on circadian influences upon neuroendocrine stress responses.

  7. Relation between education and dementia: the role of test bias revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmand, B; Lindeboom, J; Hooijer, C; Jonker, C

    1995-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that dementia screening tests may be biased against low levels of education, whereas others find that a low level of education is a genuine risk factor for dementia. The present paper attempts to reconcile these conflicting views by examining item bias and test bias indices of the mini mental state examination (MMSE). Psychometric calculations and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses of sensitivity and specificity as performed by earlier studies were replicated and extended from the database of the Amsterdam Study of the Elderly. This is a population survey on cognitive decline and dementia (age range 65-84). Subjects with a low level of education (primary school) were compared with better educated subjects (at least some secondary education). Cases were matched by age and sex. The results indicate that the MMSE is not educationally biased as far as item characteristics, reliability, and construct validity are concerned. Yet its predictive validity as a screening test for dementia is educationally biased. This bias will effectively be eliminated with a two point higher cut off score for the subjects whose education extends beyond primary school. Even after such score correction, a low level of education probably remains a genuine risk factor for dementia. PMID:7629532

  8. An empirical test of competing theories of hazard-related trust: the case of GM food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allum, Nick

    2007-08-01

    Few scholars doubt the importance of trust in explaining variation in public perception of technological risk. Relatively little, however, is known about the particular types of judgments that people use in granting or withholding trust. This article presents findings from an empirical study that explores several dimensions of trust relevant for citizens' judgments of scientists involved in the development of GM food. The relationship between particular dimensions of trust and perceptions of GM food risk is also explored, using structural equation modeling. Results suggest that trust judgments based on the perception of shared values are most important in relation to GM food risk, but that judgments about scientists' technical competence are also important.

  9. Tests of General relativity with planetary orbits and Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fienga, A; Exertier, P; Manche, H; Gastineau, M

    2014-01-01

    Based on the new developped planetary ephemerides INPOP13c, determinations of acceptable intervals of General Relativity violation in considering simultaneously the PPN parameters $\\beta$, PPN $\\gamma$, the flattening of the sun $J_{2}^\\odot$ and time variation of the gravitational mass of the sun $\\mu$ are obtained in using Monte Carlo simulation coupled with basic genetic algorithm. Possible time variations of the gravitational constant G are also deduced. Discussions are lead about the better choice of indicators for the goodness-of-fit for each run and limits consistent with general relativity are obtained simultaneously.

  10. Assessment of a relative contribution of terrestrial background radiation in the test field by using RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdić Senada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on the radiological investigation of terrestrial gamma radiation in the test field with soil samples from different minefields in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Measurements of ambient dose equivalent rate, commonly referred to as “air dose rate”, in the test field located in the Tuzla Canton, were performed by RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter, based on energy-compensated Geiger-Muller counter. Its performances were tested in the laboratory conditions with gamma point sources. Since all the samples in the test field were exposed to the same cosmic radiation, there was a possibility to assess a relative contribution of terrestrial gamma radiation due to soil samples of different composition. One set of measurements in the test field was performed with RADIAGEMTM 2000, at a height of about one meter above the ground and basic statistical parameters indicated that there was no significant difference of terrestrial gamma radiation from different soil samples. The other set of measurements was carried out with the same device placed on the ground in the test field. Processing of experimental data on terrestrial gamma radiation has shown that it was possible to make a difference between relative contributions of terrestrial gamma radiation from individual soil samples. The results of investigation could be useful for multiple purposes of public interest.

  11. Recovery during lunch breaks: Testing long-term relations with energy levels at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sianoja, M.; Kinnunen, U.; Bloom, J. de; Korpela, K.; Geurts, S.A.E.

    2016-01-01

    This study had two aims. First, we examined whether lunch break settings, activities, and recovery experiences were associated with lunchtime recovery cross-sectionally. Second, we investigated whether lunchtime recovery was related to energy levels (i.e., exhaustion and vigor) across a 12-month per

  12. School Public Relations: Helping an American Institution Pass Its Most Crucial Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    The professional discipline of strategic public relations offers many benefits to organizations. It helps them prevent and mitigate crises. It allows them to identify and manage issues that may interfere with their goals and objectives. It also leads them in building and maintaining quality relationships with strategic publics. However, can the…

  13. Food-related lifestyles in Singapore: Testing a Western European research instrument in Southeast Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, Søren; Brunsø, Karen; Crippen, Kaye;

    The food-realaed life style instrument developed by the MAPP research group has, up till now, been applied mainly in the context of European cultures. The purpose of the present study is to apply the food-related life style instrument in a new and different cultural setting, to compare results, a...

  14. Possibility for a fourth test of general relativity in earth's gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuan-zhong

    1982-10-01

    In this work, the effect of Earth's gravitational field on a interferometer is calculated in general relativity. The result is that an expected fringe shift, about 10/sup -10/, will occur when the interferometer is rotated through 90/sup 0/ if the length of arms are 1 meter and wavelength of light is 1 ..mu..m.

  15. Explaining the relation between IQ and delinquency: class, race, test motivation, school failure, or self-control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, D; Moffitt, T; Stouthamer-Loeber, M

    1993-05-01

    An inverse relation between IQ and delinquency has been well established, but the direction of effect remains to be specified. Differing explanatory accounts of the relation were empirically examined in the present study using data on 13-year-old boys involved in a high-risk longitudinal study. Accounts that interpreted the relation as spurious or that posited that delinquency-related factors lead to low IQ scores received no support; findings were most consistent with the hypothesis that the direction of effect runs from low IQ to delinquency. The IQ-delinquency relation was robust after race, class, and observed test motivation were controlled statistically. Additionally, the effect of IQ was mediated by school performance for Black youth but not for White youth.

  16. A Test of the Calibration of the Tully-Fisher Relation Using Cepheid and SNIa Distances

    OpenAIRE

    Shanks, T.

    1997-01-01

    We make a direct test of Tully-Fisher distance estimates to eleven spiral galaxies with HST Cepheid distances and to twelve spiral galaxies with SNIa distances. The HST Cepheid distances come from the work of Freedman (1997), Sandage et al (1996) and Tanvir et al (1995). The SNIa distances come from Pierce (1994), calibrated using the Cepheid results of Sandage et al (1996). The Tully-Fisher distances mostly come from the work of Pierce (1994). The results show that the Tully-Fisher distance ...

  17. Associative vocabulary learning: development and testing of two paradigms for the (re- acquisition of action- and object-related words.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Freundlieb

    Full Text Available Despite a growing number of studies, the neurophysiology of adult vocabulary acquisition is still poorly understood. One reason is that paradigms that can easily be combined with neuroscientfic methods are rare. Here, we tested the efficiency of two paradigms for vocabulary (re- acquisition, and compared the learning of novel words for actions and objects. Cortical networks involved in adult native-language word processing are widespread, with differences postulated between words for objects and actions. Words and what they stand for are supposed to be grounded in perceptual and sensorimotor brain circuits depending on their meaning. If there are specific brain representations for different word categories, we hypothesized behavioural differences in the learning of action-related and object-related words. Paradigm A, with the learning of novel words for body-related actions spread out over a number of days, revealed fast learning of these new action words, and stable retention up to 4 weeks after training. The single-session Paradigm B employed objects and actions. Performance during acquisition did not differ between action-related and object-related words (time*word category: p = 0.01, but the translation rate was clearly better for object-related (79% than for action-related words (53%, p = 0.002. Both paradigms yielded robust associative learning of novel action-related words, as previously demonstrated for object-related words. Translation success differed for action- and object-related words, which may indicate different neural mechanisms. The paradigms tested here are well suited to investigate such differences with neuroscientific means. Given the stable retention and minimal requirements for conscious effort, these learning paradigms are promising for vocabulary re-learning in brain-lesioned people. In combination with neuroimaging, neuro-stimulation or pharmacological intervention, they may well advance the understanding of

  18. Associative vocabulary learning: development and testing of two paradigms for the (re-) acquisition of action- and object-related words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlieb, Nils; Ridder, Volker; Dobel, Christian; Enriquez-Geppert, Stefanie; Baumgaertner, Annette; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Gerloff, Christian; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Liuzzi, Gianpiero

    2012-01-01

    Despite a growing number of studies, the neurophysiology of adult vocabulary acquisition is still poorly understood. One reason is that paradigms that can easily be combined with neuroscientfic methods are rare. Here, we tested the efficiency of two paradigms for vocabulary (re-) acquisition, and compared the learning of novel words for actions and objects. Cortical networks involved in adult native-language word processing are widespread, with differences postulated between words for objects and actions. Words and what they stand for are supposed to be grounded in perceptual and sensorimotor brain circuits depending on their meaning. If there are specific brain representations for different word categories, we hypothesized behavioural differences in the learning of action-related and object-related words. Paradigm A, with the learning of novel words for body-related actions spread out over a number of days, revealed fast learning of these new action words, and stable retention up to 4 weeks after training. The single-session Paradigm B employed objects and actions. Performance during acquisition did not differ between action-related and object-related words (time*word category: p = 0.01), but the translation rate was clearly better for object-related (79%) than for action-related words (53%, p = 0.002). Both paradigms yielded robust associative learning of novel action-related words, as previously demonstrated for object-related words. Translation success differed for action- and object-related words, which may indicate different neural mechanisms. The paradigms tested here are well suited to investigate such differences with neuroscientific means. Given the stable retention and minimal requirements for conscious effort, these learning paradigms are promising for vocabulary re-learning in brain-lesioned people. In combination with neuroimaging, neuro-stimulation or pharmacological intervention, they may well advance the understanding of language learning

  19. Gravitational Wave Tests of General Relativity with the Parameterized Post-Einsteinian Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish, Neil; Yunes, Nico; Pretorius, Frans

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy has tremendous potential for studying extreme astrophysical phenomena and exploring fundamental physics. The waves produced by binary black hole mergers will provide a pristine environment in which to study strong field, dynamical gravity. Extracting detailed information about these systems requires accurate theoretical models of the gravitational wave signals. If gravity is not described by General Relativity, analyses that are based on waveforms derived from Einstein's field equations could result in parameter biases and a loss of detection efficiency. A new class of "parameterized post-Einsteinian" (ppE) waveforms has been proposed to cover this eventuality. Here we apply the ppE approach to simulated data from a network of advanced ground based interferometers (aLIGO/aVirgo) and from a future spaced based interferometer (LISA). Bayesian inference and model selection are used to investigate parameter biases, and to determine the level at which departures from general relativity...

  20. Fluid dynamic research at NASA-Ames Research Center related to transonic wind tunnel design and testing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlstein, L., Jr.; Steinle, F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Fluid dynamic research with the objective of developing new and improved technology in both test facility concepts and test techniques is being reported. A summary of efforts and results thus far obtained in four areas is presented. The four area are: (1) the use of heavy gases to obtain high Reynolds numbers at transonic speeds: (2) high Reynolds number tests of the C-141A wing configuration; (3) performance and flow quality of the pilot injector driven wind tunnel; and (4) integration time required to extract accurate static and dynamic data from tests in transonic wind tunnels. Some of the principal conclusions relative to each of the four areas are: (1) Initial attempts to apply analytical corrections to test results using gases with gamma other than 1.4 to simulate conditions in air show promise but need significant improvement; (2) for the C-141A configuration, no Reynolds number less than the full scale flight value provides an accurate simulation of the full scale flow; (3) high ratios of tunnel mass flow rate to injection mass flow rate and high flow quality can be obtained in an injector driven transonic wind tunnel; and (4) integration times of 0.5 to 1.0 sec may be required for static force and pressure tests, respectively, at some transonic test conditions in order to obtain the required data accuracy.

  1. DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE AND ORAL GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST IN YOUNG WOMEN: IS IT RELATED TO EACH OTHER?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M AMINI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this study we wanted to compare the means of area under the curve (AVC of glucose tolerance test in young women depending on dehydroepiandrosteron (DHEA levels. Methods. Selected subjects were examined for DHEA and glucose tolerance test. At first, they were divided into two groups (under the mean of DHEA vs above the mean of DHEA and then into three groups (under the mean-SD, between the mean±SD, above the mean + SD. 37 young women with no abnormality whose 8MI was below 30 Kg/m2 they were refered to research center of endocrinology and metabolism of IUMSHS. Results. The mean of DHEA was 2895±1113 ng/ml. The mean of AUC was 745±104.7 mmol/l/min in women under the mean of DHEA and 670±51.9 mmol/l/min in women above the mean of DHEA (P < 0.05. In comparison of women based on mean±SD, the AVe was 786±88.3, 691. 7 ± 77.5 and 670.8±92.5 mmol/l/min, respectively. Results showed a significant decrease of AVC in women above the mean+ SO of DHEA (P < 0.05. Discussion. This study suggests that in young healthy women DHEA can increase the glucose tolerance.

  2. Values at stake: autonomy, responsibility, and trustworthiness in relation to genetic testing and personalized nutrition advice

    OpenAIRE

    Nordström, Karin; Juth, Niklas; Kjellström, Sofia; Meijboom, Franck L. B.; Görman, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Personalized nutrition has the potential to enhance individual health control. It could be seen as a means to strengthen people’s autonomy as they learn more about their personal health risks, and receive dietary advice accordingly. We examine in what sense personalized nutrition strengthens or weakens individual autonomy. The impact of personalized nutrition on autonomy is analyzed in relation to responsibility and trustworthiness. On a societal level, individualization of health promotion m...

  3. Association between parent-adolescent communication about sex-related topics and HIV testing, United States. 2006-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Alexandra B; Oraka, Emeka; Fasula, Amy M; Jayne, Paula E; Carry, Monique G; Raiford, Jerris L

    2017-03-01

    Adolescents need information about sex-related topics in order to reduce risk behavior and engage in healthy sexual decision-making. Parents have the potential to be an important source of this information. Using the 2006-2010 and 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth, we examined associations between parent-adolescent communication before age 18 about sex-related topics and HIV testing among respondents aged 18-24 that ever had sexual intercourse (women = 3893; men = 3359). Analyses showed that for both men and women, discussing how to prevent HIV/AIDS and how to use a condom with a parent before age 18 were positively associated with HIV testing. Among women only, discussions about methods of birth control, where to get birth control, and STDs were positively associated with HIV testing. Developing strategies and interventions to facilitate parent-adolescent communication about sex-related topics, particularly HIV prevention and condom use, may be important to increase HIV testing among young women and men.

  4. Assessment of HIV-related stigma in a US faith-based HIV education and testing intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannette Y Berkley-Patton

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The African American church is a highly influential institution with the potential to greatly increase the reach of HIV prevention interventions and address HIV-related stigma in US African American communities. However, there are few studies on HIV-related stigma and African American church populations. This study explored HIV-related stigma among church and community members participating in an HIV education and testing intervention pilot study in African American churches, named Taking It to the Pews. Methods: Four African American churches located in Kansas City, MO and KS, were randomized to either intervention or comparison groups. Churches assigned to the intervention group received religiously tailored HIV education, testing and compassion messages/activities (e.g. sermons, brochures/church bulletins, testimonials via the Taking It to the Pews HIV Tool Kit. Comparison churches received non-religiously tailored HIV information. HIV-related stigma was assessed with 543 church members and with community members served through church outreach services (e.g. food/clothing pantries, social services in the four churches. Participants completed surveys at baseline, 6 months and 12 months to assess their HIV-related stigma beliefs, exposure to intervention components and satisfaction with the study. Results: At baseline, HIV-related stigma beliefs were similar across experimental groups and were quite low. Mean HIV-related stigma scores were not significantly different between experimental groups at 6 months (p=0.92 or at 12 months (p=0.70. However, mean HIV-related stigma scores within both groups showed decreasing trends at six months, which approached significance. Analysis of previously studied HIV-related stigma factors (e.g. age, gender, income, HIV knowledge, religiosity did not yield changes in the null findings. Intervention group participants were highly exposed to several intervention components (sermons, HIV resource

  5. Flight Controllability Limits and Related Human Transfer Functions as Determined from Simulator and Flight Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Day, Richard E.

    1961-01-01

    A simulator study and flight tests were performed to determine the levels of static stability and damping necessary to enable a pilot to control the longitudinal and lateral-directional dynamics of a vehicle for short periods of time. Although a basic set of aerodynamic characteristics was used, the study was conducted so that the results would be applicable to a wide range of flight conditions and configurations. Novel piloting techniques were found which enabled the pilot to control the vehicle at conditions that were otherwise uncontrollable. The influence of several critical factors in altering the controllability limits was also investigated. Several human transfer functions were used which gave fairly good representations of the controllability limits determined experimentally for the short-period longitudinal, directional, and lateral modes. A transfer function with approximately the same gain and phase angle as the pilot at the controlling frequencies along the controllability limits was also derived.

  6. A test of the culture-performance related distress hypothesis among employees in a collectivistic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pheko, M.M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To test the notions that people from collectivist cultures may experience more intense Sensitivity Towards being the Target of Upward Comparison (STTUC responses the current study investigated the relationships between traditional gender role orientation and STTUC, and collectivistic cultural orientation and STTUC. Using a quantitative, cross-sectional survey approach, a convenient sample of 464 participants from various organizations in Botswana completed the questionnaire. The participants were mostly female (59.9%, in a dating relationship (67.9%, and between the ages of 20 and 57 (M = 32.69, SD = 7.43. In the main, the hypotheses were not supported as the correlation results indicated that neither collectivistic cultural orientation nor traditional gender role orientation were linked to STTUC experiences. Discussions center on the importance of reporting and suggesting theoretical justifications for the so called ‘”nonsignificant findings.” Implications of the empirical findings and the future research directions are also discussed.

  7. Applications of Generalizability Theory and Their Relations to Classical Test Theory and Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vispoel, Walter P; Morris, Carrie A; Kilinc, Murat

    2017-01-23

    Although widely recognized as a comprehensive framework for representing score reliability, generalizability theory (G-theory), despite its potential benefits, has been used sparingly in reporting of results for measures of individual differences. In this article, we highlight many valuable ways that G-theory can be used to quantify, evaluate, and improve psychometric properties of scores. Our illustrations encompass assessment of overall reliability, percentages of score variation accounted for by individual sources of measurement error, dependability of cut-scores for decision making, estimation of reliability and dependability for changes made to measurement procedures, disattenuation of validity coefficients for measurement error, and linkages of G-theory with classical test theory and structural equation modeling. We also identify computer packages for performing G-theory analyses, most of which can be obtained free of charge, and describe how they compare with regard to data input requirements, ease of use, complexity of designs supported, and output produced. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Divergence of conserved non-coding sequences: rate estimates and relative rate tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Günter P; Fried, Claudia; Prohaska, Sonja J; Stadler, Peter F

    2004-11-01

    In many eukaryotic genomes only a small fraction of the DNA codes for proteins, but the non-protein coding DNA harbors important genetic elements directing the development and the physiology of the organisms, like promoters, enhancers, insulators, and micro-RNA genes. The molecular evolution of these genetic elements is difficult to study because their functional significance is hard to deduce from sequence information alone. Here we propose an approach to the study of the rate of evolution of functional non-coding sequences at a macro-evolutionary scale. We identify functionally important non-coding sequences as Conserved Non-Coding Nucleotide (CNCN) sequences from the comparison of two outgroup species. The CNCN sequences so identified are then compared to their homologous sequences in a pair of ingroup species, and we monitor the degree of modification these sequences suffered in the two ingroup lineages. We propose a method to test for rate differences in the modification of CNCN sequences among the two ingroup lineages, as well as a method to estimate their rate of modification. We apply this method to the full sequences of the HoxA clusters from six gnathostome species: a shark, Heterodontus francisci; a basal ray finned fish, Polypterus senegalus; the amphibian, Xenopus tropicalis; as well as three mammalian species, human, rat and mouse. The results show that the evolutionary rate of CNCN sequences is not distinguishable among the three mammalian lineages, while the Xenopus lineage has a significantly increased rate of evolution. Furthermore the estimates of the rate parameters suggest that in the stem lineage of mammals the rate of CNCN sequence evolution was more than twice the rate observed within the placental amniotes clade, suggesting a high rate of evolution of cis-regulatory elements during the origin of amniotes and mammals. We conclude that the proposed methods can be used for testing hypotheses about the rate and pattern of evolution of putative

  9. In vitro axial preload application during spine flexibility testing: towards reduced apparatus-related artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripton, P A; Bruehlmann, S B; Orr, T E; Oxland, T R; Nolte, L P

    2000-12-01

    Presently, there is little consensus about how, or even if, axial preload should be incorporated in spine flexibility tests in order to simulate the compressive loads naturally present in vivo. Some preload application methods are suspected of producing unwanted "artefact" forces as the specimen rotates and, in doing so, influencing the resulting kinematics. The objective of this study was to quantitatively compare four distinct types of preload which have roots in contemporary experimental practice. The specific quantities compared were the reaction moments and forces resulting at the intervertebral disc and specimen kinematics. The preload types incorporated increasing amounts of caudal constraint on the preload application vector ranging from an unconstrained dead-load arrangement to an apparatus that allowed the vector to follow rotations of the specimen. Six human cadaveric spine segments were tested (1-L1/L2, 3-L2/L3, 1-L3/L4 and 1-L4/L5). Pure moments were applied to the specimens with each of the four different types of compressive preload. Kinematic response was measured using an opto-electronic motion analysis system. A six-axis load cell was used to measure reaction forces and moments. Artefact reaction moments and shear forces were significantly affected by preload application method and magnitude. Unconstrained preload methods produced high artefact moments and low artefact shear forces while more constrained methods did the opposite. A mechanical trade-off is suggested by our results, whereby unwanted moment can only be prevented at the cost of shear force production. When comparing spine flexibility studies, caution should be exercised to ensure preload was applied in a similar manner for all studies. Unwanted moments or forces induced as a result of preload application method may render the comparison of two seemingly similar studies inappropriate.

  10. Usefulness of predischarge exercise electrocardiographic testing in detecting the late patency status of the infarct-related artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountouris, Evaggelos; Pappa, Eugenia; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Pappas, Kostas; Karanikis, Paulos; Dimitroula, Vasiliki; Ntatsis, Anastasios; Siogas, Kostas

    2004-05-01

    Predischarge exercise electrocardiographic testing (PEET) represents a widely accepted clinical tool for prognostic and functional assessment of patients who experience an uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, there are no data suggesting any relation between PEET results and patency status of the infarct-related artery (IRA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether ST and/or QT-dispersion (QTD) changes induced by a low-level PEET, after uncomplicated ST-elevation AMI, are related to the late patency status of the IRA. We prospectively evaluated 61 consecutive patients who had suffered a first uncomplicated ST-elevation AMI. All of them successfully carried out four stages of the modified Bruce protocol exercise testing before discharge, and thereafter were subjected to coronary angiography. Exercise-induced ST elevation and QTD shortening were found significantly more frequently in patients with persistently occluded IRA, as compared to patients with patent IRA (ST elevation 65% vs 27%, P = 0.006; QTD shortening 80% vs 29%, P positive predictive value of 75%, whereas the absence of both predicted the patency of IRA with a negative predictive value of 100%. These results indicate that ST-elevation and QT-dispersion changes induced by a predischarge exercise testing after a first ST-elevation AMI may effectively predict the late patency status of the infarct-related artery.

  11. A psychometric comparison of the Internet Addiction Test, the Internet Related Problem Scale, and self-diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Widyanto, L; Griffiths, MD; Brunsden, V

    2011-01-01

    One of the more prominent issues in the field of Internet addiction is the validity of the instrument used to assess users’ level of Internet involvement. Many of the instruments used to assess Internet addiction have high face validity but have yet to be tested psychometrically. The aim of this study is to compare two of the most used Internet addiction research measures, the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Internet-Related Problem Scale (IRPS), along with a self-diagnostic question si...

  12. Geospatial analysis of HIV-Related social stigma: a study of tested females across mandals of Andhra Pradesh in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandwal, Rashmi; Augustijn, Ellen-Wien; Stein, Alfred; Miscione, Gianluca; Garg, Pradeep Kumar; Garg, Rahul Dev

    2010-04-12

    In Geographical Information Systems issues of scale are of an increasing interest in storing health data and using these in policy support. National and international policies on treating HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) positive women in India are based on case counts at Voluntary Counseling and Testing Centers (VCTCs). In this study, carried out in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, these centers are located in subdistricts called mandals, serving for both registration and health facility policies. This study hypothesizes that people may move to a mandal different than their place of residence for being tested for reasons of stigma. Counts of a single mandal therefore may include cases from inside and outside a mandal. HIV counts were analyzed on the presence of outside cases and the most likely explanations for movement. Counts of women being tested on a practitioners' referral (REFs) and those directly walking-in at testing centers (DWs) were compared and with counts of pregnant women. At the mandal level incidence among REFs is on the average higher than among DWs. For both groups incidence is higher in the South-Eastern coastal zones, being an area with a dense highway network and active port business. A pattern on the incidence maps was statistically confirmed by a cluster analysis. A spatial regression analysis to explain the differences in incidence among pregnant women and REFs shows a negative relation with the number of facilities and a positive relation with the number of roads in a mandal. Differences in incidence among pregnant women and DWs are explained by the same variables, and by a negative relation with the number of neighboring mandals. Based on the assumption that pregnant women are tested in their home mandal, this provides a clear indication that women move for testing as well as clues for explanations why. The spatial analysis shows that women in India move towards a different mandal for getting tested on HIV. Given the scale of study

  13. Geospatial analysis of HIV-Related social stigma: A study of tested females across mandals of Andhra Pradesh in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miscione Gianluca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Geographical Information Systems issues of scale are of an increasing interest in storing health data and using these in policy support. National and international policies on treating HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive women in India are based on case counts at Voluntary Counseling and Testing Centers (VCTCs. In this study, carried out in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, these centers are located in subdistricts called mandals, serving for both registration and health facility policies. This study hypothesizes that people may move to a mandal different than their place of residence for being tested for reasons of stigma. Counts of a single mandal therefore may include cases from inside and outside a mandal. HIV counts were analyzed on the presence of outside cases and the most likely explanations for movement. Counts of women being tested on a practitioners' referral (REFs and those directly walking-in at testing centers (DWs were compared and with counts of pregnant women. Results At the mandal level incidence among REFs is on the average higher than among DWs. For both groups incidence is higher in the South-Eastern coastal zones, being an area with a dense highway network and active port business. A pattern on the incidence maps was statistically confirmed by a cluster analysis. A spatial regression analysis to explain the differences in incidence among pregnant women and REFs shows a negative relation with the number of facilities and a positive relation with the number of roads in a mandal. Differences in incidence among pregnant women and DWs are explained by the same variables, and by a negative relation with the number of neighboring mandals. Based on the assumption that pregnant women are tested in their home mandal, this provides a clear indication that women move for testing as well as clues for explanations why. Conclusions The spatial analysis shows that women in India move towards a different

  14. Testing the electron-capture supernova scenario using universal relations between neutron star properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, William

    2017-01-01

    8-10 solar mass stars may end their lives in electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe), in which ONeMg cores are destabilized by electron captures onto Neon and Magnesium. Strong circumstantial evidence exists that the Crab pulsar and PSR J0737-3039b were formed in ECSNe. Evidence for the existence of the ECSN mechanism has important implications for the rate of production of Be/X-ray binaries and the rate of binary neutron star mergers.I will discuss how supernova modeling suggests that neutron stars formed via the electron-capture mechanism have a specific gravitational binding energy. Recently, universal relations between neutron star properties including their binding energy, moment of inertia, quadrupole moments and tidal polarizability have been carefully examined. I will show how these relations, coupled with measurements of the post-Newtonian parameters of the PSR J0737-3039 system and of the acceleration of the Crab supernova remnant, can provide evidence for or against the electron-capture supernova formation scenario.

  15. Reliability and criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test in competitive junior tennis players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Eriksson,1 Fredrik R Johansson,2 Maria Bäck3–5 1Rehab City Östermalm, Primary Health Care, 2Department of Environmental Medicine, Musculoskeletal and Sports Injury Epidemiology Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 3Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 4Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 5Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden Purpose: This study adds to the previous work in the field of sport-specific fitness testing by evaluating a tennis-specific agility test called “the 20-yard shuttle test”. The aim of the study was to evaluate the test–retest reliability, the inter-rater reliability, and the criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test on competitive junior tennis players. Participants and methods: Totally, 34 Swedish tennis players (13 girls, mean age 14±1.6 years, participated in the study. To examine test–retest reliability, the subjects performed the 20-yard shuttle test three times on the same day and then the same procedure was repeated after 3 days. To test the inter-rater reliability, the time was measured with a stopwatch simultaneously by two different raters. The time recorded manually was compared to the gold standard of digital timing to evaluate the criterion-related validity. Results: Excellent test–retest reliability was found both within the same day (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.95 and between days (ICC 0.91. Furthermore, the results showed excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.99 and criterion-related validity on both test occasions (ICC 0.99. Conclusion: We have provided introductory support for the 20-yard shuttle test as a reliable and valid test for use in competitive junior tennis players. The ease of administration makes this test a practical alternative to evaluate physical fitness in order to

  16. Testing the social identity relative deprivation (SIRD) model of social change: the political rise of Scottish nationalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Dominic; Grant, Peter R

    2012-12-01

    We tested a social-identity relative deprivation (SIRD) model predicting Scottish nationalist beliefs and intention to vote for the separatist Scottish Nationalist Party (SNP). Data were from a survey of a large and representative sample of Scottish teenagers administered in the late 1980s. The SIRD model distinguishes effects of group-based and personal relative deprivation, which should be independent of one another. Importantly, social change beliefs should mediate the effects of both collective relative deprivation and group identification on protest intentions (in this case intention to vote for the SNP). Egoistic relative deprivation should be the strongest predictor of feelings of depression. Using structural equation modelling, the results strongly support this model and replicate in two different cohorts.

  17. Applying Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process and Grey Relation Analysis to Evaluate the Supply Chain Performance of the Wafer Testing House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Chin Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In the information age, the process of E-Commerce (EC operates quickly and the present enterprises of Taiwan have to face the Free Cross-Strait Market (FCSM with Mainland China, which will definitely change the model as well as the performance of the supply chain. Hence, this study focuses on the issue of supply chain performance evaluation of the wafer testing house in Taiwan. Approach: This investigation applied the Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP to derive the weights of influential indicators for evaluating the supply chain performance of the wafer testing house and the Grey Relation Analysis (GRA was used to evaluate the performance between the FCSM and EC aspects. Results: The analyzed results had identified the indicator weight of the supply chain performance evaluation in the wafer testing house and the indicator performances between different aspects were compared. The research results indicated that the FCSM aspect had better performance than EC aspect of the supply chain evaluation in the wafer testing house. Conclusion/Recommendations: Based on the analyzed results, the managers can find out the problems and improve the supply chain performance of the wafer testing house. This study not only can be a good basis for improvements of the case company, but also can be the reference for evaluating the supply chain performance of the wafer testing house.

  18. Verification of FPGA-Signal using the test board which is applied to Safety-related controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Youn-Hu; Yoo, Kwanwoo; Lee, Myeongkyun; Yun, Donghwa [SOOSAN ENS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This article aims to provide the verification method for BGA-type FPGA of Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) developed as Safety Class. The logic of FPGA in the control device with Safety Class is the circuit to control overall logic of PLC. Saftety-related PLC must meet the international standard specifications. With this reason, we use V and V according to an international standard in order to secure high reliability and safety. By using this, we are supposed to proceed to a variety of verification courses for extra reliability and safety analysis. In order to have efficient verification of test results, we propose the test using the newly changed BGA socket which can resolve the problems of the conventional socket on this paper. The Verification of processes is divided into verification of Hardware and firmware. That processes are carried out in the unit testing and integration testing. The proposed test method is simple, the effect of cost reductions by batch process. In addition, it is advantageous to measure the signal from the Hi-speed-IC due to its short length of the pins and it was plated with the copper around it. Further, it also to prevent abrasion on the IC ball because it has no direct contact with the PCB. Therefore, it can be actually applied is to the BGA package test and we can easily verify logic as well as easily checking the operation of the designed data.

  19. Testing General Relativity with Stellar Orbits around the Supermassive Black Hole in Our Galactic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A; Do, T; Ghez, A M; Martinez, G D; Naoz, S; Becklin, E E; Boehle, A; Chappell, S; Chu, D; Dehghanfar, A; Kosmo, K; Lu, J R; Matthews, K; Morris, M R; Sakai, S; Schödel, R; Witzel, G

    2017-05-26

    We demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from general relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of |α|black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.

  20. Down regulation of gene related sex hormone synthesis pathway in mouse testes by miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomsuk, Latiporn; Juengwatanatrakul, Thaweesak; Putalun, Waraporn; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2011-12-01

    Miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol are phytoestrogens isolated from tuberous root of Pueraria candollei var. mirifica. Modulatory effects of miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol on enzymes involved in sex-hormone synthesis pathway in male C57BL/6 mice were investigated using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol suppressed the expressions of 3β-HSD, 17β-HSD1, and CYP17 while CYP19 mRNA expression was slightly decreased. In addition, the expression of 17β-HSD2 was induced in correlation with those did by estradiol. These observations supported that miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol could exhibit the same effect as estradiol regarding regulation of testicular gene related sex hormone synthesis pathway.

  1. Age-related changes in human vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflexes: Pseudorandom rotation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.; Schoenhoff, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and optokinetic reflex (OKR) were characterized in 216 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. The object of this cross-sectional study was to determine the effects of aging on VOR and OKR reflex dynamics, and to identify the distributions of parameters which describe VOR and OKR responses to pseudorandom stimuli in a putatively normal population. In general, VOR and OKR response parameters changed in a manner consistent with declining function with increasing age. For the VOR this was reflected in declining response amplitudes, although the magnitude of the decline was small relative to the variability of the data. For the OKR the lag time of the response, probably associated with the time required for visual information processing, increased linearly with age at a rate of about 1 ms per year.

  2. Testing the relative contribution of positive and negative interactions in rocky intertidal communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertness, M.D.; Leonard, G.H.; Levine, J.M.; Schmidt, P.R.; Ingraham, A.O.

    1999-12-01

    In contrast to many other biotic forces, such as competition and predation, the role played by habitat modification by plants and sessile animals in natural communities has not been given the experimental attention it deserves. To test the hypothesis that habitat modification by seaweed canopies can have direct positive effects on rocky intertidal communities, the authors quantified habitat amelioration by Ascophyllum nodosum canopies and its consequences on understory organisms in the Gulf of Maine, USA. At the upper and lower elevational borders of the algal canopy, the authors examined the recruitment, growth, and survivorship of common benthic organisms in canopy removal, and shaded canopy removal plots intended to mimic canopy habitat modifications. The algal canopy greatly reduced potential physical stresses, particularly at high tidal heights. Maximum daily rock temperatures were 5--10 C lower and evaporative water loss was in order of magnitude less under the canopy than in canopy removal plots. The response of understory organisms to canopy removal, however, was species specific and somewhat idiosyncratic. Nonetheless, in general, at the high intertidal border of the canopy the recruitment, growth, and survival of understory organisms were enhanced by the canopy, whereas at the low intertidal border canopy effects were negative or neutral. nearly half of the interactions the authors studied were positive in the high zone.

  3. Time-frequency intracranial source localization of feedback-related EEG activity in hypothesis testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papo, David; Douiri, Abdel; Bouchet, Florence; Bourzeix, Jean-Claude; Caverni, Jean-Paul; Baudonnière, Pierre-Marie

    2007-06-01

    The neural correlates of the response to performance feedback have been the object of numerous neuroimaging studies. However, the precise timing and functional meaning of the resulting activations are poorly understood. We studied the electroencephalographic response time locked to positive and negative performance feedback in a hypothesis testing paradigm. The signal was convoluted with a family of complex wavelets. Intracranial sources of activity at various narrow-band frequencies were estimated in the 100- to 400-ms time window following feedback onset. Positive and negative feedback were associated to 1) early parahippocampo-cingular sources of alpha oscillations, more posteriorly located and long lasting for negative feedback and to 2) late partially overlapping neural circuits comprising regions in prefrontal, cingular, and temporal cortices but operating at feedback-specific latencies and frequencies. The results were interpreted in the light of neurophysiological models of feedback and were used to discuss methodological issues in the study of high-level cognitive functions, including reasoning and decision making.

  4. A Test of the Calibration of the Tully-Fisher Relation Using Cepheid and SNIa Distances

    CERN Document Server

    Shanks, T

    1997-01-01

    We make a direct test of Tully-Fisher distance estimates to eleven spiral galaxies with HST Cepheid distances and to twelve spiral galaxies with SNIa distances. The HST Cepheid distances come from the work of Freedman (1997), Sandage et al (1996) and Tanvir et al (1995). The SNIa distances come from Pierce (1994), calibrated using the Cepheid results of Sandage et al (1996). The Tully-Fisher distances mostly come from the work of Pierce (1994). The results show that the Tully-Fisher distance moduli are too short with respect to the Cepheid distances by 0.46+-0.14mag and too short with respect to the SNIa distances by 0.46+-0.19mag. Combining the HST Cepheid and SNIa data suggests that, overall, previous Tully-Fisher distances were too short by 0.46+-0.11mag, a result which is significant at the 4sigma level. These data therefore indicate that previous Tully-Fisher distances should be revised upwards by 24+-6% implying, for example, a Virgo distance of 19.3+-1.9Mpc. The value of Ho from Tully-Fisher estimates ...

  5. Testing the Epeak - Eiso relation for GRBs detected by Swift and Suzaku-WAM

    CERN Document Server

    Krimm, H A; Sugita, S; Ohno, M; Sakamoto, T; Barthelmy, S D; Gehrels, N; Hara, R; Norris, J P; Ohmori, N; Onda, K; Sato, G; Tanaka, H; Tashiro, M; Yamauchi, M

    2009-01-01

    One of the most prominent, yet controversial associations derived from the ensemble of prompt-phase observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the apparent correlation in the source frame between the peak energy Epeak) of the nu-F(nu) spectrum and the isotropic radiated energy, Eiso. Since most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have Epeak above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, determining accurate Epeak values for large numbers of Swift bursts has been difficult. However, by combining data from Swift/BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50-5000 keV, for bursts which are simultaneously detected, one can accurately fit Epeak and Eiso and test the relationship between them for the Swift sample. Between the launch of Suzaku in July 2005 and the end of April 2009, there were 48 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which triggered both Swift/BAT and WAM and an additional 48 bursts which triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger...

  6. GAME - A small mission concept for high-precision astrometric test of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, A.; Gai, Mario; Donati, Paolo; Morbidelli, Roberto; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Crosta, Mariateresa

    2010-11-01

    GAME (Gamma Astrometric Measurement Experiment) is a concept for a small mission whose main goal is to measure from space the γ parameter of the Parameterized Post-Newtonian formalism, Will (2001)) A satellite, looking as close as possible to the Solar limb, measures the gravitational bending of light in a way similar to that followed by past experiments from the ground during solar eclipses. In the cited formalism, deviations of the γ parameter from unity are interpreted as deviations from the predictions of General Relativity which are foreseen by several competing theories of gravity. In the present theoretical scenario, such deviations are expected to appear in the range between 10-5 and 10-7. The most stringent experimental constraints available up to now are those of the Cassini mission, that gives 1-γ≲10-5 Bertotti et al. (2003), while future space missions are expected to reach the 10-7 level of accuracy. (Vecchiato et al. (2003), Turyshev et al. (2004), Ni (2008)) Preliminary simulations have shown that the expected final accuracy of GAME can reach the 10-7 level, or better if the mission profile can be extended to fit a larger budget Vecchiato et al. (2009), Gai et al. (2009). This work, which has recently been extended to better assess the mission performances, has confirmed the previous results and has given indications on how further improve various aspects of the mission profile. Moreover, thanks to its flexible observation strategy, GAME is also able to target other interesting scientific goals in the realm of General Relativity, as well as in those involving observations of selected extrasolar systems in the brown dwarf and planetary regime.

  7. TESTING SCALING RELATIONS FOR SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS FROM THE MAIN SEQUENCE TO RED GIANTS USING KEPLER DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Stello, D. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hekker, S. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mathur, S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Mosser, B. [LESIA, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Denis, Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Verner, G. A.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Hale, S. J.; Chaplin, W. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bonanno, A. [INAF Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania (Italy); Buzasi, D. L. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Campante, T. L. [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Kallinger, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Silva Aguirre, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); De Ridder, J. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, K.U.Leuven (Belgium); Garcia, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Appourchaux, T. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Frandsen, S. [Danish AsteroSeismology Centre (DASC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Houdek, G., E-mail: dhuber@physics.usyd.edu.au [Institute of Astronomy, University of Vienna, 1180 Vienna (Austria); and others

    2011-12-20

    We have analyzed solar-like oscillations in {approx}1700 stars observed by the Kepler Mission, spanning from the main sequence to the red clump. Using evolutionary models, we test asteroseismic scaling relations for the frequency of maximum power ({nu}{sub max}), the large frequency separation ({Delta}{nu}), and oscillation amplitudes. We show that the difference of the {Delta}{nu}-{nu}{sub max} relation for unevolved and evolved stars can be explained by different distributions in effective temperature and stellar mass, in agreement with what is expected from scaling relations. For oscillation amplitudes, we show that neither (L/M){sup s} scaling nor the revised scaling relation by Kjeldsen and Bedding is accurate for red-giant stars, and demonstrate that a revised scaling relation with a separate luminosity-mass dependence can be used to calculate amplitudes from the main sequence to red giants to a precision of {approx}25%. The residuals show an offset particularly for unevolved stars, suggesting that an additional physical dependency is necessary to fully reproduce the observed amplitudes. We investigate correlations between amplitudes and stellar activity, and find evidence that the effect of amplitude suppression is most pronounced for subgiant stars. Finally, we test the location of the cool edge of the instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram using solar-like oscillations and find the detections in the hottest stars compatible with a domain of hybrid stochastically excited and opacity driven pulsation.

  8. Update on Immunological Test (Quantiferon-TB Gold) Contribution in the Management of Tuberculosis-Related Ocular Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, S; Bodaghi, B; Saadoun, D

    2017-07-12

    To clarify interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) contributions to intraocular tuberculosis management, according to related TB endemic prevalence. Despite extensive investigations, including IGRA, the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis (TB) is still challenging and remains mostly presumptive. According to the literature, it appears that management of suspected ocular TB differs significantly based on whether patients are from areas of high TB prevalence or from non-TB-endemic countries. The accuracy and final contribution of chest X-rays, tuberculin skin test and IGRA differ significantly according to low or high endemic TB areas. This work aims to review IGRA test outcomes in the light of these clinical and epidemiological settings. We therefore focused our analysis and its subsequent guidelines proposal based on the TB prevalence where the patient lives. We believe that distinct guidelines should be determined for managing patients with suspected ocular TB, first taking into consideration the relative TB prevalence.

  9. Deformation Behavior of Severely Deformed Al and Related Mechanisms Through Warm Tensile Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkhesht, V.; Kazeminezhad, M.

    2017-01-01

    Flow stress and ductility behaviors of the annealed and severely deformed Al were investigated at warm deformation temperatures. Constrained groove pressing (CGP) method as a severe plastic deformation process was used. The tensile test was carried out at the temperature range of the 298-573 K and strain rate range of 0.001-0.1 s-1 to present the elevated temperature deformation behavior utilizing hyperbolic sine constitutive equation. The flow stress of the CGPed sample is increased with the number of CGP passes and decreased with temperature. Dynamic recovery and strain softening are found as main restoration mechanisms. Flow stress amounts are not remarkably affected by the strain rate. Values of the elongation are decreased with the number of CGP passes. Values of the calculated strain rate sensitivity are utilized to justify the elongation behavior. Shear bands created by CGP remarkably decrease the fracture elongation values. Temperature interval of 298-473 K cannot remarkably affect the flow stress and ductility. The interval of 473-573 K is chosen as critical temperature interval in which the values of flow stress and elongation are remarkably decreased and increased, respectively. Increasing the temperature up to 573 K causes recrystallization in shear bands. Scanning electron microscope was used to study fracture surface which can truly predict the elongation behavior. With increasing the temperature, the shear decohesion area is gradually replaced with fully dimpled structures. Finally, hot deformation activation energy for CGPed samples was calculated about 85 kJ/mol which is close to the grain boundary diffusion activation energy in pure Al.

  10. Tests of the CMB temperature-redshift relation, CMB spectral distortions and why adiabatic photon production is hard

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens

    2014-01-01

    In the expanding Universe, the average temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is expected to depend like TCMB (1+z) on redshift z. Adiabatic photon production (or destruction) or deviations from isotropy and homogeneity could modify this scaling and several observational tests have been carried out in response. Here, we explain why `adiabatic' conditions are extremely difficult to establish in the redshift range targeted by these tests. Thus, instead of leading to a simple rescaling of the CMB temperature, a spectral distortion should be produced, which can be constrained using COBE/FIRAS. For scenarios with late photon production, tests of the temperature-redshift relation (TRR) should therefore be reinterpreted as weak spectral distortion limits, directly probing the energy dependence of the photon production process. For inhomogeneous cosmologies, a y-type distortion is produced, but this type of distortion can be created in several ways. Here, we briefly discuss possible effects that may hel...

  11. Pacemaker patients’ perspective and experiences in a pacemaker outpatient clinic in relation to test intervals of the pacemaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauberg, Astrid; Hansen, Tina; Pedersen, Trine Pernille Dahl

    In and out in 15 minutes! Shorttime nursing in an outpatient clinic Pacemaker patients’ perspective and experiences in a pacemaker outpatient clinic in relation to test intervals of the pacemaker. Background Pacemaker implantation is a highly documented treatment for patients with bradycardia....... In Aalborg University Hospital pacemakers are tested when implanted, 3 months later and then two years after the implantation. It is tested by a nurse specialist who also is interested in the patient’s general health status and well being. Patient expectations are unknown. Cheng et al (2002) have found...... an evident decline in quality of life regarding psychological and social aspects 6 month after the implantation in terms of cognitive function, work ability, and sexual activity. Mlynarski et al (2009) have found correlations between pacemaker implantation and anxiety and depression. Aim The aim...

  12. Timed up & go test score in patients with hip fracture is related to the type of walking aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Bandholm, Thomas; Holm, Bente

    2009-01-01

    Kristensen MT, Bandholm T, Holm B, Ekdahl C, Kehlet H. Timed Up & Go test score in patients with hip fracture is related to the type of walking aid. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between Timed Up & Go (TUG) test scores and type of walking aid used during the test, and to determine...... the feasibility of using the rollator as a standardized walking aid during the TUG in patients with hip fracture who were allowed full weight-bearing (FWB). DESIGN: Prospective methodological study. SETTING: An acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients (N=126; 90 women......, 36 men) with hip fracture with a mean age +/- SD of 74.8+/-12.7 years performed the TUG the day before discharge from the orthopedic ward. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The TUG was performed with the walking aid the patient was to be discharged with: a walker (n=88) or elbow...

  13. Introducing Distance and Measurement in General Relativity: Changes for the Standard Tests and the Cosmological Large-Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crothers S. J.

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic motion in the gravitational field of a massive body is governed by the external metric of a spherically symmetric extended object. Consequently, any solution for the point-mass is inadequate for the treatment of such motions since it pertains to a fictitious object. I therefore develop herein the physics of the standard tests of General Relativity by means of the generalised solution for the field external to a sphere of incompressible homogeneous fluid.

  14. [Evaluation of the relations between serum proteins electrophoresis and other laboratory tests in monoclonal gammopathies (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramacciotti, P G; Lazzari, L; Minardi, P

    1976-03-01

    We have considered interesting to determine monoclonal gammopathies incidence, in 2191 serum proteins electrophoresis performed in our laboratory from January to December 1974. We have found 15 cases of monoclonal gammopathies, some cases combined with Mieloma (3 cases), some other with other with non specific diseases. We have considered the relations between type of gammopathy and other laboratory tests useful for any other diagnose: they are: immunochemical analysis, E.S.R., red and white count, total proteins, Bence Jones protein.

  15. Using modified Kramers-Kronig relations to test transmission spectra of porous media in THz-TDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuononen, H; Gornov, E; Zeitler, J A; Aaltonen, J; Peiponen, K-E

    2010-03-01

    We show that modified Kramers-Kronig relations provide a useful tool to test the validity of the complex refractive index extracted from transmission terahertz spectra of porous matrices containing pharmaceutical materials. The role of scattering of terahertz radiation is qualitatively considered as a reason for the observed discrepancy between experimental data and the values extracted from the inverted complex refractive index. As an example we present an analysis of the terahertz spectra of carbamazepine and lactose alpha-monohydrate.

  16. Testing DNA barcodes in closely related species of Curcuma (Zingiberaceae) from Myanmar and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Zhao, Jietang; Erickson, David L; Xia, Nianhe; Kress, W John

    2015-03-01

    The genus Curcuma L. is commonly used as spices, medicines, dyes and ornamentals. Owing to its economic significance and lack of clear-cut morphological differences between species, this genus is an ideal case for developing DNA barcodes. In this study, four chloroplast DNA regions (matK, rbcL, trnH-psbA and trnL-F) and one nuclear region (ITS2) were generated for 44 Curcuma species and five species from closely related genera, represented by 96 samples. PCR amplification success rate, intra- and inter-specific genetic distance variation and the correct identification percentage were taken into account to assess candidate barcode regions. PCR and sequence success rate were high in matK (89.7%), rbcL (100%), trnH-psbA (100%), trnL-F (95.7%) and ITS2 (82.6%) regions. The results further showed that four candidate chloroplast barcoding regions (matK, rbcL, trnH-psbA and trnL-F) yield no barcode gaps, indicating that the genus Curcuma represents a challenging group for DNA barcoding. The ITS2 region presented large interspecific variation and provided the highest correct identification rates (46.7%) based on BLASTClust method among the five regions. However, the ITS2 only provided 7.9% based on NJ tree method. An increase in discriminatory power needs the development of more variable markers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Geometric and growth rate tests of General Relativity with recovered linear cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    I investigate the consistency of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey v7 galaxy sample with the expansion history and linear growth rate predicted by General Relativity (GR) and a Planck (2015) cosmology. To do so, I measure the redshift-space power spectrum, which is anisotropic due to both redshift-space distortions (RSD) and the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect. In Chapter 6, I place constraints of $f \\sigma_8(0.76) = 0.44 \\pm 0.04$ and $f \\sigma_8(1.05) = 0.28 \\pm 0.08$, which remain consistent with GR at 95% confidence. Marginalising over the anisotropic AP effect degrades the constraints by a factor of three but allows $F_{AP} \\equiv (1+z) D_A H/c$ to be simultaneously constrained. The VIPERS v7 joint-posterior on $(f \\sigma_8, F_{AP})$ shows no compelling deviation from GR. Chapter 7 investigates the inclusion of a simple density transform: `clipping' prior to the RSD analysis. This tackles the root-cause of non-linearity and may extend the validity of perturbation theory. Moreover, this marked s...

  18. An in vitro model to test relative antioxidant potential: Ultraviolet-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelle, E.; Maes, D.; Padulo, G.A.; Kim, E.K.; Smith, W.P. (Estee Lauder Research and Development, Melville, NY (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Since antioxidants have been shown to play a major role in preventing some of the effects of aging and photoaging in skin, it is important to study this phenomenon in a controlled manner. This was accomplished by developing a simple and reliable in vitro technique to assay antioxidant efficacy. Inhibition of peroxidation by antioxidants was used as a measure of relative antioxidant potential. Liposomes, high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), were dispersed in buffer and irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light. Irradiated liposomes exhibited a significantly higher amount of hydroperoxides than liposomes containing antioxidants in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner. Lipid peroxidation was determined spectrophotometrically by an increase in thiobarbituric acid reacting substances. To further substantiate the production of lipid peroxides, gas chromatography was used to measure a decrease in PUFA substrate. In order of decreasing antioxidant effectiveness, the following results were found among lipophilic antioxidants: BHA greater than catechin greater than BHT greater than alpha-tocopherol greater than chlorogenic acid. Among hydrophilic antioxidants, ascorbic acid and dithiothreitol were effective while glutathione was ineffective. In addition, ascorbic acid was observed to act synergistically with alpha-tocopherol, which is in agreement with other published reports on the interaction of these two antioxidants. Although peroxyl radical scavengers seem to be at a selective advantage in this liposomal/UV system, these results demonstrate the validity of this technique as an assay for measuring an antioxidant's potential to inhibit UV-induced peroxidation.

  19. Testing asteroseismic scaling relations using eclipsing binaries in star clusters and the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, K.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Handberg, R.; Arentoft, T.; Frandsen, S.; Grundahl, F.; Bruntt, H.; Sandquist, E. L.; Miglio, A.; Beck, P. G.; Thygesen, A. O.; Kjærgaard, K. L.; Haugaard, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of stellar masses and radii determined from asteroseismology is not known! We examine this issue for giant stars by comparing classical measurements of detached eclipsing binary systems (dEBs) with asteroseismic measurements from the Kepler mission. For star clusters, we extrapolate measurements of dEBs in the turn-off region to the red giant branch and the red clump where we investigate the giants as an ensemble. For the field stars, we measure dEBs with an oscillating giant component. These measurements allow a comparison of masses and radii calculated from a classical eclipsing binary analysis to those calculated from asteroseismic scaling relations and/or other asteroseismic methods. Our first results indicate small but significant systematic differences between the classical and asteroseismic measurements. In this contribution we show our latest results and summarize the current status and future plans. We also stress the importance of realizing that for giant stars mass cannot always be translated to age, since an unknown fraction of these evolved through a blue straggler phase with mass transfer in a binary system. Rough estimates of how many such stars to expect are given based on our findings in the open clusters NGC 6819 and NGC 6791.

  20. The sensitivity of acoustic cough recording relative to intraesophageal pressure recording and patient report during reflux testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, R; Amirault, J; Heinz, N; Litman, H; Khatwa, U

    2014-11-01

    One of the primary indications for reflux testing with multichannel intraluminal impedance with pH (pH-MII) is to correlate reflux events with symptoms such as cough. Adult and pediatric studies have shown, using cough as a model, that patient report of symptoms is inaccurate. Unfortunately, intraesophageal pressure recording (IEPR) to record coughs is more invasive which limits its utility in children. The primary aim of this study was to validate the use of acoustic cough recording (ACR) during pH-MII testing. We recruited children undergoing pH-MII testing for the evaluation of cough. We simultaneously placed IEPR and pH-MII catheters and an ACR device in each patient. Each 24 h ACR, pH-MII, and IEPR tracing was scored by blinded investigators. Sensitivities for each method of symptom recording were calculated. A total of 2698 coughs were detected; 1140 were patient reported PR, 2425 were IEPR detected, and 2400 were ACR detected. The sensitivity of PR relative to ACR was 45.9% and the sensitivity of IEPR relative to ACR was 93.6%. There was strong inter-rater reliability (κ = 0.78) for the identification of cough by ACR. Acoustic recording is a non-invasive, sensitive method of recording cough during pH-MII testing that is well suited for the pediatric population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. An integrated electrochemical device based on immunochromatographic test strip and enzyme labels for sensitive detection of disease-related biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Zhexiang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Li, Yao Q.; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-05-30

    A novel electrochemical biosensing device that integrates an immunochromatographic test strip and a screen-printed electrode (SPE) connected to a portable electrochemical analyzer was presented for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of disease-related biomarker in human blood samples. The principle of the sensor is based on sandwich immunoreactions between a biomarker and a pair of its antibodies on the test strip, followed by highly sensitive square-wave voltammetry (SWV) detection. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used as a signal reporter for electrochemical readout. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was employed as a model protein biomarker to demonstrate the analytical performance of the sensor in this study. Some critical parameters governing the performance of the sensor were investigated in detail. The sensor was further utilized to detect HBsAg in human plasma with an average recovery of 91.3%. In comparison, a colorimetric immunochromatographic test strip assay (ITSA) was also conducted. The result shows that the SWV detection in the electrochemical sensor is much more sensitive for the quantitative determination of HBsAg than the colorimetric detection, indicating that such a sensor is a promising platform for rapid and sensitive point-of-care testing/screening of disease-related biomarkers in a large population

  2. Factors related to failure to attend the consultation to receive the results of the Pap smear test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Teixeira Moreira Vasconcelos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the factors related to the failure of women to attend the follow-up consultation to receive the results of the Pap smear test.METHOD: a cross-sectional study, carried out with 775 patients who underwent the Pap smear test in the Centro de Saúde da Família of Fortaleza, between September 2010 and February 2011.RESULTS: the majority of the women studied were young (≤35 years, had low levels of education (≤7 years of study, and commenced sexual activity early (≤20 years, with 17.0% of them failing to return to receive the test results. Statistically significant results for the failure to return were related to: young women (p=0.001; early onset of sexual activity (p=0.047; and inadequate knowledge about the Pap smear test (p=0.029. Conclusion the fact that the women failed to return for the result is a problem for the control of cervical cancer and must be addressed through educational strategies that reinforce the importance of the return for the early detection of this cancer.

  3. Increasing HIV-related knowledge, communication, and testing intentions among Latinos: Protege tu Familia: Hazte la Prueba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Ellis, Britt; Espinoza, Lilia; Bird, Mara; Garcia, Melawhy; D'Anna, Laura Hoyt; Bellamy, Laura; Scolari, Rosana

    2010-08-01

    Latinos are less likely to be aware of their HIV seropositivity than African Americans and Whites. 'Protege tu Familia: Hazte la Prueba' is a culturally and linguistically-sensitive HIV/AIDS prevention and testing program targeting Latino families. Using community-based participatory research techniques, Spanish-speaking bicultural community health workers helped develop and then used an educational flip chart and materials to conduct outreach and HIV prevention education in diverse settings. The intervention was created to increase HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, to improve communication regarding sexual risk, and to augment intentions to use condoms and test for HIV. A secondary purpose was to decrease HIV-related stigma by improving knowledge about transmission and reducing homophobia. Participants demonstrated significant increases in HIV knowledge, intention to practice safer sex and communicate sexual risk to partner(s), and intention to test for HIV. Improvements were also found in self-reported comfort levels when interacting with and caring for the HIV positive, thus decreasing HIV/AIDS-related stigma.

  4. Pre-test of questions on health-related resource use and expenditure, using behaviour coding and cognitive interviewing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyak Nadja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Validated instruments collecting data on health-related resource use are lacking, but required, for example, to investigate predictors of healthcare use or for health economic evaluation. The objective of the study was to develop, test and refine a questionnaire collecting data on health-related resource use and expenditure in patients with diabetes. Methods The questionnaire was tested in 43 patients with diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2 in Germany. Response behaviour suggestive of problems with questions (item non-response, request for clarification, comments, inadequate answer, “don’t know” was systematically registered. Cognitive interviews focusing on information retrieval and comprehension problems were carried out. Results Many participants had difficulties answering questions pertaining to frequency of visits to the general practitioner (26%, time spent receiving healthcare services (39%, regular medication currently taken (35% and out of pocket expenditure on medication (42%. These difficulties seem to result mainly from poor memory. A number of comprehension problems were established and relevant questions were revised accordingly. Conclusion The questionnaire on health-related resource use and expenditure for use in diabetes research in Germany was developed and refined after careful testing. Ideally, the questionnaire should be externally validated for different modes of administration and recall periods within a variety of populations.

  5. Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Brewster, Hilary D

    2009-01-01

    The theory of relativity has become a cornerstone of modern physics. Over the course of time it has been scrutinized in a multitude of experiments and has always been verified with high accuracy. The correctness of this theory can no longer be called into question. Right after its discovery by Albert Einstein in 1905, special relativity was only gradually accepted because it made numerous predictions contradicting common sense, fervently castigated by Einstein, and also defied experiment for too long a time. It was only with the advent of particle or high energy physics that matter could be ac

  6. Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Time magazine's ""Man of the Century"", Albert Einstein is the founder of modern physics and his theory of relativity is the most important scientific idea of the modern era. In this short book, Einstein explains, using the minimum of mathematical terms, the basic ideas and principles of the theory that has shaped the world we live in today. Unsurpassed by any subsequent books on relativity, this remains the most popular and useful exposition of Einstein's immense contribution to human knowledge.With a new foreword by Derek Raine.

  7. Exploring gait-related dual task tests in community-dwelling fallers and non-faller: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhaidat, Jennifer; Kerr, Andrew; Evans, Jonathan J; Skelton, Dawn A

    2013-07-01

    The best test to assess dual task (DT)-related falls' risk is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate differences between community-dwelling fallers and non-fallers on a variety of simple task combinations. Twenty-seven adults, aged 65 years or older, took part. Forty-eight DT tests and one triple task (TT) test were conducted. Fallers had longer walking time when avoiding a moving obstacle and performing a motor task and longer walking time when triple tasking, as suggested by a measure of proportionate difference between single and DT/TT conditions (p = 0.014 and 0.044, respectively). The absolute difference in accuracy on a visuospatial task suggested that fallers were more accurate than non-fallers when combined with walking with turns and when triple tasking (p = 0.048 and 0.030, respectively). Fallers were less accurate in naming animals than non-fallers when combined with a bending task (p = 0.009). These results indicate that fallers might prioritise tasks based on perceived risk, which highlights the importance of task selection when designing tests. Despite the small sample size, the data suggest that a TT test could be used to assess risk of falling. However, this needs to be confirmed with larger prediction studies.

  8. Gravitational Wave Tests of Strong Field General Relativity with Binary Inspirals: Realistic Injections and Optimal Model Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Sampson, Laura; Yunes, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    We study generic tests of strong-field General Relativity using gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral of compact binaries. Previous studies have considered simple extensions to the standard post-Newtonian waveforms that differ by a single term in the phase. Here we improve on these studies by (i) increasing the realism of injections and (ii) determining the optimal waveform families for detecting and characterizing such signals. We construct waveforms that deviate from those in General Relativity through a series of post-Newtonian terms, and find that these higher-order terms can affect our ability to test General Relativity, in some cases by making it easier to detect a deviation, and in some cases by making it more difficult. We find that simple single-phase post-Einsteinian waveforms are sufficient for detecting deviations from General Relativity, and there is little to be gained from using more complicated models with multiple phase terms. The results found here will help guide future attempts t...

  9. EXAMINATION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT STUDENTS' APPROACH TO LEARNING AND STUDYING AND TEST ANXIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the aim of this study was to examine the relation between school of physical education and sport students' approach to learning and studying and test anxiety. Students in departments of physical education and sport teacher (n=103, coaching education (n=155 and sport management (n=110 at Mugla Sıtkı Koçman University participated in the study (n=368. 145 of participant were female, 223 of them were male. Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI, developed by Speilberger (1980 and adapted to Turkish by Öner and Albayrak-Kaymak (1993 (cited in Erözkan, 2004, was used to identify students' test anxiety levels. Approaches to Learning and Studying Inventory (ALSI, developed by Hounsell, Entwistle, Anderson et al. (2002 and adapted to Turkish by Topyaka, Yaka and Öğretmen (2011, was used to identify students' approaches to learning and studying. ALSI consists of 18 items with 5 Likert. TAI consists of 20 items with 4 likert. One-Way ANOVA and Independent T-Test in SPSS 16.0 were used to analyze the collected data. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA was used to find out whether used inventories were suitable for the sample. When the differences about approaches to learning and studying between departments were examined, while no significant difference was found in surface and deep approaches, significant difference was found in strategic approaches. No significant difference was found between grades. Significant gender differences were found in emotionality, worry and total test anxiety. Positive correlation was found between surface approach and emotionality, worry and total test anxiety. Consequently, it was found that students who adopt surface approach have high-test anxiety, because it was found that while adopting surface approach, students could have high-level of emotionality and worry. It is important to create learning environment that discourage students to adopt surface approach.

  10. A Test of General Relativity Using the LARES and LAGEOS Satellites and a GRACE Earth's Gravity Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of General Relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth's gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure $\\mu = (0.994 \\pm 0.002) \\pm 0.05$, where $\\mu$ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its General Relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is the estimated systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth's gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of General Relativity.

  11. On possible a-priori "imprinting" of General Relativity itself on the performed Lense-Thirring tests with LAGEOS satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    The impact of possible a-priori "imprinting" effects of general relativity itself on recent attempts to measure the Lense-Thirring precessions with the LAGEOS satellites orbiting the Earth and the terrestrial geopotential models by the dedicated mission GRACE is investigated. It is analytically shown that general relativity, not explicitly solved for in the GRACE-based models, may "imprint" their even zonal harmonic coefficients J_L at a non-negligible level, given the present-day accuracy in recovering them. This translates into a bias of the LAGEOS-based relativistic tests as large as the Lense-Thirring effect itself. Further analyses should include general relativity itself in the GRACE data processing by explicitly solving for it.

  12. Postprandial lipemia in relation to sterol and fat excretion in ileostomy subjects given oat-bran and wheat test meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lia, A; Andersson, H; Mekki, N; Juhel, C; Senft, M; Lairon, D

    1997-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms behind the serum cholesterol-lowering effect of oat fiber, we simultaneously measured postprandial lipid responses, serum lathosterol concentrations, and small bowel excretion of fat and sterols in ileostomy subjects given test meals high or low in oat fiber. Six ileostomy subjects (three women and three men) were served an oat-bran test meal (OB; 16.3 g fiber) and a wheat test meal (6.3 g fiber) in random order. After the postprandial 7-h period, a controlled, low-fat, cholesterol-free diet was served and ileostomy effluent was sampled throughout the 24-h period. Bile acid and fat excretion (24 h) increased by 93% and 146%, respectively (P < 0.05), and total and endogenous cholesterol excretion decreased by 14% and 19%, respectively (P < 0.05), after the OB test meal. The change in hepatic cholesterol synthesis was strongly related to the change in bile acid excretion (Spearman r = 0.89, P < 0.02). The postprandial chylomicron lipid concentration tended to be lower after the OB test meal (-43% for cholesterol, P = 0.07) whereas there was no difference in cholesterol absorption measured by isotope in five subjects. The main effect of the viscous oat beta-glucan seems to be related to increased bile acid excretion and subsequent changes in synthesis and endogenous excretion of cholesterol. An additional effect may have been a delay in the micellar lipid solubilization process and a consequent reduction in the secretion of chylomicrons into the circulation.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of zinc oxide particles on five micro-organisms of the Challenge Tests related to their physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, Julia; Chevalier, Yves; Couval, Emmanuelle; Bouvier, Dominique; Noizet, Gaëlle; Morlière, Cécile; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine

    2014-01-02

    Zinc oxide is commonly used in pharmaceutical products to prevent or treat topical or systemic diseases owing to its antimicrobial properties, but it is scarcely used as preservative in topical formulations. The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of zinc oxide (ZnO) powders on the five microbial strains used for Challenge Tests in order to evaluate this inorganic compound as a preservative in topical formulation and assess relationships between the structural parameters of ZnO particles and their antimicrobial activity. For this purpose, the physicochemical characteristics of three ZnO grades were measured and their antimicrobial efficacy against the following micro-organisms - Escherichia coli; Staphylococcus aureus; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Candida albicans; Aspergillus brasiliensis - was assessed using disc diffusion susceptibility tests and a broth dilution method. The comprehensive dataset of physicochemical characteristics and antimicrobial activities (MIC and MBC) is discussed regarding methodological issues related to the particulate nature of ZnO and structure-activity relationships. Every ZnO grade showed bactericidal and antifungal activity against the five tested micro-organisms in a concentration dependent manner. ZnO particles with smaller size, larger specific area and higher porosity exhibit higher antimicrobial activity. Such trends are related to their mechanisms of antimicrobial activity.

  14. Role of advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing in the assessment of sport-related concussion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Michael; Meier, Timothy; Huber, Daniel; Ptito, Alain; Bigler, Erin; Debert, Chantel T; Manley, Geoff; Menon, David; Chen, Jen-Kai; Wall, Rachel; Schneider, Kathryn J; McAllister, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    To conduct a systematic review of published literature on advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing in the assessment of sport-related concussion (SRC). Computerised searches of Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Scopus and Cochrane Library from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2016 were done. There were 3222 articles identified. In addition to medical subject heading terms, a study was included if (1) published in English, (2) represented original research, (3) involved human research, (4) pertained to SRC and (5) involved data from neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers or genetic testing collected within 6 months of injury. Ninety-eight studies qualified for review (76 neuroimaging, 16 biomarkers and 6 genetic testing). Separate reviews were conducted for neuroimaging, biomarkers and genetic testing. A standardised data extraction tool was used to document study design, population, tests employed and key findings. Reviewers used a modified quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS-2) tool to rate the risk of bias, and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to rate the overall level of evidence for each search. Results from the three respective reviews are compiled in separate tables and an interpretive summary of the findings is provided. Advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing are important research tools, but require further validation to determine their ultimate clinical utility in the evaluation of SRC. Future research efforts should address current gaps that limit clinical translation. Ultimately, research on neurobiological and genetic aspects of SRC is predicted to have major translational significance to evidence-based approaches to clinical management of SRC, much like applied clinical research has had over the past 20 years. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  15. Blood gas testing and related measurements: National recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Kopčinović, Lara Milevoj; Dorotić, Adrijana; Baršić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Blood gas analysis (BGA) is exposed to risks of errors caused by improper sampling, transport and storage conditions. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) generated documents with recommendations for avoidance of potential errors caused by sample mishandling. Two main documents related to BGA issued by the CLSI are GP43-A4 (former H11-A4) Procedures for the collection of arterial blood specimens; approved standard – fourth edition, and C46-A2 Blood gas and pH analysis and related measurements; approved guideline – second edition. Practices related to processing of blood gas samples are not standardized in the Republic of Croatia. Each institution has its own protocol for ordering, collection and analysis of blood gases. Although many laboratories use state of the art analyzers, still many preanalytical procedures remain unchanged. The objective of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CSMBLM) is to standardize the procedures for BGA based on CLSI recommendations. The Working Group for Blood Gas Testing as part of the Committee for the Scientific Professional Development of the CSMBLM prepared a set of recommended protocols for sampling, transport, storage and processing of blood gas samples based on relevant CLSI documents, relevant literature search and on the results of Croatian survey study on practices and policies in acid-base testing. Recommendations are intended for laboratory professionals and all healthcare workers involved in blood gas processing. PMID:27812301

  16. Blood gas testing and related measurements: National recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Kopčinović, Lara Milevoj; Dorotić, Adrijana; Baršić, Ivana

    2016-10-15

    Blood gas analysis (BGA) is exposed to risks of errors caused by improper sampling, transport and storage conditions. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) generated documents with recommendations for avoidance of potential errors caused by sample mishandling. Two main documents related to BGA issued by the CLSI are GP43-A4 (former H11-A4) Procedures for the collection of arterial blood specimens; approved standard - fourth edition, and C46-A2 Blood gas and pH analysis and related measurements; approved guideline - second edition. Practices related to processing of blood gas samples are not standardized in the Republic of Croatia. Each institution has its own protocol for ordering, collection and analysis of blood gases. Although many laboratories use state of the art analyzers, still many preanalytical procedures remain unchanged. The objective of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CSMBLM) is to standardize the procedures for BGA based on CLSI recommendations. The Working Group for Blood Gas Testing as part of the Committee for the Scientific Professional Development of the CSMBLM prepared a set of recommended protocols for sampling, transport, storage and processing of blood gas samples based on relevant CLSI documents, relevant literature search and on the results of Croatian survey study on practices and policies in acid-base testing. Recommendations are intended for laboratory professionals and all healthcare workers involved in blood gas processing.

  17. Anorexia nervosa: selective processing of food-related word and pictorial stimuli in recognition and free recall tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C; Weisbrod, M; Schild, S; Bender, S; Walther, S; Herzog, W; Zipfel, S; Friederich, H C

    2008-07-01

    Maladaptive processing of food cues is considered pivotal in the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa. However, the influence of hunger and differences in processing because of the type of stimuli remain largely unclear. Memory bias for food-related pictorial and semantic stimuli was assessed in a recognition and a free recall test in 16 anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, 16 control participants with food intake prior to the study (CG-FI) and 16 control participants with a fasting period prior to the study (CG-NF). Compared with CG-FI participants, both AN and CG-NF participants responded faster to food-related as compared with neutral words (p word but not for pictorial stimuli. No group differences were observed with respect to the number of correct retrievals in either the recognition or the free recall test. The present study found behavioral indications of abnormal processing of food-related and neutral stimuli in anorectic patients similar to those found in fasted healthy controls. Results are discussed in terms of self-schemata in eating disorders, competitive interference, and levels of processing. (c) 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A polytomous rasch analysis of the english version of health-related quality of life for drug abusers test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Oscar M; Rojas Tejada, Antonio J; Foresti, Katia; Zubaran, Carlos

    2015-06-03

    The specific aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the English version of the Health-Related Quality of Life for Drug Abusers Test (HRQoLDA Test) applying the Rasch model, and emphasizing fit between empirical data and theoretical Rasch model assumptions; item(s) category probability curve; and precision in terms of information function. In this study, the authors present the results of the translation and adaptation of the original Spanish version to English, as applied to a sample of substance users in Australia. The authors evaluated 121 adults recruited from inpatient and outpatient treatment facilities in Sydney, Australia. The Rating Scale Model was used in the psychometric analysis of the English version of the HRQoLDA Test. The items and persons revealed a fit between the reported data and the model. It was also demonstrated that respondents did not discriminate among the five response categories, which led to a reduction to three response categories. The adaptation of the TECVASP to the English language, renamed the HRQoLDA test, as developed with an Australian sample revealed adequate psychometric properties.

  19. Tests of the CMB temperature-redshift relation, CMB spectral distortions and why adiabatic photon production is hard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chluba, J.

    2014-09-01

    In the expanding Universe, the average temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is expected to depend like TCMB ∝ (1 + z) on redshift z. Adiabatic photon production (or destruction) or deviations from isotropy and homogeneity could modify this scaling and several observational tests have been carried out in response. Here, we explain why `adiabatic' conditions are extremely difficult to establish in the redshift range targeted by these tests. Thus, instead of leading to a simple rescaling of the CMB temperature, a spectral distortion should be produced, which can be constrained using COBE/FIRAS. For scenarios with late photon production, tests of the temperature-redshift relation (TRR) should therefore be reinterpreted as weak spectral distortion limits, directly probing the energy dependence of the photon production process. For inhomogeneous cosmologies, an average y-type distortion is produced, but this type of distortion can be created in several other ways. Here, we briefly discuss possible effects that may help disentangling different contributions to the distortion signal, finding this to be very challenging. We furthermore argue that tests of the TRR using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect have limited applicability and that for non-gravitational changes to the TRR, the CMB anisotropy spectrum should exhibit an additional y-type dependence.

  20. Relative embryotoxicity of two classes of chemicals in a modified zebrafish embryotoxicity test and comparison with their in vivo potencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Sanne A B; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2011-04-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) is a fast and simple method to study chemical toxicity after exposure of the complete vertebrate embryo during embryogenesis in ovo. We developed a novel quantitative evaluation method to assess the development of the zebrafish embryo based on specific endpoints in time, the general morphology score (GMS) system. For teratogenic effects a separate scoring list was developed. The relative effects of eight glycol ethers and six 1,2,4-triazole anti-fungals were evaluated in this system and results were compared with in vivo developmental toxicity potencies. Methoxyacetic acid and ethoxyacetic acid appeared as the most potent glycol ether metabolites, inducing growth retardation and malformations. Other glycol ethers showed no developmental toxicity. Flusilazole appeared the most potent triazole, followed by hexaconazole, cyproconazole, triadimefon, myclobutanil and triticonazole, respectively. In general, the potency ranking of the compounds within their class in the ZET was comparable to their in vivo ranking. In conclusion, the ZET with the GMS system appears an efficient and useful test system for screening embryotoxic properties of chemicals within the classes of compounds tested. This alternative test method may also be useful for the detection of embryotoxic properties of other classes of chemicals.

  1. Testing Scaling Relations for Solar-Like Oscillations from the Main Sequence to Red Giants using Kepler Data

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, D; Stello, D; Hekker, S; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; Verner, G A; Bonanno, A; Buzasi, D L; Campante, T L; Elsworth, Y P; Hale, S J; Kallinger, T; Aguirre, V Silva; Chaplin, W J; De Ridder, J; Garcia, R A; Appourchaux, T; Frandsen, S; Houdek, G; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Monteiro, M J P F G; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Gilliland, R L; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Broomhall, A M; Corsaro, E; Salabert, D; Sanderfer, D T; Seader, S E; Smith, J C

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed solar-like oscillations in ~1700 stars observed by the Kepler Mission, spanning from the main-sequence to the red clump. Using evolutionary models, we test asteroseismic scaling relations for the frequency of maximum power (nu_max), the large frequency separation (Delta_nu) and oscillation amplitudes. We show that the difference of the Delta_nu-nu_max relation for unevolved and evolved stars can be explained by different distributions in effective temperature and stellar mass, in agreement with what is expected from scaling relations. For oscillation amplitudes, we show that neither (L/M)^s scaling nor the revised scaling relation by Kjeldsen & Bedding (2011) are accurate for red-giant stars, and demonstrate that a revised scaling relation with a separate luminosity-mass dependence can be used to calculate amplitudes from the main-sequence to red-giants to a precision of ~25%. The residuals show an offset particularly for unevolved stars, suggesting that an additional physical dependency ...

  2. Use of the Yitzhaki Index as a test of relative deprivation for health outcomes: a review of recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjaye-Gbewonyo, Kafui; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2012-07-01

    We reviewed the empirical studies published between 2000 and 2010 that test the relative deprivation (RD) hypothesis in relation to population health. Our review focuses primarily on 14 studies using the Yitzhaki Index and related relative income measures. We summarize their main findings by health outcome, address methodological challenges in measuring RD, and identify several gaps in the literature as well as future directions for research in this area. Gaps in the evidence include the need for longitudinal studies with stronger causal designs - for example, examining changes in RD in relation to changes in health outcomes, with careful control for confounding by individual income and other indicators of socioeconomic position. Defining the appropriate reference group (from which people make social comparisons) poses a major empirical challenge, as evidenced by the fact that the measurement of RD has not materially advanced since Yitzhaki's original formulation in 1979. More innovative approaches to operationalizing RD are needed - including the measurement of RD in dimensions other than income, incorporating inter-generational comparisons; and attempting exogenous manipulation of RD, e.g. through laboratory-based experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Test-enhanced learning may be a gender-related phenomenon explained by changes in cortisol level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Charles B; Jensen, Morten Lind; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    student performance in a CPR scenario using a checklist and a single blinded assessor. We measured salivary cortisol pre-course, half an hour before the end of the course and post-course, and compared learning outcomes and cortisol responses between groups and genders. Results In total, 146 of 202 (72......%) students completed the study. We found a significant difference in learning outcome between the intervention and control groups for both genders (mean ± standard deviation, 5.0 ± 3.5; p = 0.006). We found a significant effect of increase in cortisol on learning outcome in men. The correlation between...... learning outcome and cortisol increase was medium to large for men (r = 0.38), but not for women (r = - 0.05). Conclusions Cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills testing induces a rise in cortisol in men, which is related to the better retention of skills in men. Cortisol modulates test-enhanced learning...

  4. Pacemaker patients’ perspective and experiences in a pacemaker outpatient clinic in relation to test intervals of the pacemaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauberg, Astrid; Hansen, Tina; Pedersen, Trine Pernille Dahl

    the pacemaker and psychological reactions. Patients with pacemakers older than 3 months lacked communication with fellowmen. Conclusion The patients express receiving competent and professional treatment when visiting the outpatient clinic, there seems to be a discrepancy between the long test intervals......In and out in 15 minutes! Shorttime nursing in an outpatient clinic Pacemaker patients’ perspective and experiences in a pacemaker outpatient clinic in relation to test intervals of the pacemaker. Background Pacemaker implantation is a highly documented treatment for patients with bradycardia...... an evident decline in quality of life regarding psychological and social aspects 6 month after the implantation in terms of cognitive function, work ability, and sexual activity. Mlynarski et al (2009) have found correlations between pacemaker implantation and anxiety and depression. Aim The aim...

  5. Testing Scaling Relations for Solar-like Oscillations from the Main Sequence to Red Giants Using Kepler Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, D.; Bedding, T.R.; Stello, D.;

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed solar-like oscillations in ~1700 stars observed by the Kepler Mission, spanning from the main sequence to the red clump. Using evolutionary models, we test asteroseismic scaling relations for the frequency of maximum power (νmax), the large frequency separation (Δν...... an offset particularly for unevolved stars, suggesting that an additional physical dependency is necessary to fully reproduce the observed amplitudes. We investigate correlations between amplitudes and stellar activity, and find evidence that the effect of amplitude suppression is most pronounced...... for subgiant stars. Finally, we test the location of the cool edge of the instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram using solar-like oscillations and find the detections in the hottest stars compatible with a domain of hybrid stochastically excited and opacity driven pulsation....

  6. Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 Post-Flight Navigation Performance Assessment Relative to the Best Estimated Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Robert S.; Holt, Greg N.; Zanetti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    This paper details the post-flight navigation performance assessment of the Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1). Results of each flight phase are presented: Ground Align, Ascent, Orbit, and Entry Descent and Landing. This study examines the on-board Kalman Filter uncertainty along with state deviations relative to the Best Estimated Trajectory (BET). Overall the results show that the Orion Navigation System performed as well or better than expected. Specifically, the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurement availability was significantly better than anticipated at high altitudes. In addition, attitude estimation via processing GPS measurements along with Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data performed very well and maintained good attitude throughout the mission.

  7. Reliability and criterion-related validity with a smartphone used in timed-up-and-go test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Mercant, Alejandro; Barón-López, Francisco Javier; Labajos-Manzanares, María T; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2014-12-02

    The capacity to diagnosys, quantify and evaluate movement beyond the general confines of a clinical environment under effectiveness conditions may alleviate rampant strain on limited, expensive and highly specialized medical resources. An iPhone 4® mounted a three dimensional accelerometer subsystem with highly robust software applications. The present study aimed to evaluate the reliability and concurrent criterion-related validity of the accelerations with an iPhone 4® in an Extended Timed Get Up and Go test. Extended Timed Get Up and Go is a clinical test with that the patient get up from the chair and walking ten meters, turn and coming back to the chair. A repeated measure, cross-sectional, analytical study. Test-retest reliability of the kinematic measurements of the iPhone 4® compared with a standard validated laboratory device. We calculated the Coefficient of Multiple Correlation between the two sensors acceleration signal of each subject, in each sub-stage, in each of the three Extended Timed Get Up and Go test trials. To investigate statistical agreement between the two sensors we used the Bland-Altman method. With respect to the analysis of the correlation data in the present work, the Coefficient of Multiple Correlation of the five subjects in their triplicated trials were as follows: in sub-phase Sit to Stand the ranged between r = 0.991 to 0.842; in Gait Go, r = 0.967 to 0.852; in Turn, 0.979 to 0.798; in Gait Come, 0.964 to 0.887; and in Turn to Stand to Sit, 0.992 to 0.877. All the correlations between the sensors were significant (p Timed Get Up and Go test. The inertial sensor mounted in the iPhone 4® is sufficiently reliable and accurate to evaluate and identify the kinematic patterns in an Extended Timed Get and Go test. While analysis and interpretation of 3D kinematics data continue to be dauntingly complex, the iPhone 4® makes the task of acquiring the data relatively inexpensive and easy to use.

  8. Sports-related testing protocols are required to reveal trunk stability adaptations in high-level athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbado, David; Barbado, Luis C; Elvira, Jose L L; Dieën, Jaap H van; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    Trunk/core stability is considered a key component of training programs, because it could contribute to prevention of low-back and lower-limb injuries and to sports performance. Based on the specificity principle, sports-related trunk stability tests would be required in elite sports performance. However, there may be some generic qualities underlying trunk stability that can be assessed with nonspecific protocols, which are broadly used in sport and rehabilitation. To assess whether specific tests are needed in a high-performance context, we analyzed the influence of specialization in sports with large but qualitatively different balance control demands (judo and kayaking) on trunk stability and compared high-performance athletes with recreational athletes without a specific training history. Twenty-five judokas, sixteen kayakers and thirty-seven recreational athletes performed two trunk stability protocols: sudden loading, to assess trunk responses to external and unexpected perturbations; stable and unstable sitting, to assess the participant's ability to control trunk while sitting. Within-session test-retest reliability analyses were performed to support the between-groups comparison. Judokas showed lower angular displacement (0.199rad) against posterior loading than kayakers (0.221rad) probably because they are frequently challenged by higher sudden loads while they are pushed or pulled. Kayakers showed lower error (7.33mm), probably because they train and compete seated on unstable surfaces. Importantly, judokas and kayakers obtained better results than recreational athletes only in those tests designed according to the specific demands of each sport (psport training induces specific trunk stability adaptations, which are not revealed through nonspecific tests.

  9. The Click Test: A Novel Tool to Quantify the Age-Related Decline of Fast Motor Sequencing of the Thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodranghien, Florian; Mahé, Helene; Baude, Benjamin; Manto, Mario U; Busegnies, Yves; Camut, Stéphane; Habas, Christophe; Marien, Peter; de Marco, Giovanni; van Dun, Kim

    2017-05-10

    The thumb plays a critical role for manual tasks during the activities of daily life and the incidence of neurological or musculoskeletal disorders affecting the voluntary movements of the thumb is high in the elderly. There is currently no tool to assess repetitive motor sequencing of the thumb during ageing. To report a novel procedure (the Click Test) assessing the effects of ageing on fast motor sequencing of the thumb. Healthy subjects (n = 252; mean age +/- SD: 49.76 +/- 19.97 years; range: 19-89 years; F/M: 151/101) were asked to perform fast repeated flexion/extension movements of the thumb using a mechanical counter. Motor performances (assessed by the number of clicks during 3 time periods: 15, 30 and 45 sec), significantly decreased as a function of age for both the dominant (age effect; p < 0.0001 for 15, 30 and 45 sec) and the non-dominant hand (p < 0.0001 for 15, 30 and 45 sec). The number of clicks was significantly higher in males (gender effect; p < 0.001) and was higher on the dominant side as compared to the non-dominant side (handedness effect: p < 0.001). The Click Test is characterized by high repeatability (coefficients of variation from 3.20 to 4.47%), excellent intra-rater reliability (intra-class coefficients ICC ranging from 0.89 to 0.98), high inter-rater reproducibility (Pearson's product correlation ranging from 0.85 to 0.96), high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha coefficient = 0.95) and is highly correlated in terms of relative performances with the box and block test and the 9-hole peg test (positive linear correlation with the results of the box and block test: p < 0.001 for 15, 30 and 45 sec for both the dominant and the non-dominant hand; negative linear correlation with the results of the 9-hole peg test: p < 0.001 for 15, 30 and 45 sec for both the dominant and the non-dominant hand). The Click Test is an entirely novel and very low cost tool to reliably discriminate the ageing effects upon the performances during fast

  10. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  11. Laboratory and field studies related to radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site October 1, 1998-September 30, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Finnegan; K. S. Kung; B. A. Martinez

    2000-02-01

    In this report the author describes his research in FY 1999 at the Nevada Test Site regarding the movement of radionuclides in groundwater. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office through their Defense Programs and Environmental Restorations divisions. Significant accomplishments include upgrading a spectrometer used to characterize groundwater colloids, acquisition of a probe to allow in situ measurement of groundwater parameters, and purchase of pumps for use in small-diameter access tubing. He collected water samples from a number of nuclear test sites during the past year. Samples from the chimney horizon at the Camembert site show that only volatile radionuclides are present there, as expected. Groundwater from the cavity region at the Cheshire site shows evidence of fission product leaching or desorption from melt glass or rock surfaces. Colloids present in this water were found to be remarkably stable during storage for many years. The colloid content of groundwater at the Cambric site and at UE-5n was found to be low relative to that in groundwater on Pahute Mesa. This, coupled with the apparent lack of groundwater flow in the alluvial rock at the Cambric site, suggests that radionuclide movement underground in this area is relatively minimal. He continued the yearly monitoring of the thermally hot cavity fluids at the Almendro site. He concludes this report by listing documents reviewed and presentations and publications generated by the program.

  12. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  13. Test-retest reliability of pain-related functional brain connectivity compared with pain self-report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letzen, Janelle E; Boissoneault, Jeff; Sevel, Landrew S; Robinson, Michael E

    2016-03-01

    Test-retest reliability, or reproducibility of results over time, is poorly established for functional brain connectivity (fcMRI) during painful stimulation. As reliability informs the validity of research findings, it is imperative to examine, especially given recent emphasis on using functional neuroimaging as a tool for biomarker development. Although proposed pain neural signatures have been derived using complex, multivariate algorithms, even the reliability of less complex fcMRI findings has yet to be reported. This study examined the test-retest reliability for fcMRI of pain-related brain regions, and self-reported pain (through visual analogue scales [VASs]). Thirty-two healthy individuals completed 3 consecutive fMRI runs of a thermal pain task. Functional connectivity analyses were completed on pain-related brain regions. Intraclass correlations were conducted on fcMRI values and VAS scores across the fMRI runs. Intraclass correlations coefficients for fcMRI values varied widely (range = -.174-.766), with fcMRI between right nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex showing the highest reliability (range = .649-.766). Intraclass correlations coefficients for VAS scores ranged from .906 to .947. Overall, self-reported pain was more reliable than fcMRI data. These results highlight that fMRI findings might be less reliable than inherently assumed and have implications for future studies proposing pain markers.

  14. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  15. Automatic detection of MLC relative position errors for VMAT using the EPID-based picket fence test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophides, Damianos; Davies, Alex; Fleckney, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) ensure the accurate delivery of treatments requiring complex beam fluences like intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy. The purpose of this work is to automate the detection of MLC relative position errors  ⩾0.5 mm using electronic portal imaging device-based picket fence tests and compare the results to the qualitative assessment currently in use. Picket fence tests with and without intentional MLC errors were measured weekly on three Varian linacs. The picket fence images analysed covered a time period ranging between 14-20 months depending on the linac. An algorithm was developed that calculated the MLC error for each leaf-pair present in the picket fence images. The baseline error distributions of each linac were characterised for an initial period of 6 months and compared with the intentional MLC errors using statistical metrics. The distributions of median and one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test p-value exhibited no overlap between baseline and intentional errors and were used retrospectively to automatically detect MLC errors in routine clinical practice. Agreement was found between the MLC errors detected by the automatic method and the fault reports during clinical use, as well as interventions for MLC repair and calibration. In conclusion the method presented provides for full automation of MLC quality assurance, based on individual linac performance characteristics. The use of the automatic method has been shown to provide early warning for MLC errors that resulted in clinical downtime.

  16. Access and Quality of HIV-Related Point-of-Care Diagnostic Testing in Global Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Boeras, Debrah I; Zeh, Clement; Alexander, Heather; Parekh, Bharat S; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-02-01

    Access to point-of-care testing (POCT) improves patient care, especially in resource-limited settings where laboratory infrastructure is poor and the bulk of the population lives in rural settings. However, because of challenges in rolling out the technology and weak quality assurance measures, the promise of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related POCT in resource-limited settings has not been fully exploited to improve patient care and impact public health. Because of these challenges, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), in partnership with other organizations, recently launched the Diagnostics Access Initiative. Expanding HIV programs, including the "test and treat" strategies and the newly established UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, will require increased access to reliable and accurate POCT results. In this review, we examine various components that could improve access and uptake of quality-assured POC tests to ensure coverage and public health impact. These components include evaluation, policy, regulation, and innovative approaches to strengthen the quality of POCT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual.

  18. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  19. 454 pyrosequencing to describe microbial eukaryotic community composition, diversity and relative abundance: a test for marine haptophytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elianne Egge

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing of ribosomal DNA is increasingly used to assess the diversity and structure of microbial communities. Here we test the ability of 454 pyrosequencing to detect the number of species present, and assess the relative abundance in terms of cell numbers and biomass of protists in the phylum Haptophyta. We used a mock community consisting of equal number of cells of 11 haptophyte species and compared targeting DNA and RNA/cDNA, and two different V4 SSU rDNA haptophyte-biased primer pairs. Further, we tested four different bioinformatic filtering methods to reduce errors in the resulting sequence dataset. With sequencing depth of 11000-20000 reads and targeting cDNA with Haptophyta specific primers Hap454 we detected all 11 species. A rarefaction analysis of expected number of species recovered as a function of sampling depth suggested that minimum 1400 reads were required here to recover all species in the mock community. Relative read abundance did not correlate to relative cell numbers. Although the species represented with the largest biomass was also proportionally most abundant among the reads, there was generally a weak correlation between proportional read abundance and proportional biomass of the different species, both with DNA and cDNA as template. The 454 sequencing generated considerable spurious diversity, and more with cDNA than DNA as template. With initial filtering based only on match with barcode and primer we observed 100-fold more operational taxonomic units (OTUs at 99% similarity than the number of species present in the mock community. Filtering based on quality scores, or denoising with PyroNoise resulted in ten times more OTU99% than the number of species. Denoising with AmpliconNoise reduced the number of OTU99% to match the number of species present in the mock community. Based on our analyses, we propose a strategy to more accurately depict haptophyte diversity using 454 pyrosequencing.

  20. Power and related statistical properties of conditional likelihood score tests for association studies in nuclear families with parental genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Gastwirth, J L; Gail, M H

    2005-05-01

    Both population based and family based case control studies are used to test whether particular genotypes are associated with disease. While population based studies have more power, cryptic population stratification can produce false-positive results. Family-based methods have been introduced to control for this problem. This paper presents the full likelihood function for family-based association studies for nuclear families ascertained on the basis of their number of affected and unaffected children. The likelihood of a family factors into the probability of parental mating type, conditional on offspring phenotypes, times the probability of offspring genotypes given their phenotypes and the parental mating type. The first factor can be influenced by population stratification, whereas the latter factor, called the conditional likelihood, is not. The conditional likelihood is used to obtain score tests with proper size in the presence of population stratification (see also Clayton (1999) and Whittemore & Tu (2000)). Under either the additive or multiplicative model, the TDT is known to be the optimal score test when the family has only one affected child. Thus, the class of score tests explored can be considered as a general family of TDT-like procedures. The relative informativeness of the various mating types is assessed using the Fisher information, which depends on the number of affected and unaffected offspring and the penetrances. When the additive model is true, families with parental mating type Aa x Aa are most informative. Under the dominant (recessive) model, however, a family with mating type Aa x aa(AA x Aa) is more informative than a family with doubly heterozygous (Aa x Aa) parents. Because we derive explicit formulae for all components of the likelihood, we are able to present tables giving required sample sizes for dominant, additive and recessive inheritance models.

  1. Sex-Related Online Behaviors, Perceived Peer Norms and Adolescents' Experience with Sexual Behavior: Testing an Integrative Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornwaard, Suzan M; ter Bogt, Tom F M; Reitz, Ellen; van den Eijnden, Regina J J M

    2015-01-01

    Research on the role of sex-related Internet use in adolescents' sexual development has often isolated the Internet and online behaviors from other, offline influencing factors in adolescents' lives, such as processes in the peer domain. The aim of this study was to test an integrative model explaining how receptive (i.e., use of sexually explicit Internet material [SEIM]) and interactive (i.e., use of social networking sites [SNS]) sex-related online behaviors interrelate with perceived peer norms in predicting adolescents' experience with sexual behavior. Structural equation modeling on longitudinal data from 1,132 Dutch adolescents (M(age) T1 = 13.95; range 11-17; 52.7% boys) demonstrated concurrent, direct, and indirect effects between sex-related online behaviors, perceived peer norms, and experience with sexual behavior. SEIM use (among boys) and SNS use (among boys and girls) predicted increases in adolescents' perceptions of peer approval of sexual behavior and/or in their estimates of the numbers of sexually active peers. These perceptions, in turn, predicted increases in adolescents' level of experience with sexual behavior at the end of the study. Boys' SNS use also directly predicted increased levels of experience with sexual behavior. These findings highlight the need for multisystemic research and intervention development to promote adolescents' sexual health.

  2. Accelerated relative sea-level rise and rapid coastal erosion: Testing a causal relationship for the Louisiana barrier islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, J.H.; Sallenger, A.H.; Hansen, M.E.; Jaffe, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    The role of relative sea-level rise as a cause for the rapid erosion of Louisiana's barrier island coast is investigated through a numerical implementation of a modified Bruun rule that accounts for the low percentage of sand-sized sediment in the eroding Louisiana shoreface. Shore-normal profiles from 150 km of coastline west of the Mississippi delta are derived from bathymetric surveys conducted during the 1880s. 1930s and 1980s. An RMS difference criterion is employed to test whether an equilibrium profile form is maintained between survey years. Only about half the studied profiles meet the equilibrium Criterion this represents a significant limitation on the potential applicability of the Bruun rule. The profiles meeting the equilibrium criterion, along with measured rates of relative sea-level rise, are used to hindcast shoreline retreat rates at 37 locations within the study area. Modeled and observed shoreline retreat rates show no significant correlation. Thus in terms of the Bruun approach relative sea-level rise has no power for hindcasting (and presumably forecasting) rates of coastal erosion for the Louisiana barrier islands.

  3. Direct and indirect effects of enablers on HIV testing, initiation and retention in antiretroviral treatment and AIDS related mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background An enabling environment is believed to have significant and critical effects on HIV and AIDS program implementation and desired outcomes. This paper estimates the paths, directionality, and direct and indirect associations between critical enablers with antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage and to AIDS-related mortality. Methods Frameworks that consider the role of enablers in HIV and AIDS programs were systematically reviewed to develop a conceptual model of interaction. Measurements for constructs of the model were pooled from the latest publicly available data. A hypothetical model, including latent/unobserved factors and interaction of enablers, program activities and outcomes, was analyzed cross-sectionally with structural equation modeling. Coefficients of the model were used to estimate the indirect associations of enablers to treatment coverage and the subsequent associated impact on AIDS related mortality. Findings The model’s fit was adequate (RMSEA = 0·084, 90% CI [0·062, 0·104]) and the indirect effects of enablers on outcomes were measured. Enablers having significant associations with increased ART coverage were social/financial protection, governance, anti-discrimination, gender equality, domestic AIDS spending, testing service delivery, and logistics. Interpretation Critical enablers are significantly correlated to outcomes like ART coverage and AIDS related mortality. Even while this model does not allow inference on causality, it provides directionality and magnitude of the significant associations. PMID:28225790

  4. Sex-Related Online Behaviors, Perceived Peer Norms and Adolescents’ Experience with Sexual Behavior: Testing an Integrative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornwaard, Suzan M.; ter Bogt, Tom F. M.; Reitz, Ellen; van den Eijnden, Regina J. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Research on the role of sex-related Internet use in adolescents’ sexual development has often isolated the Internet and online behaviors from other, offline influencing factors in adolescents’ lives, such as processes in the peer domain. The aim of this study was to test an integrative model explaining how receptive (i.e., use of sexually explicit Internet material [SEIM]) and interactive (i.e., use of social networking sites [SNS]) sex-related online behaviors interrelate with perceived peer norms in predicting adolescents’ experience with sexual behavior. Structural equation modeling on longitudinal data from 1,132 Dutch adolescents (Mage T1 = 13.95; range 11-17; 52.7% boys) demonstrated concurrent, direct, and indirect effects between sex-related online behaviors, perceived peer norms, and experience with sexual behavior. SEIM use (among boys) and SNS use (among boys and girls) predicted increases in adolescents’ perceptions of peer approval of sexual behavior and/or in their estimates of the numbers of sexually active peers. These perceptions, in turn, predicted increases in adolescents’ level of experience with sexual behavior at the end of the study. Boys’ SNS use also directly predicted increased levels of experience with sexual behavior. These findings highlight the need for multisystemic research and intervention development to promote adolescents’ sexual health. PMID:26086606

  5. Experimental model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis to test combination biomaterials using biofilms as initial inocula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dustin L; Haymond, Bryan S; Woodbury, Kassie L; Beck, J Peter; Moore, David E; Epperson, R Tyler; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2012-07-01

    Currently, the majority of animal models that are used to study biofilm-related infections use planktonic bacterial cells as initial inocula to produce positive signals of infection in biomaterials studies. However, the use of planktonic cells has potentially led to inconsistent results in infection outcomes. In this study, well-established biofilms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were grown and used as initial inocula in an animal model of a Type IIIB open fracture. The goal of the work was to establish, for the first time, a repeatable model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis, wherein biofilms were used as initial inocula to test combination biomaterials. Results showed that 100% of animals that were treated with biofilms developed osteomyelitis, whereas 0% of animals not treated with biofilm developed infection. The development of this experimental model may lead to an important shift in biofilm and biomaterials research by showing that when biofilms are used as initial inocula, they may provide additional insights into how biofilm-related infections in the clinic develop and how they can be treated with combination biomaterials to eradicate and/or prevent biofilm formation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fish oil-supplementation from 9 to 12 months of age affects infant attention in a free-play test and is related to change in blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbild, Helle Liliegren; Harsløf, Laurine Bente Schram; Christensen, J. H.;

    2013-01-01

    This intervention examined whether fish-oil-supplementation in late infancy modifies free-play test scores and if this is related to blood pressure (BP) and mean RR interval.......This intervention examined whether fish-oil-supplementation in late infancy modifies free-play test scores and if this is related to blood pressure (BP) and mean RR interval....

  7. Results of a survey among GP practices on how they manage patient safety aspects related to point-of-care testing in every day practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, C. de; Doggen, C.J.M.; Hilbers, E.; Verheij, R.; IJzerman, M.; Geertsma, R.; Kusters, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care (POC) tests are devices or test strips that can be used near or at the site where care is delivered to patients, enabling a relatively fast diagnosis. Although many general practitioners (GPs) in the Netherlands are using POC tests in their practice, little i

  8. Results of a survey among GP practices on how they manage patient safety aspects related to point-of-care testing in every day practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Claudette; Doggen, Carine; Hilbers, Ellen; Verheij, Robert; IJzerman, Maarten; Geertsma, Robert; Kusters, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care (POC) tests are devices or test strips that can be used near or at the site where care is delivered to patients, enabling a relatively fast diagnosis. Although many general practitioners (GPs) in the Netherlands are using POC tests in their practice, little is known on how t

  9. Results of a survey among GP practices on how they manage patient safety aspects related to point-of-care testing in every day practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Claudette; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Hilbers, Ellen; Verheij, Robert; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Geertsma, Robert; Kusters, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care (POC) tests are devices or test strips that can be used near or at the site where care is delivered to patients, enabling a relatively fast diagnosis. Although many general practitioners (GPs) in the Netherlands are using POC tests in their practice, little is known on how

  10. Associations of hypoosmotic swelling test, relative sperm volume shift, aquaporin7 mRNA abundance and bull fertility estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimanickam, R K; Kasimanickam, V R; Arangasamy, A; Kastelic, J P

    2017-02-01

    Mammalian sperm are exposed to a natural hypoosmotic environment during male-to-female reproductive tract transition; although this activates sperm motility in vivo, excessive swelling can harm sperm structure and function. Aquaporins (AQPs) is a family of membrane-channel proteins implicated in sperm osmoregulation. The objective was to determine associations among relative sperm volume shift, hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST), sperm aquaporin (AQP) 7 mRNA abundances, and sire conception rate (SCR; fertility estimate) in Holstein bulls at a commercial artificial insemination center. Three or four sires for each full point SCR score from -4 to +4 were included. Each SCR estimate for study bulls (N = 30) was based on > 500 services (mean ± SEM) of 725 ± 13 services/sire). Sperm from a single collection day (two ejaculates) from these commercial Holstein bulls were used. Relative mRNA expression of AQP7 in sperm was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Mean relative sperm volume shift and percentage of sperm reacted in a HOST (% HOST) were determined (400 sperm per bull) after incubating in isoosmotic (300 mOsm/kg) and hypoosmotic (100 mOsm/kg) solutions for 30 min. There was no correlation between %HOST and SCR (r = 0.28 P > 0.1). However, there was a positive correlation between relative sperm volume shift and SCR (r = 0.65, P 2) fertility sire groups. In conclusion, bulls with higher SCR had significantly greater AQP7 mRNA abundance in frozen-thawed sperm. This plausibly contributed to greater regulation of sperm volume shift, which apparently conferred protection from detrimental swelling and impaired functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of the influence of traffic-related particles in urban dust using sequential selective extraction and oral bioaccessibility tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patinha, C; Durães, N; Sousa, P; Dias, A C; Reis, A P; Noack, Y; Ferreira da Silva, E

    2015-08-01

    Urban dust is a heterogeneous mix, where traffic-related particles can combine with soil mineral compounds, forming a unique and site-specific material. These traffic-related particles are usually enriched in potentially harmful elements, enhancing the health risk for population by inhalation or ingestion. Urban dust samples from Estarreja city and traffic-related particles (brake dust and white traffic paint) were studied to understand the relative contribution of the traffic particles in the geochemical behaviour of urban dust and to evaluate the long-term impacts of the metals on an urban environment, as well as the risk to the populations. It was possible to distinguish two groups of urban dust samples according to Cu behaviour: (1) one group with low amounts of fine particles (car brands (with more than 10 years old), composed by coarser wear particles; and (2) another group with greater amounts of fine particles (car brands (with less than 10 years old). The results obtained showed that there is no direct correlation between the geoavailability of metals estimated by sequential selective chemical extraction (SSCE) and the in vitro oral bioaccessibility (UBM) test. Thus, oral bioaccessibility of urban dust is site specific. Geoavailability was greatly dependent on particle size, where the bioaccessibility tended to increase with a reduction in particle diameter. As anthropogenic particles showed high metal concentration and a smaller size than mineral particles, urban dusts are of major concern to the populations' health, since fine particles are easily re-suspended, easily ingested, and show high metal bioaccessibility. In addition, Estarreja is a coastal city often influenced by winds, which favours the re-suspension of small-sized contaminated particles. Even if the risk to the population does not represent an acute case, it should not be overlooked, and this study can serve as baseline study for cities under high traffic influence.

  12. Conflict monitoring and stimulus categorization processes involved in the prosocial attitude implicit association test: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fengqiu; Zheng, Zhiwei; Wang, Ya; Cui, Jifang; Chen, Yinghe

    2015-08-01

    The implicit association test (IAT) is a promising method used to assess individual implicit attitudes by indirectly measuring the strengths of associations between target and attribute categories. To date, the cognitive processes involved in the prosocial attitude IAT task have received little attention. The present study examined the temporal dynamics of the IAT that measures prosocial attitude using event-related potentials (ERPs). ERP results revealed enhanced N2 amplitudes for incongruent trials when compared with congruent trials and enhanced P300 amplitudes for congruent trials when compared with incongruent trials. In addition, the N2 amplitude differences were significantly correlated with individual prosocial behavior (the amount of donation). Our findings suggest that conflict monitoring and stimulus categorization processes are involved in the prosocial attitude IAT task and that the ERP indices of IATs that measure prosocial attitude may predict individual prosocial behavior.

  13. Classical Tests of General Relativity: Probing Topologically Charged Black Holes on Brane Worlds in f(R) Bulk

    CERN Document Server

    da Rocha, Roldao

    2014-01-01

    The perihelion precession, the deflection of light, and the radar echo delay are classical tests of General Relativity here used to probe brane world topologically charged black holes in a f(R) bulk and to constrain the parameter that arises from the Shiromizu-Maeda-Sasaki procedure applied to a f(R) bulk as well. The existing Solar system observational data constrain the possible values of the tidal charge parameter and the effective cosmological constant including f(R) brane world effects. We show that the observational/experimental data for both perihelion precession and radar echo delay make the black hole space of parameters to be more strict than the ones for the Dadhich, Maartens, Papadopoulos and Rezania (DMPR) black hole geometry. Furthermore, the deflection of light constrains the tidal charge parameter similarly as the DMPR black holes due to a peculiarity in the equation of motion.

  14. An evaluation of the relative sensitivities of the venereal disease research laboratory test and the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test among patients diagnosed with primary syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creegan, Linda; Bauer, Heidi M; Samuel, Michael C; Klausner, Jeffrey; Liska, Sally; Bolan, Gail

    2007-12-01

    Because definitive methods for diagnosing primary syphilis are limited, it is important to optimize the sensitivity of serodiagnosis. To determine the most sensitive testing approach to the diagnosis of primary syphilis, using the commonly available serologic tests: the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test and the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TP-PA) test. Sensitivities of 2 serologic testing strategies for primary syphilis were compared among 106 darkfield-confirmed cases treated in San Francisco from January 2002 through December 2004. The sensitivity of the diagnostic strategy using VDRL confirmed by TP-PA was 71% (95% CI, 61%-79%). Substituting Rapid Plasma Reagin test for VDRL in a subset of 51 patients produced the same sensitivity (71%; 95% CI, 56%-83%). The sensitivity of TP-PA as the first-line diagnostic test was 86% (95% CI, 78%-92%). The sensitivity of the former approach was significantly lower among HIV-positive patients, compared with HIV-negative patients (55% vs. 77%, P = 0.05). The TP-PA test as the first-line diagnostic test yielded higher sensitivity for primary syphilis than did the use of the currently recommended strategy.

  15. Improving effects of long-term growth hormone treatment on monoaminergic neurotransmission and related behavioral tests in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Susana; Garau, Celia; Aparicio, Sara; Moranta, David; Barceló, Pere; Ramis, Margarita; Tresguerres, Jesús A F; Rial, Rubén

    2010-12-01

    An age-related decline in cognitive functions and physical performance has been associated with reductions in growth hormone (GH) secretion and brain neurotransmitter function. In vivo experiments were performed to study the long-term effects of exogenously administered GH on the central monoaminergic neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline and behavioral tests in old Wistar rats. The accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) after decarboxylase inhibition was used as a measure of the rate of tryptophan and tyrosine hydroxylation in vivo. Also, the content of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline and some metabolites was measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in the hippocampus and striatum, brain regions involved in adult memory processing and motor coordination. The age-related decline observed in all the neurochemical parameters in control rats was significantly reversed after repeated subcutaneous administration of GH (2 mg/kg per day, 4 weeks). Thus, GH treatment exerted a long-term effect on serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline neurotransmission by enhancing neurotransmitter synthesis and metabolism in aged rats. The results obtained after examining working memory tasks in the eight-radial maze and motor ability in the Rotarod treadmill in aged rats were consistent with these neurochemical data; both tests were significantly improved after chronic GH treatment. Overall, these in vivo findings suggest that the positive effects induced by GH on serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline neurotransmitters might explain, at least in part, the effects of chronic GH treatment in improving cognitive and motor ability in aged rats, and could aid in preventing or delaying deficits in monoamines associated with learning or motor disabilities.

  16. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermo JD

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic using point-of-care testing (POCT device versus venipuncture within ambulatory care clinics at our institution. Methods: All patients currently treated with warfarin therapy who were managed by clinical pharmacists for anticoagulation monitoring at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Family Medicine Center and University Diagnostic Center, were enrolled. Patients were asked to complete a satisfaction survey regarding their anticoagulation monitoring. In addition, data related to emergency department (ED visits, hospitalizations and percent of time in the INR therapeutic range for 6 months pre- and post-implementation of POCT device was collected. This information was obtained through an electronic patient information database, Oacis. Results: A total of 145 patients were included in the data collection from the two clinics. The majority (41% of these patients were taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation. Satisfaction surveys were completed by 86 (59 % of patients. The surveys revealed that POCT device was preferred over venipuncture in 95% of patients. Reasons for the preference included more face-to-face interaction, less wait time, less pain, less blood needed, and quicker results. Of the 145 patients who were included in the objective data analysis, no significant differences were found in the number of hospitalizations, ED visits, or percent of time in the INR therapeutic range pre- and post- implementation of POCT device

  17. Age related efficiency of the leishmanin skin test as a marker of immunity to human visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, A; Ben Salah, A; Hamida, N Bel Haj; Zaatour, A

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating whether the efficiency of the leishmanin skin test (LST) to evaluate the immune status of individuals exposed to Leishmania (L.) infantum is age-related. It was conducted in two districts of the governorate of Kairouan, an endemic region for L. infantum infection in Tunisia. Healthy individuals (n = 119) were selected according to two criteria: no current or past history of visceral or cutaneous leishmaniasis, and their age range: 1-6 years (group I), 7-14 years (group II), and 20-66 years old (group III). Assessments comprised LSTs, in vitro lymphoproliferative response, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) productions induced by soluble leishmanial antigens (SLA). LST recorded an overall of 89.07% and 89.9% concordance with T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production induced by SLA, respectively. Using in vitro tests as gold standards, LST was found more sensitive for screening individuals from group I (96% and 100%, considering T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production results, respectively), than group II (91% and 97%) and group III (70% and 74%,). Conversely, LST was less specific in group I (84% and 77%) than group II (100% and 94%) and group III (100% for both in vitro tests). Our results suggested that the strength of LST resided in its higher sensitivity, to unravel asymptomatic injections and cell mediated immunity to L. infantum parasite in infants and its higher specificity for screening adult individuals. Negative LST in adults and positive LST in children < 5 years, the population at risk of developing visceral leishmaniasis, remain the weaknesses of LST and should be interpreted with caution.

  18. Hippocampal, amygdala, and neocortical synchronization of theta rhythms is related to an immediate recall during rey auditory verbal learning test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Claudio; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Mirabella, Giovanni; Buttiglione, Maura; Sebastiano, Fabio; Picardi, Angelo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier P; Grammaldo, Liliana G; Buffo, Paola; Esposito, Vincenzo; Manfredi, Mario; Cantore, Giampaolo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-07-01

    It is well known that theta rhythms (3-8 Hz) are the fingerprint of hippocampus, and that neural activity accompanying encoding of words differs according to whether the items are later remembered or forgotten ["subsequent memory effect" (SME)]. Here, we tested the hypothesis that temporal synchronization of theta rhythms among hippocampus, amygdala, and neocortex is related to immediate memorization of repeated words. To address this issue, intracerebral electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was recorded in five subjects with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), under presurgical monitoring routine. During the recording of the intracerebral EEG activity, the subjects performed a computerized version of Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT), a popular test for the clinical evaluation of the immediate and delayed memory. They heard the same list of 15 common words for five times. Each time, immediately after listening the list, the subjects were required to repeat as many words as they could recall. Spectral coherence of the intracerebral EEG activity was computed in order to assess the temporal synchronization of the theta (about 3-8 Hz) rhythms among hippocampus, amygdala, and temporal-occipital neocortex. We found that theta coherence values between amygdala and hippocampus, and between hippocampus and occipital-temporal cortex, were higher in amplitude during successful than unsuccessful immediate recall. A control analysis showed that this was true also for a gamma band (40-45 Hz). Furthermore, these theta and gamma effects were not observed in an additional (control) subject with drug-resistant TLE and a wide lesion to hippocampus. In conclusion, a successful immediate recall to the RAVLT was associated to the enhancement of temporal synchronization of the theta (gamma) rhythms within a cerebral network including hippocampus, amygdala, and temporal-occipital neocortex. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  19. Accelerated Testing and Modeling of Potential-Induced Degradation as a Function of Temperature and Relative Humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Spataru, Sergiu; Terwilliger, Kent; Perrin, Greg; Glick, Stephen; Kurtz, Sarah; Wohlgemuth, John

    2015-06-14

    An acceleration model based on the Peck equation was applied to power performance of crystalline silicon cell modules as a function of time and of temperature and humidity, the two main environmental stress factors that promote potential-induced degradation. This model was derived from module power degradation data obtained semi-continuously and statistically by in-situ dark current-voltage measurements in an environmental chamber. The modeling enables prediction of degradation rates and times as functions of temperature and humidity. Power degradation could be modeled linearly as a function of time to the second power; additionally, we found that coulombs transferred from the active cell circuit to ground during the stress test is approximately linear with time. Therefore, the power loss could be linearized as a function of coulombs squared. With this result, we observed that when the module face was completely grounded with a condensed phase conductor, leakage current exceeded the anticipated corresponding degradation rate relative to the other tests performed in damp heat.

  20. A psychometric comparison of the Internet Addiction Test, the Internet-Related Problem Scale, and self-diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyanto, Laura; Griffiths, Mark D; Brunsden, Vivienne

    2011-03-01

    One of the more prominent issues in the field of Internet addiction is the validity of the instrument used to assess users' level of Internet involvement. Many of the instruments used to assess Internet addiction have high face validity but have yet to be tested psychometrically. The aim of this study is to compare two of the most used Internet addiction research measures, the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Internet-Related Problem Scale (IRPS), along with a self-diagnostic question simply asking Internet users if they thought they were addicted to the Internet. A total of 225 Internet users participated in the study (69 males and 156 females). Participants who defined themselves as Internet addicts had higher scores on both the IAT and IRPS, and the three different Internet addiction measures were strongly correlated to each other. For the IAT, factor analysis generated three factors (emotional/psychological conflict; time management issues; mood modification) explaining 56.3% of the variance. For the IRPS, factor analysis generated four factors (negative effects of Internet use; mood modification; loss of control; increased Internet use) explaining 60.2% of the variance. The implications for these findings are discussed.